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Sample records for office buildings survey

  1. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey - Office Buildings

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2010-01-01

    Provides an in-depth look at this building type as reported in the 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings are the most common type of commercial building and they consumed more than 17% of all energy in the commercial buildings sector in 2003. This special report provides characteristics and energy consumption data by type of office building (e.g. administrative office, government office, medical office) and information on some of the types of equipment found in office buildings: heating and cooling equipment, computers, servers, printers, and photocopiers.

  2. Activity Stream - STIL2 Swedish Office Buildings Survey - Datasets...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over 1 year ago Jay Huggins created the dataset STIL2 Swedish Office Buildings Survey over 1 year ago License License Not Specified Author Swedish Energy Agency Contact OpenEI User...

  3. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Energy Efficiency Starts Here. 2 Building Technologies Office Integrated Approach: Improving ...

  4. Office Buildings - Types of Office Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    administration building Insurance company headquarters building Local insurance agency Social services office Attorney's office Real estate sales office Government office State...

  5. Building Technologies Office Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  6. Office Buildings - Full Report

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    administration building Insurance company headquarters building Local insurance agency Social services office Attorney's office Real estate sales office Government office State...

  7. Office Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    page, please call 202-586-8800. There were enough buildings in the responding sample to report statistics for all of these types except for research and development, which has...

  8. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 11 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 11 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  9. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 19 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 19 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  10. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 29 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailing during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 29 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  11. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office Building Technologies Office Overview Our Homes and Buildings Use 40% of Our Nation's Energy and 75% of Electricity Energy Use Electricity Use Residential Transportation 21 quads 27 quads Commercial 18 quads Industrial 31 quads U.S. Energy Bill for Buildings: $410 billion per year 2 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Ecosystem Emerging Technologies Building Codes Appliance Standards Residential Buildings Integration Commercial Buildings

  12. Office Buildings: Consumption Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    and Type of Office Building Total (trillion Btu) per Building (million Btu) per Square Foot (thousand Btu) Dollars per Million Btu All Office Buildings 1,089 1,475 90.5 16.32...

  13. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 54 at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.K.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 54 and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated, and can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual release report for each GJO building.

  14. Office Buildings - End-Use Equipment

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. More computers, dedicated servers, printers, and photocopiers were used in office buildings than in...

  15. Office Buildings - Energy Consumption

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Energy Consumption Office buildings consumed more than 17 percent of the total energy used by the commercial buildings sector (Table 4). At least half of total energy, electricity,...

  16. Director, Building Technologies Office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This position is located in the Building Technologies Office (BTO) of the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE). The mission of EERE is to create and sustain American leadership...

  17. Energy use in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-10-01

    This is the report on Task IB, Familiarization with Additional Data Collection Plans of Annual Survey of BOMA Member and Non-Member Buildings in 20 Cities, of the Energy Use in Office Buildings project. The purpose of the work was to monitor and understand the efforts of the Building Owners and Managers Association International (BOMA) in gathering an energy-use-oriented data base. In order to obtain an improved data base encompassing a broad spectrum of office space and with information suitable for energy analysis in greater detail than is currently available, BOMA undertook a major data-collection effort. Based on a consideration of geographic area, climate, population, and availability of data, BOMA selected twenty cities for data collection. BOMA listed all of the major office space - buildings in excess of 40,000 square feet - in each of the cities. Tax-assessment records, local maps, Chamber of Commerce data, recent industrial-development programs, results of related studies, and local-realtor input were used in an effort to assemble a comprehensive office-building inventory. In order to verify the accuracy and completeness of the building lists, BOMA assembled an Ad-Hoc Review Committee in each city to review the assembled inventory of space. A questionnaire on office-building energy use and building characteristics was developed. In each city BOMA assembled a data collection team operating under the supervision of its regional affiliate to gather the data. For each city a random sample of buildings was selected, and data were gathered. Responses for over 1000 buildings were obtained.

  18. Final report of the radiological release survey of Building 30B at the Grand Junction Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krauland, P.A.; Corle, S.G.

    1997-09-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore concentrates and mill tailings during vanadium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District, and during sampling, assaying, pilot milling, storage, and brokerage activities conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJO Remedial Action Project (GJORAP) to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and underlying aquifer. WASTREN-Grand Junction is the site contractor for the facility and the remedial action contractor for GJORAP. Building 30B and the underlying soil were found not to be radiologically contaminated; therefore, the building can be released for unrestricted use. Placards have been placed at the building entrances indicating the completion of the radiological release survey and prohibiting the introduction of any radioactive materials within the building without written approvals from the GJO Facilities Operations Manager. This document was prepared in response to a DOE-GJO request for an individual final release report for each GJO building.

  19. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey -- Overview

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993 provides building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the...

  20. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Campaign quantifies actual energy savings, market uptake trajectory, and adoption by ... realize energy savings through optimal control of building subsystems. * Reduce cost to ...

  1. Building Technologies Office Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Building Energy Asset Tool Market Stimulation Digital Tools & Solutions Lock-In Savings ... & Standards Tools & Programs Market Transformation No Codes IECC 200912 90% Compliance ...

  2. A Look at Office Buildings - Index

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    law office, or medical office. An office building may also be part of a campus or complex, such as an administrative building on a college campus. (See Description of Building...

  3. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is mandated by Congress to be the agency that collects, analyzes, and disseminates impartial, comprehensive data about energy including the volume consumed, its customers, and the purposes for which it is used. The Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey (FBSS) was conducted by EIA in conjunction with DOE`s Office of Federal Energy Management Programs (OFEMP) to gain a better understanding of how Federal buildings use energy. This report presents the data from 881 completed telephone interviews with Federal buildings in three Federal regions. These buildings were systematically selected using OFEMP`s specifications; therefore, these data do not statistically represent all Federal buildings in the country. The purpose of the FBSS was threefold: (1) to understand the characteristics of Federal buildings and their energy use; (2) to provide a baseline in these three Federal regions to measure future energy use in Federal buildings as required in EPACT; and (3) to compare building characteristics and energy use with the data collected in the CBECS.

  4. 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report The 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review ...

  5. Building Technologies Office Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About Building Technologies Office Peer Review Building Technologies Office Peer Review The Building Technologies Office (BTO) hosts an annual peer review. The event is open to ...

  6. 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report The 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review ...

  7. 2015 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report 2015 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report The 2015 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review ...

  8. Building Technologies Office Projects Map | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Projects Map Building Technologies Office Projects Map Welcome to the Building Technologies Office Projects Map. Here you will find listings for our ...

  9. An Overview of the Building Technologies Office

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Driving Innovation, Speeding Adoption, Scaling Savings An Overview of the Building Technologies Office Roland Risser Director, Building Technologies Office National Energy Consumption Costs U.S. $410 billion to power 2 National Electricity Use Our homes and buildings use 76% of all U.S. electricity 3 The Opportunity: Energy Savings Potential for Buildings and Homes Reduce building energy use by 50% 4 BTO Budget: FY2013 - Proposed FY2016 $0 $50 $100 $150 $200 $250 $300 Residential Buildings

  10. building tech office | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Building Technologies Office The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) advances building energy performance through the development and promotion of efficient, affordable, and high-impact technologies, systems and practices. The long-term goal of the Building Technologies Office is to reduce energy use by 50%, compared to a 2010 baseline. To secure these savings, research, development, demonstration, and deployment of next-generation building technologies are needed to advance building systems and

  11. REPORT OF SURVEY OF OAK RIDGE BUILDING 3597 HOT STORAGE GARDEN

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    OF SURVEY OF OAK RIDGE BUILDING 3597 HOT STORAGE GARDEN U.S. Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management & Office of Science Report of Survey of Oak Ridge Building 3597 ...

  12. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey - Index Page

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings 1993 Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey Overview Full Report Tables Energy usage and energy costs, by building characteristics, for federally-owned buildings in...

  13. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies Emerging Technologies R&D Program Karma Sawyer, Ph.D. karma.sawyer@ee.doe.gov BTO Goal Reduce building energy use by ...

  14. Building Technologies Office At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE FY 2017 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE Buildings and homes use more than 73% of the electrical energy consumed in the United States. They also consume 40% of the nation's total energy, with an annual energy bill of $430 billion. These energy bills can be cost effectively reduced by 20%-50% or more through various energy-efficient technologies and techniques. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) will continue to develop and demonstrate advanced building efficiency technologies

  15. Buildings Technology Office Residential Buildings Integration...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Summaries Building America, ARIES: High Performance Factory Built Housing Presenter: Jordan Dentz, ARIESThe Levy Partnership Project Goal Provide factory homebuilders with high ...

  16. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) project cycle spans at least ... Data collection for the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) took ...

  17. Building Technologies Office 2014 Highlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2014 Highlights Building Technologies Office 2014 Highlights View a summary of select 2014 accomplishments from DOE's Building Technologies Office. Building Technologies Office 2014 Highlights (2.6 MB) More Documents & Publications Multi-Year Program Plan Building Technologies Office Overview - 2013 Peer Review Building Technologies Office Overview - 2015

  18. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Medium office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  19. Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In addition to the ZIP file for each building type, you can directly view the "scorecard" spreadsheet that summarizes the inputs and results for each location. This Microsoft Excel spreadsheet is also included in the ZIP file. For version 1.4, only the IDF file is included.

  20. Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office The Future of Air Conditioning for Buildings Report The Future of Air Conditioning for Buildings Report This report characterizes the current landscape and trends in the global air conditioning (A/C) market, including discussion of both direct and indirect climate impacts, and potential global warming impacts from growing global A/C usage. Read more Energy Department Invests $19 Million to Improve Efficiency of Nation's Buildings Energy Department Invests $19 Million

  1. Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Building Technologies Office (BTO) hosts an annual programmatic peer review. The event is open to the public and will provide the opportunity for stakeholders to learn more about BTO research, development, demonstration and deployment projects.

  2. Building Technologies Office: 179D DOE Calculator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    179D DOE Calculator EERE Building Technologies Office 179D DOE Calculator Printable Version Bookmark and Share What is the 179D federal tax deduction? Section 179D of the...

  3. Building Technologies Office Overview - 2013 Peer Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Overview Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review btooverviewrisser040213.pdf (2.55 MB) More Documents & ...

  4. Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2015 Highlights Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights View a summary of select 2015 accomplishments from DOE's Building Technologies Office. Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights (3.51 MB) More Documents & Publications The Future of Air Conditioning for Buildings Report Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Low Global Warming Potential Refrigerants Building Technologies Office Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review

  5. Office of Survey Development and Statistical Integration

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Steve Harvey April 27, 2011 | Washington, D.C. Tough Choices in U.S. EIA's Data Programs Agenda * Office of Oil, Gas, and Coal Supply Statistics * Office of Petroleum and Biofuels Statistics * Office of Electricity, Renewables, and Uranium Statistics * Office of Energy Consumption and Efficiency Statistics * Office of Survey Development and Statistical Integration 2 Presenter name, Presentation location, Presentation date Coal Data Collection Program 3 James Kendell Washington, DC, April 27,

  6. Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guopeng; Liu, Bing; Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Athalye, Rahul A.; Moser, Dave; Crowe, Eliot; Bengtson, Nick; Effinger, Mark; Webster, Lia; Hatten, Mike

    2011-09-27

    The Advanced Energy Retrofit Guide for Office Buildings is a component of the Department of Energy’s Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides for Existing Buildings series. The aim of the guides is to facilitate a rapid escalation in the number of energy efficiency projects in existing buildings and to enhance the quality and depth of those projects. By presenting general project planning guidance as well as financial payback metrics for the most common energy efficiency measures, these guides provide a practical roadmap to effectively planning and implementing performance improvements for existing buildings.

  7. Achieving 50% Energy Savings in Office Buildings, Advanced Energy Design Guides: Office Buildings (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-09-01

    This fact sheet summarizes recommendations for designing new office buildings that result in 50% less energy use than conventional designs meeting minimum code requirements. The recommendations are drawn from the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small to Medium Office Buildings, an ASHRAE publication that provides comprehensive recommendations for designing low-energy-use office buildings with gross floor areas up to 100,000 ft2 (see sidebar). Designed as a stand-alone document, this fact sheet provides key principles and a set of prescriptive design recommendations appropriate for smaller office buildings with insufficient budgets to fully implement best practices for integrated design and optimized performance. The recommendations have undergone a thorough analysis and review process through ASHRAE, and have been deemed the best combination of measures to achieve 50% savings in the greatest number of office buildings.

  8. 2015 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report 2015 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report The 2015 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report summarizes the results of the 2015 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Peer Review, which was held in Vienna, Virginia, on April 14-16, 2015. Read the report 2015 BTO Peer Review Report (10.27 MB) More Documents & Publications 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report Market

  9. 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report The 2014 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report summarizes the results of the 2014 Building Technologies Office (BTO) Peer Review, which was held in Arlington, Virginia, on April 22-24, 2014. Read the report 2014 BTO Peer Review Report (12.66 MB) More Documents & Publications 2015 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report Emerging

  10. Building Technologies Office 2016 Peer Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2016 Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office Peer Review will be held April 4-7, 2016 at the Falls Church Marriott Fairview Park, 3111 Fairview Park Drive, Falls Church, VA 22042. Space for the event is limited and registration is required.

  11. Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office is hosting its third annual Program Peer Review on April 14-16, 2015 in Vienna, Virginia. The event is open to the public and will provide the opportunity for stakeholders to learn more about BTO research, development, demonstration and deployment projects. Space for the event is limited and registration is required.

  12. Contact the Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About » Contact the Building Technologies Office Contact the Building Technologies Office The Building Technologies Office always welcomes your feedback and suggestions. Contact us via mail, phone or email. Address U.S. Department of Energy Building Technologies Office (BTO) Mail Stop EE-2J 1000 Independence Ave, SW Washington, DC 20585 Email Buildings@ee.doe.gov Phone Number 202.586.9127 Media Inquiries For media inquiries, please email the EERE communications team at EE.Media@ee.doe.gov. Web

  13. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4. Energy Conservation Features in FBSS Building in Federal Region 3, Number of Buildings and Floorspace, 1993 Total Floorspace Number of Buildings (thousand square feet) Any Any...

