Sample records for offset slow growth

  1. Slow crack growth in polycarbonate films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Vanel, Loic; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study experimentally the slow growth of a single crack in polycarbonate films submitted to uniaxial and constant imposed stress. The specificity of fracture in polycarbonate films is the appearance of flame shaped macroscopic process zones at the tips of the crack. Supported by an experimental study of the mechanical properties of polycarbonate films, an analysis of the stress dependence of the mean ratio between the process zone and crack lengths, during the crack growth, show a quantitative agreement with the Dugdale-Barenblatt model of the plastic process zone. We find that the fracture growth curves obey strong scaling properties that lead to a well defined growth master curve.

  2. A dynamical law for slow crack growth in polycarbonate films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cortet, Pierre-Philippe; Ciliberto, Sergio

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study experimentally the slow growth of a single crack in polycarbonate films submitted to uniaxial and constant imposed stress. For this visco-plastic material, we uncover a dynamical law that describes the dependence of the instantaneous crack velocity with experimental parameters. The law involves a Dugdale-Barenblatt static description of crack tip plastic zones associated to an Eyring's law and an empirical dependence with the crack length that may come from a residual elastic field.

  3. Emittance growth due to beam-beam effects with a static offset in collision in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pieloni, T; Qiang, J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under nominal operational conditions, the LHC bunches experience small unavoidable offset at the collision points caused by long range beam-beam interactions. Although the geometrical loss of luminosity is small, one may have to consider an increase of the beam transverse emittance, leading to a deterioration of the experimental conditions. In this work we evaluate and understand the dynamics of beam-beam interactions with static offsets at the collision point. A study of the emittance growth as a function of the offset amplitude in collisions is presented. Moreover, we address the effects coming from the beam parameters such as the initial transverse beam size, bunch intensity and tune.

  4. ensl-00156750,version1-22Jun2007 A dynamical law for slow crack growth in polycarbonate films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ensl-00156750,version1-22Jun2007 A dynamical law for slow crack growth in polycarbonate films: 24 juin 2007) We study experimentally the slow growth of a single crack in polycarbonate films experimental insight in our plastic zone pz Fig. 1 ­ Image of a crack in a polycarbonate film with its

  5. Berberine slows cell growth in autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonon, Anna; Mangolini, Alessandra [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)] [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Pinton, Paolo [Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)] [Department of Morphology, Surgery and Experimental Medicine, Section of General Pathology, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Senno, Laura del [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)] [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy); Aguiari, Gianluca, E-mail: dsn@unife.it [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)] [Department of Biomedical and Specialty Surgical Sciences, University of Ferrara, 44121 Ferrara (Italy)

    2013-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Berberine at appropriate doses slows cell proliferation in ADPKD cystic cells. •Reduction of cell growth by berberine occurs by inhibition of ERK and p70-S6 kinase. •Higher doses of berberine cause an overall cytotoxic effect. •Berberine overdose induces apoptotic bodies formation and DNA fragmentation. •Antiproliferative properties of this drug make it a new candidate for ADPKD therapy. -- Abstract: Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD) is the most common hereditary monogenic disorder characterized by development and enlargement of kidney cysts that lead to loss of renal function. It is caused by mutations in two genes (PKD1 and PKD2) encoding for polycystin-1 and polycystin-2 proteins which regulate different signals including cAMP, mTOR and EGFR pathways. Abnormal activation of these signals following PC1 or PC2 loss of function causes an increased cell proliferation which is a typical hallmark of this disease. Despite the promising findings obtained in animal models with targeted inhibitors able to reduce cystic cell growth, currently, no specific approved therapy for ADPKD is available. Therefore, the research of new more effective molecules could be crucial for the treatment of this severe pathology. In this regard, we have studied the effect of berberine, an isoquinoline quaternary alkaloid, on cell proliferation and apoptosis in human and mouse ADPKD cystic cell lines. Berberine treatment slows cell proliferation of ADPKD cystic cells in a dose-dependent manner and at high doses (100 ?g/mL) it induces cell death in cystic cells as well as in normal kidney tubule cells. However, at 10 ?g/mL, berberine reduces cell growth in ADPKD cystic cells only enhancing G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of cell cycle and inhibiting ERK and p70-S6 kinases. Our results indicate that berberine shows a selected antiproliferative activity in cellular models for ADPKD, suggesting that this molecule and similar natural compounds could open new opportunities for the therapy of ADPKD patients.

  6. Fast and slow crystal growth kinetics in glass-forming melts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orava, J.; Greer, A. L., E-mail: alg13@cam.ac.uk [WPI-Advanced Institute for Materials Research (WPI-AIMR), Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577, Japan and Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, 27 Charles Babbage Road, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Published values of crystal growth rates are compared for supercooled glass-forming liquids undergoing congruent freezing at a planar crystal-liquid interface. For the purposes of comparison pure metals are considered to be glass-forming systems, using data from molecular-dynamics simulations. For each system, the growth rate has a maximum value U{sub max} at a temperature T{sub max} that lies between the glass-transition temperature T{sub g} and the melting temperature T{sub m}. A classification is suggested, based on the lability (specifically, the propensity for fast crystallization), of the liquid. High-lability systems show “fast” growth characterized by a high U{sub max}, a low T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a very broad peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. In contrast, systems showing “slowgrowth have a low U{sub max}, a high T{sub max}?/?T{sub m}, and a sharp peak in U vs. T?/?T{sub m}. Despite the difference of more than 11 orders of magnitude in U{sub max} seen in pure metals and in silica, the range of glass-forming systems surveyed fit into a common pattern in which the lability increases with lower reduced glass-transition temperature (T{sub g}?/?T{sub m}) and higher fragility of the liquid. A single parameter, a linear combination of T{sub g}?/?T{sub m} and fragility, can show a good correlation with U{sub max}. For all the systems, growth at U{sub max} is coupled to the atomic/molecular mobility in the liquid. It is found that, across the diversity of glass-forming systems, T{sub max}?/?T{sub g} = 1.48 ± 0.15.

  7. Slow bainite: an opportunity to determine the carbon content of the bainitic ferrite during growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caballero, Francesca G. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain; Miller, Michael K [ORNL; Garcia-Mateo, C. [CENIM-CSIC, Madrid, Spain

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The amount of carbon in solid solution in bainitic ferrite at the early stage of transformation has been directly determined by atom probe tomography at 200 C, taking advantage of the extremely slow transformation kinetics of a novel nanocrystalline steel. Results demonstrated that the original bainitic ferrite retains much of the carbon content of the parent austenite providing strong evidence that bainite transformation is essentially displacive in nature. In this work, the carbon content of the bainitic ferrite away from any carbon-enriched regions has been determined by atom probe tomography as the bainite transformation progresses at 200 C in this nanocrystalline steel. Results provide experimental evidence for the mechanism controlling bainitic ferrite growth in steels.

  8. Journal of Statistical Physics, Vol. 90, Nos. 5/6, 1998 We study the nucleation and growth of flame fronts in slow combustion. This

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Martin

    fronts in slow combustion. This is modeled by a set of reaction-diffusion equations for the temperature: Nucleation; reaction-diffusion systems; flame fronts. Nucleation, Growth, and Scaling in Slow Combustion applied to understand some aspects of slow combustion. We use a phase-field model of two coupled reaction

  9. Insulin-like Growth Factor-I and Slow, Bi-directional Perfusion Enhance the Formation of Tissue-Engineered Cardiac Grafts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Mingyu

    Biochemical and mechanical signals enabling cardiac regeneration can be elucidated using in vitro tissue-engineering models. We hypothesized that insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF) and slow, bi-directional perfusion could ...

  10. Was Dinosaurian Physiology Inherited by Birds? Reconciling Slow Growth in Archaeopteryx

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inouye, Brian

    of Science, Beijing, China, 4 Department of Anatomical Sciences, Stony Brook University, Stony Brook, New, China, 6 Division of Paleontology, American Museum of Natural History, New York, New York, United States). It is believed that the growth and energetic physiology of basalmost birds such as Archaeopteryx were inherited

  11. Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Purdue Climate Change Research Center, 2010 #12;Agricultural Mitigation and Offsets: Policy Issues, Progress Presentation Overview: Global Climate Change...and Agriculture Policy Landscape: US and International Agricultural Offsets and Policy

  12. Explaining the Price of Voluntary Carbon Offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Marc N.; Kotchen, Matthew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy and Sustainable Development, Stanford Univer- sity. Figure 1: Histogram of carbon offset prices (

  13. Reservoir offset models for Radiocarbon calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholls, Geoff

    Reservoir offset models for Radiocarbon calibration Martin Jones Department of Anthropology mdj offset is to enable the application of calibration data (µ(), e.g. Stuiver et al. 1998) developed for one are not independent. However, the standard procedure for incorporating offset error into calibrated distributions

  14. CARBON OFFSETTING IN A TOURSIM CONTEXT: WHISTLER BC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARBON OFFSETTING IN A TOURSIM CONTEXT: WHISTLER BC by Katie von Gaza Bachelor of Environmental: Carbon offsetting in a Tourism Context: Whistler, BC. Project No.: 471 Examining Committee: Chair 2.2 Carbon Offsetting

  15. Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets Transcript This document contains the transcript for the...

  16. Running Jobs Intermittently Slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    globalscratch2). It could also happen to aplications using shared libraries, or CCM jobs on any Hopper file systems. The slowness is identified to be related to DVSGPFS...

  17. Band offsets at zincblende-wurtzite GaAs nanowire sidewall surfaces P. Capiod,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    Band offsets at zincblende-wurtzite GaAs nanowire sidewall surfaces P. Capiod,1 T. Xu,1,2 J. P. Nys of zincblende (ZB)-wurtzite (WZ) GaAs nanowires are investigated by scanning tunneling spectroscopy and density inclusions consisting of zinc-blende (ZB) and wurtzite (WZ) segments form during the growth of NWs and where

  18. Grow Iron, Slow Pollution | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Grow Iron, Slow Pollution Scientists connect previous studies on electron transport in hematite Making a Deposit: Scanning electron micrographs of...

  19. Carbon offsets, the CDM, and sustainable development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for research on post-2012 climate policy at the British Tyndall Centre for Climate Change, and chairsChapter 11 Carbon offsets, the CDM, and sustainable development Diana M. Liverman Diana M. Liverman of the ESSP. Her research has focused on the human dimensions of global environmental change, especially

  20. Slow light with flat or offset band edges in few-mode fiber with two gratings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , C. J. Handmer2, C. Martijn de Sterke2 and M. J. Steel3 1 ARC Center of Excellence for Ultrahigh waveguides with dual Bragg gratings," Electron. Lett. 38, 1049­1051 (2002). 10. T. Erdogan and J. E. Sipe, "Tilted fiber phase gratings," J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 13, 296­313 (1996). 11. S. K. Case, "Coupled-wave theory

  1. Random Offset Curves and Surfaces with Controllable Noise (Extended Abstract)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, In-Kwon

    similar complex patterns often being able to be defined with the gradient noise functions. PORN is defined by replacing a static offset distance in a general offset with a gradient noise function. For example, PORN

  2. Divergence and Lifecycle Offsets in Product Families with Commonality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Divergence and Lifecycle Offsets in Product Families with Commonality Ryan Boas,1 * Bruce G Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139DIVERGENCE AND LIFECYCLE OFFSETS IN PRODUCT FAMILIES benefits across individual products. We predict that lifecycle offsets exacerbate divergence. We propose

  3. Semiconductor heterojunction band offsets and charge neutrality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Chomsik

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    = 33&Pb = 3 3&PAB = 35 1 . aI M 0 A 0. ? 1 2. 0. Energy(eV) 1 2. 0 0. ? 1 0. Energy(eV) 1 2. Figure 4. 4. Local density of states, parameters for this case are s, = ? 7, s?= 1, s, = l&sp 7~Pa = 4~A = 4)DAB ? .35. -12. 0. Energy(eV) 0... Signature of APS Member Roland E. Allen Department of Physics'- Texas A&M University ' College Station, TX 77843 s p ~ CX3 SEMICONDUCTOR HETEROJUNCTION BAND OFFSETS AND CHARGE NEUTRALITY A Thesis by CHOMSIK LEE Submitted to the Oflice of Graduate...

  4. Slow-light solitons revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Rybin; I. P. Vadeiko; A. R. Bishop

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate propagation of slow-light solitons in atomic media described by the nonlinear $\\Lambda$-model. Under a physical assumption, appropriate to the slow light propagation, we reduce the $\\Lambda$-scheme to a simplified nonlinear model, which is also relevant to 2D dilatonic gravity. Exact solutions describing various regimes of stopping slow-light solitons can then be readily derived.

  5. 1 18 June 2009 Thermal excitation of large charge offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 18 June 2009 Thermal excitation of large charge offsets in a single-Cooper-pair transistor L.R.Simkins

  6. Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural Communities Jump to: navigation, search Name Carbon Offsets for Forestry and Bioenergy: Researching Opportunities for Poor Rural...

  7. Seismic Amplitude Versus Offset (AVO) Character of Geopressured Transition Zones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -stack amplitude versus offset behavior of seismic reflections from the eal. Acoustic synthetic seismograms based. Local conductivity logs and regional drilling mud weight compilations estab ish the presence

  8. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    for, a complete and focused analysis of public policy initiatives. Economic Trends Productivity and investment offset slow growth in labor force Slow consumption growth, rapid...

  9. Report of the Offset Drilling Workshop Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Report of the Offset Drilling Workshop held at Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Need for an Engineering Leg 35 Realistic Strategies for Offset Drilling 37 Appendix 1 Workshop (Leg 153) 21 Figure 4 "Rig Floor Perception" of Generic Boreholes Drilled During Leg 153 22 Figure 5

  10. Azimuthal Offset-Dependent Attributes (AVO And FVO) Applied To Fracture Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shen, Feng

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the amplitude versus offset (AVO) and the frequency versus offset (FVO) information, the diagnostic ability of P-wave seismic data in fracture detection is investigated. The offset-dependent attributes (AVO and FVO) ...

  11. Saturable absorption and 'slow light'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian C Selden

    2006-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantitative evaluation of some recent 'slow light' experiments based on coherent population oscillations (CPO) shows that they can be more simply interpreted as saturable absorption phenomena. Therefore they do not provide an unambiguous demonstration of 'slow light'. Indeed a limiting condition on the spectral bandwidth is not generally satisfied, such that the requirements for burning a narrow spectral hole in the homogeneously broadened absorption line are not met. Some definitive tests of 'slow light' phenomena are suggested, derived from analysis of phase shift and pulse delay for a saturable absorber

  12. 29 April 2010 The What, Why, and How of Offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Examples of Offset Projects Biomass and Waste mgt Small Scale Hydropower Animal Waste Biodigestors Landfill Methane Agricultural Biodigestors #12;© Det Norske Veritas AS. All rights reserved. Thursday, 29 April

  13. Missouri: EERE Funds Help Offset City Electricity Expenses |...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    produce between 90,000 and 100,000 kilowatt-hours (kWh) annually. This renewable energy production will offset 10% of the facility's total electricity usage (just over 12,000...

  14. Countries Commit to White Roofs, Potentially Offsetting the Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the road for 11 years. This is also equivalent to offsetting the annual emissions of 700 medium sized coal-fired power plants, operating 6,000 hours per year.5 I am happy to...

  15. Sequestration Offsets versus Direct Emission Reductions: Consideration of Environmental Externalities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    support for allocating resources to alter the market mix of carbon sequestration and direct emission carbon sequestration practices also influence the environment by for example reducing erosion1 Sequestration Offsets versus Direct Emission Reductions: Consideration of Environmental

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Source

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Economic Activity AEO 2013 Trends in economic activity Mkt trends Market Trends Productivity and investment offset slow growth in labor force...Read full section Slow consumption...

  17. Localisation of beam offset jitter sources at ATF2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pfingstner, J; Patecki, M; Schulte, D; Tomás, R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For the commissioning and operation of modern particle accelerators, automated error detection and diagnostics methods are becoming increasingly important. In this paper, we present two such methods, which are capable of localising sources of beam offset jitter with a combination of correlation studies and so called degree of freedom plots. The methods were applied to the ATF2 beam line at KEK, where one of the major goals is the reduction of the beam offset jitter. Results of this localisation are shown in this paper. A big advantage of the presented method is its high robustness especially to varying optics parameters. Therefore, we believe that the developed beam offset jitter localisation methods can be easily applied to other accelerators.

  18. Gas Slow Control System Specifications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roma "La Sapienza", Università di

    AMS-02 TRD Gas Slow Control System Specifications v 4.2 26-06-2006 A. Bartoloni, B. Borgia, F. Bucci, F. R. Spada INFN Sezione di Roma 1- Roma, Italy #12;2/45 #12;3/45 1. ABSTRACT 5 2. GAS SYSTEM FUNCTIONAL DESCRIPTION 5 3. GAS CONTROL SYSTEM 8 4. CONTROL SYSTEM COMPONENTS 12 a. Universal Control System

  19. Slow light enhanced photon echoes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Hahn; B. S. Ham

    2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a slow light-enhanced photon echo method, whose retrieval efficiency is two orders of magnitude higher than that of conventional photon echoes. The enhanced photon echo efficiency is due to lengthened interaction time given by ultraslow group velocity.

  20. Proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents proceedings of the Axial Offset Anomaly (AOA) Science Workshop, held February 10-11 in Palo Alto, California. Twenty-two papers were presented on various aspects of AOA by utilities, EPRI Robust Fuel Program contractors, staff from EPRI and universities, international researchers, and equipment vendors.

  1. POTENTIAL MEXICAN OFFSETS TO Business Council for Sustainable Development Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    POTENTIAL MEXICAN OFFSETS TO CALIFORNIA Business Council for Sustainable Development ­ Mexico Companies ALFA Altos Hornos de Mexico Bachoco CEMEX Cuprum DeAcero FEMSA GCC Grupo Bimbo Grupo Syngenta Acciona Energía 2 #12;Basic Facts on the California ­ Mexico Relationship 3 · Major trade partner

  2. The COSI Tool -Carbon Offsets with SD Impacts (COSI)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The COSI Tool - Carbon Offsets with SD Impacts (COSI) Fifth Meeting of the Development Dividend of Presentation · The rationale for a COSI Tool · Cooperative framework and status of progress · Methodological and procedural issues #12;The COSI Tool: Why? · Recap of outcomes of the 4th DDTFM in October, 2006: · Applying

  3. JOINT CHANNEL AND FREQUENCY OFFSET ESTIMATION FOR OFDM SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arslan, Hüseyin

    . of Electrical Eng., University of South Florida and Raytheon Company 4202 E. Fowler Avenue, ENB-118, Tampa, FL 1501 72th Street North, Saint Petersburg, FL yucek@eng.usf.edu mohamed k nezami@raytheon.com ABSTRACT is transmitted and This work is supported by Raytheon Company. frequency offset is estimated by finding the phase

  4. Slow light microfluidics: a proposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sumetsky, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonant slow light structures created along a thin-walled optical capillary by nanoscale deformation of its surface can perform comprehensive simultaneous detection and manipulation of microfluidic components. This concept is illustrated with a model of a 0.5 millimeter long 5 nm high triangular bottle resonator created at a 50 micron radius silica capillary containing floating microparticles. The developed theory shows that the microparticle positions can be determined from the bottle resonator spectrum. In addition, the microparticles can be driven and simultaneously positioned at predetermined locations by the localized electromagnetic field created by the optimized superposition of eigenstates of this resonator, thus, exhibiting a multicomponent near field optical tweezers.

  5. Offset-free Receding Horizon Control of Constrained Linear Systems subject to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Offset-free Receding Horizon Control of Constrained Linear Systems subject to Time/F-INFENG/TR.468 November 4, 2003 #12;Offset-free Receding Horizon Control of Constrained Linear Systems subject and offset-free control of con- strained, linear time-invariant systems in the presence of time

  6. First principles investigation of scaling trends of zirconium silicate interface band offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutton, Robert W.

    First principles investigation of scaling trends of zirconium silicate interface band offsets out to investigate the scaling trends of band offsets at model silicon/zirconium silicate interfaces. Owing to the d character of zirconium silicate conduction bands, the band gap and band offset are shown

  7. Fracture mechanics analysis of slow crack growth in polyethylene

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Self, Robert Alan

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    polyethylenes were used to evaluate the new test and analysis methods. Static loading of deeply notched three-point bend specimens was conducted at 26.7 'C, 40 'C, and 70 'C on 1.27 cm , 0.953 cm, and 0.635 cm material. The crack length as a function of time...

  8. K-theoretic rigidity and slow dimension growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Oct 28, 2009 ... In fact, there are no simple separable nuclear stably finite C. ? ... fine locally finite nuclear dimension here; it is enough for us that separable.

  9. Slow Sorption Kinetics of Pentachlorophenol on Soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    -term sorption kinetic data and a void in the understanding of the factors that control the slow sorption stage virtually unexplored. A complete understanding of the mechanisms that control the slow sorption of organic.1; cation exchange capacity (CEC), 5.02 cmol/kg; 1.7% organic matter (measured by incineration); 29.6% sand

  10. Band offsets at heterojunctions and the charge neutrality condition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taferner, Waltraud Teresa

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    P InSb ZnSe Znte Gap indirect indirect indirect indirect direct indirect direct direct direct direct direct direct E4 (eV) O'K 0. 76 1. 13 2. 30 1. 88 1. 55 2. 35 0. 78 0. 43 1. 41 0. 23 2. 68 2. 56 If the atoms of a...&' ?r&rl c!?? &'nt h&: R . F. . X I 1 e n t C. 'k&r&ic &?f l'nn&rr&it&ee) l. H. B. r&ss (:& I e m h e r! R. R. L?cchese (lvlpmhe& ) etta. g R. AIT&&J?' &t t (Ifead of Department) May 1990 ABSTRACT Band OfFsets at Heterojunctions...

  11. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidum FMOIncreasingSlowSlowSlow

  12. Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckhaus, Steffi

    Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus IAD - Technical University of Darmstadt interactiondesign@steffi.beckhaus.de ABSTRACT Slow technology is technology that actively influences our well): Miscellaneous General Terms Slow Technology SLOW TECHNOLOGY IS... Slow technology is technology that actively

  13. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite Print At the ALS, an international team of researchers has used low-energy coherent x rays to extract new knowledge about the...

  14. Offset-free Receding Horizon Control of Constrained Linear Gabriele Pannocchia1 Eric C. Kerrigan2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Offset-free Receding Horizon Control of Constrained Linear Systems Gabriele Pannocchia1 Eric C stability and offset-free control of constrained linear systems in the presence of time-varying setpoints-free controller and computing an appropriate domain of attraction for this controller. The linear (unconstrained

  15. Offset-free control of constrained linear discrete-time systems subject to persistent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Offset-free control of constrained linear discrete-time systems subject to persistent unmeasured-free control of constrained linear discrete-time systems subject to persistent unmeasured disturbances Gabriele Technical report CUED/F-INFENG/TR.466 September 10, 2003 #12;#12;Offset-free control of constrained linear

  16. Offset-free control of constrained linear discrete-time systems subject to persistent unmeasured disturbances

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    Offset-free control of constrained linear discrete-time systems subject to persistent unmeasured, this objective is obtained by designing a dynamic, linear, time-invariant, offset-free controller, and an appropriate domain of attraction for this linear controller is defined. Following this, the linear

  17. Economic Trade-Offs between Carbon Offset and Timber Opportunities in British Columbia's Central Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Economic Trade-Offs between Carbon Offset and Timber Opportunities in British Columbia's Central on the implications of timber harvest and carbon offset projects in British Columbia. I would also like to thank Research Project Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree of Master of Resource

  18. An enhanced model for calculating delay as a function of offset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Shweta

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the enhancements made to an existing model for calculating delay as a function of offset between the traffic signals of a link. The delay-difference-of offset technique is a signal control concept used for strategic optimization...

  19. ZnO/Sn:In2O3 and ZnO/CdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . ZnOSn:In2O3 and ZnOCdTe band offsets for extremely thin absorber photovoltaics . Abstract: Band...

  20. Carbon offsets as a cost containment instrument : a case study of reducing emissions from deforestation and forest degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Jieun, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission trading schemes that helps nations meet their emission commitments at lower costs. Carbon offsets take advantage of lower abatement cost ...

  1. Slow motion responses of compliant offshore structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Peimin

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    -HEAVE-PITCH MOTION ANALYSIS 3. 1 Mathematical Formulation . 3. 1. 1 Governing equation for surge-heave-pitch motions 3. 1. 2 Numerical scheme 3. 2 Comparisons of the JIP Spar . 3. 2. 1 Experimental set-up 3. 2. 2 Regular wave 3. 2. 3 Irregular wave 3. 2. 4... structural analyses. Courtesy of American Petroleum Institute. SDOF surge motion model of the JIP Spar. S?rge static offset test of the JIP Spar in the calm water. Surge RAOs of the JIP Spar: experiment ( ~ ); present ( ? ? ); and HOBEM ( ? - ? ). 14...

  2. Transplanckian energy production and slow roll inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulf H. Danielsson

    2004-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we investigate how the energy density due to a non-standard choice of initial vacuum affects the expansion of the universe during inflation. To do this we introduce source terms in the Friedmann equations making sure that we respect the relation between gravity and thermodynamics. We find that the energy production automatically implies a slow rolling cosmological constant. Hence we also conclude that there is no well defined value for the cosmological constant in the presence of sources. We speculate that a non-standard vacuum can provide slow roll inflation on its own.

  3. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology and Soft7/2014U.S.C.Slow Dynamics ofSlow

  4. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidum FMOIncreasingSlowSlow

  5. Offset voltage of Schottky-collector silicon-on-glass vertical PNP's G. Lorito, L. K. Nanver and N. Nenadovi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technische Universiteit Delft

    Offset voltage of Schottky-collector silicon-on-glass vertical PNP's G. Lorito, L. K. Nanver and N and investigated with respect to the influence of the collector design on the offset voltage. With Schottky collector contacts the offset voltage can be made both very low (

  6. Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing Emissions from and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Carbon Offsets as a Cost Containment Instrument: A Case Study of Reducing in Technology and Policy Abstract Carbon offset is one type of flexibility mechanism in greenhouse gas emission

  7. A Parallel Coiled-Coil Tetramer with Offset Helices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu,J.; Deng, Y.; Zheng, Q.; Cheng, C.; Kallenbach, N.; Lu, M.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Specific helix-helix interactions are fundamental in assembling the native state of proteins and in protein-protein interfaces. Coiled coils afford a unique model system for elucidating principles of molecular recognition between {alpha} helices. The coiled-coil fold is specified by a characteristic seven amino acid repeat containing hydrophobic residues at the first (a) and fourth (d) positions. Nonpolar side chains spaced three and four residues apart are referred to as the 3-4 hydrophobic repeat. The presence of apolar amino acids at the e or g positions (corresponding to a 3-3-1 hydrophobic repeat) can provide new possibilities for close-packing of {alpha}-helices that includes examples such as the lac repressor tetramerization domain. Here we demonstrate that an unprecedented coiled-coil interface results from replacement of three charged residues at the e positions in the dimeric GCN4 leucine zipper by nonpolar valine side chains. Equilibrium circular dichroism and analytical ultracentrifugation studies indicate that the valine-containing mutant forms a discrete {alpha}-helical tetramer with a significantly higher stability than the parent leucine-zipper molecule. The 1.35 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the tetramer reveals a parallel four-stranded coiled coil with a three-residue interhelical offset. The local packing geometry of the three hydrophobic positions in the tetramer conformation is completely different from that seen in classical tetrameric structures yet bears resemblance to that in three-stranded coiled coils. These studies demonstrate that distinct van der Waals interactions beyond the a and d side chains can generate a diverse set of helix-helix interfaces and three-dimensional supercoil structures.

  8. Can reductions in logging damage increase carbon storage over time? Evaluation of a simulation model for a pilot carbon offset project in Malaysia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinard, M.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Selective timber harvesting operations, if uncontrolled, can severely degrade a forest. Although techniques for reducing logging damage are well-known and inexpensive to apply, incentives to adopt these techniques are generally lacking. Power companies and other emitters of {open_quotes}greenhouse{close_quotes} gases soon may be forced to reduce or otherwise offset their net emissions; one offset option is to fund programs aimed at reducing logging damage. To investigate the consequences of reductions in logging damage for ecosystem carbon storage, I constructed a model to simulate changes in biomass and carbon pools following logging of primary dipterocarp forests in southeast Asia. I adapted a physiologically-driven, tree-based model of natural forest gap dynamics (FORMIX) to simulate forest recovery following logging. Input variables included stand structure, volume extracted, stand damage (% stems), and soil disturbance (% area compacted). Output variables included total biomass, tree density, and total carbon storage over time. Assumptions of the model included the following: (1) areas with soil disturbances have elevated probabilities of vine colonization and reduced rates of tree establishment, (2) areas with broken canopy but no soil disturbance are colonized initially by pioneer tree species and 20 yr later by persistent forest species, (3) damaged trees have reduced growth and increased mortality rates. Simulation results for two logging techniques, conventional and reduced-impact logging, are compared with data from field studies conducted within a pilot carbon offset project in Sabah, Malaysia.

  9. STEPS IN SLOW FLAGELLAR MOTOR ROTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leake, Mark C.

    STEPS IN SLOW FLAGELLAR MOTOR ROTATION Alexander D. Rowe1 , Yoshiyuki Sowa2, Mark C. Leake1+ -specific motors. Torque is generated by the interaction between stator complexes and FliG proteins revolution. CHIMERIC MOTOR: The stator units comprising the flagellar motors of the YS34 strain - used

  10. EECBG Success Story: Small Town Using Wind Power to Offset Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wind Power to Offset Electricity Costs September 8, 2010 - 10:26am Addthis Carmen, Oklahoma, is not your average small town. It was the first recipient of an Energy Efficiency...

  11. Slow dynamics and anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics in diverse solids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slow dynamics and anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics in diverse solids Paul Johnsona) Geophysics study of anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics and slow dynamics in a number of solids. Observations are presented from seven diverse materials showing that anomalous nonlinear fast dynamics ANFD and slow dynamics

  12. Bio-inspired Slowness for Robotic Systems Ronald C. Arkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be applied to robotic systems. While slugs, snails, and tortoises are frequently and correctly associated behaviors for robots that deliberately exploit slowness. There has also been research in slow movements in human factors associated with determining safe slow speeds for robots performing alongside humans [6

  13. Bioinspired Slowness for Robotic Systems Ronald C. Arkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    be applied to robotic systems. While slugs, snails, and tortoises are frequently and correctly associated behaviors for robots that deliberately exploit slowness. There has also been research in slow movements in human factors associated with determining safe slow speeds for robots performing alongside humans [6

  14. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bonebrake, Eric; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, Victor A.; Haight, R. C.; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the progress that has been completed in the first half of FY2012 in the MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer project. Significant progress has been made on the algorithm development. We have an improve understanding of the experimental responses in LSDS for fuel-related material. The calibration of the ultra-depleted uranium foils was completed, but the results are inconsistent from measurement to measurement. Future work includes developing a conceptual model of an LSDS system to assay plutonium in used fuel, improving agreement between simulations and measurement, design of a thorium fission chamber, and evaluation of additional detector techniques.

  15. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology and Soft7/2014U.S.C.Slow Dynamics of

  16. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidum FMOIncreasingSlow Dynamics of

  17. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidum FMOIncreasingSlow Dynamics

  18. Slow Dynamics of Orbital Domains in Manganite

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz9Morgan ManagingW.tepidum FMOIncreasingSlow

  19. RESEARCH ARTICLE Bubble growth in visco-elastic magma: implications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyakhovsky, Vladimir

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Bubble growth in visco-elastic magma: implications to magma fragmentation modulus, bubble growth is slow and follows an exponential law in a viscous growth regime, while for low friction and the Mohr-Coulomb failure theory, and a strain related one based on fibre elongation

  20. Temperature dependent band offsets in PbSe/PbEuSe quantum well heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simma, M.; Bauer, G.; Springholz, G. [Institut fuer Halbleiter und Festkoerperphysik, Johannes Kepler Universitaet, A-4040 Linz (Austria)

    2012-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The band offsets of PbSe/Pb{sub 1-x}Eu{sub x}Se multi-quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy are determined as a function of temperature and europium content using temperature-modulated differential transmission spectroscopy. The confined quantum well states in the valence and conduction bands are analyzed using a k{center_dot}p model with envelope function approximation. From the fit of the experimental data, the normalized conduction band offset is determined as 0.45{+-}0.15 of the band gap difference, independently of Eu content up to 14% and temperature from 20 to 300 K.

  1. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Damage Profile and Ion Distribution of Slow Heavy Ions in Compounds. Abstract: Slow heavy ions inevitably produce a...

  2. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer Research Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The MPACT-funded Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. The LSDS collaborations suggests that the next step to in empirically testing the feasibility is to conduct measurements on fresh fuel assemblies to understand investigate self-attenuation and fresh mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel rodlets so we may betterto understand extraction of masses for 235U and 239Pu. While progressing toward these goals, the collaboration also strongly suggests the continued development of enabling technology such as detector development and algorithm development, thatwhich could provide significant performance benefits.

  3. Slow speed object detection for haul trucks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Caterpillar integrates radar technology with its current camera based system. Caterpillar has developed the Integrated Object Detection System, a slow speed object detection system for mining haul trucks. Object detection is a system that aids the truck operator's awareness of their surroundings. The system consists of a color touch screen display along with medium- and short-range radar as well as cameras, harnesses and mounting hardware. It is integrated into the truck's Work Area Vision System (WAVS). After field testing in 2007, system commercialization began in 2008. Prototype systems are in operation in Australia, Utah and Arizona and the Integrated Object Detection System will be available in the fourth quarter of 2009 and on production trucks 785C, 789C, 793D and 797B. The article is adapted from a presentation by Mark Richards of Caterpillar to the Haulage & Loading 2009 conference, May, held in Phoenix, AZ. 1 fig., 5 photos.

  4. Joint Carrier Frequency Offset and Fast Time-varying Channel Estimation for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    environment. An L-path channel model with known path delays is considered to jointly estimate the multi1 Joint Carrier Frequency Offset and Fast Time-varying Channel Estimation for MIMO-OFDM Systems, a novel pilot-aided iterative algorithm is developed for MIMO-OFDM systems operating in fast time- varying

  5. CRLB for Blind Timing Offset Estimation of a Two-Channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levy, Bernard C.

    CRLB for Blind Timing Offset Estimation of a Two-Channel Time-Interleaved A/D Converter Steve Huang Engineering University of California at Davis #12;1 Outline Motivation Blind Calibration Method Large signals or blindly. Blind methods do not lower ADC throughput and can adjust to changes online. Asilomar

  6. Learning Grasp Affordances with Variable Tool Point Offsets Thomas J. Palmer and Andrew H. Fagg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fagg, Andrew H.

