Powered by Deep Web Technologies
Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

UNLV Center for Energy Research CER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNLV Center for Energy Research CER UNLV Center for Energy Research CER Jump to: navigation, search Name UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89154 4027 Product The Center for Energy Research is a focus area for research, information exchange, and education in energy topics. References UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) is a company located in Las Vegas, Nevada . References ↑ "UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNLV_Center_for_Energy_Research_CER&oldid=352568" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

2

BiOctane | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Name BiOctane Place Worcester, Massachusetts Product Biofuel start-up planning to design and develop a biodiesel and ethanol refinery. References...

3

Centro De Energias Renovables (CER): A Major OpenEI Contributor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centro De Energias Renovables (CER): A Major OpenEI Contributor Centro De Energias Renovables (CER): A Major OpenEI Contributor Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 March, 2010 - 12:25 imported OpenEI OpenEI continues to expand and grow, and recently a new partnership between the Centro De Energias Renovables (CER) in Santiago, Chile and the international group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado has led to the creation of a Latin American gateway on OpenEI.org, where users in Spanish-speaking countries can upload their data. The CER is focused on developing and growing the Latin American community around OpenEI by holding training sessions, and communicating with NREL's international group and community building team on ways to improve the

4

Octane Number Prediction in a Reforming Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work a neural network for the prediction of the complex and non-linear behavior of a Catalytic Reforming of a refinery has been developed. In a fuel, refinery reforming is a conversion process to increase octane number (RON) of the desulphurated ...

E. Chibaro

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Name Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Address Agustinas 640, piso 16 Place Santiago, Chile Zip 8320219 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 2009 Phone number +5624969600 Coordinates -33.4403824°, -70.6459388° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-33.4403824,"lon":-70.6459388,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

6

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) en español | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en español en español Jump to: navigation, search CER.png El CER es una institución que consolida los esfuerzos del Gobierno de Chile para desarrollar las energías renovables no convencionales (ERNC) y será un núcleo central de información y apoyo a la promoción de inversiones y transferencia tecnológica en esta materia. Este nuevo organismo es resultado del trabajo conjunto de la Comisión Nacional de Energía (CNE) y CORFO. La misión La misión del CER es promover y facilitar el desarrollo de la industria de las ERNC, articulando esfuerzos públicos y privados que optimicen el uso del gran potencial de recursos energéticos renovables no convencionales existentes en Chile, contribuyendo así a lograr un abastecimiento de energía seguro y sustentable económica, ambiental y socialmente.

7

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) International Energy Agency (IEA)

8

Octane number requirements of vehicles at high altitude  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past tests of vehicles show that their octane number requirements decrease with altitude. As a result, gasoline marketers sell lower-octane-number(ON) gasoline in the mountain states and other high-altitude areas. The current ASTM specifications, which allow reduction of gasoline octane of 1.0 to 1.5 ON per thousand feet, are based on CRC test programs run on 1967 to 1972 model vehicles. However, many new vehicles are now equipped with sophisticated electronic engine systems for control of emissions and improvement of performance and fuel economy at all altitudes. Because these new systems could minimize the altitude effect on octane requirement, Amoco Oil tested twelve 1984-1986 model cars and light trucks. The authors found their ON requirements were reduced on average about 0.2 ON per thousand feet on an (R+M)/2 basis (RMON/1,000 feet). The authors expect octane demand on gasoline suppliers in high-altitude areas to increase as these new cars make up a larger part of the vehicle population, and this could raise the cost of gasoline.

Callison, J.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

I E L D ESCALATION EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y Y I E L D ESCALATION EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION Las V e g a s , Nevada J u n e 1 5 , ,1972 C o n t r a c t No. AT(26-1) -.429 b e t w e e n t h e U . S . Atomic Energy Commission, t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f t h e I n t e r i o r , A u s t r a l O i l Company, I n c o r p o r a t e d , a n d CER G e o n u c l e a r C o r p o r a t i o n . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. C O N T E N T S . . ....... . . 1 INTRODUCTION . . . - 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . P U R P O S E OF EVALUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R E G R E S S I O N EQUATION D E R I V A T I O N S 4 S E I S M I C PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FREQUENCY P R E D I C T I O N 7 6 . DAMAGE PREDICTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A P P E N D I X A . E S C A L A T I O N E Q U A T I O N S . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 S c a l

10

Exploring the use of a higher octane gasoline for the U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores the possible benefits that can be achieved if U.S. oil companies produced and offered a grade of higher-octane gasoline to the consumer market. The octane number of a fuel represents how resistant the ...

Chow, Eric W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

FCC LPG olefinicity and branching enhanced by octane catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Refiners are increasingly recognizing the downstream opportunities for fluid catalytic cracking LPG olefins for the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, if the ethanol subsidy is extended to the production of ETBE), and as petrochemical feedstocks. Some of new gasoline FCC octane-enhancing catalysts can support those opportunities because their low non-framework alumina (low NFA) preserve both LPG olefinicity and promote branching of the LPG streams from the FCCU. The combined effect results in more isobutane for alkylate feed, more propylene in the propane/propylene stream, and more isobutene - which makes the addition of an MTBE unit very enticing.

Keyworth, D.A.; Reid, T.A.; Kreider, K.R.; Yatsu, C.A.

1989-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

12

GM sees octane surplus; wants improved diesel fuel in future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Under the subject of fuels, both gasoline and diesel fuel are discussed. A primary gasoline issue is that of the satisfaction of vehicle octane number requirements. Secondary issues are the compatibility of gasolines and vehicular fuel systems, and the plugging of exhaust gas recirculation systems with deposits. The important diesel fuel issues are water in the fuel, low temperature fuel properties, fuel effects on particulate emissions, and fuel specifications. Other matters are those concerning fuel demand in the future, and alternate fuels. Lubricants are also discussed. 9 refs.

Route, W.D.; Amann, C.A.; Gallopoulos, N.E.

1982-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

13

High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

The lean oxidation of iso-octane at elevated pressures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Both spark-ignition and compression-ignition engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF), n-heptane and iso-octane belong. In this study experiments were performed using iso-octane in a high pressure flow reactor at a temperature of 925 K, at 3, 6 and 9 atm pressure and with a fuel/air equivalence ratio of approximately 0.05. Many hydrocarbon and oxygenated hydrocarbon intermediates were identified and quantified as a function of time. These experimental results provide a strin- gent test of the low temperature chemistry portion of a kinetic model as they emphasise the importance of alkyl radical addition to molecular oxygen and internal H-atom isomerization reactions relative to alkyl radical decomposition reactions. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments. We provide comparisons of model predictions with experimentally measured species profiles and describe how each species is formed as predicted by the detailed model.

Chen, J S; Curran, H J; Litzinger, T A

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

15

Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

16

Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Anthony, Brian W. (Clearfield, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Ionization of ethane, butane, and octane in strong laser fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Strong-field photoionization of ethane, butane, and octane are reported at intensities from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 17} W/cm{sup 2}. The molecular fragment ions, C{sup +} and C{sup 2+}, are created in an intensity window from 10{sup 14} to 10{sup 15} W/cm{sup 2} and have intensity-dependent yields similar to the molecular fragments C{sub m}H{sub n}{sup +} and C{sub m}H{sub n}{sup 2+}. In the case of C{sup +}, the yield is independent of the molecular parent chain length. The ionization of more tightly bound valence electrons in carbon (C{sup 3+} and C{sup 4+}) has at least two contributing mechanisms, one influenced by the parent molecule size and one resulting from the tunneling ionization of the carbon ion.

Palaniyappan, Sasi; Mitchell, Rob; Ekanayake, N.; Watts, A. M.; White, S. L.; Sauer, Rob; Howard, L. E.; Videtto, M.; Mancuso, C.; Wells, S. J.; Stanev, T.; Wen, B. L.; Decamp, M. F.; Walker, B. C. [Physics and Astronomy Department, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining | U.S. DOE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » July 2013 Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining A novel metal-organic framework (MOF) efficiently separates higher octane components from the low value ones, offering great potential for significant cost reduction in gasoline production. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

19

An experimental investigation of low octane gasoline in diesel engines.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional combustion techniques struggle to meet the current emissions norms. In particular, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) emissions have limited the utilization of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Advance combustion concepts have proved the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved emission performance. Low-temperature combustion (LTC) offers reduced NO{sub x} and PM emissions with comparable modern diesel engine efficiencies. The ability of premixed, low-temperature compression ignition to deliver low PM and NO{sub x} emissions is dependent on achieving optimal combustion phasing. Diesel operated LTC is limited by early knocking combustion, whereas conventional gasoline operated LTC is limited by misfiring. So the concept of using an unconventional fuel with the properties in between those two boundary fuels has been experimented in this paper. Low-octane (84 RON) gasoline has shown comparable diesel efficiencies with the lowest NO{sub x} emissions at reasonable high power densities (NO{sub x} emission was 1 g/kW h at 12 bar BMEP and 2750 rpm).

Ciatti, S. A.; Subramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

A study of the physics and chemistry of knock in modern SI engines and their relationship to the octane tests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Avoiding knock is the major design constraint for spark ignition engines because of the unacceptable noise and engine damage associated with it. Hence, the Research and Motor Octane Number (RON and MON) tests were established ...

Mittal, Vikram

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on Ethanol Engine Optimization  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol is a very attractive fuel from an end-use perspective because it has a high chemical octane number and a high latent heat of vaporization. When an engine is optimized to take advantage of these fuel properties, both efficiency and power can be increased through higher compression ratio, direct fuel injection, higher levels of boost, and a reduced need for enrichment to mitigate knock or protect the engine and aftertreatment system from overheating. The ASTM D5798 specification for high level ethanol blends, commonly called E85, underwent a major revision in 2011. The minimum ethanol content was revised downward from 68 vol% to 51 vol%, which combined with the use of low octane blending streams such as natural gasoline introduces the possibility of a lower octane E85 fuel. While this fuel is suitable for current ethanol tolerant flex fuel vehicles, this study experimentally examines whether engines can still be aggressively optimized for the resultant fuel from the revised ASTM D5798 specification. The performance of six ethanol fuel blends, ranging from 51-85% ethanol, is compared to a premium-grade certification gasoline (UTG-96) in a single-cylinder direct-injection (DI) engine with a compression ratio of 12.9:1 at knock-prone engine conditions. UTG-96 (RON = 96.1), light straight run gasoline (RON = 63.6), and n-heptane (RON = 0) are used as the hydrocarbon blending streams for the ethanol-containing fuels in an effort to establish a broad range of knock resistance for high ethanol fuels. Results show that nearly all ethanol-containing fuels are more resistant to engine knock than UTG-96 (the only exception being the ethanol blend with 49% n-heptane). This knock resistance allows ethanol blends made with 33 and 49% light straight run gasoline, and 33% n-heptane to be operated at significantly more advanced combustion phasing for higher efficiency, as well as at higher engine loads. While experimental results show that the octane number of the hydrocarbon blend stock does impact engine performance, there remains a significant opportunity for engine optimization when considering even the lowest octane fuels that are in compliance with the current revision of ASTM D5798 compared to premium-grade gasoline.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition in High Temperature Hydrogenated Water Using the Contact Electric Resistance (CER) Technique  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Prior studies of Alloy 600 and Alloy X-750 have shown the existence of a maximum in stress corrosion cracking (SCC) susceptibility in high temperature water (e.g., at 360 C), when testing is conducted over a range of dissolved (i.e., aqueous) hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentrations. It has also been shown that this maximum in SCC susceptibility tends to occur in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition, suggesting that oxide phase stability may affect primary water SCC (PWSCC) resistance. Previous studies have estimated the Ni/NiO transition using thermodynamic calculations based on free energies of formation for NiO and H{sub 2}O. The present study reports experimental measurements of the Ni/NiO transition performed using a contact electric resistance (CER) instrument. The CER is capable of measuring the surface resistance of a metal to determine whether it is oxide-covered or oxide-free at a given condition. The transition aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) concentration corresponding to the Ni/NiO equilibrium was measured at 288, 316, 338 and 360 C using high purity Ni specimens. The results showed an appreciable deviation (i.e., 7 to 58 scc H{sub 2}/kg H{sub 2}O) between the measured Ni/NiO transition and the theoretical Ni/NiO transition previously calculated using free energy data from the Journal of Solution Chemistry. The CER-measured position of the Ni/NiO transition is in good agreement with the maxima in PWSCC susceptibility at 338 and 360 C. The measured Ni/NiO transition provides a reasonable basis for estimating the aqueous H{sub 2} level at which the maximum in SCC susceptibility is likely to be observed at temperatures lower than 338 to 360 C, at which SCC tests are time-consuming to perform. Limited SCC data are presented which are consistent with the observation that SCC susceptibility is maximized near the Ni/NiO transition at 288 C.

S.A. Attanasio; D.S. Morton; M.A. Ando; N.F. Panayotou; C.D. Thompson

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, L. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutschmann, O. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanisms for Primary Reference Fuels for Diesel Cetane Number and Spark-Ignition Octane Number  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the first time, a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism is developed for primary reference fuel mixtures of n-hexadecane and 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane for diesel cetane ratings. The mechanisms are constructed using existing rules for reaction pathways and rate expressions developed previously for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, n-heptane and iso-octane. These reaction mechanisms are validated by comparisons between computed and experimental results for shock tube ignition and for oxidation under jet-stirred reactor conditions. The combined kinetic reaction mechanism contains the submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for diesel cetane ratings and submechanisms for the primary reference fuels for gasoline octane ratings, all in one integrated large kinetic reaction mechanism. Representative applications of this mechanism to two test problems are presented, one describing fuel/air autoignition variations with changes in fuel cetane numbers, and the other describing fuel combustion in a jet-stirred reactor environment with the fuel varying from pure 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethyl nonane (Cetane number of 15) to pure n-hexadecane (Cetane number of 100). The final reaction mechanism for the primary reference fuels for diesel fuel and gasoline is available on the web.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M; Curran, H J

2010-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

25

Effect of reaction pressure on octane number and reformate and hydrogen yields in catalytic reforming  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of reaction pressure in catalytic reforming was studied in a pilot reactor with a commercial Pt-Re/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} reforming catalyst and a hydrotreated naphtha from a North Sea crude. Reformate and hydrogen yields, research octane numbers (RON), and reformate composition at reactor pressures in the range of 12--25 bar were measured as a function of temperature in the range of 95--105 RON. Reformate and hydrogen yields increased as the pressure range. For the lower reaction pressures the hydrogen yields increased with increasing severity, but for the higher pressures the hydrogen yields started to decline above certain severities. RON was linearly dependent on the concentration of aromatics in the reformate, although the selectivity toward aromatics depends on both pressure and temperature. Less hydro dealkylation of C{sub 8} and heavier aromatics to benzene and toluene resulted in a shift toward xylenes and heavier aromatic components when pressure was lowered. Variations in the degree of paraffin isomerization did not influence RON significantly at those severities.

Moljord, K.; Hellenes, H.G.; Hoff, A.; Tanem, I. [SINTEF Applied Chemistry, Trondheim (Norway); Grande, K. [Statoil Research Centre, Trondheim (Norway); Holmen, A. [Univ. of Trondheim (Norway). Dept. Industrial Chemistry

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

DIFFRA TION: ENHAN ED LIGHT A SORPTION OF SOLAR ELLS AND PHOTODETE ...  

POTENTIAL APPLI ATIONS Improved performance of thin For more information or Solar & renewable energy Photovoltaic Thin-film solar cells

27

Comparison of iso-octane burning rates between single-phase and two-phase combustion for small droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two-phase combustion is a widespread mechanism of energy conversion that is of practical importance in gas turbines, diesel and spark ignition engines, furnaces, and hazardous environments. However, the exploration of important parameters in combustion systems of practical application is difficult, due to the multiplicity of dependent variables. In the present work, combustion rates of well-defined droplet suspensions of iso-octane have been measured using techniques employed for gaseous combustion. This required a full characterization of the aerosols produced in the combustion apparatus, which determined that the maximum droplet size produced was around 30 {mu}m. Comparisons of two-phase with single-phase laminar mixtures suggest that there were negligible differences in the burning velocity of an aerosol and a gaseous mixture at the same overall equivalence ratio and similar conditions for iso-octane. At high stretch rates, flames remained smooth and droplet enhancement was negligible. However, at lower rates of stretch, both gaseous and aerosol flames became unstable and cellular, and this cellularity, in some cases, increased the burning rate. The values of Markstein length measured for aerosol flames had trends similar to those for gaseous-phase mixtures (Markstein length decreased with equivalence ratio), but were lower than in gaseous combustion. The values of Markstein length in aerosol flames also decreased with liquid equivalence ratio and/or Sauter mean diameter. All this indicates a higher tendency to instabilities in aerosol flames compared to gaseous combustion. A qualitative explanation for the lower values of Markstein length in aerosol combustion is given. It is suggested in the present work that aerosol flames became unstable, and hence had faster burning rates, under conditions that would not result in unstable gaseous flames. Comparisons, qualitative and in terms of dimensionless groups, of two-phase with single-phase turbulent combustion also suggest no enhancement. (author)

Lawes, M.; Lee, Y. [School of Mechanical Engineering, The University of Leeds (United Kingdom); Marquez, N. [Escuela de Ingenieria Mecanica, Universidad del Zulia, Maracaibo 4011 Apto. 526 (Venezuela)

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane  

SciTech Connect

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

29

Use of a thermodynamic cycle simulation to determine the difference between a propane-fuelled engine and an iso-octane-fuelled engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A thermodynamic cycle simulation of the four-stroke spark-ignition engine was used to determine the effects of variations in engine design and operating parameters on engine performance and emission characteristics. The overall objective was to use the engine cycle simulation to determine the difference between a propane-fuelled and an iso-octane-fuelled engine for the same operating conditions and engine specifications. A comprehensive parametric investigation was conducted to examine the effects of variations in load, speed, combustion duration, spark timing, equivalence ratio, exhaust gas recycle, and compression ratio for a 3.3 liter, Chrysler Minivan, V 6 engine operating on propane. Parameters were selected for the analysis. Variations in the brake specific fuel consumption, brake specific NOx emissions, and mean exhaust temperature were determined for both the propane-fuelled and the iso-octane-fuelled engines. Brake specific fuel consumption and mean exhaust temperature values for the propane-fuelled engine were consistently lower (3 to 5 %) than the corresponding values for the iso-octane-fuelled engine. Fuel structure did not have a significant effect on brake specific nitric oxide emissions. Predictions made from the simulation were compared with some of the available experimental results. Predicted brake torque and brake power showed acceptable quantitative agreement (less than 10 % variation) in the low engine speed range (1,000 to 3,000 rpm) and similar trends with the available experimental data.

Pathak, Dushyant

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A study of PVT relations for carbon dioxide, n-pentane, and n-octane mixtures using a recombination apparatus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide flooding is considered to have a multi- contact miscibility displacement mechanism. It changes the reservoir fluid in a complex manner. This type of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) technique is very economically viable, readily available, and environmentally acceptable. Carbon dioxide flooding is one of the EOR techniques in the gas processes category. Miscibility is defined as physical condition between two or more fluids that will permit them to mix in all proportions without the existence of an interface. The minimum pressure required to achieve a multicontact miscibility between injected fluid and oil, specifically, is called the minimum miscibility pressure. The objectives of this study could be separated into two. The first was to look for correlation between bubble-point pressure and minimum miscibility pressure. Simulators were used to obtain the bubble-points and, based on those data, the minimum miscibility pressures were able to be calculated using available correlations. The second part of the objectives was experimental study. A laboratory for reservoir fluid studies was set up and experimental procedures were developed from experiments using propane in the calibration experiment and n-pentane - n-octane - carbon dioxide mixtures in the main experiment.

Wirawan, Januar Fitri Santo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

A detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for the oxidation of iso-octane and n-heptane over an extended temperature range and its application to analysis of engine knock  

SciTech Connect

A detailed chemical kinetic reaction is developed to describe the oxidation of n-heptane, iso-octane, and their mixtures over a wide range of operating conditions. In addition to a high temperature submechanism, reaction paths are included to describe the lower temperature regimes in which the rate and intermediate products of oxidation are controlled by addition of molecular oxygen to alkyl and isomerized alkylperoxy radicals, internal H atom abstractions, and reactions involving O-heterocyclic species. The mechanism is then used to study the influence of fuel composition on knocking in internal combustion engines. Autoignition of mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane is examined. The computations reproduce the variations of autoignition delay time with octane number and these variations are interpreted in terms of detailed differences in the structure of the two primary reference fuels. Sensitivity analyses of the computations are also presented. 30 refs., 2 figs.

Westbrook, C.K.; Warnatz, J.; Pitz, W.J.

1988-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

32

A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane  

SciTech Connect

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of the n-alkanes, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for n-heptane, using the same reaction class mechanism construction developed initially for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and there is an intent to develop these mechanisms further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. Several of these areas for improvement are identified and explained in detail. These mechanisms are validated through comparisons between computed and experimental data from as many different sources as possible. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare processes in all of the n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available on our web page when the paper is accepted for publication.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J; Curran, H J

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

33

A comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for combustion of n-alkane hydrocarbons from n-octane to n-hexadecane  

SciTech Connect

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction classes first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, is available for download from our web page. (author)

Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J.; Herbinet, Olivier; Silke, Emma J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); Curran, Henry J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States); University College of Ireland, Galway (Ireland)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Auto-ignition of toluene-doped n-heptane and iso-octane/air mixtures: High-pressure shock-tube experiments and kinetics modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Toluene is often used as a fluorescent tracer for fuel concentration measurements, but without considering whether it affects the auto-ignition properties of the base fuel. We investigate the auto-ignition of pure toluene and its influence on the auto-ignition of n-heptane and iso-octane/air mixtures under engine-relevant conditions at typical tracer concentrations. Ignition delay times {tau}{sub ign} were measured behind reflected shock waves in mixtures with air at {phi}=1.0 and 0.5 at p=40 bar, over a temperature range of T=700-1200 K and compared to numerical results using two different mechanisms. Based on the models, information is derived about the relative influence of toluene on {tau}{sub ign} on the base fuels as function of temperature. For typical toluene tracer concentrations {<=}10%, the ignition delay time {tau}{sub ign} changes by less than 10% in the relevant pressure and temperature range. (author)

Hartmann, M.; Fikri, M.; Schulz, C. [Institute for Combustion and Gasdynamics (IVG), University of Duisburg-Essen, Duisburg (Germany); Gushterova, I.; Schiessl, R.; Maas, U. [Institute for Technical Thermodynamics (ITT), Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

35

TZD conference .....................2 CERS-Isanti TZD...................2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carsten Inside History continued on page 3 History holds lessons for future transportation policy Big on transportation research, education, and outreach activities at the University of Minnesota December 2008 CTS. The luncheon is sponsored by the Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Institute at CTS. Research in Europe

Minnesota, University of

36

Pages that link to "Centro de Energas Renovables (CER)" | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar ( links) Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model ( links) Biopower Tool Webinar ( links) Gateway:Amrica...

37

Lipoxygenases are nonheme, iron-containing enzymes that catalyze the oxygenation of cer-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Peacock, C. H. Turner, M. J. Econs, T. Foroud, Endocr. Rev. 23, 303 (2002). 2. Q. Y. Huang, R. R. Recker, R. J. Kuban, Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat. 68-69, 263 (2002). 8. O. Nosjean, J. A. Boutin, Cell. Signal. 14, 573 (2002). 9. B. Lecka-Czernik et al., Endocrinology 143, 2376 (2002). 10. E. Khan, Y. Abu

Ochsner, Kevin

38

Ecological Modelling 138 (2001) 321330 Habitat suitability modelling for red deer (Cer6us elaphus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of mountain reebuck in Karoo arid dwarf shrubland in South Africa. Kobler et al. (1997) studied a brown bear

Dzeroski, Saso

39

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-13-01 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the components and large number of components handled within the Hot Cell, a large building is required. Site shielding for the activated products handled and stored in the Hot Cell. A wide variety of maintenance and decontamination functions are being accomplished within the Hot Cell, all in a remote operations mode

California at San Diego, University of

40

Alkylation is an important source for octane in gasoline - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Petroleum & Other Liquids. Crude oil, gasoline, heating oil, diesel, propane, and other liquids including biofuels and natural gas liquids. Natural Gas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Catalytic reforming boosts octane for gasoline blending - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Because reformate contains significant amounts of benzene, toluene, and xylene, it also is an important source of feedstock for the petrochemical industry.

42

Alkylation is an important source for octane in gasoline - Today ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Greenhouse gas data, voluntary report- ing, electric power plant emissions. ... (like temperature and pressure) along with different safety considerations.

43

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependence of ether synthesis, particularly unsymmetric methylisobutylether (MIBE), was carried out over the Nafion-H microsaddles (MS) catalyst. The principal product formed under the rather severe reaction conditions of 1100 psig pressure and temperatures in the range of 123--157{degree}C was the expected MIBE formed directly by coupling the methanol/isobutanol reactants. In addition, significantly larger quantities of the dimethylether (DME) and hydrocarbon products were observed than were obtained under milder reaction conditions. Deactivation of the Nafion-H MS catalyst was determined by periodically testing the catalyst under a given set of reaction conditions for the synthesis of MIBE and MTBE from methanol/isobutanol = 2/1, i.e. 123{degree}C, 1100 psig, and total GHSV = 248 mol/kg cat/hr. After carrying out various tests over a period of 2420 hr, with intermittant periods of standing under nitrogen at ambient conditions, the yields of MIBE and MTBE had decreased by 25% and 41%, respectively. In order to gain insight into the role of the surface acidity in promoting the selective coupling of the alcohols to form the unsymmetric ether, the strengths of the acid sites on the catalysts are still being probed by calorimetric titrations in non-aqueous solutions. 11 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; DeTavernier, S.; Johannson, M.; Kieke, M.; Bastian, R.D.

1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Today in Energy - Catalytic reforming boosts octane for gasoline ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... solar, wind, geothermal, biomass and ethanol. Nuclear & Uranium.