  14. Delaware Company Breathes New Life into Old Post Office Building...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Company Breathes New Life into Old Post Office Building Delaware Company Breathes New Life into Old Post Office Building November 26, 2013 - 12:51pm Addthis Thanks to the Energy ...

  15. 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review 2013 DOE Building Technologies Office Program Review The 2013 Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office Program Review was held April 2-4, 2013 in Washington, DC. This inaugural review encompassed active work done by the Building Technologies Office (BTO), with a total of 59 individual activities reviewed. Sixty independent experts assessed the progress and contributions of each project toward BTO's mission and goals, and these

  16. 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 3 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report The 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report summarizes the results of the 2013 Building Technologies Office (BTO) peer review, which was held in Washington, D.C., on April 2-4, 2013. The review was attended by over 300 participants and included presentations on 59 BTO-funded projects: 29 from BTO's Emerging Technologies Program, 20 from the

  17. Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights Building Technologies Office 2015 Highlights Table of Contents Feature Story: Major Advances toward Low-GWP Cooling Advancing Technology to Market Making a Difference in the Marketplace Design Solutions for Building Industry Locking in Energy Savings The Future of Buildings Employee Profile: Dr. Jason Hartke Download PDF Version >> bto_highlights_2015_director_letter_011416.png Roland Risser Dear

  18. Office Buildings: Assessing and Reducing Plug and Process Loads in Office Buildings (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    Plug and process loads (PPLs) in commercial buildings account for almost 5% of U.S. primary energy consumption. Minimizing these loads is a primary challenge in the design and operation of an energy-efficient building. PPLs are not related to general lighting, heating, ventilation, cooling, and water heating, and typically do not provide comfort to the occupants. They use an increasingly large fraction of the building energy use pie because the number and variety of electrical devices have increased along with building system efficiency. Reducing PPLs is difficult because energy efficiency opportunities and the equipment needed to address PPL energy use in office spaces are poorly understood.

  19. All Office Administrative/ Professional Government All Other

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Consumption Survey All Office Administrative Professional Government All Other Office All Buildings... 4,645 824 442 84...

  20. All Office Administrative/ Professional Government All Other

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings Energy Consumption Survey All Office Administrative Professional Government All Other Office All Buildings... 64,783 12,208...

  1. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    6. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, 1993 Electricity Consumption Electricity Expenditures Distribution of Building-Level...

  2. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    1993 Natural Gas Consumption Natural Gas Expenditures Distribution of per per per per Building-Level Intensities Total Building Square Worker per per Thousand (cubic feetsquare...

  3. About the Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    About the Building Technologies Office About the Building Technologies Office What We Do We lead a vast network of research and industry partners to continually develop innovative, cost-effective energy saving solutions-better products, better new homes, better ways to improve older homes, and better buildings in which we work, shop, and lead our everyday lives. The Building Technologies Office's Multi-Year Program Plan for Fiscal Years 2016-2020 provides a roadmap of our strategies and goals

  4. Highlighting High Performance Buildings: Department of Environmental Protection-Cambria Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-11-01

    The 36,000-square-foot Cambria Office building used integrated design to minimize energy use, pollution and environmental impact the building will create over its lifetime.

  5. Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Property Edit with form History Property:BuildingFloorAreaOffices Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Number. Floor area for Offices Pages using the property...

  6. Building Technologies Office Overview - 2014 Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4 Peer Review Building Technologies Office Overview - 2014 Peer Review Presenter: Roland Risser, U.S. Department of Energy Cutting our nation's energy consumption calls for cutting-edge, energy-efficient solutions. That's where the Building Technologies Office comes in. We are researching, developing, and deploying cost-effective solutions to cut building energy use in half by 2030. Our office will examine the feedback from the 2014 Program Peer Review to see what's working for us,

  7. How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings How to Select Lighting Controls for Offices and Public Buildings Fact sheet details agency guidelines for selecting lighting controls for offices and public buildings to save operating costs and energy. Download the fact sheet. (91.23 KB) More Documents & Publications Wireless Occupancy Sensors for Lighting Controls: An Applications Guide for Federal Facility Managers Exterior LED Lighting Projects at

  8. Building Technologies Office 2014 Program Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 4 Program Peer Review Building Technologies Office 2014 Program Peer Review The 2014 Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office Peer Review was held April 22-24, 2014 in Arlington, Virginia. This second annual review encompassed active work done by the Building Technologies Office (BTO). Independent experts assessed the progress and contributions of each project toward BTO's mission and goals, and these assessments will be used to enhance the management of existing

  9. Building Technologies Office Challenges National Labs to Rethink...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... DOE Announces JUMP Initiative Winners, Launches New Crowdsourcing Calls at Bay Area Maker Faire Building Technologies Office Challenges National Labs to Rethink Market ...

  10. Building Technologies Office Overview - 2015 Peer Review | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Building Technologies Office Overview - 2015 Peer Review Presenter: Roland Risser, U.S. ... View the Presentation BTO Overview 2015 - Roland Risser (1.6 MB) More Documents & ...

  11. Behavioral Opportunities for Energy Savings in Office Buildings...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Behavioral Opportunities for Energy Savings in Office Buildings: a London Field Experiment Report details a controlled field experiment to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas ...

  12. Archive Reference Buildings by Building Type: Small office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the reference buildings for new construction commercial buildings, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is...

  13. Building Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    BUILDING TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE FY 2016 BUDGET AT-A-GLANCE Buildings and homes use more than 73% of the electrical energy consumed in the United States. They also consume 40% of the nation's total energy, with an annual energy bill of $430 billion. These energy bills can be cost effectively reduced by 20%-50% or more through various energy-efficient technologies and techniques. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) will continue to develop and demonstrate advanced building efficiency technologies

  14. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    3. Consumption and Expenditures for Sum of Major Fuels, Electricity, and Natural Gas in FBSS Buildings in Federal Region 3, 1993 Sum of Sum of Major Major Electricity Natural...

  15. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey 1993

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    tank where heat produced from the combustion of fuels such as natural gas, fuel oil, or coal is used to generate hot water or steam. Many buildings have their own boilers, while...

  16. DOE Building Technologies Office seeks science and engineering graduate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    students for pilot program in building to grid integration DOE Building Technologies Office seeks science and engineering graduate students for 2016-2017 pilot program to research building to grid integration Deadline for applying is Nov. 15, 2015, at 11:59 p.m. EST FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 9, 2015 FY16-05 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-The Department of Energy's Building Technologies Office is seeking graduate students interested in exploring energy systems of buildings and how building assets or

  17. Building Technologies Office | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    will develop innovative techniques for improving home construction and retrofit processes. ... While commercial building owners generally have control over building systems and ...

  18. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed in or after 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary of building types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  19. Post Office Building, Rancho Mirage, California | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Photo of Photovoltaic System at Rancho Mirage Post Office in California The U.S. Postal Service (USPS) has been making an effort to add solar power to its offices as part of the ...

  20. 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-11-01

    The 2013 Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review Report summarizes the results of the 2013 Building Technologies Office (BTO) peer review, which was held in Washington, D.C., on April 2–4, 2013. The review was attended by over 300 participants and included presentations on 59 BTO-funded projects: 29 from BTO’s Emerging Technologies Program, 20 from the Commercial Buildings Integration Program, 6 from the Residential Buildings Integration Program, and 4 from the Building Energy Codes Program. This report summarizes the scores and comments provided by the independent reviewers for each project.

  1. Archived Reference Building Type: Medium office

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you will find past versions of the commercial reference building models for existing buildings constructed before 1980, organized by building type and location. A summary ofbuilding types and climate zones is available for reference. Current versions are also available.

  2. Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Better Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Initiative Support Services | Department of Energy Better Buildings Initiative Support Services Golden Reading Room: Office of Acquisition Documents, Better Buildings Initiative Support Services Below are electronic versions of Golden Field Office Reading Room documents that were created after November 1, 1996, per the requirements of the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendment of 1996. Most documents are available in Adobe Acrobat Portable Document Format (PDF). DE-SOL-0005538

  3. Building Technologies Office Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 6 BTO Peer Review Building Technologies Office Overview - 2016 BTO Peer Review Presenter: Roland Risser, U.S. Department of Energy This presentation at the 2016 Peer Review provided an overview of the Building Technologies Office. Through robust feedback, the BTO Program Peer Review enhances existing efforts and improves future designs. 2016 BTO Peer Review Presentation-Driving Innovation, Speeding Adoption, Scaling Savings (3.2 MB) More Documents & Publications Goals Framework

  4. Building Technologies Office 2015 Program Peer Review | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 Program Peer Review Building Technologies Office 2015 Program Peer Review The 2015 Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO) Peer Review was held April 14-16, 2015 in Vienna, Virginia. This third annual review encompassed many of BTO's active research, development, demonstration and deployment projects. Independent experts assessed the progress and contributions of each project toward BTO's mission and goals, and these assessments will be used to enhance the

  5. Building Technologies Office 2016 Peer Review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6 Peer Review Building Technologies Office 2016 Peer Review The 2016 Department of Energy (DOE) Building Technologies Office (BTO) Peer Review was held April 4-7, 2016 in Falls Church, Virginia. This fourth annual review encompassed many of BTO's active research, development, demonstration and deployment projects. Independent experts assessed the progress and contributions of each project toward BTO's mission and goals, and these assessments will be used to enhance the management of existing

  6. Types of Lighting in Commercial Buildings - Building Size and...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    commercial buildings. Note: Data are for non-mall buildings. Source: Energy Information Administration, 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. Office buildings and...

  7. Building Technologies Office Challenges National Labs to Rethink Market

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Engagement Strategy | Department of Energy Building Technologies Office Challenges National Labs to Rethink Market Engagement Strategy Building Technologies Office Challenges National Labs to Rethink Market Engagement Strategy December 10, 2015 - 2:21pm Addthis Karma Sawyer, Ph.D. Karma Sawyer, Ph.D. Acting Program Manager of Emerging Technologies What are the key facts? According to the U.S. Patent Office, only about 3,000 out of 1.5 million U.S. patents evaluated have resulted in a product

  8. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Consumption & Efficiency Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) Glossary FAQS Overview Data 2012 2003 1999 1995 1992 Previous Analysis & Projections ...

  9. A Prospective Study of Ventilation Rates and Illness Absence in California Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eliseeva, Ekaterina A.; Spears, Michael; Chan, Wanyu R.; Cohn, Sebastian; Sullivan, Douglas P.; Fisk, William J.

    2014-10-07

    Background – This study investigated the associations of ventilation rates (VRs), estimated from indoor CO2 concentrations, in offices with the amount of respiratory infections, illness absences, and building-related health symptoms in occupants. Methods – Office buildings were recruited from three California climate zones. In one or more study spaces within each building, real-time logging sensors measured carbon dioxide, temperature, and relative humidity for one year. Ventilation rates were estimated using daily peak CO2 levels, and also using an alternative metric. Data on occupants and health outcomes were collected through web-based surveys every three months. Multivariate models were used to assess relationships between metrics of ventilation rate or CO2 and occupant outcomes. For all outcomes, negative associations were hypothesized with VR metrics, and positive associations with CO2 metrics. Results – Difficulty recruiting buildings and low survey response limited sample size and study power. In 16 studied spaces within 9 office buildings, VRs were uniformly high over the year, from twice to over nine times the California office VR standard (7 L/s or 15 cfm per person). VR and CO2 metrics had no statistically significant relationships with occupant outcomes, except for a small significantly positive association of the alternative VR metric with respiratory illness-related absence, contrary to hypotheses. Conclusions– The very high time-averaged VRs in the California office buildings studied presumably resulted from “economizer cycles” bringing in large volumes of outdoor air; however, in almost all buildings even the estimated minimum VRs supplied (without the economizer) substantially exceeded the minimum required VR. These high VRs may explain the absence of hypothesized relationships with occupant outcomes. Among uniformly high VRs, little variation in contaminant concentration and occupant effects would be expected. These findings may

  10. STIL2 Swedish Office Buildings Survey - Offices_Sweden_-20100409...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Last updated December 1, 2010 Created July 29, 2014 Format applicationvnd.ms-excel License License Not Specified can be previewed 1 created over 1 year ago format XLS id...

  11. Radiological Laboratory, Utility, Office Building LEED Strategy & Achievement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seguin, Nicole R.

    2012-07-18

    Missions that the Radiological Laboratory, utility, Office Building (RLUOB) supports are: (1) Nuclear Materials Handling, Processing, and Fabrication; (2) Stockpile Management; (3) Materials and Manufacturing Technologies; (4) Nonproliferation Programs; (5) Waste Management Activities - Environmental Programs; and (6) Materials Disposition. The key capabilities are actinide analytical chemistry and material characterization.

  12. Estimating Total Energy Consumption and Emissions of China's Commercial and Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fridley, David; Fridley, David G.; Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan

    2008-03-01

    Buildings represent an increasingly important component of China's total energy consumption mix. However, accurately assessing the total volume of energy consumed in buildings is difficult owing to deficiencies in China's statistical collection system and a lack of national surveys. Official statistics suggest that buildings account for about 19% of China's total energy consumption, while others estimate the proportion at 23%, rising to 30% over the next few years. In addition to operational energy, buildings embody the energy used in the in the mining, extraction, harvesting, processing, manufacturing and transport of building materials as well as the energy used in the construction and decommissioning of buildings. This embodied energy, along with a building's operational energy, constitutes the building's life-cycle energy and emissions footprint. This report first provides a review of international studies on commercial building life-cycle energy use from which data are derived to develop an assessment of Chinese commercial building life-cycle energy use, then examines in detail two cases for the development of office building operational energy consumption to 2020. Finally, the energy and emissions implications of the two cases are presented.

  13. Trends in energy use in commercial buildings -- Sixteen years of EIA's commercial buildings energy consumption survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, J.; Swenson, A.