    Learning Grasp Affordances with Variable Tool Point Offsets Thomas J. Palmer and Andrew H. Fagg.D. student and University of Oklahoma Foun- dation Fellow, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA, University of Oklahoma, Norman, OK 73019, USA fagg@cs.ou.edu In this paper, we examine the grasp affordance

  7. The Role of Offsets in Meeting Duke University's Commitment to `Climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Pei

    ................................................................................................................................................21 4. Greenhouse Gas Markets: the State of Play this Report This report examines the potential role of carbon offsets in meeting Duke University`s and other from within North Carolina, the international and national market context, and the potential

  8. CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CARBON SEQUESTRATION IN ARABLE SOILS IS LIKELY TO INCREASE NITROUS OXIDE EMISSIONS, OFFSETTING in strategies for climate protection. 1. Introduction Carbon sequestration has been highlighted recently concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmo- sphere include sequestering carbon (C) in soils

  9. Commonality in Complex Product Families: Implications of Divergence and Lifecycle Offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Commonality in Complex Product Families: Implications of Divergence and Lifecycle Offsets by Ryan C Committee #12;2 #12;3 Commonality in Complex Product Families: Implications of Divergence and Lifecycle product family planning and lifecycle management, and ultimately, to improving corporate profitability

  10. Reducing axial offset and improving stability in PWRs by using uraniumethorium fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demazière, Christophe

    Reducing axial offset and improving stability in PWRs by using uraniumethorium fuel Cheuk Wah Lau a that a new type uraniumethorium (UeTh) based fuel assembly could be used to achieve a more homogenous radial that a core containing UeTh fuel assemblies also reduces the AO and improves the core stability

  11. Blade Offset and Pitch Effects on a High Solidity Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullis, Stephen

    Blade Offset and Pitch Effects on a High Solidity Vertical Axis Wind Turbine Andrzej J. Fiedler ABSTRACT A high solidity, small scale, 2.5m diameter by 3m high Vertical Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT in an open-air wind tunnel facility to investigate the effects of preset toe-in and toe-out turbine blade

  12. Joint Identification of Stepper Motor Parameters and of Initial Encoder Offset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    procedure to identify at the same time the electrical parameters of a permanent magnet stepper motor (PMSM is present. The standard DQ model of PMSM's assumes that the permanent magnet is lined up with a winding when, offset calibration, sliding modes. 1. INTRODUCTION Permanent Magnet Stepper Motors (PMSM's) are widely

  13. Interfacial chemistry and valence band offset between GaN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} studied by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duan, T. L.; Ang, D. S. [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore)] [School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Nanyang Avenue, Singapore 639798 (Singapore); Pan, J. S. [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)] [Institute of Materials Research and Engineering, A-STAR (Agency for Science, Technology and Research), 3 Research Link, Singapore 117602 (Singapore)

    2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The interface region between Ga-face n-type GaN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} dielectric (achieved via atomic-layer deposition or ALD) is investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). An increase in the Ga-O to Ga-N bond intensity ratio following Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} deposition implies that the growth of an interfacial gallium sub-oxide (GaO{sub x}) layer occurred during the ALD process. This finding may be ascribed to GaN oxidation, which may still happen following the reduction of a thin native GaO{sub x} by trimethylaluminum (TMA) in the initial TMA-only cycles. The valence band offset between GaN and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, obtained using both core-level and valence band spectra, is found to vary with the thickness of the deposited Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. This observation may be explained by an upward energy band bending at the GaN surface (due to the spontaneous polarization induced negative bound charge on the Ga-face GaN) and the intrinsic limitation of the XPS method for band offset determination.

  14. SLOW DEGRADATION AND ELECTRON INJECTION IN SODIUM-B ALUMINAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transfer of 703 XBB 804 4126 Degradation of sulfur side ofsilver staining. The degradation layer becomes more uniformMaterials Science SLOW DEGRADATION AND ELECTRON INJECTION IN

  15. Nuclear Symbiosis - A Means to Achieve Sustainable Nuclear Growth while Limiting the Spread of Sensititive Nuclear Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Shropshire

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Global growth of nuclear energy in the 21st century is creating new challenges to limit the spread of nuclear technology without hindering adoption in countries now considering nuclear power. Independent nuclear states desire autonomy over energy choices and seek energy independence. However, this independence comes with high costs for development of new indigenous fuel cycle capabilities. Nuclear supplier states and expert groups have proposed fuel supply assurance mechanisms such as fuel take-back services, international enrichment services and fuel banks in exchange for recipient state concessions on the development of sensitive technologies. Nuclear states are slow to accept any concessions to their rights under the Non-Proliferation Treaty. To date, decisions not to develop indigenous fuel cycle capabilities have been driven primarily by economics. However, additional incentives may be required to offset a nuclear state’s perceived loss of energy independence. This paper proposes alternative economic development incentives that could help countries decide to forgo development of sensitive nuclear technologies. The incentives are created through a nuclear-centered industrial complex with “symbiotic” links to indigenous economic opportunities. This paper also describes a practical tool called the “Nuclear Materials Exchange” for identifying these opportunities.

  16. Household scale slow sand filtration in the Dominican Republic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donison, Kori S. (Kori Shay), 1981-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow sand filtration is a method of water treatment that has been used for hundreds of years. In the past two decades, there has been resurgence in interest in slow sand filtration, particularly as a low-cost, household-scale ...

  17. Using Measurements of Fill Factor at High Irradiance to Deduce Heterobarrier Band Offsets: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, J. M.; Steiner, M. A.; Kanevce, A.

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a 2D device simulation tool, we examine the high irradiance behavior of a single junction, GaAs concentrator cell as a function of the doping in the back surface confinement layer. The confinement layer is designed to be a barrier for both holes and electrons in the base of the solar cell. For a p-type base we show that the FF of the cell at high concentrations is a strong function of both the magnitude of the valence band offset and the doping level in the barrier. In short, for a given valence band offset (VBO), there is a critical barrier doping, below which the FF drops rapidly with lower doping. This behavior is confirmed experimentally for a GaInP/GaAs double heterostructure solar cell where the critical doping concentration (at 500 suns) in the back surface confinement layer is ~1e18 cm-3 for a VBO of 300 meV.

  18. ISCAS 2000 -IEEE InternationalSymposiumon Circuits and Systems, May 28-31,2000, Geneva, Switzerland AN ADAPTIVE OFFSET CANCELLATIONMIXER FOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moon, Un-Ku

    -converted signal in the form of a DC offset. Coupling of the LO to the LNA and RF port of the mixer cause static conversion mixer incorporating adaptive offset cancellation. The basic circuit structure is that of a Gilbert cell mixer. Offsets are cancelled by dynamically varying the bias on the loads, which are designed

  19. Influence of GaAs surface termination on GaSb/GaAs quantum dot structure and band offsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zech, E. S.; Chang, A. S.; Martin, A. J.; Canniff, J. C.; Millunchick, J. M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Lin, Y. H. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Goldman, R. S. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States) [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States); Department of Physics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2136 (United States)

    2013-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the influence of GaAs surface termination on the nanoscale structure and band offsets of GaSb/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. Transmission electron microscopy reveals both coherent and semi-coherent clusters, as well as misfit dislocations, independent of surface termination. Cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy reveal clustered GaSb QDs with type I band offsets at the GaSb/GaAs interfaces. We discuss the relative influences of strain and QD clustering on the band offsets at GaSb/GaAs interfaces.

  20. Map Shows Groundwater Decline Slowed LINCOLN, Neb. --Groundwater levels in Nebraska slowed their rate of decline and actually

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    Map Shows Groundwater Decline Slowed LINCOLN, Neb. -- Groundwater levels in Nebraska slowed director of the UNL Water Center, said that the groundwater level maps produced annually by SNR, or stable groundwater levels, with oranges and reds indicating declines and greens and blues showing

  1. Band offsets of n-type electron-selective contacts on cuprous oxide (Cu[subscript 2]O) for photovoltaics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brandt, Riley E.

    The development of cuprous oxide (Cu [subscript 2]O) photovoltaics (PVs) is limited by low device open-circuit voltages. A strong contributing factor to this underperformance is the conduction-band offset between Cu ...

  2. Imaging Sources with Fast and Slow Emission Components

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Verde; D. A. Brown; P. Danielewicz; C. K. Gelbke; W. G. Lynch; M. B. Tsang

    2001-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate two-proton correlation functions for reactions in which fast dynamical and slow evaporative proton emission are both present. In such cases, the width of the correlation peak provides the most reliable information about the source size of the fast dynamical component. The maximum of the correlation function is sensitive to the relative yields from the slow and fast emission components. Numerically inverting the correlation function allows one to accurately disentangle fast dynamical from slow evaporative emission and extract details of the shape of the two-proton source.

  3. Computation of Slow Invariant Manifolds for Hydrogen-Air Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    · Summary #12;Introduction Motivation and background · Detailed kinetics are essential for accurate modeling systems · ILDM, CSP, and ICE-PIC are approximations of the reaction slow invariant manifold. · MEPT

  4. Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Supernatant Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Figure 1. Typical Slow Sand Filter Schematic Headspace Supernatant Water Schmutzdecke Raw water Supernatant drain Filter drain & backfill Sand media Support gravel Drain tile Adjustable weir Overflow weir Vent Control valve Treated Water Effluent flow control structure Overflow Assessing Temperature

  5. Nighttime Offset and Capping Experiment Results of the Isothermal Pyranometer at the 2001 Diffuse Shortwave IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337,2April 2013we have solar panels but notOffset

  6. THE ROCKSTAR PHASE-SPACE TEMPORAL HALO FINDER AND THE VELOCITY OFFSETS OF CLUSTER CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Behroozi, Peter S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Wu, Hao-Yi [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States)

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new algorithm for identifying dark matter halos, substructure, and tidal features. The approach is based on adaptive hierarchical refinement of friends-of-friends groups in six phase-space dimensions and one time dimension, which allows for robust (grid-independent, shape-independent, and noise-resilient) tracking of substructure; as such, it is named ROCKSTAR (Robust Overdensity Calculation using K-Space Topologically Adaptive Refinement). Our method is massively parallel (up to 10{sup 5} CPUs) and runs on the largest current simulations (>10{sup 10} particles) with high efficiency (10 CPU hours and 60 gigabytes of memory required per billion particles analyzed). A previous paper has shown ROCKSTAR to have excellent recovery of halo properties; we expand on these comparisons with more tests and higher-resolution simulations. We show a significant improvement in substructure recovery compared to several other halo finders and discuss the theoretical and practical limits of simulations in this regard. Finally, we present results that demonstrate conclusively that dark matter halo cores are not at rest relative to the halo bulk or substructure average velocities and have coherent velocity offsets across a wide range of halo masses and redshifts. For massive clusters, these offsets can be up to 350 km s{sup -1} at z = 0 and even higher at high redshifts. Our implementation is publicly available at http://code.google.com/p/rockstar.

  7. The SAMI Galaxy Survey: Unveiling the nature of kinematically offset active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allen, J T; Scott, N; Fogarty, L M R; Ho, I -T; Medling, A M; Leslie, S K; Bland-Hawthorn, J; Bryant, J J; Croom, S M; Goodwin, M; Green, A W; Konstantopoulos, I S; Lawrence, J S; Owers, M S; Richards, S N; Sharp, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed two kinematically offset active galactic nuclei (AGN), whose ionised gas is at a different line-of-sight velocity to their host galaxies, with the SAMI integral field spectrograph (IFS). One of the galaxies shows gas kinematics very different to the stellar kinematics, indicating a recent merger or accretion event. We demonstrate that the star formation associated with this event was triggered within the last 100 Myr. The other galaxy shows simple disc rotation in both gas and stellar kinematics, aligned with each other, but in the central region has signatures of an outflow driven by the AGN. Other than the outflow, neither galaxy shows any discontinuity in the ionised gas kinematics at the galaxy's centre. We conclude that in these two cases there is no direct evidence of the AGN being in a supermassive black hole binary system. Our study demonstrates that selecting kinematically offset AGN from single-fibre spectroscopy provides, by definition, samples of kinematically peculiar objects, bu...

  8. SLOW MAGNETOSONIC WAVES AND FAST FLOWS IN ACTIVE REGION LOOPS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L.; Wang, T. J. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Davila, J. M. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent extreme ultraviolet spectroscopic observations indicate that slow magnetosonic waves are present in active region (AR) loops. Some of the spectral data were also interpreted as evidence of fast ({approx}100-300 km s{sup -1}) quasi-periodic flows. We have performed three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (3D MHD) modeling of a bipolar AR that contains impulsively generated waves and flows in coronal loops. The model AR is initiated with a dipole magnetic field and gravitationally stratified density, with an upflow-driven steadily or periodically in localized regions at the footpoints of magnetic loops. The resulting flows along the magnetic field lines of the AR produce higher density loops compared to the surrounding plasma by injection of material into the flux tubes and the establishment of siphon flow. We find that the impulsive onset of flows with subsonic speeds result in the excitation of damped slow magnetosonic waves that propagate along the loops and coupled nonlinearly driven fast-mode waves. The phase speed of the slow magnetosonic waves is close to the coronal sound speed. When the amplitude of the driving pulses is increased we find that slow shock-like wave trains are produced. When the upflows are driven periodically, undamped oscillations are produced with periods determined by the periodicity of the upflows. Based on the results of the 3D MHD model we suggest that the observed slow magnetosonic waves and persistent upflows may be produced by the same impulsive events at the bases of ARs.

  9. Formalising the Slow-Roll Approximation in Inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R. Liddle; Paul Parsons; John D. Barrow

    1994-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The meaning of the inflationary slow-roll approximation is formalised. Comparisons are made between an approach based on the Hamilton-Jacobi equations, governing the evolution of the Hubble parameter, and the usual scenario based on the evolution of the potential energy density. The vital role of the inflationary attractor solution is emphasised, and some of its properties described. We propose a new measure of inflation, based upon contraction of the comoving Hubble length as opposed to the usual e-foldings of physical expansion, and derive relevant formulae. We introduce an infinite hierarchy of slow-roll parameters, and show that only a finite number of them are required to produce results to a given order. The extension of the slow-roll approximation into an analytic slow-roll expansion, converging on the exact solution, is provided. Its role in calculations of inflationary dynamics is discussed. We explore rational-approximants as a method of extending the range of convergence of the slow-roll expansion up to, and beyond, the end of inflation.

  10. Forward Modelling of Standing Slow Modes in Flaring Coronal Loops

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuan, D; Banerjee, D; Antolin, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Standing slow mode waves in hot flaring loops are exclusively observed in spectrometers and are used to diagnose the magnetic field strength and temperature of the loop structure. Due to the lack of spatial information, the longitudinal mode cannot be effectively identified. In this study, we simulate standing slow mode waves in flaring loops and compare the synthesized line emission properties with SUMER spectrographic and SDO/AIA imaging observations. We find that the emission intensity and line width oscillations are a quarter period out of phase with Doppler shift velocity both in time and spatial domain, which can be used to identify a standing slow mode wave from spectroscopic observations. However, the longitudinal overtones could be only measured with the assistance of imagers. We find emission intensity asymmetry in the positive and negative modulations, this is because the contribution function pertaining to the atomic emission process responds differently to positive and negative temperature variat...

  11. Heterojunction band offsets and dipole formation at BaTiO{sub 3}/SrTiO{sub 3} interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaz, Snjezana [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, Ohio 44555 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Youngstown State University, One University Plaza, Youngstown, Ohio 44555 (United States); Zeng, Zhaoquan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Brillson, Leonard J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States) [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 205 Dreese Lab, 2015 Neil Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2013-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We used a complement of photoemission and cathodoluminescence techniques to measure formation of the BaTiO{sub 3} (BTO) on SrTiO{sub 3} (STO) heterojunction band offset grown monolayer by monolayer by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) provided core level and valence band edge energies to monitor the valence band offset in-situ as the first few crystalline BTO monolayers formed on the STO substrate. Ultraviolet photoemission spectroscopy (UPS) measured Fermi level positions within the band gap, work functions, and ionization potentials of the growing BTO film. Depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy measured energies and densities of interface states at the buried heterojunction. Kraut-based XPS heterojunction band offsets provided evidence for STO/BTO heterojunction linearity, i.e., commutativity and transitivity. In contrast, UPS and XPS revealed a large dipole associated either with local charge transfer or strain-induced polarization within the BTO epilayer.

  12. Shallow melt apparatus for semicontinuous czochralski crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Tihu; Ciszek, Theodore F.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  13. Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration Offset Programs: Strengths, Difficulties, and Suggestions for Their Potential Use in AB 32's Cap and Trade Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernadett, Lauren

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    offset credits for installing “a biogas control system thatemissions by installing biogas control systems (BCS), whichin exchange for installing biogas control systems (BCS), a

  14. Restricted growth of Schwann cells lacking Cajal bands slows conduction in myelinated nerves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Court, Felipe A; Sherman, Diane L; Pratt, Thomas; Garry, Emer M; Ribchester, Richard R; Cottrell, David F; Fleetwood-Walker, Susan; Brophy, Peter J.

    2004-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Nerve impulses are propagated at nodes of Ranvier in the myelinated nerves of vertebrates. Internodal distances have been proposed to affect the velocity of nerve impulse conduction; however, direct evidence is lacking, ...

  15. ON THE PERSISTENCE OF LABOR MARKET INSECURITY AND SLOW GROWTH IN THE US: Reckoning with the Waltonist Growth Regime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vidal, Matt

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    domains – such as corporate governance, industrial relationsshareholder value model of corporate governance. While thesevalue approach to corporate governance – an externalized

  16. Slowing the Flow at Pickering PROGRAMME DELIVERY GROUP MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slowing the Flow at Pickering PROGRAMME DELIVERY GROUP MEETING The Mill Suite, Memorial Hall the group on construction of debris dams in Cropton East (Pickering Beck catchment). A team of National Park/River Seven ­ TN confirmed that the Seven modelling report including the results of the cross

  17. Interactions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Destexhe, Alain

    or oscillations can be explained by interactions between calcium- and voltage-dependent channels. At the networkInteractions Between Membrane Conductances Underlying Thalamocortical Slow-Wave Oscillations A: Oscillations and Bursts Emerging From the Interplay of Intrinsic Conductances in Single Neurons 1404 A

  18. Distortion management in slow-light pulse delay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gauthier, Daniel

    . K. Lee, and A. Yariv, "Scattering theory analysis of waveguide-resonator coupling," Phys. Rev. E 62, 7389­7404 (2000). 5. A. Yariv, Y. Xu, R. K. Lee, and A. Scherer, "Coupled resonator optical waveguideDistortion management in slow-light pulse delay Michael D. Stenner and Mark A. Neifeld University

  19. Slowing Amazon deforestation through public policy and interventions in beef

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    REVIEW Slowing Amazon deforestation through public policy and interventions in beef and soy supply 70% decline in deforestation in the Brazilian Amazon suggests that it is possible to manage, as did a decline in the demand for new deforestation. The supply chain interventions that fed

  20. Matched slow pulses using double electromagnetically induced transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lvovsky, Alexander

    Matched slow pulses using double electromagnetically induced transparency Andrew MacRae,* Geoff, 2008 We implement double electromagnetically induced transparency (DEIT) in rubidium vapor using Optical Society of America OCIS codes: 270.1670, 270.5585, 190.5530. Electromagnetically induced

  1. Robust concatenated codes for the slow Rayleigh fading channel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Teh-Hsuan

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, we design a robust concatenated code for the Multiple-Input Multiple-Output (MIMO) system in the presence of slow Rayleigh fading with no channel side information at the transmitter (no CSIT) and perfect channel side information...

  2. Slow-light enhancement of Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niels Asger Mortensen; Sanshui Xiao

    2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We theoretically show how slow light in an optofluidic environment facilitates enhanced light-matter interactions, by orders of magnitude. The proposed concept provides strong opportunities for improving existing miniaturized chemical absorbance cells for Beer-Lambert-Bouguer absorption measurements widely employed in analytical chemistry.

  3. Association of length-slow silica with evaporites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heaney, P.J. (Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States). Dept. of Geology); Sheppard, R.A. (Geological Survey, Denver, CO (United States). Denver Federal Center); Post, J.E. (Smithsonian Inst., Washington, DC (United States). Dept. of Mineral Sciences)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1971, Folk and Pittman described the common occurrence of length-slow quartz (or lutecite) with evaporitic minerals, and they suggested that lutecite might be a useful indicator for vanished evaporites. However, the subsequent discoveries of length-slow silica in carbonate turbidites and in abyssal Pacific cherts revealed that lutecite is not restricted to near-surface deposits. Moreover, Kastner found that length-slow quartz could be crystallized in slightly alkaline solutions enriched in Mg[sup 2+], Na[sup +], and SO[sub 4][sup [minus]2]. Following these studies, researchers have cited the presence of lutecite in rock samples as suggestive but not compelling evidence for an evaporitic origin, and the precise nature of this form of silica has remained somewhat enigmatic. Investigations of chert nodules from evaporitic and non-evaporitic regimes support an identification of length-slow quartz'' with the mineral moganite, a polymorph of silica that is fibrous and optically length slow. Results are based upon X-ray powder diffraction of the chert, followed by Rietveld refinement of the X-ray patterns to quantify the weight fraction of quartz and moganite in each specimen. Most non-evaporitic chert appears to contain between 5 and 15 wt. % moganite, but evaporitic cherts often contain more than 20 wt. %. Cherts that have transformed from precursor magadiite can be particularly rich in moganite; samples from Lake Magadi, Kenya and from Harney Lake, Oregon revealed about equal parts moganite and quartz. However, the observation of decreasing abundances of moganite in rocks of increasing age indicates that moganite is metastable relative to quartz.

  4. Single-band and Dual-band Beam Switching Systems and Offset-fed Beam Scanning Reflectarray

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jungkyu

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    for multi-band applications. A modified Butler matrix is used to reduce a size and a sidelobe level. The bandwidth of the microstrip antenna is inherently small. A broadband circularly polarized microstrip antenna with dual-offset feedlines is introduced...

  5. Dynamic and Static Characteristics of a Rocker-Pivot, Tilting-Pad Bearing with 50% and 60% Offsets.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kulhanek, Chris David

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Static performance and rotordynamic coefficients are provided for a rocker-pivot, tilting-pad journal bearing with 50 and 60 percent offset pads in a load-between-pad configuration. The bearing uses leading-edge-groove lubrication and has...

  6. Band Offsets of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Y. Dong and R. M. Feenstra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feenstra, Randall

    1 Band Offsets of InGaP/GaAs Heterojunctions by Scanning Tunneling Spectroscopy Y. Dong and R. M Abstract Scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy are used to study InGaP/GaAs heterojunctions computation of the tunnel current. Curve fitting of theory to experiment is performed. Using an InGaP band gap

  7. Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution within Carbonate Oil Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crosswell Seismic Amplitude-Versus-Offset for Detailed Imaging of Facies and Fluid Distribution, and demonstrate a method of using crosswell seismic profiling for identification of trapped oil, bypassed reservoir compartments, and location of fluid fronts in carbonate reefs. The method of crosswell seismic

  8. Shallow Melt Apparatus for Semicontinuous Czochralski Crystal Growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, T.; Ciszek, T. F.

    2006-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    In a single crystal pulling apparatus for providing a Czochralski crystal growth process, the improvement of a shallow melt crucible (20) to eliminate the necessity supplying a large quantity of feed stock materials that had to be preloaded in a deep crucible to grow a large ingot, comprising a gas tight container a crucible with a deepened periphery (25) to prevent snapping of a shallow melt and reduce turbulent melt convection; source supply means for adding source material to the semiconductor melt; a double barrier (23) to minimize heat transfer between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow melt in the growth compartment; offset holes (24) in the double barrier (23) to increase melt travel length between the deepened periphery (25) and the shallow growth compartment; and the interface heater/heat sink (22) to control the interface shape and crystal growth rate.

  9. Slow, stable delamination in graphite/epoxy composites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razi, Hamid

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SLOB, STABLE DELAFIINATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by HAMID RA2I Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the reouirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1982 Major... Subject: Mechanical Engineering SLOW, STABLE DELAMINATION IN GRAPHITE/EPOXY COMPOSITES A Thesis by HAMID RAZI Approved as to style and content by: (R. A. Schapery, hair (J. R. Wa ton, Member) (W. L. Bradley, Membe . R. Hopkins, ead of Department...

  10. Lemniscate growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    May 8, 2012 ... [8], (mem)Brane theory [3], elliptic growth [11], and non-Newtonian Hele-Shaw flows [5]. ...... a loose connection to non-Newtonian fluids.

  11. Slow electromagnetic pulse propagation through a narrow transmission band in a coaxial photonic crystal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robertson, William

    Slow electromagnetic pulse propagation through a narrow transmission band in a coaxial photonic the slow group-velocity propagation of electromagnetic pulses through a narrow transmission band describe a simple experimental configuration that leads to slow-group-velocity electromagnetic pulse

  12. First-principles calculations of quasiparticle energies at surfaces and interfaces: Semiconductor surface-state spectra and band offsets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louie, S.G.

    1987-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first-principles theory for calculating surface-state energies and semiconductor band offsets is described. Within a quasiparticle interpretation of excitation spectra, the approach provides well-founded energies which can be compared directly with sepctroscopy measurements. Results for the As-capped Si(111) and Ge(111) surfaces and for the GaAs-AlAs(001) heterojunction are discussed and compared with experiment. 14 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Enhancing the efficiency of SnS solar cells via band-offset engineering with a zinc oxysulfide buffer layer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .1063/1.4789855] The toxicity of Cd and the scarcity of Te, In, and Ga used in CdTe and Cu(In,Ga)S2 (CIGS) thin-film solar cellsEnhancing the efficiency of SnS solar cells via band-offset engineering with a zinc oxysulfideS is a promising earth-abundant material for photovoltaic applications. Heterojuction solar cells were made

  14. Conduction-Band-Offset Rule Governing J-V Distortion in CdS/CI(G)S Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sites, James R.

    Conduction-Band-Offset Rule Governing J-V Distortion in CdS/CI(G)S Solar Cells A. Kanevce, MV at the n/p interface of a solar cell can lead to significant distortion of the current-voltage (J-V) curve-layer [TCO/CdS/CI(G)S] approximation for the solar cell. The parameters that influence the barrier height

  15. Band offset between cubic GaN and AlN from intra- and interband spectroscopy of superlattices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mietze, C.; Lischka, K.; As, D. J. [University of Paderborn, Faculty of Science, Department of Physics, Warburger Strasse 100 D-33098 Paderborn (Germany); DeCuir, E. A. Jr.; Manasreh, M. O. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of Arkansas, 3217 Bell Engineering Center, Fayetteville, Arkansas 72701 (United States)

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    By the analysis of intra- and intersubband transitions in GaN/AlN superlattices the band offset is determined experimentally. Superlattice structures with different period lengths were fabricated by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy 3C-SiC substrates. The structural properties were studied by high resolution X-ray diffraction, revealing a high structural perfection of the superlattice region with several peaks in the X-ray spectra. Infrared absorbance spectroscopy revealed clear intrasubband transitions in the spectral region of 1.55 {mu}m measured at room temperature. Clear intersubband transitions were observed by photoluminescence at room temperature. These transition energies were compared to calculated energies using a 1D Poisson Schroedinger solver. For the calculations standard parameters for cubic GaN and AlN were used, while the band offset between GaN and AlN was varied. Optimal agreement between experimental and theoretical data was obtained for a band offset {Delta}E{sub C}:{Delta} E{sub V} of 55:45.

  16. Criticality and axial offset searches based on the integrated neutron balance approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dall'Osso, A. [AREVA NP Tour AREVA, 92084 Paris La Defense Cedex (France); Van Geemert, R. [AREVA GmbH, Paul Gossenstrasse 100, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Criticality and axial offset (AO) searches are key features in the simulation of plant operation procedures. Typically, the dedicated algorithms consist of either a Newton method or a secant method that features the successive computation of difference quotients to be used as derivatives. Within this context, computational robustness and efficiency are of paramount importance. This applies in particular to when the variations imposed during the search are spatially heterogeneous, such as in the case of tuning control rod positions for achieving target AO. In order to optimize this kind of search capability in AREVA NP's reactor code ARTEMIS in accordance with this design principle, a generalized approach has been implemented that harmonizes very well numerically with the overall multi-physics iterative solution process. As embedded in the latter, the new neutronic integral re-balancing approach is defined through periodic whole-core space-energy integrations of the principal terms in the core-integrated process-rate balance terms (i.e. neutron absorption, production and leakage). This procedure yields sequences of single zero-dimensional equations from which the chosen tuning parameters can be solved directly in dependence of the imposed (and systematically fixed) values for the response quantities k{sub eff} and/or AO. The converged result of the iteration sequence of successively obtained search parameter values is final in terms of being fully consistent with the entire set of multi-physics equations while enabling the accurate fulfillment of the target response value. The k etc and AO searches can be pursued simultaneously. Judging from the results of pursued verifications, the neutronic integral re-balancing approach fulfils the above-mentioned expectations convincingly. Specific verification examples are presented, such as the determination of the insertion depth of a critical control bank, a double search on target criticality and target AO by adjusting the boron concentration and the position of a control bank, and a critical power search during reactor cycle stretch out. (authors)

  17. Gravitational red-shift and deflection of slow light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Dressel; S. G. Rajeev; J. C. Howell; A. N. Jordan

    2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the nature of the classical propagation of light through media with strong frequency-dependent dispersion in the presence of a gravitational field. In the weak field limit, gravity causes a redshift of the optical frequency, which the slow-light medium converts into a spatially-varying index of refraction. This results in the bending of a light ray in the medium. We further propose experimental techniques to amplify and detect the phenomenon using weak value measurements. Independent heuristic and rigorous derivations of this effect are given.

  18. Extending magnetohydrodynamics to the slow dynamics of collisionless plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Passot, T.; Sulem, P. L. [Universite de Nice Sophia Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, B.P. 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Hunana, P. [Code 673, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Maryland 20771 (United States)

    2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A fluid approach aimed to provide a consistent description of the slow dynamics of a collisionless plasma, is presented. In this regime, both Landau damping and finite Larmor radius effects cannot be ignored. Two models are discussed; one retains the dynamics at sub-ionic scales, while the other is restricted to scales larger than the ion gyroscale. Special attention is paid to the capability of these approaches to accurately reproduce the properties of linear waves that are known to play an important role, for example, in the small-scale dynamics of solar wind turbulence.

  19. Evidence For The Production Of Slow Antiprotonic Hydrogen In Vacuum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Zurlo; M. Amoretti; C. Amsler; G. Bonomi; C. Carraro; C. L. Cesar; M. Charlton; M. Doser; A. Fontana; R. Funakoshi; P. Genova; R. S. Hayano; L. V. Jorgensen; A. Kellerbauer; V. Lagomarsino; R. Landua; E. Lodi Rizzini; M. Macrì; N. Madsen; G. Manuzio; D. Mitchard; P. Montagna; L. G. Posada; H. Pruys; C. Regenfus; A. Rotondi; G. Testera; D. P. Van der Werf; A. Variola; L. Venturelli; Y. Yamazaki

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present evidence showing how antiprotonic hydrogen, the quasistable antiproton-proton (pbar-p) bound system, has been synthesized following the interaction of antiprotons with the hydrogen molecular ion (H2+) in a nested Penning trap environment. From a careful analysis of the spatial distributions of antiproton annihilation events, evidence is presented for antiprotonic hydrogen production with sub-eV kinetic energies in states around n=70, and with low angular momenta. The slow antiprotonic hydrogen may be studied using laser spectroscopic techniques.

  20. Report on First Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Stave, Sean; Woodring, Mitchell L.

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    On Feb. 17 and 18 2011, six items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer. After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials, with the exception of silver. We observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours, except for 198Au which has a half-life of 2.7 d.

  1. Slow Mo Guys and Cold Spray | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology and Soft7/2014U.S.C.Slow Dynamics

  2. Non-slow-roll dynamics in $\\alpha-$attractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kumar, K Sravan; Moniz, Paulo Vargas; Das, Suratna

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we consider the $\\alpha-$attractor model and study inflation under a generalization of slow-roll dynamics. We follow the recently proposed Gong \\& Sasaki approach \\cite{Gong:2015ypa} of assuming $N=N\\left(\\phi\\right)$. We relax the requirement of inflaton potential flatness and consider a sufficiently steep one to support 60-efoldings. We find that this type of inflationary scenario predicts an attractor at $n_{s}\\approx0.967$ and $r\\approx5.5\\times10^{-4}$ which are very close to the predictions of the first chaotic inflationary model in supergravity (Goncharov-Linde model) \\cite{Goncharov:1983mw}. We show that even with non-slow-roll dynamics, the $\\alpha-$attractor model is compatible with any value of $r<0.1$. In addition, we emphasize that in this particular inflationary scenario, the standard consistency relation $\\left(r\\simeq-8n_{t}\\right)$ is significantly violated and we find an attractor for tensor tilt at $n_{t}\\approx-0.034$ as $r\\rightarrow0$. Any prominent detection of the ...

  3. SLOW MAGNETOACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS IN THE MICROWAVE EMISSION OF SOLAR FLARES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, S.; Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: sjkim@nro.nao.ac.jp [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of the microwave data, obtained in the 17 GHz channel of the Nobeyama Radioheliograph during the M1.6 flare on 2010 November 4, revealed the presence of 12.6 minute oscillations of the emitting plasma density. The oscillations decayed with the characteristic time of about 15 minutes. Similar oscillations with the period of about 13.8 minutes and the decay time of 25 minutes are also detected in the variation of EUV emission intensity measured in the 335 A channel of the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly. The observed properties of the oscillations are consistent with the oscillations of hot loops observed by the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) in the EUV spectra in the form of periodic Doppler shift. Our analysis presents the first direct observations of the slow magnetoacoustic oscillations in the microwave emission of a solar flare, complementing accepted interpretations of SUMER hot loop oscillations as standing slow magnetoacoustic waves.

  4. Agricultural Soil Carbon Sequestration Offset Programs: Strengths, Difficulties, and Suggestions for Their Potential Use in AB 32's Cap and Trade Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernadett, Lauren

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    pdf; Section 3: Emissions Trading/Offset Credits – A Market1, 2013. 19 Under the Emissions Trading Program , L EGAL Pand-ab-32s- emissions-trading-program/. Additionally,

  5. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Fining Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas Using A Three-Component Long-Offset Surface Seismic Survey, PSInSAR, and Kinematic Analysis presentation at the April 2013 peer review meeting held in Denver, Colorado.

  6. Predicted roles of defects on band offsets and energetics at CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS) solar cell interfaces and implications for improving performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    Predicted roles of defects on band offsets and energetics at CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS) solar cell (2014) Predicted roles of defects on band offsets and energetics at CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2/CdS) solar cell of CIGS (Cu(In,Ga)Se2) based solar cells (20.8% efficiency) makes them promising candidate photovoltaic

  7. Slow stress relaxation in randomly disordered nematic elastomers and gels

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Clarke; E. M. Terentjev

    1998-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Randomly disordered (polydomain) liquid crystalline elastomers align under stress. We study the dynamics of stress relaxation before, during and after the Polydomain-Monodomain transition. The results for different materials show the universal ultra-slow logarithmic behaviour, especially pronounced in the region of the transition. The data is approximated very well by an equation Sigma(t) ~ Sigma_{eq} + A/(1+ Alpha Log[t]). We propose a theoretical model based on the concept of cooperative mechanical resistance for the re-orientation of each domain, attempting to follow the soft-deformation pathway. The exact model solution can be approximated by compact analytical expressions valid at short and at long times of relaxation, with two model parameters determined from the data.

  8. Slow-mode shocks in the earth's magnetosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, W.C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The locations and structure of slow-mode shocks in the earth's magnetosphere are reviewed. To date, such shocks have only been identified along the high latitude portions of the lobe-plasma sheet boundary of the geomagnetic tail. Although their intrinsic thickness is of the order of the upstream ion inertial length, they affect the internal state of a relatively much larger volume of surrounding plasma. In particular, they support a well-developed foreshock very similar to that observed upstream of the earth's bow shock, and a turbulent, strongly convecting downstream flow. They also figure importantly in the energy budget of geomagnetic substorms and produce effects which are closely analogous to much of the phenomenology known from solar observations to be associated with two-ribbon flares. 74 refs., 14 figs.

  9. Tailoring the slow light behavior in terahertz metasurfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manjappa, Manukumara; Cong, Longqing; Bettiol, Andrew A; Zhang, Weili; Singh, Ranjan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We experimentally study the effect of near field coupling on the transmission of light in terahertz metasurfaces, possessing slightly distinctive SRR resonances. Our results show that the interplay between the strengths of electric and magnetic dipoles, modulates the amplitude of resulting electromagnetically induced transmission, probed under different types of asymmetries in the coupled system. We employ a two-particle model to theoretically study the influence of the near field coupling between bright and quasi-dark modes on the transmission properties of the coupled system and we find an excellent agreement with our observed results. Adding to the enhanced transmission characteristics, our results provide a deeper insight into the metamaterial analogues of atomic electromagnetically induced transparency and offer an approach to engineer slow light devices, broadband filters and attenuators at terahertz frequencies.