45

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

46

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. [801Methyl tert-butyl ether  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

[Oxygenated octane enhancers: Syngas to isobutylene]. Technical progress report No. 8, January 1, 1993--March 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this program is to develop a catalyst and a process for the conversion of syngas to isobutylene. However, due to the low conversion and selectivity generally experienced by the industry in direct conversion of syngas to isobutylene, indirect conversion via branched C{sub 4} alcohol intermediates is being explored. The objectives of the current program are to develop a catalyst and process for the conversion of syngas to isobutanol and to evaluate the commercial potential of the new process. The research program underway at UOP will identify and optimize key catalyst and process characteristics. This report covers the modification and shake-down of a fixed-bed pilot plant (No. 700) for the testing of catalysts and catalyst combinations. A separate syngas feed system has been added to an existing fixed bed Fischer-Tropsch pilot plant and new reactors are constructed to avoid catalyst cross contamination. Shake-down testing with a commercial Cu/Zn/Al oxide catalyst alone and in combination with a basic Mg/Al MOSS (Metal Oxide Solid Solution) catalyst have demonstrated good CO and H{sub 2} conversion. However, contamination of the product by residual Fischer-Tropsch product in the exit lines and the liquid gas chromatograph (GC) has prevented accurate product analyses. A separate exit system and liquid GC have been added to the plant for use by the higher alcohols synthesis project.

Barger, P.T.

1993-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

48

Table 1. Halocarbons Dichlorodifluoromethane (CFC-12) ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Table 2. Hydrocarbons Ethane n-Heptane Propane Benzene Propene n-Octane n-Butane iso-Octane iso-Butane Toluene iso-Butene Nonane n ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

49

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

51

nist23  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heptane, hexane, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, isobutane, isopentane, methane, nitrogen, nonane, octane, oxygen, pentane, propane, and water. ...

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

nist23old  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... heptane, hexane, hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, isobutane, isopentane, methane, nitrogen, nonane, octane, oxygen, pentane, propane, and water. ...

2013-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

Proposal to Designate an Emission Control Area for Nitrogen Oxides,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a massive scale. These processes include catalytic reforming (to increase the octane number), catalytic

Hanson, Thomas

54

Introduction 1 2BChapter 1. Introduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These processes include catalytic reforming (to increase the octane number), catalytic cracking (to increase

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

55

Systems & Control Letters 60 (2011) 815824 Contents lists available at SciVerse ScienceDirect  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], the octane rating control in the continuous catalytic reforming process [2], and the control of chemical

Pagilla, Prabhakar R.

56

Nowadays, removal of the sulphur generally takes place prior to the oxygen blowing, as the reduced state of the pig iron promotes the removal of the sulphur.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on a massive scale. These processes include catalytic reforming (to increase the octane number), catalytic

Groningen, Rijksuniversiteit

57

Oak Ridge Associated Universities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

UT -OT IB-0064. January 2010. Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) CER. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009. Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office...

58

Targeted Discovery of Glycoside Hydrolases from a Switchgrass-Adapted Compost Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organic matter into carbon dioxide, water, and stable humus-A, temperature; B, carbon dioxide evolution rates (CER); C,phase (Figure 1A). Carbon dioxide evolution (CER) and oxygen

Reddy, Amitha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

NIST: Freq. Interstellar Molec. Micro. Trans. - Table 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Ber89. C 6 H 2, 1,3,5-Hexatriyne, HCCCCCCH, IR, [3161-99-7], Cer01a. C 6 H 6, Benzene, C 6 H 6, IR, [71-43-2], Cer01. HN, Imidogen, ...

60

Information for the Commercialisation of Renewables in ASEAN (ICRA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 Quantity of CERs 6 3.2 Price of CERs 6 3.3 Transaction Costs 8 3.4 Impact of CERs on Project Feasibility 9Information for the Commercialisation of Renewables in ASEAN (ICRA) Project Co-Financed by the EC.2 Clean Development Mechanism 4 3. Impacts of Carbon Finance on Renewable Energy Project Viability 6 3

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A comparison of estimates of cost-effectiveness of alternative fuels and vehicles for reducing emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) is a measure of the monetary value of resources expended to obtain reductions in emissions of air pollutants. The CER can lead to selection of the most effective sequence of pollution reduction options. Derived with different methodologies and technical assumptions, CER estimates for alternative fuel vehicles (AFVs) have varied widely among pervious studies. In one of several explanations of LCER differences, this report uses a consistent basis for fuel price to re-estimate CERs for AFVs in reduction of emissions of criteria pollutants, toxics, and greenhouse gases. The re-estimated CERs for a given fuel type have considerable differences due to non-fuel costs and emissions reductions, but the CERs do provide an ordinal sense of cost-effectiveness. The category with CER less than $5,000 per ton includes compressed natural gas and ed Petroleum gas vehicles; and E85 flexible-fueled vehicles (with fuel mixture of 85 percent cellulose-derived ethanol in gasoline). The E85 system would be much less attractive if corn-derived ethanol were used. The CER for E85 (corn-derived) is higher with higher values placed on the reduction of gas emissions. CER estimates are relative to conventional vehicles fueled with Phase 1 California reformulated gasoline (RFG). The California Phase 2 RFG program will be implemented before significant market penetration by AFVs. CERs could be substantially greater if they are calculated incremental to the Phase 2 RFG program. Regression analysis suggests that different assumptions across studies can sometimes have predictable effects on the CER estimate of a particular AFV type. The relative differences in cost and emissions reduction assumptions can be large, and the effect of these differences on the CER estimate is often not predictable. Decomposition of CERs suggests that methodological differences can make large contributions to CER differences among studies.

Hadder, G.R.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BiOctane: energy company profile. OpenEIPageKeyword BiOctane + , Energy Company + , Biofuel start-up planning to design and develop a biodiesel and ethanol refinery. + ,...

63

EFFECT OF FUEL TYPE ON FLAME IGNITION BY TRANSIENT PLASMA Jianbang Liu1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT Rise and delay times of mixtures of methane, propane, n-butane, iso-butane and iso- octane mixed performance of various fuels including methane, propane, iso-butane, n-butane and iso-octane mixed with air

64

Hydrogen Storage -Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

75 100 125 hydrogen m ethane ethane propane butane pentane hexane heptane octane (gasoline) cetane (diesel) octane (gasoline) heptane hexane pentane butane ethane propane ethanol m ethane m ethanol am m

65

Price spread between regular and premium gasoline has changed over ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Exploration and reserves, storage, imports and exports, production, ... more cost savings result from reducing octane levels for premium gasoline blendstock ...

66

N d'ordre : 2010 EMSE 0563 prsente par  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) in the catalytic reforming units that are subsequently used to upgrade the octane rating of the naphtha streams

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

67

Price spread between regular and premium gasoline has changed ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... electric power plant ... period coincides with increased blending of ethanol into the motor gasoline ... savings result from reducing octane levels ...

68

Does green lead to green? : an exploratory study of the influence of corporate environmental reputation on investor decision making.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In this dissertation, I report on the results of an exploratory study that examined the impact of corporate environmental reputation (CER) on investor decision-making. By (more)

Pather, Rubintheran

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

High-solids enrichment of thermophilic microbial communities and their enzymes on bioenergy feedstocks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incubated samples. Carbon dioxide concentration was measuredAalborg, Orangeburg, NY). Carbon dioxide and flow data weredata acquisition system; carbon dioxide evolution rate (CER)

Reddy, A. P.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Enrichment, isolation and characterization of fungi tolerant to 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bourne, MA, USA). Carbon dioxide concentration was measuredOrangeburg, NY, USA). Carbon dioxide and ?ow data wereReddy et al. 2009). Carbon dioxide evolution rates (CER)

Singer, S.W.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Acta bot. bras. 20(2): 329-338. 2006 Efeitos da radiao ultravioleta-B sobre a morfologia foliar de  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lançamento de efluentes de indústrias de papel e 3 #12;celulose, têxtil, cerâmica e suinocultura, de empresas

Poulson, Mary

72

the Y-12 Times, a newsletter for employees and friends of the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Services: Gary R. Burnum Human Resources: Eloise Duff Safeguards and Security: Warren L. Willis 20 years Chief Financial Offi cer Division: Victoria P. Marrow Engineering:...

73

Letter submitted to Observer for publication on 27 january 2013 You correctly identify threats encircling the English Lake District (Townsend "Battle for soul  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for advising the government of Iraq on characterizing and decommissioning former nuclear facilities homeland security and international nuclear safety. STRENGTHS: Scientists associated with CERS have been leaders in research at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in Ukraine since 1992. Recently, CERS

74

EUROPEAN COGENERATION CERTIFICATE TRADING- ECOCERT Demand creation and scheme interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As interest in market-based domestic mechanisms has increased in the EU, a tradable certificate scheme for CHP is an option. During the period January 2002- April 2003, within the European Cogeneration Certificate Trading (ECoCerT) project, activities have been undertaken in a series of phases to analyse a CHP certificate scheme. The ECoCerT project was financially supported

M. G. Boots

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

The institute for cyber-enabled research: regional organization to promote computation in science  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Institute for Cyber-Enabled Research (iCER) at Michigan State University (MSU) was established in 2009 to coordinate and support multidisciplinary resources for computation and computational sciences. iCER is the home of MSU's centralized High Performance ...

Dirk Colbry, Bill Punch, Wolfgang Bauer

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

unknown title  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A comprehensive detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism for combustion of n?alkane hydrocarbons from n?octane to n?hexadecane

Charles K. Westbrook A; William J. Pitz A; Olivier Herbinet A; Henry J. Curran A; Emma J. Silke A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Octane rating: A number used to ... domestic hot water heating, ... A building is considered owner occupied if an employee or representative of the ...

78

Engineering of amylolytic yeast strains for starch fermentation .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol can be used as a complete fuel or as an octane enhancer, and has the advantages of being renewable and environmentally friendly. Ethanol produced (more)

LIAO, BO

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Use of genetically modified saccharomyces cerevisiae to convert soluble starch directly to bioethanol .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Ethanol can be used as a complete fuel or as an octane enhancer, and has the advantages of being renewable and environmentally friendly. Ethanol produced (more)

Liao, Bo

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Apps for Vehicles: Why should I care what data is in my car and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

interested in vehicle performance may use it to compare engine operations given different oil weights or gasoline octane ratings to determine what engine inputs provide optimal...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a
real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

VarPetrRef 1 VARIETY AND THE EVOLUTION OF REFINERY PROCESSING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Catalytic reforming followed as a means of upgrading the octane of gasoline range materials principally): Catalytic reforming, Isomerization, Alkylation, Catalytic polymerization, MTBE and Hydrotreating. The last Distillation Visbreaking Hydrotreating Hydrocracking Thermal Reforming Alkylation MTBE Catalytic Reform ing

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

102

Industrial Fuel Switching - Emerging NGL Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Removing butanes and pentanes from gasoline to meet local and seasonal regulatory limitations on volatility requires US refiners to make up the lost octane with higher cost alternative components, and challenges them to either: store the liquids in summer

Cascone, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

FY2002 Progress Report for Combustion and Emission Control for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Prediction of Iso-Octane HCCI Combustion, Salvador M. Aceves, Joel Martinez-Frias, Daniel L. Flowers, J. Ray Smith, Robert W. Dibble, John F. Wright, Randy P. Hessel, SAE Paper...

104

Estimate product quality with ANNs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been applied to predict catalytic reformer octane number (ON) and gasoline splitter product qualities. Results show that ANNs are a valuable tool to derive fast and accurate product quality measurements, and offer a low-cost alternative to online analyzers or rigorous mathematical models. The paper describes product quality measurements, artificial neural networks, ANN structure, estimating gasoline octane numbers, and estimating naphtha splitter product qualities.

Brambilla, A. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy); Trivella, F. [Adicon Advanced Distillation Control SrL, Pisa (Italy)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Compressed Beamforming in Ultrasound Imaging  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Emerging sonography techniques often require increasing the number of transducer elements involved in the imaging process. Consequently, larger amounts of data must be acquired and processed. The significant growth in the amounts of data affects both machinery size and power consumption. Within the classical sampling framework, state of the art systems reduce processing rates by exploiting the bandpass bandwidth of the detected signals. It has been recently shown, that a much more significant sample-rate reduction may be obtained, by treating ultrasound signals within the Finite Rate of Innovation framework. These ideas follow the spirit of Xampling, which combines classic methods from sampling theory with recent developments in Compressed Sensing. Applying such low-rate sampling schemes to individual transducer elements, which detect energy reflected from biological tissues, is limited by the noisy nature of the signals. This often results in erroneous parameter extraction, bringing forward the need to enhan...

Wagner, Noam; Feuer, Arie; Friedman, Zvi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

107

Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incubator Austin Clean Energy Incubator West Braker Incubator Austin Clean Energy Incubator West Braker Lane Austin Texas http www ati utexas edu clean energy clean energy html Texas Area Bank of Italy Bank of Italy Via nazionale Rome Italy http www bancaditalia Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory William Floyd Parkway Upton New York http www bnl gov Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Centro de Energ as Renovables CER Centro de Energ as Renovables CER Agustinas piso Santiago Chile http www cer gov cl Clean Start McClellan Technology Incubator Clean Start McClellan Technology Incubator Bailey Loop McClellan California http www sarta org go cs Bay Area Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory th Street Suite Denver Colorado http www coloradocollaboratory org

108

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Legal Background Legal Background Book 1 . . Project Rulison :.Contract: . . AEC, Austral Oil Company, and CER Geonuclear Corporation, . . . . , . . . . , . . February 1969 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. PROJECT RULISON CONTRACT NO. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA REPRESENTED BY THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION and THE DEPARTMENT. OF THE INTERIOR and AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY INCORPORATED and CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION Prepared by OFFICE OF THE CHIEF COUNSEL NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE FEBRUARY 1969 This page intentionally left blank UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION . NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE TABLE OF CONTENTS VII VIII XV XVI XVII SUBJECT - PAGE Definitions 2 Description of Project ~ulisdn 3

109

Preliminary assessment of potential CDM early start projects in Brazil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Brazil/US Aspen Global Forum on Climate Change Policies and Programs has facilitated a dialogue between key Brazil and US public and private sector leaders on the subject of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). With support from the US government, a cooperative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Sao Paulo conducted an assessment of a number of projects put forth by Brazilian sponsors. Initially, we gathered information and conducted a screening assessment for ten projects in the energy sector and six projects in the forestry sector. Some of the projects appeared to offer greater potential to be attractive for CDM, or had better information available. We then conducted a more detailed assessment of 12 of these projects, and two other projects that were submitted after the initial screening. An important goal was to assess the potential impact of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) on the financial performance of projects. With the exception of the two forestry-based fuel displacement projects, the impact of CERs on the internal rate of return (IRR) is fairly small. This is true for both the projects that displace grid electricity and those that displace local (diesel-based) electricity production. The relative effect of CERs is greater for projects whose IRR without CERs is low. CERs have a substantial effect on the IRR of the two short-rotation forestry energy substitution projects. One reason is that the biofuel displaces coke and oil, both of which are carbon-intensive. Another factor is that the product of these projects (charcoal and woodfuel, respectively) is relatively low value, so the revenue from carbon credits has a strong relative impact. CERs also have a substantial effect on the NPV of the carbon sequestration projects. Financial and other barriers pose a challenge for implementation of most of the projects. In most cases, the sponsor lacks sufficient capital, and loans are available only at high interest rate and with substantial guarantee. A few of the projects might go ahead without the benefit of CERs, but most probably would not. Whether the projected revenue from CERs would be sufficient to induce sponsors to proceed with the projects is an important issue that requires further investigation. All of the projects contribute to economic development in Brazil. The forestry projects in particular would create a significant number of rural jobs, and contribute income to rural communities. Some of the carbon sequestration projects would provide environmental benefits with respect to protection of biodiversity and soil.

Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.; Lehman, B.; Schumacher, K.; van Vliet, O.; Moreira, J.R.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst; the kinetics for this catalyst; reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed reactors; and to simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene. A hydrogen-lean synthesis gas with a ratio of H{sub 2}/CO of 0.5 to 1.0 is produced from the gasification of coal, lignite, or biomass. Isobutylene is a key reactant in the synthesis of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and of isooctanes. MTBE and isooctanes are high octane fuels used to blend with low octane gasolines to raise the octane number required for modern automobiles. The production of these two key octane boosters is limited by the supply of isobutylene. MTBE, when used as an octane enhancer, also decreases the amount of pollutants emitted from the exhaust of an automobile engine.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Steady detonation problem for slow and fast chemical reactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mathematical modelling of chemically reacting gas mixtures in view of practical applications is a fundamental problem in the scientific lit- erature [Cer00, Gio99]. On the other hand, kinetic approaches to chemical is conserved only if each particle is endowed with its chemical energy Es, in addition to its kinetic energy 1

Ceragioli, Francesca

112

An evaluation of an empirical model for stall delay due to rotation for HAWTS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to evaluate the Corrigan and Schillings stall delay model for predicting rotor performance for horizontal axis wind turbines. Two-dimensional (2D) wind tunnel characteristics with and without stall delay were used in the computer program PROP93 to predict performance for the NREL Combined Experiment Rotor (CER) and a lower solidity commercial machine. For the CER, predictions were made with a constant-chord/twisted blade and a hypothetical tapered/twisted blade. Results for the constant-chord/twisted blade were compared with CER data. Predicted performance using this empirical stall-delay method provided significant increases in peak power over 2D post-stall airfoil characteristics. The predicted peak power increase due to stall delay for the CER was found to be quite large (20% to 30%) as a result of its high blade solidity. For a more typical, lower-solidity commercial blade the predicted peak power increase was 15% to 20%. As described in the paper, correlation with test data was problematic due to factors not related to the stall-delay model.

Tangler, J.L. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Selig, M.S. [Univ. of Illinois, Urbana, IL (United States). Dept. of Aeronautical and Astronautical Engineering

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Institution: MONTANA STATE UNIV AT BOZEMAN Sign In as Member About the Cover  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NOMENCLATURE BEST Brihanmumbai Electric Supply and Transport BOD Biological oxygen demand BOO Build, own Development Mechanism CER Certified Emissions Reduction CFB Circulating fluidized bed C/N Carbon/nitrogen COD Chemical oxygen demand CPCB Central Pollution Control Board DO Dissolved oxygen ED Electricity Department

Priscu, John C.

114

Wichita State University Libraries Department of Special Collections  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fogel, Jeanne May and Cheryl Pell ­ will be honored during a 6 p.m. cer- emony at the Kellogg Hotel, she died in 2005. · Cheryl Pell, executive director of the Michigan Interscholastic Press Association students. Pell is also a faculty member in the MSU School of Journalism. The event marks the 22nd anni

115

The UNEP Project CD4CDM BUNDLING SMALL-SCALE CDM PROJECTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

costs and low sales realizations deter project developers from offering Carbon Emission Reductions (CER it hard to bear high up-front costs and risk capital for running projects through the CDM marketThe UNEP Project CD4CDM BUNDLING SMALL-SCALE CDM PROJECTS December, 2004 H V Kumar S V Kulkarni

116

MFR PAPER 1268 What Is A Tuna?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MFR PAPER 1268 What Is A Tuna? W. L. KLAWE The word "tuna" is applied to cer- tain member mackerel ) and the butterfly kingfi h. "Tuna" i a newcomer to the English language. It eem to have come ." Most likely " tuna" as a name for fish originated in California with immigrant fishermen

117

Tracer Diffusion Db- NIST09  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... DCu Cu-Zn, 780oC Atom Fraction Zinc (X Zn ) 0.0 0.1 0.2 0.3 Tra cer Diffusion Co ... Au-Ni, 900 o C Atom fraction nickel (X Ni ) 0.0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 ...

2012-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

118

Campus leaders see huge potential in Google's plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campus leaders see huge potential in Google's plans to make Kansas City, Kan., the pilot for its superfast Internet service. Exactly what that poten- tial is, no one knows for cer- tain, not even Google 35 percent of capacity. And now Google wants to put that same 1 gig pipeline into most homes and busi

Albertini, David

119

Variation in wood density determines spatial patterns in Amazonian forest biomass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

confeitaria,s/ cacau 10,12 Papel e Celulose 8,86 Produtos cerâmicos 7,04 Vidros e suas obras 5,6 Calçados e e peles (+18,0%), Alumínio em bruto (+8,9%) Celulose (+4,7%). Máquinas e aparelhos para

Malhi, Yadvinder

120

INDICADORES DE PRODUO Bruno Mazzucco  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

confeitaria,s/ cacau 10,12 Papel e Celulose 8,86 Produtos cerâmicos 7,04 Vidros e suas obras 5,6 Calçados e e peles (+18,0%), Alumínio em bruto (+8,9%) Celulose (+4,7%). Máquinas e aparelhos para

Floeter, Sergio Ricardo

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

From the Interim Senior Vice President The numbers tell us our state is in the midst of rapid change --underscoring the importance of the University of Florida's Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

crops in Florida. Without a cost-effective substitute, Florida producers will not be competitive campaign will shape the university, cer- tainly. But its ripple effect will also touch the state of Florida recommendations for citrus and vegetable growers to reduce their need for fertilizers and pesticides. Well man

Roy, Subrata

122

Zero Energy States In Supersymmetric Matrix Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Summary: Symmetry reductions of bosonic matrix models, along with some subtleties, are pointed out; the asymptotic form of $SU(2)$ zero-energy wavefunctions is mentioned, and a nonperturbative approach to the solution of the full equations is described.CER 2140141 BASE L 13

Hoppe, J

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Debris Basin and Deflection Berm Design for Fire-Related Debris-Flow Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- inal scientific research and engineering design at the forefront of their particular area-solving methodologies, including engineering design and structured decision-making, which is of growing importance, departments and divisions can also offer graduate certificates. Graduate cer- tificates are designed to have

124

Journal of Sedimentary Research, 2006, v. 76, 819838 Research Article  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

original scientific research and engineering design at the forefront of their particular area design and structured decision-making, which is of growing importance in all technical-social- political also offer graduate certificates. Graduate cer- tificates are designed to have selective focus, short

125

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

petroleum petroleum Alcohol: The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH(3)-(CH(2))n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate: The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high-octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation: A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of anacid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product alkylate, an isoparaffin, has high octane value and is blended with motor and aviation gasoline to

126

PSADEFS.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH 3 - (CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usu- ally refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gaso- line. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, buty- lene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product, alkylate, an isoparaffin, has high octane value and is blended with motor and aviation gasoline to improve the antiknock

127

Advances in the chemistry of catalytic reforming of naphtha  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic reforming of naphtha remains the key process for production of high octane gasoline and aromatics (BTX) which are used as petrochemicals feedstocks. The increased demand for these products has led refiners to investigate ways for improving the performance of the reforming process and its catalysts. Moreover, in order to comply with environmental restrictions, the reduction in lead content would require further increase in the reformate octane number. In response to these requirements, refiners and catalyst manufacturers are examining the role of the catalysts in improving the selectivity to aromatics and in octane enhancement. By understanding the chemistry and the mechanism of the reforming process, higher performance catalysts with longer life on stream and lower cost can be developed. This review covers recent developments in reforming catalysts, process reaction chemistry and mechanism. It also highlights prospective areas of research.

Anabtawi, J.A.; Redwan, D.S.; Al-Jarallah, A.M.; Aitani, A.M. (Petroleum and Gas Technology Div., Research Inst., King Fahd Univ. of Petroleum and Minerals, Dhahran (SA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Selective hydrocracking of light naphtha cuts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For the production of high-quality automotive gasolines, technology has been developed for a combined ''isoreforming'' process, in which hydrocracking of a heavy straight-run naphtha cut to give a high-octane component with an octane number of 84-86 (MM) is combined with catalytic reforming of the residual fraction from hydrocracking. The ''isoreforming'' technology can be used to produce AI-93 automotive gasolines with aromatic hydrocarbon contents of 45-49% by weight, without TEL, in yields of 78-82% by weight on the original feed. The authors also discuss a catalytic upgrading process for light straight-run naphtha distillates or raffinates from catalytic reforming. The influence of the depth of reaction in hydrocracking n-paraffins in the straight-run 62-105 degrees C cut on the yield of the C5-EP cut and its octane number is investigated.

Koslov, I.T.; Khavkin, V.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

130

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 September 2013 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

131

Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

132

Emissions with butane/propane blends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article reports on various aspects of exhaust emissions from a light-duty car converted to operate on liquefied petroleum gas and equipped with an electrically heated catalyst. Butane and butane/propane blends have recently received attention as potentially useful alternative fuels. Butane has a road octane number of 92, a high blending vapor pressure, and has been used to upgrade octane levels of gasoline blends and improve winter cold starts. Due to reformulated gasoline requirements for fuel vapor pressure, however, industry has had to remove increasing amounts of butane form the gasoline pool. Paradoxically, butane is one of the cleanest burning components of gasoline.

NONE

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Autoignition chemistry of the hexane isomers: An experimental and kinetic modeling study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Autoignition of the five distinct isomers of hexane is studied experimentally under motored engine conditions and computationally using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. Computed and experimental results are compared and used to help understand the chemical factors leading to engine knock in spark-ignited engines and the molecular structure factors contributing to octane rating for hydrocarbon fuels. The kinetic model reproduces observed variations in critical compression ratio with fuel structure, and it also provides intermediate and final product species concentrations in very dose agreement with observed results. In addition, the computed results provide insights into the kinetic origins of fuel octane sensitive.

Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Leppard, W.R. [General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

135

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prime Supplier Sales Volume Prime Supplier Sales Volume Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Finished Aviation Gasoline A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

136

WAYNE STATE UNIVERSITY Department of Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's product requirements are met by blending feedstocks on hand at midnight. The volumes vary daily, depending, an NLP, an ILP, or a MILP, and is it single or multi-objective? Explain. Question 2 ­ LP Case Analysis ­ will be shipped that day. Both products are blended from 90-octane unleaded gasoline. Ethyl alcohol, the only

Chinnam, Ratna Babu

137

Biodiesel Production from Algal Blooms: A Step towards Renewable Energy Generation & Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of Bio-energy is becoming more and more prominent due to the peak oil crisis. Bio-energy is the energy which can be synthesized using methods and raw material which are available in nature and are derived from the biological sources. They are referred ... Keywords: Bio-Diesel, Octane Number, Ph Measurement, Renewable Energy Generation, Trans-Esterification

Shabana Urooj, Athar Hussain, Narayani Srivastava

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

Sick, V; Westbrook, C

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

139

Autoignition chemistry in a motored engine: An experimental and kinetic modeling study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Autoignition of isomers of pentane, hexane, and primary reference fuel mixture of n-heptane and iso-octane has been studied experimentally under motored engine conditions and computationally using a detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanism. Computed and experimental results are compared and used to help understand the chemical factors leading to engine knock in spark-ignited engines. The kinetic model reproduces observed variations in critical compression ratio with fuel molecular size and structure, provides intermediate product species concentrations in good agreement with observations, and gives insights into the kinetic origins of fuel octane sensitivity. Sequential computed engine cycles were found to lead to stable, non-igniting behavior for conditions below a critical compression ratio; to unstable, oscillating but nonigniting behavior in a transition region; and eventually to ignition as the compression ratio is steadily increased. This transition is related to conditions where a negative temperature coefficient of reaction exists, which has a significant influence on octane number and fuel octane sensitivity.

Curran, H.J.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Gaffuri, P. [Politecnico Milano, Milan (Italy). Chemical Engineerng Dept.; Leppard, W.R. [General Motors Research Lab., Warren, MI (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Petroleum: An energy profile, 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report prepared by the Energy Information Administration covers the following topics: petroleum production and end-use sectors; resources and reserves; exploration and production; LPG sources and processing; motor gasoline octane enhancement; constructing pipelines; the strategic petroleum reserve; imports and exports; marketing; district descriptions and maps; and refinery processes and facilities. 33 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

142

PROJECT RULISON A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O N S T I M U L A T I O N EXPERIMENT U S I N G A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE Issued By PROJECT RULISON JOINT OFFICE OF INFORMATION U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION - AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY, INCORPORATED THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR - CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION May 1, 1969 OBSERVATION AREA J SURFACE GROUND ZERO AREA S C A L E - I inch e q u a l s approximatly I 2 m i l e s Project Rulison Area Map PROJECT RULISON A N INDUSTRY-GOVERNMENT NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 ON STIMULATION EXPERIMENT USING A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE I. INTRODUCTION Project Rulison is o joint experiment sponsored by Austral O i l Company, Incorporated, of Houston, Texas, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Department o f the Interior, w i t h the Program Management provided b y CER Geonuclear Corporotion of L

143

NEPA Lessons Learned Second Quarter FY 2006  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6 1 6 1 (continued on page 4) Second Quarter FY 2006 June 1, 2006; Issue No. 47 National Environmental Policy Act U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A Quality + Leadership = NEPA Success NEPA 35 Earns Special Award from NAEP; see page 3 DOE's NEPA Compliance Offi cers discussed quality assurance during the interactive meeting of more than

144

THE BEVALAC RADIOTHERAPY FACILITY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

set of c o n c e n t r i c brass r i n g s blocks out cer td i t i o n a l 4 mm o f brass, i s attached t o these ringsI t c o n s i s t s of a brass plate with a p r e c i s e l

Alonso, J.R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Clean Development Mechanism: An opportunity to finance decentralised sanitation?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-1 Key data for the landfill gas flaring project 28 Table 3-2 Key data for the decentralised composting projects within the CDM 17 1.4.5 Options to finance greenhouse gas abating projects outside the CDM 17 1.2.1 Options to share the risk between seller and buyer 24 2.2.2 CER pricing 25 3 Case Studies 27 3.1 Landfill

Richner, Heinz

146

@Title = Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms (Revised January 2010) Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH 3 - (CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product, alkylate, an

147

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Definitions Key Terms Definition Alkylate The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Aromatics Hydrocarbons characterized by unsaturated ring structures of carbon atoms. Commercial petroleum aromatics are benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX). Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

148

COAL CLEANING BY GAS AGGLOMERATION  

SciTech Connect

The agglomeration of ultrafine-size coal particles in an aqueous suspension by means of microscopic gas bubbles was demonstrated in numerous experiments with a scale model mixing system. Coal samples from both the Pittsburgh No. 8 Seam and the Upper Freeport Seam were used for these experiments. A small amount of i-octane was added to facilitate the process. Microscopic gas bubbles were generated by saturating the water used for suspending coal particles with gas under pressure and then reducing the pressure. Microagglomerates were produced which appeared to consist of gas bubbles encapsulated in coal particles. Since dilute particle suspensions were employed, it was possible to monitor the progress of agglomeration by observing changes in turbidity. By such means it became apparent that the rate of agglomeration depends on the concentration of microscopic gas bubbles and to a lesser extent on the concentration of i-octane. Similar results were obtained with both Pittsburgh No. 8 coal and Upper Freeport coal.

MEIYU SHEN; ROYCE ABBOTT; T.D. WHEELOCK

1998-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

149

High Conversion of Coal to Transportation Fuels for the Future With Low HC Gas Production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An announced objective of the Department of Energy in funding this work, and other current research in coal liquefaction, is to produce a synthetic crude from coal at a cost lower than $30.00 per barrel (Task A). A second objective, reflecting a recent change in direction in the synthetic fuels effort of DOE, is to produce a fuel which is low in aromatics, yet of sufficiently high octane number for use in the gasoline- burning transportation vehicles of today. To meet this second objective, research was proposed, and funding awarded, for conversion of the highly-aromatic liquid product from coal conversion to a product high in isoparaffins, which compounds in the gasoline range exhibit a high octane number (Task B).

Alex G. Oblad; Wendell H. Wiser

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in

152

Rigid bifunctional chelating agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bicyclo[2.2.2] octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1] heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N`,N`-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

Sweet, M.P.; Mease, R.C.; Srivastava, S.C.

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

153

Exam 1, Chemistry 210, Dr. Rainer Glaser, W97, MU --1 --Chemistry 210Chemistry 210  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,4-dimethyl-octane (4 points) 7-tert.-butyl-4-iso.-propyl-3,5-decadiene (3 pts) H O butanal (3 pts) O ethylmethylketone Condensed structural formula of n-butane. (2 pts) H3C-CH2-CH2-CH3 Bond line structure of butane. (2 pts) Newman projection of gauche butane along the central C2-C3 bond. (4 pts) H H Me Me H H

Glaser, Rainer

154

Evaluation of the absorption capacity of various absorbers by reversed-phase chromatography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An investigation of the separation of alkanes, alkenes, and cycloalkanes from benzene in coke oven gas was presented. The absorption index was determined for benzene and n-octane as a function of temperature in methylnaphthalene, coal oil, solar oil, polyalkylbenzenes, tetraline, and 1,7-dimethylnaphthalene by gas chromatography. It was concluded that the best absorbers for the recovery of benzene were tetraline and coal oil. The most efficient absorber present in wash oil was methylnaphthalene. (JMT)

Mariich, L.I.; Ambrozevich, F.N.; Platonova, L.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Rigid bifunctional chelating agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bicyclo[2.2.2]octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo[2.2.1]heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

Sweet, Mark P. (Coram, NY); Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

156

Rigid bifunctional chelating agents  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bicyclo2.2.2! octane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acids (BODTA) and bicyclo2.2.1! heptane-2,3 diamine-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BHDTA) are chelating agents useful in forming detectably labeled bioconjugate compounds for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. New compounds and processes of forming BODTA and BHDTA are disclosed. Radioimmunoconjugates of the present invention show high and prolonged tumor uptake with low normal tissue uptakes.

Sweet, Mark P. (Coram, NY); Mease, Ronnie C. (Fairfax, VA); Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY)

1998-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

157

Reforming petroleum-based fuels for fuel cell vehicles : composition-performance relationships.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Onboard reforming of petroleum-based fuels, such as gasoline, may help ease the introduction of fuel cell vehicles to the marketplace. Although gasoline can be reformed, it is optimized to meet the demands of ICEs. This optimization includes blending to increase the octane number and addition of oxygenates and detergents to control emissions. The requirements for a fuel for onboard reforming to hydrogen are quite different than those for combustion. Factors such as octane number and flame speed are not important; however, factors such as hydrogen density, catalyst-fuel interactions, and possible catalyst poisoning become paramount. In order to identify what factors are important in a hydrocarbon fuel for reforming to hydrogen and what factors are detrimental, we have begun a program to test various components of gasoline and blends of components under autothermal reforming conditions. The results indicate that fuel composition can have a large effect on reforming behavior. Components which may be beneficial for ICEs for their octane enhancing value were detrimental to reforming. Fuels with high aromatic and naphthenic content were more difficult to reform. Aromatics were also found to have an impact on the kinetics for reforming of paraffins. The effects of sulfur impurities were dependent on the catalyst. Sulfur was detrimental for Ni, Co, and Ru catalysts. Sulfur was beneficial for reforming with Pt catalysts, however, the effect was dependent on the sulfur concentration.

Kopasz, J. P.; Miller, L. E.; Ahmed, S.; Devlin, P. R.; Pacheco, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

158

The importance of FCC catalyst selection on LPG profitability  

SciTech Connect

Recently the value of LPG in chemical operations downstream of the FCC unit has increased. Such downstream operations utilize propylene not only in alkylate, but also in rapid growth petrochemical applications such as for a raw material in the manufacture of polypropylene and propylene oxide. Isobutane and the butenes (particularly butene-2 in sulfuric acid catalyzed alkylation units) are prized for alkylate feed. The profit potential and incentives to use other LPG components such as isobutene to make MTBE is now increased because of legislative actions and increased octane performance demand; and because of the greater isobutene content in the LPG from the new FCC octane catalysts. A low non-framework alumina (NFA) zeolite studied made a more olefinic LPG with higher iso-to normal C4 ratio than the other zeolites. Pilot plant data has also shown the new low NFA zeolite gave not only outstanding motor octane (MON) performance, but produced an LPG with better propylene to propane ratio, more isobutene, more n-butenes and more C4 branching than other RE promoted zeolite catalysts. Commercial results have verified the improved performance and profitability for the new low-NFA type zeolite catalysts. Three commercial examples are described.

Keyworth, D.A.; Gilman, R.; Pearce, J.R. (AKZO Catalysts, 13000 Bay Park Road, Pasadena, TX (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

IFP solutions for revamping catalytic reforming units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The decision-making process for the refiner considering a revamp of a catalytic reforming unit comprises many factors. These may be grouped in two broad areas: technical and economic. This paper presents the results of a study performed by IFP that illustrates catalytic reforming unit revamp options. Three IFP processes are described and operating conditions, expected yields, and economic data are presented. The following options are discussed: base case Conventional, fixed-bed, semi-regenerative catalytic reformer; Case 1--revamp using IFP Dualforming technology; Case 2--revamp using IFP Dualforming Plus technology; and Case 3--revamp to IFP Octanizing technology. The study illustrates various options for the refiner to balance unit performance improvements with equipment, site, and economic constraints. The study was performed assuming design feedrate of 98.2 tons/hour (20,000 BPSD) in all cases. Because of the increased need for octane in many refineries, the study assumed that operating severity was set at a design value of 100 research octane number clear (RON). In all of the cases in this study, it was assumed that the existing recycle compressor was reused. Operating pressure differences between the cases is discussed separately. Also, in all cases, a booster compressor was included in order to return export hydrogen pressure to that of the conventional unit.

Gendler, J.L. [HRI, Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States); Domergue, B.; Mank, L. [Inst. Francais du Petrole, Rueil Malmaison (France)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ecofys Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys Feed Ecofys Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

162

Netherlands Development Organisation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organisation Feed Organisation Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

163

German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperation (GIZ) Feed Cooperation (GIZ) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

164

Wrapping up the bad news - HIV assembly and release  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

form a filamentous structure in vitro [104,127,128] and in vivo [126,129], it was proposed that the progression of this filament would lead to thinning of the plasma membrane and to a cer- tain degree the energy accumulated would favor fission [145... mediates the functional link between human immunodeficiency virus type 1 RNA nuclear export elements and the assembly competency of Gag in murine cells. J Virol 2009, 83:85258535. 40. Mouland AJ, Mercier J, Luo M, Bernier L, DesGroseillers L, Cohen EA...

Meng, Bo; Lever, Andrew ML

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

165

Joint Implementation Network Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Feed Network Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

166

UNEP-Risoe Centre Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre Feed Centre Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

167

2004 ORAU/ORISE Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 Bibliography 4 Bibliography Prepared by Communications, Printing and Design P.O. Box 117, MS 44 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Table of Contents Basic and Applied Research Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) ORISE Radioactive Beam Studies (ORIBS) Business Operations Communications, Printing, and Design (CPD) Health, Safety, and Emergency Management Medical Education and Outreach (MEO) National Security Operations Center for Human Reliability Studies (CHRS) Radiation Emergency Response and Dose Assessment Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) Radiological Safety, Assessments, and Training Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) Science and Engineering Education

168

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Agency/Company /Organization: Sandbag Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Industry, Solar, Wind Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: sandbag.org.uk/carbondata/cers Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Screenshot References: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map[1] Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a massive issue and personal actions like switching off lights and unplugging televisions can feel like small contributions. Background "Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a

169

Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Feed | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Bank Feed World Bank Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

170

ORAU/ORISE Bibliography of 2007 Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities/ Oak Ridge Associated Universities/ Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2007 Bibliography Prepared by ORAU Communications and Marketing (Formerly Communications, Printing and Design) P.O. Box 117, MS 44 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 www.orau.org/about/pubs/ Table of Contents Business Operations (BusOps) Communications and Marketing (CM) (Formerly Communications, Printing and Design [CPD]) 1 Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) Survey Projects and Health Physics 1 National Security and Emergency Management Program (NSEMP) Center for Human Reliability Studies (CHRS) 3 Occupational Exposure and Worker Health (OEWH) Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) 4 Professional and Technical Training (PTT)

171

Climate Technology Initiative Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initiative Feed Initiative Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

172

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Feed Development Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

173

Discovering Potential Precursors of Mammography Abnormalities based on Textual Features, Frequencies, and Sequences  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Diagnosingbreastcancerfrommammographyreportsisheav- ily dependant on the time sequences of the patient visits. In the work described, we take a longitudinal view of the text of a patient s mam- mogram reports to explore the existence of certain phrase patterns that indicate future abnormalities may exist for the patient. Our approach uses various text analysis techniques combined with Haar wavelets for the discovery and analysis of such precursor phrase patterns. We believe the results show significant promise for the early detection of breast can- cer and other breast abnormalities.

Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Functional studies of signaling pathways in peri-implantation development of the mouse embryo by RNAi  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work... % of group 1 embryos (n = 11), Lefty-1 expression was found at or close to the DVE (f') (E6.5 n = 3/6; E7.5 n = 3/5). Accordingly, the expression of Cer-l was also found to be restricted to the DVE in all defective embryos essayed (n') (n = 5). In over 50...

Soares, Miguel L; Haraguchi, Seiki; Torres-Padilla, Maria-Elena; Kalmar, Tibor; Carpenter, Lee; Bell, Graham; Morrison, Alastair; Ring, Christopher J A; Clarke, Neil J; Glover, David M; Zernicka-Goetz, Magdalena

2005-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

176

A Kinetic Modeling study on the Oxidation of Primary Reference Fuel?Toluene Mixtures Including Cross Reactions between Aromatics and Aliphatics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A detailed chemical kinetic model for the mixtures of Primary Reference Fuel (PRF: n-heptane and iso-octane) and toluene has been proposed. This model is divided into three parts; a PRF mechanism [T. Ogura et al., Energy & Fuels 21 (2007) 3233-3239], toluene sub-mechanism and cross reactions between PRF and toluene. Toluene sub-mechanism includes the low temperature kinetics relevant to engine conditions. A chemical kinetic mechanism proposed by Pitz et al. [Proc. the 2nd Joint Meeting of the U.S. Combust. Institute (2001)] was used as a starting model and modified by updating rate coefficients. Theoretical estimations of rate coefficients were performed for toluene and benzyl radical reactions important at low temperatures. Cross-reactions between alkane, alkene, and aromatics were also included in order to account for the acceleration by the addition of toluene into iso-octane recently found in the shock tube study of the ignition delay [Y. Sakai et al, SAE 2007-01-4014 (2007)]. Validations of the model were performed with existing shock tube and flow tube data. The model well predicts the ignition characteristics of toluene and PRF/Toluene mixtures under the wide range of temperatures (500-1700 K) and pressures (2-50 atm). It is found that reactions of benzyl radical with oxygen molecule determine the reactivity of toluene at low temperature. Although the effect of toluene addition to iso-octane is not fully resolved, the reactions of alkene with benzyl radical have the possibility to account for the kinetic interactions between PRF and toluene.

Sakai, Y; Miyoshi, A; Koshi, M; Pitz, W J

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels development Unit (AFDU). The program will initially involve a continuation of the work performed under the Liquid Phase Methanol Program but will later draw upon information and technologies generated in current and future DOE-funded contracts, as well as test commercially available catalysts. 1 fig., 3 tabs.

Not Available

1991-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

178

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline (Released in the STEO October 1999)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an increase in MTBE production between 1990 and 1994. MTBE demand increased from 83,000 in 1990 to 161,000 barrels per day in 1994. The reformulated gasoline (RFG) program provided a further boost to oxygenate blending. The MTBE contained in motor gasoline increased to 269,000 barrels per day by 1997.

Information Center

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Novel strategies for the synthesis of methane adsorbents with controlled porosity and high surface area. Final report, October 1991-October 1992  

SciTech Connect

Natural gas is an attractive alternative to gasoline as fuel for cars because of its desirable emission characteristics, good cold starting characteristics, and high octane number. A major factor that limits widespread use of NGVs is the low energy density of natural gas. The energy density can be increased by adsorption of the natural gas on high surface area sorbents. Present carbon adsorbents do not adsorb enough methane on a volume per volume basis to be commercially attractive for storage of methane on natural gas fueled vehicles. The report has begun exploring the use of organic gels for the adsorption of methane. Preliminary results are promising enough to warrant further research.

Ventura, S.C.; Hum, G.P.; Narang, S.C.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Interpretation of engine cycle-to-cycle variation by chaotic time series analysis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this paper we summarize preliminary results from applying a new mathematical technique -- chaotic time series analysis (CTSA) -- to cylinder pressure data from a spark-ignition (SI) four-stroke engine fueled with both methanol and iso-octane. Our objective is to look for the presence of deterministic chaos'' dynamics in peak pressure variations and to investigate the potential usefulness of CTSA as a diagnostic tool. Our results suggest that sequential peak cylinder pressures exhibit some characteristic features of deterministic chaos and that CTSA can extract previously unrecognized information from such data. 18 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

Daw, C.S.; Kahl, W.K.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Catalytic reforming with a platinum group and phosphorus-containing composition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new catalyst composition for converting hydrocarbons is disclosed. Also disclosed is a method for making the catalyst. The catalyst comprises a platinum group component and a phosphorous component with a porous support material. The catalyst is made by compositing a platinum group component with a porous support material and then contacting that composite with phosphorus or a compound of phosphorus. In a preferred embodiment of the invention a catalyst comprising platinum, phosphorus and chlorine with alumina is utilized in the catalytic reforming of hydrocarbons boiling in the gasoline range to produce a high octane reformate suitable for gasoline blending or a high aromatics content reformate suitable as a petrochemical feedstock.

Antos, G. J.; Chao, T.-H.

1984-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998  

SciTech Connect

This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

EFRCs Science Highlights  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

highlights/ The Office of Science is the highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {F258B204-092C-455E-8B98-75B03053E1E3}http://science.energy.gov/bes/highlights/2013/bes-2013-07-a/ Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining A novel metal-organic framework (MOF) efficiently separates higher octane

184

Three-stage autoignition of gasoline in an HCCI engine: An experimental and chemical kinetic modeling investigation  

SciTech Connect

The alternative HCCI combustion mode presents a possible means for decreasing the pollution with respect to conventional gasoline or diesel engines, while maintaining the efficiency of a diesel engine or even increasing it. This paper investigates the possibility of using gasoline in an HCCI engine and analyzes the autoignition of gasoline in such an engine. The compression ratio that has been used is 13.5, keeping the inlet temperature at 70 C, varying the equivalence ratio from 0.3 to 0.54, and the EGR (represented by N{sub 2}) ratio from 0 to 37 vol%. For comparison, a PRF95 and a surrogate containing 11 vol% n-heptane, 59 vol% iso-octane, and 30 vol% toluene are used. A previously validated kinetic surrogate mechanism is used to analyze the experiments and to yield possible explanations to kinetic phenomena. From this work, it seems quite possible to use the high octane-rated gasoline for autoignition purposes, even under lean inlet conditions. Furthermore, it appeared that gasoline and its surrogate, unlike PRF95, show a three-stage autoignition. Since the PRF95 does not contain toluene, it is suggested by the kinetic mechanism that the benzyl radical, issued from toluene, causes this so-defined ''obstructed preignition'' and delaying thereby the final ignition for gasoline and its surrogate. The results of the kinetic mechanism supporting this explanation are shown in this paper. (author)

Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert (France)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

185

Catalytic oxidative pyrolysis of liquid fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidative pyrolysis of n-heptane was investigated with metal oxides Cr/sub 2/O/sub 3/, MnO/sub 2/, Fe/sub 2/O/sub 3/, NiO, Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, and CuO supported on alumina. Metallic content of the catalyst weight varied from 0.1 to 2.0% with catalytic activity reaching a maximum when the metal content was 1%. The most active catalysts were Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/, MnO/sub 2/, and NiO. Pyrolysis of cyclohexane and toluene was also studied with Co/sub 3/O/sub 4/-Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ as catalyst. Hydrocarbon stability and coke formation increase with increase of hydrocarbon condensation in the series paraffin < naphthalene < aromatic hydrocarbons. Pyrolysis of the various hydrocarbons at 800/sup 0/C yielded a gas that has an octane number of 90 to 93, and the process was shown to be adaptable to pyrolysis of various commercial fractions such as benzines A-72 and A-76, petroleum fractions, and liquid paraffins to produce gas of about the same octane. (BLM)

Antonova, V.M.; Gorlov, E.G.; Paushkin, Ya.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.

None

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Synthetic Fuel Center construction and alternative test fuels production: Final report, 7 June 1982 to 7 September 1985  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Synthetic Fuel Center has been established by the Department of Energy as part of the Alternative Fuels Utilization Program. The main function is to provide test fuels in 5-gallon to 500-gallon quantities for research projects on utilization of alternative fuels. In the three-year report period, 26 fuels were prepared for 11 projects. Quantities ranged from 50 to 200 gallons of each fuel; the total production was 2490 gallons. Starting materials for processing or blending included two shale oils, two shale-derived naphthas, and two coal-derived middle distillates. A hydrogenation pilot plant was installed for processing synthetic feedstocks from oil shale and coal. Moderate severity upgrading of shale oil is reported, and the unit is capable of intermediate to high severity conversion of shale oil and coal liquids. Catalytic reforming of shale-derived naphthas at low pressure raised the octane of these paraffinic materials from less than 50 to above 90 Research Octane Number. Processing capabilities include distillation, adsorption, filtration, and centrifuging. Storage tanks from 500-gallon to 10,000-gallon capacity were installed. These are connected through piping and a manifold to the processing unit and other tanks for storage or blending. Fuel blending to target properties or compositions was a major activity. Complete characterizations were made of all feedstocks and products.

Sefer, N.R.; Erwin, J.; Russell, J.A.

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Alternative fuel performance and emissions characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the question of what problems might be caused by the use of non-petroleum based gasolines in a standard throttle body fuel injection closed-loop spark-ignition internal combustion engine. Five fuels were tested in five separate but physically identical engines. The five fuels were, one baseline unleaded gasoline, two oil shale-derived gasolines, and two coal-derived gasolines. The basic testing of a fuel centered around a 5 hour cycle which was repeated daily until 200 hours of operation were accumulated. The 5 hour cycle was run by alternating every 15 minutes between two distinct conditions. The engines were disassembled and inspected nine times. Additionally, thermal efficiency, regulated emissions, unburnt hydrocarbon makeup, catalyst pressure drop, and cylinder pressure versus crankshaft position measurements were made. Noteworthy differences in the behavior of the fuels in terms of producing deposits that caused intake valve sticking are presented in this report. Additionally, the fuels behaved differently when operated in the presence of knock producing deposits. (R + M)/2 octane numbers proved to be a poor indicator of the fuels knocking behavior. R-M octane numbers proved to be a better indicator of knocking behavior. 16 refs., 43 figs., 29 tabs.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Trends in motor gasolines: 1942-1981  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trends in motor gasolines for the years of 1942 through 1981 have been evaluated based upon data contained in surveys that have been prepared and published by the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). These surveys have been published twice annually since 1935 describing the properties of motor gasolines from throughout the country. The surveys have been conducted in cooperation with the American Petroleum Institute (API) since 1948. Various companies from throughout the country obtain samples from retail outlets, analyze the samples by the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) procedures, and report data to the Bartlesville center for compilation, tabulation, calculation, analysis and publication. A typical motor gasoline report covers 2400 samples from service stations throughout the country representing some 48 companies that manufacture and supply gasoline. The reports include trend charts, octane plots, and tables of test results from about a dozen different tests. From these data in 77 semiannual surveys, a summary report has thus been assembled that shows trends in motor gasolines throughout the entire era of winter 1942 to 1943 to the present. Trends of physical properties including octane numbers, antiknock ratings, distillation temperatures, Reid vapor pressure, sulfur and lead content are tabulated, plotted and discussed in the current report. Also included are trend effects of technological advances and the interactions of engine design, societal and political events and prices upon motor gasoline evolution during the 40 year period.