    1998-07-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) collects basic statistical information on energy consumption and energy-related characteristics of commercial buildings in the US. The first CBECS was conducted in 1979 and the most recent was completed in 1995. Over that period, the number of commercial bindings and total amount of floorspace increased, total consumption remained flat, and total energy intensity declined. By 1995, there were 4.6 million commercial buildings and 58.8 billion square feet of floorspace. The buildings consumed a total of 5.3 quadrillion Btu (site energy), with a total intensity of 90.5 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity consumption exceeded natural gas consumption (2.6 quadrillion and 1.9 quadrillion Btu, respectively). In 1995, the two major users of energy were space heating (1.7 quadrillion Btu) and lighting (1.2 quadrillion Btu). Over the period 1979 to 1995, natural gas intensity declined from 71.4 thousand to 51.0 thousand Btu per square foot per year. Electricity intensity did not show a similar decline (44.2 thousand Btu per square foot in 1979 and 45.7 thousand Btu per square foot in 1995). Two types of commercial buildings, office buildings and mercantile and service buildings, were the largest consumers of energy in 1995 (2.0 quadrillion Btu, 38% of total consumption). Three building types, health care, food service, and food sales, had significantly higher energy intensities. Buildings constructed since 1970 accounted for half of total consumption and a majority (59%) of total electricity consumption.

  14. A generalized window energy rating system for typical office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Cheng; Chen, Tingyao; Yang, Hongxing; Chung, Tse-ming

    2010-07-15

    Detailed computer simulation programs require lengthy inputs, and cannot directly provide an insight to relationship between the window energy performance and the key window design parameters. Hence, several window energy rating systems (WERS) for residential houses and small buildings have been developed in different countries. Many studies showed that utilization of daylight through elaborate design and operation of windows leads to significant energy savings in both cooling and lighting in office buildings. However, the current WERSs do not consider daylighting effect, while most of daylighting analyses do not take into account the influence of convective and infiltration heat gains. Therefore, a generalized WERS for typical office buildings has been presented, which takes all primary influence factors into account. The model includes embodied and operation energy uses and savings by a window to fully reflect interactions among the influence parameters. Reference locations selected for artificial lighting and glare control in the current common simulation practice may cause uncompromised conflicts, which could result in over- or under-estimated energy performance. Widely used computer programs, DOE2 and ADELINE, for hourly daylighting and cooling simulations have their own weaknesses, which may result in unrealistic or inaccurate results. An approach is also presented for taking the advantages of the both programs and avoiding their weaknesses. The model and approach have been applied to a typical office building of Hong Kong as an example to demonstrate how a WERS in a particular location can be established and how well the model can work. The energy effect of window properties, window-to-wall ratio (WWR), building orientation and lighting control strategies have been analyzed, and can be indicated by the localized WERS. An application example also demonstrates that the algebraic WERS derived from simulation results can be easily used for the optimal design of

  15. DOE standard compliance demonstration program: An office building example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, S.A.; Keller, J.M.; Wrench, L.E.; Williams, C.J.

    1993-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) issued interim new building energy standards (10 CFR 435 1989) to achieve maximum energy efficiency in the designs of new buildings. DOE then entered into a project to demonstrate and assess the impact of these standards on the design community. One area of focus was a test to see how a less conventional design-focused building would meet the standards` requirements -- DOE wanted to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean compromising the architectural intent of a building. This study, which was initiated at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), illustrated the process by which compliance with the standards can be proven for a highly {open_quotes}design-oriented{close_quotes} office building. The study also assessed the impact of the whole building simulation compliance alternatives on design. This report documents the compliance requirements, gives a description of the sample building chosen for the study, provides general guidance for the compliance process, documents the method of compliance that was undertaken for the sample building, presents the results of the study, and provides a recommendation on how the compliance requirements could be improved to reflect more realistic use types.

  16. Office of Building Technologies evaluation and planning report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierce, B.

    1994-06-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Building Technologies (OBT) encourages increased efficiency of energy use in the buildings sector through the conduct of a comprehensive research program, the transfer of research results to industry, and the implementation of DOE`s statutory responsibilities in the buildings area. The planning and direction of these activities require the development and maintenance of database and modeling capability, as well as the conduct of analyses. This report summarizes the results of evaluation and planning activities undertaken on behalf of OBT during the past several years. It provides historical data on energy consumption patterns, prices, and building characteristics used in OBT`s planning processes, and summaries of selected recent OBT analysis activities.

  17. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Building Type Definitions In the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), buildings are classified according to principal activity, which is the primary business, commerce, or function carried on within each building. Buildings used for more than one of the activities described below are assigned to the activity occupying the most floorspace. A building assigned to a particular principal activity category may be used for other activities in a

  18. Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey Tables

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy use intensities in commercial buildings vary widely and depend on activity and climate, as shown in this data table, which was derived from the Energy Information Agency's 2003 Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey.

  19. Air exchange effectiveness in office buildings: Measurement techniques and results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisk, W.J.; Faulkner, D.

    1992-07-01

    We define two air exchange effectiveness parameters which indicate the extent of short circuiting, mixing, or displacement air flow in an entire building, the air diffusion effectiveness which indicates the air flow pattern locally, and the normalized local age of air. After describing two tracer gas procedures for measuring these parameters, we discuss assumptions inherent in the data analysis that are often violated in large office buildings. To obtain valuable data, careful selection of buildings for measurements and assessments to determine if operating conditions are reasonably consistent with the assumptions are necessary. Multiple factors, in addition to the air flow pattern in the occupied space, can affect measurement results, consequently, the interpretation of measurements is not straightforward. We summarize the results of measurements in several office buildings and in a research laboratory. Almost all measurements indicate that the extent of both short circuiting and displacement flow is small. A moderate amount of short circuiting is evident from a few measurements in rooms with heated supply air. Ages of air and their reciprocals (local ventilation rates) often vary substantially between rooms, probably because of room-to-room variation in the rate of air supply. For future research, we suggest assessments of measurement accuracy, development of measurement approaches that may be practically applied for a broader range of buildings, and a greater focus on pollutant removal efficiencies.

  20. Field surveys of office equipment operating patterns

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Webber, Carrie A.; Roberson, Judy A.; Brown, Richard E.; Payne, Christopher T.; Nordman, Bruce; Koomey, Jonathan G.

    2001-09-05

    This paper presents the results of 11 after-hours walk-throughs of offices in the San Francisco CA and Washington D.C. areas. The primary purpose of these walk-throughs was to collect data on turn-off rates for various types of office equipment (computers, monitors, printers, fax machines, copiers, and multifunction products). Each piece of equipment observed was recorded and its power status noted (e.g. on, off, low power). Whenever possible, we also recorded whether power management was enabled on the equipment. The floor area audited was recorded as well, which allowed us to calculate equipment densities. We found that only 44 percent of computers, 32 percent of monitors, and 25 percent of printers were turned off at night. Based on our observations we estimate success rates of 56 percent for monitor power management and 96 percent for enabling of power management on printers.

  1. CBECS 1993 - Federal Buildings Supplement Survey - Detailed Tables

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings Supplemental Survey. Divider Line To View andor Print Reports (requires Adobe Acrobat Reader) - Download Adobe Acrobat Reader If you experience any difficulties,...

  2. Highlighting High Performance: Department of Environmental Protection; Cambria Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2001-11-01

    The 36,000-square-foot Cambria Office building used integrated design to minimize energy use, pollution and environmental impact the building will create over its lifetime.

  3. Building-related risk factors and work-related lower respiratory symptoms in 80 office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Naco, G.M.; Wilcox, T.G.; Sieber, W.K.

    2002-01-01

    We assessed building-related risk factors for lower respiratory symptoms in office workers. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health in 1993 collected data during indoor environmental health investigations of workplaces. We used multivariate logistic regression analyses to assess relationships between lower respiratory symptoms in office workers and risk factors plausibly related to microbiologic contamination. Among 2,435 occupants in 80 office buildings, frequent, work-related multiple lower respiratory symptoms were strongly associated, in multivariate models, with two risk factors for microbiologic contamination: poor pan drainage under cooling coils and debris in outside air intake. Associations tended to be stronger among those with a history of physician-diagnosed asthma. These findings suggest that adverse lower respiratory health effects from indoor work environments, although unusual, may occur in relation to poorly designed or maintained ventilation systems, particularly among previously diagnosed asthmatics. These findings require confirmation in more representative buildings.

  4. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    5 Top 10 Office Building Owners Globally as of Year End, 2010 (million SF) Owner 1. RREEF Americas 2. Brookfield Properties Corp. 3. The Blackstone Group 4. CB Richard Ellis Investors 5. Hines 6. LaSalleInvestment Management 7. TIAA-CREF 8. Boston Properties 9. Vornado Realty Trust 10. Duke Realty Corp. Total for Top 10: Source(s): National Real Estate Investor, The 2011 Best of The Best Rankings: 2011 Top 25 Office Owners, June 1, 2011.

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2009 Energy Consumption per Square Foot of Office Floorspace by Vintage (Thousand Btu/SF) (1) Vintage 2000-2009 81.4 1990-1999 74.1 1980-1989 73.1 1970-1979 102.8 1960-1969 71.4 Pre-1959 75.5 Buildings providing consumption data: 436 Note(s): Source(s): Energy Intensity 1) Commercial office buildings sampled include the following: Class A, B, C. BOMA International, Experience Exchange Report 2010, 2010

  6. DOE/EIA-0318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    318/1 Nonresidential Buildings Energy Consumption Survey: 1979 Consumption and Expenditures D! Part I: Natural Gas and Electricity March 1983 Energy Information Administration Washington, D.C. 1111? This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office |GPO). Make check or money order payable to the Superintendent of Documents. You may send your order to the U.S. Government Printing Office or the National Energy Information Center. GPO prices are

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    1 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 38.6 0.9 0.8 1.1 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones.

  8. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    9 Energy Benchmarks for Newly Constructed Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) Miami 1A Houston 2A Phoenix 2B Atlanta 3A Los Angeles 3B Las Vegas 3B San Francisco 3C Baltimore 4A Albuquerque 4B Seattle 4C Chicago 5A Boulder 5B Minneapolis 6A Helena 6B Duluth 7 Fairbanks 8 Note(s): Source(s): 31.7 1.7 0.6 1.3 Commercial building energy benchmarks are based off of the current stock of commercial buildings and reflect 2004 ASHRAE 90.1 Climate Zones.

  9. Pollution prevention opportunity assessment for Building 922 solid office waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, N.M.

    1995-01-01

    Building 922 houses all of SNL/California`s ES and H Departments: Health Protection, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Environmental Operations. It covers approximately 10,000 square feet and houses about 80 people. The office personnel generate nonhazardous solid office wastes in their daily activities. To determine the types and amounts of waste generated, a special PPOA sorting team sorted all of the trash collected from the building for a period of one-week (including paper and aluminum cans in the recycling bins). The team sorted the trash into major categories: paper, plastic, metals, glass, wet garbage, rest room waste, and miscellaneous materials. They then sorted it into subcategories within each major category. Rest room waste was collected but not sorted. The waste in each category was weighed separately. The total amount of trash collected during the week was approximately 168.8 kg (371.4 lbs). The results of this PPOA indicate that SNL/California is minimizing most nonhazardous office waste and reductions planned for the near future will add significantly to the minimization efforts.

  10. Energy Savings Modeling of Standard Commercial Building Re-tuning Measures: Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Liu, Guopeng

    2012-06-01

    Today, many large commercial buildings use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide range of building equipment. While the capabilities of BASs have increased over time, many buildings still do not fully use the BAS's capabilities and are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained, which leads to inefficient operation, increased energy use, and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. This report investigates the energy savings potential of several common HVAC system retuning measures on a typical large office building prototype model, using the Department of Energy's building energy modeling software, EnergyPlus. The baseline prototype model uses roughly as much energy as an average large office building in existing building stock, but does not utilize any re-tuning measures. Individual re-tuning measures simulated against this baseline include automatic schedule adjustments, damper minimum flow adjustments, thermostat adjustments, as well as dynamic resets (set points that change continuously with building and/or outdoor conditions) to static pressure, supply air temperature, condenser water temperature, chilled and hot water temperature, and chilled and hot water differential pressure set points. Six combinations of these individual measures have been formulated - each designed to conform to limitations to implementation of certain individual measures that might exist in typical buildings. All of these measures and combinations were simulated in 16 cities representative of specific U.S. climate zones. The modeling results suggest that the most effective energy savings measures are those that affect the demand-side of the building (air-systems and schedules). Many of the demand-side individual measures were capable of reducing annual HVAC system energy consumption by over 20% in most cities that were modeled. Supply side measures affecting HVAC plant conditions were only modestly successful (less than 5% annual HVAC energy savings for

  11. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 1, dose assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.; Warga, J.; Thorne, D.

    1997-07-01

    Building 2 on the US Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site is part of the GJO Remedial Action Program (GJORAP). During evaluation of Building 2 for determination of radiological release disposition, some inaccessible surface contamination measurements were detected to be greater than the generic surface contamination guidelines of DOE Order 5400.5 (which are functionally equivalent to US Nuclear Regulatory Commission [NRC] Regulatory Guide 1.86). Although the building is nominal in size, it houses the site telecommunications system, that is critical to continued GJO operations, and demolition is estimated at $1.9 million. Because unrestricted release under generic surface contamination guidelines is cost-prohibitive, supplemental standards consistent with DOE Order 5400.5 are being pursued. This report describes measurements and dose analysis modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might occupy or demolish Building 2, a 2,480 square-foot (ft) building constructed in 1944. The north portion of the building was used as a shower facility for Manhattan Project uranium-processing mill workers and the south portion was a warehouse. Many originally exposed surfaces are no longer accessible for contamination surveys because expensive telecommunications equipment have been installed on the floors and mounted on panels covering the walls. These inaccessible surfaces are contaminated above generic contamination limits.

  12. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings for Small Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Lane, Michael D.; Liu, Bing

    2010-04-30

    The Technical Support Document (TSD) for 50% energy savings in small office buildings documents the analysis and results for a recommended package of energy efficiency measures (EEMs) referred to as the advanced EEMs. These are changes to a building design that will reduce energy usage. The package of advanced EEMs achieves a minimum of 50% energy savings and a construction area weighted average energy savings of 56.6% over the ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004 for 16 cities which represent the full range of climate zones in the United States. The 50% goal is for site energy usage reduction. The weighted average is based on data on the building area of construction in the various climate locations. Cost-effectiveness of the EEMs is determined showing an average simple payback of 6.7 years for all 16 climate locations. An alternative set of results is provided which includes a variable air volume HVAC system that achieves at least 50% energy savings in 7 of the 16 climate zones with a construction area weighted average savings of 48.5%. Other packages of EEMs may also achieve 50% energy savings; this report does not consider all alternatives but rather presents at least one way to reach the goal. Design teams using this TSD should follow an integrated design approach and utilize additional analysis to evaluate the specific conditions of a project.