  10. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light with Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Safavi-Naeini, Amir H; Chan, Jasper; Eichenfield, Matt; Winger, Martin; Lin, Qiang; Hill, Jeffrey T; Chang, Darrick; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. To date, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Converseley, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to strong nonlinear optical effects such as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, seminal experiments and proposals to slow and stop the propagation of light, and their applicability to modern optical networks, and future quantum networks, have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the last two decades. In a similar fashion, here we use the optomechanical nonli...

  11. Report on Second Activations with the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stave, Sean C.; Mace, Emily K.; Pratt, Sharon L.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Summary On August 18 and 19 2011, five items were irradiated with neutrons using the Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS). After irradiation, dose measurements and gamma-spectrometry measurements were completed on all of the samples. No contamination was found on the samples, and all but one provided no dose. Gamma-spectroscopy measurements qualitatively agreed with expectations based on the materials. As during the first activation run, we observed activation in the room in general, mostly due to 56Mn and 24Na. Most of the activation of the samples was short lived, with half-lives on the scale of hours to days, except for 60Co which has a half-life of 5.3 y.

  12. Amplitude death in coupled slow and fast dynamical systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajari Gupta; G. Ambika

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We study how mismatch between dynamical time scales of interacting identical systems can result in the suppression of collective dynamics leading to amplitude death. We find that the inability of the interacting systems to fall in step leads to difference in phase as well as change in amplitude. If the mismatch is small, the systems settle to a frequency synchronised state with constant phase difference. But as mismatch in time scale increases, the systems have to compromise to a state of no oscillations. We establish that this regime of amplitude death exists in a net work of identical systems also for sufficient number of slow systems. For standard nonlinear systems, the regions of quenched dynamics in the parameter plane and the transition curves are studied analytically and confirmed by numerical simulations.

  13. Evaluation of hydrogen pressure vessels using slow strain rate testing and fracture mechanics analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murray, S.H. [National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Kennedy Space Center, FL (United States). Materials Science Div.; Desai, V.H. [Univ. of Central Florida, Orlando, FL (United States)

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A total of 108 seamless, forged pressure vessels, fabricated from ASTM A372 type IV (UNS K14508) and type V low alloy steel, are currently in 4,200 psi (29 MPa) gaseous hydrogen (GH{sub 2}) service at the Kennedy Space Center`s (KSC) Space Shuttle Launch Complex 39 (LC-39). The vessels were originally used in 6,000 psi (41 MPa) GH{sub 2} service during the Apollo program. NASA recently received a letter of warning from the manufacturer of the vessels stating that the subject vessels should be now be removed from GH{sub 2} service due to the fact that the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of many of the vessels exceeds the maximum limit of 126 ksi (869 MPa) now imposed on A372 steel intended for GH{sub 2} service, and therefore are susceptible to hydrogen environment embrittlement. Due to the expense associated with vessel replacement, it was decided to determine by testing and analysis whether or not the vessels needed to be removed from GH{sub 2} service. Slow strain rate testing was performed under hydrogen charging conditions to determine the value of the threshold fracture toughness for sustained loading crack growth in GH{sub 2}, (K{sub H}) for the vessel material, this value was then used in a fracture mechanics safe-life analysis (a 20-year service life was modeled) that indicated the vessels are safe for continued use.

  14. Characterization of slow rusting components in maize (Zea mays) inbreds and single crosses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ngoko

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Gompertz model The logistic model Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIII INHERITANCE OF SLOW RUSTING IN MAIZE Introduction Materials and methods Results Discussion CHAPTERIV IDENTIFICATION OF THE COMPONENTS OF SLOW RUSTING... (30) working with oats, found out that the Gompertz transformation was more consistent at detecting degrees of slow rusting than the logistic model. Vanderplank (61) stressed the concept of disease increase as a function of time. This theory implies...

  15. arbitrary-profile slow-wave structure: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been applied to silicon transmission lines under Swaminathan, Madhavan 10 Title of Document: STUDIES OF HIGH FREQUENCY WAVE EXCITATION IN FAST AND SLOW WAVE Materials Science...

  16. Band offsets of TiZnSnO/Si heterojunction determined by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun, R. J.; Jiang, Q. J.; Yan, W. C.; Feng, L. S.; Lu, B.; Ye, Z. Z. [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Li, X. F. [Key Laboratory of Advanced Display and System Application, Ministry of Education, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Li, X. D. [Xinyi PV Products (Anhui) Holdings LTD, Xinyi PV Glass Industrial Zone, No. 2 Xinyi Road, ETDZ, Wuhu 241009 (China); Lu, J. G., E-mail: lujianguo@zju.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Key Laboratory of Advanced Display and System Application, Ministry of Education, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China)

    2014-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was utilized to measure the valence band offset (?E{sub V}) of the TiZnSnO (TZTO)/Si heterojunction. TZTO films were deposited on Si (100) substrates using magnetron sputtering at room temperature. By using the Zn 2p{sub 3/2} and Sn 3d{sub 5/2} energy levels as references, the value of ?E{sub V} was calculated to be 2.69 ± 0.1 eV. Combining with the experimental optical energy band gap of 3.98 eV for TZTO extracted from the UV-vis transmittance spectrum, the conduction band offset (?E{sub C}) was deduced to be 0.17 ± 0.1 eV at the interface. Hence, the energy band alignment of the heterojunction was determined accurately, showing a type-I form. This will be beneficial for the design and application of TZTO/Si hybrid devices.

  17. Experimental Investigation of the Root Cause Mechanism and Effectiveness of Mitigating Actions for Axial Offset Anomaly in Pressurized Water Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Said Abdel-Khalik

    2005-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Axial offset anomaly (AOA) in pressurized water reactors refers to the presence of a significantly larger measured negative axial offset deviation than predicted by core design calculations. The neutron flux depression in the upper half of high-power rods experiencing significant subcooled boiling is believed to be caused by the concentration of boron species within the crud layer formed on the cladding surface. Recent investigations of the root-cause mechanism for AOA [1,2] suggest that boron build-up on the fuel is caused by precipitation of lithium metaborate (LiBO2) within the crud in regions of subcooled boiling. Indirect evidence in support of this hypothesis was inferred from operating experience at Callaway, where lithium return and hide-out were, respectively, observed following power reductions and power increases when AOA was present. However, direct evidence of lithium metaborate precipitation within the crud has, heretofore, not been shown because of its retrograde solubility. To this end, this investigation has been undertaken in order to directly verify or refute the proposed root-cause mechanism of AOA, and examine the effectiveness of possible mitigating actions to limit its impact in high power PWR cores.

  18. Exponential energy growth in adiabatically changing Hamiltonian Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiago Pereira; Dmitry Turaev

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Fermi acceleration is the process of energy transfer from massive objects in slow motion to light objects that move fast. The model for such process is a time-dependent Hamiltonian system. As the parameters of the system change with time, the energy is no longer conserved, which makes the acceleration possible. One of the main problems is how to generate a sustained and robust energy growth. We show that the non-ergodicity of any chaotic Hamiltonian system must universally lead to the exponential growth of energy at a slow periodic variation of parameters. We build a model for this process in terms of a Geometric Brownian Motion with a positive drift, and relate it to the entropy increase.

  19. Characterization of Co-planar Silicon Transmission Lines with and without Slow-waveEffect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swaminathan, Madhavan

    Characterization of Co-planar Silicon Transmission Lines with and without Slow-waveEffect Woopoung and package transmission lines has been explained showing that the slow-wave mode cannot be represented only][2][3][4], characterization methods for package transmission lines have been applied to silicon transmission lines under

  20. Dancoff's solution for the number of collisions necessary to slow down

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruby, L.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A succession of authors, following in the footsteps of Glasstone and Edlund, have perpetuated the same estimate for the number of collisions to slow down. Investigation of the slowing down distribution by Dancoff and others has been shown to correspond to a more meaningful estimate. Dancoff's treatment, probably the most concise of any thus far proposed, is discussed in detail.

  1. Measurements with the high flux lead slowing-down spectrometer at LANL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    slow down by scattering interactions with the lead and thus enable measurements of neutron.40.Sc Keywords: Lead-slowing-down spectrometer; Lithium; Alpha; Cross section; Neutron reactions 1.elsevier.com/locate/nimb Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research B 261 (2007) 953­955 NIM BBeam Interactions

  2. The 2006 aseismic slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico: New results Kristine M. Larson,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    The 2006 aseismic slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico: New results from GPS Kristine M. Larson,1. Miyazaki, and J. A. S. Santiago (2007), The 2006 aseismic slow slip event in Guerrero, Mexico: New results from Guerrero, Mexico were made with continuous GPS instrumentation. This network spans 75 km along

  3. SPIN-DEPENDENT SCATTERING LENGTHS OF SLOW NEUTRONS WITH NUCLEI BY PSEUDOMAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-263 SPIN-DEPENDENT SCATTERING LENGTHS OF SLOW NEUTRONS WITH NUCLEI BY PSEUDOMAGNETIC MEASUREMENTS vu par les noyaux. Abstract. - The spin-dependent scattering length of slow neutrons by the nuclei 23 can be of practical importance in many thermal neutron scattering experiments. A new method, called

  4. Method for solid state crystal growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nolas, George S.; Beekman, Matthew K.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel method for high quality crystal growth of intermetallic clathrates is presented. The synthesis of high quality pure phase crystals has been complicated by the simultaneous formation of both clathrate type-I and clathrate type-II structures. It was found that selective, phase pure, single-crystal growth of type-I and type-II clathrates can be achieved by maintaining sufficient partial pressure of a chemical constituent during slow, controlled deprivation of the chemical constituent from the primary reactant. The chemical constituent is slowly removed from the primary reactant by the reaction of the chemical constituent vapor with a secondary reactant, spatially separated from the primary reactant, in a closed volume under uniaxial pressure and heat to form the single phase pure crystals.

  5. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency and Slow Light with Optomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir H. Safavi-Naeini; Thiago P. Mayer Alegre; Jasper Chan; Matt Eichenfield; Martin Winger; Qiang Lin; Jeffrey T. Hill; Darrick Chang; Oskar Painter

    2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Controlling the interaction between localized optical and mechanical excitations has recently become possible following advances in micro- and nano-fabrication techniques. To date, most experimental studies of optomechanics have focused on measurement and control of the mechanical subsystem through its interaction with optics, and have led to the experimental demonstration of dynamical back-action cooling and optical rigidity of the mechanical system. Conversely, the optical response of these systems is also modified in the presence of mechanical interactions, leading to strong nonlinear effects such as Electromagnetically Induced Transparency (EIT) and parametric normal-mode splitting. In atomic systems, seminal experiments and proposals to slow and stop the propagation of light, and their applicability to modern optical networks, and future quantum networks, have thrust EIT to the forefront of experimental study during the last two decades. In a similar fashion, here we use the optomechanical nonlinearity to control the velocity of light via engineered photon-phonon interactions. Our results demonstrate EIT and tunable optical delays in a nanoscale optomechanical crystal device, fabricated by simply etching holes into a thin film of silicon (Si). At low temperature (8.7 K), we show an optically-tunable delay of 50 ns with near-unity optical transparency, and superluminal light with a 1.4 microseconds signal advance. These results, while indicating significant progress towards an integrated quantum optomechanical memory, are also relevant to classical signal processing applications. Measurements at room temperature and in the analogous regime of Electromagnetically Induced Absorption (EIA) show the utility of these chip-scale optomechanical systems for optical buffering, amplification, and filtering of microwave-over-optical signals.

  6. Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer FY2013 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Stewart, T.

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary The Lead Slowing Down Spectrometry (LSDS) project, funded by the Materials Protection And Control Technology campaign, has been evaluating the feasibility of using LSDS techniques to assay fissile isotopes in used nuclear fuel assemblies. The approach has the potential to provide considerable improvement in the assay of fissile isotopic masses in fuel assemblies compared to other non-destructive techniques in a direct and independent manner. This report is a high level summary of the progress completed in FY2013. This progress included: • Fabrication of a 4He scintillator detector to detect fast neutrons in the LSDS operating environment. Testing of the detector will be conducted in FY2014. • Design of a large area 232Th fission chamber. • Analysis using the Los Alamos National Laboratory perturbation model estimated the required number of neutrons for an LSDS measurement to be 10 to the 16th source neutrons. • Application of the algorithms developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to LSDS measurement data of various fissile samples conducted in 2012. The results concluded that the 235U could be measured to 2.7% and the 239Pu could be measured to 6.3%. Significant effort is yet needed to demonstrate the applicability of these algorithms for used-fuel assemblies, but the results reported here are encouraging in demonstrating that we are making progress toward that goal. • Development and cost-analysis of a research plan for the next critical demonstration measurements. The plan suggests measurements on fresh fuel sub assemblies as a means to experimentally test self-attenuation and the use of fresh mixed-oxide fuel as a means to test simultaneous measurement of 235U and 239Pu.

  7. Slow, stable delamination in graphite/epoxy composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razi, Hamid

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Material ABCD, Ic' Strain-Rate Sensitive Material EBCD [ij Schematic Load-Deflection (P-c) Curves: (a) Flat P-c Cracking Behavior, (b) Peaked P-a Cracking Behavior [1] Hypothesized Relationship Between Energy Release Rate and Crack Speed Cure Cycle... crack at point a in Figure 6, the crack speed jumps discontinuously from point a to point b. Crack growth is continuous from point b to point c at a decreasing velocity, as the available energy decreases to the value GIA. Between points c and d...

  8. Simulating Solid-Solid Phase Transition in Shape-Memory Alloy Microstructure by Face-Offsetting Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bellur Ramaswamy, Ravi S.; Tortorelli, Daniel A. [Department of Mechanical Science and Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1206 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Fried, Eliot [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Washington University, Campus Box 1185, St. Louis, MO 63130-4899 (United States); Jiao Xiangmin [Computational Science and Engineering Division, College of Computing, Georgia Institute of Technology, 801 Atlantic Drive, Atlanta, GA 30332 (United States)

    2008-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Advances in the understanding of martensitic transformations (diffusionless, solid-solid phase transformations) have been instrumental to the recent discovery of new low hysteresis alloys. However, some key fundamental issues must be better understood to design still better alloys. Restricting attention to antiplane shear, we use finite element analysis to model the shape-memory alloy microstructure within the Abeyaratne-Knowles continuum thermomechanical framework and use an interface kinetic relation of the kind proposed by Rosakis and Tsai. Geometric singularities and topological changes associated with microstructural evolution pose significant numerical challenges. We address such challenges with a recently developed front-tracking scheme called the face-offsetting method (FOM) to explicitly model phase interfaces. Initial results demonstrate the effectiveness of FOM in resolving needle-like twinned microstructures.

  9. The extended wedge method: Atomic force microscope friction calibration for improved tolerance to instrument misalignments, tip offset, and blunt probes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khare, H. S.; Burris, D. L. [126 Spencer Laboratory, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

    2013-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the major challenges in understanding and controlling friction is the difficulty in bridging the length and time scales of macroscale contacts and those of the single asperity interactions they comprise. While the atomic force microscope (AFM) offers a unique ability to probe tribological surfaces in a wear-free single-asperity contact, instrument calibration challenges have limited the usefulness of this technique for quantitative nanotribological studies. A number of lateral force calibration techniques have been proposed and used, but none has gained universal acceptance due to practical considerations, configuration limitations, or sensitivities to unknowable error sources. This paper describes a simple extension of the classic wedge method of AFM lateral force calibration which: (1) allows simultaneous calibration and measurement on any substrate, thus eliminating prior tip damage and confounding effects of instrument setup adjustments; (2) is insensitive to adhesion, PSD cross-talk, transducer/piezo-tube axis misalignment, and shear-center offset; (3) is applicable to integrated tips and colloidal probes; and (4) is generally applicable to any reciprocating friction coefficient measurement. The method was applied to AFM measurements of polished carbon (99.999% graphite) and single crystal MoS{sub 2} to demonstrate the technique. Carbon and single crystal MoS{sub 2} had friction coefficients of {mu}= 0.20 {+-} 0.04 and {mu}= 0.006 {+-} 0.001, respectively, against an integrated Si probe. Against a glass colloidal sphere, MoS{sub 2} had a friction coefficient of {mu}= 0.005 {+-} 0.001. Generally, the measurement uncertainties ranged from 10%-20% and were driven by the effect of actual frictional variation on the calibration rather than calibration error itself (i.e., due to misalignment, tip-offset, or probe radius).

  10. Florida Growth Fund (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Florida Growth Fund can provide investments in technology and growth-related companies through co-investments with other institutional investors. The Fund awards preference to companies...

  11. Slow isocharged sequence ions with helium collisions: Projectile core dependence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu Deyang; Cai Xiaohong; Shao Caojie; Lu Jun; Yang Zhihu [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Lu Rongchun; Ruan Fangfang [Institute of Modern Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Lanzhou 730000 (China); Graduate School of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Zhang Hongqiang; Cui Ying; Xu Xu; Shao Jianxiong; Ding Baowei; Chen Ximeng; Liu Zhaoyuan [Department of Modern Physics, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou 730000 (China)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The collisions of the isocharged sequence ions of q=6 (C{sup 6+}, N{sup 6+}, O{sup 6+}, F{sup 6+}, Ne{sup 6+}, Ar{sup 6+}, and Ca{sup 6+}), q=7 (F{sup 7+}, Ne{sup 7+}, S{sup 7+}, Ar{sup 7+}, and Ca{sup 7+}), q=8 (F{sup 8+}, Ne{sup 8+}, Ar{sup 8+}, and Ca{sup 8+}), q=9 (F{sup 9+}, Ne{sup 9+}, Si{sup 9+}, S{sup 9+}, Ar{sup 9+}, and Ca{sup 9+}) and q=11 (Si{sup 11+}, Ar{sup 11+}, and Ca{sup 11+}) with helium at the same velocities were investigated. The cross-section ratios of the double-electron transfer (DET) to the single-electron capture (SEC) {sigma}{sup DET}/{sigma}{sup SEC} and the true double-electron capture (TDC) to the double-electron transfer {sigma}{sup TDC}/{sigma}{sup DET} were measured. It shows that for different ions in an isocharged sequence, the experimental cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup DET}/{sigma}{sup SEC} varies by a factor of 3. The results confirm that the projectile core is another dominant factor besides the charge state and the collision velocity in slow (0.35-0.49v{sub 0}; v{sub 0} denotes the Bohr velocity) highly charged ions (HCIs) with helium collisions. The experimental cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup DET}/{sigma}{sup SEC} is compared with the extended classical over-barrier model (ECBM) [A. Barany et al., Nucl. Instrum. Methods Phys. Res. B 9, 397 (1985)], the molecular Coulombic barrier model (MCBM) [A. Niehaus, J. Phys. B 19, 2925 (1986)], and the semiempirical scaling laws (SSL) [N. Selberg et al., Phys. Rev. A 54, 4127 (1996)]. It also shows that the projectile core properties affect the initial capture probabilities as well as the subsequent relaxation of the projectiles. The experimental cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup TDC}/{sigma}{sup DET} for those lower isocharged sequences is dramatically affected by the projectile core structure, while for those sufficiently highly isocharged sequences, the autoionization always dominates, hence the cross-section ratio {sigma}{sup TDC}/{sigma}{sup DET} is always small.

  12. New measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. B. Grammer; R. Alarcon; L. Barrón-Palos; D. Blyth; J. D. Bowman; J. Calarco; C. Crawford; K. Craycraft; D. Evans; N. Fomin; J. Fry; M. Gericke; R. C. Gillis; G. L. Greene; J. Hamblen; C. Hayes; S. Kucuker; R. Mahurin; M. Maldonado-Velázquez; E. Martin; M. McCrea; P. E. Mueller; M. Musgrave; H. Nann; S. I. Penttilä; W. M. Snow; Z. Tang; W. S. Wilburn

    2014-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Slow neutron scattering provides quantitative information on the structure and dynamics of materials of interest in physics, chemistry, materials science, biology, geology, and other fields. Liquid hydrogen is a widely-used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. In particular the rapid drop of the slow neutron scattering cross section of liquid parahydrogen below 14.5~meV is especially interesting and important. We have measured the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43~meV and 16.1~meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6~K using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. At 1~meV this measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work which has been used in the design of liquid hydrogen moderators at slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements, compare them with previous work, and discuss the implications for designing more intense slow neutron sources.

  13. Enhancing the efficiency of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers with the tapered refractive index

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kong Lingbao; Hou Zhiling; Jing Jian [School of Science and Beijing Key Laboratory of Environmentally Harmful Chemicals Assessment, Beijing University of Chemical Technology, Beijing 100029 (China); Jin Haibo [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China); Du Chaohai [Institute of Electronics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear analysis of slow-wave electron cyclotron masers (ECM) based on anomalous Doppler effect in a slab waveguide is presented. A method of tapered refractive index (TRI) is proposed to enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM. The numerical calculations show that the TRI method can significantly enhance the efficiency of slow-wave ECM with the frequency ranging from the microwave to terahertz band. The effect of beam velocity spread on the efficiency has also been studied. Although the velocity spread suppresses the efficiency significantly, a great enhancement of efficiency can still be introduced by the TRI method.

  14. Slow light of an amplitude modulated Gaussian pulse in electromagnetically induced transparency medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wenzhuo Tang; Bin Luo; Yu Liu; Hong Guo

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The slow light effects of an amplitude modulated Gaussian (AMG) pulse in a cesium atomic vapor are presented. In a single-$\\Lambda$ type electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) medium, more severe distortion is observed for an AMG pulse than a Gaussian one. Using Fourier spectrum analysis, we find that the distortion, as well as the loss, is dominantly caused by linear absorption than dispersion. Accordingly, a compensation method is proposed to reshape the slow light pulse based on the transmission spectrum. In addition, we find a novel way to obtain simultaneous slow and fast light.

  15. Merger-driven Fueling of Active Galactic Nuclei: Six Dual and Offset Active Galactic Nuclei Discovered with Chandra and Hubble Space Telescope Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comerford, Julia M; Barrows, R Scott; Greene, Jenny E; Zakamska, Nadia L; Madejski, Greg M; Cooper, Michael C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dual active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and offset AGNs are kpc-scale separation supermassive black holes pairs created during galaxy mergers, where both or one of the black holes are AGNs, respectively. These dual and offset AGNs are valuable probes of the link between mergers and AGNs but are challenging to identify. Here we present Chandra/ACIS observations of 12 optically-selected dual AGN candidates at z < 0.34, where we use the X-rays to identify AGNs. We also present HST/WFC3 observations of 10 of these candidates, which reveal any stellar bulges accompanying the AGNs. We discover a dual AGN system with separation of 2.2 kpc, where the two stellar bulges have coincident [O III] and X-ray sources. This system is an extremely minor merger (460:1) that may include a dwarf galaxy hosting an intermediate mass black hole. We also find six single AGNs, and five systems that are either dual or offset AGNs with separations < 10 kpc. Four of the six dual AGNs and dual/offset AGNs are in ongoing major mergers, a...

  16. Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors),

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Seeds may be started in peat pots; they are slow to germinate (up to three weeks indoors), so in peat pots; they are slow to germinate, so be patient. Seedlings may be transplanted in June. Crowns

  17. LATERAL OFFSET OF THE CORONAL MASS EJECTIONS FROM THE X-FLARE OF 2006 DECEMBER 13 AND ITS TWO PRECURSOR ERUPTIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sterling, Alphonse C.; Moore, Ronald L. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); Harra, Louise K., E-mail: alphonse.sterling@nasa.gov, E-mail: ron.moore@nasa.gov, E-mail: lkh@mssl.ucl.ac.uk [UCL-Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Two GOES sub-C-class precursor eruptions occurred within {approx}10 hr prior to and from the same active region as the 2006 December 13 X4.3-class flare. Each eruption generated a coronal mass ejection (CME) with center laterally far offset ({approx}> 45 Degree-Sign ) from the co-produced bright flare. Explaining such CME-to-flare lateral offsets in terms of the standard model for solar eruptions has been controversial. Using Hinode/X-Ray Telescope (XRT) and EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) data, and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO)/Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph (LASCO) and Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) data, we find or infer the following. (1) The first precursor was a 'magnetic-arch-blowout' event, where an initial standard-model eruption of the active region's core field blew out a lobe on one side of the active region's field. (2) The second precursor began similarly, but the core-field eruption stalled in the side-lobe field, with the side-lobe field erupting {approx}1 hr later to make the CME either by finally being blown out or by destabilizing and undergoing a standard-model eruption. (3) The third eruption, the X-flare event, blew out side lobes on both sides of the active region and clearly displayed characteristics of the standard model. (4) The two precursors were offset due in part to the CME originating from a side-lobe coronal arcade that was offset from the active region's core. The main eruption (and to some extent probably the precursor eruptions) was offset primarily because it pushed against the field of the large sunspot as it escaped outward. (5) All three CMEs were plausibly produced by a suitable version of the standard model.

  18. Slow dynamics in supercooled liquids : matrix formalism, mode coupling and glass transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Jianlan, 1976-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, slow dynamics of supercooled liquids are investigated in the framework of the mode-coupling theory (MCT). Following the real-time generalized Langevin equation in Newtonian liquids, the dynamic Gaussian ...

  19. Nonlinear theory of resonant slow waves in anisotropic and dispersive plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher Clack; Istvan Ballai

    2008-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The solar corona is a typical example of a plasma with strongly anisotropic transport processes. The main dissipative mechanisms in the solar corona acting on slow magnetoacoustic waves are the anisotropic thermal conductivity and viscosity. Ballai et al. [Phys. Plasmas 5, 252 (1998)] developed the nonlinear theory of driven slow resonant waves in such a regime. In the present paper the nonlinear behaviour of driven magnetohydrodynamic waves in the slow dissipative layer in plasmas with strongly anisotropic viscosity and thermal conductivity is expanded by considering dispersive effects due to Hall currents. The nonlinear governing equation describing the dynamics of nonlinear resonant slow waves is supplemented by a term which describes nonlinear dispersion and is of the same order of magnitude as nonlinearity and dissipation. The connection formulae are found to be similar to their non-dispersive counterparts.

  20. Efficient tunable switch from slow light to fast light in quantum opto-electromechanical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Javed Akram; Khalid Naseer; Farhan Saif

    2015-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The control of slow and fast light propagation, in the probe transmission in a single experiment, is a challenging task. This type of control can only be achieved through highly nonlinear interactions and additional interfering pathway(s), which is therefore seldom reported. Here, we devise a scheme in which slow light, and a tunable switch from slow light to fast light can be achieved in the probe transmission based on a hybrid setup, which is composed of an optical cavity with two charged nano mechanical resonators (MRs). The two MRs are electrostatically coupled via tunable Coulomb coupling strength ($g_{c}$) making a quantum opto-electromechanical system (QOEMS). The parameter $g_{c}$ that couples the two MRs can be switched on and off by controlling the bias voltages on the MRs, and acts as a tunable switch that allows the propagation of transmitted probe field as slow light ($g_{c} \

  1. Study of slow dynamics in supercooled water by molecular dynamics and quasi-elastic neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The slow dynamics of supercooled water is studied by modelling the spectrum of test particle fluctuations: intermediate scattering function (ISF). The theoretical models are compared with experimental measurements by ...

  2. Coupling between slow and fast degrees of freedom in systems with complex spectra: Driven systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bulgac, A. [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States)] [Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Dang, G.D. [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies, Universite de Paris-Sud, Bat. 211, 91405 Orsay (France)] [Laboratoire de Physique Theorique et Hautes Energies, Universite de Paris-Sud, Bat. 211, 91405 Orsay (France); Kusnezov, D. [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120 (United States)] [Center for Theoretical Physics, Sloane Physics Laboratory, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06520-8120 (United States)

    1995-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider many-body systems which display slow modes and have complex spectra of intrinsic states, as atomic nuclei, atomic clusters, deformable cavities, and so forth. The effects of the coupling between the intrinsic and the slow degrees of freedom is analyzed, by assuming random matrix properties for the intrinsic degrees of freedom and the fact that the time evolution of the slow degree of freedom modifies the intrinsic configuration of the system. By neglecting the reaction of the intrinsic degrees of freedom on the slow modes, we derive evolution equations for intrinsic state population probabilities, the average excitation energy, and their fluctuations. These evolution equations are characterized by strong memory effects, and only in the long time limit does the dynamics become Markovian. Copyright {copyright} 1995 Academic Press, Inc.

  3. The Homeowner Revolution: Democracy, Land Use and the Los Angeles Slow-Growth Movement, 1965-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into the Inglewood Oilfield, an environmental would beginnot surprisingly – held that oilfield operations were not aSurvey documented that oilfield operations had the Yellow

  4. The Homeowner Revolution: Democracy, Land Use and the Los Angeles Slow-Growth Movement, 1965-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change.consciousness. Reaching peak oil (crossing fuel cells and aCities: Responding to Peak Oil and Climate Change (

  5. The Homeowner Revolution: Democracy, Land Use and the Los Angeles Slow-Growth Movement, 1965-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    from oil sands to “fracking” for natural tidal) account forhorizontal fracturing or “fracking”) to extend the space has

  6. The Homeowner Revolution: Democracy, Land Use and the Los Angeles Slow-Growth Movement, 1965-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Valley, along with incumbent 517,000, and Planning Chief Roberts estimated that the area farmers, were not at all happy

  7. The Homeowner Revolution: Democracy, Land Use and the Los Angeles Slow-Growth Movement, 1965-1992

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrow, Gregory D.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Newman, Peter, Timothy Beatley, and Heather Boyer. Resilient55. Peter Newman, Timothy Beatley, and Heather Boyer, “Hope

  8. Simulations of slow positron production using a low-energy electron accelerator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, B. E.; Kinomura, A.; Kuroda, R.; Ohdaira, T.; Oshima, N.; Suzuki, R. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), AIST-Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Hayashizaki, N. [Tokyo Institute of Technology, Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Minehara, E. J. [The Wakasa Wan Energy Research Centre, 64-52-1 Nagatani, Tsuruga, Fukui 941-0821 (Japan)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulations of slow positron production via energetic electron interaction with a solid target have been performed. The aim of the simulations was to determine the expected slow positron beam intensity from a low-energy, high-current electron accelerator. By simulating (a) the fast positron production from a tantalum electron-positron converter and (b) the positron depth deposition profile in a tungsten moderator, the slow positron production probability per incident electron was estimated. Normalizing the calculated result to the measured slow positron yield at the present AIST linear accelerator, the expected slow positron yield as a function of energy was determined. For an electron beam energy of 5 MeV (10 MeV) and current 240 {mu}A (30 {mu}A), production of a slow positron beam of intensity 5 x 10{sup 6} s{sup -1} is predicted. The simulation also calculates the average energy deposited in the converter per electron, allowing an estimate of the beam heating at a given electron energy and current. For low-energy, high-current operation the maximum obtainable positron beam intensity will be limited by this beam heating.

  9. Simulations of slow positron production using a low energy electron accelerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Rourke, B E; Kinomura, A; Kuroda, R; Minehara, E; Ohdaira, T; Oshima, N; Suzuki, R

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Monte Carlo simulations of slow positron production via energetic electron interaction with a solid target have been performed. The aim of the simulations was to determine the expected slow positron beam intensity from a low energy, high current electron accelerator. By simulating (a) the fast positron production from a tantalum electron-positron converter and (b) the positron depth deposition profile in a tungsten moderator, the slow positron production probability per incident electron was estimated. Normalizing the calculated result to the measured slow positron yield at the present AIST LINAC the expected slow positron yield as a function of energy was determined. For an electron beam energy of 5 MeV (10 MeV) and current 240 $\\mu$A (30 $\\mu$A) production of a slow positron beam of intensity 5 $\\times$ 10$^{6}$ s$^{-1}$ is predicted. The simulation also calculates the average energy deposited in the converter per electron, allowing an estimate of the beam heating at a given electron energy and current. For...

  10. Photosynthesis: Research for Food, Fuel and Future--15th International Conference on Photosynthesis518 FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) of Avocado Leaves during Slow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Govindjee

    518 FLIM (Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy) of Avocado Leaves during Slow Fluorescence avocado leaves (Persea americana Mill.) during the slow part of chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence transient

  11. Measurement of the valence band-offset in a PbSe/ZnO heterojunction by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li Lin; Qiu Jijun; Weng Binbin; Yuan Zijian; Shi Zhisheng [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States); Li Xiaomin; Gan Xiaoyan [State Key Laboratory of High Performance Ceramics and Superfine Microstructures, Shanghai Institute of Ceramics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China); Sellers, Ian R. [Deparment of Physics, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019 (United States)

    2012-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A heterojunction of PbSe/ZnO has been grown by molecular beam epitaxy. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to directly measure the valence-band offset (VBO) of the heterojunction. The VBO, {Delta}E{sub V}, was determined as 2.51 {+-} 0.05 eV using the Pb 4p{sup 3/2} and Zn 2p{sup 3/2} core levels as a reference. The conduction-band offset, {Delta}E{sub C}, was, therefore, determined to be 0.59 {+-} 0.05 eV based on the above {Delta}E{sub V} value. This analysis indicates that the PbSe/ZnO heterojunction forms a type I (Straddling Gap) heterostructure.

  12. Pathological scattering by a defect in a slow-light medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen P. Shipman; Aaron T. Welters

    2014-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Scattering of electromagnetic fields by a defect layer embedded in a slow-light periodically layered ambient medium exhibits phenomena markedly different from typical scattering problems. In a slow-light medium, constructed by Figotin and Vitebskiy, the energy velocity of a propagating mode in one direction slows to zero, creating a "frozen mode" at a single frequency within a pass band, where the dispersion relation possesses a flat inflection point. The slow-light regime is characterized by a $3\\!\\times\\!3$ Jordan block of the log of the $4\\!\\times\\!4$ monodromy matrix for EM fields in a periodic medium at special frequency and parallel wavevector. The scattering problem breaks down as the 2D rightward and leftward mode spaces intersect in the frozen mode and therefore span only a 3D subspace $\\mathring V$ of the 4D space of EM fields. Analysis of pathological scattering near the slow-light frequency and wavevector is based on the interaction between the flux-unitary transfer matrix $T$ across the defect layer and the projections to the rightward and leftward spaces, which blow up as Laurent-Puiseux series. Two distinct cases emerge: the generic, non-resonant case when $T$ does not map $\\mathring V$ to itself and the quadratically growing mode is excited; and the resonant case, when $\\mathring V$ is invariant under $T$ and a guided frozen mode is resonantly excited.

  13. Channelization architecture for wide-band slow light in atomic vapors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zachary Dutton; Mark Bashkansky; Michael Steiner; John Reintjes

    2005-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a ``channelization'' architecture to achieve wide-band electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) and ultra-slow light propagation in atomic Rb-87 vapors. EIT and slow light are achieved by shining a strong, resonant ``pump'' laser on the atomic medium, which allows slow and unattenuated propagation of a weaker ``signal'' beam, but only when a two-photon resonance condition is satisfied. Our wideband architecture is accomplished by dispersing a wideband signal spatially, transverse to the propagation direction, prior to entering the atomic cell. When particular Zeeman sub-levels are used in the EIT system, then one can introduce a magnetic field with a linear gradient such that the two-photon resonance condition is satisfied for each individual frequency component. Because slow light is a group velocity effect, utilizing differential phase shifts across the spectrum of a light pulse, one must then introduce a slight mismatch from perfect resonance to induce a delay. We present a model which accounts for diffusion of the atoms in the varying magnetic field as well as interaction with levels outside the ideal three-level system on which EIT is based. We find the maximum delay-bandwidth product decreases with bandwidth, and that delay-bandwidth product ~1 should be achievable with bandwidth ~50 MHz (~5 ns delay). This is a large improvement over the ~1 MHz bandwidths in conventional slow light systems and could be of use in signal processing applications.

  14. Strain induced variations in band offsets and built-in electric fields in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alpay, S. Pamir

    Strain induced variations in band offsets and built-in electric fields in InGaN/GaN multiple InxGa1-xN(InGaN)/GaN multilayers on the In composition and misfit strain. The results indicate that for non-polar m-plane configurations with ½1210InGaN//½1210GaN and ½0001InGaN//½0001GaN epitaxial

  15. Shaped Offset QPSK Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sahin, Cenk

    2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    -state machine (FSM). The state of the CPE denoted by Sn is uniquely determined by the state vector sn = [Pn?L, ?n?L+1, ?n?L+2, . . . , ?n?1] where Pn?L is the phase state index from an alphabet of p values, Pn?L ? {0, 1, 2, . . . , p? 1}. The value of the state... Sn captures the entire memory in the modulator due to all past symbols. From Figure 2.2 it can be seen that the phase state index is given by Pn?L = (n?L? i=0 ?i ) mod p (2.11) 9 s(t;?)MM CPE D DD ?p ... Pn-L ?n-L+1 ?n-1 ?n Figure 2.2: Rimoldi...