Shelton, E M; Whisman, M L; Woodward, P W

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Motor gasolines, Summer 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The samples were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The analytical data for 796 samples of motor gasoline, were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). They represent the products of 22 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1959. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R + M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.3 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, 89.0 for leaded below 93.0, and no data in this report for 93.0 and above grades of leaded gasoline.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

In-Cylinder Reaction Chemistry and Kinetics During Negative Valve Overlap Fuel Injection Under Low-Oxygen Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel injection into the negative valve overlap (NVO) period is a common method for controlling combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as well as other forms of advanced combustion. During this event, at least a portion of the fuel hydrocarbons can be converted to products containing significant levels of H2 and CO, as well as other short chain hydrocarbons by means of thermal cracking, water-gas shift, and partial oxidation reactions, depending on the availability of oxygen and the time-temperature-pressure history. The resulting products alter the autoignition properties of the combined fuel mixture for HCCI. Fuel-rich chemistry in a partial oxidation environment is also relevant to other high efficiency engine concepts (e.g., the dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept from SWRI). In this study, we used a unique 6-stroke engine cycle to experimentally investigate the chemistry of a range of fuels injected during NVO under low oxygen conditions. Fuels investigated included iso-octane, iso-butanol, ethanol, and methanol. Products from NVO chemistry were highly dependent on fuel type and injection timing, with iso-octane producing less than 1.5% hydrogen and methanol producing more than 8%. We compare the experimental trends with CHEMKIN (single zone, 0-D model) predictions using multiple kinetic mechanisms available in the current literature. Our primary conclusion is that the kinetic mechanisms investigated are unable to accurately predict the magnitude and trends of major species we observed.

Kalaskar, Vickey B [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

[98e]-Catalytic reforming of gasoline and diesel fuel  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing a fuel processor for converting liquid hydrocarbon fuels to a hydrogen-rich product suitable for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack. The processor uses an autothermal reformer to convert the feed to a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water with trace quantities of other components. The carbon monoxide in the product gas is then converted to carbon dioxide in water-gas shift and preferential oxidation reactors. Fuels that have been tested include standard and low-sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel, and Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Iso-octane and n-hexadecane were also examined as surrogates for gasoline and diesel, respectively. Complete conversion of gasoline was achieved at 750 C in a microreactor over a novel catalyst developed at Argonne. Diesel fuel was completely converted at 850 C over this same catalyst. Product streams contained greater than 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis with iso-octane, gasoline, and n-hexadecane. For a diesel fuel, product streams contained >50% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis. The catalyst activity did not significantly decrease over >16 hours operation with the diesel fuel feed. Coke formation was not observed. The carbon monoxide fraction of the product gas could be reduced to as low as 1% on a dry, nitrogen-free basis when the water-gas shift reactors were used in tandem with the reformer.

Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

193

Organization of American States (OAS) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organization of American States (OAS) Feed Organization of American States (OAS) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

194

2008 ORAU/ORISE Bibliography  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

9-CM-0135 9-CM-0135 2008 Bibliography Prepared by ORAU Communications and Marketing P.O. Box 117, MS 44 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 www.orau.org/about/pubs/ Contents Business Operations (BusOps)  Communications and Marketing (CM) 1 Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV)  Survey Projects and Health Physics 1 National Security and Emergency Management Program (NSEMP)  Center for Human Reliability Studies (CHRS) 2 Occupational Exposure and Worker Health (OEWH)  Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) 2 3 Professional and Technical Training (PTT)  Medical Education and Outreach (MEO) 4 Radiation Emergency Medicine (REM)  Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS)

195

Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

196

United Nations Industrial Development Organization Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

197

World Watch Institute Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Watch Institute Feed World Watch Institute Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

198

Latin America Energy Organization Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latin America Energy Organization Feed Latin America Energy Organization Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

199

Newsletter7.09  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and 4 packages should be submitted six and 4 packages should be submitted six weeks in advance. If these conditions above are not met, certifica- tion actions on those packages will not be con- sidered until the next Board meeting. Please communicate with your respective Program Secretarial Officer (PSO)-internal PMCDP point- of-contact to coordinate the necessary amount of time needed to develop and submit your package to ensure that certification actions will be conducted in a timely manner. * The CRB released a Policy Flash for this change which can be viewed at http:// management.energy.gov/1675.htm. * For additional information of the PMCDP cer- tification process, please contact your PSO-

200

Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coalition for Rainforest Nations Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

202

BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioCF T3) BioCF T3) Jump to: navigation, search Name BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass Topics Finance, Low emission development planning Website http://climate-l.iisd.org/news References BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3)[1] "...the BioCF T3, focuses on reforestation and agriculture projects that facilitates decreased soil erosion and increased land fertility. In particular, the initiatives focus on agriculture directly and improving access to energy. They will facilitate the purchase of certified emission reductions (CERs) from various projects such as household biogas systems in Nepal, cook stoves in Africa, reforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, soil carbon in Kenya, and municipal solid waste in Uganda."

203

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

204

United Nations Foundation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

205

Category:CLEAN Partner | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN Partner CLEAN Partner Jump to: navigation, search This page contains current Coordinated Low Emission Assistance Network (CLEAN) partners. Pages in category "CLEAN Partner" The following 44 pages are in this category, out of 44 total. C Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) D Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH E Ecofys ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM)

206

Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

207

Savannah River National Laboratory Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Savannah River National Laboratory Feed Savannah River National Laboratory Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

208

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off April 24,2001 ACTION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER COMPLIANCE ACTIVITIES AT THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE, SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO ISSUE: DraR Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Shiprock, New Mexico, to the Navajo Nation, federal and tribal regulatoly agencies, and other interested stakeholders for review and comment. RECOMMENDATION: The Management Review Team and the DOE-AL NEPA Compliance Off~cer have determined that this E A meets the requirements of 10 CFR 1021 and implementing g u i d a n p q d is adequate for transmittal to the external stakeholders. DOE-GJO ~ocumen&ana~er ' D. Metzler WE-& NCO J. Robbins

209

International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

210

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

211

EA-1622: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Finding of No Significant Impact 2: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1622: Finding of No Significant Impact University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation Solar Technology Center The Department of Energy is proposing to provide funding to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Research Foundation to construct and operate the Solar Technology Center (STC) in collaboration with the UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER). The STC, hereinafter referred to as the Proposed Action, would operate for research and development, educational training, and as a center for renewable energy and conservation information. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Solar Technology Center Boulder City, Nevada, DOE/EA-1622, January 2009, Finding of No Significant Impact More Documents & Publications

212

United Nations Environment Programme Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

United Nations Environment Programme Feed United Nations Environment Programme Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

213

International Atomic Energy Agency Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Atomic Energy Agency Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

214

International Energy Agency Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

215

LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve LEDS Capacity Building and Training Activities and Resources Upcoming Capacity Building Events CLEAN shares capacity building activity information to encourage technical institutions to better coordinate efforts and avoid duplication of effort. If you are aware of an upcoming LEDS-related training or capacity building event please add it to the calendar below. Add Capacity Building or Training Event Webinars Title Developer Biopower Tool Webinar National Renewable Energy Laboratory United States Department of Energy Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) CESC-Webinar: Building an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Driven Economy: How Policies Can Foster Risk Capital Investment in Renewable Energy Clean Energy Solutions Center

216

ClimateWorks Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ClimateWorks Feed ClimateWorks Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

217

Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 As-Built Report DISCLAIMER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 As-Built Report DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Category No. UC-92a SAND84-7132 Unlimited Distribution Printed May 1984 MULTI-WELL EXPERIMENT MWX-3 AS-BUILT REPORT Contract Sponsor: SANDIA CORPORATION Division 6253 Albuquerque, N M 871 85 Multi-Well Experiment Project Contract Number: 6 1-3428 Prepared By: CER CORPORATION 2225 E. Flamingo Rd, Suite 300 Las Vegas, NV 89 109 February 1984 ABSTRACT The Multi-Well Experiment, sponsored by the Department o f Energy, has two overall objectives: (1) characterize low-permeability lenticular gas sands and (2) develop and evaluate technology for the production of natural gas from them. The third well o

218

Institute of Development Studies Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Institute of Development Studies Feed Institute of Development Studies Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

219

OpenEI International Sponsors and Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Sponsors and Partners International Sponsors and Partners Jump to: navigation, search Overview OpenEI partners with a variety of international organizations to enhance its content, services and data offerings. Additionally, some partners share data bi-directionally with OpenEI. Below is a list of OpenEI sponsor organizations, partnerships and notable data consumers. Sponsors Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Reegle logo.png Partners REEEP-big.png Reegle logo.png Illinois State University Logo.png UNEP.JPG CDKN.png Clean energy ministerial logo.png IRENA logo trans.png CER.png Cesc logo.gif ArgonneNationalLaboratory logo.png OakRidgeNationalLaboratory logo.png ISGAN logo.png Notable data consumers Beopt logo with text.png Sam screenshot.jpg Should your organization or application be listed in any of these sections?

220

Research Centre for Sustainable Development (RCSD), Chinese Academy of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Tecmed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tecmed Tecmed Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Tecmed Name Tecmed Place Hermosillo, Mexico Zip 83210 Sector Biomass Product CER Website http://www.tecmedmx.com/ Coordinates 29.0891857°, -110.9613299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.0891857,"lon":-110.9613299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

222

Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials Website: en.openei.org/wiki/GsT Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/geospatial-toolkit-gst Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar[1] Logo: Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar This webinar provides an overview, and also demonstrates usage of the Geospatial Toolkit. Webinar Video

223

International Institute for Sustainable Development Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

224

Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

225

Information for Development Program (infoDev) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

for Development Program (infoDev) Feed for Development Program (infoDev) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

226

Unendo Energia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unendo Energia Unendo Energia Jump to: navigation, search Name Unendo Energia Place Milano, Italy Zip 20152 Sector Biomass, Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product Milano-based developer of clean energy projects within the wind, solar, biomass, CERS, and small hydro sectors. Coordinates 45.468945°, 9.18103° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.468945,"lon":9.18103,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

227

Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

228

Kumasi Institute of Technology and Environment Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

229

Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Webinar References: WPA[1] Logo: Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region This webinar provides an overview of the Department of Energy's Wind Powering America program, key program areas, and success stories that might be of interest to policy makers and stakeholders interested in adapting this program for Chile and other countries in Latin America. Watch Click here to view this webinar

230

u.s. DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:SarTec Corporation Page I of2 STATE: MN PROJECf TITLE : Use of Inedible Energy Crops for Production of Advanced Bioruels with the Mcgyan Process Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procuremenllnstrument Number NEPA Control Number em NumbeT DE-FOA-000380 DE-EEOOO3127 GF()"()()()3127 -001 EE3127 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Off'tCer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I han made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.8 Outdoor ecological and other environmental research (including siting , oonstruction , and operation of a small-scale laboratory building or renovation of a room in an existing building for sample analysis) in a small area (generally less

231

Biopower Tool Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biopower Tool Webinar Biopower Tool Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biopower Tool Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biofuels Resource Type: Maps, Training materials, Webinar References: Biopower Tool Webinar[1] Logo: Biopower Tool Webinar This webinar demonstrates uses for the Bio-power Tool, an interactive geospatial application allowing users to view biomass resources, infrastructure, and other relevant information, as well as query the data and conduct initial screening analyses. Webinar Video BATscreen.JPG Presentation Biopower Assessment Tool Presentation Announcement Wednesday, December 1, 2010 12-1 p.m. Golden, CO

232

Action Memo for NSEP-TP-2007-1  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EXEC-2007-009892 EXEC-2007-009892 September 7,2007 MEMORANDUM FOR THOMAS P. D'AGOSTINO UNDER SECRETARY FOR NUCLEAR SECUHTY CLARENCE H. ALBRIGHT, JR. UNDER SECRETARY OF ENERGY RAYMOND L. ORBACH UNDER SECRETARY FOR SCIENCE FROM: CER OFFICE OF SUBJECT: . ACTION: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. lB, Facility Safety ISSUE: The attached technical position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, clarifies the use of national consensus and building codes consistent with the requirements of DOE 0 420.1B. BACKGROUND: The attached technical position was developed in response to line organization requests for clarification and it will be posted on the Office of

233

DOE_34181R06.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING Final Technical Progress Report, Revised Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 1997 Reporting Period End Date: March 5, 1999 Dr. Ronald C. Surdam Project Manager & Principal Investigator August 1999 D.O.E. Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34181 Department of Energy Contracting Of cer: Ms. Mary Beth Pearse Institute for Energy Research Dr. Ronald Steel, Interim Director University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming 82071 iii Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

234

1pagertmplt.qxd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Right: Images Right: Images from the stud- ies carried out on APS beam- line 2-ID-E. a) X-ray fluo- rescence maps of a cell trans- fected with "free" titanium oxide (Ti) crys- tals, showing that most of the Ti nanoparticles (green) are located outside the cells. b) X-ray fluorescence maps of a cell transfected with titanium oxide nanocomposites, showing introduction of the nanocompos- ites in the cell. Inset: The hard x- ray microscope at 2-ID-E. The specimen is located inside the orange enclosure. A novel, light-activated hybrid "nanodevice" composed of titani- um oxide nanocrystals and carefully selected segments of DNA could one day be used to target the defective genes that play a role in can- cer, neurological diseases, and other conditions. The work that has

235

rulison.cdr  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rulison Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on the north flank of Battlement Mesa in western Colorado, about 12 miles southwest of the town of Rifle and 8 miles southeast of the town of Parachute. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8,426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas from the fine-grained, low-permeability sandstone of the Williams Fork Formation. This was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. Austral Oil Company of Houston, Texas, and the nuclear engineering firm CER Geonuclear Corporation of Las Vegas, Nevada, proposed the project. Those two firms and AEC jointly

236

EA-1622: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

22: Final Environmental Assessment 22: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1622: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Solar Technology Center Boulder City, Nevada The Department of Energy is proposing to provide funding to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Research Foundation to construct and operate the Solar Technology Center (STC) in collaboration with the UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER). The STC, hereinafter referred to as the Proposed Action, would operate for research and development, educational training, and as a center for renewable energy and conservation information. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Solar Technology Center Boulder City, Nevada, DOE/EA-1622, January 2009 More Documents & Publications EA-1622: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment

237

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

238

German Aerospace Center (DLR)Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

239

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials References: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model[1] Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Webinar Video SMARTSwebinar.JPG Announcement " Monday, December 6, 2010 11-12 a.m. Golden, CO 1-2 p.m., Washington, D.C. 3-4 p.m., Santiago, Chile

240

R U S O N PROJECT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

R R U S O N PROJECT Austral (X1 Company 25-95 A Hasward u s o n Field Garfield County, Colorado .. 10 3/4" Caaing to 8701 Feet DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Representatives Present During Operations Austral O i l Company AEC Continental. O i l C - C.E.R. Fenix & Scisson, Inc. Iamb, Inc. Dresser Atlas Representative Miles Reynolds U b e r t Veronie Alvin Toniette Don Dahle C. m m l e y R. Bmdahaw Francis West R. V. Quim D. Mitchell Carl Schwab larrg Meam & Crew R. Smith N. Pomerenke B. McDonald K. Daaldns W. Bains & Crew 28'' OPEN HOLE T O 37' POLYMER XP-20 SPERSENE WIRE LINE MEASUREMENTS WT. - 9.1 USING KELLY BUSHING AS VIS.- 68 ZERO REFERENCE. GROUND

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y ~L.ho-I . Y ~L.ho-I . I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286 : This dooumetlt consists 0.f 3 pages E end p. t' &ures. No. a of &copies. a Seriee A. 7 Novembar 6, 1944 Subject: Visit to Fansteel Netallurgical Corporaticn, North Chicago, Novembar 4, 1944 - AwAlabilityof~lnmbium!kkl Chapin, Simmons end I discussed witb~. C. N. B&e (ResearchDirector) . end LIr. F.L.Hunter (Chief&ineer, TanteInmDivision) availability, purity, and @co of columbiwn,metel. columbium metal is of particular interest to the Project because tuballoy-columbium alloys containing about 4$ or more of columbium are remarkably corrosion resistant. An 'order has &ready been &.ced for 30 lbs. of columbium metal, end it is cerW that large qutnititicsof them&al willbeneededin order that

242

rulison.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on the north flank of Battlement Mesa in western Colorado, about 12 miles southwest of the town of Rifle and 8 miles southeast of the town of Parachute. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8,426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas from the fine-grained, low-permeability sandstone of the Williams Fork Formation. This was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. Austral Oil Company of Houston, Texas, and the nuclear engineering firm CER

243

Nevada's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1st congressional district: Energy Resources 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Nevada. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Nevada's 1st congressional district NV Energy, Inc. Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Nevada's 1st congressional district Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc Innovative Energy Solutions Inc Li ion Motors Corp formerly EV Innovations Inc Merlin Contracting Power Efficiency Corporation PEFF Powered by Renewables formerly Nevada Wind Renewable Capital Renewable Energy Resources Inc Renewable Powertech Inc Sol-Up USA, LLC Summit Energy Ventures LLC UNLV Center for Energy Research CER

244

ENDA Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENDA Feed ENDA Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

245

Hybrid vehicle potential assessment. Volume 10. Electric and hybrid vehicle cost handbook  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this interim cost handbood is to provide a consistent single-point source of data and procedures for estimating the costs of electric and hybrid vehicles. These costs include manufacturing, acquisition (purchase price), operating, and life cycle. Each suggested Cost Estimating Relation (CER) presented herein is a result of the compilation of currently existing cost estimates and cost relationships. No independent cost analysis was performed for this handbook, nor was any analysis performed to rework existing cost data for consistency in all primary assumptions. The cost data is presented in terms of major component and subassembly costs so that any vehicle (electric, hybrid, or conventional) can be costed. The cost estimating relations presented in this handbook are subjective averages of the several independent estimates for each component.

Heft, R.C.; Heller, S.C.

1979-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

246

The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

247

World Resources Institute Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Resources Institute Feed World Resources Institute Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

248

CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Concentrating Solar Power Overview Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials Website: www.nrel.gov/csp/ References: Concentrating Solar Power Overview [1] Webinar Video Click here to watch the webinar https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=42294577&rKey=2b8c3800c9c1c824 Presentation Speaker Biography Craig S. Turchi-Senior Engineer II Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University B.S. Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University

249

Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

250

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Rio Blanco - CO 0-09  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Rio Blanco - CO 0-09 Project Rio Blanco - CO 0-09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Project Rio Blanco (CO.0-09) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: ~ 52 miles north of Grand Junction, Co. , Rio Blanco County , Colorado CO.0-09-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CO.0-09-1 Site Operations: The project was a cooperative research effort undertaken in 1973 between CER Geonuclear Corp, Continental Oil Co (Conoco), and the US Energy Research and Development Administration Nevada Operations Office (ERDA/NV) to assess the commercial feasibility of using nuclear explosives to recover natural gas from low permeability formations in the Rocky Mountains. CO.0-09-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria CO.0-09-1

251

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

252

Primary Water SCC Understanding and Characterization Through Fundamental Testing in the Vicinity of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Phase Transition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper quantifies the nickel alloy stress corrosion crack growth rate (SCCGR) dissolved hydrogen level functionality. SCCGR has been observed to exhibit a maximum in proximity to the nickel/nickel oxide phase transition. The dissolved hydrogen level SCCGR dependency has been quantified in a phenomenological model in terms of the stability of nickel oxide not the dissolved hydrogen level. The observed SCCGR dependency has been extended to lower temperatures through the developed model and Contact Electrical Resistance (CER) measurements of the nickel/nickel oxide phase transition. Understanding obtained from this hydrogen level SCC functionality and complementary SCC subprocesses test results is discussed. Specifically, the possible SCC fundamental subprocesses of corrosion kinetics, hydrogen permeation and pickup have also been measured for nickel alloys. Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) analysis has been performed on SCCGR specimens tested in heavy water (D{sub 2}O).

D.S. Morton; S.A. Attanasio; G.A. Young

2001-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

253

CDM as a Solution for the Present World Energy Problems (An Overview with Respect to the Building and Construction Sector)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the important responses of Kyoto Protocol towards mitigation of global warming is the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), which has garnered large emphasis amidst the global carbon market in terms of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs). While CDM aims to achieve sustainable development in the energy production and its consumption in developing countries, the results achieved through its implementation are still uncertain. Presently, the domestic and commercial buildings are responsible for more than one third of the total conventional energy use and associated greenhouse gas emissions. The Inter-governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) stated that, the building sector has the largest potential for significantly reducing greenhouse gas emissions. This paper envisages the important aspects such as, the non-inclusion of construction sector projects in CDM and its reasons, the role of energy efficiency buildings in the energy conservation arena and the new challenges being faced, while implementing the CDM portfolio in building energy sector.

Sudarsan, N.; Jayaraj, S.; Sreekanth, K. J.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

F O L E  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Box, z Box, z ,* 2-10-5 F O L ~ E @ \o d P!LC 5 Historical Information H. 1 General, . . . ' Book 1 : ; Economics of Nuclear Gas,. . Stimulation DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. ABSTRACT ECONOMICS O F NUCLEAR GAS STIMULATION G. W . F r a n k A u s t r a l Oil Company I n c o r p o r a t e d Houston, T e x a s H. F. Coffer CER Geonuclear C o r p o r a t i o n Las V e g a s , Nevada G. R . Luetkehans CER Geonuclear C o r p o r a t i o n Las V e g a s , Nevada Nuclear s t i m u l a t i o n of the M e s a v e r d e F o r m a t i o n i n t h e P i c e a n c e B a s i n a p - p e a r s to b e t h e only a v a i l a b l e method t h a t can r e l e a s e the contained gas economically. ' In the R u l i s o n F i e l d alone e s t i m a t e s show s i x t o eight t r i l - lion cubic f e e t of g a s m

255

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Styrofoam cups are one of many Styrofoam cups are one of many products made from styrene monomer. Exelus Inc. (Livingston, NJ), established in 2000, develops and licenses "Cleaner-by- Design" chemical technologies to produce a vast array of products and materials used in consumer goods, transportation, and food processing. Currently, the company's principal process technologies are: ExSact - a refining technology that overcomes the environmental concerns, safety hazards and rising costs associated with conventional liquid acid technologies ExSyM - energy efficient, low cost SM production technology BTG - efficient, cost-effective conversion of biomass to clean, high-octane, gasoline-compatible fuel http://www.exelusinc.com/ New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces

256

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can also be transferred to our laboratory. Molecular Target/use Radiotracer Name Structure Chemical Name Hexokinase/glucose metabolism, cancer, brain function 18 FDG 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose Dopamine D2/D3 receptors/addiction, psychiatric disorders [ 11 C]raclopride 3,5-dichloro-N-{[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin- 2-yl]methyl}-2-hydroxy-6- [ 11 C]methoxybenzamide Dopamine transporters / cocaine pharmacokinetics, addiction, neurological disorders [ 11 C]cocaine methyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-s(benzoyloxy)- 8-[ 11 C]methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1] octane-2-carboxylate Blood flow/nicotine pharmacokinetics [ 11 C]nicotine 3-[(2S)-1-[ 11 C]methylpyrrolidin-2-

257

 

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

The City of Moline Public Works location has a 24 hour central fueling facility to provide fueling resources for the City's entire fleet of vehicles. This The City of Moline Public Works location has a 24 hour central fueling facility to provide fueling resources for the City's entire fleet of vehicles. This facility provides 100% of the fueling needs for the City of Moline. Available at this facility is 87 octane unleaded, E85 Ethanol and B20 Biodiesel. This facility never closes. Because of the constant flow of vehicles and equipment using the facility, lighting is a requirement from dusk until dawn. The light not only provides security for the employees using the facility, but also allows them the light necessary to use the dispensers and equipment. Currently there are 12 individual light fixtures that are equipped with 400 watt bulbs in each fixture. On an annual basis, these light are illuminated

258

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Natural Gas Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains hydrocarbons such as ethane and propane and other gases such as nitrogen,

259

CX-005266: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005266: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Moline, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The City of Moline Public Works location has a 24 hour central fueling facility to provide fueling resources for the City's entire fleet of vehicles. This facility provides 100% of the fueling needs for the City of Moline. Available at this facility is 87 octane unleaded, E85 Ethanol, and B20 Biodiesel. This facility never closes. Because of the constant flow of vehicles and equipment using the facility, lighting is a requirement from dusk until dawn. The light not only provides security for the employees using the

260

CX-005265: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005265: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Vehicle Purchase Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Moline, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The City of Moline has a practice of reassigning retired Police Cruisers to other non-pursuit assignments. These assignments can vary from administrative to transportation for inspectors. These units are exposed to constant stop and go driving as the result of the assignments. These units are also used almost exclusively in the city limits of Moline and rarely if ever leave the community. The vehicles are all equipped with a 4.6 liter engine. They are all currently operating on 87 octane, unleaded fuel. The model year of all these units to be replaced is 2005. In order to reduce

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Poster BOTTOM-UP NANOLITHOGRAPHY BASED ON THE FORMATION OF NANOMETER-SIZE ORGANIC LIQUID MENISCI  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanometer-size menisci of organic liquids such as octane and 1-octene have been formed and used to confine chemical reactions. The application of a bias voltage between a conductive scanning probe tip separated a few nanometers from a silicon surface allows the field-induced formation of nanometer-size liquid menisci which can subsequently be used to fabricate nanometer-size structures. We report the fabrication of sub-10 nm nanostructures in 0.1 ms. Growth kinetics studies reveal that the nanostructure composition and its formation mechanism is liquid dependent. Both voltage polarities can be used to grow nanostructures although the growth rate is significantly higher for positively biased samples. These experiments allow to produce in the same sample a large variety of chemically different nanostructures that are easily addressed, positioned and have sub-10 nm features. (*) Author to whom correspondence should be addressed

Ramss V. Martinez; Ricardo Garcia; B I Ii

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Research Institutions in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional Research Institutions in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district Massachusetts Technology Collaborative - Renewable Energy Trust Registered Energy Companies in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district American Superconductor Corporation AMSC Aspen Aerogels Aspen Aerogels Inc Atmosclear Climate Club BiOctane Biomass Combustion Systems Inc Boston Power CTP Hydrogen CellTech Power Inc Conservation Services Group Evergreen Solar, Inc. Guardian Energy Management Solutions Hy9 Hy9 Corporation Mass Megawatts Wind Power Inc Massachusetts Electric Company Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust MRET Noresco LLC Northern Energy Services Inc Protonex Technology Corporation ThermoEnergy Corporation Trenergi Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Massachusetts%27s_3rd_congressional_district&oldid=193518

263

Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Propane Propane Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane July 30, 2013 - 4:31pm Addthis Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP-gas), or autogas in Europe, is a high-energy alternative fuel. It has been used for decades to fuel light-duty and heavy-duty propane vehicles. Propane is a three-carbon alkane gas (C3H8). Stored under pressure inside a tank, propane turns into a colorless, odorless liquid. As pressure is released, the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used for combustion. An odorant, ethyl mercaptan, is added for leak detection. Propane has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic and presents no threat to soil,

264

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate All gasoline sold in the state must be blended with 10% ethanol (E10). Gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or above is exempt from this mandate,

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

P-Series to someone by P-Series to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels P-Series P-Series fuels are blends of natural gas liquids (pentanes plus), ethanol, and methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF), a biomass co-solvent. P-Series fuels are clear, colorless, 89-93 octane, liquid blends used either alone or mixed with gasoline in any proportion in flexible fuel vehicles. These fuels are

266

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Background As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90), the year-round use of reformulated gasoline (RFG) has been required in cities with the worst smog problems since 1995 (Figure 1). One of the requirements of RFG specified by CAAA90 is a 2- percent oxygen requirement, which is met by blending "oxygenates," 1 including methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and ethanol, into the gasoline. MTBE is the oxygenate used in almost all RFG outside of the Midwest. Ethanol is currently used in the Midwest as an oxygenate in RFG and as an octane booster and volume extender in conventional gasoline. Several years ago, MTBE was detected in water supplies scattered throughout the country, but predominantly in areas using RFG. MTBE from RFG was apparently

267

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE, Oxygenates, and MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline Contents * Introduction * Federal gasoline product quality regulations * What are oxygenates? * Who gets gasoline with oxygenates? * Which areas get MTBE? * How much has been invested in MTBE production capacity? * What does new Ethanol capacity cost? * What would an MTBE ban cost? * On-line information resources * Endnotes * Summary of revisions to this analysis Introduction The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an

268

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processing of Fresh Feed Input Processing of Fresh Feed Input Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Catalytic Cracking The refining process of breaking down the larger, heavier, and more complex hydrocarbon molecules into simpler and lighter molecules. Catalytic cracking is accomplished by the use of a catalytic agent and is an effective process for increasing the yield of gasoline from crude oil. Catalytic cracking processes fresh feeds and recycled feeds. Catalytic Hydrocracking A refining process that uses hydrogen and catalysts with relatively low temperatures and high pressures for converting middle boiling or residual material to high-octane gasoline, reformer charge stock, jet fuel, and/or high grade fuel oil. The process uses one or more catalysts, depending upon product output, and can handle high sulfur feedstocks without prior desulfurization.