  13. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 Energy Consumption and Expenditures per Square Foot of Office Floorspace, by Function and Class (1) | | Medical Offices | Financial Offices | Corporate Facilities(2) | Class A | Class B | Class C | | All Buildings | Note(s): Source(s): 2006 2004 Energy Intensity Energy Energy Intensity Energy (thousand Btu/SF) Expenditures ($2010/SF) (thousand Btu/SF) Expenditures ($2010/SF) 90.79 2.56 N.A. 2.36 N.A. 3.12 N.A. 3.32 96.78 2.74 89.38 2.72 81.88 2.44 78.84 2.08 74.87 2.30 N.A. 2.04 1) Categories

  14. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Survey Background and Technical Information Survey Background The commercial sector encompasses a vast range of building types-service businesses, such as retail and wholesale stores, hotels and motels, restaurants, and hospitals, as well as certain buildings that would not be considered "commercial" in a traditional economic sense, such as public and private schools, correctional institutions, and religious and fraternal organizations. Excluded

  15. Chapter 5: Increasing Efficiency of Building Systems and Technologies | Building Technologies Office Potential Energy Savings Analysis Supplemental Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Roadmaps Building Technologies Office Potential Energy Savings Analysis ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 1 Quadrennial Technology Review 2015 Building Technologies Office Potential Energy Savings Analysis Chapter 5: Supplemental Information Introduction The analysis undertaken to support Chapter 5 compares the potential energy savings from research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) targets developed by the Department of Energy Building

  16. Building Technologies Office Program Peer Review April 2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... * ISO 50001: Conformant Energy Management Systems * Small Building Energy Management * BEM Library * Financing Turnkey Energy Efficiency Solutions * Better Buildings Challenge ...

  17. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - How Was Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Usage Information Collected in the 2012 CBECS? Energy Usage Information Collected in the 2012 CBECS? CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 18, 2016 The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) project cycle spans at least four years, beginning with development of the sample frame and survey questionnaire and ending with release of data to the public. This set of three methodology documents provides details about each of the three major stages of the 2012 CBECS survey process. * How

  18. DOEs Building Technologies Office Technology-to-Market (T2M...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Building Technologies Office (BTO) Ecosystem Clean Energy Innovation Infrastructure ... What does this model look like in BTO? * INFORM: - Utilize the BTO ecosystem to scope R&D ...

  19. Behavioral Opportunities for Energy Savings in Office Buildings: a London Field Experiment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Report details a controlled field experiment to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions in five organizations across four office buildings in London, England.

  20. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    7 Advanced Energy Design Guide for Small Office Buildings (1) Shell Percent Glass (WWR) 20-40% Window U-Factor 0.33-0.56 SHGC 0.31-0.49 Wall R-Value 7.6-15.2 Roof R-Value Attic 30-60 Insulation Above Deck 15-30 Wall Material Mass (HC > 7 Btu/ft^2) Lighting Average Power Density (Watts/SF) 0.9 System and Plant System and Plant Packaged Single-Zone Packaged Single-Zone w/ Economizer Cooling Capacity > 54 kBtu Heating Plant: Gas Furnace 80% Combustion Efficiency Cooling Plant: Air conditioner

  1. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    2 Energy Expenditures per Square Foot of Office Floorspace by Building Age ($2009) (1) Number of Number of Number of Age (years) 2009 Responses 2006 Responses 2004 Responses 0-9 2.1 451 2.1 483 1.8 564 10-19 1.9 582 2.3 503 2.0 848 20-29 2.1 1,161 2.4 939 2.0 786 30-39 2.4 416 2.7 314 2.3 290 40-49 2.5 150 3.0 68 2.9 57 50+ 2.5 187 2.5 128 2.1 164 All Buildings 2.2 3,494 2.4 2,619 1.8 2,939 Note(s): Source(s): 1) Energy includes electric, gas, fuel oil, purchased steam, purchased chilled water,

  2. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) All Reports & Publications Search By: Go Pick a date range: From: To: Go Commercial Buildings Available formats Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2012 - Detailed Tables Released: May 17, 2016 The 2012 CBECS consumption and expenditures detailed tables are comprised of Tables C1-C38, which cover overall electricity, natural gas, fuel oil and district heat consumption, and tables E1-E11, which disaggregate the same

  3. Building Technologies Office FY 2017 Budget At-A-Glance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy About Us » Building Technologies Office FY 2017 Budget At-A-Glance Building Technologies Office FY 2017 Budget At-A-Glance Buildings and homes use more than 73% of the electrical energy consumed in the United States. They also consume 40% of the nation's total energy, with an annual energy bill of $430 billion. These energy bills can be cost effectively reduced by 20%-50% or more through various energy-efficient technologies and techniques. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) will

  4. Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, & Manufacturing (Fact Sheet), Office of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) | Department of Energy Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, & Manufacturing (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy-Saving Homes, Buildings, & Manufacturing (Fact Sheet), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) This document highlights DOE's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy's advancements in saving

  5. Technical Support Document: 50% Energy Savings Design Technology Packages for Medium Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Brian A.; Wang, Weimin; Lane, Michael D.; Rosenberg, Michael I.; Liu, Bing

    2009-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) describes the process and methodology for development of the Advanced Energy Design Guide for Medium Offices (AEDG-MO or the Guide), a design guidance document which intends to provide recommendations for achieving 50% energy savings in medium office buildings that just meet the requirements of ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004, Energy Standard for Buildings Except Low-Rise Residential Buildings.

  6. Highlighting High Performance: Department of Environmental Protection; Cambria Office Building, Ebensburg, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-10-01

    The 36,000-square-foot Cambria Office building in Ebensbug, Pennsylvania houses the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection. Designers of the energy-efficient building used integrated design to minimize energy use and pollution created in the production of the materials they used, and reduced the overall pollution and environmental impact the building will create over its lifetime. The building also employs daylighting and renewable energy technologies.

  7. Office of Building Technology, State and Community Programs Strategic Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2009-01-18

    This is the strategic plan for the Building Technology Program in 1998. This describes trends in the BTP program and projects goals for the future.

  8. Preliminary Energy Analysis of the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection's Cambria Office Building Ebensburg, PA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Hancock, E.

    2003-01-01

    The Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) has undertaken a path to build''high performance green'' buildings as part of the objectives of the Governors Green Government Council. The first building, completed in 1998, is used as the DEPs regional headquarters in Harrisburg. The Cambria office, located in Ebensburg, is DEPs second building. Many of the lessons learned from the first building were successfully applied to this building, which was completed in 2000. The objective was to provide a comfortable and productive work environment while minimizing its short- and long-term environmental impacts.

  9. Building Technologies Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 5 Budget At-A-Glance Building Technologies Office FY 2015 Budget At-A-Glance Buildings use more than 70% of the electrical energy consumed in the United States. Homes and commercial buildings consume 40% of the nation's total energy with an annual energy bill of more than $400 billion. These energy bills can be cost-effectively reduced by 20-50% or more through various energy efficiency technologies and techniques. The Building Technologies Office will continue to develop and

  10. Building Technologies Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy Consumption in Miscellaneous Electric Loads ... Why Do We Care About MELs? Problem: Fraction of energy consumption due to MELs is rising ...

  11. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Net Zero Office Building |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Net Zero Office Building Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Net Zero Office Building Document describes the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Research Support Facility data center. Download the case study. (3.03 MB) More Documents & Publications Top ECMs for Labs and Data Centers Best Practices Guide for Energy-Efficient Data

  12. Attendees: John Cymbalsky, Equipment and Appliance Standards Program Manager, Building Technologies Office,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lutron ex-parte meeting at DOE Pekka Hakkarainen 11 February 2015 Page 1 of 4 Lutron Electronics Co., Inc. ex-parte meeting at the U.S. Department of Energy Subject: LED drivers are not external power supplies Meeting date: 11 February 2015 Attendees: John Cymbalsky, Equipment and Appliance Standards Program Manager, Building Technologies Office, DOE Jeremy Dommu, Project Manager, Equipment and Appliance Standards Program, Building Technologies Office, DOE Laura Barhydt, Assistant General

  13. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Relationship of CBECS Coverage to EIA Supply Surveys The primary purpose of the CBECS is to collect accurate statistics of energy consumption by individual buildings. EIA also collects data on total energy supply (sales). For the information on sales totals, a different reporting system is used for each fuel and the boundaries between the different sectors (e.g., residential, commercial, industrial) are drawn differently for each fuel. Background EIA sales

  14. USDOE energy standard compliance test on two-story office building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, S.A.

    1993-11-01

    There exists some skepticism in the design community regarding the ability to design an aesthetically pleasing building that meets the interim energy conservation standard for new commercial buildings initiated by the US Department of Energy. In response to this, a study was undertaken to demonstrate that compliance with energy standards does not mean giving up the architectural intent of a building. An unusual and architecturally pleasing building design was chosen for this study. This two-story office building has a large, central atrium, made almost entirely of glass. It is the building`s focal point, lending an inviting atmosphere to the interior spaces but also poses a considerable challenge to the HVAC system to keep the building comfortable. The building was simulated and easily complied with the Standard, based on an annual energy cost comparison. Alterations to the original design affected neither the interior floor plan nor exterior elevations.

  15. DOE Building Technologies Office seeks science and engineering...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Deadline for applying is Nov. 15, 2015, at 11:59 p.m. EST FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE Nov. 9, ... The deadline for applying is Nov. 15, at 11:59 p.m. EST. The Building-Grid Integration ...

  16. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    0 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Medium Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 1.0 0.0 22.0 19.2 0.4 0.4 1.9 13.0 Houston 2A 4.6 1.8 15.5 14.7 0.5 0.5 1.5 12.8 Phoenix 2B 4.0 0.7 17.5 19.4 0.4 0.4 1.9 15.0 Atlanta 3A 7.8 4.3 10.1 10.4 0.6 0.5 1.4 13.9 Los Angeles 3B 4.1 0.3 8.0 3.5 0.5 0.5 1.4 10.9 Las Vegas 3B 5.6 1.4 13.2 14.6 0.5 0.5 1.8 14.5 San Francisco 3C 5.8 1.7 2.9 1.2 0.6 0.6 1.1 8.9 Baltimore 4A

  17. Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.6 Office Building Markets and Companies

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    8 Energy Benchmarks for Existing Large Office Buildings, by Selected City and End-Use (thousand Btu per square foot) IECC Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Post Pre Miami 1A 0.3 0.8 21.9 24.5 0.3 0.2 3.1 3.5 Houston 2A 4.2 4.4 17.7 20.9 0.3 0.3 2.8 3.3 Phoenix 2B 3.0 3.3 16.2 18.3 0.3 0.3 3.2 3.7 Atlanta 3A 6.9 8.5 14.1 17.5 0.4 0.4 2.6 3.2 Los Angeles 3B 2.8 2.9 11.9 13.0 0.4 0.4 2.5 2.7 Las Vegas 3B 4.6 4.7 10.8 13.0 0.3 0.3 2.7 3.3 San Francisco 3C 5.0 6.4 5.6 6.6 0.4 0.4 1.8 2.1 Baltimore 4A 9.8

  18. Indoor Thermal Factors and Symptoms in Office Workers: Findings...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    We reexamined this relationship in data from 95 office buildings in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Building Assessment Survey and Evaluation (BASE) Study. We ...

  19. Office | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Office Jump to: navigation, search Building Type Office Definition Buildings used for general office space, professional office, or administrative offices. Medical offices are...

  20. Building Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 6 Budget At-A-Glance Building Technologies Office FY 2016 Budget At-A-Glance Buildings and homes use more than 73% of the electrical energy consumed in the United States. They also consume 40% of the nation's total energy, with an annual energy bill of $430 billion. These energy bills can be cost effectively reduced by 20%-50% or more through various energy-efficient technologies and techniques. The Building Technologies Office (BTO) will continue to develop and demonstrate advanced

  1. Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

    2007-08-01

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

  2. On Variations of Space-heating Energy Use in Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Hung-Wen; Hong, Tianzhen

    2013-05-01

    Space heating is the largest energy end use, consuming more than 7 quintillion joules of site energy annually in the U.S. building sector. A few recent studies showed discrepancies in simulated space-heating energy use among different building energy modeling programs, and the simulated results are suspected to be underpredicting reality. While various uncertainties are associated with building simulations, especially when simulations are performed by different modelers using different simulation programs for buildings with different configurations, it is crucial to identify and evaluate key driving factors to space-heating energy use in order to support the design and operation of low-energy buildings. In this study, 10 design and operation parameters for space-heating systems of two prototypical office buildings in each of three U.S. heating climates are identified and evaluated, using building simulations with EnergyPlus, to determine the most influential parameters and their impacts on variations of space-heating energy use. The influence of annual weather change on space-heating energy is also investigated using 30-year actual weather data. The simulated space-heating energy use is further benchmarked against those from similar actual office buildings in two U.S. commercial-building databases to better understand the discrepancies between simulated and actual energy use. In summary, variations of both the simulated and actual space-heating energy use of office buildings in all three heating climates can be very large. However these variations are mostly driven by a few influential parameters related to building design and operation. The findings provide insights for building designers, owners, operators, and energy policy makers to make better decisions on energy-efficiency technologies to reduce space-heating energy use for both new and existing buildings.

  3. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) CBECS Terminology NOTE: This glossary is specific to the 1999, 2003 and 2012Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Surveys (CBECS). CBECS glossaries for prior years can be found in the appendices of past CBECS reports. A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Account Classification: The method in which suppliers of electricity, natural gas, or fuel oil classify and bill their customers. Commonly used account classifications are

  4. Building Technologies Office (BTO) Sensors and Controls Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sensors and Controls Technologies Emerging Technologies R&D Program Marina Sofos, Ph.D. marina.sofos@ee.doe.gov 2 BTO Emerging Technologies R&D Goals As a result of ET sponsored research, cost effective technologies will be introduced into the marketplace by 2020 that will be capable of reducing a building's energy use by 25% relative to 2010 cost effective technologies, and 35% by 2030. Technology-specific targets relative to the 2030 primary energy consumption projected by the 2010

  5. Vehicle Technologies Office: Workplace Charging Challenge 2015 Annual Survey Webinar

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This webinar provides an update on the Workplace Charging Challenge initiative, describes the survey, discusses why the Survey input is essential, and walks through the log-in and submission process.