  16. Power Spectra beyond the Slow Roll Approximation in Theories with Non-Canonical Kinetic Terms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carsten van de Bruck; Mathew Robinson

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We derive analytical expressions for the power spectra at the end of inflation in theories with two inflaton fields and non-canonical kinetic terms. We find that going beyond the slow-roll approximation is necessary and that the nature of the non-canonical terms have an important impact on the final power spectra at the end of inflation. We study five models numerically and find excellent agreement with our analytical results. Our results emphasise the fact that going beyond the slow-roll approximation is important in times of high-precision data coming from cosmological observations.

  17. Enhanced four-wave mixing in graphene-silicon slow-light photonic crystal waveguides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Hao, E-mail: hz2299@columbia.edu, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu [College of Electronic Information, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Gu, Tingyi, E-mail: hz2299@columbia.edu, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; McMillan, James F.; Wong, Chee Wei, E-mail: hz2299@columbia.edu, E-mail: tg2342@columbia.edu, E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu [Optical Nanostructures Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Petrone, Nicholas; Zande, Arend van der; Hone, James C. [Mechanical Engineering, Columbia University, New York, New York 10027 (United States); Yu, Mingbin; Lo, Guoqiang; Kwong, Dim-Lee [The Institute of Microelectronics, Singapore 117685 (Singapore); Feng, Guoying [College of Electronic Information, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Zhou, Shouhuan [College of Electronic Information, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); North China Research Institute of Electro-Optics, Beijing 100015 (China)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate the enhanced four-wave mixing of monolayer graphene on slow-light silicon photonic crystal waveguides. 200-?m interaction length, a four-wave mixing conversion efficiency of ?23?dB is achieved in the graphene-silicon slow-light hybrid, with an enhanced 3-dB conversion bandwidth of about 17?nm. Our measurements match well with nonlinear coupled-mode theory simulations based on the measured waveguide dispersion, and provide an effective way for all-optical signal processing in chip-scale integrated optics.

  18. Particle acceleration by slow modes in strong compressible MHD turbulence, with application to solar flares

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin D. G. Chandran

    2003-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Energetic particles that undergo strong pitch-angle scattering and diffuse through a plasma containing strong compressible MHD turbulence undergo diffusion in momentum space with diffusion coefficient Dp. In this paper, the contribution of slow modes to Dp is calculated assuming the rms turbulent velocity is of order the Alfven speed. The energy spectrum of accelerated particles is derived assuming slow modes make the dominant contribution to Dp, taking into account Coulomb losses and particle escape from the acceleration region with an energy-independent escape time. The results are applied to solar flares.

  19. Slow dynamics of nanocomposite polymer aerogels as revealed by X-ray photocorrelation spectroscopy (XPCS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hernández, Rebeca, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Mijangos, Carmen [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Ciencia y Tecnología de Polímeros, ICTP-CSIC, Juan de la Cierva, 3, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Nogales, Aurora, E-mail: rhernandez@ictp.csic.es, E-mail: aurora.nogales@csic.es; Ezquerra, Tiberio A. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain)] [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Sprung, Michael [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)] [Petra III at DESY, Notkestr. 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany)

    2014-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on a novel slow dynamics of polymer xerogels, aerogels, and nanocomposite aerogels with iron oxide nanoparticles, as revealed by X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy. The polymer aerogel and its nanocomposite aerogels, which are porous in nature, exhibit hyper-diffusive dynamics at room temperature. In contrast, non-porous polymer xerogels exhibit an absence of this peculiar dynamics. This slow dynamical process has been assigned to a relaxation of the characteristic porous structure of these materials and not to the presence of nanoparticles.

  20. Time dependent crack growth in polyethylene: characterizing the da/dt = AKn dependence and the effects of Igepal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slay, Jeremy Buc

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    slow crack growth (SCG) rate as a function of stress intensity. Constant load single-edge-notch bend (SENB) tests commonly know as ''three point bend'' tests have been performed on deeply notched specimens. The load-line displacement as a function...

  1. Effects of threading dislocations on drain current dispersion and slow transients in unpassivated AlGaN/GaN/Si heterostructure field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Saptarsi, E-mail: saptarsi123@gmail.com; Dinara, Syed Mukulika; Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Jana, Sanjay K.; Bag, Ankush; Kabi, Sanjib [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Chakraborty, Apurba [Department of E and E C E, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Chang, Edward Yi [Department of Material Science and Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30050, Taiwan (China); Biswas, Dhrubes [Advanced Technology Development Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India); Department of E and E C E, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721302 (India)

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Current transient analysis combined with response to pulsed bias drives have been used to explore the possibilities of threading dislocations affecting the current dispersion characteristics of AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs). A growth strategy is developed to modulate the dislocation density among the heterostructures grown on silicon by plasma-assisted molecular-beam epitaxy. Slow pulsed I-V measurements show severe compressions and appear to be significantly dependent on the threading dislocation density. By analyzing the corresponding slow detrapping process, a deep-level trap with emission time constant in the order of seconds was identified as the cause. Among the specimens, both in the epilayers and at the surface, the number of dislocations was found to have a notable influence on the spatial distribution of deep-level trap density. The observations confirm that the commonly observed degraded frequency performance among AlGaN/GaN HFETs in the form of DC-radio frequency dispersions can at least partly be correlated with threading dislocation density.

  2. Suppression of chaos at slow variables by rapidly mixing fast dynamics through linear energy-preserving coupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafail V. Abramov

    2011-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Chaotic multiscale dynamical systems are common in many areas of science, one of the examples being the interaction of the low-frequency dynamics in the atmosphere with the fast turbulent weather dynamics. One of the key questions about chaotic multiscale systems is how the fast dynamics affects chaos at the slow variables, and, therefore, impacts uncertainty and predictability of the slow dynamics. Here we demonstrate that the linear slow-fast coupling with the total energy conservation property promotes the suppression of chaos at the slow variables through the rapid mixing at the fast variables, both theoretically and through numerical simulations. A suitable mathematical framework is developed, connecting the slow dynamics on the tangent subspaces to the infinite-time linear response of the mean state to a constant external forcing at the fast variables. Additionally, it is shown that the uncoupled dynamics for the slow variables may remain chaotic while the complete multiscale system loses chaos and becomes completely predictable at the slow variables through increasing chaos and turbulence at the fast variables. This result contradicts the common sense intuition, where, naturally, one would think that coupling a slow weakly chaotic system with another much faster and much stronger mixing system would result in general increase of chaos at the slow variables.

  3. Cyclotron emission during electron heating by Landau wave damping of slow modes in tokamak palsmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fidone, I.; Granata, G.; Meyer, R.L.; Bernabei, S.

    1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The emission of cyclotron radiation from PLT plasma in the presence of a mildly superthermal tail in the electron velocity distribution is investigated. The emitted spectrum has asymmetries which can be used to investigate the tail formation during slow modes electron Landau damping.

  4. Nematode faunal analysis in an aquic brown soil fertilised with slow-release urea, Northeast China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neher, Deborah A.

    Nematode faunal analysis in an aquic brown soil fertilised with slow-release urea, Northeast China, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016, PR China b Department of Earth of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039, PR China Received 14 May 2004; received in revised form 15

  5. Slow changes in performance consistent with expectations for increasing radiation damage and contamination deposition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grant, Catherine E.

    (i.e. non-flaring) particle background should continue to drop as we approach solar maximum · ACIS hardware and software continue to perform nominally · No known limitations on ACIS lifetime Energy Scale degraded · Slow decay in energy scale with time - Directly related to increasing CTI - Structure in FI CCD

  6. Friction experiments with elastography: the slow slip and the super-shear regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Friction experiments with elastography: the slow slip and the super-shear regimes S. Cathelinea , S technique derived from elastography, is used to follow the dynamic of the interface failure in a friction by Amontons in 1699 [1], the resistance to slip of an interface can be modeled by two main frictional states

  7. Slow Cortical Dynamics and the Accumulation of Information over Long Timescales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasson, Uri

    Neuron Article Slow Cortical Dynamics and the Accumulation of Information over Long Timescales to identify brain regions that accumulate information over short and long timescales and to characterize movie, indicating that these regions accumulate information over relatively long time periods (several

  8. Slow Admission and Power Control for Small Cell Networks via Distributed Optimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Slow Admission and Power Control for Small Cell Networks via Distributed Optimization Siew Eng Nai on a large-scale basis. In recent work, we developed the joint admission and power control algorithm for two of the joint admission and power control problem where the small cells can determine jointly

  9. Client-Controlled Slow TCP and Denial of Service Songlin Cai, Yong Liu, Weibo Gong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yong

    Client-Controlled Slow TCP and Denial of Service Songlin Cai, Yong Liu, Weibo Gong Abstract of TCP connections available at the server S. Cai and W. Gong are with Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (scai, gong@ecs.umass.edu) Y. Liu

  10. An extremely sharp phase transition threshold for the slow growing hierarchy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weiermann, Andreas

    threshold point'. An everyday life example of this is the change from one material state to a different oneAn extremely sharp phase transition threshold for the slow growing hierarchy Andreas Weiermann of. This article is part of our general research program on phase transitions in logic

  11. Ultrahigh-Intensity Optical Slow-Wave Structure B. D. Layer,1,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milchberg, Howard

    Ultrahigh-Intensity Optical Slow-Wave Structure B. D. Layer,1,3 A. York,1,3 T. M. Antonsen,2,3 S on the extended diffraction- suppressed propagation of extreme intensity laser pulses in plasma optical guiding structures. Plasma waveguides for intense optical pulses were first generated through the radial hydrodynamic

  12. Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Receptive Field Positions in Area MT during Slow Eye

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krekelberg, Bart

    Behavioral/Systems/Cognitive Receptive Field Positions in Area MT during Slow Eye Movements Till S across eye movements. We first tested the hypothesis that motion signals are integrated by neurons whose receptive fields (RFs) do not move with the eye but stay fixed in the world. Specifically, we measured

  13. The Density Perturbation Power Spectrum to Second-Order Corrections in the Slow-Roll Expansion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewan D. Stewart; Jin-Ook Gong

    2001-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We set up a formalism that can be used to calculate the power spectrum of the curvature perturbations produced during inflation up to arbitrary order in the slow-roll expansion, and explicitly calculate the power spectrum and spectral index up to second-order corrections.

  14. Rethinking Query Processing for Energy Efficiency: Slowing Down to Win the Race

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patel, Jignesh

    Rethinking Query Processing for Energy Efficiency: Slowing Down to Win the Race Willis Lang of an energy efficiency metric along with traditional performance metrics. This change is fueled by the growing, real, and urgent demand for energy-efficient database processing. Database query processing engines

  15. Modelling propagation of sinkhole, in both slow and dynamic modes, using the UDEC computer code.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Modelling propagation of sinkhole, in both slow and dynamic modes, using the UDEC computer code RISques) : Adresse* : Ecole des mines de Nancy, Parc de Saurupt, 54042 Nancy-Cedex, France ; Adresse sinkhole forms and to propose a prediction model. The UDEC code is used. An actual case of sinkhole

  16. Soft-ratchet modeling of slow dynamics in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soft-ratchet modeling of slow dynamics in the nonlinear resonant response of sedimentary rocks of Physics 0-7354-0330-9/06/$23.00 CREDIT LINE (BELOW) TO BE INSERTED ONLY ON THE FIRST PAGE OF THE #12;SOFT-RATCHET

  17. The horizontal dam break problem for slow non-Newtonian power-law fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The horizontal dam break problem for slow non-Newtonian power-law fluids P. Saramito a C. Smutek bLaboratoire g´eosciences ­ IPGP et universit´e de La R´eunion, France Abstract ­ The dam break problem shallow for the horizontal dam break problem. Keywords ­ viscoplastic fluid; dam break problem; shallow flows. 1

  18. Environment Agency volunteers and Forestry Commission working together to Slow the Flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Environment Agency volunteers and Forestry Commission working together to Slow the Flow A team of Environment Agency staff from the York office recently volunteered for a day building timber dams in Cropton. As part of their `environmental leave day' programme Environment Agency staff are encouraged to get out

  19. ON QUASI-ELASTIC SCATTERING OF SLOW NEUTRONS IN MOLECULAR LIQUIDS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    L-317 ON QUASI-ELASTIC SCATTERING OF SLOW NEUTRONS IN MOLECULAR LIQUIDS M. UTSURO Research Reactor de neutrons avec élargissement par rotation moléculaire dans le liquide sont étudiés dans le cadre du du benzène liquide. Abstract. 2014 The rotational broadened quasi-elastic scattering spectrum

  20. Dynamic control of slow water transport by aquaporin 0: Implications for hydration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, David E.

    Dynamic control of slow water transport by aquaporin 0: Implications for hydration and junction as the primary water channel in this tissue but also appears to mediate the formation of thin junctions between fiber cells. AQP0 is remarkably less water perme- able than other aquaporins, but the structural basis

  1. Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Family of Trigonal Pyramidal Iron(II) Pyrrolide Complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    computing, and magnetic refrigeration.6-15 However, in order for any such applications to be realizedSlow Magnetic Relaxation in a Family of Trigonal Pyramidal Iron(II) Pyrrolide Complexes W. HillVersity of Missouri, Rolla, Missouri 65409-0010, United States, and National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida

  2. Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity tectonic process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fritz, Harald

    Neoproterozoic tectonothermal evolution of the Central Eastern Desert, Egypt: a slow velocity, University of Assiut, Egypt Received 10 January 2001; received in revised form 24 October 2001; accepted 25 in the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt is constraint by 40 Ar/39 Ar ages of hornblende and muscovite from Meatiq

  3. Sorghum Growth and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerik, Tom; Bean, Brent W.; Vanderlip, Richard

    2003-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorghum is well adapted to Texas, and its ability to yield consistently makes it popular with growers. This publication discusses sorghum plant biology and growth....

  4. Strategic Growth Initiative (Michigan)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A joint venture between Michigan Department of Agriculture and Rural Development (MDARD) and the Michigan Economic Development Corporation (MEDC), the Strategic Growth Initiative Grant Program was...

  5. Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slow Magnetic Relaxation in a Trigonal Prismatic Uranium(III) Complex Jeffrey D. Rinehart and Jeffrey R. Long* Department of Chemistry, UniVersity of California, Berkeley, California 94720 Herein, we show that a simple trigonal prismatic uranium(III) complex can indeed display slow magnetic

  6. Model reduction for slow–fast stochastic systems with metastable behaviour

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bruna, Maria, E-mail: bruna@maths.ox.ac.uk [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom) [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge CB1 2FB (United Kingdom); Chapman, S. Jonathan [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom)] [Mathematical Institute, University of Oxford, Oxford OX2 6GG (United Kingdom); Smith, Matthew J. [Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge CB1 2FB (United Kingdom)] [Computational Science Laboratory, Microsoft Research, Cambridge CB1 2FB (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The quasi-steady-state approximation (or stochastic averaging principle) is a useful tool in the study of multiscale stochastic systems, giving a practical method by which to reduce the number of degrees of freedom in a model. The method is extended here to slow–fast systems in which the fast variables exhibit metastable behaviour. The key parameter that determines the form of the reduced model is the ratio of the timescale for the switching of the fast variables between metastable states to the timescale for the evolution of the slow variables. The method is illustrated with two examples: one from biochemistry (a fast-species-mediated chemical switch coupled to a slower varying species), and one from ecology (a predator–prey system). Numerical simulations of each model reduction are compared with those of the full system.

  7. Universality of the Volume Bound in Slow-Roll Eternal Inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubovsky, Sergei; Senatore, Leonardo; Villadoro, Giovanni

    2012-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    It has recently been shown that in single field slow-roll inflation the total volume cannot grow by a factor larger than e{sup S{sub dS}/2} without becoming infinite. The bound is saturated exactly at the phase transition to eternal inflation where the probability to produce infinite volume becomes non zero. We show that the bound holds sharply also in any space-time dimensions, when arbitrary higher-dimensional operators are included and in the multi-field inflationary case. The relation with the entropy of de Sitter and the universality of the bound strengthen the case for a deeper holographic interpretation. As a spin-off we provide the formalism to compute the probability distribution of the volume after inflation for generic multi-field models, which might help to address questions about the population of vacua of the landscape during slow-roll inflation.

  8. Quadratic voltage profiles in lead acid cells during slow, steady processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haaser, Robert Anthony

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    studies have been conducted, in the past, on batteries and battery materials, but details about the fields and potentials within a cell's electrolyte have been, for the most part, overlooked. A detailed theory of steady state pmcesses in lead acid cells... during the slow, steady processes ? charge, discharge, and rehxation ? of any voltaic cell in a one-dimensional geometry. The condition of electro-neutrality in the battery cell's electrolyte implies that the electric field is uniform across the cell...

  9. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FAILURE OF ALLOYS X-750 AND 625 UNDER SLOW STRAIN-RATE CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motta, Arthur T.

    HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FAILURE OF ALLOYS X-750 AND 625 UNDER SLOW STRAIN-RATE CONDITIONS R.S. Daum, A-purity, deaerated water in order to determine whether hydrogen embrittlement occurs in these alloys at room psig nitrogen (0 cc H2/kg H2O STP) and 40 psig hydrogen (60 cc H2/kg H2O STP), on Alloy X-750 in two

  10. Observation of slow light in the noise spectrum of a vertical external cavity surface emitting laser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. El Amili; B. -X. Miranda; F. Goldfarb; G. Baili; G. Beaudoin; I. Sagnes; F. Bretenaker; M. Alouini

    2010-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of coherent population oscillations is evidenced in the noise spectrum of an ultra-low noise lasers. This effect is isolated in the intensity noise spectrum of an optimized single-frequency vertical external cavity surface emitting laser. The coherent population oscillations induced by the lasing mode manifest themselves through their associated dispersion that leads to slow light effects probed by the spontaneous emission present in the non-lasing side modes.

  11. Slow Feature Analysis on Retinal Waves Leads to V1 Complex Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiskott, Laurenz

    Slow Feature Analysis on Retinal Waves Leads to V1 Complex Cells Sven Da¨hne1,2,3 *, Niko Wilbert2 such that it is best prepared for coding input from the natural world. Citation: Da¨hne S, Wilbert N, Wiskott L (2014 Received June 25, 2013; Accepted December 20, 2013; Published May 8, 2014 Copyright: ß 2014 Da¨hne et al

  12. Slow magnetization dynamics in a series of two-coordinate iron(II) complexes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and magnetic refrigeration.4 A signicant effort has therefore been dedicated to the preparation and studySlow magnetization dynamics in a series of two- coordinate iron(II) complexes Joseph M. Zadrozny-molecule magnet behavior. Five of the compounds, Fe[N(SiMe3)(Dipp)]2 (1), Fe[C(SiMe3)3]2 (2), Fe[N(H)Ar0 ]2 (3

  13. Fast and Slow Responses of the South Asian Monsoon System to Anthropogenic Aerosols

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganguly, Dilip; Rasch, Philip J.; Wang, Hailong; Yoon, Jin-Ho

    2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Using a global climate model with fully predictive aerosol life cycle, we investigate the fast and slow responses of the South Asian monsoon system to anthropogenic aerosol forcing. Our results show that the feedbacks associated with sea surface temperature (SST) change caused by aerosols play a more important role than the aerosol's direct impact on radiation, clouds and land surface (rapid adjustments) in shaping the total equilibrium climate response of the monsoon system to aerosol forcing. Inhomogeneous SST cooling caused by anthropogenic aerosols eventually reduces the meridional tropospheric temperature gradient and the easterly shear of zonal winds over the region, slowing down the local Hadley cell circulation, decreasing the northward moisture transport, and causing a reduction in precipitation over South Asia. Although total responses in precipitation are closer to the slow responses in general, the fast component dominates over land areas north of 25°N. Our results also show an east-west asymmetry in the fast responses to anthropogenic aerosols causing increases in precipitation west of 80°E but decreases east of it.

  14. ON THE ORIGIN OF THE SLOW SPEED SOLAR WIND: HELIUM ABUNDANCE VARIATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rakowski, Cara E.; Laming, J. Martin [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory Code 7674L, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The first ionization potential (FIP) effect is the by now well-known enhancement in abundance over photospheric values of Fe and other elements with FIP below about 10 eV observed in the solar corona and slow speed solar wind. In our model, this fractionation is achieved by means of the ponderomotive force, arising as Alfven waves propagate through or reflect from steep density gradients in the solar chromosphere. This is also the region where low FIP elements are ionized, and high FIP elements are largely neutral leading to the fractionation as ions interact with the waves but neutrals do not. Helium, the element with the highest FIP and consequently the last to remain neutral as one moves upward, can be depleted in such models. Here, we investigate this depletion for varying loop lengths and magnetic field strengths. Variations in this depletion arise as the concentration of the ponderomotive force at the top of the chromosphere varies in response to Alfven wave frequency with respect to the resonant frequency of the overlying coronal loop, the magnetic field, and possibly also the loop length. We find that stronger depletions of He are obtained for weaker magnetic field, at frequencies close to or just above the loop resonance. These results may have relevance to observed variations of the slow wind solar He abundance with wind speed, with slower slow speed solar wind having a stronger depletion of He.

  15. Inflating Fat Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies by Precessing Massive Slow Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sternberg, Assaf

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct hydrodynamical numerical simulations and find that precessing massive slow jets can inflate fat bubble, i.e., more or less spherical, attached to the center of clusters of galaxies. To inflate a fat bubble the jet should precess fast. The precessing angle $\\theta$ should be large, or change over a large range $ 0 \\le \\theta \\le \\theta_{\\max} \\sim 30-70 ^\\circ$ (depending also on other parameters), where $\\theta=0$ is the symmetry axis. The constraints on the velocity and mass outflow rate are similar to those on wide jets to inflate fat bubbles. The velocity should be $v_j \\sim 10^4 \\km \\s^{-1}$, and the mass loss rate of the two jets should be $ 2 \\dot M_j \\simeq 1-50 \\dot M_\\odot \\yr^{-1} $. These results and our results from a previous paper dealing with slow wide jets support the claim that a large fraction of the feedback heating in cooling flow clusters and in the processes of galaxy formation is done by slow massive jets.

  16. Inflating Fat Bubbles in Clusters of Galaxies by Precessing Massive Slow Jets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Assaf Sternberg; Noam Soker

    2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct hydrodynamical numerical simulations and find that precessing massive slow jets can inflate fat bubbles, i.e., more or less spherical bubbles, that are attached to the center of clusters of galaxies. To inflate a fat bubble the jet should precess fast. The precessing angle $\\theta$ should be large, or change over a large range $ 0 \\le \\theta \\le \\theta_{\\max} \\sim 30-70 ^\\circ$ (depending also on other parameters), where $\\theta=0$ is the symmetry axis. The constraints on the velocity and mass outflow rate are similar to those on wide jets to inflate fat bubbles. The velocity should be $v_j \\sim 10^4 \\kms$, and the mass loss rate of the two jets should be $ 2 \\dot M_j \\simeq 1-50 \\dot M_\\odot \\yr^{-1} $. These results, and our results from a previous paper dealing with slow wide jets, support the claim that a large fraction of the feedback heating in cooling flow clusters and in the processes of galaxy formation is done by slow massive jets.

  17. Growth studies and characterization of the mycorrhizal fungi associated with Sophora secundiflora (Ortega) Lag.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strong, Martha Erin

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . secundiflora seedlings grown in sterilized 1 sand 1 peat media amended with 0, 1. 19, and 4. 15 kg/m of 18N-6P-12K slow release fertilizer. After 263 days, seedlings lgd 1gGl d~Gfg*g'2dg*d growth responses at the intermediate fertilizer level. Fresh and dry... . . . . . . . . ~ ~ ~ . . ~ ~ . ~ 34 Soil analyses of pot culture and growth study media 41 incidence of endomycorrhizal infection of ~So hors secundiflora from experiment 1 grown in 1 sand:1 peat media Effect of endomycorrhizal inocula on ~So hors secundiflora using 1 sand:1...

  18. Modeling tin whisker growth.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weinberger, Christopher Robert

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tin, lead, and lead-tin solders are the most commonly used solders due to their low melting temperatures. However, due to the toxicity problems, lead must now be removed from solder materials. This has lead to the re-emergence of the issue of tin whisker growth. Tin whiskers are a microelectronic packaging issue because they can lead to shorts if they grow to sufficient length. However, the cause of tin whisker growth is still not well understood and there is lack of robust methods to determine when and if whiskering will be a problem. This report summarizes some of the leading theories on whisker growth and attempts to provide some ideas towards establishing the role microstructure plays in whisker growth.

  19. Planar elliptic growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mineev, Mark [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The planar elliptic extension of the Laplacian growth is, after a proper parametrization, given in a form of a solution to the equation for areapreserving diffeomorphisms. The infinite set of conservation laws associated with such elliptic growth is interpreted in terms of potential theory, and the relations between two major forms of the elliptic growth are analyzed. The constants of integration for closed form solutions are identified as the singularities of the Schwarz function, which are located both inside and outside the moving contour. Well-posedness of the recovery of the elliptic operator governing the process from the continuum of interfaces parametrized by time is addressed and two examples of exact solutions of elliptic growth are presented.

  20. Renewable Energy Growth Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In 2014, Act H 7727 created the Renewable Energy Growth (REG) program with the goal to promote installation of grid connected renewable energy within the load zones of electric distribution...

  1. Robust Growth Determinants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doppelhofer, Gernot; Weeks, Melvyn

    2011-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the robustness of determinants of economic growth in the presence of model uncertainty, parameter heterogeneity and outliers. The robust model averaging approach introduced in the paper uses a flexible and parsimonious...

  2. FGF growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Zamora, Paul O. (Gaithersburg, MD); Pena, Louis A. (Poquott, NY); Lin, Xinhua (Plainview, NY); Takahashi, Kazuyuki (Germantown, MD)

    2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the formula: ##STR00001## where R.sub.1, R.sub.2, R.sub.3, R.sub.4, R.sub.5, X, Y and Z are as defined, pharmaceutical compositions, coating compositions and medical devices including the fibroblast growth factor heparin-binding analog of the foregoing formula, and methods and uses thereof.

  3. Residential Electricity Demand in China -- Can Efficiency Reverse the Growth?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Letschert, Virginie; McNeil, Michael A.; Zhou, Nan

    2009-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The time when energy-related carbon emissions come overwhelmingly from developed countries is coming to a close. China has already overtaken the United States as the world's leading emitter of greenhouse gas emissions. The economic growth that China has experienced is not expected to slow down significantly in the long term, which implies continued massive growth in energy demand. This paper draws on the extensive expertise from the China Energy Group at LBNL on forecasting energy consumption in China, but adds to it by exploring the dynamics of demand growth for electricity in the residential sector -- and the realistic potential for coping with it through efficiency. This paper forecasts ownership growth of each product using econometric modeling, in combination with historical trends in China. The products considered (refrigerators, air conditioners, fans, washing machines, lighting, standby power, space heaters, and water heating) account for 90percent of household electricity consumption in China. Using this method, we determine the trend and dynamics of demandgrowth and its dependence on macroeconomic drivers at a level of detail not accessible by models of a more aggregate nature. In addition, we present scenarios for reducing residential consumption through efficiency measures defined at the product level. The research takes advantage of an analytical framework developed by LBNL (BUENAS) which integrates end use technology parameters into demand forecasting and stock accounting to produce detailed efficiency scenarios, thus allowing for a technologically realistic assessment of efficiency opportunities specifically in the Chinese context.

  4. Journal of the Korean Physical Society, Vol. 59, No. 2, August 2011, pp. 16491653 Fission Physics and Cross Section Measurements with a Lead Slowing down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danon, Yaron

    and Cross Section Measurements with a Lead Slowing down Spectrometer Y. Danon, R. Block (emeritus), J) A Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer (LSDS) provides a high neutron flux environment that en- ables to be adjusted. PACS numbers: 25.40.-h, 25.85.Ec Keywords: ND2010, Nuclear data, Lead slowing down spectrometer

  5. The effects of unconfined slow uniform heating on the mechanical and transport properties of the westerly and charcoal granites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bauer, Stephen Joseph

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE EFFECTS OF UNCONFINED SLOW UNIFORM HEATING ON THE MECHANICAL AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES OF THE WESTERLY AND CHARCOAL GRANITES A Thesis L by STEPHEN '-JOSEPH BAUER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial... JOSEPH BAUER Approved as to style and content by: (Chairs of Committee) iember) (Member) (Hea f Department) May 1980 111 ABSTRACT The Effects of Unconfined Slow Uniform Heating on the Mechanical and Transport Properties of the Westerly...

  6. Enhanced efficiency of p-type doping by band-offset effect in wurtzite and zinc-blende GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Changsheng; Wang, Jiqing, E-mail: jqwang@ee.ecnu.edu.cn; Lin, Weixian; Mao, Huibing; Zhao, Qiang; Yang, Pingxiong [Key Laboratory of Polarized Materials and Devices, East china Normal University, shanghai 200241 (China); Xing, Huaizhong [Department of Applied Physics, Donghua University, Shanghai 201620 (China)

    2014-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Using first principles calculation based on density-functional theory, we investigated p-type electronic structures and the doping mechanism in wurtzite (WZ) and zinc-blende (ZB) GaAs/InAs-core-shell nanowires (NWs) along the [0001] and [111] directions, respectively. Comparing the doping in WZ and ZB core-shell NWs, we found it is easier and more stable to realize dopant in WZ NWs. Due to the type I band-offset, p-type doping in the GaAs-core of GaAs{sub core}/InAs{sub shell} for both WZ and ZB NWs makes that the valence band-edge electrons in the InAs-shell can spontaneously transfer to the impurity states, forming one-dimensional hole gas. In particular, this process accompanies with a reverse transition in WZ core-shell nanowire due to the existence of antibonding and bonding states.

  7. New measurement of the scattering cross section of slow neutrons on liquid parahydrogen from neutron transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. B. Grammer; R. Alarcon; L. Barrón-Palos; D. Blyth; J. D. Bowman; J. Calarco; C. Crawford; K. Craycraft; D. Evans; N. Fomin; J. Fry; M. Gericke; R. C. Gillis; G. L. Greene; J. Hamblen; C. Hayes; S. Kucuker; R. Mahurin; M. Maldonado-Velázquez; E. Martin; M. McCrea; P. E. Mueller; M. Musgrave; H. Nann; S. I. Penttilä; W. M. Snow; Z. Tang; W. S. Wilburn

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid hydrogen is a dense Bose fluid whose equilibrium properties are both calculable from first principles using various theoretical approaches and of interest for the understanding of a wide range of questions in many body physics. Unfortunately, the pair correlation function $g(r)$ inferred from neutron scattering measurements of the differential cross section $d\\sigma \\over d\\Omega$ from different measurements reported in the literature are inconsistent. We have measured the energy dependence of the total cross section and the scattering cross section for slow neutrons with energies between 0.43~meV and 16.1~meV on liquid hydrogen at 15.6~K (which is dominated by the parahydrogen component) using neutron transmission measurements on the hydrogen target of the NPDGamma collaboration at the Spallation Neutron Source at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The relationship between the neutron transmission measurement we perform and the total cross section is unambiguous, and the energy range accesses length scales where the pair correlation function is rapidly varying. At 1~meV our measurement is a factor of 3 below the data from previous work. We present evidence that these previous measurements of the hydrogen cross section, which assumed that the equilibrium value for the ratio of orthohydrogen and parahydrogen has been reached in the target liquid, were in fact contaminated with an extra non-equilibrium component of orthohydrogen. Liquid parahydrogen is also a widely-used neutron moderator medium, and an accurate knowledge of its slow neutron cross section is essential for the design and optimization of intense slow neutron sources. We describe our measurements and compare them with previous work.

  8. Slow-light plasmonic metamaterial based on dressed-state analog of electromagnetically-induced transparency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raza, Søren

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a simple configuration for realizing one-dimensional slow-light metamaterials with large bandwidth-delay products using stub-shaped Fabry-Perot resonators as building blocks. Each metaatom gives rise to large group indices due to a classical analog of the dressed-state picture of electromagnetically-induced transparency. By connecting up to eight metaatoms, we find bandwidth-delay products over unity and group indices approaching 100. Our approach is quite general and can be applied to any type of Fabry-Perot resonators and tuned to different operating wavelengths.

  9. Huge enhancement of backward second-harmonic generation with slow light in photonic crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iliew, Rumen [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Solid State Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Etrich, Christoph; Pertsch, Thomas [Institute of Applied Physics/Ultra Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Lederer, Falk [Institute of Condensed Matter Theory and Solid State Optics, Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Kivshar, Yuri S. [Nonlinear Physics Center, Research School of Physics and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study theoretically forward and backward second-harmonic generation in a two-dimensional photonic crystal structure made of lithium niobate. The aim of this article is twofold: First, we propose a reliable modal algorithm for describing the light propagation taking into account the vectorial character of the interacting fields as well as the tensorial character of the nonlinearity and verify it by means of the nonlinear finite-difference time-domain method. Second, we propose a photonic crystal where we obtain a giant efficiency increase for backward second-harmonic generation with slow light.

  10. Non-Relativistic Approximation of the Dirac Equation for Slow Fermions in Static Metric Spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. N. Ivanov; M. Pitschmann

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyse the non-relativistic approximation of the Dirac equation for slow fermions moving in spacetimes with a static metric, caused by the weak gravitational field of the Earth and a chameleon field, and derive the most general effective gravitational potential, induced by a static metric of spacetime. The derivation of the non-relativistic Hamilton operator of the Dirac equation is carried out by using a standard Foldy-Wouthuysen (SFW) transformation. We discuss the chameleon field as source of a torsion field and torsion-matter interactions.

  11. Slow-light propagation using mode locking of spin precession in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shabaev, A. [George Mason University, Fairfax Virginia 22030 (United States); Dutton, Z. [Raytheon BBN Technologies, 10 Moulton Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States); Kennedy, T. A.; Efros, Al. L. [Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, D.C. 20375 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose using mode locking to enable coherent nonlinear optical effects in inhomogenously broadened spin ensembles. We carry out detailed calculations for quantum dot systems in which increased spin coherence via mode locking has been recently observed [A. Greilich et al., Science 313, 341 (2006); 317, 1896 (2007)]. We show how, in the presence of spin locking, a strong pulse-matching effect occurs, providing a powerful tool for high-bandwidth linear optical processing. We then go on to study 'slow light' in this system and show that high-bandwidth pulses can be controllably delayed by a time comparable to the pulse width.

  12. Zero energy resonance and the logarithmically slow decay of unstable multilevel systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manabu Miyamoto

    2006-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The long time behavior of the reduced time evolution operator for unstable multilevel systems is studied based on the N-level Friedrichs model in the presence of a zero energy resonance.The latter means the divergence of the resolvent at zero energy. Resorting to the technique developed by Jensen and Kato [Duke Math. J. 46, 583 (1979)], the zero energy resonance of this model is characterized by the zero energy eigenstate that does not belong to the Hilbert space. It is then shown that for some kinds of the rational form factors the logarithmically slow decay of the reduced time evolution operator can be realized.

  13. Slow electrons and fast protons from activation of matter with intense

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebookScholarship Fund3Biology and Soft7/2014U.S.C.Slow Dynamicslight

  14. Slow shocks and conduction fronts from Petschek reconnection of skewed magnetic fields: two-fluid effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Longcope, D W

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In models of fast magnetic reconnection, flux transfer occurs within a small portion of a current sheet triggering stored magnetic energy to be thermalized by shocks. When the initial current sheet separates magnetic fields which are not perfectly anti-parallel, i.e. they are skewed, magnetic energy is first converted to bulk kinetic energy and then thermalized in slow magnetosonic shocks. We show that the latter resemble parallel shocks or hydrodynamic shocks for all skew angles except those very near the anti-parallel limit. As for parallel shocks, the structures of reconnection-driven slow shocks are best studied using two-fluid equations in which ions and electrons have independent temperature. Time-dependent solutions of these equations can be used to predict and understand the shocks from reconnection of skewed magnetic fields. The results differ from those found using a single-fluid model such as magnetohydrodynamics. In the two-fluid model electrons are heated indirectly and thus carry a heat flux alw...