269

NREL: Energy Sciences - David K. Johnson  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

K. Johnson K. Johnson Senior Scientist Photo of David K. Johnson Phone: (303) 384-6263 Email: david.johnson@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 1982 David Johnson joined NREL in 1982. He has extensive knowledge and practical experience of electrochemistry, biomass composition and analysis, biomass pyrolysis oil fractionation and analysis, lignin chemistry, high-temperature and high-pressure lignin hydrotreating, supercritical fluid separations, and high-performance liquid and size exclusion chromatographies. He has guided research into conversion of lignin into high-octane gasoline blending components via based catalyzed depolymerization followed by catalytic hydrotreating. He has also led research into the effects of harvesting and storage on the composition of biomass feedstocks and the effect of these changes on the interaction

270

Definition: Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol A colorless, flammable liquid produced by fermentation of sugars. While it is also the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, it can be denatured for fuel use. Fuel ethanol is used principally for blending in low concentrations with motor gasoline as an oxygenate or octane enhancer. In high concentrations, it is used to fuel alternative-fuel vehicles specially designed for its use.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ethanol fuel is ethanol (ethyl alcohol), the same type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. It is most often used as a motor fuel, mainly as a biofuel additive for gasoline. World ethanol production for transport fuel tripled between 2000 and 2007 from 17 billion to more than 52 billion liters. From 2007 to 2008, the share of ethanol in global gasoline type

271

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels (Redirected from - Biofuels) Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

272

NETL: Gasifipedia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gasification plant in Sasolburgh, South Africa Gasification plant in Sasolburgh, South Africa Sasol I Gasification plant in Sasolburgh, South Africa (source: Sasol) Post WWII Development Following World War II, many countries had access to large supplies of low-cost gasoline and diesel fuel resulting in a decreased role for gasification as a means of energy production. However, South Africa's political and geographic isolation led to the development of a large coal-to-liquid fuels industry. In 1950, the South African government sponsored the South African Coal, Oil and Gas Corporation Limited's (SASOL) construction of a gasification plant (SASOL I) which used both American and German processes to produce diesel fuel, medium octane gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas, and a number of chemicals. Following operational

273

Biofuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Text Version Photo of a woman in goggles handling a machine filled with biofuels. Biofuels are liquid or gaseous fuels produced from biomass. Most biofuels are used for transportation, but some are used as fuels to produce electricity. The expanded use of biofuels offers an array of benefits for our energy security, economic growth, and environment. Current biofuels research focuses on new forms of biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, and on biofuels conversion processes. Ethanol Ethanol-an alcohol-is made primarily from the starch in corn grain. It is most commonly used as an additive to petroleum-based fuels to reduce toxic air emissions and increase octane. Today, roughly half of the gasoline sold in the United States includes 5%-10% ethanol.

274

Apps for Vehicles: Why should I care what data is in my car and what can be  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why should I care what data is in my car and what can be Why should I care what data is in my car and what can be done with this data (examples)? Home > Groups > Developer This question relates to energy hackathons and the OpenXC platform. More information at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Help:Energy_Hackathon_Resources Submitted by Rmckeel on 24 September, 2012 - 10:36 3 answers Points: 0 The goal of the Open Data initiative is to empower customers to use their data to their individual advantage. An eco-conscious individual may focus on data that reveals how driving patterns affect GHG emissions. Someone interested in vehicle performance may use it to compare engine operations given different oil weights or gasoline octane ratings to determine what engine inputs provide optimal performance. With the magnitude of data

275

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

276

Vortex flow in the technology of radiation wave cracking (RWC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article examines the theory of vortex flows in relation to the processes occurring in the radiation-wave cracking of crude oil, when the crude oil is sprayed into the gas stream in the form of a mist and then is fed into the reactor, where it is treated by the accelerated electrons and the UHF radiation. The output of this process are the products with the specified parameters (high-octane petroleum products). This process operates at the ambient pressure and temperature, which makes the process safer for industrial purposes. Besides the process itself, the authors described the equipment used in this process, as well as the parameters of the optimal process.

L. A. Tsoy; V. N. Kolushov; A. G. Komarov; A. N. Tsoy

2012-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

277

Vortex flow in the technology of radiation wave cracking (RWC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This article examines the theory of vortex flows in relation to the processes occurring in the radiation-wave cracking of crude oil, when the crude oil is sprayed into the gas stream in the form of a mist and then is fed into the reactor, where it is treated by the accelerated electrons and the UHF radiation. The output of this process are the products with the specified parameters (high-octane petroleum products). This process operates at the ambient pressure and temperature, which makes the process safer for industrial purposes. Besides the process itself, the authors described the equipment used in this process, as well as the parameters of the optimal process.

Tsoy, L A; Komarov, A G; Tsoy, A N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Quarterly report, July--September 1976  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility and estimate the economics of hydroprocessing four synthetic fuels to distillate fuels, including high octane gasoline, using presently available technology. The feedstocks include three coal-derived synthetic crudes and shale oil. The first feedstock is Paraho crude shale oil, produced in the indirect-heated mode. The feed was received less than three weeks before the end of the quarter. The work to date consists of analyses of the shale oil. Results are incomplete. However, there is no reason to believe that this shale oil is atypical of Paraho shale oil prepared by the indirect-heated mode of retorting. Currently available technology is being studied to determine the appropriate methods for removal of fines and water to prepare the whole shale oil feed for hydrofining.

Sullivan, R.F.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes, Phase 1. Topical report, January 1990--January 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The authors have found a family of new catalytic materials which, if successfully developed, will be effective in the conversion of light alkanes to alcohols or other oxygenates. Catalysts of this type have the potential to convert natural gas to clean-burning high octane liquid fuels directly without requiring the energy-intensive steam reforming step. In addition they also have the potential to upgrade light hydrocarbons found in natural gas to a variety of high value fuel and chemical products. In order for commercially useful processes to be developed, increases in catalytic life, reaction rate and selectivity are required. Recent progress in the experimental program geared to the further improvement of these catalysts is outlined.

NONE

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Performance of gasoline and diesel fuels produced from COED syncrude  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel consumption and exhaust emissions characteristics were evaluated for gasoline and diesel fuel produced from coal liquid derived syncrude. The engine types used were: (1) current technology spark-ignition, homogeneous charge, (2) stratified-charge, and (3) Stirling. There were no significant changes in fuel consumption or exhaust emissions between syncrude-derived fuels and conventional fuels in stratified-charge and Stirling engines. Because of its low (approximately equal to 70) octane number and volatility, the synthetic gasoline required a reduction in compression ratio to achieve knock-limited, MBT spark timing. This was in comparison to the reference gasoline, in a single-cylinder spark-ignited test engine, at one speed/load point. Exhaust emissions were very similar between the two fuels.

Bechtold, R.L.; Fleming, R.D.

1978-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Fuel property effects on engine combustion processes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A major obstacle to improving spark ignition engine efficiency is the limitations on compression ratio imposed by tendency of hydrocarbon fuels to knock (autoignite). A research program investigated the knock problem in spark ignition engines. Objective was to understand low and intermediate temperature chemistry of combustion processes relevant to autoignition and knock and to determine fuel property effects. Experiments were conducted in an optically and physically accessible research engine, static reactor, and an atmospheric pressure flow reactor (APFR). Chemical kinetic models were developed for prediction of species evolution and autoignition behavior. The work provided insight into low and intermediate temperature chemistry prior to autoignition of n-butane, iso-butane, n-pentane, 1-pentene, n-heptane, iso-octane and some binary blends. Study of effects of ethers (MTBE, ETBE, TAME and DIPE ) and alcohols (methanol and ethanol) on the oxidation and autoignition of primary reference fuel (PRF) blends.

Cernansky, N.P.; Miller, D.L.

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

282

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling--Benedict--Webb--Rubin equation of state was used. A brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine are included.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Computer program for determining the thermodynamic properties of light hydrocarbons  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This program was written to be used as a subroutine. The program determines the thermodynamics of light hydrocarbons. The following light hydrocarbons can be analyzed: butane, ethane, ethylene, heptane, hexane, isobutane, isopentane, methane, octane, pentane, propane and propylene. The subroutine can evaluate a thermodynamic state for the light hydrocarbons given any of the following pairs of state quantities: pressure and quality, pressure and enthalpy, pressure and entropy, temperature and pressure, temperature and quality and temperature and specific volume. These six pairs of knowns allow the user to analyze any thermodynamic cycle utilizing a light hydrocarbon as the working fluid. The Starling-Benedict-Webb-Rubin equation of state was used. This report contains a brief description, flowchart, listing and required equations for each subroutine.

Riemer, D.H.; Jacobs, H.R.; Boehm, R.F.; Cook, D.S.

1976-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

The Development of a Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for Diisobutylene and Comparison to Shock Tube Ignition Times  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There is much demand for chemical kinetic models to represent practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel and aviation fuel. These blended fuels contain hundreds of components whose identity and amounts are often unknown. A chemical kinetic mechanism that would represent the oxidation of all these species with accompanying chemical reactions is intractable with current computational capabilities, chemical knowledge and manpower resources. The use of surrogate fuels is an approach to make the development of chemical kinetic mechanisms for practical fuels tractable. A surrogate fuel model consists of a small number of fuel components that can be used to represent the practical fuel and still predict desired characteristics of the practical fuel. These desired fuel characteristics may include ignition behavior, burning velocity, fuel viscosity, fuel vaporization, and fuel emissions (carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, soot and nitric oxides). Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, alkenes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, and aromatics. One approach is to use a fuel surrogate that has a single component from each class of hydrocarbon in gasoline so that the unique molecular structure of each class is represented. This approach may lead to reliable predictions of many of the combustion properties of the practical fuel. In order to obtain a fuel surrogate mechanism, detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms must be developed for each component in the surrogate. In this study, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is developed for diisobutylene, a fuel intended to represent alkenes in practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel. The fuel component diisobutylene usually consists of a mixture of two conjugate olefins of iso-octane: 1- or 2-pentene, 2,4,4-trimethyl. Diisobutylene has a similar molecular structure to iso-octane, so that its kinetics offers insight into the effect of including a double bond in the carbon skeletal structure of iso-octane. There are few previous studies on diisobutylene. Kaiser et al. [1] examined the exhaust emission from a production spark ignition engine with neat diisobutylene and with it mixed with gasoline. They found the exhaust emissions of diisobutylene to be similar to that of iso-octane. They saw a significant increase in the amount of 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene measured in the exhaust of the engine. They also found appreciable amount of propene in the exhaust, but could not explain the source of this product as they did others in terms of C-C bond beta scission of alkyl radicals. Risberg et al. [2] studied a number of fuel blends to evaluate their autoignition quality for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine, using diisobutylene to represent olefins in one of their test fuels. In this study, experiments on the shock tube ignition of both isomers of diisobutylene will be described. Then, the development of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the two isomers of diisobutylene will be discussed.

Metcalfe, W; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

285

Corrosion protection of reforming equipment during regeneration of the catalyst  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The authors discuss the important process of catalytic reforming to produce the basic components of high-octane gasolines and aromatic hydrocarbons in petroleum chemistry. Wide use is made of two-stage oxidative regeneration--coke burning and oxychlorination. This increases the activity of the catalysts. The authors developed a two-stage industrial method of corrosion protection for the low-temperature equipment of catalytic reforming plants during catalyst regeneration. The system is washed, before catalyst regeneration, with an aqueous solution of KLOE-15 in order to remove corrosion products already present. During catalyst regeneration, KLOE-15 and a neutralizing additive are fed in. The method is technically simple and economically effective, and has been introduced in a number of petroleum refineries.

Altsybeeva, A.I.; Andreeva, G.A.; Prasolova, O.N.; Ratner, E.M.; Reshetnikov, S.M.; Teslya, B.M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Conversion of cellulosic and waste polymer material to gasoline  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The present status and future plans for a project to convert cellulosic (biomass) and waste synthetic polymer materials to quality liquid fuels is presented. A thermal gasification approach is utilized followed by catalytic liquid fuels synthesis steps. Potential products include a medium quality substitute for natural gas or liquid fuel equivalents of diesel fuel, kerosene or high octane gasoline. The process appears very flexible with regard to ability to handle different sources of feedstock. Results to date indicate quality products can be produced. Product yields need to be improved with the main thrust centered on improvement of pyrolysis gas composition. This will be a major effort in the new contract period. Other items to be addressed are study of alternate economic feedstocks, waste stream characterization, and liquid fuels synthesis and tailoring with particular attention on the effects of alternate feedstocks. A description of a proposed 10 ton/day pilot plant is presented with flow sheet, material balance and cost estimates.

Kuester, J.L.

1979-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

287

Evaluate reformer performance at a glance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic reforming is becoming increasingly important in replacing octane lost as the removal of lead from worldwide gasoline pools continues. A method has been developed that can quickly evaluate the performance of any catalytic reformer. The catalytic naphtha reforming process primarily involves three well-known reactions. These are aromatization of naphthenes, cyclization of paraffins and hydrocracking of paraffins. Hydrogen is produced in the process of aromatization and dehydrocyclization of paraffins. Reformer performance is normally evaluated with a reformate analysis (PONA) and yield of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate. This method of quick evaluation of reformer performance is based upon the main assumption that the increase in hydrocarbon moles in the process is equal to the number of C{single_bond}C bond ruptures and one mole of hydrogen is absorbed to saturate the same. This new method calculates aromatization efficiency, paraffin conversion, aromatic selectivity and finally the paraffin, naphthene and aromatic content of C{sub 5{sup +}} reformate.

Nag, A. [Indian Oil Corporation Ltd., Gujarat (India)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Susceptibility of Aluminum Alloys to Corrosion in Simulated Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined was accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

Lyons, J.E.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Light alkane conversion processes - Suprabiotic catalyst systems for selective oxidation of light alkane gases to fuel oxygenates.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the work presented in this paper is to develop new, efficient catalysts for the selective transformation of the light alkanes in natural gas to alcohols for use as liquid transportation fuels, fuel precursors and chemical products. There currently exists no DIRECT one-step catalytic air-oxidation process to convert these substrates to alcohols. Such a one-step route would represent superior useful technology for the utilization of natural gas and similar refinery-derived light hydrocarbon streams. Processes for converting natural gas or its components (methane, ethane, propane, and the butanes) to alcohols for use as motor fuels, fuel additives or fuel precursors will not only add a valuable alternative to crude oil but will produce a clean-burning, high octane alternative to conventional gasoline.

Lyons, J.E.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Vehicle trends and future gasoline needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The passenger car continues to change at a rapid pace, responding both to customers' preferences and to regulations. Vehicle trends place demands on the powertrain for high specific output, efficiency and reliability. Engine design and calibration must be optimized to utilize available fuel octane fully since low speed knock remains a significant constraint. Emerging capabilities for engine control provide flexible, adaptive approaches for fuel/engine matching. Recent, substantial increases in fuel volatility raise concerns for both driveability and emissions. Expanded use of fuel injection will be helpful for future vehicles, but new problems have appeared, and tighter definition of gasoline properties will be needed. The high sensitivity of fuel systems and emission controls to fuel quality is demonstrated by injector deposits and plugged catalysts. Dependable gasoline quality is essential. High standards of quality and reliability are necessary for fuel and lubricant products. The precision offered by current emission control systems can only be achieved with fuels that are properly prepared and marketed.

Baker, R.E.; Chui, G.K.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains

293

Extents of alkane combustion during rapid compression leading to single and two stage ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Extents of reactant consumption have been measured during the course of spontaneous ignition following rapid compression of N-pentane and N-heptane and also of PRF 60 (N-heptane = i-octane, 2.2.4 trimethylpentane) in stoichiometric mixtures with air. Compressed gas temperatures of 720-750 K and 845-875 K were studied at reactant densities of 131 mol m{sup minus 3}. At the lower gas temperature there was no evidence of reactant consumption during the course of the compression stroke. Two-stage ignition occurred at these temperatures, but only modest proportions of n-pentane were consumed during the first stage (< 15%) whereas about 40% of proportions of n- heptane reacted under the same conditions. At the higher compressed gas temperature the oxidation of n-pentane began only after the piston had stopped, whereas more than 30% of the n-heptane had already been consumed in the final stage of the compression stroke. The behavior of the PRF 60 mixture differed somewhat from that of N- pentane despite the similarly of the research octane numbers. Although there was a preferential oxidation of n-heptane at T{sub c} = 850K, which persisted throughout the early development of spontaneous ignition during the post-compression period, oxidation of both components of the PRF 60 mixture began before the piston had stopped. Numerical simulations of the spontaneous ignition under conditions resembling those of the rapid compression experiments show that the predicted reactivity from detailed kinetics are consistent with the observed features. Insights into the kinetic interactions that give rise to the relative reactivities of the primary reference fuel components are established

Cox, A.; Griffiths, J.F.; Mohamed, C. [Leeds Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Chemistry; Curran, H.; Pitz, W.J.; Westbrook, C.K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Catalytic hydroprocessing of shale oil to produce distillate fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of a Chevron Research Company study sponsored by the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) to demonstrate the feasibility of converting whole shale oil to a synthetic crude resembling a typical petroleum distillate. The synthetic crude thus produced can then be processed, in conventional petroleum-refining facilities, to transportation fuels such as high octane gasoline, diesel, and jet fuel. The raw shale oil feed used is a typical Colorado shale oil produced in a surface retort in the so-called indirectly heated mode. It is shown that whole shale oil can be catalytically hydrodenitrified to reduce the nitrogen to levels as low as one part per million in a single catalytic stage. However, for economic reasons, it appears preferable to denitrify to about 0.05 wt % nitrogen. The resulting synthetic crude resembles a petroleum distillate that can be fractionated and further processed as necessary in conventional petroleum refining facilities. Shale oil contains about 0.6% sulfur. Sulfur is more easily removed by hydrofining than is nitrogen; therefore, only a few parts per million of sulfur remain at a product nitrogen of 0.05 wt %. Oxygen contained in the shale oil is also reduced to low levels during hydrodenitrification. The shale oil contains appreciable quantities of iron and arsenic which are also potential catalyst poisons. These metals are removed by a guard bed placed upstream from the hydrofining catalyst. Based on correlations, the naphthas from the shale oil hydrofiner can readily be upgraded to high octane gasolines by catalytic reforming. The middle distillate fractions may require some additional hydrofining to produce salable diesel or jet fuel. The technology is available, and pilot plant studies are scheduled to verify diesel hydrofiner performance.

Sullivan, R.F.; Stangeland, B.E.

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Alternative fuels performance and emissions characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report addresses the question of what problems might be caused by the use of non-petroleum based gasolines in a standard throttle body fuel injection closed-loop spark-ignition internal combustion engine. Five fuels were tested in five separate but physically identical engines. The five fuels were, one baseline unleaded gasoline, two oil shale-derived gasolines, and two coal-derived gasolines. The basic testing of a fuel centered around a 5 hour cycle which was repeated daily until 200 hours of operation were accumulated. The 5 hour cycle was run by alternating every 15 minutes between two distinct conditions. During the accumulation of the 200 hours of operation, the engines were disassembled and inspected nine times. Additionally, thermal efficiency, regulated emissions, unburnt hydrocarbon makeup, catalyst pressure drop, and cylinder pressure versus crankshaft position measurements were made. Negligibly small differences were recorded in the behavior of the fuels, in terms of brake thermal efficiency, regulated emissions, effect on oxygen sensor life, and effect on catalyst life. Noteworthy differences in individual unburnt hydrocarbon concentration in the exhaust were recorded. Noteworthy differences in the behavior of the fuels in terms of producing deposits that caused intake valve sticking are presented in this report. Additionally, the fuels behaved differently when operated in the presence of knock producing deposits. (R+M)/2 octane numbers proved to be a poor indicator of the fuels knocking behavior. R-M octane numbers proved to be a better indicator of knocking behavior. 16 refs., 43 figs., 29 tabs.

Swain, M.R.; Swain, M.N.; Blanco, J.A.; Adt, R.R. Jr.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Br???????¸nsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with blending octane No. of 105, and can replace aromatics in liquid fuels.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

297

Motor gasolines, winter 1982-83  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analytical data for 1330 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 28 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R + M/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R + M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.3 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.5 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 89.1 for leaded below 93.0, and no data was reported in this report for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above. 21 figures, 5 tables.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Combustion, Control, and Fuel Effects in a Spark Assisted HCCI Engine Equipped with Variable Valve Timing  

SciTech Connect

Widespread implementation of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines is presently hindered by stability, control, and load range issues. Although the operable HCCI speed/load range is expanding, it is likely that the initial HCCI engines will rely on conventional combustion for part of the operating cycle. In the present study, we have investigated the role of fuel properties and chemistry on the operation of a spark-assisted gasoline HCCI engine. The engine employed is a single cylinder, 500 cc, port fuel injected research engine, operating near lambda = 1.0 and equipped with hydraulic variable valve actuation. HCCI is initiated by early exhaust valve closing to retain exhaust in the cylinder, thereby increasing the cylinder gas temperature. This is also referred to as a 'negative overlap' strategy. A total of 10 custom blended gasolines and three different batches of indolene from two suppliers were run at 5 speed-load combinations and performance was characterized by timing sweeps. Within the quality of the data set, we can say the all fuels provided equivalent combustion and performance characteristics when compared at the same combustion phasing. The fuels did, however, require different degrees of retained exhaust as measured by exhaust valve closing angle to achieve the same combustion phasing. Fuels with higher octane sensitivity were found to ignite more easily or more quickly and to burn more quickly than fuels with lower octane sensitivity. This is an expected result since the engine is naturally aspirated and operates with high compression temperatures due to the high retained exhaust fraction and recompression.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants  

SciTech Connect

High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

Jun, Ji Hyun

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Transition in Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys and Updated Data and Correlations to Quantify the Effect of Aqueous Hydrogen on Primary Water SCC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alloys 600 and X-750 have been shown to exhibit a maximum in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility, when testing is conducted over a range of aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) levels. Contact electric resistance (CER) and corrosion coupon testing using nickel specimens has shown that the maximum in SCC susceptibility occurs in proximity to the nickel-nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition. The measured location of the Ni/NiO transition has been shown to vary with temperature, from 25 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 360 C to 4 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 288 C. New CER measurements show that the Ni/NiO transition is located at 2 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 260 C. An updated correlation of the phase transition is provided. The present work also reports CER testing conducted using an Alloy 600 specimen at 316 C. A large change in resistance occurred between 5 and 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}, similar to the results obtained at 316 C using a nickel specimen. This result adds confidence in applying the Ni/NiO transition measurements to Ni-Cr-Fe alloys. The understanding of the importance of the Ni/NiO transition to PWSCC has been used previously to quantify H{sub 2} effects on SCC growth rate (SCCGR). Specifically, the difference in the electrochemical potential (EcP) of the specimen or component from the Ni/NiO transition (i.e., EcP{sub Ni/NiO}-EcP) has been used as a correlating parameter. In the present work, these SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations, which were based on SCCGR data obtained at relatively high test temperatures (338 and 360 C), are evaluated via SCCGR tests at a reduced temperature (316 C). The 316 C data are in good agreement with the predictions, implying that the SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations extrapolate well to reduced temperatures. The SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations have been revised to reflect the updated Ni/NiO phase transition correlation. New data are presented for EN82H weld metal (also known as Alloy 82) at 338 C. Similar to other nickel alloys, SCC of EN82H is a function of the aqueous H{sub 2} level, with the SCCGR exhibiting a maximum near the Ni/NiO transition. For example, the SCCGR at 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} is {approx} 81 x higher than at 60 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} condition is near the Ni/NiO transition (located at {approx} 14 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 338 C), while 60 scc/kg H{sub 2} is well into the nickel metal regime. A hydrogen-SCCGR correlation is provided for EN82H. The data and understanding obtained from the present work show that SCC can be mitigated by adjusting the aqueous H{sub 2} level. For example, SCCGR is typically minimized at relatively high aqueous H{sub 2} levels, that are well into the nickel metal regime (i.e., far from the Ni/NiO transition).

Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Partitioning in trees and soil (PiTS) - a experimental approach to improve knowledge of forest carbon dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Summary The dynamics of rapid changes in carbon (C) partitioning within forest ecosystems are not well understood, which limits improvement of mechanistic models of C cycling. Our objective was to inform model processes by describing relationships between C partitioning and accessible environmental or physiological measurements, with a special emphasis on belowground C flux. We exposed eight 7-year-old loblolly pine trees to air enriched with 13CO2 and then implemented adjacent light shade (LS) and heavy shade (HS) treatments in order to manipulate C uptake and flux. A soil pit was dug adjacent to the trees to provide greater access belowground. The impacts of shading on photosynthesis, plant water potential, sap flow, basal area growth, root growth, and soil C exchange rate (CER) were assessed for each tree over a three-week period. The progression of the 13C label was concurrently tracked from the atmosphere through foliage, phloem, roots, and soil CO2 efflux. The HS treatment significantly reduced C uptake, sap flow, stem growth and root standing crop, and resulted in greater residual soil water content to 1 m depth. Sap flow was strongly correlated with CER on the previous day, but not the current day, with no apparent treatment effect on the relationship. The 13C label was immediately detected in foliage on label day (half-life = 0.5 d), progressed through phloem by day 2 (half-life = 4.7 d), roots by day 2-4, and subsequently was evident as respiratory release from soil which peaked between days 3-6. The 13C of soil CO2 efflux was strongly correlated with phloem 13C on the previous day, or two days earlier. These data detail the timing and relative magnitude of C flux through a young pine stand in relation to environmental conditions. Refinement of belowground sampling will be necessary to adequately separate and quantify the flux of recently fixed C into roots, and fate of that new C as respiratory, mycorrhizal or exudative release, storage or partitioning into new root biomass.

Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Iversen, Colleen M [ORNL; Norby, Richard J [ORNL; Thornton, Peter E [ORNL; Weston, David [ORNL; Gu, Lianhong [ORNL; Brice, Deanne Jane [ORNL; Childs, Joanne [ORNL; Evans, R [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Regional  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 3 AÇORIANO ORIENTAL SEGUNDA-FEIRA, 5 DE MARÇO DE 2012 PUB Da Graciosa para a Índia graças à estação atmosférica Carlos está atualmente a trabalhar na estação atmosférica móvel instalada na Índia, a dois mil metros de altitude Estar no lugar certo na hora cer- ta pode mudar radicalmente a vida de uma pessoa. Foi isso que aconteceu ao graciosense Carlos Sousa, de 41 anos, que começou por ser trabalhador daconstrução civil antes de emigrar para os Es- tados Unidos da América. No regresso à sua ilha, foi ain- Começou na construção e foi emigrante nos EUA. Hoje trabalha com equipamento de ponta no estudo do clima RUI JORGE CABRAL rcabral@acorianooriental.pt da gerente de um restaurante e, graças aum encontro improvável, é hoje técnico das Estações de Me- dição da Radiação Atmosférica que os americanos têm espalha- das pelo mundo para estudar as alterações

303

101112-FINAL.indd  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Voice 918-595-6600 Fax 918-595-6656 www.swpa.gov The UPDATE is published by and for customers, retirees, and employees of Southwestern Power Administration like: Linda Mummey Realty Offi cer Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: Scott Carpenter Vicki Clarke Gary Cox Ruben Garcia Larry Harp William Hiller Beth Nielsen Kathy O'Neal Carrie Quick Angela Summer Mike Wech Jon Worthington U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N O C T O B E R - D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 8 Keystone Switchyard Switches Hands Keystone Dam Switchyard, located approximately 20 miles west of Southwestern's downtown Tulsa headquarters, became the fi rst switchyard to be transferred from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Tulsa District (Corps) to Southwestern under a new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) executed November 5, 2008.

304

RNK Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RNK Capital LLC RNK Capital LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name RNK Capital LLC Place Wilmington, Delaware Zip 19808 Sector Renewable Energy Product RNK intends to invest money in the purchase of CERs to be delivered during the 2008-2012 commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol and the US domestic renewable energy market. Coordinates 42.866922°, -72.868494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.866922,"lon":-72.868494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

305

Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Rulison 1970 Environmerstal Surveillance Summary Report J - - Colorado Department of Health DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL AND RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. STATE OF COLORADO P R O J E C T R U L I S O N Environments 1 S u r v e i l l a n c e Summary R e p o r t C o l o r a d o D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h D i v i s i o n o f O c c u p a t i o n a l and R a d i o l o g i c a l 3 e a l t h This page intentionally left blank FOREWORD Project Rulison is an experimental Plowshare project undertaken cooperatively by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Department of Interior for the government, and Austral Oil Company and CER Geo- nuclear Corporation for private industry. As required by law, the AEC

306

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: A guide to record series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This guide describes record series that pertain to epidemiologic and health-related studies at the Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). These records document the health and safety monitoring of employees and contract employees of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of the DOE and its epidemiologic research program, and the history of the Oak Ridge Reservation and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. It also furnishes information on the procedures that HAI sued to select, inventory, and describe pertinent records; the methodology used to produce the guide; the arrangement of the record series descriptions; the location of the records; and procedures for accessing records repositories.

NONE

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

307

An Agent Based Classification Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The major function of this model is to access the UCI Wisconsin Breast Can- cer data-set[1] and classify the data items into two categories, which are normal and anomalous. This kind of classifi cation can be referred as anomaly detection, which discriminates anomalous behaviour from normal behaviour in computer systems. One popular solution for anomaly detection is Artifi cial Immune Sys- tems (AIS). AIS are adaptive systems inspired by theoretical immunology and observed immune functions, principles and models which are applied to prob- lem solving. The Dendritic Cell Algorithm (DCA)[2] is an AIS algorithm that is developed specifi cally for anomaly detection. It has been successfully applied to intrusion detection in computer security. It is believed that agent-based mod- elling is an ideal approach for implementing AIS, as intelligent agents could be the perfect representations of immune entities in AIS. This model evaluates the feasibility of re-implementing the DCA in an agent-based simulation environ- ...

Gu, Feng; Greensmith, Julie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

In-Situ Real Time Measurements of Molten Glass Properties, Final Report  

SciTech Connect

Energy Research Company (ERCo) of Staten Island, NY has developed a sensor capable of measuring in situ and in real time, both the elemental composition and the temperature of molten glass. A prototype sensor has been designed, constructed and tested in ERCo's laboratory. The sensor was used to collect atomic emission spectra from molten fiberglass via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). From these spectra, we were able to readily identify all elements of interest (B, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, Sr, Al). The high signal-to-background signals achieved suggest that data from the sensor can be used to determine elemental concentrations, either through calibration curves or using ERCo's calibrationless method. ERCo's technology fits in well with DOE's Glass Industry Technology Roadmap which emphasizes the need for accurate process and feedstock sensors. Listed first under technological barriers to increased production efficiency is the 'Inability to accurately measure and control the production process'. A large-scale glass melting furnace, developed by SenCer Inc. of Penn Yan, NY was installed in ERCo's laboratory to ensure that a large enough quantity of glass could be melted and held at temperature in the presence of the water-cooled laser sensor without solidifying the glass.

Robert De Saro; Joe Craparo

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

309

Measurement of neutral beam profiles at DIII-D. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The neutral beam systems of DIII-D, a National Fusion Facility at General Atomics, are used both for heating the plasma, and as tools for plasma diagnostics. The spatial distribution (profile) and energy of the beam is used in the absolute calibration of both the Charge Exchange Recombination (CER) and Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostics. In the past, the beam spatial profile used in these calibrations was derived from beam divergence calculations and IR camera observations on the tokamak centerpost target tiles. Two experimental methods are now available to better determine the beam profile. In one method, the Doppler shifted D{sub {alpha}} light from the energetic neutrals are measured, and the full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of the beam can be inferred from the measured divergence of the D{sub {alpha}} light intensity. The other method for determining the beam profile uses the temperature gradients measured by the thermocouples mounted on the calorimeter. A new iterative fitting routine for the measured thermocouple data has been developed to fit theoretical models on the dispersion of the beam. The results of both methods are compared, and used to provide a new experimental verification of the beam profile.

Chiu, H.

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Hope or Hype? What's Next for Biofuels? (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Science at the Theater: From the sun to your gas tank: A new breed of biofuels may help solve the global energy challenge and reduce the impact of fossil fuels on global warming. KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who are developing ways to convert the solar energy stored in plants into liquid fuels. Jay Keasling is one of the foremost authorities in the ?eld of synthetic biology. He is applying this research toward the production of advanced carbon-neutral biofuels that can replace gasoline on a gallon-for-gallon basis. Keasling is Berkeley Labs Acting Deputy Director and the Chief Executive Of?cer of the U.S. Department of Energys Joint BioEnergy Institute. Jim Bristow is deputy director of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility in Walnut Creek, CA. He developed and implemented JGIs Community Sequencing Program, which provides large-scale DNA sequencing and analysis to advance genomics related to bioenergy and environmental characterization and cleanup. Susanna Green Tringe is a computational biologist with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). She helped pioneer the ?eld of metagenomics, a new strategy for isolating, sequencing, and characterizing DNA extracted directly from environmental samples, such as the contents of the termite gut, which yielded enzymes responsible for breakdown of wood into fuel.

Keasling, Jay; Bristow, Jim; Tringe, Susannah Green

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

311

Generating CO{sub 2}-credits through landfill in situ aeration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Landfills are some of the major anthropogenic sources of methane emissions worldwide. The installation and operation of gas extraction systems for many landfills in Europe and the US, often including technical installations for energy recovery, significantly reduced these emissions during the last decades. Residual landfill gas, however, is still continuously produced after the energy recovery became economically unattractive, thus resulting in ongoing methane emissions for many years. By landfill in situ aeration these methane emissions can be widely avoided both, during the aeration process as well as in the subsequent aftercare period. Based on model calculations and online monitoring data the amount of avoided CO{sub 2-eq}. can be determined. For an in situ aerated landfill in northern Germany, acting as a case study, 83-95% (depending on the kind and quality of top cover) of the greenhouse gas emission potential could be reduced under strictly controlled conditions. Recently the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) has approved a new methodology on the 'Avoidance of landfill gas emissions by in situ aeration of landfills' (). Based on this methodology landfill aeration projects might be considered for generation of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) in the course of CDM projects. This paper contributes towards an evaluation of the potential of landfill aeration for methane emissions reduction.

Ritzkowski, M., E-mail: m.ritzkowski@tu-harburg.d [Institute of Environmental Technology and Energy Economics, Hamburg University of Technology, Harburger Schlossstr. 36, D-21079 Hamburg (Germany); Stegmann, R. [Consultants for Waste Management, Prof. R. Stegmann and Partner, Schellerdamm 19-21, D-21079 Hamburg (Germany)

2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

High pressure ceramic air heater for indirectly fired gas turbine applications  

SciTech Connect

The EFCC cycle is conceptually simple. Air enters the compressor where it is pressurized and becomes the tube-side flow of the ceramic air heater. Heat transferred from the hot combustion gases flowing through the shell-side raises the air temperature to the desired turbine inlet temperature. Internally insulated high pressure piping returns the heated compressor air to the turbine, where it is expanded providing power to drive the electric generator and gas turbine compressor. Exhaust air from the turbine is used as the combustion air for the coal combustor. The EFCC cycle burns pulverized coal in an atmospheric combustion chamber similar to the combustion system in a conventional steam generator. The combustion gas exits the combustor and enters a slag screen, or impact separator, where the larger ash particles are collected to prevent fouling of the heat exchanger. After the slag screen, the combustion gas enters the shell-side of the CerHX where its thermal energy is transferred to the tube side air flow. Shell-side exit temperatures are sufficiently high to provide thermal energy for the bottoming Rankine Cycle through a heat recovery steam generator. Exhaust gas exiting the steam generator passes through a flue gas desulfurization system and a particulate removal system.

LaHaye, P.G.; Briggs, G.F.; Orozxo, N.J.; Seger, J.L.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Western Gas Sands Subprogram. Status report, October-November-December 1982  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The progress during October, November and December 1982 of government-sponsored projects to increase gas production from low permeability gas sands of the Western United States, is summarized in this edition of the Western Gas Sands Subprogram (WGSS) Quarterly Status Report. During the quarter, major changes were made in the management of the subprogram. Personnel in the Division of Petroleum Projects Management at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) assumed the role of management for the Western Gas Sands Subprogram that had been performed by the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). BETC continued in-house research on the fluid and proppant problems of fracture conductivity, and management of the Multi-Well Experiment (MWX). Owing to economic constraints, all efforts at the Sandia National Laboratory that were not directly related to the performance of MWX were terminated. The projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory were reduced by approximately 50 percent. The efforts at the USGS were reduced by 70 percent. Significant progress was made in the MWX project. Both the Upper and Lower Cozzette zones were production tested. Interference tests run on the Upper Cozzette showed much higher in situ permeability than core and log analysis indicated. This higher permeability has been attributed to the natural fractures. The site was closed for the winter on December 22 and the test trailer moved to CER Corporation, Las Vegas, for maintenance and upgrading. 40 figures, 16 tables.

Crawley, A. (comp.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline (octane or decane) at low temperature and ambient pressure via treatment with a TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide in a two-phase system consisting of the fuel as the first phase and a water/tertiary butanol second phase. The DBTs are oxidized to sulphones (or sulfoxides), which then completely extract into the water/t-butanol phase. Treatment of commercial diesel spiked with DBT under the same conditions results in compete DBT oxidation. In contrast with the octane and decane experiments, removal to the water/t-butanol phase is not yet complete and is being further optimized. Analysis by the sulfur specific GC-FPD technique suggests that >70% sulfur compounds are removed from unspiked diesel after one treatment. Further treatments are being investigated. The GC-FPD results will be checked by total sulfur analysis methodology.

Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

316

DOE Project 18546, AOP Task 1.1, Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Engines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research in 2011 was focused on diesel range fuels and diesel combustion and fuels evaluated in 2011 included a series of oxygenated biofuels fuels from University of Maine, oxygenated fuel compounds representing materials which could be made from sewage, oxygenated marine diesel fuels for low emissions, and a new series of FACE fuel surrogates and FACE fuels with detailed exhaust chemistry and particulate size measurements. Fuels obtained in late 2011, which will be evaluated in 2012, include a series of oil shale derived fuels from PNNL, green diesel fuel (hydrotreated vegetable oil) from UOP, University of Maine cellulosic biofuel (levulene), and pyrolysis derived fuels from UOP pyrolysis oil, upgraded at University of Georgia. We were able to demonstrate, through a project with University of Wisconsin, that a hybrid strategy for fuel surrogates provided both accurate and rapid CFD combustion modeling for diesel HCCI. In this strategy, high molecular weight compounds are used to more accurately represent physical processes and smaller molecular weight compounds are used for chemistry to speed chemical calculations. We conducted a small collaboration with sp3H, a French company developing an on-board fuel quality sensor based on near infrared analysis to determine how to use fuel property and chemistry information for engine control. We were able to show that selected outputs from the sensor correlated to both fuel properties and to engine performance. This collaboration leveraged our past statistical analysis work and further work will be done as opportunity permits. We conducted blending experiments to determine characteristics of ethanol blends based on the gasoline characteristics used for blending. Results indicate that much of the octane benefits gained by high level ethanol blending can be negated by use of low octane gasoline blend stocks, as allowed by ASTM D5798. This may limit ability to optimize engines for improved efficiency with ethanol fuels. Extensive data from current and previous years was leveraged into participation with several large proposal teams, as our fuels database covers a very wide range of conventional and emerging fuels and biofuels.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.

L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Improving Energy Efficiency and Enabling Water Recycle in Biorefineries Using Bioelectrochemical Cells.  

SciTech Connect

Improving biofuel yield and water reuse are two important issues in further development of biorefineries. The total energy content of liquid fuels (including ethanol and hydrocarbon) produced from cellulosic biomass via biochemical or hybrid bio-thermochemical routes can vary from 49% to 70% of the biomass entering the biorefinery, on an energy basis. Use of boiler for combustion of residual organics and lignin results in significant energy and water losses. An alternate process to improve energy recovery from the residual organic streams is via use of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The potential advantages of this alternative scheme in a biorefinery include minimization of heat loss and generation of a higher value product, hydrogen. The need for 5-15 gallons of water per gallon of ethanol can be reduced significantly via recycle of water after MEC treatment. Removal of inhibitory byproducts such as furans, phenolics and acetate in MFC/MECs to generate energy, thus, has dual advantages including improvements in energy efficiency and ability to recycle water. Conversion of the sugar- and lignin- degradation products to hydrogen is synergistic with biorefinery hydrogen requirements for upgrading F-T liquids and other byproducts to high-octane fuels and/or high value products. Some of these products include sorbitol, succinic acid, furan and levulinate derivatives, glycols, polyols, 1,4-butenadiol, phenolics polymers, etc. Potential process alternatives utilizing MECs in biorefineries capable of improving energy efficiency by up to 30% are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Analysis of leaded and unleaded gasoline pricing. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the evaluation of the cost price relation between the two fuels. The original scope of work identified three separate categories of effort: Gather and organize available data on the wholesale and retail prices of gasoline at a national level for the past 5 years. Using the data collected in Subtask 1, develop models of pricing practices that aid in explaining retail markups and price differentials for different types and grades of gasoline at different retail outlets in the current gasoline market. Using the data from Subtask 1 and the analysis framework from Subtask 2, analyze the likely range of future retail markups and price differentials for different grades of leaded and unleaded gasoline. The report is organized in a format that is different than suggested by the subtasks outlined above. The first section provides a characterization of the problem - data available to quantify cost and price of the fuels as well as issues that directly affect this relationship. The second section provides a discussion of issues likely to affect this relation in the future. The third section postulates a model that can be used to quantify the relation between fuels, octane levels, costs and prices.

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

320

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Surrogate Fuels for Gasoline and Application to an HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect

Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons, such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and cycloalkanes. In this study, a surrogate gasoline reaction mechanism is developed, and it has one representative fuel constituent from each of these classes. These selected constituents are iso-octane, n-heptane, 1-pentene, toluene, and methyl-cyclohexane. The mechanism was developed in a step-wise fashion, adding submechanisms to treat each fuel component. Reactions important for low temperature oxidation (<1000K) and cross-reactions among different fuels are incorporated into the mechanism. The mechanism consists of 1214 species and 5401 reactions. A single-zone engine model is used to evaluate how well the mechanism captures autoignition behavior for conditions corresponding to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine operation. Experimental data are available for both how the combustion phasing changes with fueling at a constant intake temperature, and also how the intake temperature has to be changed with pressure in order to maintain combustion phasing for a fixed equivalence ratio. Three different surrogate fuel mixtures are used for the modeling. Predictions are in reasonably good agreement with the engine data. In addition, the heat release rate is calculated and compared to the data from experiments. The model predicts less low-temperature heat release than that measured. It is found that the low temperature heat-release rate depends strongly on engine speed, reactions of RO{sub 2}+HO{sub 2}, fuel composition, and pressure boost.

Naik, C V; Pitz, W J; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J E; Orme, J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly report, October 1, 1996--December 31, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Task 1 is to prepare and evaluate catalysts and to develop efficient reactor systems for the selective conversion of hydrogen-lean synthesis gas to alcohol fuel extender and octane enhancers. Task 1 is subdivided into three separate subtasks: laboratory and equipment setup; catalysis research; and reaction engineering and modeling. Research at West Virginia University (WVU) is focused on molybdenum-based catalysts for higher alcohol synthesis. Parallel research carried out at Union Carbide Corporation (UCC) is focused on transition-metal-oxide catalysts. During this time period, at WVU, we tried several methods to eliminate problems related to condensation of heavier products when reduced Mo-Ni-K/C materials were used as catalysts. We then resumed our kinetic study on the reduced Mo-Ni-K/C materials were used as catalysts. We then resumed our kinetic study on the reduced Mo-Ni-K/C catalysts. We have also obtained same preliminary results in our attempts to analyze quantitatively the temperature-programmed reduction spectra for C- supported Mo-based catalysts. We have completed the kinetic study for the sulfided Co-K-MoS{sub 2}/C catalyst. We have compared the results of methanol synthesis using the membrane reactor with those using a simple plug-flow reactor. At UCC, the complete characterization of selected catalysts has been completed. The results suggest that catalyst pretreatment under different reducing conditions yield different surface compositions and thus different catalytic reactivities.

NONE

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 16, July 1, 1995--September 30, 1995  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Task 1 is to prepare and evaluate catalysts and to develop efficient reactor systems for the selective conversion of hydrogen-lean synthesis gas to alcohol fuel extenders and octane enhancers. Task 1 is subdivided into three separate subtasks: laboratory setup; catalysis research; and reaction engineering and modeling. Research at West Virginia University (WVU) is focused on molybdenum-based catalysts for higher alcohol synthesis (HAS). Parallel research carried out at Union Carbide Chemicals and Plastics (UCC&P) is focused on transition-metal-oxide catalysts. Accomplishments to date are discussed in this report. In Task 2, during the past three months, much has been accomplished in fuel testing. Several tests have been run on pure indolene, and the data have been analyzed from these tests. The two limiting alcohol blends have been made, sent out for analysis and the results obtained. The emissions sampling system is undergoing changes necessary for running alcohol fuels. A cylinder pressure measurement system has been installed.

NONE

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Renova Energy Plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Plc Energy Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Renova Energy Plc Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1B 1PN Product Producer of ethanol used as a motor fuel that is blended with gasoline either as an additive to reduce exhaust emissions or as a lower cost high octane substitute. However, it went bankrupt in June 2008. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

324

Photocatalytic oxidation of gas-phase BTEX-contaminated waste streams  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have been exploring heterogeneous photocatalytic oxidation (PCO) as a remediation technology for air streams contaminated with benzene, toluene, ethyl-benzene, and xylenes (BTEX). This research is a continuation of work performed on chlorinated organics. The photocatalytic oxidation of BTEX has been studied in the aqueous phase, however, a study by Turchi et al. showed a more economical system would involve stripping organic contaminants from the aqueous phase and treating the resulting gas stream. Another recent study by Turchi et al. indicated that PCO is cost competitive with such remediation technologies as activated carbon adsorption and catalytic incineration for some types of contaminated air streams. In this work we have examined the photocatalytic oxidation of benzene using ozone (0{sub 3}) as an additional oxidant. We varied the residence time in the PCO reactor, the initial concentration of the organic pollutant, and the initial ozone concentration in a single-pass reactor. Because aromatic hydrocarbons represent only a small fraction of the total hydrocarbons present in gasoline and other fuels, we also added octane to the reaction mixture to simulate the composition of air streams produced from soil-vapor-extraction or groundwater-stripping of sites contaminated with gasoline.

Gratson, D A; Nimlos, M R; Wolfrum, E J

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

John D. Jones

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

Lyons, J.E.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

327

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes. Quarterly progress report, April 1--June 30, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The second Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between April 1, 1992 and June 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products that can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon uwspomdon fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE I).

Lyons, J.E.

1992-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Use of Fuel Chemistry and Property Variations to Evaluate the Robustness of Variable Compression Ratio as a Control Method for Gasoline HCCI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On a gasoline engine platform, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) holds the promise of improved fuel economy and greatly reduced engine-out NOx emissions, without an increase in particulate matter emissions. In this investigation, a variable compression ratio (CR) engine equipped with a throttle and intake air heating was used to test the robustness of these control parameters to accommodate a series of fuels blended from reference gasoline, straight run refinery naptha, and ethanol. Higher compression ratios allowed for operation with higher octane fuels, but operation could not be achieved with the reference gasoline, even at the highest compression ratio. Compression ratio and intake heat could be used separately or together to modulate combustion. A lambda of 2 provided optimum fuel efficiency, even though some throttling was necessary to achieve this condition. Ethanol did not appear to assist combustion, although only two ethanol-containing fuels were evaluated. The increased pumping work from throttling was minimal compared to the efficiency increases that were the result of lower unburned hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Low temperature heat release was present for all the fuels, but could be suppressed with a higher intake air temperature. Results will be used to design future fuels and combustion studies with this research platform.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Synthesis of higher alcohols from carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a slurry reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Higher, i.e. C{sub 2{sup +}}, alcohols are desired as gasoline additives, feedstocks for producing ethers and as alternative fuels for automobiles. In all cases, the backbone branching of an alcohol improves octane rating, which is essential for good engine performance. These types of branched, higher alcohols are the desired products for a process converting synthesis gas, a CO and H{sub 2} mixture, often generated from coal gasification. Based on this premise, promoted ZnCr oxide catalysts appear to be as one of the best avenues for further investigation. Once this investigation is complete, a natural extension is to replace the Cr in the ZnCr oxide catalyst with Mo and W, both in the same elemental triad with Cr. Mo has already been shown as an active HAS catalyst, both on a SiO{sub 2} support and in the MoS{sub 2} form. The three catalyst combinations, ZnMo, ZnW, and MnCr oxides will be tested in the stirred autoclave system. However, if none of the three indicate any comparable activity and/or selectivity toward higher alcohols as compared with other HAS catalysts, then an investigation of the effects of Cs promotion on the ZnCr oxide methanol catalysts will be executed.