  6. Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 public dose evaluation. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, R.

    1996-05-01

    Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) site, which is operated by Rust Geotech, is part of the GJPO Remedial Action Program. This report describes measurements and modeling efforts to evaluate the radiation dose to members of the public who might someday occupy or tear down Building 2. The assessment of future doses to those occupying or demolishing Building 2 is based on assumptions about future uses of the building, measured data when available, and predictive modeling when necessary. Future use of the building is likely to be as an office facility. The DOE sponsored program, RESRAD-BUILD, Version. 1.5 was chosen for the modeling tool. Releasing the building for unrestricted use instead of demolishing it now could save a substantial amount of money compared with the baseline cost estimate because the site telecommunications system, housed in Building 2, would not be disabled and replaced. The information developed in this analysis may be used as part of an as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) cost/benefit determination regarding disposition of Building 2.

  7. MEMORANDUM TO: John Cymbalsky, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Building

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    MEMORANDUM TO: John Cymbalsky, U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Building Technologies FROM: Ginger Willson, Director, Nebraska Energy Office DATE: December 12, 2011 RE: Meeting regarding DOE Energy Conservations Standards for Battery Chargers Following the Friday, December 2, 2011 meeting, please find below participants and discussion points presented relating to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Energy Conservation Standards for Battery Chargers. The following participated in the meeting:

  8. Energy and Cost Savings of Retro-Commissioning and Retrofit Measures for Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Weimin; Zhang, Jian; Moser, Dave; Liu, Guopeng; Athalye, Rahul A.; Liu, Bing

    2012-08-03

    This paper evaluates the energy and cost savings of seven retro-commissioning measures and 29 retrofit measures applicable to most large office buildings. The baseline model is for a hypothetical building with characteristics of large office buildings constructed before 1980. Each retro-commissioning measure is evaluated against the original baseline in terms of its potential of energy and cost savings while each retrofit measure is evaluated against the commissioned building. All measures are evaluated in five locations (Miami, Las Vegas, Seattle, Chicago and Duluth) to understand the impact of weather conditions on energy and cost savings. The results show that implementation of the seven operation and maintenance measures as part of a retro-commissioning process can yield an average of about 22% of energy use reduction and 14% of energy cost reduction. Widening zone temperature deadband, lowering VAV terminal minimum air flow set points and lighting upgrades are effective retrofit measures to be considered.

  9. Federal Buildings Supplemental Survey--Public Use Files

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    how Federal buildings use energy. OFEMP requested that the FBSS provide building-level energy-related characteristics for a special sample of commercial buildings owned by the...

  10. Characterizing Indoor Airflow and Pollutant Transport using Simulation Modeling for Prototypical Buildings. I. Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sohn, M.D.; Daisey, J.M.; Feustel, H.E.

    1999-06-01

    This paper describes the first efforts at developing a set of prototypical buildings defined to capture the key features affecting airflow and pollutant transport in buildings. These buildings will be used to model airflow and pollutant transport for emergency response scenarios when limited site-specific information is available and immediate decisions must be made, and to better understand key features of buildings controlling occupant exposures to indoor pollutant sources. This paper presents an example of this approach for a prototypical intermediate-sized, open style, commercial building. Interzonal transport due to a short-term source release, e.g., accidental chemical spill, in the bottom and the upper floors is predicted and corresponding HVAC system operation effects and potential responses are considered. Three-hour average exposure estimates are used to compare effects of source location and HVAC operation.

  11. Health-hazard evaluation report HETA 86-434-1833, Federal Office Building, Evansville, Indiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryant, C.J.

    1987-09-01

    An evaluation was made of potential asbestos exposure in the Federal Office Building located in Evansville, Indiana. Several surface samples revealed chrysotile and amosite fibers which indicated a history of past airborne asbestos at the site. The author concluded that a potential health hazard exists. It is recommended that the material be safely removed by a reliable contractor skilled in asbestos abatement. Interim precautionary measures are suggested to allow for building use until the asbestos is completely removed.

  12. NIOSH (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health) indoor air quality in office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wallingford, K.M.

    1987-01-01

    A total of 356 indoor-air-quality health-hazard evaluations were completed by NIOSH from 1971 through December of 1985. Most of these studies concerned government and private office buildings where there were worker complaints. Worker complaints resulted from contamination from inside the building (19% of the cases), contamination from outside (11 percent), contamination from the building fabric (4%), biological contamination (5%), inadequate ventilation (50%), and unknown causes (11%). Health complaints addressed by investigative efforts included eye irritation, dry throat, headache, fatigue, sinus congestion, skin irritation, shortness of breath, cough, dizziness, and nausea.

  13. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey 2003 - Detailed Tables

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    The tables contain information about energy consumption and expenditures in U.S. commercial buildings and information about energy-related characteristics of these buildings.

  14. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  15. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-12-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  16. Plug-Load Control and Behavioral Change Research in GSA Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Metzger, I.; Cutler, D.; Sheppy, M.

    2012-10-01

    The U.S. General Services Administration (GSA) owns and leases over 354 million square feet (ft2) of space in over 9,600 buildings [1]. GSA is a leader among federal agencies in aggressively pursuing energy efficiency (EE) opportunities for its facilities and installing renewable energy (RE) systems to provide heating, cooling, and power to these facilities. According to several energy assessments of GSA's buildings conducted by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), plug-loads account for approximately 21% of the total electricity consumed within a standard GSA Region 3 office building. This study aims to provide insight on how to effectively manage plug-load energy consumption and attain higher energy and cost savings for plug-loads. As GSA improves the efficiency of its building stock, plug-loads will become an even greater portion of its energy footprint.

  17. DOE/ NREL Build One of the World's Most Energy Efficient Office Spaces

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-29

    Technology ? from sophisticated computer modeling to advanced windows that actually open ? will help the newest building at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) be one of the world's most energy efficient offices. Scheduled to open this summer, the 222,000 square-foot RSF will house more than 800 staff and an energy efficient information technology data center. Because 19 percent of the country's energy is used by commercial buildings, DOE plans to make this facility a showcase for energy efficiency. DOE hopes the design of the RSF will be replicated by the building industry and help reduce the nation's energy consumption by changing the way commercial buildings are designed and built.

  18. Energy Savings Modelling of Re-tuning Energy Conservation Measures in Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, Nicholas; Katipamula, Srinivas; Wang, Weimin; Huang, Yunzhi; Liu, Guopeng

    2014-10-20

    Today, many large commercial buildings use sophisticated building automation systems (BASs) to manage a wide range of building equipment. While the capabilities of BASs have increased over time, many buildings still do not fully use the BASs capabilities and are not properly commissioned, operated or maintained, which leads to inefficient operation, increased energy use, and reduced lifetimes of the equipment. This paper investigates the energy savings potential of several common HVAC system re-tuning measures on a typical large office building, using the Department of Energys building energy modeling software, EnergyPlus. The baseline prototype model uses roughly as much energy as an average large office building in existing building stock, but does not utilize any re-tuning measures. Individual re-tuning measures simulated against this baseline include automatic schedule adjustments, damper minimum flow adjustments, thermostat adjustments, as well as dynamic resets (set points that change continuously with building and/or outdoor conditions) to static pressure, supply-air temperature, condenser water temperature, chilled and hot water temperature, and chilled and hot water differential pressure set points. Six combinations of these individual measures have been formulated each designed to conform to limitations to implementation of certain individual measures that might exist in typical buildings. All the individual measures and combinations were simulated in 16 climate locations representative of specific U.S. climate zones. The modeling results suggest that the most effective energy savings measures are those that affect the demand-side of the building (air-systems and schedules). Many of the demand-side individual measures were capable of reducing annual total HVAC system energy consumption by over 20% in most cities that were modeled. Supply side measures affecting HVAC plant conditions were only modestly successful (less than 5% annual HVAC energy

  19. Cooling season performance of an earth-sheltered office/dormitory building in Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christian, J.E.

    1984-07-01

    Detailed hourly measurements taken in and around an underground office-dormitory building for two summers document energy savings; whole building-component interface problems; and specific cooling contributions from earth contact, interior thermal mass, and an economizer. The Joint Institute Dormitory (JID) saves about 30% compared with well-built above-grade buildings in a climate typical of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and has the potential to save as much as 50%. The detailed measurements, which include extensive thermal comfort data, indicate that at least 90% of the occupants are comfortable all of the time. The thermal performance measurements and analysis determine that the peak cooling requirement of this building is 50% less than that of well-built above-grade structures, permitting a cost savings on installed cooling capacity. The dominant building components contributing to the good thermal performance are the structural thermal mass, the earth-covered roof, and the earth contact provided by the bermed walls and slab floor. The 372-m/sup 2/ (4000 gross ft/sup 2/) building used about $300 (at 5.7 cents/kWh) to cool and ventilate from May through September. Eliminating a number of building design and construction anomalies could improve the whole-building performance and reduce the seasonal cooling cost another $85. Close examination of the thermal performance of this building revealed that a very efficient heat pump and thermally sound envelope do not necessarily produce otpimum performance without careful attention given to component interface details. 8 references, 24 figures, 12 tables.

  20. Final Project Report for DPD, Inc. Office Building in Lansing, Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deru, M.; Sherman, M.

    2003-03-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory participated with DPD, Inc., in the thermal analysis of buildings constructed using concrete with recycled materials in the aggregate. This project was part of a Phase II Small Business Innovative Research grant to determine how the thermal properties of concrete can be''tuned'' for use in passive solar buildings. DPD Inc. and Michigan State University developed techniques to alter the thermal properties of concrete by introducing recycled materials into the aggregate. Two office/retail buildings were built in Lansing, Michigan for this research. The objective of NREL's involvement was to evaluate the effects of concrete thermal properties on the building performance through energy simulations and monitoring. This report presents a summary of work accomplished on this project, including a predesign analysis of the concrete properties and building designs as well as energy performance analysis after construction. The test results were used to calibrate computer models that were later used to predict long-term performance of the buildings.

  1. Design and testing of a control strategy for a large naturallyventilated office building

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carrilho da Graca, Guilherme; Linden, Paul F.; Haves, Philip

    2004-03-16

    The design for the new Federal Building for San Franciscoincludes an office tower that is to be naturally ventilated. Each flooris designed to be cross-ventilated, through upper windows that arecontrolled by the building management system (BMS). Users have controlover lower windows, which can be as much as 50 percent of the totalopenable area. There are significant differences in the performance andthe control of the windward and leeward sides of the building, andseparate monitoring and control strategies are determined for each side.The performance and control of the building has been designed and testedusing a modified version of EnergyPlus. Results from studies withEnergyPlus and CFD are used in designing the control strategy. EnergyPluswas extended to model a simplified version of the airflow patterndetermined using CFD. Wind-driven cross-ventilation produces a main jetthrough the upper openings of the building, across the ceiling from thewindward to the leeward side. Below this jet, the occupied regions aresubject to a recirculating air flow. Results show that temperatureswithin the building are predicted to be satisfactory, provided a suitablecontrol strategy is implemented uses night cooling in periods of hotweather. The control strategy has 10 window opening modes. EnergyPlus wasextended to simulate the effects of these modes, and to assess theeffects of different forms of user behavior. The results show how userbehavior can significantly influence the buildingperformance.

  2. Targeted Energy Efficiency Expert Evaluation (E4) Report: Iowa City Federal Building and U.S. Post Office, Iowa City, IA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goddard, James K.; Fernandez, Nicholas; Underhill, Ronald M.; Gowri, Krishnan

    2013-03-01

    Final report summarizing Targeted E4 measures and energy savings analysis for the Iowa City Federal Building and Post Office.

  3. Nonresidential-building energy-consumption survey, 1979. Final report, Part II and Part III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    The Utility Survey component of the Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Survey was designed to provide data on the quantity and costs of energy consumed during 1979 by each building represented in the Building Survey data. To this end, 13,386 consumption and cost reporting forms were mailed to 1509 companies/organizations/agencies who supplied some type of energy to the 6222 buildings represented in the data from the earlier Building Survey. Part II, Section 2 discusses the step-by-step process of building the computer and manual files that were needed in order to conduct the Utility Survey. How the files were actually used in order to implement, control, and manage the Utility Survey was also discussed. Section 3 discusses the reporting forms and the accompanying instructional material used to collect data from the energy suppliers and Section 4 discusses the various operations for implementing the data collection task. The proessing of the data is described in Section 5 and the method of keeping the data confidential is described in Section 6. Part III, Section 7 presents several analyses of the costs associated with the Interim Nonresidential Building Energy Consumption Survey. Tables included reflect costs incurred through April 25, 1981. Administrative correspondence, record sheets, and explanatory notes are included in appendices. (MCW)

  4. Radiant cooling in US office buildings: Towards eliminating the perception of climate-imposed barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stetiu, C.

    1998-01-01

    Much attention is being given to improving the efficiency of air-conditioning systems through the promotion of more efficient cooling technologies. One such alternative, radiant cooling, is the subject of this thesis. Performance information from Western European buildings equipped with radiant cooling systems indicates that these systems not only reduce the building energy consumption but also provide additional economic and comfort-related benefits. Their potential in other markets such as the US has been largely overlooked due to lack of practical demonstration, and to the absence of simulation tools capable of predicting system performance in different climates. This thesis describes the development of RADCOOL, a simulation tool that models thermal and moisture-related effects in spaces equipped with radiant cooling systems. The thesis then conducts the first in-depth investigation of the climate-related aspects of the performance of radiant cooling systems in office buildings. The results of the investigation show that a building equipped with a radiant cooling system can be operated in any US climate with small risk of condensation. For the office space examined in the thesis, employing a radiant cooling system instead of a traditional all-air system can save on average 30% of the energy consumption and 27% of the peak power demand due to space conditioning. The savings potential is climate-dependent, and is larger in retrofitted buildings than in new construction. This thesis demonstrates the high performance potential of radiant cooling systems across a broad range of US climates. It further discusses the economics governing the US air-conditioning market and identifies the type of policy interventions and other measures that could encourage the adoption of radiant cooling in this market.