  15. Development for fissile assay in recycled fuel using lead slowing down spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Yong Deok; Je Park, C.; Kim, Ho-Dong; Song, Kee Chan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute - KAERI, 1045 Daedeok-daero, Daejeon, Korea, 305-353 (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A future nuclear energy system is under development to turn spent fuels produced by PWRs into fuels for a SFR (Sodium Fast Reactor) through the pyrochemical process. The knowledge of the isotopic fissile content of the new fuel is very important for fuel safety. A lead slowing down spectrometer (LSDS) is under development to analyze the fissile material content (Pu{sup 239}, Pu{sup 241} and U{sup 235}) of the fuel. The LSDS requires a neutron source, the neutrons will be slowed down through their passage in a lead medium and will finally enter the fuel and will induce fission reactions that will be analysed and the isotopic content of the fuel will be then determined. The issue is that the spent fuel emits intense gamma rays and neutrons by spontaneous fission. The threshold fission detector screens the prompt fast fission neutrons and as a result the LSDS is not influenced by the high level radiation background. The energy resolution of LSDS is good in the range 0.1 eV to 1 keV. It is also the range in which the fission reaction is the most discriminating for the considered fissile isotopes. An electron accelerator has been chosen to produce neutrons with an adequate target through (e{sup -},?)(?,n) reactions.

  16. Photonic-band-gap properties for two-component slow light

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruseckas, J.; Kudriasov, V.; Juzeliunas, G.; Unanyan, R. G.; Otterbach, J.; Fleischhauer, M. [Institute of Theoretical Physics and Astronomy, Vilnius University, A. Gostauto 12, Vilnius 01108 (Lithuania); Fachbereich Physik and Research Center OPTIMAS, Technische Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern D-67663 (Germany)

    2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider two-component ''spinor'' slow light in an ensemble of atoms coherently driven by two pairs of counterpropagating control laser fields in a double tripod-type linkage scheme. We derive an equation of motion for the spinor slow light (SSL) representing an effective Dirac equation for a massive particle with the mass determined by the two-photon detuning. By changing the detuning the atomic medium acts as a photonic crystal with a controllable band gap. If the frequency of the incident probe light lies within the band gap, the light experiences reflection from the sample and can tunnel through it. For frequencies outside the band gap, the transmission and reflection probabilities oscillate with the increasing length of the sample. In both cases the reflection takes place into the complementary mode of the probe field. We investigate the influence of the finite excited state lifetime on the transmission and reflection coefficients of the probe light. We discuss possible experimental implementations of the SSL using alkali-metal atoms such as rubidium or sodium.

  17. Can Light Echoes Account for the Slow Decay of Type IIn Supernovae?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Roscherr; B. E. Schaefer

    1999-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The spectra of type IIn supernovae indicate the presence of apre-existing slow, dense circumstellar wind (CSW). If the CSW extends sufficiently far from the progenitor star, then dust formation should occur in the wind. The light from the supernova explosion will scatter off this dust and produce a light echo. Continuum emission seen after the peak will have contributions from both this echo as well as from the shock of the ejecta colliding with the CSW, with a fundamental question of which source dominates the continuum. We calculate the brightness of the light echo as a function of time for a range of dust shell geometries, and use our calculations to fit to the light curves of SN 1988Z and SN 1997ab, the two slowest declining IIn supernovae on record. We find that the light curves of both objects can be reproduced by the echo model. However, their rate of decay from peak, color at peak and their observed peak absolute magnitudes when considered together are inconsistent with the echo model. Furthermore, when the observed values of M$_{B}$ are corrected for the effects of dust scattering, the values obtained imply that these supernovae have unrealistically high luminosities. We conclude that light echoes cannot properly account for the slow decline seen in some IIn's, and that the shock interaction is likely to dominate the continuum emission.

  18. Modeling resonance interference by 0-D slowing-down solution with embedded self-shielding method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.; Martin, W. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, 2355 Bonisteel Blvd., Ann Arbor, MI, 48109 (United States); Kim, K. S.; Williams, M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Road, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6172 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The resonance integral table based methods employing conventional multigroup structure for the resonance self-shielding calculation have a common difficulty on treating the resonance interference. The problem arises due to the lack of sufficient energy dependence of the resonance cross sections when the calculation is performed in the multigroup structure. To address this, a resonance interference factor model has been proposed to account for the interference effect by comparing the interfered and non-interfered effective cross sections obtained from 0-D homogeneous slowing-down solutions by continuous-energy cross sections. A rigorous homogeneous slowing-down solver is developed with two important features for reducing the calculation time and memory requirement for practical applications. The embedded self-shielding method (ESSM) is chosen as the multigroup resonance self-shielding solver as an integral component of the interference method. The interference method is implemented in the DeCART transport code. Verification results show that the code system provides more accurate effective cross sections and multiplication factors than the conventional interference method for UO{sub 2} and MOX fuel cases. The additional computing time and memory for the interference correction is acceptable for the test problems including a depletion case with 87 isotopes in the fuel region. (authors)

  19. The Intense Slow Positron Beam Facility at the NC State University PULSTAR Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hawari, Ayman I.; Moxom, Jeremy; Hathaway, Alfred G.; Brown, Benjamin [Nuclear Engineering/Nuclear Reactor Program, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W.; Vallery, Richard [Physics Department, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States); Xu, Jun [Chemical and Analytical Sciences Division, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge TN 37831 (United States)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense slow positron beam is in its early stages of operation at the 1-MW open-pool PULSTAR research reactor at North Carolina State University. The positron beam line is installed in a beam port that has a 30-cmx30-cm cross sectional view of the core. The positrons are created in a tungsten converter/moderator by pair-production using gamma rays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium cladding surrounding the tungsten. Upon moderation, slow ({approx}3 eV) positrons that are emitted from the moderator are electrostatically extracted, focused and magnetically guided until they exit the reactor biological shield with 1-keV energy, approximately 3-cm beam diameter and an intensity exceeding 6x10{sup 8} positrons per second. A magnetic beam switch and transport system has been installed and tested that directs the beam into one of two spectrometers. The spectrometers are designed to implement state-of-the-art PALS and DBS techniques to perform positron and positronium annihilation studies of nanophases in matter.

  20. Journal of Crystal Growth ] (

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) at high pressure of CO2 (initial PCO2 ¼ 55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 1C) was used and the dissolved quantity of CO2 have a significant effect on the average particle size, specific surface areaJournal of Crystal Growth ] (

  1. Eco-Growth: A Framework for Sustainable Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blanco, Edgar E.

    Growth is imperative for corporate success and yet the environmental impact of this growth is not sustainable. In this paper we offer a framework for thinking about the stages of tackling the environmental sustainability ...

  2. Small Enterprise Growth Fund (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Small Enterprise Growth Fund is a professionally-managed venture capital fund that invests in Maine companies which demonstrate high potential for growth and public benefit. The fund has...

  3. The establishment, growth, and forage production of five grass species during their first growing season on an upland postoak site in Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adcock, Willie Leroy

    1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    showing good growth and its erect culms on July 16, 1953 King Ranch bluestem on July 16, 1953, showing its sprawling culms and slow initial growth 31 32 32 14. Silver beardgrass on July 16, 1953. Growth compares favorably with that of RF472... and isolation strips. When plantings were made and when readings were taken of the plots, the inside plots A I' ) Replications V Poi Poi Pci Bou 4sa RF472 Asa RF472 Asa Asa 4is N Bou Poi Cheek Asa RF472 Asa Ais Cheok Pci 1. 9 ' Cheek Bou Asa RF...

  4. Implications of early stages in the growth of stress corrosion cracking on component reliability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, R.H.; Simonen, E.P.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Environment-induced crack growth generally progresses through several stages prior to component failure. Crack initiation, short crack growth, and stage 1 growth are early stages in crack development that are summarized in this paper. The implications of these stages on component reliability, derive from the extended time that the crack exists in the early stages because crack velocity is slow. The duration of the early stages provides a greater opportunity for corrective action if cracks can be detected. Several important factors about the value of understanding short crack behavior include: (1) life prediction requires a knowledge of the total life cycle of the crack including the early stages, (2) greater reliability is possible if the transition between short and long crack behavior is known component life after this transition is short and (3) remedial actions are more effective for short than long cracks.

  5. Geometry of Valley Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petroff, Alexander P; Abrams, Daniel M; Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Kudrolli, Arshad; Rothman, Daniel H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although amphitheater-shaped valley heads can be cut by groundwater flows emerging from springs, recent geological evidence suggests that other processes may also produce similar features, thus confounding the interpretations of such valley heads on Earth and Mars. To better understand the origin of this topographic form we combine field observations, laboratory experiments, analysis of a high-resolution topographic map, and mathematical theory to quantitatively characterize a class of physical phenomena that produce amphitheater-shaped heads. The resulting geometric growth equation accurately predicts the shape of decimeter-wide channels in laboratory experiments, 100-meter wide valleys in Florida and Idaho, and kilometer wide valleys on Mars. We find that whenever the processes shaping a landscape favor the growth of sharply protruding features, channels develop amphitheater-shaped heads with an aspect ratio of pi.

  6. A scheme comparison of Autler-Townes based slow light in inhomogeneously broadened quantum dot media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Per Lunnemann; Jesper Mørk

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a method to achieve significant optical signal delays exploiting the effect of Autler-Townes splitting in an inhomogeneously broadened quantum dot medium. The absorption and slow-down effects are compared for three schemes i.e. $\\Xi$, V and $\\Lambda$, corresponding to different excitation configurations. Qualitative differences of the V-scheme compared to the $\\Xi$- and $\\Lambda$-scheme are found, which show that features of Autler-Townes splitting are only revealed in the V-scheme. The underlying physical mechanisms causing this discrepancy are analyzed and discussed. Finally we compare field propagation calculations of the schemes showing significantly larger achievable signal delays for the V-scheme despite finite absorption of the coupling field. This opens the possibility for using waveguide structures for both coupling and probe fields, thus significantly increasing the achievable signal delays.

  7. On the speed of fast and slow rupture fronts along frictional interfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trømborg, Jørgen Kjoshagen; Thøgersen, Kjetil; Scheibert, Julien; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The transition from stick to slip at a dry frictional interface occurs through the breaking of the junctions between the two contacting surfaces. Typically, interactions between the junctions through the bulk lead to rupture fronts propagating from weak and/or highly stressed regions, whose junctions break first. Experiments find rupture fronts ranging from quasi-static fronts with speeds proportional to external loading rates, via fronts much slower than the Rayleigh wave speed, and fronts that propagate near the Rayleigh wave speed, to fronts that travel faster than the shear wave speed. The mechanisms behind and selection between these fronts are still imperfectly understood. Here we perform simulations in an elastic 2D spring--block model where the frictional interaction between each interfacial block and the substrate arises from a set of junctions modeled explicitly. We find that a proportionality between material slip speed and rupture front speed, previously reported for slow fronts, actually holds ac...

  8. An elastic, plastic, viscous model for slow shear of a liquid foam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philippe Marmottant; François Graner

    2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a scalar model for deformation and flow of an amorphous material such as a foam or an emulsion. To describe elastic, plastic and viscous behaviours, we use three scalar variables: elastic deformation, plastic deformation rate and total deformation rate; and three material specific parameters: shear modulus, yield deformation and viscosity. We obtain equations valid for different types of deformations and flows slower than the relaxation rate towards mechanical equilibrium. In particular, they are valid both in transient or steady flow regimes, even at large elastic deformation. We discuss why viscosity can be relevant even in this slow shear (often called "quasi-static") limit. Predictions of the storage and loss moduli agree with the experimental literature, and explain with simple arguments the non-linear large amplitude trends.

  9. OBSERVATIONS AND MODELS OF SLOW SOLAR WIND WITH Mg{sup 9+} IONS IN QUIESCENT STREAMERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States); Abbo, L.; Giordano, S. [INAF, Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)] [INAF, Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Quiescent streamers are characterized by a peculiar UV signature as pointed out by the results from the observations of the Ultraviolet and Coronograph Spectrometer (UVCS) on board SOHO: the intensity of heavy-ion emission lines (such as O VI) shows dimmer core relative to the edges. Previous models show that the structure of the heavy-ion streamer emission relates to the acceleration regions of the slow solar wind at streamer legs and to gravitational settling processes in the streamer core. Observations of Mg{sup 9+} ion EUV emission in coronal streamers at solar minimum were first reported by the UVCS instrument. The Mg X 625 A emission is an order of magnitude smaller than the O VI 1032 A emission, requiring longer exposures to obtain statistically significant results. Here, Mg X coronal observations are analyzed and compared, for the first time, with the solar minimum streamer structure in hydrogen and O VI emissions. We employ the 2.5D three-fluid model, developed previously to study the properties of O{sup 5+} ions in streamers, and calculate for the first time the density, temperature, and outflow structure of Mg{sup 9+} ions in the solar minimum streamer. The Mg{sup 9+} ions are heated by an empirical radial heating function constrained by observations of the kinetic ion temperature obtained from Mg X emission line profiles. The detailed structure of Mg{sup 9+} density, temperature, and outflow speed is determined by the Coulomb momentum and energy exchange as well as electromagnetic interactions with electrons and protons in the three-fluid model of the streamer. The results of the model are in good qualitative agreement with observations, and provide insights on the possible link between the magnetic structure of the streamer, slow solar wind sources, and relative abundances of heavy ions.

  10. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size Distribution and Growth Rate. Direct Observation of Aggregative Nanoparticle Growth: Kinetic Modeling of the Size...

  11. Growth, microstructure, and luminescent

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed- Deep Vadose ZonescheduleGrowth,

  12. Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray{velocity surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Relation of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvatures of the slowness and ray The contravariant components of the wave{propagation metric tensor equal half the second{order partial derivatives. The relations of the wave{propagation metric tensor to the curvature matrix and Gaussian curvature

  13. Slow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertram, Richard

    of the ramp current-voltage curves, oscillated and was larger during the silent phase than during the activeSlow oscillations of KATP conductance in mouse pancreatic islets provide support for electrical bursting driven by metabolic oscillations Jianhua Ren,1 Arthur Sherman,2 Richard Bertram,3 Paulette B

  14. The role of linear and voltage-dependent ionic currents in the generation of slow wave oscillations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bose, Amitabha

    The role of linear and voltage-dependent ionic currents in the generation of slow wave oscillations voltages, re- spectively. Oscillations are created by inward currents driving the cell away from rest voltages and one outward current that repolarizes the cell. Such currents have traditionally been assumed

  15. Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes in plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    : status and concerns. Ecological relationships of winter ticks, moose, and climate change. Moose) changes · "moose sickness" · deer keds · forestry impacts ("sprucification") Russia: poaching#12; Most impacts on wildlife will likely be indirect as wildlife species respond to slow changes

  16. Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 7 2002 228 234 Slow dynamics in glasses, gels and foams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weeks, Eric R.

    Z .Current Opinion in Colloid & Interface Science 7 2002 228 234 Slow dynamics in glasses, gels and foams Luca CipellettiU , Laurence Ramos Groupe de Dynamique des Phases Condensees, Uni. Keywords: Aging; Lightscattering; Glass; Gel; Colloids; Rheolgy 1. Introduction Disordered, out

  17. Design concepts for a pulse power test facility to simulate EMP surges. Part II. Slow pulses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dethlefsen, R.

    1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work described in this report was sponsored by the Division of Electric Energy Systems (EES) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) through a subcontract with the Power Systems Technology Program at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The work deals with the effect of high altitude nuclear bursts on electric power systems. In addition to fast voltage transients, slow, quasi-dc currents are also induced into extended power systems with grounded neutral connections. Similar phenomena at lower magnitude are generated by solar induced electromagnetic pulses (EMP). These have caused power outages, related to solar storms, at northern latitudes. The applicable utility experience is reviewed in order to formulate an optimum approach to future testing. From a wide variety of options two pulser designs were selected as most practical, a transformer-rectifier power supply, and a lead acid battery pulser. both can be mounted on a trailer as required for field testing on utility systems. The battery system results in the least cost. Testing on power systems requires that the dc pulser pass high values of alternating current, resulting from neutral imbalance or from potential fault currents. Batteries have a high ability to pass alternating currents. Most other pulser options must be protected by an ac bypass in the form of an expensive capacitor bank. 8D truck batteries can meet the original specification of 1 kA test current. Improved batteries for higher discharge currents are available.

  18. Non-destructive Assay Measurements Using the RPI Lead Slowing Down Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Becker, Bjorn; Weltz, Adam; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Thompson, J. T.; Thompson, N.; Danon, Yaron

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of a Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometer (LSDS) is consid- ered as a possible option for non-destructive assay of fissile material of used nuclear fuel. The primary objective is to quantify the 239Pu and 235U fissile content via a direct measurement, distinguishing them through their characteristic fission spectra in the LSDS. In this pa- per, we present several assay measurements performed at the Rensse- laer Polytechnic Institute (RPI) to demonstrate the feasibility of such a method and to provide benchmark experiments for Monte Carlo cal- culations of the assay system. A fresh UOX fuel rod from the RPI Criticality Research Facility, a 239PuBe source and several highly en- riched 235U discs were assayed in the LSDS. The characteristic fission spectra were measured with 238U and 232Th threshold fission cham- bers, which are only sensitive to fission neutron with energy above the threshold. Despite the constant neutron and gamma background from the PuBe source and the intense interrogation neutron flux, the LSDS system was able to measure the characteristic 235U and 239Pu responses. All measurements were compared to Monte Carlo simula- tions. It was shown that the available simulation tools and models are well suited to simulate the assay, and that it is possible to calculate the absolute count rate in all investigated cases.

  19. Last Passage Percolation with a Defect Line and the Solution of the Slow Bond Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riddhipratim Basu; Vladas Sidoravicius; Allan Sly

    2014-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We address the question of how a localized microscopic defect, especially if it is small with respect to certain dynamic parameters, affects the macroscopic behavior of a system. In particular we consider two classical exactly solvable models: Ulam's problem of the maximal increasing sequence and the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process. For the first model, using its representation as a Poissonian version of directed last passage percolation on $\\mathbb R^2$, we introduce the defect by placing a positive density of extra points along the diagonal line. For the latter, the defect is produced by decreasing the jump rate of each particle when it crosses the origin. The powerful algebraic tools for studying these processes break down in the perturbed versions of the models. Taking a more geometric approach we show that in both cases the presence of an arbitrarily small defect affects the macroscopic behavior of the system: in Ulam's problem the time constant increases, and for the exclusion process the flux of particles decreases. This, in particular, settles the longstanding Slow Bond Problem.

  20. Estimates for Pu-239 loadings in burial ground culverts based on fast/slow neutron measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winn, W.G.; Hochel, R.C.; Hofstetter, K.J.; Sigg, R.A.

    1989-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides guideline estimates for Pu-239 mass loadings in selected burial ground culverts. The relatively high recorded Pu-239 contents of these culverts have been appraised as suspect relative to criticality concerns, because they were assayed only with the solid waste monitor (SWM) per gamma-ray counting. After 1985, subsequent waste was also assayed with the neutron coincidence counter (NCC), and a comparison of the assay methods showed that the NCC generally yielded higher assays than the SWM. These higher NCC readings signaled a need to conduct non-destructive/non-intrusive nuclear interrogations of these culverts, and a technical team conducted scoping measurements to illustrate potential assay methods based on neutron and/or gamma counting. A fast/slow neutron method has been developed to estimate the Pu-239 in the culverts. In addition, loading records include the SWM assays of all Pu-239 cuts of some of the culvert drums and these data are useful in estimating the corresponding NCC drum assays from NCC vs SWM data. Together, these methods yield predictions based on direct measurements and statistical inference.

  1. Simplified treatment of exact resonance elastic scattering model in deterministic slowing down equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ono, M.; Wada, K.; Kitada, T. [Osaka Univ., 2-1, yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simplified treatment of resonance elastic scattering model considering thermal motion of heavy nuclides and the energy dependence of the resonance cross section was implemented into NJOY [1]. In order to solve deterministic slowing down equation considering the effect of up-scattering without iterative calculations, scattering kernel for heavy nuclides is pre-calculated by the formula derived by Ouisloumen and Sanchez [2], and neutron spectrum in up-scattering term is expressed by NR approximation. To check the verification of the simplified treatment, the treatment is applied to U-238 for the energy range from 4 eV to 200 eV. Calculated multi-group capture cross section of U-238 is greater than that of conventional method and the increase of the capture cross sections is remarkable as the temperature becomes high. Therefore Doppler coefficient calculated in UO{sub 2} fuel pin is calculated more negative value than that on conventional method. The impact on Doppler coefficient is equivalent to the results of exact treatment of resonance elastic scattering reported in previous studies [2-7]. The agreement supports the validation of the simplified treatment and therefore this treatment is applied for other heavy nuclide to evaluate the Doppler coefficient in MOX fuel. The result shows that the impact of considering thermal agitation in resonance scattering in Doppler coefficient comes mainly from U-238 and that of other heavy nuclides such as Pu-239, 240 etc. is not comparable in MOX fuel. (authors)

  2. Inverse patchy colloids with small patches: fluid structure and dynamical slowing down

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silvano Ferrari; Emanuela Bianchi; Yura V. Kalyuzhnyi; Gerhard Kahl

    2014-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Inverse Patchy Colloids (IPCs) differ from conventional patchy particles because their patches repel (rather than attract) each other and attract (rather than repel) the part of the colloidal surface that is free of patches. These particular features occur, .e.g., in heterogeneously charged colloidal systems. Here we consider overall neutral IPCs carrying two, relatively small, polar patches. Previous studies of the same model under planar confinement have evidenced the formation of branched, disordered aggregates composed of ring-like structures. We investigate here the bulk behavior of the system via molecular dynamics simulations, focusing on both the structure and the dynamics of the fluid phase in a wide region of the phase diagram. Additionally, the simulation results for the static observables are compared to the Associative Percus Yevick solution of an integral equation approach based on the multi-density Ornstein-Zernike theory. A good agreement between theoretical and numerical quantities is observed even in the region of the phase diagram where the slowing down of the dynamics occurs.

  3. Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

  4. Capping layer growth rate and the optical and structural properties of GaAsSbN-capped InAs/GaAs quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulloa, J. M., E-mail: jmulloa@isom.upm.es; Utrilla, A. D.; Guzman, A.; Hierro, A. [Institute for Systems based on Optoelectronics and Microtechnology (ISOM) and Dpto. Ingeniería Electrónica, Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Reyes, D. F.; Ben, T.; González, D. [Departamento de Ciencia de los Materiales e IM y QI, Universidad de Cádiz, 11510 Puerto Real (Cádiz) (Spain)

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Changing the growth rate during the heteroepitaxial capping of InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) with a 5?nm-thick GaAsSbN capping layer (CL) strongly modifies the QD structural and optical properties. A size and shape transition from taller pyramids to flatter lens-shaped QDs is observed when the CL growth rate is decreased from 1.5 to 0.5 ML/s. This indicates that the QD dissolution processes taking place during capping can be controlled to some extent by the GaAsSbN CL growth rate, with high growth rates allowing a complete preservation of the QDs. However, the dissolution processes are shown to have a leveling effect on the QD height, giving rise to a narrower size distribution for lower growth rates. Contrary to what could be expected, these effects are opposite to the strong blue-shift and improvement of the photoluminescence (PL) observed for higher growth rates. Nevertheless, the PL results can be understood in terms of the strong impact of the growth rate on the Sb and N incorporation into the CL, which results in lower Sb and N contents at higher growth rates. Besides the QD-CL band offsets and QD strain, the different CL composition alters the band alignment of the system, which can be transformed to type-II at low growth rates. These results show the key role of the alloyed CL growth parameters on the resulting QD properties and demonstrate an intricate correlation between the PL spectra and the sample morphology in complex QD-CL structures.

  5. Analysis of amplitude versus offset

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Xiaotao

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ). Waves generated at a plane interface by an incident P-wave or S-wave. Reflection coefFicients versus angle of incidence for the gas sa, nd/shale model. P-P reflection coefFicients. SV-SV reflection coefiicients. P-P reflection coefficients of shale/gas... sand model. Curves from top to bottom correspond to oi ? 0. 4, 0. 3, 0. 2, 0. 1. SV-SV reflection coefflcients of shale/gas sand model. Curves froin bottoiu to top at normal incidence correspond to &r, = 0. 4, 0. 3, 0. 2, 0. 1. Error surface iii...

  6. Resistance of fast-and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone-induced attack by western balsam bark beetle (Coleoptera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Staffan

    Resistance of fast- and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone- induced attack by western balsam the resistance of fast- and slow-growing subalpine fir to pheromone-induced attack by western balsam bark beetle at two sites in the interior of British Columbia, Canada. 2 Attack success by the beetle and subsequent

  7. Kinetics of growth of spinel crystals in a borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alton, Jesse; Plaisted, Trevor J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of the kinetics of spinel crystallization in a high-level waste (HLW) glass were studied: (1) the effect of nucleation agents on the number density (ns) of spinel crystals, (2) crystallization kinetics in a crushed glass, and (3) crystallization kinetics in a glass preheated at T > TL (liquidus temperature). In glass lacking in nucleation agents, ns was a strong function of temperature. In glasses with noble metals (Rh, Ru, Pd, and Pt), ns increased by up to four orders of magnitude and was nearly independent of temperature. The kinetics of spinel crystallization in crushed glass lacking nucleation agents was dominated by surface crystallization and was described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation with the Avrami exponent n {at} 0.5. For application to HLW glass melter processing, it was necessary to preheat glass at T > TL to eliminate the impact of temperature history and surface crystallization on crystal nucleation and growth. In the temperature range of glass processing, crystals descend under gravity when they reach a critical size. Below this critical size, crystallization kinetics is described by the KJMA equation and above the critical size by the Hixson-Crowell equation. At low temperatures, at which glass viscosity is high and diffusion is slow, the KJMA equation represents crystal growth from nucleation to equilibrium. As ns increases, the temperature interval of the transition from the KJMA to Hixson-Crowell regime shifts to a higher temperature.

  8. Kinetics of growth of spinel crystals in a borosilicate glass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alton, Jesse; Plaisted, Trevor J.; Hrma, Pavel R.

    2002-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Three aspects of the kinetics of spinel crystallization in a high-level waste (HLW) glass were studied: (1) the effect of nucleation agents on the number density (ns) of spinel crystals, (2) crystallization kinetics in a crushed glass, and (3) crystallization kinetics in a glass preheated at T>TL (liquidus temperature). In glass lacking in nucleation agens, ns was a strong function of temperature. In glasses with noble metals (Rh, Ru, Pd, and Pt), ns increased by up to four orders of magnitude and was nearly independent of temperature. The kinetics of spinel crystallization in crushed glass lacking nucleation agents was dominated by surface crystallization and was described by the Kolmogorov-Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (KJMA) equation with the Avrami exponent n~0.5. For application to HLW glass melter processing, it was necessary to preheat glass at T>TL to eliminate the impact of temperature history and surface crystallization on crystal nucleation and growth. In the temperature range of glass processing, crystals descend under gravity when they reach a critical size. Below this critical size, crystallization kinetics is described by the KJMA equation and above the critical size by the Hixson-Crowell equation. At low temperatures, at which glass viscosity is high and diffusion is slow, the KJMA equation represents crystal growth from nucleation to equilibrium. As ns increases, the temperature interval of the transition from the KJMA to Hisxon-Crowell regime shifts to a higher temperature.

  9. Synthesis, growth, structure determination and optical properties of chalcone derivative single crystal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karthi, S., E-mail: girijaeaswaradas@gmail.com; Girija, E. K., E-mail: girijaeaswaradas@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Periyar University, Salem - 636011 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Acquiring large nonlinear optical (NLO) efficient organic material is essential for the development of optoelectronics and photonic devices. Chalcone is the donor - ? - acceptor - ? - donor (D-?-A-?-D) type conjugated molecule with appreciable hyperpolarizability of potential interest in NLO applications. The addition of vinyl and electron donor groups in the chalcone molecule may enhance the second harmonic generation (SHG) efficiency. Here we report the synthesis, crystal growth and characterization of a chalcone derivative 1-(4-methylphenyl)-5-(4-methoxyphenyl)-penta-2,4-dien-1-one (MPMPP). The MPMPP crystal was grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique from acetone. The grown crystal structure was studied by single crystal X-ray diffraction. The SHG efficiency of the grown crystal was determined by Kurtz and Perry method.

  10. Dynamics of slow light and light storage in a Doppler-broadened electromagnetically-induced-transparency medium: A numerical approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Shih-Wei; Chen, Yi-Hsin; Yu, Ite A. [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Gou, Shih-Chuan [Department of Physics, National Changhua University of Education, Changhua 50058, Taiwan (China); Horng, Tzyy-Leng [Department of Applied Mathematics, Feng Chia University, Taichung 40074, Taiwan (China)

    2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a numerical scheme to study the dynamics of slow light and light storage in an electromagnetically-induced-transparency (EIT) medium at finite temperatures. Allowing for the motional coupling, we derive a set of coupled Schroedinger equations describing a boosted closed three-level EIT system according to the principle of Galilean relativity. The dynamics of a uniformly moving EIT medium can thus be determined by numerically integrating the coupled Schroedinger equations for atoms plus one ancillary Maxwell-Schroedinger equation for the probe pulse. The central idea of this work rests on the assumption that the loss of ground-state coherence at finite temperatures can be ascribed to the incoherent superposition of density matrices representing the EIT systems with various velocities. Close agreements are demonstrated in comparing the numerical results with the experimental data for both slow light and light storage. In particular, the distinct characters featuring the decay of ground-state coherence can be well verified for slow light and light storage. This warrants that the current scheme can be applied to determine the decaying profile of the ground-state coherence as well as the temperature of the EIT medium.

  11. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M.? J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center.; Li, C.? K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center.; Fox, W. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab. (PPPL), Princeton, NJ (United States); Zylstra, A.? B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center.; Stoeckl, C. [University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States). Laboratory for Laser Energetics.; Séguin, F.? H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center.; Frenje, J.? A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center.; Petrasso, R.? D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States). Plasma Science and Fusion Center.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, ? ? 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet ~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early in time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.

  12. Slowing of magnetic reconnection concurrent with weakening plasma inflows and increasing collisionality in strongly-driven laser-plasma experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M.? J.; Li, C.? K.; Fox, W.; Zylstra, A.? B.; Stoeckl, C.; Séguin, F.? H.; Frenje, J.? A.; Petrasso, R.? D.

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An evolution of magnetic reconnection behavior, from fast jets to the slowing of reconnection and the establishment of a stable current sheet, has been observed in strongly driven, ? ? 20 laser-produced plasma experiments. This process has been inferred to occur alongside a slowing of plasma inflows carrying the oppositely-directed magnetic fields as well as the evolution of plasma conditions from collisionless to collisional. High-resolution proton radiography has revealed unprecedented detail of the forced interaction of magnetic fields and super-Alfvénic electron jets (Vjet ~ 20VA) ejected from the reconnection region, indicating that two-fluid or collisionless magnetic reconnection occurs early inmore »time. The absence of jets and the persistence of strong, stable magnetic fields at late times indicates that the reconnection process slows down, while plasma flows stagnate and plasma conditions evolve to a cooler, denser, more collisional state. These results demonstrate that powerful initial plasma flows are not sufficient to force a complete reconnection of magnetic fields, even in the strongly-driven regime.« less

  13. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111) and Pd(111): Nonwetting Growth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111) and Pd(111): Nonwetting Growth on a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111) and Pd(111): Nonwetting Growth on a Hydrophobic...

  14. Crystal growth kinetics in Lennard-Jones and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen systems along the solid-liquid coexistence line

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin, Ronald

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Kinetics of crystal-growth is investigated along the solid-liquid coexistence line for the (100), (110) and (111) orientations of the Lennard-Jones and Weeks-Chandler-Andersen fcc crystal-liquid interface, using non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. A slowing down of the growth kinetics along the coexistence line is observed, which is mostly a temperature effect, with other quantities such as the melting pressure and liquid self-diffusion coefficient having a negligible impact. The growth kinetics of the two potentials become similar at large values of the melting temperature and pressure, when both resemble a purely repulsive soft-sphere potential. Classical models of crystallization from the melt are in reasonable qualitative agreement with our simulation data. Finally, several one-phase empirical melting/freezing rules are studied with respect to their validity along the coexistence line.

  15. Growth and properties of Lithium Salicylate single crystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zaitseva, N; Newby, J; Hull, G; Saw, C; Carman, L; Cherepy, N; Payne, S

    2009-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    An attractive feature of {sup 6}Li containing fluorescence materials that determines their potential application in radiation detection is the capture reaction with slow ({approx}< 100 keV) neutrons: {sup 6}Li + n = {sup 4}He + {sup 3}H + 4.8MeV. The use of {sup 6}Li-salicylate (LiSal, LiC{sub 6}H{sub 5}O{sub 3}) for thermal neutron detection was previously studied in liquid and polycrystalline scintillators. The studies showed that both liquid and polycrystalline LiSal scintillators could be utilized in pulse shape discrimination (PSD) techniques that enable separation of neutrons from the background gamma radiation. However, it was found that the efficiency of neutron detection using LiSal in liquid solutions was severely limited by its low solubility in commonly used organic solvents like, for example, toluene or xylene. Better results were obtained with neutron detectors containing the compound in its crystalline form, such as pressed pellets, or microscopic-scale (7-14 micron) crystals dispersed in various media. The expectation drown from these studies was that further improvement of pulse height, PSD, and efficiency characteristics could be reached with larger and more transparent LiSal crystals, growth of which has not been reported so far. In this paper, we present the first results on growth and characterization of relatively large, a cm-scale size, single crystals of LiSal with good optical quality. The crystals were grown both from aqueous and anhydrous (methanol) media, mainly for neutron detection studies. However, the results on growth and structural characterization may be interesting for other fields where LiSal, together with other alkali metal salicylates, is used for biological, medical, and chemical (as catalyst) applications.

  16. Normal Growth of Range Cattle.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lush, Jay L. (Jay Laurence)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of surplus stock unless home-grown supplemental feed is cheap and abundant or the price to be obtained for the cattle the following spring is much higher per pound than can be had in the fall. Fall sale also lessens the danger of over-grazing in the late... of growth. Naturally the feed supply is the first thing considered as a cause of growth and it is the cause which is usually most nearly under control. Diseases or minor differences in health are just as obvious in controlling growth as are changes...

  17. Bertrand's postulate and subgroup growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bou-Rabee, K

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this article we investigate the L^1-norm of certain functions on groups called divisibility functions. Using these functions, their connection to residual finiteness, and integration theory on profinite groups, we define the residual average of a finitely generated group. One of the main results in this article is the finiteness of residual averages on finitely generated linear groups. Whether or not the residual average is finite depends on growth rates of indices of finite index subgroups. Our results on index growth rates are analogous to results on gaps between primes, and provide a variant of the subgroup growth function, which may be of independent interest.

  18. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry Time Spectral Analysis for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Warren, Glen A.