McCutchen, M.S.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

331

ISOBUTANOL FROM SYNGAS IN A THREE PHASE SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

With growing interest in oxygenates as octane booster for automotive fuels, various synthesis routes for these chemicals are being investigated. Among others, alternative routes to isobutene, the C4-components in MTBE-synthesis are under investigation. A promising path to isobutene is the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol with following dehydration (Fig. 1). As shown by thermodynamical studies, the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol is not expected to experience any thermodynamic constraints. However, heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO is a very exothermic process, a problem which can only be partly solved when being conducted in a plug flow reactor. When carried out in reaction vessels with moving catalyst bed (e.g. three phase stirred tank), heat transfer problems can be resolved, along with additional benefits connected with this reactor type. Several heterogeneous catalytic systems have been under investigation for their capability of isobutanol synthesis from syngas. Most promising catalysts for an active and selective isobutanol synthesis from CO are modified high temperature methanol catalysts.

Peter Tijrn

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE's LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products' laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively benign'' system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE's program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

Brown, D.M.

1992-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

333

Development of alternative fuels from coal-derived syngas. Quarterly status report No. 6, January 1--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

The overall objectives of this program are to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated fuels, hydrocarbon fuels, fuel intermediates, and octane enhancers; and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at DOE`s LaPorte, Texas, Slurry Phase Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). BASF continues to have difficulties in scaling-up the new isobutanol synthesis catalyst developed in Air Products` laboratories. Investigations are proceeding, but the proposed operation at LaPorte in April is now postponed. DOE has accepted a proposal to demonstrate Liquid Phase Shift (LPS) chemistry at LaPorte as an alternative to isobutanol. There are two principal reasons for carrying out this run. First, following the extensive modifications at the site, operation on a relatively ``benign`` system is needed before we start on Fischer-Tropsch technology in July. Second, use of shift catalyst in a slurry reactor will enable DOE`s program on coal-based Fischer-Tropsch to encompass commercially available cobalt catalysts-up to now they have been limited to iron-based catalysts which have varying degrees of shift activity. In addition, DOE is supportive of continued fuel testing of LaPorte methanol-tests of MIOO at Detroit Diesel have been going particularly well. LPS offers the opportunity to produce methanol as the catalyst, in the absence of steam, is active for methanol synthesis.

Brown, D.M.

1992-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

334

Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

The Autoignition of iso-Cetane: Shock Tube Experiments and Kinetic Modeling  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Iso-cetane (2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, C{sub 16}H{sub 34}) is a highly branched alkane reference compound for determining cetane ratings. It is also a candidate branched alkane representative in surrogate mixtures for diesel and jet fuels. Here new experiments and kinetic modeling results are presented for the autoignition of iso-cetane at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to combustion in internal combustion engines. Ignition delay time measurements were made in reflected shock experiments in a heated shock tube for {Phi} = 0.5 and 1.0 iso-cetane/air mixtures at temperatures ranging from 953 to 1347 K and pressures from 8 to 47 atm. Ignition delay times were measured using electronically excited OH emission, monitored through the shock tube end wall, and piezoelectric pressure transducer measurements, made at side wall locations. A new kinetic mechanism for the description of the oxidation of iso-cetane is presented that is developed based on a previous mechanism for iso-octane. Computed results from the mechanism are found in good agreement with the experimental measurements. To our knowledge, the ignition time measurements and detailed kinetic mechanism for isocetane presented here are the first of their kind.

Oehlschlaeger, M A; Steinberg, J; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Quarterly report, January--March 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility and estimate the economics of hydroprocessing four synthetic fuels to distillate fuels, including high octane gasoline, using presently available technology. The feedstocks include three coal-derived synthetic crudes and shale oil. The first feedstock is Paraho crude shale oil, produced in the indirectly heated mode. Whole shale oil was hydrofined in a 2000-hour pilot plant test using ICR 106 catalyst. The results show that shale oil containing 2.2 percent nitrogen can be hydrofined to residuum-free product containing 1 to 2 ppM nitrogen in a single stage. Process design studies indicate that it is preferable to hydrofine the whole shale oil to about 500 ppM nitrogen and then to fractionate the product before conventional downstream processing to produce transportation fuels. The product resembles the fraction of a waxy petroleum crude boiling below 1000/sup 0/F. This report includes yields and product properties determined from the small-scale pilot plant test. A larger-scale pilot plant demonstration run is now in progress.

Sullivan, R.F.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes: Quarterly report, January 1-March 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first Quarterly Report of 1992 on the Catalytic Conversion of Light Alkanes reviews the work done between January 1. 1992 and March 31, 1992 on the Cooperative Agreement. The mission of this work is to devise a new catalyst which can be used in a simple economic process to convert the light alkanes in natural gas to oxygenate products which can either be used as clean-burning, high octane liquid fuels, as fuel components or as precursors to liquid hydrocarbon transportation fuel. During the past quarter we have continued to design, prepare, characterize and test novel catalysts for the mild selective reaction of light hydrocarbons with air or oxygen to produce alcohols directly. These catalysts are designed to form active metal oxo (MO) species and to be uniquely active for the homolytic cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bonds in light alkanes producing intermediates which can form alcohols. We continue to investigate three molecular environments for the active catalytic species that we are trying to generate: electron-deficient porphryinic macrocycles (PHASE I), polyoxometallates (PHASE II), and regular oxidic lattices including zeolites and related structures as well as other molecular surface structures having metal oxo groups (PHASE III).

Biscardi, J.; Bowden, P.T.; Durante, V.A.; Ellis, P.E. Jr.; Gray, H.B.; Gorbey, R.G.; Hayes, R.C.; Hodge, J.; Hughes, M.; Langdale, W.A.; Lyons, J.E.; Marcus, B.; Messick, D.; Merrill, R.A.; Moore, F.A.; Myers, H.K. Jr.; Seitzer, W.H.; Shaikh, S.N.; Tsao, W.H.; Wagner, R.W.; Warren, R.W.; Wijesekera, T.P.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

50,000 mile methanol/gasoline blend fleet study: a progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Seven current production automobiles are being used in a fleet study to obtain operational experience in using 10% methanol/90% gasoline blends as an automotive fuel. Data from chassis dynamometer tests (run according to the 1975--1978 Federal test procedure) have been obtained, showing fuel economy and exhaust emissions of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen, unburned fuel, methanol, and aldehydes. These data are shown for each of the vehicles when operated on the 10% methanol blend, and on unleaded low octane Indolene. Chassis dynamometer tests were run at 5,000-mile intervals during the 35,000 miles accumulated on each of the four 1977 model-year vehicles and at 5,000 and 10,000 mile accumulation levels for each of the three 1978 model-year vehicles. These data show an average decrease in volumetric fuel economy (approx. = 5%) and a reduction in carbon monoxide emissions associated with the use of the 10% methanol blend. Exhaust emission deterioration factors are projected from the Federal test procedure urban cycle data. The most severe driveability problems that have been encountered thus far into the program are related to operating on a phase separated fuel and materials compatibility problems with an elastomer in the air-fuel control hardware of one vehicle.

Stamper, K R

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Catalyst and feedstock effects in the thermochemical conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The thermochemical conversion of biomass feedstocks to liquid transportation fuels can be accomplished by three processes, namely gasification, high-pressure liquefaction, and pyrolysis. In this study, the pyrolysis option is selected which is followed by the catalytic upgrading of pyrolysis vapors to aromatic and olefinic hydrocarbons (PYROCAT process). The aromatics constitute a high-octane gasoline blend, while the olefins can be utilized as feedstocks for various chemicals. The PYROCAT process has been studied in a laboratory-scale fixed-bed catalytic reactor. Consecutive biomass samples were pyrolyzed rapidly in steam at 550{degree}C and atmospheric pressure, and then the pyrolysis vapors were passed over a zeolite catalyst. The catalytic upgrading products were monitored in real-time using molecular-beam mass-spectrometry (MBMS). The yields of major products were estimated from mass-spectral data. Several zeolite catalysts were screened in the upgrading process and promising catalysts with high yields were identified. Feedstocks studied included: the woody biomass species aspen (Populus tremuloides), basswood (Tilia americana), and willow (Salix alba); the three isolated components of wood lignin, xylan and cellulose; and the herbaceous species bagasse (Saccharum spp. hybrid), wheat straw (Triticum aestivum), and Sericea lespedeza (Lespedeza cuneata). 17 refs.

Rejai, B.; Agblevor, F.A.; Evans, R.J.; Wang, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

A Rapid Compression Machine Modelling Study of the Heptane Isomers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previously we have reported on the combustion behavior of all nine isomers of heptane in a rapid compression machine (RCM) with stoichiometric fuel and ''air'' mixtures at a compressed gas pressure of 15 atm. The dependence of autoignition delay times on molecular structure was illustrated. Here, we report some additional experimental work that was performed in order to address unusual results regarding significant differences in the ignition delay times recorded at the same fuel and oxygen composition, but with different fractions of nitrogen and argon diluent gases. Moreover, we have begun to simulate these experiments with detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms. These mechanisms are based on previous studies of other alkane molecules, in particular, n-heptane and iso-octane. We have focused our attention on n-heptane in order to systematically redevelop the chemistry and thermochemistry for this C{sub 7} isomer with the intention of extending our greater knowledge gained to the other eight isomers. The addition of new reaction types, that were not included previously, has had a significant impact on the simulations, particularly at low temperatures.

Silke, E J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes - phase V. Topical report, February 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect

We have made excellent progress toward a practical route from field butanes to MTBE, the oxygenate of choice for high-octane, clean-burning, environmentally acceptable reformulated gasoline. We have evaluated two proprietary process possibilities with a potential commercial partner and have conducted a joint catalyst evaluation program. The first of the two potential processes considered during the past quarter utilizes a two-step route from isobutane to tert-butyl alcohol, TBA. Not only is TBA an intermediate for MTBE production but is equally applicable for ETBE-an oxygenate which utilizes renewable ethanol in its` manufacture. In the two-step process, isobutane is oxidized in a non-catalytic reaction to a roughly equal mixture of TBA and tert-butyl hydroperoxide. TBHP, eq. 1. We have developed an inexpensive new catalyst system based on an electron-deficient macrocyclic metal complex that selectively converts TBHP to TBA, eq. 2, and meets or exceeds all of the process criteria that we have set.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

342

Soot profiles in boundary-layer flames  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Carbon particulate volume fractions and approximate particle size distributions are measured in a free laminar combusting boundary layer for liquid hydrocarbon fuels (n-heptane, iso-octane, cyclohexane, cyclohexene, toluene) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). A multiwavelength laser transmission technique determines a most probable radius and the total particle concentration, which are two parameters in an assumed form for the size distribution. In the combusting boundary layer, a sooting region exists between the pyrolyzing fuel surface and the flame zone. The liquid fuel soot volume fractions, f/sub v/, range from f/sub v/ approx. 10/sup -7/ for n-heptane, a paraffin, to f/sub v approx. 10/sup -5/ for toluene, an aromatic. The PMMA volume fractions, f/sub v/ approx. 5 X 10/sup -7/, are approximately the same as the values previously reported for pool fires. The soot volume fractions increase with height; convection of carbon particles downstream widens the soot region with height. For all fuels tested, the most probable radius is between 20 nm and 50 nm, and it changes only slightly with height and distance from the fuel surface.

Beier, R.A.; Pagni, P.J.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Pemex opts for catalytic dehydrogenation  

SciTech Connect

In the gas-rich areas such as the Middle East, Southeast Asia, Canada, and Mexico, low-cost ethane is the feed of choice for ethylene production. Coproduct production is minimal. Continued growth in demand for propylene, isobutylene, normal butone-1, and butadiene requires that alternate sources of these normally coproduct olefins be developed. Catalytic dehydrogenation, with its high selectivity to the desired olefin, is the logical and economic choice. Mexico is a case in point. It's ethylene production is based on ethane. Demand is rising for propylene and butadiene derivatives, and a potential demand exists for isobutylene to produce octane enhancers to implement an announced lead phase down. Only modest amounts of by-product monoolefin will be available from refining operations. Pemex, the Mexican refining and petrochemical giant, recognized this and started up its first Houdry Catadene /SUP TM/ plant in 1975 at Ciudad Madero to produce 55,000 metric ton/year of butadiene from normal butane. Pemex recently committed to a large (350,000 metric ton/year) propylene-from-propane plant at Morelos based on the Houdry Catofin /SUP TM/ catalytic dehydrogenation process. The plant will supply propylene to a long list of derivative plants (Table 1).

Craig, R.G.; Penny, S.J.; Schwartz, W.A.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Conversion of light naphthas over sulfided nickle erionite  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A natural erionite ore has been exchanged with ammonium and nickel salts to yield a Ni/H erionite catalyst that is active and stable for selectively hydrocracking only the n-paraffins from light straight-run naphthas. The primary product is a C[sup 5+] liquid that is 15-20 octane numbers higher than the feed and a propane- and butane-rich gas by-product. Results from a 110-day pilot plant run demonstrated that a catalyst life of more than 1 year should be possible. Naphthenes, aromatics, and isoparaffins are neither produced nor consumed in this process, resulting in a C[sup 5+] liquid product that is lower in benzene and total aromatics than attainable by catalytic reforming of these feeds. Although no further work is planned with this catalyst, a naphtha-upgrading process based on shape-selective zeolitic hydrocracking could provide an attractive alternative to catalytic reforming or isomerization for these hard to upgrade naphthas. It should be particularly attractive in areas where the by-product propane and butane have good value.

Heck, R.H.; Chen, Nai Y. (Mobil Research and Development Corp., Princeton, NJ (United States). Central Research Laboratory)

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Purification of reformer streams by catalytic hydrogenation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Catalytic Reforming is one of the most important processes to produce high grade motor gasolines. Feedstocks are mainly gasoline and naphtha streams from the crude oil distillation boiling in the range of 212 F to 350 F. By catalytic reforming the octane number of these gasoline components is increased from 40--60 RON to 95--100 RON. Besides isomerization and dehydrocyclization reactions mainly formation of aromatics by dehydrogenation of naphthenes occur. Thus, catalytic reformers within refineries are an important source of BTX--aromatics (benzene, toluene, xylenes). Frequently, high purity aromatics are recovered from these streams using modern extractive distillation or liquid extraction processes, e.g. the Krupp-Koppers MORPHYLANE{reg_sign} process. Aromatics product specifications, notably bromine index and acid wash color, have obligated producers to utilize clay treatment to remove trace impurities of diolefins and/or olefins. The conventional clay treatment is a multiple vessel batch process which periodically requires disposal of the spent clay in a suitable environmental manner. BASF, in close cooperation with Krupp-Koppers, has developed a continuous Selective Catalytic Hydrogenation Process (SCHP) as an alternative to clay treatment which is very efficient, cost effective and environmentally compatible. In the following the main process aspects including the process scheme catalyst and operating conditions is described.

Polanek, P.J. [BASF Corp., Geismar, LA (United States); Hooper, H.M. [Krupp Wilputte Corp., Bridgeville, PA (United States); Mueller, J.; Walter, M. [BASF AG, Ludwigshafen (Germany); Emmrich, G. [Krupp Koppers GmbH, Essen (Germany)

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Fractionation of reformate: A new variant of gasoline production technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Novo-Ufa Petroleum Refinery is the largest domestic producer of the unique high-octane unleaded automotive gasolines AI-93 and AI-95 and the aviation gasolines B-91/115 and B-92. The base component for these gasolines is obtained by catalytic reforming of wide-cut naphtha; this basic component is usually blended with certain other components that are expensive and in short supply: toluene, xylenes, and alkylate. For example, the unleaded gasoline AI-93 has been prepared by blending reformate, alkylate, and toluene in a 65:20:15 weight ratio; AI-95 gasoline by blending alkylate and xylenes in an 80:20 weight ratio; and B-91/115 gasoline by compounding a reformate obtained with light straight-run feed, plus alkylate and toluene, in a 55:35:10 weight ratio. Toluene and xylenes have been obtained by process schemes that include the following consecutive processes: redistillation of straight-run naphtha cuts to segregate the required narrow fraction; catalytic reforming (Platforming) of the narrow toluene-xylene straight-run fraction; azeotropic distillation of the reformate to recover toluene and xylenes. A new technology based on the use of reformate fractions is proposed.

Karakuts, V.N.; Tanatarov, M.A.; Telyashev, G.G. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Conversion of cellulosic wastes to liquid fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The current status and future plans for a project to convert waste cellulosic (biomass) materials to quality liquid hydrocarbon fuels is described. The basic approach is indirect liquefaction, i.e., thermal gasification followed by catalytic liquefaction. The indirect approach results in separation of the oxygen in the biomass feedstock, i.e., oxygenated compounds do not appear in the liquid hydrocarbon fuel product. The process is capable of accepting a wide variety of feedstocks. Potential products include medium quality gas, normal propanol, diesel fuel and/or high octane gasoline. A fluidized bed pyrolysis system is used for gasification. The pyrolyzer can be fluidized with recycle pyrolysis gas, steam or recycle liquefaction system off gas or some combination thereof. Tars are removed in a wet scrubber. Unseparated pyrolysis gases are utilized as feed to a modified Fischer-Tropsch reactor. The liquid condensate from the reactor consists of a normal propanol-water phase and a paraffinic hydrocarbon phase. The reactor can be operated to optimize for either product. The following tasks were specified in the statement of work for the contract period: (1) feedstock studies; (2) gasification system optimization; (3) waste stream characterization; and (4) liquid fuels synthesis. In addition, several equipment improvements were implemented.

Kuester, J.L.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Transportation fuels from synthetic gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Twenty-five experimental Fischer-Tropsch synthesis runs were made with 14 different catalysts or combinations of catalysts using a Berty reactor system. Two catalysts showed increased selectivity to transportation fuels compared to typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. With a catalyst consisting of 5 wt % ruthenium impregnated on a Y zeolite (run number 24), 63 to 70 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the gasoline boiling range. Using a 0.5 wt % ruthenium on alumina catalyst (run number 22), 64 to 78 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the diesel fuel boiling range. Not enough sample was produced to determine the octane number of the gasoline from run number 24, but it is probably somewhat better than typical Fischer-Tropsch gasoline (approx. 50) and less than unleaded gasoline (approx. 88). The diesel fuel produced in run number 22 consisted of mostly straight chained paraffins and should be an excellent transportation fuel without further refining. The yield of transportation fuels from biomass via gasification and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with the ruthenium catalysts identified in the previous paragraph is somewhat less, on a Btu basis, than methanol (via gasification) and wood oil (PERC and LBL processes) yields from biomass. However, the products of the F-T synthesis are higher quality transportation fuels. The yield of transportation fuels via the F-T synthesis is similar to the yield of gasoline via methanol synthesis and the Mobil MTG process.

Baker, E.G.; Cuello, R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

An interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons based on the modified embedded-atom method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we developed an interatomic potential for saturated hydrocarbons using the modified embedded-atom method (MEAM), a semi-empirical many-body potential based on density functional theory and pair potentials. We parameterized the potential by fitting to a large experimental and first-principles (FP) database consisting of 1) bond distances, bond angles, and atomization energies at 0 K of a homologous series of alkanes and their select isomers from methane to n-octane, 2) the potential energy curves of H2, CH, and C2 diatomics, 3) the potential energy curves of hydrogen, methane, ethane, and propane dimers, i.e., (H2)2, (CH4)2, (C2H6)2, and (C3H8)2, respectively, and 5) pressure-volume-temperature (PVT) data of a dense high-pressure methane system with the density of 0.5534 g/cc. We compared the atomization energies and geometries of a range of linear alkanes, cycloalkanes, and free radicals calculated from the MEAM potential to those calculated by other commonly used potentials for hydrocarbons, i....

Nouranian, S; Gwaltney, S R; Baskes, M I; Horstemeyer, M F

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Process design and costing of bioethanol technology: A tool for determining the status and direction of research and development  

SciTech Connect

Bioethanol is a fuel-grade ethanol made from trees, grasses, and waste materials. It represents a sustainable substitute for gasoline in today's passenger cars. Modeling and design of processes for making bioethanol are critical tools used in the US Department of Energy's bioethanol research and development program. The authors use such analysis to guide new directions for research and to help them understand the level at which and the time when bioethanol will achieve commercial success. This paper provides an update on their latest estimates for current and projected costs of bioethanol. These estimates are the result of very sophisticated modeling and costing efforts undertaken in the program over the past few years. Bioethanol could cost anywhere from $1.16 to $1.44 per gallon, depending on the technology and the availability of low cost feedstocks for conversion to ethanol. While this cost range opens the door to fuel blending opportunities, in which ethanol can be used, for example, to improve the octane rating of gasoline, it is not currently competitive with gasoline as a bulk fuel. Research strategies and goals described in this paper have been translated into cost savings for ethanol. Their analysis of these goals shows that the cost of ethanol could drop by 40 cents per gallon over the next ten years by taking advantage of exciting new tools in biotechnology that will improve yield and performance in the conversion process.

Wooley, R.; Ruth, M.; Glassner, D.; Sheehan, J.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Integrated solar receiver/biomass gasifier research  

SciTech Connect

Processes for producing liquid fuels from olefin-rich pyrolysis gases obtained from fast pyrolysis of biomass are being developed by J. Kuester at Arizona State University and J. Diebold at the Naval Weapons Center, China Lake, Calif. In the Diebold process the biomass, carried by steam, is blown through an entrained bed gasifier. The olefins are then separated from the rest of the reaction products and polymerized thermally to gasoline; the other gases are used as fuel for the process. The Kuester process uses a fluidized bed gasifier and a catalytic Fischer-Tropsch reactor which converts the olefins, hydrogen, and carbon monoxide into n-propanol and paraffinic hydrocarbons. The advantages over the Diebold process are shorter residence time and elimination of the gas separation requirement. One disadvantage is the low octane rating of the fuel. As part of the solar thermal program at the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI), an entrained bed reactor/receiver for fast pyrolysis of biomass is being developed for use with either the Diebold or Kuester process. This system is discussed.

Benham, C.; Bergeron, P.; Bessler, G.; Bohn, M.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

DYNAMIC MODELING AND CONTROL OF REACTIVE DISTILLATION FOR HYDROGENATION OF BENZENE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work presents a modeling and control study of a reactive distillation column used for hydrogenation of benzene. A steady state and a dynamic model have been developed to investigate control structures for the column. The most important aspects of this control problem are that the purity of the product streams regarding benzene need to be met. At the same time as little toluene as possible should be converted. The former is a constraint imposed by EPA regulations while the latter is tied to process economics due to the high octane number of toluene. It is required to satisfy both of these objectives even under the influence of disturbances, as the feed composition changes on a regular basis. The dynamic model is used for developing transfer function models of two potential control structures. Pairing of inputs and outputs is performed based upon the Relative Gain Array (RGA) and PI controllers were designed for each control structure. The controller performance was then compared in simulation studies. From our results, control structure 2 performed better than control structure 1. The main advantage of CS2 over CS1 is noticed in the simulation of feed composition disturbance rejection, where CS2 returns all variables back to steady state within 3 hrs while it take CS1 more than 20 hrs to return the temperature variables back to steady state.

Aluko, Obanifemi

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Ignition of Isomers of Pentane: An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon ignition is an important element in many practical combustion systems, including internal combustion engines, detonations, pulse combustors, and flame initiation. The rapid compression machine (RCM) is used frequently to study the kinetics of hydrocarbon autoignition [e.g., 1-7], since the reactive gas temperatures and time histories are similar to those seen in automotive engines during Diesel ignition and end gas autoignition leading to engine knock in spark-ignition engines. The RCM provides a rich environment for study of the theory of hydrocarbon oxidation, including degenerate chain branching, alkylperoxy radical isomerization and effects of thermal feedback [8]. The literature of hydrocarbon oxidation studies in the RCM has been summarized recently [9,10], and many classes of fuels have been studied. Detailed kinetic modeling is another tool available to study hydrocarbon oxidation in the RCM [4,11]. The aim of the present work is to determine experimentally the influence of variations in fuel molecular structure on autoignition, and to use a kinetic model to understand the reasons for those variations. This study is unique in that while other studies have addressed variations in pressure and equivalence ratio on ignition [11], this work addresses effects of variations in fuel molecular structure for all of the isomers of a single fuel formula, pentane, in a RCM. The three isomers of pentane possess many of the structural elements that determine such autoignition characteristics as octane number and variability in cool flame production, so this study will benefit our efforts to describe these effects.

Ribaucour, M; Minetti, R; Sochet, L R; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Effects of Fuel Characteristics on Stoichiometric Spark-Assisted HCCI  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics of fuel lean HCCI operation using a variety of fuels are well known and have been demonstrated using different engine concepts in the past. In contrast, stoichiometric operation of HCCI is less well documented. Recent studies have highlighted the benefits of operating at a stoichiometric condition in terms of load expansion combined with the applicability of three way catalyst technology to reduce NOx emissions. In this study the characterization of stoichiometric HCCI using gasoline-like fuels was undertaken. The fuels investigated are gasoline, a 50 vol% blend of iso-butanol and gasoline (IB50), and an 85% vol blend of ethanol and gasoline (E85). A single cylinder engine operating with direct injection and spark assist combined with a fully variable hydraulic valve actuation system allowed a wide range of operating parameters to be studied. The resultant fuel properties which differed in terms of octane rating, fuel oxygenation and heat of vaporization show that stoichiometric HCCI is possible using a range of fuels but that these fuel characteristics do have some effect on the combustion characteristics. How these fuel properties can enable an increased engine operating envelope to be achieved, in comparison with both fuel lean HCCI and conventional spark ignited combustion, is then discussed.