  5. Survey and Analysis of Weather Data for Building Energy Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhandari, Mahabir S; Shrestha, Som S; New, Joshua Ryan

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, calibrated energy modeling of residential and commercial buildings has gained importance in a retrofit-dominated market. Accurate weather data plays an important role in this calibration process and projected energy savings. It would be ideal to measure weather data at the building location to capture relevant microclimate variation but this is generally considered cost-prohibitive. There are data sources publicly available with high temporal sampling rates but at relatively poor geospatial sampling locations. To overcome this limitation, there are a growing number of service providers that claim to provide real time and historical weather data for 20-35 km2 grid across the globe. Unfortunately, there is limited documentation from 3rd-party sources attesting to the accuracy of this data. This paper compares provided weather characteristics with data collected from a weather station inaccessible to the service providers. Monthly average dry bulb temperature; relative humidity; direct, diffuse and horizontal solar radiation; and wind speed are statistically compared. Moreover, we ascertain the relative contributions of each weather variable and its impact on building loads. Annual simulations are calculated for three different building types, including a closely monitored and automated energy efficient research building. The comparison shows that the difference for an individual variable can be as high as 90%. In addition, annual building energy consumption can vary by 7% while monthly building loads can vary by 40% as a function of the provided location s weather data.

  6. Select Results from the Energy Assessor Experiment in the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Select Results from the Energy Assessor Experiment in the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey December 2015 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Select Results from the Energy Assessor Experiment in the 2012 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the

  7. Technical Support Document: Strategies for 50% Energy Savings in Large Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leach, M.; Lobato, C.; Hirsch, A.; Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2010-09-01

    This Technical Support Document (TSD) documents technical analysis that informs design guidance for designing and constructing large office buildings that achieve 50% net site energy savings over baseline buildings defined by minimal compliance with respect to ANSI/ASHRAE/IESNA Standard 90.1-2004. This report also represents a step toward developing a methodology for using energy modeling in the design process to achieve aggressive energy savings targets. This report documents the modeling and analysis methods used to identify design recommendations for six climate zones that capture the range of U.S. climate variability; demonstrates how energy savings change between ASHRAE Standard 90.1-2007 and Standard 90.1-2004 to determine baseline energy use; uses a four-story 'low-rise' prototype to analyze the effect of building aspect ratio on energy use intensity; explores comparisons between baseline and low-energy building energy use for alternate energy metrics (net source energy, energy emissions, and energy cost); and examines the extent to which glass curtain construction limits achieve energy savings by using a 12-story 'high-rise' prototype.

  8. Reducing Plug and Process Loads for a Large Scale, Low Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lobato, C.; Pless, S.; Sheppy, M.; Torcellini, P.

    2011-02-01

    This paper documents the design and operational plug and process load energy efficiency measures needed to allow a large scale office building to reach ultra high efficiency building goals. The appendices of this document contain a wealth of documentation pertaining to plug and process load design in the RSF, including a list of equipment was selected for use.

  9. Energy Department Announces $9 Million to Improve Energy Efficiency of Hotels, Hospitals, Offices and other Commercial Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Obama Administration’s effort to double energy productivity by 2030 and reduce carbon emissions in commercial buildings, the Energy Department today announced $9 million to encourage investments in energy-saving technologies that can be tested and deployed in offices, shops, restaurants, hospitals, hotels and other types of commercial buildings.

  10. Energy Department Invests $6 Million to Increase Energy Efficiency of Schools, Offices, Stores and other U.S. Buildings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of the Administration’s effort to cut energy waste in the nation’s buildings and double energy productivity by 2030, the Energy Department today announced nearly $6 million to accelerate energy efficiency in offices, shops, schools and other buildings that will help businesses and communities save money, create jobs, and reduce pollution.

  11. User-needs study for the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey. [Energy Consumption Series

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) that is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the primary source of energy data for commercial buildings in the United States. The survey began in 1979 and has subsequently been conducted in 1983, 1986, and 1989. The next survey will cover energy consumption during the year 1992. The building characteristic data will be collected between August 1992 and early December 1992. Requests for energy consumption data are mailed to the energy suppliers in January 1993, with data due by March 1993. Before each survey is sent into the field, the data users' needs are thoroughly assessed. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of that user-needs assessment for the 1992 survey.

  12. User-needs study for the 1992 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-09-01

    The Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) that is conducted by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) is the primary source of energy data for commercial buildings in the United States. The survey began in 1979 and has subsequently been conducted in 1983, 1986, and 1989. The next survey will cover energy consumption during the year 1992. The building characteristic data will be collected between August 1992 and early December 1992. Requests for energy consumption data are mailed to the energy suppliers in January 1993, with data due by March 1993. Before each survey is sent into the field, the data users` needs are thoroughly assessed. The purpose of this report is to document the findings of that user-needs assessment for the 1992 survey.

  13. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Analysis &

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Projections - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) 2012 CBECS Preliminary Results What is a commercial building? The CBECS includes buildings greater than 1,000 square feet that devote more than half of their floorspace to activity that is neither residential, manufacturing, industrial, nor agricultural. When will energy consumption estimates be available? Energy consumption and expenditures data will be available beginning in spring 2015. CBECS data collection is currently in its

  14. Potential energy savings with exterior shades in large office buildings and the impact of discomfort glare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffmann, Sabine; Lee, Eleanor

    2015-04-01

    Exterior shades are highly efficient for reducing solar load in commercial buildings. Their impact on net energy use depends on the annual energy balance of heating, cooling, fan and lighting energy. This paper discusses the overall energy use intensity of various external shading systems for a prototypical large office building split into the different types of energy use and for different orientations and window sizes. Lighting energy was calculated for a constant lighting power as well as for dimmed lighting fixtures (daylighting control). In Section 3, slat angles and solar cut-off angles were varied for fixed exterior slat shading systems. While the most light-blocking shades performed best for the case without daylighting controls, the optimum cut-off angle with daylighting controls was found to be 30 deg for the office building prototype used in Chicago and Houston. For large window-to-wall (WWR) ratios, window related annual energy use could be reduced by at least 70 % without daylighting control and by a minimum of 86 % with daylighting control in average over all orientations. The occurrence of discomfort glare was is considered in Section 4 of the paper, which looks at the performance of commercially available exterior shading systems when an interior shade is used in addition to the exterior shade during hours when occupants would experience discomfort glare. Glare control impacts overall energy use intensity significantly for exterior shades with high transmittance, especially when daylighting controls are used. In these cases, exterior shades are only beneficial for window-to-wall areas ≥ 45% in the hot Houston climate. For smaller windows and in a heating/cooling climate like Chicago, exterior shades can increase energy consumption

  15. Gas-fired chiller-heaters as a central plant alternative for small office buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thies, R.M.; Bahnfleth, W.

    1998-01-01

    Gas absorption chillers-heaters have been applied successfully in large projects where use of multiple chillers is feasible. Large facilities typically have a substantial base cooling load. If the base load is greater than 30% of the minimum capacity of the smallest chiller, chiller-heaters alone can be used as the building central plant. However, this study shows that a small office building presents part-load design difficulties that tend to favor the use of other technologies. The engineer can overcome these application problems by a variety of means, as has been illustrated. Manufacturers, too, are addressing the problems associated with low-load operation of direct-fired chiller heaters. A new generation of chiller-heaters that can unload down to 10% of design load will soon be available. If these new machines are capital-cost-competitive and perform up to expectations, the routine application of chiller-heaters in small commercial buildings may be just around the corner.

  16. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) Estimation of Energy End-use Consumption CBECS 2012 - Release date: March 18, 2016 2012 CBECS The energy end-use consumption tables for the 2012 CBECS (Detailed Tables E1-E 11) provide estimates of the amount of electricity, natural gas, fuel oil, and district heat used for ten end uses: space heating, cooling, ventilation, water heating, lighting, cooking, refrigeration, computing (including servers), office equipment, and other uses. Although details vary

  17. Small Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings (Fact Sheet), Building Technologies Office (BTO), Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Buildings = Big Opportunity for Energy Savings There is nothing small about the impact that small commercial buildings have on energy use in the United States. In fact, the 4.6 million small buildings across the nation consume 44% of the overall energy use in buildings, presenting an enormous opportunity to cut costs, energy use, and greenhouse gas emissions. Despite this potential, small building owners and operators face unique challenges that have historically impeded the adoption of

  18. Surveys

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Surveys can be a useful way to gauge the opinions of your readers and learn more about your website's audiences, but you'll often need approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) to run...

  19. Energy Savings Potential of Flexible and Adaptive HVAC Distribution Systems for Office Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loftness, Vivian; Brahme, Rohini; Mondazzi, Michelle; Vineyard, Edward; MacDonald, Michael

    2002-06-01

    It has been understood by architects and engineers that office buildings with easily re-configurable space and flexible mechanical and electrical systems are able to provide comfort that increases worker productivity while using less energy. Raised floors are an example of how fresh air, thermal conditioning, lighting needs, and network access can be delivered in a flexible manner that is not ''embedded'' within the structure. What are not yet documented is how well these systems perform and how much energy they can save. This area is being investigated in phased projects of the 21st Century Research Program of the Air-conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute. For the initial project, research teams at the Center for Building Performance and Diagnostics, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, documented the diversity, performance, and incidence of flexible and adaptive HVAC systems. Information was gathered worldwide from journal and conference articles, case studies, manufactured products and assemblies, and interviews with design professionals. Their report thoroughly describes the variety of system types along with the various design alternatives observed for plenums, diffusers, individual control, and system integration. Many of the systems are illustrated in the report and the authors provide quantitative and qualitative comparisons. Among conclusions regarding key design issues, and barriers to widespread adoption, the authors state that flexible and adaptive HVAC systems, such as underfloor air, perform as well if not better than ceiling-based systems. Leading engineers have become active proponents after their first experience, which is resulting in these flexible and adaptive HVAC systems approaching 10 percent of the new construction market. To encourage adoption of this technology that improves thermal comfort and indoor air quality, follow-on work is required to further document performance

  20. Radiological Assessment Survey of the Vance road Facility Source Vault Building Materials, Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. R. Morton

    2000-09-01

    From the 1950s, the Vance Road laboratory was the site of extensive nuclear medical research and involved the used of numerous radionuclides. These nuclides were stored in a source vault stored on the first floor of the facility. Nuclear medical research is no longer conducted in this facility, and the source vault was remediated in preparation for converting the area to office space and general use. The Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of ORISE performed a radiological assessment survey of the source vault and its associated miscellaneous building materials and laboratory equipment in preparation for the conversion to general use space.

  1. Evaluation of the near-term commercial potential of technologies being developed by the Office of Building Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weijo, R.O. ); Nicholls, A.K.; Weakley, S.A.; Eckert, R.L.; Shankle, D.L.; Anderson, M.R.; Anderson, A.R. )

    1991-03-01

    This project developed an inventory of the Office of Building Technologies (OBT) from a survey administered in 1988 to program managers and principal investigators from OBT. Information provided on these surveys was evaluated to identify equipment and practices that are near-term opportunities for technology commercialization and to determine whether they needed some form of assistance from OBT to be successful in the marketplace. The near-term commercial potential of OBT technologies was assessed by using a technology selection screening methodology. The screening first identified those technologies that were ready to be commercialized in the next two years. The second screen identified the technologies that had a simple payback period of less than five years, and the third identified those that met a current need in the marketplace. Twenty-six OBT technologies met all the criteria. These commercially promising technologies were further screened to determine which would succeed on their own and which would require further commercialization support. Additional commercialization support was recommended for OBT technologies where serious barriers to adoption existed or where no private sector interest in a technology could be identified. Twenty-three technologies were identified as requiring commercialization support from OBT. These are categorized by each division within OBT and are shown in Table S.1. The methodology used could easily be adapted to screen other DOE-developed technologies to determine commercialization potential and to allocate resources accordingly. It provides a systematic way to analyze numerous technologies and a defensible and documented procedure for comparing them. 4 refs., 7 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pless, S.; Torcellini, P.

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents a set of 15 best practices for owners, designers, and construction teams of office buildings to reach high performance goals for energy efficiency, while maintaining a competitive budget. They are based on the recent experiences of the owner and design/build team for the Research Support Facility (RSF) on National Renewable Energy Facility's campus in Golden, CO, which show that achieving this outcome requires each key integrated team member to understand their opportunities to control capital costs.

  3. Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Controlling Capital Costs in High Performance Office Buildings: A Review of Best Practices for Overcoming Cost Barriers Preprint Shanti Pless and Paul Torcellini To be presented at the ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55264 May 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No.

  4. Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) - Data - U.S. Energy

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Information Administration (EIA) What is an RSE? The estimates in the Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) are based on data reported by representatives of a statistically-designed subset of the entire commercial building population in the United States, or a "sample." Consequently, the estimates differ from the true population values. However, the sample design permits us to estimate the sampling error in each value. It is important to understand: CBECS estimates

  5. Professional","Government ","All Other Office"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"All Buildings*","Office Buildings" ,,"All Office","Administrative Professional","Government ","All Other Office" "All Buildings",64783,12208,6628,1549,4031 "Building...

  6. Professional","Government ","All Other Office"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"All Buildings*","Office Buildings" ,,"All Office","Administrative Professional","Government ","All Other Office" "All Buildings",4645,824,442,84,298 "Building Floorspace"...

  7. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project, final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 36 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 36 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  8. Technical basis for radiological release of Grand Junction Office Building 2. Volume 2, dose assessment supporting data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The second volume of the Grand Junction Office Action Program Technical Basis for Radiological Release of Grand Junction Office Building 2 report includes the data quality objectives (DQO), sampling plan, collected data, and analysis used to model future radiation doses to members of the public occupying Building 2 on the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Office (GJO) site. This volume was assembled by extracting relevant components of the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project Building 2 Public Dose Evaluation (DOE 1996) and inserting recent additional data that was gathered and dose pathway modeling that was performed. The intent of this document is to provide all derived guidance decisions, assumptions, measured data, testing results, and pathway modeling software input and output data that supports the discussion and determinations presented in Volume 1 of this report. For constructive employment of this document, the reader is encouraged to closely follow Volume 1 for proper association with the segment of information being examined.