    2012-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration, of which PNNL is a part, to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS). This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory methods. This document is a progress report for FY2012 PNNL analysis and algorithm development. Progress made by PNNL in FY2012 continues to indicate the promise of LSDS analysis and algorithms applied to used fuel assemblies. PNNL further refined the semi-empirical model developed in FY2011 based on singular value decomposition (SVD) to numerically account for the effects of self-shielding. The average uncertainty in the Pu mass across the NGSI-64 fuel assemblies was shown to be less than 3% using only six calibration assemblies with a 2% uncertainty in the isotopic masses. When calibrated against the six NGSI-64 fuel assemblies, the algorithm was able to determine the total Pu mass within <2% uncertainty for the 27 diversion cases also developed under NGSI. Two purely empirical algorithms were developed that do not require the use of Pu isotopic fission chambers. The semi-empirical and purely empirical algorithms were successfully tested using MCNPX simulations as well applied to experimental data measured by RPI using their LSDS. The algorithms were able to describe the 235U masses of the RPI measurements with an average uncertainty of 2.3%. Analyses were conducted that provided valuable insight with regard to design requirements (e.g. Pb stack size, neutron source location) of an LSDS for the purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Sensitivity studies were conducted that provide insight as to how the LSDS instrument can be improved by making it more sensitive to the center of the fuel assemblies. In FY2013, PNNL will continue efforts to develop and refine design requirements of an LSDS for the ultimate purpose of assaying used fuel assemblies. Future efforts will be directed toward more extensive experimental benchmarking of currently implemented time-spectra analysis algorithms.

  19. Growth machine theory: a qualitative analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Gavin Paul

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of land inherent in growth machine theory, does not necessarily result in a dialectic, win-lose situation. Furthermore, it is argued that the growth coalition may not always ado t a unidimensional roach to development where further growth...

  20. Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Hal

    Bacterial Growth H. L. Smith 1 Simple Models Bacteria are the dominant form of life on the planet the concentration of the nutrient in the media (grams/liter) and N(t) de

  1. Vermont Employment Growth Incentive (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The purpose of the Employment Growth Incentive (VEGI) is to encourage job creation in Vermont by a Vermont company, a Vermont division of a company that plans to grow and expand in Vermont, a...

  2. Inequality and Growth: Why Differential Fertility Matters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de la Croix, David; Doepke, Matthias

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Barro, Robert J. 2000. “Inequality and Growth in a Panel of1–25. Benabou, Roland. 1996. “Inequality and Growth. ” NBER1996. “Measuring Income Inequality: A New Database. ”

  3. Lead Slowing-Down Spectrometry for Spent Fuel Assay: FY12 Status Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Glen A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Danon, Yaron; Devlin, M.; Gavron, A.; Haight, R. C.; Harris, Jason; Imel, G. R.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Stewart, T.; Weltz, Adam

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary The Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign is supporting a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of using Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) to conduct direct, independent and accurate assay of fissile isotopes in used fuel assemblies. The collaboration consists of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute (RPI), Idaho State University (ISU). There are three main challenges to implementing LSDS to assay used fuel assemblies. These challenges are the development of an algorithm for interpreting the data with an acceptable accuracy for the fissile masses, the development of suitable detectors for the technique, and the experimental benchmarking of the approach. This report is a summary of the progress in these areas made by the collaboration during FY2012. Significant progress was made on the project in FY2012. Extensive characterization of a “semi-empirical” algorithm was conducted. For example, we studied the impact on the accuracy of this algorithm by the minimization of the calibration set, uncertainties in the calibration masses, and by the choice of time window. Issues such a lead size, number of required neutrons, placement of the neutron source and the impact of cadmium around the detectors were also studied. In addition, new algorithms were developed that do not require the use of plutonium fission chambers. These algorithms were applied to measurement data taken by RPI and shown to determine the 235U mass within 4%. For detectors, a new concept for a fast neutron detector involving 4He recoil from neutron scattering was investigated. The detector has the potential to provide a couple of orders of magnitude more sensitivity than 238U fission chambers. Progress was also made on the more conventional approach of using 232Th fission chambers as fast neutron detectors. For benchmarking measurements, we continue to improve our understanding of the experimental setup by studying issues such as the effect of room return and impurities in the lead. RPI performed a series of experiments with a fresh fuel pin and various 235U and 239Pu sources. A comparison between simulations and measurements shows significant deviations after 200 µs for both 235U and 239Pu samples, as well as significant deviations at earlier times for the 239Pu sample. The FY2013 effort will shift focus to planning for a Technical Readiness Level 5 demonstration. The primary deliverable for the year will be a plan on how to do this demonstration. The plan will include measurement design, sample acquisition, sample handling, cost estimate, schedule and assumptions. Research will continue on the 4He detector, algorithms development, thorium fission chambers and benchmarking measurements involving sub assemblies of fresh fuel.

  4. Economic Growth and Development Economics 777

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Almor, Amit

    Economic Growth and Development Economics 777 July 18, 2008 Fall Semester 2008 Professor J. H. Mc of economic growth and development. We will analyze several different growth models and look at some recent empirical research. Text The text for this course is: Economic Growth (2nd Edition) by Robert J. Barro

  5. Dispersion retrieval from multi-level ultra-deep reactive-ion-etched microstructures for terahertz slow-wave circuits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baik, Chan-Wook, E-mail: cw.baik@samsung.com; Young Ahn, Ho; Kim, Yongsung; Lee, Jooho; Hong, Seogwoo; Hee Choi, Jun; Kim, Sunil; Hun Lee, Sang; Min Kim, Jong; Hwang, Sungwoo [Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, Yongin 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yeon Jun, So; Yu, SeGi [Department of Physics, Hankuk University of Foreign Studies, Yongin 449-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lawrence Ives, R. [Calabazas Creek Research, Inc., San Mateo, California 94404-1010 (United States)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-level microstructure is proposed for terahertz slow-wave circuits, with dispersion relation retrieved by scattering parameter measurements. The measured return loss shows strong resonances above the cutoff with negligible phase shifts compared with finite element analysis. Splitting the circuit into multi levels enables a low aspect ratio configuration that alleviates the loading effect of deep-reactive-ion etching on silicon wafers. This makes it easier to achieve flat-etched bottom and smooth sidewall profiles. The dispersion retrieved from the measurement, therefore, corresponds well to the theoretical estimation. The result provides a straightforward way to the precise determination of dispersions in terahertz vacuum electronics.

  6. Rate coefficient for the chemi-ionization in slow Li*(n)+Li and Na*(n)+Na collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ignjatovic, Lj.M.; Mihajlov, A.A. [Institute of Physics, P. O. Box 68, 11080 Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro)

    2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The chemi-ionization processes in slow-atom-Rydberg-atom collisions are considered in this paper. A version of the semiclassical method of rate coefficient calculation that is free of the presumptions which significantly limited its applicability previously is presented. The method is applied to the cases of Li*(n)+Li and Na*(n)+Na collisions for the principal quantum numbers 5{<=}n{<=}25 and temperatures 600{<=}T{<=}1200 K. The results of calculation of the rate coefficients of the corresponding chemi-ionization processes are compared to the existing experimental data from the literature.

  7. Slow motions detection in polybutadiene through novel analyses of MSE refocusing efficiency and spin-lattice relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simone Sturniolo; Marco Pieruccini; Maurizio Corti; Attilio Rigamonti

    2014-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Novel methods to analyze NMR signals dominated by dipolar interaction are applied to the study of slow relaxation motions in polybutadiene approaching its glass transition temperature. The analysis is based on a recently developed model where the time dependence in an ensemble of dipolar interacting spin pairs is described without resorting to the Anderson-Weiss approximation. The ability to catch relevant features of the $\\alpha$ relaxation process is emphasized. In particular, it is shown that the temperature profile of the Magic Sandwich Echo efficiency carries information on the frequency profile of the $\\alpha$-process. The analysis is corroborated by the temperature dependence of the spin-lattice relaxation time.

  8. Exercise overloading in the equine: cardiorespiratory and metabolic response to a combined long, slow, distance and interval training exercise regimen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drozd, Leann Francine

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) on an equine treadmill. The total conditioning portion of the study was divided into two, 42-d phases. The first 42 d of conditioning were designed to condition the horses through long, slow, distance (LSD) exercise. Horses were galloped 4. 8 km at 400 m... were not significantly different. After a 14-wk study of traditionally training the Thoroughbred, Foreman et al. (1983) reported no significant differences in HR at rest, during a SET gallop, nor at 20, 40 and 60 min post exercise. However...

  9. Nonlinear structural crack growth monitoring

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Welch, Donald E. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hively, Lee M. (Philadelphia, TN); Holdaway, Ray F. (Clinton, TN)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for the detection, through nonlinear manipulation of data, of an indicator of imminent failure due to crack growth in structural elements. The method is a process of determining energy consumption due to crack growth and correlating the energy consumption with physical phenomena indicative of a failure event. The apparatus includes sensors for sensing physical data factors, processors or the like for computing a relationship between the physical data factors and phenomena indicative of the failure event, and apparatus for providing notification of the characteristics and extent of such phenomena.

  10. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1995-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A device is described for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient`s skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures. 5 figs.

  11. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for stimulating bone tissue by applying a low level alternating current signal directly to the patient's skin. A crystal oscillator, a binary divider chain and digital logic gates are used to generate the desired waveforms that reproduce the natural electrical characteristics found in bone tissue needed for stimulating bone growth and treating osteoporosis. The device, powered by a battery, contains a switch allowing selection of the correct waveform for bone growth stimulation or osteoporosis treatment so that, when attached to the skin of the patient using standard skin contact electrodes, the correct signal is communicated to the underlying bone structures.

  12. The intense slow positron beam facility at the PULSTAR reactor and applications in nano-materials study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Ming; Moxom, Jeremy; Hawari, Ayman I. [Nuclear Reactor Program, Department of Nuclear Engineering, North Carolina State University, P.O. Box 7909, Raleigh, NC 27695 (United States); Gidley, David W. [Department of Physics, University of Michigan, 450 Church Street, Ann Arbor MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    An intense slow positron beam has been established at the PULSTAR nuclear research reactor of North Carolina State University. The slow positrons are generated by pair production in a tungsten moderator from gammarays produced in the reactor core and by neutron capture reactions in cadmium. The moderated positrons are electrostatically extracted and magnetically guided out of the region near the core. Subsequently, the positrons are used in two spectrometers that are capable of performing positron annihilation lifetime spectroscopy (PALS) and positron Doppler broadening spectroscopy (DBS) to probe the defect and free volume properties of materials. One of the spectrometers (e{sup +}-PALS) utilizes an rf buncher to produce a pulsed beam and has a timing resolution of 277 ps. The second spectrometer (Ps-PALS) uses a secondary electron timing technique and is dedicated to positronium lifetime measurements with an approximately 1 ns timing resolution. PALS measurements have been conducted in the e{sup +}-PALS spectrometer on a series of nano-materials including organic photovoltaic thin films, membranes for filtration, and polymeric fibers. These studies have resulted in understanding some critical issues related to the development of the examined nano-materials.

  13. SBA Growth Accelerator Fund Competition

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Small Business Administration (SBA) is accepting applications for the Growth Accelerator Fund Competition to identify the nation's innovative accelerators and similar organizations and award them cash prizes they may use to fund their operations costs and allow them to bring startup competitions to scale and new ideas to life.

  14. The Cutaneous Epidermal Growth Factor Network: Can it be Translated Clinically to Stimulate Hair Growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrescu, Doru T; Kauffman, C Lisa; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of epidermal growth factor on hair growth in the mouse. Jstem cell character in hair follicles. Science. 2006;312:Notch signalling pathway in hair growth. Mech Dev. 1998;78:

  15. Non-intrusive and structure preserving multiscale integration of stiff ODEs, SDEs and Hamiltonian systems with hidden slow dynamics via flow averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Molei; Marsden, Jerrold E

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce a new class of integrators for stiff ODEs as well as SDEs. These integrators are (i) {\\it Multiscale}: they are based on flow averaging and so do not resolve the fast variables but rather employ step-sizes determined by slow variables (ii) {\\it Basis}: the method is based on averaging the flow of the given dynamical system (which may have hidden slow and fast processes) instead of averaging the instantaneous drift of assumed separated slow and fast processes. This bypasses the need for identifying explicitly (or numerically) the slow or fast variables. (iii) {\\it Non intrusive}: A pre-existing numerical scheme resolving the microscopic time scale can be used as a black box and turned into one of the integrators in this paper by simply turning the large coefficients on over a microscopic timescale and off during a mesoscopic timescale. (iv) {\\it Convergent over two scales}: strongly over slow processes and in the sense of measures over fast ones. (v) {\\it Structure preserving}: For stiff Hamiltoni...

  16. Universal slow fall-off to the unique AdS infinity in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maeda, Hideki [Centro de Estudios Cientificos (CECS), Arturo Prat 514, Valdivia (Chile)

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the following two propositions are proven under the dominant energy condition for the matter field in the higher-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime in Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet gravity in the presence of a cosmological constant {lambda}. First, for {lambda}{<=}0 and {alpha}{>=}0 without a fine-tuning to give a unique anti-de Sitter (AdS) vacuum, where {alpha} is the Gauss-Bonnet coupling constant, vanishing generalized Misner-Sharp mass is equivalent to the maximally symmetric spacetime. Under the fine-tuning, it is equivalent to the vacuum class I spacetime. Second, under the fine-tuning with {alpha}>0, the asymptotically AdS spacetime in the higher-dimensional Henneaux-Teitelboim sense is only a special class of the vacuum class I spacetime. This means the universal slow fall-off to the unique AdS infinity in the presence of physically reasonable matter.

  17. Status on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Warren, Glen A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Devlin, M.; Haight, R. C.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Bonebrake, Eric; Imel, G. R.; Harris, Jason; Beller, Dennis; Hatchett, D.; Droessler, J.

    2012-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) from next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to study the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy. This technique is an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. This paper will present efforts on the development of time-spectral analysis algorithms, fast neutron detector advances, and validation and testing measurements.

  18. New Partners for Smart Growth Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The New Partners for Smart Growth Conference is the nation's largest smart growth and sustainability conference. The three-day conference is themed, "Practical Tools and Innovative Strategies for Creating Great Communities."

  19. Stress corrosion crack growth in porous sandstones. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ojala, Ira O

    Stress corrosion crack growth occurs when the chemical weakening of strained crack tip bonds facilitates crack propagation. I have examined the effect of chemical processes on the growth of a creack population by carrying out triaxial compression...

  20. SMALL-SCALE PRESSURE-BALANCED STRUCTURES DRIVEN BY OBLIQUE SLOW MODE WAVES MEASURED IN THE SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yao Shuo [School of Geophysics and Information Technology, China University of Geosciences (Beijing), Beijing 100083 (China); He, J.-S.; Tu, C.-Y.; Wang, L.-H. [Department of Geophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Marsch, E., E-mail: yaoshuo@cugb.edu.cn [Christian Albrechts University at Kiel, Kiel (Germany)

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, small-scale pressure-balanced structures (PBSs) were identified in the solar wind, but their formation mechanism remains unclear. This work aims to reveal the dependence of the properties of small-scale PBSs on the background magnetic field (B{sub 0}) direction and thus to corroborate the in situ mechanism that forms them. We analyze the plasma and magnetic field data obtained by WIND in the quiet solar wind at 1 AU. First, we use a developed moving-average method to obtain B{sub 0}(s, t) for every temporal scale (s) at each time moment (t). By wavelet cross-coherence analysis, we obtain the correlation coefficients between the thermal pressure P{sub th} and the magnetic pressure P{sub B}, distributing against the temporal scale and the angle {theta}{sub xB} between B{sub 0}(s, t) and Geocentric Solar Ecliptic coordinates (GSE)-x. We note that the angle coverage of a PBS decreases with shorter temporal scale, but the occurrence of the PBSs is independent of {theta}{sub xB}. Suspecting that the isolated small PBSs are formed by compressive waves in situ, we continue this study by testing the wave modes forming a small-scale PBS with B{sub 0}(s, t) quasi-parallel to GSE-x. As a result, we identify that the cross-helicity and the compressibility attain values for a slow mode from theoretical calculations. The wave vector is derived from minimum variance analysis. Besides, the proton temperatures obey T < T{sub Parallel-To} derived from the velocity distribution functions, excluding a mirror mode, which is the other candidate for the formation of PBSs in situ. Thus, a small-scale PBS is shown to be driven by oblique, slow-mode waves in the solar wind.

  1. Transgenic mice expressing mutant Pinin exhibit muscular dystrophy, nebulin deficiency and elevated expression of slow-type muscle fiber genes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Hsu-Pin; Hsu, Shu-Yuan [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China)] [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Wu, Wen-Ai; Hu, Ji-Wei [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)] [Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Ouyang, Pin, E-mail: ouyang@mail.cgu.edu.tw [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China) [Department of Anatomy, Chang Gung University Medical College, Taiwan (China); Transgenic Mouse Core Laboratory, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China); Molecular Medicine Research Center, Chang Gung University, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •Pnn CCD domain functions as a dominant negative mutant regulating Pnn expression and function. •Pnn CCD mutant Tg mice have a muscle wasting phenotype during development and show dystrophic histological features. •Pnn mutant muscles are susceptible to slow fiber type gene transition and NEB reduction. •The Tg mouse generated by overexpression of the Pnn CCD domain displays many characteristics resembling NEB{sup +/?} mice. -- Abstract: Pinin (Pnn) is a nuclear speckle-associated SR-like protein. The N-terminal region of the Pnn protein sequence is highly conserved from mammals to insects, but the C-terminal RS domain-containing region is absent in lower species. The N-terminal coiled-coil domain (CCD) is, therefore, of interest not only from a functional point of view, but also from an evolutionarily standpoint. To explore the biological role of the Pnn CCD in a physiological context, we generated transgenic mice overexpressing Pnn mutant in skeletal muscle. We found that overexpression of the CCD reduces endogenous Pnn expression in cultured cell lines as well as in transgenic skeletal muscle fibers. Pnn mutant mice exhibited reduced body mass and impaired muscle function during development. Mutant skeletal muscles show dystrophic histological features with muscle fibers heavily loaded with centrally located myonuclei. Expression profiling and pathway analysis identified over-representation of genes in gene categories associated with muscle contraction, specifically those related to slow type fiber. In addition nebulin (NEB) expression level is repressed in Pnn mutant skeletal muscle. We conclude that Pnn downregulation in skeletal muscle causes a muscular dystrophic phenotype associated with NEB deficiency and the CCD domain is incapable of replacing full length Pnn in terms of functional capacity.

  2. The Slow:Fast substitution ratio reveals changing patterns of natural selection in gamma-proteobacterial genomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alm, Eric; Shapiro, B. Jesse

    2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Different microbial species are thought to occupy distinct ecological niches, subjecting each species to unique selective constraints, which may leave a recognizable signal in their genomes. Thus, it may be possible to extract insight into the genetic basis of ecological differences among lineages by identifying unusual patterns of substitutions in orthologous gene or protein sequences. We use the ratio of substitutions in slow versus fast-evolving sites (nucleotides in DNA, or amino acids in protein sequence) to quantify deviations from the typical pattern of selective constraint observed across bacterial lineages. We propose that elevated S:F in one branch (an excess of slow-site substitutions) can indicate a functionally-relevant change, due to either positive selection or relaxed evolutionary constraint. In a genome-wide comparative study of gamma-proteobacterial proteins, we find that cell-surface proteins involved with motility and secretion functions often have high S:F ratios, while information-processing genes do not. Change in evolutionary constraints in some species is evidenced by increased S:F ratios within functionally-related sets of genes (e.g., energy production in Pseudomonas fluorescens), while other species apparently evolve mostly by drift (e.g., uniformly elevated S:F across most genes in Buchnera spp.). Overall, S:F reveals several species-specific, protein-level changes with potential functional/ecological importance. As microbial genome projects yield more species-rich gene-trees, the S:F ratio will become an increasingly powerful tool for uncovering functional genetic differences among species.

  3. TILT STABILITY, UNIFORM QUADRATIC GROWTH, AND STRONG ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Tilt stability, variational analysis, subdifferentials, quadratic growth, strong metric .... Some convex analysis. ..... Example 3.5 (Failure of subdifferential continuity).

  4. Method for crystal growth control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yates, Douglas A. (Burlington, MA); Hatch, Arthur E. (Waltham, MA); Goldsmith, Jeff M. (Medford, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of a crystalline body of a selected material is controlled so that the body has a selected cross-sectional shape. The apparatus is of the type which includes the structure normally employed in known capillary die devices as well as means for observing at least the portion of the surfaces of the growing crystalline body and the meniscus (of melt material from which the body is being pulled) including the solid/liquid/vapor junction in a direction substantially perpendicular to the meniscus surface formed at the junction when the growth of the crystalline body is under steady state conditions. The cross-sectional size of the growing crystalline body can be controlled by determining which points exhibit a sharp change in the amount of reflected radiation of a preselected wavelength and controlling the speed at which the body is being pulled or the temperature of the growth pool of melt so as to maintain those points exhibiting a sharp change at a preselected spatial position relative to a predetermined reference position. The improvement comprises reference object means positioned near the solid/liquid/vapor junction and capable of being observed by the means for observing so as to define said reference position so that the problems associated with convection current jitter are overcome.

  5. Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    Reduced models of algae growth Heikki Haario, Leonid Kalachev Marko Laine, Lappeenranta University of the phenomena studied. Here, in the case of algae growth modelling, we show how a systematic model reduction may: Algae growth modelling, asymptotic methods, model reduction, MCMC, Adaptive Markov chain Monte Carlo. 1

  6. Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

  7. From "Stages" of Business Growth to a Dynamic States Model of Entrepreneurial Growth and Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    From "Stages" of Business Growth to a Dynamic States Model of Entrepreneurial Growth and Change and Gumpert, 1985), and virtually all economic models of business creation follow firm birth with firm growth models of new business growth assume a limited number of distinct stages through #12;3 which businesses

  8. Growth in Solar Means Growth in Ohio | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 BudgetGoals andSenate | DepartmentGroundwaterGrowingGrowth in

  9. Spallation in ductile void growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, J.N.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematical model of ductile void growth under the application of a mean tensile stress is applied to the problem of spallation in solids. Calculation of plate-impact spallation in copper (peak compressive stress approx. 29 kbar) shows good agreement with the dynamically measured spall signal. A second calculation, using identical material parameters, of explosively produced spallation in copper (peak compressive stress approx. 250 kbar) does very well in reproducing experimentally observed multiple spall thicknesses as observed by dynamic x-radiographic techniques. This theoretical model thus appears applicable to a wide range of dynamic uniaxial-strain loading conditions, bridging a gap that has been thought to exist for some time.

  10. Fostering Growth | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed offOCHCO2: FinalOffers3.pdf0-45.pdf0 Budget Fossil Energy FY 2010 Budget FossilThirdFostering Growth

  11. A PERIOD-LUMINOSITY RELATION FOR THE SLOW VARIATIONS OF LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLES RICHARD B. STOTHERS AND CHAO-WEN CHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fridlind, Ann

    A PERIOD-LUMINOSITY RELATION FOR THE SLOW VARIATIONS OF LUMINOUS BLUE VARIABLES RICHARD B. STOTHERS of light and color variation displayed by many luminous blue variables show mean ``periods. INTRODUCTION Luminous blue variables (LBVs) comprise a class of intrin- sically bright stars that display

  12. Acoustic waves in a Biot-type porous snow model: The fast slow wave in light snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidler, Rolf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave velocities, attenuation and reflection coefficients in snow can not be explained by the widely used elastic or viscoelastic models for wave propagation. Instead, Biot's model of wave propagation in porous materials should be used. However, the application of Biot's model is difficult due to the large property space of the underlying porous material. Here we use the properties of ice and air as well as empirical relationships to define the properties of snow as a function of porosity. This reduction allows to predict phase velocities and attenuation of the shear- and compressional-waves as functions of porosity or density. For light snow the peculiarity was found that the velocity of the compressional wave of the first kind is lower than the compressional wave of the second kind that is commonly referred to as the "slow" wave. The reversal of the velocities comes with an increase of attenuation for the first compressional wave. This is in line with the common observation that sound is strongly absorbed af...

  13. Update on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Casella, Andrew M.; Warren, Glen A.; Gavron, Victor A.; Danon, Yaron; Weltz, Adam; Harris, Jason; Imel, G. R.; Stewart, T.

    2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) of next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT supports a multi-institutional collaboration to address the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) as an active, nondestructive assay method. LSDS has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than today’s confirmatory assay methods, for which typical uncertainties are approximately 10%. LSDS techniques are sensitive to the fission resonances in the energy range of ~0.1-1000 eV, enabling their use to determine the mass content of the fissile isotopes in used fuel. This paper will present an update with regard to applying LSDS for used fuel assay and the development of algorithms to extract fissile isotopic masses from the used fuel.

  14. Effect of non-uniform slow wave structure in a relativistic backward wave oscillator with a resonant reflector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Changhua; Xiao, Renzhen; Sun, Jun; Song, Zhimin; Huo, Shaofei; Bai, Xianchen; Shi, Yanchao; Liu, Guozhi [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)] [Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Northwest Institute of Nuclear Technology, Xi'an 710024 (China)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper provides a fresh insight into the effect of non-uniform slow wave structure (SWS) used in a relativistic backward wave oscillator (RBWO) with a resonant reflector. Compared with the uniform SWS, the reflection coefficient of the non-uniform SWS is higher, leading to a lower modulating electric field in the resonant reflector and a larger distance to maximize the modulation current. Moreover, for both types of RBWOs, stronger standing-wave field takes place at the rear part of the SWS. In addition, besides Cerenkov effects, the energy conversion process in the RBWO strongly depends on transit time effects. Thus, the matching condition between the distributions of harmonic current and standing wave field provides a profound influence on the beam-wave interaction. In the non-uniform RBWO, the region with a stronger standing wave field corresponds to a higher fundamental harmonic current distribution. Particle-in-cell simulations show that with a diode voltage of 1.02 MV and beam current of 13.2 kA, a microwave power of 4 GW has been obtained, compared to that of 3 GW in the uniform RBWO.

  15. D-Factor: A Quantitative Model of Application Slow-Down in Multi-Resource Shared Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lim, Seung-Hwan [ORNL] [ORNL; Huh, Jae-Seok [ORNL] [ORNL; Kim, Youngjae [ORNL] [ORNL; Shipman, Galen M [ORNL] [ORNL; Das, Chita [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA] [Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Scheduling multiple jobs onto a platform enhances system utilization by sharing resources. The benefits from higher resource utilization include reduced cost to construct, operate, and maintain a system, which often include energy consumption. Maximizing these benefits comes at a price - resource contention among jobs increases job completion time. In this paper, we analyze slow-downs of jobs due to contention for multiple resources in a system; referred to as dilation factor. We observe that multiple-resource contention creates non-linear dilation factors of jobs. From this observation, we establish a general quantitative model for dilation factors of jobs in multi-resource systems. A job is characterized by a vector-valued loading statistics and dilation factors of a job set are given by a quadratic function of their loading vectors. We demonstrate how to systematically characterize a job, maintain the data structure to calculate the dilation factor (loading matrix), and calculate the dilation factor of each job. We validate the accuracy of the model with multiple processes running on a native Linux server, virtualized servers, and with multiple MapReduce workloads co-scheduled in a cluster. Evaluation with measured data shows that the D-factor model has an error margin of less than 16%. We also show that the model can be integrated with an existing on-line scheduler to minimize the makespan of workloads.

  16. Phenomenological approach for describing environment dependent growths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dibyendu Biswas; Swarup Poria

    2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Different classes of phenomenological universalities of environment dependent growths have been proposed. The logistic as well as environment dependent West-type allometry based biological growth can be explained in this proposed framework of phenomenological description. It is shown that logistic and environment dependent West-type growths are phenomenologically identical in nature. However there is a difference between them in terms of coefficients involved in the phenomenological descriptions. It is also established that environment independent and enviornment dependent biological growth processes lead to the same West-type biological growth equation. Involuted Gompertz function, used to describe biological growth processes undergoing atrophy or a demographic and economic system undergoing involution or regression, can be addressed in this proposed environment dependent description. In addition, some other phenomenological descriptions have been examined in this proposed framework and graphical representations of variation of different parameters involved in the description are executed.

  17. Synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pena, Louis A.; Zamora, Paul; Lin, Xinhua; Glass, John D.

    2007-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs having at least one peptide chain that binds a heparin-binding growth factor receptor, covalently bound to a hydrophobic linker, which is in turn covalently bound to a non-signaling peptide that includes a heparin-binding domain. The synthetic heparin-binding growth factor analogs are useful as soluble biologics or as surface coatings for medical devices.

  18. Running Jobs Intermittently Slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15Rotary Firing inRotaryRui Data

  19. "Conflict Between Economic Growth and Environmental Protection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dr. Bryan Czech, resident, Center for the Advancement of the Steady State of the Economy Presentation: Presentation Abstract: Abstract Conflict Between Economic Growth and...

  20. Interface control and snow crystal growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jessica Li; Laura P. Schaposnik

    2015-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth of snow crystals is dependent on the temperature and saturation of the environment. In the case of dendrites, Reiter's local two-dimensional model provides a realistic approach to the study of dendrite growth. In this paper we obtain a new geometric rule that incorporates interface control, a basic mechanism of crystallization that is not taken into account in the original Reiter's model. By defining two new variables, growth latency and growth direction, our improved model gives a realistic model not only for dendrite but also for plate forms.

  1. Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hastings, Alan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EDITORIAL Theoretical Ecology: Continued growth and successof areas in theoretical ecology. Among the highlights areyear represent theoretical ecology from around the world: 20

  2. Unlocking Growth Opportunities for Minority Businesses Through...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    economic growth. At the Energy Innovation Portal, the Department's hub for technology transfer resources, minority owned firms and other businesses can browse through the patents...

  3. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  4. Thermomechanical cavity-growth modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glass, R.E.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of recent field tests, laboratory studies, and modeling efforts in UCG have indicated that the thermal and mechanical properties of coal may be the controlling parameters in determining initial cavity shape. In examining this possibility, laboratory efforts have been directed at determining temperature and bedding plane dependent properties of coal. A thermomechanical model which uses these properties has indicated that the cavity shapes seen at both the Hanna and Hoe Creek test sites result from the temperature dependent properties of the coal such as the coefficients of thermal expansion and the elastic moduli. The model determines stress levels and uses a simple bedding plane dependent stress failure mechanism to determine cavity growth.

  5. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, E.D.

    1992-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A method is disclosed for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B[sub x]O[sub y] are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T[sub m1] of the oxide of boron (T[sub m1]=723 K for boron oxide B[sub 2]O[sub 3]), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T[sub m2] of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm[sup 2]. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 [mu]m. 7 figs.

  6. Controlled growth of semiconductor crystals

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bourret-Courchesne, Edith D. (Richmond, CA)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for growth of III-V, II-VI and related semiconductor single crystals that suppresses random nucleation and sticking of the semiconductor melt at the crucible walls. Small pieces of an oxide of boron B.sub.x O.sub.y are dispersed throughout the comminuted solid semiconductor charge in the crucible, with the oxide of boron preferably having water content of at least 600 ppm. The crucible temperature is first raised to a temperature greater than the melt temperature T.sub.m1 of the oxide of boron (T.sub.m1 =723.degree. K. for boron oxide B.sub.2 O.sub.3), and the oxide of boron is allowed to melt and form a reasonably uniform liquid layer between the crucible walls and bottom surfaces and the still-solid semiconductor charge. The temperature is then raised to approximately the melt temperature T.sub.m2 of the semiconductor charge material, and crystal growth proceeds by a liquid encapsulated, vertical gradient freeze process. About half of the crystals grown have a dislocation density of less than 1000/cm.sup.2. If the oxide of boron has water content less than 600 ppm, the crucible material should include boron nitride, a layer of the inner surface of the crucible should be oxidized before the oxide of boron in the crucible charge is melted, and the sum of thicknesses of the solid boron oxide layer and liquid boron oxide layer should be at least 50 .mu.m.

  7. Surveillance of Craniopharyngioma Cyst Growth in Children Treated With Proton Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winkfield, Karen M. [Harvard Radiation Oncology Program, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)], E-mail: kwinkfield@partners.org; Linsenmeier, Claudia; Yock, Torunn I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Grant, P. Ellen [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. Sc.D. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Butler, William E. [Department of Neurosurgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Tarbell, Nancy J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Craniopharyngiomas are benign, slow-growing tumors that frequently contain a cystic component. Even with gross total resection, the cyst can reform and cause symptoms. Fluctuations in cyst volume during radiotherapy (RT) can affect treatment planning and delivery. The aim of this study was to report our experience with cyst enlargement during conformal proton RT for children with craniopharyngioma and to make recommendations regarding mid-treatment surveillance. Methods and Materials: Between January 2001 and August 2007, 24 children (aged {<=}18 years) underwent proton RT at the Massachusetts General Hospital for craniopharyngioma. For all 24 patients, tumor size on magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography was measured before and after RT. Surveillance imaging was available for review on 17 patients. During RT, cyst growth was assessed to determine whether the treatment fields needed to be altered. Results: Of the 17 children who underwent repeat imaging during RT, 6 required intervention because of changes in cyst dimensions. Four patients (24%) had cyst growth beyond the original treatment fields, requiring enlargement of the treatment plan. One patient's treatment field was reduced after a decreased in cyst size. Cyst drainage was performed in another patient to avoid enlargement of the treatment fields. Conclusion: In patients undergoing highly conformal RT for craniopharyngiomas with cysts, routine imaging during treatment is recommended. Surveillance imaging should be performed at least every 2 weeks during proton RT in an attempt to avoid marginal failure. Craniopharyngiomas with large cystic components or enlargement during treatment might require weekly imaging.

  8. The response of self-graviting protostellar discs to slow reduction in cooling timescale: the fragmentation boundary revisited

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Clarke; E. Harper-Clark; G. Lodato

    2007-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of previous studies of the fragmentation of self-gravitating protostellar discs have modeled radiative cooling with a cooling timescale (t_{cool}) parameterised as a simple multiple (beta_{cool}) of the local dynamical timescale. Such studies have delineated the `fragmentation boundary' in terms of a critical value of beta_{cool} (beta_{crit}), where the disc fragments if beta_{cool} < beta_{crit}. Such an approach however begs the question of how in reality a disc could ever be assembled with beta_{cool} < beta_{crit}. Here we adopt the more realistic approach of gradually reducing beta_{cool}, as might correspond to changes in thermal regime due to secular changes in the disc density profile. We find that when beta_{cool} is gradually reduced (on a timescale longer than t_{cool}), the disc is stabilised against fragmentation, compared with models in which beta_{cool} is reduced rapidly. We therefore conclude that a disc's ability to remain in a self-regulated, self-gravitating state (without fragmentation) is partly dependent on its thermal history, as well as its current cooling rate. Nevertheless, a slow reduction in t_{cool} appears only to lower the fragmentation boundary by about a factor two in t_{cool} and thus only permits maximum alpha values (parameterising the efficiency of angular momentum transfer in the disc) that are about a factor two higher than determined hitherto. Our results therefore do not undermine the notion of a fundamental upper limit to the heating rate that can be delivered by gravitational instabilities before the disc is subject to fragmentation. An important implication of this work, therefore, is that self-gravitating discs can enter into the regime of fragmentation via secular evolution and it is not necessary to invoke rapid (impulsive) events to trigger fragmentation.

  9. Time-resolved analysis of Fermi gamma-ray bursts with fast- and slow-cooled synchrotron photon models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgess, J. M.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Goldstein, A.; Bhat, P. N.; Paciesas, W. S.; Xiong, S. [University of Alabama in Huntsville, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Greiner, J.; Gruber, D.; Kienlin, A.; Rau, A. [Max-Planck-Institut für extraterrestrische Physik, Giessenbachstrasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kouveliotou, C. [Space Science Office, VP62, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States); McGlynn, S. [Exzellence Cluster "Universe," Technische Universitt Mnchen, Boltzmannstrasse 2, D-85748, Garching (Germany); Meegan, C. A. [Universities Space Research Association, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States); Axelsson, M. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Baring, M. G. [Rice University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, MS-108, P.O. Box 1892, Houston, TX 77251 (United States); Dermer, C. D. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375-5352 (United States); Iyyani, S. [The Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Kocevski, D., E-mail: james.m.burgess@nasa.gov, E-mail: Rob.Preece@nasa.gov, E-mail: shabuiyyani@gmail.com, E-mail: baring@rice.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Department of Physics, and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); and others

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved spectroscopy is performed on eight bright, long gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) dominated by single emission pulses that were observed with the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Fitting the prompt radiation of GRBs by empirical spectral forms such as the Band function leads to ambiguous conclusions about the physical model for the prompt radiation. Moreover, the Band function is often inadequate to fit the data. The GRB spectrum is therefore modeled with two emission components consisting of optically thin non-thermal synchrotron radiation from relativistic electrons and, when significant, thermal emission from a jet photosphere, which is represented by a blackbody spectrum. To produce an acceptable fit, the addition of a blackbody component is required in five out of the eight cases. We also find that the low-energy spectral index ? is consistent with a synchrotron component with ? = –0.81 ± 0.1. This value lies between the limiting values of ? = –2/3 and ? = –3/2 for electrons in the slow- and fast-cooling regimes, respectively, suggesting ongoing acceleration at the emission site. The blackbody component can be more significant when using a physical synchrotron model instead of the Band function, illustrating that the Band function does not serve as a good proxy for a non-thermal synchrotron emission component. The temperature and characteristic emission-region size of the blackbody component are found to, respectively, decrease and increase as power laws with time during the prompt phase. In addition, we find that the blackbody and non-thermal components have separate temporal behaviors as far as their respective flux and spectral evolutions.