  9. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  10. Energy Efficient Buildings Hub

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Energy Efficient Buildings HUB Lunch Presentation for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  11. Building America System Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-04-01

    Residential Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  12. Industrial Buildings

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Industrial Industrial Manufacturing Buildings Industrialmanufacturing buildings are not considered commercial, but are covered by the Manufacturing Energy Consumption Survey...

  13. OFFICE,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    OFFICE, . . . . . ..-..__. _ --.-.__.. .-..I............ !..-... bUmME. wArl&l ' rrsldu*. in the dw6lopmQt pmgrwh : Be ostiamts Uuat not man lf+ .b%'o,Q~~~ds. cik'e%ah of the eevenl reel&~ will be require& In : 'ri~ofthehereiabefor6notedeopreodo~ of puriata~tio.aadap :, Iv ve unbntend you vi11 not obj.& to:tha aoe " ai spoh +ant+lea of the mirloua real&es ,, ', ',"" ': ., .,.. i. : /~. ,".. .I,: /, . . ' .* ,; ., ,' ,:.' . .-;. ,-Y .b4 P-0 : ,.

  14. Building Technologies Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy Consumption in Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Office: R&D Opportunities to Reduce Energy Consumption in Miscellaneous Electric Loads (MELs) Pat Phelan (patrick.phelan@ee.doe.gov) BTO Emerging Technologies June 3, 2016 2 Why Do We Care About MELs? Problem: Fraction of energy consumption due to MELs is rising as other building technologies become more efficient. DOE Quadrennial Technology Review (2015)  60% of remaining energy consumption after 2020 R&D targets are achieved, the majority of which are MELs. FY16 Activities: * Panel

  15. Total heat gain and the split between radiant and convective heat gain from office and laboratory equipment in buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hosni, M.H.; Jones, B.W.; Sipes, J.M.; Xu, Y.

    1998-10-01

    An accurate determination of the cooling load is important in the proper sizing of air-conditioning equipment. Improvements on the thermal insulation characteristics of building materials and recent advances in building envelope systems have reduced the building cooling load from external sources. However, the number of internal cooling load sources have increased due to the addition of various office and laboratory equipment (e.g., microcomputer, monitor, printer copier, scanner, overhead projector, microwave oven, incubator, etc.). In this article, typical office and laboratory equipment such as desktop computers (with a Pentium and a 486DX2-33 processor), monitors, a copier, a laser printer, and a biological incubator are evaluated to determine the total heat gain and the split between radiant and convective heat gain from these items. In addition, two standard objects with well-defined radiant heat loss characteristics, a heated flat slab, and a heated sphere are used to verify the accuracy of measurement and data reduction procedures. The total heat gain from tested office equipment was significantly less than the name plate ratings even when operated continuously. The actual power consumption ranged from 14% to 36% of the name plate ratings. Thus, care must be taken when using equipment nameplate ratings in estimating total heat gain for air-conditioning equipment sizing.

  16. Buildings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Historically, only Industrial Facilities (ISO 50003 Industry - light to medium and ... is allowing Commercial Buildings (ISO 50003 - Buildings and Building Complexes) ...

  17. Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings, Chicago, Illinois (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Chicago, Illinois PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Steam System Balancing and Tuning for Multifamily Residential Buildings Location: Chicago, IL Partners: Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org Building Component: Steam heating distribution system and controls Application: Retrofit; Multifamily Year Tested: 2011-2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold humid continental PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of

  18. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2015: Clean Cities Coordinator Resource Building and National Networking Activities

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Presentation given by National Renewable Energy Laboratory at 2015 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Clean...

  19. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: VTO Vehicle to Building Integration Pathway

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting...

  20. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 34 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7 acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, was also the remedial action contractor. Building 34 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1996. The soil area within the footprint of the building was analyzed and found to be not contaminated. The area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual closeout report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  1. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 44 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7 acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. Building 44 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building was not contaminated; it complies with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  2. Building Technologies Office Window and Envelope Technologies Emerging Technologies R&D Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The BPD statistically analyzes the energy performance and physical and operational characteristics of real commercial and residential buildings. The Building Performance Database offers two primary methods to analyze building performance data. These are "Explore", which allows users to browse a single dataset within the BPD, and "Compare", which allowed users to compare multiple datasets within the BPD side-by-side. Explore The Explore tool allows users to browse a single

  3. US Department of Energy Grand Junction Projects Office Remedial Action Project. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 52 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Building 52 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1994. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  4. Seaborg and Kennedy in the AEC Building | U.S. DOE Office of...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    Enlarge Photo Sample Horizontal Photo Dr. Seaborg and President Kennedy at the Atomic Energy Commission headquarters building, room A-445, in Germantown MD on February 16, 1961. ...

  5. Risk Factors in Heating, Ventilating, and Air-Conditioning Systemsfor Occupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: the EPA BASE Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mendell, M.J.; Lei-Gomez, Q.; Mirer, A.; Seppanen, O.; Brunner, G.

    2006-10-01

    Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Characteristics of heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems in office buildings that increase risk of indoor contaminants or reduce effectiveness of ventilation may cause adverse exposures and subsequent increase in these symptoms among occupants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. EPA from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations adjusted for potential personal and building confounders. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and selected HVAC system characteristics. Among factors of HVAC design or configuration: Outdoor air intakes less than 60 m above the ground were associated with approximately doubled odds of most symptoms assessed. Sealed (non-operable) windows were associated with increases in skin and eye symptoms (ORs= 1.9, 1.3, respectively). Outdoor air intake without an intake fan was associated with an increase in eye symptoms (OR=1.7). Local cooling coils were associated with increased headache (OR=1.5). Among factors of HVAC condition, maintenance, or operation: the presence of humidification systems in good condition was associated with an increase in headache (OR=1.4), whereas the presence of humidification systems in poor condition was associated with increases in fatigue/difficulty concentrating, as well as upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=1.8, 1.5). No regularly scheduled inspections for HVAC components was associated with increased eye symptoms, cough and upper respiratory symptoms (ORs=2.2, 1.6, 1.5). Less frequent cleaning of cooling coils or drip pans was associated

  6. Final Status Survey Report for Corrective Action Unit 117 - Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Gwin and Douglas Frenette

    2010-09-30

    This document contains the process knowledge, radiological data and subsequent statistical methodology and analysis to support approval for the radiological release of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201 located in Area 26 of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Preparations for release of the building began in 2009 and followed the methodology described in the Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM). MARSSIM is the DOE approved process for release of Real Property (buildings and landmasses) to a set of established criteria or authorized limits. The pre-approved authorized limits for surface contamination values and corresponding assumptions were established by DOE O 5400.5. The release criteria coincide with the acceptance criteria of the U10C landfill permit. The U10C landfill is the proposed location to dispose of the radiologically non-impacted, or “clean,” building rubble following demolition. However, other disposition options that include the building and/or waste remaining at the NNSS may be considered providing that the same release limits apply. The Final Status Survey was designed following MARSSIM guidance by reviewing historical documentation and radiological survey data. Following this review a formal radiological characterization survey was performed in two phases. The characterization revealed multiple areas of residual radioactivity above the release criteria. These locations were remediated (decontaminated) and then the surface activity was verified to be less than the release criteria. Once remediation efforts had been successfully completed, a Final Status Survey Plan (10-015, “Final Status Survey Plan for Corrective Action Unit 117 – Pluto Disassembly Facility, Building 2201”) was developed and implemented to complete the final step in the MARSSIM process, the Final Status Survey. The Final Status Survey Plan consisted of categorizing each individual room

  7. Final Environmental Assessment for the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Part 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared an Environmental Assessment (EA), DOE/EA-1107, analyzing the environmental effects relating to the construction and operation of an office building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC). SLAC is a national facility operated by Stanford University, California, under contract with DOE. The center is dedicated to research in elementary particle physics and in those fields that make use of its synchrotron facilities. The objective for the construction and operation of an office building is to provide adequate office space for existing SLAC Waste Management (WM) personnel, so as to centralize WM personnel and to make WM operations more efficient and effective. Based on the analyses in the EA, the DOE has determined that the proposed action does not constitute a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, the preparation of an Environmental Impact Statement is not required. This report contains the Environmental Assessment, as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

  8. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2016: VTO Diagnostic Security Modules for Electric Vehicle to Building Integration

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Idaho National Laboratory (INL) at the 2016 DOE Vehicle Technologies Office and Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about Vehicle...

  9. Seaborg and Kennedy in the AEC Building | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    in the AEC Building Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Organization Chart .pdf file (132KB) Staff BES Budget BES Committees of Visitors Directions Jobs Organizational History Germantown Natural History President Kennedy's AEC Briefings Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) Community Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000

  10. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 39 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. The soil beneath Building 39 was radiologically contaminated and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  11. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 6 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, is also the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 6, and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  12. Final report of the decontamination and decommission of Building 31 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krabacher, J.E.

    1996-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the domestic uranium procurement program funded by the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also was the remedial action contractor. Radiological contamination was identified in Building 31 and the building was demolished in 1992. The soil area within the footprint of the building has been remediated in accordance with the identified standards and the area can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This area was addressed in the summary final report of the remediation of the exterior areas of the GJPO facility. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  13. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 18 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. The soil beneath Building 18 was found to be radiologically contaminated; the building was not contaminated. The soil was remediated in accordance with identified standards. Building 18 and the underlying soil can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  14. CMTA Office

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Prospect, KY When CMTA outgrew their old office space, the consultant engineering company decided to construct a new building. Not only does the structure provide offices for the firm, it also showcases progressive design elements and allows the firm to test new technologies and demonstrate their effectiveness to clients. The new CMTA office building is located in a live-work development on the outskirts of Louisville, KY. The location was selected to place the office close to where the employees live.

  15. STIL2 Swedish Office Buildings Survey - Datasets - OpenEI Datasets

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Relationship Dataset Dataset extent Map data OpenStreetMap contributors Tiles by MapQuest License License Not Specified Author Swedish Energy Agency Contact OpenEI User...

  16. SEP Success Story: Delaware Company Breathes New Life into Old Post Office Building

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of the Energy Department’s State Energy Program, Brandywine CAD Design, Inc. set out to create a new workspace. The long-term goal: qualify for the U.S. Green Building Council’s Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Platinum rating -- something that they hope to achieve by mid 2014. Learn more.

  17. Consumer decision and behavior research agenda for the Office of Building and Community Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mohler, B.L.; Scheer, R.M.; Barnes, V.

    1985-12-01

    This report presents a research agenda of Consumer Decision and Behavior Projects related to improving, facilitating and planning Building and Community Systems, (BCS) research and development activities. Information for developing this agenda was gathered through focus group and depth interviews with BCS staff, directors and program managers.

  18. Final report of the decontamination and decommissioning of Building 1 at the Grand Junction Projects Office Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widdop, M.R.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) occupies a 61.7-acre facility along the Gunnison River near Grand Junction, Colorado. This site was contaminated with uranium ore and mill tailings during uranium refining activities of the Manhattan Engineer District and during pilot milling experiments conducted for the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission`s domestic uranium procurement program. The DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning Program established the GJPO Remedial Action Project to clean up and restore the facility lands, improvements, and the underlying aquifer. The site contractor for the facility, Rust Geotech, also is the remedial action contractor. Building 1 was found to be radiologically contaminated and was demolished in 1996. The soil beneath and adjacent to the building was remediated in accordance with identified standards and can be released for unlimited exposure and unrestricted use. This document was prepared in response to a DOE request for an individual final report for each contaminated GJPO building.

  19. Energy San Francisco Operations Office

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Depariment of ' Energy San Francisco Operations Office 1333 Broadway Oakland, California 94612 FEB 6 1984 Mr. c:c. canners Energy Systems Group Rockwell International Corporation Post Office BOX 309 Canoga Park Dear 8 a CA 91304 G ers : Remedial action was taken to decontaminate the Hot Cave (Building 003) and Sodium Reactor Experiment (SRE) under Contract No. DE-AT03-76SF75008. The report of the post remedial survey, performed by Argonne National Laboratory, indicates that the levels of

  20. WNR Offices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Offices, Experimental Areas, Buildings, and Contacts Description Contact Name Bldg/Room Phone Pager/Alt. Phone Group Office Julie Quintana 622/220 667-5377 665-5390 User Office Tanya Herrera 622/212 667-6797 MPF-31 Building Manager Kenny Madrid 31/125 665-0944 664-8327 MPF-17 Building Manager Gene Cartelli 6/133 667-2127 664-4234 MPF-7 Building Manager Bruce Wheeler 622/248 667-6715 664-8336 Property Julie Martinez 24/110 665-2058 664-6775 Waste Manager Lance Kloefkorn 6/236 665-3288 664-5972

  1. Building Envelope Stakeholder Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory is hosting a building envelope stakeholder workshop on behalf of the DOE Building Technologies Office.

  2. Trends in Commercial Buildings--Overview

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Buildings > Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey Survey Methodology Sampling Error, Standard Errors, and Relative Standard Errors The Commercial Buildings Energy...

  3. Building

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    DIV. Electricity Consumption and Expenditure Intensities by Census Division, 1999" ,"Electricity Consumption",,,"Electricity Expenditures" ,"per Building (thousand kWh)","per...

  4. The Advantage of Highly Controlled Lighting for Offices and Commercial Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubinstein, Francis; Bolotov, Dmitriy; Levi, Mark; Powell, Kevin; Schwartz, Peter

    2008-08-17

    The paper presents results from pilot studies of new 'workstation-specific' luminaires that are designed to provide highly, efficient, customized lighting for open-office cubicles. Workstation specific luminaires have the following characteristics: (1) they provide separate, dimming control of the cubicle's 'ambient' and 'task' lighting components, (2) occupancy sensors and control photosensors are integrated into the fixture's design and operation, (3) luminaires can be networked using physical cabling, microcontrollers and a PC running control software. The energy savings, demand response capabilities and quality of light from the two WS luminaires were evaluated and compared to the performance of a static, low-ambient lighting system that is uncontrolled. Initial results from weeks of operation provide strong indication that WS luminaires can largely eliminate the unnecessary lighting of unoccupied cubicles while providing IESNA-required light levels when the cubicles are occupied. Because each cubicle's lighting is under occupant sensor control, the WS luminaires can capitalize on the fact cubicles are often unoccupied during normal working hours and reduce their energy use accordingly.