  10. Progress on Establishing the Feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy for Direct Measurement of Plutonium in Used Fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Anderson, Kevin K.; Bowyer, Sonya M.; Casella, Andrew M.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Smith, L. E.; Gavron, A.; Devlin, M.; O'Donnell, J. M.; Haight, R. C.; Danon, Yaron; Becker, Bjorn; Imel, G. R.; Beller, D.

    2012-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Developing a method for the accurate, direct, and independent assay of the fissile isotopes in bulk materials (such as used fuel) of next-generation domestic nuclear fuel cycles is a goal of the Office of Nuclear Energy, Fuel Cycle R&D, Material Protection and Control Technology (MPACT) Campaign. To meet this goal, MPACT continues to support a multi-institutional collaboration to address the feasibility of Lead Slowing Down Spectroscopy (LSDS) as an active nondestructive assay method that has the potential to provide independent, direct measurement of Pu and U isotopic masses in used fuel with an uncertainty considerably lower than the approximately 10% typical of today’s confirmatory assay methods. An LSDS is comprised of a stack of lead (typically 1-6 m3) in which materials to be measured are placed in the lead and a pulse of neutrons is injected. The neutrons in this pulse lose energy due to inelastic and (subsequently) elastic scattering and the average energy of the neutrons decreases as the time increases by a well-defined relationship. In the interrogation energy region (~0.1-1000 eV) the neutrons have little energy spread (~30%) about the average neutron energy. Due to this characteristic, the energy of the (assay) neutrons can then be determined by measuring the time elapsed since the neutron pulse. By measuring the induced fission neutrons emitted from the used fuel, it is possible to determine isotopic-mass content by unfolding the unique structure of isotopic resonances across the interrogation energy region. This paper will present efforts on the development of time-spectral analysis algorithms, fast neutron detector advances, and validation and testing measurements.

  11. Choices for Growth: Quality of Life and the Natural Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, John

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    of interac- 6 Choices for Growth Smart growth A way to restore community and economic vitality while preserving natural areas In recent years there has been a renaissance in urban design that focuses on the human scale. Several names are used, including smart... growth, sensible growth, livable communities, and new urbanism. We use smart growth because it has the broadest base of practice in the US. Smart growth means development that ac- commodates growth in economically viable, environmentally responsible...

  12. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in IndiaUnderstanding Regional Economic Growth in India Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India* Jeffrey D. Sachs Director The Earth Institute at Columbia_ramiah@yahoo.co.uk Asian Economic Papers 1:3 © 2002 The Earth Institute at Columbia University and the Massachusetts

  13. Export Growth and Credit Constraints Tibor Besedes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Suman

    Export Growth and Credit Constraints Tibor Besedes Byung-Cheol Kim Volodymyr Lugovskyy§ May 14, 2014 Abstract We investigate the effect of credit constraints on the growth of exports at the micro of exporting, but not in later stages. Our empirical results using product level data on exports to twelve

  14. Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs, Nirupam Bajpai and Ananthi Ramiah Papers #12;Understanding Regional Economic Growth in India Jeffrey D. Sachs Center for International Development (CID) Harvard University Ananthi_Ramiah@harvard.edu This paper was prepared for the Asian Economic

  15. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Sustainable syntrophic growth of Dehalococcoides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alvarez-Cohen, Lisa

    with the capabilities of DVH to ferment lactate to provide H2 and acetate for growth, along with potential benefits from proton translocation, cobalamin-salvaging and amino acid biosynthesis, whereas MC in the tri). They exhibit low growth rates, specific obligate nutrient requirements (hydrogen as electron donor, acetate

  16. Graphene Growth on Low Carbon Solubility Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wofford, Joseph Monroe

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    preparation of Cu substrates will lead to larger grapheneGraphene Growth on Cu(100), Cu(111), and Au(111) Substrate selection and preparationGraphene Growth on Cu(100), Cu(111), and Au(111) 3.1 Substrate selection and preparation

  17. Fish production: integrating growth, mortality, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limburg, Karin E.

    1 Fish production: integrating growth, mortality, and population density K. Limburg lecture notes, Fisheries Science Outline: 1. Biological production ­ a critical ecological parameter 2. How to compute production from a simple biomass model 3. Production:biomass ratios 4. Growth: mortality ratios Reading

  18. Beer and Economic Growth Dr. Martin Shields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beer and Economic Growth Dr. Martin Shields Regional Economics Institute Colorado State University to the rest of the world #12;Industry Trends · Over the past 10 years, the growth in craft beer has significantly altered the industry · While overall beer sales are relatively flat, market share of craft brewers

  19. Digital electronic bone growth stimulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to the electrical treatment of biological tissue. In particular, the present invention discloses a device that produces discrete electrical pulse trains for treating osteoporosis and accelerating bone growth. According to its major aspects and broadly stated, the present invention consists of an electrical circuit configuration capable of generating Bassett-type waveforms shown with alternative signals provide for the treatment of either fractured bones or osteoporosis. The signal generator comprises a quartz clock, an oscillator circuit, a binary divider chain, and a plurality of simple, digital logic gates. Signals are delivered efficiently, with little or no distortion, and uniformly distributed throughout the area of injury. Perferably, power is furnished by widely available and inexpensive radio batteries, needing replacement only once in several days. The present invention can be affixed to a medical cast without a great increase in either weight or bulk. Also, the disclosed stimulator can be used to treat osteoporosis or to strengthen a healing bone after the cast has been removed by attaching the device to the patient`s skin or clothing.

  20. Effect of Applied Toroidal Electric Field on the Growth/Decay of Plateau-Phase Runaway Electron Currents in DIII-D

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hollmann, E. M. [University of California, San Diego; Parks, P. B. [General Atomics; Humphrey, D. A. [General Atomics, San Diego; Brooks, N. H. [General Atomics, San Diego; Commaux, Nicolas JC [ORNL; Eidietis, N. W. [General Atomics, San Diego; Evans, T.E. [General Atomics, San Diego; James, A. N. [University of California, San Diego; Jernigan, T. C. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Jernigan, Thomas C [ORNL; Munoz, J. [Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU); Strait, E. J. [General Atomics, San Diego; Tsui, C. [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON, Canada; Wesley, J. C. [General Atomics; Yu, J.H. [University of California, San Diego

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Large relativistic runaway electron currents (0.1-0.5 MA) persisting for similar to 100 ms are created in the DIII-D tokamak during rapid discharge shut down caused by argon pellet injection. Slow upward and downward ramps in runaway currents were found in response to externally applied loop voltages. Comparison between the observed current growth/decay rate and the rate expected from the knock-on avalanche mechanism suggests that classical collisional dissipation of runaways alone cannot account for the measured growth/damping rates. It appears that a fairly constant anomalous dissipation rate of order 10 s(-1) exists, possibly stemming from radial transport or direct orbit losses to the vessel walls, although the possibility of an apparent loss due to current profile shrinking cannot be ruled out at present.

  1. Gauging Employment Growth in Wisconsin: State-By-State Comparisons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saldin, Dilano

    Gauging Employment Growth in Wisconsin: State; 2 Employment growth in Wisconsin continues to lag both the national rate of job growth as well as the rates of employment increase in most other states

  2. adrenomedullin affects growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    based on the growth index analysis we find that the growth data favor the clustered dark energy scenario. Basilakos, Spyros 2014-01-01 96 THE GROWTH OF EUPHRASIA IN CULTIVATION...

  3. Growth, structural and optical characterization of L-histidine 4-nitrophenolate (LHPNP) single crystals for NLO applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mahadevan, M., E-mail: devanphysics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Adhiparasakthi Engineering College, Melmaruvathur - 603319 (India); Ramachandran, K., E-mail: ramach76@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, SRM University - Vadapalani Campus, Chennai -600026 (India); Anandan, P., E-mail: anandantcet@gmail.com [Department of Physics, Thiruvalluvar College of Engineering and Technology, Vandavasi-604 505, India and Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-Ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan); Arivanandhan, M., E-mail: arivucz@gmail.com, E-mail: royhaya@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp; Hayakawa, Y., E-mail: arivucz@gmail.com, E-mail: royhaya@ipc.shizuoka.ac.jp [Research Institute of Electronics, Shizuoka University, 3-5-1 Johoku, Naka-Ku, Hamamatsu 432-8011 (Japan)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Using slow evaporation solution growth technique, single crystals of L-histidine-4-nitro phenolate has been grown from the solution. Structural analyses were carried out by powder x-ray diffraction, FT-Raman, Fourier Transform Infrared and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectral methods to conform the grown crystals. Thermal stability of the grown crystals was studied by thermo-gravimetric (TG) and differential thermal analyses (DTA). UV-Vis spectral analysis has been carried out to find the transparency of the grown crystal. Nonlinear optical property has been confirmed by Kurtz powder technique. The PL measurements were carried out in Perkin Elmer LS 55 Luminescence spectrometer using 410 nm as excitation wavelength. The observed properties have confirmed that the grown crystal is suitable for nonlinear optical applications.

  4. An experiment to determine the effect of the growth hormone of the anterior lobe of the pituitary gland on swine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, Dorris David

    1940-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the parathyroids, removed the thyroid and reported that the gland was not essential for l ife , but that thyroidectomy caused lessened growth and slow ossification. 5 Horsley qb33wj stateJ t9at t9e uit4itary has essential 1or li1e as all o1 9is ouerateJ anivals... to receive the ova, and prevents the development of estrus. 15 Fraenxel qbV87(bVb8j uro2eJ t9at in t9e rammit t9e revo2al o1 mot9 o2aries or t9e Jestr4dtion o1 t9e doruora l4tea J4rin0 t9e 1irst sic Jays o1 ure0nandy in2ariamly tervinateJ t9at ure0nandy...

  5. Homebuyer Solar Option and Solar Offset Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Senate Bill 1 of 2006, which established the statewide California Solar Initiative, also required the California Energy Commission (CEC) to implement regulations that require sellers of production...

  6. Insights from Agricultural GHG Offset studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    Ron Sands PNNL Maryland Man Keun Kim PNNL Maryland Francisco de Lachesnaye EPA Heng-Chi Lee Waterloo

  7. Discounts, Fungibility and Agricultural GHG Offset projects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCarl, Bruce A.

    in MMT of Carbon Equivalents Soil Carbon Sequestration Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting of Carbon Equivalents Carbon Sequestration from Trees Discount for Saturating Sinks No Sink Discounting 0.S. Agricultural and Forest Carbon Sequestration," 2003. #12;FungibilityFungibility A number of concepts have

  8. Experience with Offset Collisions in the LHC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papotti, G; Calaga, R; Follin, F; Giachino, R; Herr, W; Miyamoto, R; Pieloni, T; Schaumann, M

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To keep the luminosity under control, some experiments require the adjustment of the luminosity during a fill, socalled luminosity levelling. One option is the separate the beams transversely and adjust the separation to the desired collision rate. The results from controlled experiments are reported and interpreted. The feasibility of this method for ultimate luminosities is discussed.

  9. Shape Smoothing using Double Offsets Frederic Chazal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thibert, Boris

    . Assuming the solid to be made of a hard material (like steel) one embed it in a bloc of wax. Then one uses a ball of given radius to remove as #12;much wax as possible to obtain the solid on the middle of the fig it with wax and remove (from the inside!) as much wax as possible with a ball. Taking again the complement

  10. Explaining the Price of Voluntary Carbon Offsets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Marc N.; Kotchen, Matthew

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on fuel efficiency, hydropower, fuel substitution, solarbiomass methane, wind, hydropower, solar, and other. 8 OECDtypes of biomass methane, hydropower, so- lar, and wind. All

  11. Sandbag Carbon Offset Map | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with form HistoryRistma AG Jump to:EnergysourceRamon, California:Sand

  12. Financing Residential Energy Efficiency with Carbon Offsets

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy June 6-7, 2013 MeetingEA # 1440Energy Upgrades forFinancing

  13. Geothermal Energy Growth Continues, Industry Survey Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey released by the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) shows continued growth in the number of new geothermal power projects under development in the United States, a 20% increase since January of this year.

  14. Economic Redevelopment and Growth Program (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Economic Redevelopment and Growth program (ERG) is an incentive for real estate development projects that have a financing gap, defined as having insufficient revenues to support the project debt...

  15. New Jersey Business Growth Fund (New Jersey)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Creditworthy small or mid-sized companies that are creating or retaining jobs in New Jersey can apply for financing through the New Jersey Business Growth Fund, a joint program of the EDA and PNC...

  16. Selective anisotropic growth of zeolite crystals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Desai, Tasha April

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Precise control over particle size and morphology is emerging as a critical issue in the design of nanostructured materials. The explosive growth of nanoparticle synthesis is a good example of this. As material chemists have developed the ability...

  17. Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure Development Growth of the NGV Market: Lessons Learned Roadmap for Infrastructure Development Presented at...

  18. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Crystalline Ice Growth on Pt(111): Observation of a Hydrophobic Water Monolayer. Abstract: The...

  19. Epitaxial Growth and Properties of Doped Transition Metal and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of crystalline oxide film growth using vacuum methods is reviewed and discussed with an eye toward gaining fundamental insights into the relationships between growth process and...

  20. Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium Deposition by in situ Electrochemical Direct Visualization of Initial SEI Morphology and Growth Kinetics During Lithium...

  1. allometric appendage growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 PERSPECTIVES Allometric growth, life-history invariants and population energetics Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: IDEAS AND PERSPECTIVES Allometric growth,...

  2. Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies: Getting Started Experience...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies: Getting Started Experience from Six Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Low-Carbon Growth Country Studies:...

  3. aqueous chemical growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technische Universiteit Delft 36 Growth of Large-Area Aligned Molybdenum Nanowires by High Temperature Chemical Vapor Deposition: Synthesis, Growth Mechanism, and Device...

  4. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of a CZT Growth Tip...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Analysis of a CZT Growth Tip from a Vertical Gradient Freeze Furnace. Electron Backscatter Diffraction Analysis of a CZT Growth Tip from a Vertical Gradient Freeze Furnace....

  5. Growth and propagation of Acer grandidentatum Nutt.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tankersley, Boyce Elbert

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    into the graduate school process. Joseph Calabrese, Lisa Lipscomb, Loras Freiberger, Sylvia Meadows, and Austin Stockton often helped to put matters into their proper perspective. Special thanks to Carol Leach for her advice and help during my studies. The many... on subsequent growth . Once the first flush was completed (June), and a terminal bud was set, fertilization was started to determine if any of the treatments could encourage subsequent growth. The data were analyzed using a general linear model analysis...

  6. Spectroscopic studies of metal growth on oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, Kai

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    : Chemistry SPECTROSCOPIC STUDIES OF METAL GROWTH ON OXIDES A Thesis by KAI LUO Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style a d content by: avid W. Goodman.... , Jilin University, P. R. China Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr, David W. Goodman Metal/oxide chemistry and metal cluster growth on oxides are fundamental to our understanding of the catalytic activity and selectivity of metal catalysts, thus...

  7. A Geometric Theory of Growth Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arash Yavari

    2009-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we formulate a geometric theory of the mechanics of growing solids. Bulk growth is modeled by a material manifold with an evolving metric. Time dependence of metric represents the evolution of the stress-free (natural) configuration of the body in response to changes in mass density and "shape". We show that time dependency of material metric will affect the energy balance and the entropy production inequality; both the energy balance and the entropy production inequality have to be modified. We then obtain the governing equations covariantly by postulating invariance of energy balance under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms. We use the principle of maximum entropy production in deriving an evolution equation for the material metric. In the case of isotropic growth, we find those growth distributions that do not result in residual stresses. We then look at Lagrangian field theory of growing elastic solids. We will use the Lagrange-d'Alembert's principle with Rayleigh's dissipation functions to derive all the governing equations. We make an explicit connection between our geometric theory and the conventional multiplicative decomposition of deformation gradient $\\mathbf{F}=\\mathbf{F}_e\\mathbf{F}_g$ into growth and elastic parts. We linearize the nonlinear theory and derive a linearized theory of growth mechanics. Finally, we obtain the stress-free growth distributions in the linearized theory.

  8. Apparatus for silicon web growth of higher output and improved growth stability

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Charles S. (Penn Hills, PA); Piotrowski, Paul A. (Monroeville, PA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This disclosure describes an apparatus to improve the web growth attainable from prior web growth configurations. This apparatus modifies the heat loss at the growth interface in a manner that minimizes thickness variations across the web, especially regions of the web adjacent to the two bounding dendrites. In the unmodified configuration, thinned regions of web, adjacent to the dendrites, were found to be the origin of crystal degradation which ultimately led to termination of the web growth. According to the present invention, thinning adjacent to the dendrites is reduced and the incidence of crystal degradation is similarly reduced.

  9. Microstructure and corrosion behavior of die-cast AM60B magnesium alloys in a complex salt solution: A slow positron beam study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Y.F. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Qin, Q.L. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Yang, W. [Wuhan University] [Wuhan University; Wen, W. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Zhai, T. [University of Kentucky] [University of Kentucky; Yu, B. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Liu, D.Y. [University of Alberta] [University of Alberta; Luo, A. [GM Research and Development Center] [GM Research and Development Center; Song, GuangLing [ORNL] [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microstructure and corrosion behavior of high pressure die-cast (HPDC) and super vacuum die-cast (SVDC) AM60B magnesium alloys were investigated in a complex salt solution using slow positron beam technique and potentiodynamic polarization tests. The experiments revealed that a CaCO3 film was formed on the surface of the alloys and that the rate of CaCO3 formation for the SVDC alloy with immersion time was slower than that of the HPDC alloy. The larger volume fraction of b-phase in the skin layer of the SVDC alloy than that of the HPDC alloy was responsible for the better corrosion resistance.

  10. The use of slow strain rate technique for studying stress corrosion cracking of an advanced silver-bearing aluminum-lithium alloy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frefer, Abdulbaset Ali; Raddad, Bashir S. [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering/Tripoli University, Tripoli (Libya); Abosdell, Alajale M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering/Mergeb University, Garaboli (Libya)

    2013-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present study, stress corrosion cracking (SCC) behavior of naturally aged advanced silver-bearing Al-Li alloy in NaCl solution was investigated using slow strain rate test (SSRT) method. The SSRT’s were conducted at different strain rates and applied potentials at room temperature. The results were discussed based on percent reductions in tensile elongation in a SCC-causing environment over those in air tended to express the SCC susceptbility of the alloy under study at T3. The SCC behavior of the alloy was also discussed based on the microstructural and fractographic examinations.

  11. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doerry, Armin W. (Albuquerque, NM); Heard, Freddie E. (Albuquerque, NM); Cordaro, J. Thomas (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  12. Trade policy and its impact on economic growth: Can openness speed up output growth?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krivobokova, Tatyana

    Trade policy and its impact on economic growth: Can openness speed up output growth? Felicitas Nowak-Lehmann D. 1. Introduction ''Economic theory generally supports the conclusion that trade trade, while others have failed to demonstrate this linkage''. (U. S. International Trade Commission

  13. Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Eric E.

    Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth Report Title: Coal Production@nmsu.edu #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic Growth i Disclaimer This report States Government or any agency thereof. #12;Arrowhead Center: Coal Production and Regional Economic

  14. Fractal-Mound Growth of Pentacene Thin Films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Serkan Zorba; Yonathan Shapir; Yongli Gao

    2006-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The growth mechanism of pentacene film formation on SiO2 substrate was investigated with a combination of atomic force microscopy measurements and numerical modeling. In addition to the diffusion-limited aggregation (DLA) that has already been shown to govern the growth of the ordered pentacene thin films, it is shown here for the first time that the Schwoebel barrier effect steps in and disrupts the desired epitaxial growth for the subsequent layers, leading to mound growth. The terraces of the growing mounds have a fractal dimension of 1.6, indicating a lateral DLA shape. This novel growth morphology thus combines horizontal DLA-like growth with vertical mound growth.

  15. In situ growth rate measurements by normal-incidence reflectance during MOVPE growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hou, H.Q.; Breiland, W.G.; Hammons, B.E.; Chui, H.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an in situ technique for monitoring metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy growth by normal-incidence reflectance. This technique is used to calibrate the growth rate periodically and to monitor the growth process routinely. It is not only a precise tool to measure the growth rate, but also very useful in identifying unusal problems during a growth run, such as depletion of source material, deterioration of surface morphology, and problems associated with an improper growht procedure. We will also present an excellent reproducibility ({+-}0.3% over a course of more than 100 runs) of the cavity wavelength of vertical-cavity surface emitting laser structures with periodic calibration by this in situ technique.

  16. A Geometric Theory of Growth Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yavari, Arash

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we formulate a geometric theory of the mechanics of growing solids. Bulk growth is modeled by a material manifold with an evolving metric. Time dependence of metric represents the evolution of the stress-free (natural) configuration of the body in response to changes in mass density and "shape". We show that time dependency of material metric will affect the energy balance and the entropy production inequality; both the energy balance and the entropy production inequality have to be modified. We then obtain the governing equations covariantly by postulating invariance of energy balance under time-dependent spatial diffeomorphisms. We use the principle of maximum entropy production in deriving an evolution equation for the material metric. In the case of isotropic growth, we find those growth distributions that do not result in residual stresses. We then look at Lagrangian field theory of growing elastic solids. We will use the Lagrange-d'Alembert's principle with Rayleigh's dissipation functions...

  17. Direct growth of graphene on Si(111)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thanh Trung, Pham, E-mail: phamtha@fundp.ac.be; Joucken, Frédéric; Colomer, Jean-François; Robert, Sporken [Research Center in Physics of Matter and Radiation (PMR), University of Namur (FUNDP), 61 Rue de Bruxelles, 5000 Namur (Belgium); Campos-Delgado, Jessica; Raskin, Jean-Pierre [Electrical Engineering (ELEN), Institute of Information and Communication Technologies, Electronics and Applied Mathematics (ICTEAM), Université catholique de Louvain UCL, 3 place du Levant, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium); Hackens, Benoît; Santos, Cristiane N. [Nanoscopic physics (NAPS), Institute of Condensed Matter and Nanosciences (IMCN), Université catholique de Louvain UCL, 2 chemin du Cyclotron, Louvain-la-Neuve (Belgium)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Due to the need of integrated circuit in the current silicon technology, the formation of graphene on Si wafer is highly desirable, but is still a challenge for the scientific community. In this context, we report the direct growth of graphene on Si(111) wafer under appropriate conditions using an electron beam evaporator. The structural quality of the material is investigated in detail by reflection high energy electron diffraction, Auger electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, high resolution scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and scanning tunneling microscopy. Our experimental results confirm that the quality of graphene is strongly dependent on the growth time during carbon atoms deposition.

  18. Klebsiella pneumoniae inoculants for enhancing plant growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Triplett, Eric W. (Middleton, WI); Kaeppler, Shawn M. (Oregon, WI); Chelius, Marisa K. (Greeley, CO)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A biological inoculant for enhancing the growth of plants is disclosed. The inoculant includes the bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101, Pantoea agglomerans P102, Klebsiella pneumoniae 342, Klebsiella pneumoniae zmvsy, Herbaspirillum seropedicae Z152, Gluconacetobacter diazotrophicus PA15, with or without a carrier. The inoculant also includes strains of the bacterium Pantoea agglomerans and K. pneumoniae which are able to enhance the growth of cereal grasses. Also disclosed are the novel bacterial strains Herbaspirillum seropedicae 2A, Pantoea agglomerans P101 and P102, and Klebsiella pneumoniae 342 and zmvsy.

  19. World economic growth pushing LNG use

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, R.L. [Mobil Oil Corp., Fairfax, VA (United States); Clary, R. [Mobil Technology Co., Dallas, TX (United States)

    1997-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Natural gas, especially liquefied (LNG), is in position to participate in the energy growth now being triggered by strong worldwide economic growth, increasingly open markets, and expanding international trade. Natural gas is abundant, burns cleanly, and is highly efficient in combined-cycle, gas-turbine power plants. Moreover, the comparative remoteness of much of the resource base to established and emerging markets can make LNG a compelling processing and transportation alternative. Discussed here are the resource distribution and emerging market opportunities that can make LNG attractive for monetizing natural-gas reserves.

  20. The Effect of Growth Volatility on Income Inequality Ho-Chuan (River) Huang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Sajjad

    positively affects growth. Barro (2000) uncovers a nonlinear inequality-growth nexus, with inequality growth in low-income ones. Rather than examining the volatility-growth or the inequality-growth linkages

  1. Surface growth effects on reactive capillary-driven flow: Lattice Boltzmann investigation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danilo Sergi; Loris Grossi; Tiziano Leidi; Alberto Ortona

    2014-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The Washburn law has always played a critical role for ceramics. In the microscale, surface forces take over volume forces and the phenomenon of spontaneous infiltration in narrow interstices becomes of particular relevance. The Lattice Boltzmann method is applied in order to ascertain the role of surface reaction and subsequent deformation of a single capillary in 2D for the linear Washburn behavior. The proposed investigation is motivated by the problem of reactive infiltration of molten silicon into carbon preforms. This is a complex phenomenon arising from the interplay between fluid flow, the transition to wetting, surface growth and heat transfer. Furthermore, it is characterized by slow infiltration velocities in narrow interstices resulting in small Reynolds numbers that are difficult to reproduce with a single capillary. In our simulations, several geometric characteristics for the capillaries are considered, as well as different infiltration and reaction conditions. The main result of our work is that the phenomenon of pore closure can be regarded as independent of the infiltration velocity, and in turn a number of other parameters. The instrumental conclusion drawn from our simulations is that short pores with wide openings and a round-shaped morphology near the throats represent the optimal configuration for the underlying structure of the porous preform in order to achieve faster infiltration. The role of the approximations is discussed in detail and the robustness of our findings is assessed.

  2. Ratchet growth in recycled PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, Darla Graff [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brown, Geoff W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mang, Joseph T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Patterson, Brian [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Olinger, Bart [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Deluca, Racci [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hagelberg, Stephanie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PBX 9502 is a plastic-bonded high explosive (PBX) containing 95 weight% TATB (triaminotrinitrobenzene) crystals in a polymer binder. TATB crystals are graphitic in nature, with a sheet-like structure and anisotropic CTE. Although the mechanism is not understood, solid-pressed TATB composites have been observed to undergo irreversible volume change ('ratchet growth') upon thermal cycling . This phenomenon has been studied but many aspects remain elusive and uncharacterized. Engineering or performance changes associated with ratchet growth have often been attributed to changes in density alone. We propose that the density changes which accompany ratchet growth involve a unique form of micro-damage distinguishable from the pore structure associated with low-pressed density. We have performed ratchet growth studies on Recycled PBX 9502 between -54 to 80{sup o}C with density changes of about 1.5%. Specimens of the same density were obtained using a lower pressure in the manufacturing process. Comparative measurements were made using quasi-static uniaxial tension tests, as well as micro x-ray computed tomography and ultra-small angle neutron scattering experiments. Through these measurements we have shown that ratchet grown PBX 9502 has properties quite different from predictions based on density alone. The pore size distribution of ratchet grown specimens is unique and easily distinguished from parts pressed to an equivalent density.

  3. Heteroepitaxial Nucleation and Oriented Growth of Manganese

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heteroepitaxial Nucleation and Oriented Growth of Manganese Oxide Islands on Carbonate Minerals-limit. Our results provide an improved basis both for the development of predictive models of contaminant Manganese oxide minerals in surface and groundwaters dissolve as Mn2+ (aq) and precipitate as manganese

  4. Growth strategies of ectothermic animals in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gotthard, Karl

    analysis is also a tool for inves- tigating hypotheses of evolutionary causes and of adaptations in general such as growth, sexual maturation and reproduction as the result of strategic decisions over an organism's life it reduces the risk of being killed before reproduction and entails a short generation time, while a large

  5. Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nanoscale Surface Topography to Guide Bone Growth P R O J E C T L E A D E R : Jirun Sun (American T S Designed and fabricated devices with nanoscale surface topography. Controlled cell alignment by varying the height and aspect ratio of the surface features. R E F E R E N C E Exploring cellular contact guidance

  6. Growth Of Oriented Crystals At Polymerized Membranes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Charych, Deborah H. (Albany, CA), Berman, Amir (Ben-Shiva, IL)

    2000-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to methods and compositions for the growth and alignment of crystals at biopolymeric films. The methods and compositions of the present invention provide means to generate a variety of dense crystalline ceramic films, with totally aligned crystals, at low temperatures and pressures, suitable for use with polymer and plastic substrates.

  7. Environmental Problems Facing Lake Tahoe Algal Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    fertilizers, which support the growth of free-floating and attached algae. Eutrophication Eutrophication refers to the effects of an overabundance of nutrients. Eutrophication occurs naturally as part. This process normally occurs over millions of years; however, we are seeing the effects of eutrophication

  8. Economic Growth and Inequality: Drawing the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    von der Heydt, Rüdiger

    and policies in later sessions #12;Economic Growth and Inequality: The Famous Kuznets Curve #12;Income Inequality #12;The New Kuznets Curve #12;Income Inequality #12;From Income Inequality to Health #12;Percent the Channels) #12;Kuznets Curves for Socially Determined Health Outcomes David Bishai, MD,MPH, PhD Professor

  9. Bioclimatology Water deficits during reproductive growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) constantly maintained at > 50% of soil available water. The treatment drought periods were: 0I) from R1 to R4 greater dry matter production than 0I and 10, and these 2 treatments produced more dry matter than 00Bioclimatology Water deficits during reproductive growth of soybeans. l. Their effects on dry

  10. Short Communication Growth of charged micelles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    nonlinearities suggests that Coulomb interactions result in an additional contribution to the free energy of an end-cap that modifies the growth law for the average micelle size. In some cases, the micelle size varies approximately as 03A6(1/2)(1+039B),where 039B > 0 depends on the renormalized coulomb charge

  11. Foreign Fishery Developments Australia Reports Growth in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ." Later studies have also shown both per capita fish and seafood consump- tion and fish prices-76, the last year of the survey. Apparent consumption per person rose another 6 percent in 1976-77 and trendsForeign Fishery Developments Australia Reports Growth in Fish Consumption and Prices Australians

  12. Emittance growth from electron beam modulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blaskiewicz, M.

    2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In linac ring colliders like MeRHIC and eRHIC a modulation of the electron bunch can lead to a modulation of the beam beam tune shift and steering errors. These modulations can lead to emittance growth. This note presents simple formulas to estimate these effects which generalize some previous results.

  13. MESOSCALE AVERAGING OF NUCLEATION AND GROWTH MODELS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burger, Martin

    MESOSCALE AVERAGING OF NUCLEATION AND GROWTH MODELS MARTIN BURGER , VINCENZO CAPASSO , AND LIVIO-Kolmogorov relations for the degree of crystallinity. By relating the computation of expected values to mesoscale averaging, we obtain a suitable description of the process at the mesoscale. We show how the variance

  14. Economic Growth, Physical Limits and Liveability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on criteria air contaminants, water use, land use, greenhouse gas emissions and solid waste disposal and population growth, impose the physical limits and then simulate household and firm responses to policy and assess the resulting implications for liveability in the region. I measure liveability using 24

  15. Graphene Layer Growth Chemistry: Five-Six-Ring Flip Reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Whitesides, Russell; Domin, Dominik; Lester Jr., William A.; Frenklach, Michael

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    25-28, 2007. Topic: Soot GRAPHENE LAYER GROWTH CHEMISTRY:on the zigzag edge of a graphene layer isomerizes to reversea possibly important step in graphene layer growth, thus

  16. Growth of Ordered Ultrathin Tungsten Oxide Films on Pt(111)....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Growth of Ordered Ultrathin Tungsten Oxide Films on Pt(111). Growth of Ordered Ultrathin Tungsten Oxide Films on Pt(111). Abstract: Ordered tungsten oxide ultra-thin films were...

  17. Akamai technologies : an analysis of product and platform growth strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piper, Victor L. (Victor Lawrence)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Akamai Technologies has achieved market leadership in content delivery and application acceleration services and is pursuing aggressive growth. Akamai has advised the market that growth to $5B by 2020 is achievable by ...

  18. Effect of Gallium Nitride Template Layer Strain on the Growth...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gallium Nitride Template Layer Strain on the Growth of InxGa1-xNGaN Multiple Quantum Well Light Emitting Diodes. Effect of Gallium Nitride Template Layer Strain on the Growth of...

  19. New Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential New Model Demonstrates Offshore Wind Industry's Job Growth Potential May 18, 2015 - 3:11pm Addthis The U.S....

  20. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In molecular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating. 1 tab.

  1. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drummond, Timothy J. (Tijeras, NM); Ginley, David S. (Albuquerque, NM); Zipperian, Thomas E. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  2. Substrate solder barriers for semiconductor epilayer growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drummond, T.J.; Ginley, D.S.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1989-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    During the growth of compound semiconductors by epitaxial processes, substrates are typically mounted to a support. In modular beam epitaxy, mounting is done using indium as a solder. This method has two drawbacks: the indium reacts with the substrate, and it is difficult to uniformly wet the back of a large diameter substrate. Both of these problems have been successfully overcome by sputter coating the back of the substrate with a thin layer of tungsten carbide or tungsten carbide and gold. In addition to being compatible with the growth of high quality semiconductor epilayers this coating is also inert in all standard substrate cleaning etchants used for compound semiconductors, and provides uniform distribution of energy in radiant heating.

  3. annual foliage growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effective use of social 187 A year of transformation, growth and success ANNUAL REPORT Fossil Fuels Websites Summary: ......

  4. THE GROWTH OF LIMITS OF VERTEX REPLACEMENT RULES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Previte, Joseph P.

    THE GROWTH OF LIMITS OF VERTEX REPLACEMENT RULES JOSEPH PREVITE, MICHELLE PREVITE, AND MARY a vertex replacement rule given by exactly one replacement graph generates an infinite graph for the growth degree of infinite graphs with polynomial growth that are gener- ated by vertex replacement rules

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Metabolic Alterations During the Growth of Tumour Spheroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maini, Philip K.

    a ``programmed'' switch to a greater reliance on the less efficient glycolytic pathway for energy to generate suffi- cient energy and biomass for sustained growth and prolif- eration. During growth and anabolic capacity to maintain growth, repair and overall integrity. Typically, the production of energy con

  6. Effects of High Nighttime Temperature and Role of Plant Growth Regulators on Growth, Development and Physiology of Rice Plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohammed, Abdul R.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    to HNT (32 degrees C) or ambient nighttime temperature (ANT) (27 degrees C) starting from 2000 h until 0600 h, and with or without plant growth regulator treatments. The plant growth regulator treatments included alpha-tocopherol (vitamin E), glycine...

  7. GROWTH OF POSITIVE WORDS AND LOWER BOUNDS OF THE GROWTH RATE FOR THOMPSON'S GROUPS F(p)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burillo, José

    GROWTH OF POSITIVE WORDS AND LOWER BOUNDS OF THE GROWTH RATE FOR THOMPSON'S GROUPS F(p) JOS´E BURILLO AND VICTOR GUBA Abstract. Let F(p), p 2 be the family of generalized Thompson's groups. Here F(2) is the famous Richard Thompson's group usually denoted by F. We find the growth rate of the monoid of positive

  8. Scaling of bubble growth in a porous medium. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Satik, C.; Yortsos, Y.; Li, X. [Univ. of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Processes involving liquid-to-gas phase change in porous media are routinely encountered, for example in the recovery of oil, geothermal processes, nuclear waste disposal or enhanced heat transfer. They involve diffusion (and convection) in the pore space, driven by an imposed supersaturation in pressure or temperature. Phase change proceeds by nucleation and phase growth. Depending on pore surface roughness, a number of nucleation centers exist, thus phase growth occurs from a multitude of clusters. Contrary to growth in the bulk or in a Hele-Shaw cell, however, growth patterns in porous media are disordered and not compact. As in immiscible displacements, they reflect the underlying pore microstructure. The competition between multiple clusters is also different from the bulk. For example, cluster growth may be controlled by a combination of diffusion (e.g. Laplace equation in the quasi-static case) with percolation. Novel growth patterns axe expected from this competition. While multiple cluster growth is important, the simpler problem of single-bubble growth is still not well understood. In this section, we focus on the growth of a single bubble, subject to a fixed far-field supersaturation (e.g. by lowering the pressure in a supersaturated solution or by raising the temperature in a. superheated liquid). Our emphasis is on deriving a scaling theory for growth at conditions of quasi-static diffusion, guided by recent experimental observations. Visualization of bubble growth in model porous media was recently conducted using 2-D etched-glass micromodels.

  9. Construction Cost Growth for New Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kubic, Jr., William L. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Cost growth and construction delays are problems that plague many large construction projects including the construction of new Department of Energy (DOE) nuclear facilities. A study was conducted to evaluate cost growth of large DOE construction projects. The purpose of the study was to compile relevant data, consider the possible causes of cost growth, and recommend measures that could be used to avoid extreme cost growth in the future. Both large DOE and non-DOE construction projects were considered in this study. With the exception of Chemical and Metallurgical Research Building Replacement Project (CMRR) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF), cost growth for DOE Nuclear facilities is comparable to the growth experienced in other mega construction projects. The largest increase in estimated cost was found to occur between early cost estimates and establishing the project baseline during detailed design. Once the project baseline was established, cost growth for DOE nuclear facilities was modest compared to non-DOE mega projects.

  10. Dynamic Modeling of Aerobic Growth of Shewanella oneidensis. Predicting Triauxic Growth, Flux Distributions and Energy Requirement for Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami; Pinchuk, Grigoriy E.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Fredrickson, Jim K.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model-based analysis is conducted to investigate metabolism of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 strain in aerobic batch culture, which exhibits an intriguing growth pattern by sequentially consuming substrate (i.e., lactate) and by-products (i.e., pyruvate and acetate). A general protocol is presented for developing a detailed network-based dynamic model for S. oneidensis based on the Lumped Hybrid Cybernetic Model (LHCM) framework. The L-HCM, although developed from only limited data, is shown to accurately reproduce exacting dynamic metabolic shifts, and provide reasonable estimates of energy requirement for growth. Flux distributions in S. oneidensis predicted by the L-HCM compare very favorably with 13C-metabolic flux analysis results reported in the literature. Predictive accuracy is enhanced by incorporating measurements of only a few intracellular fluxes, in addition to extracellular metabolites. The L-HCM developed here for S. oneidensis is consequently a promising tool for the analysis of intracellular flux distribution and metabolic engineering.

  11. Growth curve analysis of Rambouillet ewes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathenge, James Mwai

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for this study. However, most of the results were reported for 152 observations; a subset of the 283 records that contained the smst complete set of weighted' Type of birth and rearing was the single most significant source of variation for preweaning body... weights and growth rates. Estimation of mature weight obtained for 184 records was 59. 6 + . 77 kilograms. Based upon analysis of yearly weights, ewes had reached maturity by 42 months of age. Birth and 120-day weight were lower than those reported...

  12. Crystal growth under external electric fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uda, Satoshi; Koizumi, Haruhiko; Nozawa, Jun; Fujiwara, Kozo [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, 2-1-1 Katahira, Aoba-ku, Sendai, Miyagi 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    This is a review article concerning the crystal growth under external electric fields that has been studied in our lab for the past 10 years. An external field is applied electrostatically either through an electrically insulating phase or a direct injection of an electric current to the solid-interface-liquid. The former changes the chemical potential of both solid and liquid and controls the phase relationship while the latter modifies the transport and partitioning of ionic solutes in the oxide melt during crystallization and changes the solute distribution in the crystal.

  13. #MarketGrowth | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit withTianlinPapersWindey Wind Hometcdb Home Graham7781'sHomewisdom#MarketGrowth

  14. Career Growth | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadapInactiveVisiting the TWPSuccess StoriesFebruary 26,ComputersTrinity / NERSC-8CarbonTheGrowth |

  15. A Statistical Physics Perspective on Web Growth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. L. Krapivsky; S. Redner

    2002-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Approaches from statistical physics are applied to investigate the structure of network models whose growth rules mimic aspects of the evolution of the world-wide web. We first determine the degree distribution of a growing network in which nodes are introduced one at a time and attach to an earlier node of degree k with rate A_ksim k^gamma. Very different behaviors arise for gamma1. We also analyze the degree distribution of a heterogeneous network, the joint age-degree distribution, the correlation between degrees of neighboring nodes, as well as global network properties. An extension to directed networks is then presented. By tuning model parameters to reasonable values, we obtain distinct power-law forms for the in-degree and out-degree distributions with exponents that are in good agreement with current data for the web. Finally, a general growth process with independent introduction of nodes and links is investigated. This leads to independently growing sub-networks that may coalesce with other sub-networks. General results for both the size distribution of sub-networks and the degree distribution are obtained.

  16. Semi-inclusive Deep Inelastic Scattering off Few-Nucleon Systems: Tagging the EMC Effect and Hadronization Mechanisms with Detection of Slow Recoiling Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Ciofi degli Atti; L. P. Kaptari

    2011-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering of electrons off the deuteron ($^2H \\equiv D$) and $^3He$ with detection of slow protons and deuterons, respectively, i.e. the processes $D(e,e'p)X$ and $^3He(e,e'D)X$, are calculated within the spectator mechanism, taking into account the final state interaction of the hadronizing quark with the detected protons and deuterons, respectively. It is shown that by a proper choice of the kinematics the origin of the EMC effect and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which cannot be reached by inclusive deep inelastic scattering. A comparison of our calculations with recently available experimental data on the process $D(e,e'p)X$ shows a good agreement in the backward hemisphere of the emitted nucleons. Theoretical predictions at the energies thyat will be available at the upgraded Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facilty are presented, and the possibility to investigate the proposed semi-inclusive processes at electron-ion colliders is briefly discussed.

  17. Semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering off few-nucleon systems: Tagging the EMC effect and hadronization mechanisms with detection of slow recoiling nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciofi degli Atti, C.; Kaptari, L. P. [Department of Physics, University of Perugia, Piazza dell' Universita 1, I-06123 Perugia (Italy) and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Perugia, Via A. Pascoli, I-06123 Perugia (Italy)

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering of electrons off {sup 2}H and {sup 3}He with detection of slow protons and deuterons, respectively, i.e., the processes {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X and {sup 3}He(e,e{sup '}d)X, are calculated within the spectator mechanism, taking into account the final state interaction of the nucleon debris with the detected protons and deuterons. It is shown that by a proper choice of the kinematics the origin of the EMC effect and the details of the interaction between the hadronizing quark and the nuclear medium can be investigated at a level which cannot be reached by inclusive deep-inelastic scattering. A comparison of the results of our calculations, containing no adjustable parameters, with recently available experimental data on the process {sup 2}H(e,e{sup '}p)X shows a good agreement in the backward hemisphere of the emitted nucleons. Theoretical predictions at energies that will be available at the upgraded Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility are presented, and the possibility to investigate the proposed semi-inclusive processes at electron-ion colliders is briefly discussed.

  18. Cavity growth patterns on the partial seam crip test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hommert, P.J.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Partial Seam CRIP (PSC) test conducted by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories was characterized by two distinctly different types of cavity growth. Portions of the thermal data from the test have been analyzed using conduction models to infer the dynamics of the cavity growth. Growth during the first phase of the test was characterized by rapid movement of the process to the top of the seam. The growth patterns during this time were remarkably similar to those observed on the Hoe Creek III test. Cavity growth observed later in the test, after the CRIP maneuver and when the horizontal production was in use, showed more lateral extent within the seam similar to patterns that were observed on the Hanna UCG tests. This type of growth resulted in improved process efficiency, at least for the early post-CRIP period. Calculations using a thermal-mechanical growth model are consistent with both types of growth observed. In particular, when stringers that were present in the seam are included in the model calculations, the more favorable growth patterns observed in the test are predicted. It is concluded that non-coal layers within the seam have the potential to significantly affect cavity growth and thus their presence should be accounted for when designing a process. 11 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  19. ZnO nanorod growth by plasma-enhanced vapor phase transport with different growth durations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Chang-Yong; Oh, Hee-bong [Department of Nano Science and Engineering, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hyukhyun, E-mail: hhryu@inje.ac.kr [Department of Nano Science and Engineering, Center for Nano Manufacturing, Inje University, Obang-dong, Gimhae, Gyeongnam 621-749 (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Jondo [Department of Nano Science and Engineering, Kyungnam University, Changwon, Gyeongnam 631-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won-Jae [Department of Materials and Components Engineering, Dong-Eui University, 995 Eomgwangno, Busanjin-gu, Busan 614-714 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, the structural properties of ZnO nanostructures grown by plasma-enhanced vapor phase transport (PEVPT) were investigated. Plasma-treated oxygen gas was used as the oxygen source for the ZnO growth. The structural properties of ZnO nanostructures grown for different durations were measured by scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and transmission electron microscopy. The authors comprehensively analyzed the growth of the ZnO nanostructures with different growth durations both with and without the use of plasma-treated oxygen gas. It was found that PEVPT has a significant influence on the growth of the ZnO nanorods. PEVPT with plasma-treated oxygen gas facilitated the generation of nucleation sites, and the resulting ZnO nanorod structures were more vertical than those prepared by conventional VPT without plasma-treated oxygen gas. As a result, the ZnO nanostructures grown using PEVPT showed improved structural properties compared to those prepared by the conventional VPT method.

  20. A Quantitative Analysis of Branching, Growth Cone Turning, and Directed Growth in Zebrafish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goodhill, Geoffrey J.

    in Goodhill and Richards, 1999; McLaughlin and O'Leary, 2005; Feldheim and O'Leary, 2010). Studies these maps (McLaughlin and O'Leary, 2005). In chicks and rodents, serial histology at different developmental their targets (Nakamura and O'Leary, 1989; Simon and O'Leary, 1992; Yates et al., 2001). Pri- mary axon growth

  1. Hopper /scratch file system slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    This problem has been resolved. The issue was caused when the MSS (IO manangement) server had a failover (to the backup server) on July 22, it lost the default stripe count of...

  2. Slow Convergence in Bootstrap Percolation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janko Gravner; Alexander E. Holroyd

    2007-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In the bootstrap percolation model, sites in an L by L square are initially infected independently with probability p. At subsequent steps, a healthy site becomes infected if it has at least 2 infected neighbours. As (L,p)->(infinity,0), the probability that the entire square is eventually infected is known to undergo a phase transition in the parameter p log L, occurring asymptotically at lambda = pi^2/18. We prove that the discrepancy between the critical parameter and its limit lambda is at least Omega((log L)^(-1/2)). In contrast, the critical window has width only Theta((log L)^(-1)). For the so-called modified model, we prove rigorous explicit bounds which imply for example that the relative discrepancy is at least 1% even when L = 10^3000. Our results shed some light on the observed differences between simulations and rigorous asymptotics.

  3. Hopper /scratch file system slow

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville PowerCherries 82981-1cnHigh School football Highdefault Sign In AboutAmesHong QinPostdocHopper

  4. Laboratory Evidence for Stochastic Plasma-Wave Growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Austin, D. R. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales, 2006 (Australia); Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PU (United Kingdom); Hole, M. J. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales, 2006 (Australia); Research School of Physical Sciences and Engineering, Australian National University, Australian Capital Territory, 0200 (Australia); Robinson, P. A.; Cairns, Iver H. [School of Physics, University of Sydney, New South Wales, 2006 (Australia); Dallaqua, R. [Laboratorio Associado de Plasma-LAP, Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais-INPE/MCT, CP 515, 12201-970, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The first laboratory confirmation of stochastic growth theory is reported. Floating potential fluctuations are measured in a vacuum arc centrifuge using a Langmuir probe. Statistical analysis of the energy density reveals a lognormal distribution over roughly 2 orders of magnitude, with a high-field nonlinear cutoff whose spatial dependence is consistent with the predicted eigenmode profile. These results are consistent with stochastic growth and nonlinear saturation of a spatially extended eigenmode, the first evidence for stochastic growth of an extended structure.

  5. Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies - Slower Growth Ahead? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Recent Trends in Car Usage in Advanced Economies -...

  6. ascites tumor growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    circular objects revealing required features, such as the velocity of the growth and fractal behavior of their contours, is presented. It enables to reproduce some of the recent...

  7. affect yeast growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    were carried out under fixed dilution rate after batch growth in YPD as described... Pir, Pinar; Gutteridge, Alex; Wu, Jian; Rash, Bharat; Kell, Douglas B; Zhang, Nianshu;...

  8. Amplified Demand for Solar Trackers to Boost Market Growth in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Amplified Demand for Solar Trackers to Boost Market Growth in Middle East and Africa Home > Groups > Solar Permitting Roadmap Development Wayne31jan's picture Submitted by...

  9. anchorage independent growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hinton, Geoffrey E. 42 GEOLOG is an independent and privately owned oilfield services company with a strong track record of growth and international Specialized in Surface...

  10. androgen independent growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hinton, Geoffrey E. 31 GEOLOG is an independent and privately owned oilfield services company with a strong track record of growth and international Specialized in Surface...

  11. Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kudrolli, Arshad

    Hydrology, environment Four remarks on the growth of channel networks Quatre remarques sur la online xxx Presented by Ghislain de Marsily Keywords: Geomorphology Hydrology River network Mots cle

  12. altered growth differentiation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    although they did possess fewer eggs. Daphnia responses to chemicals from either roach or Elodea Burks, Romi 7 MATURE TLINEAGE LEUKEMIA WITH GROWTH FACTOR-INDUCED...

  13. apcam mediates growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of piscivore-mediated habitat use on growth, diet and zooplankton consumption of roach: an Biology and Medicine Websites Summary: Effects of piscivore-mediated habitat use...

  14. Thermodynamic and kinetic control of the lateral Si wire growth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dedyulin, Sergey N., E-mail: sdedyuli@uwo.ca; Goncharova, Lyudmila V. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, The University of Western Ontario, 1151 Richmond St., London, Ontario N6A 3K7 (Canada)

    2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Reproducible lateral Si wire growth has been realized on the Si (100) surface. In this paper, we present experimental evidence showing the unique role that carbon plays in initiating lateral growth of Si wires on a Si (100) substrate. Once initiated in the presence of ?5 ML of C, lateral growth can be achieved in the range of temperatures, T?=?450–650?°C, and further controlled by the interplay of the flux of incoming Si atoms with the size and areal density of Au droplets. Critical thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the growth are discussed in detail.

  15. ALS Technique Gives Novel View of Lithium Battery Dendrite Growth

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Technique Gives Novel View of Lithium Battery Dendrite Growth Print Lithium-ion batteries, popular in today's electronic devices and electric vehicles, could gain significant...

  16. On Better Understanding Dilute Void Growth in Ductile Metals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kostka, Tim

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and growth of damage in a dual-phase steel observed by X-rayWeck et al. , 2007], dual-phase steel [Maire et al. , 2008],

  17. Before the Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation and...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Job Creation and Regulatory Affairs - House Committee on Oversight and Governmant Reform Before the Subcommittee on Economic Growth, Job Creation and Regulatory Affairs -...

  18. aging tumor growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1983), provide valuable data on the age 85 AGE AND GROWTH OF SKIPJACK TUNA, KATSUWONUS PELAMIS, AND YELLOWFIN TUNA, THUNNUS ALBACARES, AS INDICATED Environmental Sciences and...

  19. Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline cubic zirconia...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of nanocrystalline cubic zirconia under ion irradiation. Abstract: Grain growth, oxygen stoichiometry and phase stability of nanostructurally-stabilized zirconia (NSZ) in...

  20. Why electric-power growth will not resume

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.R.

    1983-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Basic structural changes now occurring in the US economy have irrevocably broken previously existing links between gross national product and the growth of sales of electricity. The author contends that the extent of the macroeconomic changes presently taking place are underestimated by many electric-utility planners and, as a result, forecasts projecting electricity growth rates about even with gross national product growth levels when the economy recovers are too high. The article states that electric-utility companies are entering an indefinite period of stagnant sales growth. But it closes on the positive note that electric-utility managements can take certain steps to make their businesses grow again. 8 figures.

  1. Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In Submarine-Collected Basalts Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Growth History Of Kilauea...

  2. adaptive growth strategy: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effective ionization and dielectric relaxation times scales 3 146 National Industrial Hemp Strategy ii March 2008Executive Summary Growth of the Canadian Industrial Hemp Sector...

  3. affects plant growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Biology, Allegheny College, 520 North Wilmers, Chris 29 Microbial Endophytes of crop plants and their role in plant growth promotion;. Open Access Theses and...

  4. affecting plant growth: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of Biology, Allegheny College, 520 North Wilmers, Chris 29 Microbial Endophytes of crop plants and their role in plant growth promotion;. Open Access Theses and...

  5. Low Carbon Green Growth: Integrated Policy Approach to Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    scarcity and climate change and how adopting Low Carbon Green Growth can provide win-win solutions for fostering inclusive sustainable development while mitigating and...

  6. Persistent hair growth during treatment with the EGFR inhibitor erlotinib

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrescu, Doru T; Kauffman, C Lisa; Dasanu, Constantin A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    factor receptor in the differentiation of the hair follicleand normal hair development. Am J Pathol. 1997;150:1959-Persistent hair growth during treatment with the EGFR

  7. Philippines-Strengthening Planning Capacity for Low Carbon Growth...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    include: Customizing low-carbon growth planning framework that is transparent, flexible, and user-friendly Helping developupdate low-carbon roadmap Providing a suite of...

  8. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States) and University of Oslo, Oslo, N-0316 (Norway) and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory, Menlo Park, CA 94025 (United States); Max Planck Institute for Physics, Munich (Germany); University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2012-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  9. Growth of a susy bubble: inhomogeneity effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    L. Clavelli

    2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    In a dense star, the Pauli exclusion principle functions as an enormous energy storage mechanism. Supersymmetry could provide a way to recapture this energy. If there is a transition to an exactly supersymmetric (susy) phase, the trapped energy can be released with consequences similar to gamma ray burst observations. Previous zeroth order calculations have been based on the behavior in a prototypical white dwarf of solar mass and earth radius (such as Sirius B) and have neglected density inhomogeneity. In this article we show that the effects of density inhomogeneity and of variations in masses and radii are substantial enough to encourage further exploration of the susy star model. In addition, the effects discussed here have possible applications to the growth of bubbles in other phase transition models in dense matter.

  10. MIX and Instability Growth from Oblique Shock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molitoris, J D; Batteux, J D; Garza, R G; Tringe, J W; Souers, P C; Forbes, J W

    2011-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have studied the formation and evolution of shock-induced mix resulting from interface features in a divergent cylindrical geometry. In this research a cylindrical core of high-explosive was detonated to create an oblique shock wave and accelerate the interface. The interfaces studied were between the high-explosive/aluminum, aluminum/plastic, and finally plastic/air. Pre-emplaced surface features added to the aluminum were used to modify this interface. Time sequence radiographic imaging quantified the resulting instability formation from the growth phase to over 60 {micro}s post-detonation. Thus allowing the study of the onset of mix and evolution to turbulence. The plastic used here was porous polyethylene. Radiographic image data are compared with numerical simulations of the experiments.

  11. Lid for improved dendritic web growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duncan, Charles S. (Penn Hills, PA); Kochka, Edgar L. (Greentree, PA); Piotrowski, Paul A. (Monroeville, PA); Seidensticker, Raymond G. (Forest Hills, PA)

    1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A lid for a susceptor in which a crystalline material is melted by induction heating to form a pool or melt of molten material from which a dendritic web of essentially a single crystal of the material is pulled through an elongated slot in the lid and the lid has a pair of generally round openings adjacent the ends of the slot and a groove extends between each opening and the end of the slot. The grooves extend from the outboard surface of the lid to adjacent the inboard surface providing a strip contiguous with the inboard surface of the lid to produce generally uniform radiational heat loss across the width of the dendritic web adjacent the inboard surface of the lid to reduce thermal stresses in the web and facilitate the growth of wider webs at a greater withdrawal rate.

  12. Cadmium zinc sulfide by solution growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

    1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for depositing thin layers of a II-VI compound cadmium zinc sulfide (CdZnS) by an aqueous solution growth technique with quality suitable for high efficiency photovoltaic or other devices which can benefit from the band edge shift resulting from the inclusion of Zn in the sulfide. A first solution comprising CdCl.sub.2 2.5H.sub.2 O, NH.sub.4 Cl, NH.sub.4 OH and ZnCl.sub.2, and a second solution comprising thiourea ((NH.sub.2).sub.2 CS) are combined and placed in a deposition cell, along with a substrate to form a thin i.e. 10 nm film of CdZnS on the substrate. This process can be sequentially repeated with to achieve deposition of independent multiple layers having different Zn concentrations.

  13. Slow photoelectron velocity-map imaging spectroscopy of the Fe{sub 3}O{sup –} and Co{sub 3}O{sup –} anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongjin B.; Weichman, Marissa L.; Neumark, Daniel M., E-mail: dneumark@berkeley.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720, USA and Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We report high-resolution photoelectron spectra of the transition metal suboxide clusters Fe{sub 3}O{sup ?} and Co{sub 3}O{sup ?}{sub .} The combination of slow electron velocity-map imaging and cryogenic cooling yields vibrationally well-resolved spectra, from which we obtain precise values of 1.4408(3) and 1.3951(4) eV for the electron affinities of Fe{sub 3}O and Co{sub 3}O. Several vibrational frequencies of the neutral ground state Fe{sub 3}O and Co{sub 3}O clusters are assigned for the first time, and a low-lying excited state of Fe{sub 3}O is observed. The experimental results are compared with density functional electronic structure calculations and Franck-Condon spectral simulations, enabling identification of the structural isomer and electronic states. As has been found in photoelectron spectra of other trimetal oxo species, Fe{sub 3}O{sup 0/?} and Co{sub 3}O{sup 0/?} are assigned to a ?{sub 2}-oxo isomer with planar C{sub 2v} symmetry. We identify the ground states of Fe{sub 3}O{sup –} and Co{sub 3}O{sup –} as {sup 12}A{sub 1} and {sup 9}B{sub 2} states, respectively. From these states we observe photodetachment to the {sup 11}B{sub 2} ground and {sup 13}A{sub 1} excited states of Fe{sub 3}O, as well as to the {sup 8}A{sub 1} ground state of Co{sub 3}O.

  14. Metabolic indices for growth: endocrine profile of steers on different nutritional and growth regulation regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reinhardt, Christopher Dean

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IN PRELIMINARY MODELS. . Page 45 TABLE 15. SAMPLING DAYS FOR ENDOCRINE AND METABOLITE FACTORS USED IN FINAL MODELS PRODUCED FROM BACKWARD STEPWISE REGRESSION. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 TABLE 16. FINAL LINEAR PREDICTION MODELS... tends to reflect plasma glucose level and may be elevated when growth regulators alter plasma glucose (Sharp and Dyer, 1970), but this response is also inconsistent with changes in insulin independent of glucose reported by Olsen et al. (1977...

  15. Export sophistication and economic growth: evidence from China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Export sophistication and economic growth: evidence from China Joachim Jarreau PSE CEPII sandra halshs-00962593,version1-21Mar2014 #12;Export Sophistication and Economic Growth: evidence from China Joachim Jarreau and Sandra Poncet January 4, 2011 Abstract We consider the effect of export sophistication

  16. Original article Effects of arginine, growth hormone-releasing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    release of ARG (1 g/kg body weight, infused between times-15 and -5 min), growth hormone-releasing hormone Growth hormone (GH) secretion is regu- lated by many factors including nutrients. Arginine (ARG) infused infusions of ARG can stimulate GH secre- tion in lambs (Davenport et al, 1990a, 1995), adult sheep

  17. Growth mechanisms, polytypism, and real structure of kaolinite microcrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samotoin, N. D., E-mail: samnik@igem.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Geology of Ore Deposits, Petrography, Mineralogy, and Geochemistry (Russian Federation)

    2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The mechanisms of growth of kaolinite microcrystals (0.1-5.0 {mu}m in size) at deposits related to the cluvial weathering crust, as well as to the low-temperature and medium-temperature hydrothermal processes of transformations of minerals in different rocks in Russia, Kazakhstan, Ukraine, Czechia, Vietnam, India, Cuba, and Madagascar, are investigated using transmission electron microscopy and vacuum decoration with gold. It is established that kaolinite microcrystals grow according to two mechanisms: the mechanism of periodic formation of two-dimensional nuclei and the mechanism of spiral growth. The spiral growth of kaolinite microcrystals is dominant and occurs on steps of screw dislocations that differ in sign and magnitude of the Burgers vector along the c axis. The layered growth of kaolinite originates from a widespread source in the form of a step between polar (+ and -) dislocations, i.e., a growth analogue of the Frank-Read dislocation source. The density of growth screw dislocations varies over a wide range and can be as high as {approx}10{sup 9} cm{sup -2}. Layered stepped kaolinite growth pyramids for all mechanisms of growth on the (001) face of kaolinite exhibit the main features of the triclinic 1Tc and real structures of this mineral.

  18. FAST GROWTH IN THE FOLNER FUNCTION FOR THOMPSON'S GROUP F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Justin Tatch

    FAST GROWTH IN THE FOLNER FUNCTION FOR THOMPSON'S GROUP F on the growth of Folner functions for Thompson's group F . Specifi- cally I will prove that, for any). 1. Introduction In this paper we will study the Folner function for Thompson's group F

  19. FAST GROWTH IN THE FLNER FUNCTION FOR THOMPSON'S GROUP F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Justin Tatch

    FAST GROWTH IN THE F�LNER FUNCTION FOR THOMPSON'S GROUP F JUSTIN TATCH MOORE Abstract. The purpose of this note is to prove a lower bound on the growth of Følner functions for Thompson's group F. Specifi- callyF,(Cn ) expn(0). 1. Introduction In this paper we will study the Følner function for Thompson's group F. Recall

  20. FAST GROWTH IN THE FLNER FUNCTION FOR THOMPSON'S GROUP F

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Justin Tatch

    FAST GROWTH IN THE F�LNER FUNCTION FOR THOMPSON'S GROUP F JUSTIN TATCH MOORE Abstract. The purpose of this note is to prove a lower bound on the growth of Følner functions for Thompson's group F . Specifi,# (C n ) # exp n (0). 1. Introduction In this paper we will study the Følner function for Thompson

  1. Efficacy and Phytotoxicity of Sumagic (Uniconazole) for Growth Control of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lieth, J. Heinrich

    Efficacy and Phytotoxicity of Sumagic (Uniconazole) for Growth Control of Egyptian Star Star-Cluster Pentas lanceolata cv. `Butterfly Pink' REASON: Control of vegetative growth SOIL TYPE OR TYPE OF POTTING MIX: UC Mix % SAND 30 % SILT % CLAY % OM 70 pH 6.5 SEEDING DATE EMERGENCE DATE

  2. Modulation of germination, elongation growth and flowering time in plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modulation of germination, elongation growth and flowering time in plants Reference Number B69259 Background · The present invention relates to a method for modulating plant developmen- tal processes that have direct impact on plant growth and yield. · Identified genes act downstream from the gibberelic

  3. UNEDITED PREPRINT Building a dynamic growth model for trembling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    García, Oscar

    UNEDITED PREPRINT Building a dynamic growth model for trembling aspen in Western Canada without age for even-aged thinned or unthinned stands dominated by trembling aspen. Estimation used permanent sample words: Forest growth and yield, Populus tremuloides, quacking aspen, thinning, dynamical systems, TAG. 1

  4. ORIGINAL PAPER Growth and frost hardening of European aspen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ORIGINAL PAPER Growth and frost hardening of European aspen and backcross hybrid aspen) supply influence the growth, bud phenology and frost hardening of seven young European aspen (Populus tremula) and backcross hybrid aspen ([P. tremula × Populus tremuloides] × P. tremula) families. & Results

  5. ccsd00004619, BSDE with quadratic growth and unbounded terminal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00004619, version 1 ­ 1 Apr 2005 BSDE with quadratic growth and unbounded terminal value with quadratic growth and unbounded terminal value. We apply a localization procedure together with a priori bounds. As a byproduct, we apply the same method to extend a result on BSDEs with integrable terminal

  6. What constrains spread growth in forecasts ini2alized from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamill, Tom

    1 What constrains spread growth in forecasts ini2alized from ensemble Kalman filters? Tom from manner in which ini2al condi2ons are generated, some due to the model (e.g., stochas2c physics as error; part of spread growth from manner in which ini2al condi2ons are generated, some due

  7. Original article Effects of gelling agents on growth,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Effects of gelling agents on growth, mineral composition and naphthoquinone May 1992; accepted 22 October 1992) Summary — Gelling agents affect growth of walnut in vitro, induced mature leaf formation and necroses. The 2 gelling agents differed significantly in mineral content

  8. ccsd00001676, Epitaxy and growth of titanium bu er layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ccsd­00001676, version 1 ­ 16 Jun 2004 Epitaxy and growth of titanium bu#11;er layers on Al 2 O 3 de Lourmel, 75015 Paris, France Abstract The structure and growth of thin #12;lms of titanium on #11 [2110] and Ti[1010] k Al 2 O 3 [1100] epitaxy of the #11; phase of titanium reported before for thick

  9. REGIONAL INTEGRATION AND PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH IN SOUTH ASIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Title REGIONAL INTEGRATION AND PRODUCTIVITY GROWTH IN SOUTH ASIA Authors Amirul Islam Department;Abstract Understanding the role of regional integration in in productivity growth remains a key question effect of the free trade agreement on productivity. Most of the countries in South Asia have suffered

  10. Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Growth of graphene on Ir(111) Johann Coraux1 ,, Alpha T. N'Diaye1 §, Martin Engler1 , Carsten Busse a renewed interest as a route towards high quality graphene prepared in a reproducible manner. Here we employ two growth methods for graphene on Ir(111), namely room temperature adsorption and thermal

  11. Automatic Model Complexity Control Using Marginalized Discriminative Growth Functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hain, Thomas

    Automatic model complexity control . Most LVCSR systems are trained on large amounts of data. . ManyAutomatic Model Complexity Control Using Marginalized Discriminative Growth Functions X. Liu & M. J. J. F. Gales: Automatic Model Complexity Control Using Marginalized Discriminative Growth Functions

  12. Rapid Scan Humidified Growth Cloud Condensation Nuclei Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory L. Kok; Athanasios Nenes

    2013-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This research focused on enhancements to the streamwise thermal gradient cloud condensation nuclei counter to support the rapid scan mode and to enhance the capability for aerosol humidified growth measurements. The research identified the needs for flow system modifications and range of capability for operating the conventional instrument in the rapid scan and humidified growth modes.

  13. Harmonic moment dynamics in Laplacian growth Alexander Leshchiner,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin. University of

    Harmonic moment dynamics in Laplacian growth Alexander Leshchiner,1 Matthew Thrasher,1 Mark B received 12 November 2009; published 12 January 2010 Harmonic moments are integrals of integer powers of z horizontal closely spaced plates. Harmonic moments are a natural basis for such Laplacian growth phenomena

  14. Defect in lung growth* Comparative study of three diagnostic criteria.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Defect in lung growth* Comparative study of three diagnostic criteria. P. DECHELOTTE, A. LABBE, O and fetuses (49 pathological cases and 25 controls) to detect defects in lung growth. In each case lung disease. RA count is low in lung hypoplasia but is not an entirely reliable diagnostic criterion since

  15. Continuum Theory of Epitaxial Crystal Growth, I Abstract 1 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with appropriate boundary conditions at the continuum level to describe the growth ... epitaxial, i.e. layer by layer growth of a crystalline thin lm on a suitably ...... [13] Mullins W.W., Theory of Thermal Grooving, J. Appl. Phys., 28(1957), 333{

  16. Nonlineai Control of Biotechnological Processes with Growth-Production Decoupling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin, Georges

    , for instance, to substrate overload- ing. Typical examples involve biological wastewater treatment processes Nonlinear control design techniques for a class of continuous biological processes with growth growth and the product formation. The issue of feedback linearizing control of biological reactors has

  17. RESEARCH Open Access Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Wilfred

    RESEARCH Open Access Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose steps to their practical usage for ethanol production. Ideally, a recombinant microorganism, possessing the capability to utilize cellulose for simultaneous growth and ethanol production, is of great interest. We have

  18. Can we estimate bacterial growth rates from ribosomal RNA content?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kemp, P.F.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Several studies have demonstrated a strong relationship between the quantity of RNA in bacterial cells and their growth rate under laboratory conditions. It may be possible to use this relationship to provide information on the activity of natural bacterial communities, and in particular on growth rate. However, if this approach is to provide reliably interpretable information, the relationship between RNA content and growth rate must be well-understood. In particular, a requisite of such applications is that the relationship must be universal among bacteria, or alternately that the relationship can be determined and measured for specific bacterial taxa. The RNA-growth rate relationship has not been used to evaluate bacterial growth in field studies, although RNA content has been measured in single cells and in bulk extracts of field samples taken from coastal environments. These measurements have been treated as probable indicators of bacterial activity, but have not yet been interpreted as estimators of growth rate. The primary obstacle to such interpretations is a lack of information on biological and environmental factors that affect the RNA-growth rate relationship. In this paper, the available data on the RNA-growth rate relationship in bacteria will be reviewed, including hypotheses regarding the regulation of RNA synthesis and degradation as a function of growth rate and environmental factors; i.e. the basic mechanisms for maintaining RNA content in proportion to growth rate. An assessment of the published laboratory and field data, the current status of this research area, and some of the remaining questions will be presented.

  19. Energetic condensation growth of Nb thin films

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Krishnan, M.; Valderrama, E.; James, C.; Zhao, X.; Spradlin, J.; Feliciano, A-M Valente; Phillips, L.; Reece, C. E.; Seo, K.; Sung, Z. H.

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes energetic condensation growth of Nb films using a cathodic arc plasma, whose 60–120 eV ions penetrate a few monolayers into the substrate and enable sufficient surface mobility to ensure that the lowest energy state (crystalline structure with minimal defects) is accessible to the film. Heteroepitaxial films of Nb were grown on ?-plane sapphire and MgO crystals with good superconducting properties and crystal size (10??mm × 20??mm ) limited only by substrate size. The substrates were heated to temperatures of up to 700°C and coated at 125°C, 300°C, 500°C, and 700°C . Film thickness was varied from ?0.25???m to >3???m . Residual resistivity ratio (RRR) values (up to a record (RRR)=587 on MgO and (RRR)=328 on ?-sapphire) depend strongly on substrate annealing and deposition temperatures. X-ray diffraction spectra and pole figures reveal that RRR increases as the crystal structure of the Nb film becomes more ordered, consistent with fewer defects and, hence, longer electron mean-free path. A transition from Nb(110) to Nb(100) orientation on the MgO(100) lattice occurs at higher temperatures. This transition is discussed in light of substrate heating and energetic condensation physics. Electron backscattered diffraction and scanning electron microscope images complement the XRD data.

  20. 6.0 GROWTH FACILITY USER RESPONSIBILITIES Growth facility users must share the responsibility for quality plant care with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pawlowski, Wojtek

    shown that our most effective way to reduce the risk of pests and pathogen outbreaks during growth chamber, then moved to a vegetative growth chamber and finally to a seed harvesting room. The benefits and into other researcher's flats. Furthermore, the process of IPM is only effective when followed completely