  5. Verification Survey of the Building 315 Zero Power Reactor-6 Facility, Argonne National Laboratory-East, Argonne, Illinois

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. C. Adams

    2007-05-25

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted independent verification radiological survey activities at Argonne National Laboratory’s Building 315, Zero Power Reactor-6 facility in Argonne, Illinois. Independent verification survey activities included document and data reviews, alpha plus beta and gamma surface scans, alpha and beta surface activity measurements, and instrumentation comparisons. An interim letter report and a draft report, documenting the verification survey findings, were submitted to the DOE on November 8, 2006 and February 22, 2007, respectively (ORISE 2006b and 2007).

  6. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Net Zero Office Building (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-12-01

    Case study highlighting the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. In constructing a new research facility for its campus, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) project team identified the opportunity to design a world-class, energy-efficient data center to support its operations. NREL's efforts resulted in a highly efficient data center that demonstrated considerable energy savings in its first 11 months of operations. Using legacy data center performance as a baseline, the new facility cut energy use by nearly 1,450,000 kWh, delivering cost savings of approximately $82,000. The data center's average total load was 165 kW less than the legacy center's average total load, resulting in a 60% reduction in overall power. Finally, the limited use of cooling and fan energy enabled the new data center to achieve a 1.16 average power utilization effectiveness (PUE) rating, compared to the legacy data center's PUE of 2.28. The laboratory had been relying on individual servers with an energy utilization rate of less than 5%. NREL employed building best practices, innovative design techniques and energy-efficient technologies to support its energy goals for the new data center. To counteract the extensive heat generated by data center equipment, the laboratory implemented a cooling system using outdoor air and evaporative cooling to meet most of the center's needs. Inside the data center, NREL replaced much of its legacy equipment with new, energy-efficient technology. By exchanging this infrastructure for virtualized blade servers, NREL reduced its server energy footprint by 96%. Additionally, NREL replaced its 80%-efficient uninterruptible power supply (UPS) with a UPS that is 95% efficient; deployed ultra efficient power distribution units (PDU) to handle higher UPS voltages; and implemented vacancy sensors to drive down lighting loads. Using best practices and energy

  7. Building.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plant in ITER refers to plant systems located outside the Tokamak Building. A thick wall ... The cooling water system provides for the rejection of heat from a variety of ITER systems ...

  8. Demonstration of a new ICPC design with a double-effect absorption chiller in an office building in Sacramento, California[Integrated Compound Parabolic Concentrator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duff, W.S.; Winston, R.; O'Gallagher, J.J.; Henkel, T.; Muschaweck, J.; Christiansen, R.; Bergquam, J.

    1999-07-01

    In 1998 two new technologies, a new ICPC solar collector and the solar operation of a double effect chiller, have been demonstrated for the first in an office building in Sacramento, California. This paper describes the demonstration project and reports on component and system performance.

  9. THE IMACS CLUSTER BUILDING SURVEY. V. FURTHER EVIDENCE FOR STARBURST RECYCLING FROM QUANTITATIVE GALAXY MORPHOLOGIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abramson, Louis E.; Gladders, Michael D.; Dressler, Alan; Oemler, Augustus Jr.; Monson, Andrew; Persson, Eric; Poggianti, Bianca M.; Vulcani, Benedetta

    2013-11-10

    Using J- and K{sub s}-band imaging obtained as part of the IMACS Cluster Building Survey (ICBS), we measure Sérsic indices for 2160 field and cluster galaxies at 0.31 < z < 0.54. Using both mass- and magnitude-limited samples, we compare the distributions for spectroscopically determined passive, continuously star-forming, starburst, and post-starburst systems and show that previously established spatial and statistical connections between these types extend to their gross morphologies. Outside of cluster cores, we find close structural ties between starburst and continuously star-forming, as well as post-starburst and passive types, but not between starbursts and post-starbursts. These results independently support two conclusions presented in Paper II of this series: (1) most starbursts are the product of a non-disruptive triggering mechanism that is insensitive to global environment, such as minor mergers; (2) starbursts and post-starbursts generally represent transient phases in the lives of 'normal' star-forming and quiescent galaxies, respectively, originating from and returning to these systems in closed 'recycling' loops. In this picture, spectroscopically identified post-starbursts constitute a minority of all recently terminated starbursts, largely ruling out the typical starburst as a quenching event in all but the densest environments.

  10. Better Buildings Energy Data Accelerator

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Better Buildings Energy Data Accelerator *NEW PROJECT* 2014 Building Technologies Office ... 5. Successfully provide whole-building data access to 20% of included building owners ...

  11. Reducing Data Center Loads for a Large-Scale, Low-Energy Office Building: NREL's Research Support Facility (Book)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheppy, M.; Lobato, C.; Van Geet, O.; Pless, S.; Donovan, K.; Powers, C.

    2011-12-01

    This publication detailing the design, implementation strategies, and continuous performance monitoring of NREL's Research Support Facility data center. Data centers are energy-intensive spaces that facilitate the transmission, receipt, processing, and storage of digital data. These spaces require redundancies in power and storage, as well as infrastructure, to cool computing equipment and manage the resulting waste heat (Tschudi, Xu, Sartor, and Stein, 2003). Data center spaces can consume more than 100 times the energy of standard office spaces (VanGeet 2011). The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that data centers used 61 billion kilowatt-hours (kWh) in 2006, which was 1.5% of the total electricity consumption in the U.S. (U.S. EPA, 2007). Worldwide, data centers now consume more energy annually than Sweden (New York Times, 2009). Given their high energy consumption and conventional operation practices, there is a potential for huge energy savings in data centers. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is world renowned for its commitment to green building construction. In June 2010, the laboratory finished construction of a 220,000-square-foot (ft{sup 2}), LEED Platinum, Research Support Facility (RSF), which included a 1,900-ft{sup 2} data center. The RSF will expand to 360,000 ft{sup 2} with the opening of an additional wing December, 2011. The project's request for proposals (RFP) set a whole-building demand-side energy use requirement of a nominal 35 kBtu/ft{sup 2} per year. On-site renewable energy generation will offset the annual energy consumption. To support the RSF's energy goals, NREL's new data center was designed to minimize its energy footprint without compromising service quality. Several implementation challenges emerged during the design, construction, and first 11 months of operation of the RSF data center. This document highlights these challenges and describes in detail how NREL successfully overcame them. The IT

  12. Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing Project InformatIon: Project name: Cladding Attachment Over Thick Exterior Insulating Sheathing Partners: Building Science Corporation www.buildingscience.com The Dow Chemical Company www.dow.com James Hardie Building Products www.jameshardie.com Building component: Building envelope component application: New and/or retrofit; Single and/or multifamily Year research conducted: 2011 through 2012 applicable climate Zone(s): All The

  13. Whole Building Performance-Based Procurement Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Commercial Buildings Integration Project for the 2013 Building Technologies Office's Program Peer Review

  14. Buildings | Buildings | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Index for Commercial Buildings Welcome to the Energy Index for Commercial Buildings. Data for this tool comes from the Energy Information Administration's (EIA) 2003 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS). Select categories from the CBECS micro data allow users to search on common building characteristics that impact energy use. Users may select multiple criteria, however if the resulting sample size is too small, the data will be unreliable. If nothing is selected results

  15. Estimates of U.S. Commercial Building Electricity Intensity Trends: Issues Related to End-Use and Supply Surveys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belzer, David B.

    2004-09-04

    This report examines measurement issues related to the amount of electricity used by the commercial sector in the U.S. and the implications for historical trends of commercial building electricity intensity (kWh/sq. ft. of floor space). The report compares two (Energy Information Administration) sources of data related to commercial buildings: the Commercial Building Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) and the reporting by utilities of sales to commercial customers (survey Form-861). Over past two decades these sources suggest significantly different trend rates of growth of electricity intensity, with the supply (utility)-based estimate growing much faster than that based only upon the CBECS. The report undertakes various data adjustments in an attempt to rationalize the differences between these two sources. These adjustments deal with: 1) periodic reclassifications of industrial vs. commercial electricity usage at the state level and 2) the amount of electricity used by non-enclosed equipment (non-building use) that is classified as commercial electricity sales. In part, after applying these adjustments, there is a good correspondence between the two sources over the the past four CBECS (beginning with 1992). However, as yet, there is no satisfactory explanation of the differences between the two sources for longer periods that include the 1980s.

  16. Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Combustion Safety for Appliances Using Indoor Air Partners: American Gas Association www.aga.org Center of Energy and Environment www.mncee.org Building Performance Institute www.bpi.org NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership Partnership for Advanced Residential Retrofit www.gastechnology.org/PARR Building Components: Gas Appliances Application: Retrofit Single Family Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate

  17. Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials (BTESM) and research utilization/technology transfer progress report for DOE (Department of Energy) Office of Buildings Energy Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burn, G.

    1990-08-01

    The Monthly Report of the Building Thermal Envelope Systems and Materials (BTESM) Program is a monthly update of both in-house ORNL projects and subcontract activities in the research areas of building materials, wall systems, foundations, roofs, building diagnostics, and research utilization and technology transfer. Presentations are not stand-alone paragraphs every month. Their principal values are the short-time lapse between accomplishment and reporting and their evolution over a period of several months.

  18. Buildings Database

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy EERE Home | Programs & Offices | Consumer Information Buildings Database Welcome Guest Log In | Register | Contact Us Home About All Projects...

  19. Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting over Aggregate, Southwestern Pennsylvania (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting Over Aggregate Southwestern Pennsylvania PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Capillary Break Beneath a Slab: Polyethylene Sheeting Over Aggregate Location: Southwestern PA Type: Residential Partners: Builder is confidential Building America Team: IBACOS, www.ibacos.com Building Component: Foundation, water management Application: New construction; single- and multifamily homes Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All except dry

  20. 1999 Commercial Buildings Characteristics

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption SurveyCommercial Buildings Characteristics Released: May 2002 Topics: Energy...

  1. Scotts Valley Energy Office and Human Capacity Building that will provide energy-efficiency services and develop sustainable renewable energy projects.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Temashio

    2013-06-28

    The primary goal of this project is to develop a Scotts Valley Energy Development Office (SVEDO). This office will further support the mission of the Tribe's existing leadership position as the DOE Tribal Multi-County Weatherization Energy Program (TMCWEP) in creating jobs and providing tribal homes and buildings with weatherization assistance to increase energy efficiency, occupant comfort and improved indoor air quality. This office will also spearhead efforts to move the Tribe towards its further strategic energy goals of implementing renewable energy systems through specific training, resource evaluation, feasibility planning, and implementation. Human capacity building and continuing operations are two key elements of the SVEDO objectives. Therefore, the project will 1) train and employ additional Tribal members in energy efficiency, conservation and renewable resource analyses and implementation; 2) purchase materials and equipment required to implement the strategic priorities as developed by the Scotts Valley Tribe which specifically include implementing energy conservation measures and alternative energy strategies to reduce energy costs for the Tribe and its members; and 3) obtain a dedicated office and storage space for ongoing SVEDO operations.

  2. 1999 CBECS Principal Building Activities

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Data Reports > 2003 Building Characteristics Overview A Look at Building Activities in the 1999 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey The Commercial Buildings Energy...

  3. Buried and Encapsulated Ducts, Jacksonville, Florida (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Buried and Encapsulated Ducts Jacksonville, Florida PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Buried and Encapsulated Ducts Location: Jacksonville, FL Partners: BASF http://www.basf.com Consortium for Advanced Residential Buildings www.carb-swa.com Building Component: Ductwork and Attic Insulation Application: New and/or Retrofit; Single-Family Year Tested: 2010-2011 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All Climates in IECC Moisture Regime A. PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of Energy-Efficiency Measure (including labor):

  4. Stand-Off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits, Syracuse, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Technology Solutions for New and Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Stand-Off Furring in Deep Energy Retrofits Syracuse, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Deep Energy Retrofit Location: Syracuse, NY Project Partners: GreenHomes America, www.greenhomesamerica.com/ IBACOS, www.ibacos.com Building Component: Building envelope Application: Single-family retrofit Year Tested: 2012 Applicable Climate Zone(s): Cold PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of energy efficiency measure (including labor): $23,518 Projected energy savings: Approximately 50% overall savings Exterior

  5. Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols, Islip, New York (Fact Sheet), Building America Case Study: Whole-House Solutions for Existing Homes, Building Technologies Office (BTO)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Islip Housing Authority Energy Efficiency Turnover Protocols Islip, New York PROJECT INFORMATION Project Name: Islip Housing Authority Unit Turnover Retrofit Program Location: Islip, NY Partners: Islip Housing Authority, http://www.rhaonline.com/ Advanced Residential Integrated Solutions Collaborative (ARIES), http://levypartnership.com/ Building Component: Whole building Application: Retrofit; single and multifamily Year Tested: 2013 Applicable Climate Zone(s): All PERFORMANCE DATA Cost of

  6. Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. comprehensive earthquake management plan: Engineering survey building damage assessment training manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The training objectives are: differentiate between the various levels of damage caused to buildings and structures by an earthquake and classify them as to their safety of occupancy, extent of damage, and resources needed for recovery/repair.

  7. Energy Information Administration (EIA)- About the Commercial Buildings

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS) 1. Selected principal building activity: part 1, number of buildings, 2012 Released: May 2016 Number of buildings (thousand) Principal building activity All buildings Office Warehouse and storage Service Mercantile Religious worship Education Public assembly All buildings 5,557 1,012 796 619 602 412 389 352 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,777 532 380 372 250 174 143 162 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 230 180 143 143 111 51 77 10,001 to 25,000 884

  8. Building Energy Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Connecticut Office of the State Building Inspector establishes and enforces building, electrical, mechanical, plumbing and energy code requirements by reviewing, developing, adopting and...

  9. EA-1107: Construction and Operation of a Office Building at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Berkeley, California

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposed project to modify existing Building 51B at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to install and conduct...

  10. Beardmore Building

    High Performance Buildings Database

    Priest River, ID Originally built in 1922 by Charles Beardmore, the building housed offices, mercantile shops, a ballroom and a theater. After decades of neglect under outside ownership, Brian Runberg, an architect and great-grandson of Charles Beardmore, purchased the building in 2006 and began an extensive whole building historic restoration.