Weall, Adam J [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Halotolerant, biosurfactant-producing Bacillus species potentially useful for enhanced oil recovery  

SciTech Connect

A biosurfactant-producing Bacillus licheniformis was isolated from oil-field injection water with properties potentially useful for in situ enhanced oil recovery. Conventional miscible flooding procedures use expensive synthetic detergents such as petroleum sulfonates that precipitate in high NaCl brines and adsorb to rock surfaces. The Bacillus sp. produced a biosurfactant when grown at 40 C in a sucrose mineral salts medium containing 5% NaCl. The biosurfactant was produced during the log phase of growth in the presence or absence of either crude oil or hexadecane. The surface tension of a 5% NaCl solution decreased from 74.0 mN/m to 27 mN/m when the surfactant was added. Interfacial tension of a 5% NaCl brine/octane mixture was as low as 0.43 mN/m when measured by a spinning drop tensiometer. The surfactant was extracted by acid precipitation at a pH of 2.0. The extracted surfactant exhibited optimal surface tension-lowering ability in 4-5% NaCl solutions between pH's of 6.0 to 10.0. The addition of calcium up to 340 mg/liter and incubation temperatures up to 100 C did not alter appreciably the surfactant activity. Mobilization of crude oil and oil bank formation occurred in a sandpack column after addition of the biosurfactant. 16 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

Jenneman, G.E.; McInerney, M.J.; Knapp, R.M.; Clark, J.B.; Feero, J.M.; Revus, D.E.; Menzie, D.E.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Summary of Summary of Property Damage Complaints andlor Claims \ P R O J E C T R U L I S O N I - S U M M A R Y O F P R O P E R T Y D A M A G E C O M P L A I N T S A N D / O R C L A I M S AS OF MARCH 31, 1970 'E: The m a t e r i a l contained h e r e i n i s n o t t o be p u b l i c l y d i s t r i b u t e d w i t h o u t t h e p r i o r Office ( ~ E c ) , y o @ oplc-9 - Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 -- Prepared By: % & c n U a i l b 0. Brush Approved: Las Vegas Branch General Adjustment Bureau, Inc. P r o j e c t R u l i s o n Summary o f Property Damage Complaints and/or Claims DISTRIBUTION: H. E. G r i e r , President, CER Geonuclear Corp., Las Vegas, Nev. (4) G. W. Frank, A u s t r a l O i l Co., Houston, Texas (4) W. E. Ogle, LASL, Los Alamos, N. !4. (2) H. L. Reynolds, LRL, Livermore, C a l i f . ( 2 ) Fred Holzer/Gene C. Rizer, LRL, Livermore, C a l i f . ( 2 ) L l o v d A. Lee, J. A. Blume & Assoc.. San Francisco. C

357

Solar Technology Center  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy, Golden Field Office, awarded a grant to the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF) on August 1, 2005 to develop a solar and renewable energy information center. The Solar Technology Center (STC) is to be developed in two phases, with Phase I consisting of all activities necessary to determine feasibility of the project, including design and engineering, identification of land access issues and permitting necessary to determine project viability without permanently disturbing the project site, and completion of a National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) Environmental Assessment. Phase II is the installation of infrastructure and related structures, which leads to commencement of operations of the STC. The STC is located in the Boulder City designated 3,000-acre Eldorado Valley Energy Zone, approximately 15 miles southwest of downtown Boulder City and fronting on Eldorado Valley Drive. The 33-acre vacant parcel has been leased to the Nevada Test Site Development Corporation (NTSDC) by Boulder City to accommodate a planned facility that will be synergistic with present and planned energy projects in the Zone. The parcel will be developed by the UNLVRF. The NTSDC is the economic development arm of the UNLVRF. UNLVRF will be the entity responsible for overseeing the lease and the development project to assure compliance with the lease stipulations established by Boulder City. The STC will be operated and maintained by University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV) and its Center for Energy Research (UNLV-CER). Land parcels in the Eldorado Valley Energy Zone near the 33-acre lease are committed to the construction and operation of an electrical grid connected solar energy production facility. Other projects supporting renewable and solar technologies have been developed within the energy zone, with several more developments in the horizon.

Boehm, Bob

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

358

Western gas sands project status report  

SciTech Connect

The Western Gas Sands Project Plan, Project Implementation Plans and Project Plan Document FY 78 are in various stages of preparation. Information gathering by U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) of the initial data base for many of the project activities is nearing completion. Some base maps are complete and field investigations in the principal areas of interest are being conducted. Research and development by Energy Research Centers and National Laboratories were directed toward new tools and instrumentation systems, rock mechanics experiments, mathematical modeling, and data analysis. The Uinta Basin in Utah and Piceance Basin in Colorado have ongoing massive hydraulic fracture (MHF) experiments in the Upper Cretaceous tight gas formations. These are: CER Corporation, MHF 3; Gas Producing Enterprises, Natural Buttes No. 14, 18, 19, 20; Mobil Oil, F-31-13G; and Rio Blanco Natural Gas, 498-4-1. Colorado Interstate Gas Company has been awarded a contract to determine if productivity in low permeability reservoirs can be improved by reducing the interstitialwater saturation. They will be using two wells, the Sprague No. 1 and Miller No. 1, completed in the Dakota J formation in the Wattenberg Field in north central Colorado. All of the massive hydraulic fracture wells, with the exception of the Pacific Transmission well, have been fractured as planned. The Mobil and GPE No. 14, 18, and 20 wells show significant improvement as compared to original flow rates. The Mobil well is being tested for additional MHF treatments. Sandia Laboratories is continuing their research program in hydraulic fracturing at DOE's Nevada Test Site (NTS).

1977-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure compound experiments confirmed the previous results regarding hydrocarbon reactivity: 1-pentene was the most efficient LNT reductant, followed by toluene. Injection location had minimal impact on the reactivity of these two compounds. Iso-octane was an ineffective LNT reductant, requiring high doses (resulting in high HC emissions) to achieve reasonable NOx conversions. Diesel fuel reactivity was sensitive to injection location, with the best performance achieved through fuel injection downstream of the DOC. This configuration generated large LNT temperature excursions, which probably improved the efficiency of the NOx storage/reduction process, but also resulted in very high HC emissions. The ORNL team demonstrated an LNT desulfation under 'road load' conditions using throttling, EGR, and in-pipe injection of diesel fuel. Flow reactor characterization of core samples cut from the front and rear of the engine-aged LNT revealed complex spatially dependent degradation mechanisms. The front of the catalyst contained residual sulfates, which impacted NOx storage and conversion efficiencies at high temperatures. The rear of the catalyst showed significant sintering of the washcoat and precious metal particles, resulting in lower NOx conversion efficiencies at low temperatures. Further flow reactor characterization of engine-aged LNT core samples established that low temperature performance was limited by slow release and reduction of stored NOx during regeneration. Carbon monoxide was only effective at regenerating the LNT at temperatures above 200 C; propene was unreactive even at 250 C. Low temperature operation also resulted in unselective NOx reduction, resulting in high emissions of both N{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}. During the latter years of the CRADA, the focus was shifted from LNTs to other aftertreatment devices. Two years of the CRADA were spent developing detailed ammonia SCR device models with sufficient accuracy and computational efficiency to be used in development of model-based ammonia injection control algorithms.ORNL, working closely with partners at Navistar and Mi

Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Adelman, Brad [Navistar; Derybowski, Edward [Navistar

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report No. 19, April 1, 1996--June 30, 1996  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of Task I is to prepare and evaluate catalysts and to develop efficient reactor systems for the selective conversion of hydrogen-lean synthesis gas to alcohol fuel extenders and octane enhancers. In Task 1, during this reporting period, we encountered and solved a problem in the analysis of the reaction products containing a small amount of heavy components. Subsequently, we continued with the major thrusts of the program. We analyzed the results from our preliminary studies on the packed-bed membrane reactor using the BASF methanol synthesis catalyst. We developed a quantitative model to describe the performance of the reactor. The effect of varying permeances and the effect of catalyst aging are being incorporated into the model. Secondly, we resumed our more- detailed parametric studies on selected non-sulfide Mo-based catalysts. Finally, we continue with the analysis of data from the kinetic study of a sulfided carbon-supported potassium-doped molybdenum-cobalt catalyst in the Rotoberty reactor. We have completed catalyst screening at UCC. The complete characterization of selected catalysts has been started. In Task 2, the fuel blends of alcohol and unleaded test gas 96 (UTG 96) have been made and tests have been completed. The testing includes knock resistance tests and emissions tests. Emissions tests were conducted when the engine was optimized for the particular blend being tested (i.e. where the engine produced the most power when running on the blend in question). The data shows that the presence of alcohol in the fuel increases the fuel`s ability to resist knock. Because of this, when the engine was optimized for use with alcohol blends, the engine produced more power and lower emission rates.

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report Number 8, 1 July, 1993--30 September, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Task 1, the preparation of catalyst materials, is proceeding actively. At WVU, catalysts based on Mo are being prepared using a variety of approaches to alter the oxidation state and environment of the Mo. At UCC and P, copper-based zinc chromite spinel catalysts will be prepared and tested. The modeling of the alcohol-synthesis reaction in a membrane reactor is proceeding actively. Under standard conditions, pressure drop in the membrane reactor has been shown to be negligible. In Task 2, base case designs had previously been completed with a Texaco gasifier. Now, similar designs have been completed using the Shell gasifier. A comparison of the payback periods or production cost of these plants shows significant differences among the base cases. However, a natural gas only design, prepared for comparison purposes, gives a lower payback period or production cost. Since the alcohol synthesis portion of the above processes is the same, the best way to make coal-derived higher alcohols more attractive economically than natural gas-derived higher alcohols is by making coal-derived syngas less expensive than natural gas-derived syngas. The maximum economically feasible capacity for a higher alcohol plant from coal-derived syngas appears to be 32 MM bbl/yr. This is based on consideration of regional coal supply in the eastern US, coal transportation, and regional product demand. The benefits of economics of scale are illustrated for the base case designs. A value for higher alcohol blends has been determined by appropriate combination of RVP, octane number, and oxygen content, using MTBE as a reference. This analysis suggests that the high RVP of methanol in combination with its higher water solubility make higher alcohols more valuable than methanol.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

The development of multi-objective optimization model for excess bagasse utilization: A case study for Thailand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a multi-objective optimization model is proposed as a tool to assist in deciding for the proper utilization scheme of excess bagasse produced in sugarcane industry. Two major scenarios for excess bagasse utilization are considered in the optimization. The first scenario is the typical situation when excess bagasse is used for the onsite electricity production. In case of the second scenario, excess bagasse is processed for the offsite ethanol production. Then the ethanol is blended with an octane rating of 91 gasoline by a portion of 10% and 90% by volume respectively and the mixture is used as alternative fuel for gasoline vehicles in Thailand. The model proposed in this paper called 'Environmental System Optimization' comprises the life cycle impact assessment of global warming potential (GWP) and the associated cost followed by the multi-objective optimization which facilitates in finding out the optimal proportion of the excess bagasse processed in each scenario. Basic mathematical expressions for indicating the GWP and cost of the entire process of excess bagasse utilization are taken into account in the model formulation and optimization. The outcome of this study is the methodology developed for decision-making concerning the excess bagasse utilization available in Thailand in view of the GWP and economic effects. A demonstration example is presented to illustrate the advantage of the methodology which may be used by the policy maker. The methodology developed is successfully performed to satisfy both environmental and economic objectives over the whole life cycle of the system. It is shown in the demonstration example that the first scenario results in positive GWP while the second scenario results in negative GWP. The combination of these two scenario results in positive or negative GWP depending on the preference of the weighting given to each objective. The results on economics of all scenarios show the satisfied outcomes.

Buddadee, Bancha [National Center of Excellence for Environmental and Hazardous Waste Management, Chulalongkorn University, Bangkok 10330 (Thailand)], E-mail: bancha_eng@yahoo.com; Wirojanagud, Wanpen [Research Center of Environmental and Hazardous Substance Management, Department of Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Khon Kaen University, Khon Kaen 40002 (Thailand)], E-mail: wanpen@kku.ac.th; Watts, Daniel J. [Center for Environmental Engineering and Science, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, New Jersey 07102 (United States)], E-mail: daniel.watts@njit.edu; Pitakaso, Rapeepan [Department of Industrial Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Ubonratchathani University, Ubonratchathani 34190 (Thailand)], E-mail: enrapepi@ubu.ac.th

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

363

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

364

Emissions and performance evaluation of a dedicated compressed natural gas saturn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The use of compressed natural gas (CNG) as a transportation fuel has been identified as one strategy that can help ameliorate some problems, which include a growing dependence on imported oil (and all its ramifications) and the persistent contributions that mobile sources make to urban air pollution, associated with the use of conventional petroleum fuels. The attributes and limitations of CNG as a fuel for spark-ignition engines have been presented by others. The attributes are associated with its high octane rating, low cost relative to other alternative fuels, its availability, the absence of running and diurnal evaporative emissions, and its demonstrated potential for producing extremely low exhaust emissions-particularly if the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted are expressed in terms of reactivity adjusted non-methane organic gases (RANMOG). The limitations associated with the use of CNG include its limited refueling infrastructure, the cost of refueling facilities, the cost of on-board fuel storage tanks, and its relatively low energy density. Because one impediment to CNG use is the cost associated with producing a CNG-powered vehicle, a study was initiated at the University of Tennessee under sponsorship by the Saturn Corporation to determine how a CNG vehicle (specifically, a 1991 Saturn SL1) could be engineered so it could be produced with a minimal impact on the production of the base vehicle. The present study was undertaken to further investigate the emissions reduction potential of the Saturn CNG vehicle. In the previous study the role of exhaust gas recirculation was not thoroughly investigated. Those involved in the study agreed that the NO{sub x} levels could be brought down well below California ULEV levels without increasing either the non-methane organic gases or the CO levels.

Hodgson, J.W.; Taylor, J.D. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Petroleum Refinery Catalytic Reforming -- Cutting High Energy Costs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon reforming involves a variety of chemical reactions at high temperatures and pressures in the presence of suitable catalysts. The conversion of naptha to high octane aromatics requires high energy to initiate and sustain the reaction at temperatures of 850-950oF. Hydrogen - rich off - gases are fired in combinations of process furnaces. Heat is transferred to hydrocarbon fluids by radiation, principally. Feed or return stream temperatures determine the need for convection sections. It is essential that the operation and maintenance of these furnaces be optimized to minimize production costs. This paper describes the performance testing and evaluation of a set of ten refinery furnaces used to thermally drive several reforming reactors and to regenerate catalysts. Firing rates provide an input of 216.2 x 106 Btu/hr. to the furnaces, at $1.90 per 106 Btu. The units are fitted with multiple natural draft burners. There is insufficient turbulence and swirl in the burners. Operators manually set up the burners with excessive airflows for normal, full-load firing. These furnaces represent production limits. Products of combustion exhaust at high thermal levels - the range is from 985-1700oF. The mixed gases flow through a "waste heat" boiler, or they bypass the boiler and enter a single stack. Steam generation at 150 psig averages 38,200 lb/hr. Heat is wasted via the bypass at a rate of 41.1x106 Btu /hr. at 1240oF. When airflows are reduced (to 15% excess air) the loss will be 18.7x106 Btu/hr. at 1180oF. Installation of a second, parallel waste heat boiler will result in a saving of l3.4x106 Btu/hr. Energy savings at this furnace complex will be equivalent to $628,700 per year. Investment costs were estimated to be less than $250,000 for the proposed heat trap addition.

Viar, W. L.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

A comparison of ethanol and butanol as oxygenates using a direct-injection, spark-ignition (DISI) engine.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study was designed to evaluate a 'what if' scenario in terms of using butanol as an oxygenate in place of ethanol in an engine calibrated for gasoline operation. No changes to the stock engine calibration were performed for this study. Combustion analysis, efficiency, and emissions of pure gasoline, 10% ethanol, and 10% butanol blends in a modern direct-injection four-cylinder spark-ignition engine were analyzed. Data were taken at engine speeds of 1000 rpm up to 4000 rpm with load varying from 0 N m (idle) to 150 N m. Relatively minor differences existed between the three fuels for the combustion characteristics such as heat release rate, 50% mass fraction burned, and coefficient of variation in indicated mean effective pressure at low and medium engine loads. However at high engine loads the reduced knock resistance of the butanol blend forced the engine control unit to retard the ignition timing substantially, compared with the gasoline baseline and, even more pronounced, compared with the ethanol blend. Brake specific volumetric fuel consumption, which represented a normalized volumetric fuel flow rate, was lowest for the gasoline baseline fuel due to the higher energy density. The 10% butanol blend had a lower volumetric fuel consumption compared with the ethanol blend, as expected, based on energy density differences. The results showed little difference in regulated emissions between 10% ethanol and 10% butanol. The ethanol blend produced the highest peak specific NO{sub x} due to the high octane rating of ethanol and effective antiknock characteristics. Overall, the ability of butanol to perform equally as well as ethanol from an emissions and combustion standpoint, with a decrease in fuel consumption, initially appears promising. Further experiments are planned to explore the full operating range of the engine and the potential benefits of higher blend ratios of butanol.

Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A.; McConnell, S. (Energy Systems)

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

368

Devices to improve the performance of a conventional two-stroke spark ignition engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents research efforts made in three different phases with the objective of improving the fuel economy of and reducing exhaust emissions from conventional, carbureted, two-stroke spark ignition (SI) engines, which are widely employed in two-wheel transportation in India. A review concerning the existing two-stroke engine technology for this application is included. In the first phase, a new scavenging system was developed and tested to reduce the loss of fresh charge through the exhaust port. In die second phase, the following measures were carried out to improve the combustion process: (1) using an in-cylinder catalyst, such as copper, chromium, and nickel, in the form of coating; (2) providing moderate thermal insulation in the combustion chamber, either by depositing thin ceramic material or by metal inserts; (3) developing a high-energy ignition system; and (4) employing high-octane fuel, such as methanol, ethanol, eucalyptus oil, and orange oil, as a blending agent with gasoline. Based on the effectiveness of the above measures, an optimized design was developed in the final phase to achieve improved performance. Test results indicate that with an optimized two-stroke SI engine, the maximum percentage improvement in brake thermal efficiency is about 31%, together with a reduction of 3400 ppm in hydrocarbons (HC) and 3% by volume of carbon monoxide (CO) emissions over the normal engine (at 3 kW, 3000 rpm). Higher cylinder peak pressures (3-5 bar), lower ignition delay (2-4{degrees}CA){degrees} and shorter combustion duration (4-10 {degrees}CA) are obtained. The knock-limited power output is also enhanced by 12.7% at a high compression ratio (CR) of 9:1. The proposed modifications in the optimized design are simple, low-cost and easy to adopt for both production and existing engines.

Poola, R.B. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Nagalingam, B.; Gopalakrishnan, K.V. [Indian Inst. of Tech., Madras (India)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Ethanol Demand in United States Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline  

SciTech Connect

Ethanol competes with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to satisfy oxygen, octane, and volume requirements of certain gasolines. However, MTBE has water quality problems that may create significant market opportunities for ethanol. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has used its Refinery Yield Model to estimate ethanol demand in gasolines with restricted use of MTBE. Reduction of the use of MTBE would increase the costs of gasoline production and possibly reduce the gasoline output of U.S. refineries. The potential gasoline supply problems of an MTBE ban could be mitigated by allowing a modest 3 vol percent MTBE in all gasoline. In the U.S. East and Gulf Coast gasoline producing regions, the 3 vol percent MTBE option results in costs that are 40 percent less than an MTBE ban. In the U.S. Midwest gasoline producing region, with already high use of ethanol, an MTBE ban has minimal effect on ethanol demand unless gasoline producers in other regions bid away the local supply of ethanol. The ethanol/MTBE issue gained momentum in March 2000 when the Clinton Administration announced that it would ask Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to provide the authority to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of MTBE; to ensure that air quality gains are not diminished as MTBE use is reduced; and to replace the existing oxygenate requirement in the Clean Air Act with a renewable fuel standard for all gasoline. Premises for the ORNL study are consistent with the Administration announcement, and the ethanol demand curve estimates of this study can be used to evaluate the impact of the Administration principles and related policy initiatives.

Hadder, G.R.

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Characterization of sorbent properties of soil organic matter and carbonaceous geosorbents using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes  

SciTech Connect

Nonspecific interactions and modes (i.e., adsorption vs absorption) of sorption by noncondensed, amorphous organic phases (here termed organic matter; OM) in soils and by rigid, aromatic, and condensed phases (termed carbonaceous geosorbents; CGs) were investigated using n-alkanes and cycloalkanes as molecular probes. Sorption isotherms of and cyclooctane from water for seven CGs (charcoal, lignite coke, activated carbon, graphite, partially oxidized graphite, diesel soot, bituminous coal), four sorbents with a predominance of OM (lignite, peat, two sapric soils), and two soils containing OM and high amounts of CGs were measured in batch systems. The peat and the sapric soils showed extensively linear sorption, while the CGs exhibited highly nonlinear and strong (K{sub oc} values being up to 105 times those for the OM-rich materials at low concentrations) sorption for the alkanes studied, showing that enhanced sorption by CGs can occur to completely apolar sorbates that do not undergo any specific interaction. The n-octane-to-cyclooctane sorption coefficient ratios for adsorption to CGs were {ge}1, being distinctly different from those for absorption to the OM-rich materials. The measured sorption isotherms and the CG compositions in the soils determined by quantitative petrography analysis suggest, however, that CGs occurring in soils may be far less effective sorbents than the reference CGs used in the sorption experiments at least for nonspecifically interacting sorbates, probably because of competitive sorption and/or pore blocking by natural OM. The presented approaches and results offer a basis for interpreting sorption data for other organic compounds, as nonspecific interactions and sorption modes are relevant for any compound. 47 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

Satoshi Endo; Peter Grathwohl; Stefan B. Haderlein; Torsten C. Schmidt [Eberhard-Karls-University of Tuebingen, Tuebingen (Germany). Center for Applied Geoscience (ZAG)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

372

Fuel property effects on engine combustion processes. Annual report, January 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our engine studies have concentrated on 2 areas of interest to autoignition and emissions from engines. In the first, we investigated the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on the reactivity and autoignition behavior of 87 PRF. In the second study, we continued work on the effects of blending ethers on the reactivity and autoignition of a primary reference fuel blend, 87 PRF, with emphasis placed on the chemical interactions between ethers and the baseline fuel. The effects of nitric oxide (NO) on the reactivity and autoignition behavior of 87 PRF were examined in our research engine under motored conditions at compression ratios of 5.2 and 8.2. The most significant conclusions of our study are: (1) nitric oxide does interact with the hydrocarbon oxidation at conditions typically experienced by the end gas in a fired engine; (2) the effect is complex and, depending on the reaction environment, the same concentration of NO can produce dramatically different results. These results are particularly important given the fact that residual fractions and recycled exhaust gases in spark ignited engines typically result in about 200--600 ppm of NO in the unburned charge. The octane enhancing ethers, MTBE, ETBE, TAME, and DIPE, were blended into 87 PRF at a constant 0 atom fraction of 1.94% in the fuel mixtures and the mixtures were tested under motored conditions at our new compression ratio of 8.2. This new compression ratio allows studies on autoignition behaviors of 87 PRF with and without ethers. The results showed that, when using 87 PRF/ether mixtures, reactivity was significantly reduced as indicated by the higher inlet temperature required to initiate reactivity, significantly lower maximum CO concentration and the significantly higher inlet temperature required for autoignition.

Cernansky, N.P.

1994-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

373

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Research continued on coal-based, thermally stable, jet fuels. Significant progress has been made on the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in highly stressed fuels, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection. Gas chromatography is not able to detect compounds with {>=}6 fused aromatic rings, but such compounds can be identified using the HPLC method. The concentration of such compounds is low in comparison to aromatics of 1-3 rings, but the role of the large compounds in the formation of solid deposits may be crucial in determining the thermal stability of a fuel. The unusual properties of fluid fuels in the near-critical region appear to have significant effects on their thermal decomposition reactions. This issue has been investigated in the present reporting period using n-tetradecane as a model compound for fuel decomposition. Temperature-programmed retention indices are very useful for gas chromatographic and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of coal and petroleum derived jet fuels. We have demonstrated this in the identification of components in two JP-8 fuels and their liquid chromatographic fractions. The role of activated carbon surfaces as catalysts in the thermal stressing of jet fuel was investigated using n-dodecane and n-octane as model compounds. In some cases the reactions were spiked with addition of 5% decalin to test the ability of the carbon to catalyze the transformation of decalin to naphthalene. We have previously shown that benzyl alcohol and 1,4-benzenedimethanol are effective stabilizers at temperatures {>=}400{degrees}C for jet fuels and the model compound dodecane. The addition of ethanol to hydrocarbon/benzyl alcohol mixtures has a significant effect on the thermal stabilization of jet fuels above 400{degrees}C. Ethanol appears to function by reducing the benzaldehyde formed during the degradation of the benzyl alcohol. This reduction regenerates the benzyl alcohol.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in a slurry reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The April 1990 Alternative Fuels Proposal to the Department of Energy involved the development of new technology, based on the liquid phase process, for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, fuel additives, and fuel intermediates. The objective of this work was to develop a slurry reactor based process for the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The isobutene can serve as a feedstock for the high octane oxygenated fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl either (MTBE). Alumina catalysts were investigated because of their wide use as a dehydration catalyst. Four commercially available alumina catalysts (Catapal B, Versal B, Versal GH, and Al-3996R) were evaluated for both activity and selectivity to the branched olefin. All four catalysts demonstrated conversions greater than 80% at 290 C, while conversions of near 100% could be obtained at 330 C. The reaction favors low pressures and moderate to low space velocities. A yield of 0.90 mole isobutene per mole reacted isobutanol or better was obtained at conversions of 60--70% and higher. From 75 to 98% conversion, the four catalysts all provide isobutene yields ranging from 0.92 to 0.94 with the maximum occurring around 90% conversion. At low conversions, the concentration of diisobutyl ether becomes significant while the concentration of linear butenes is essentially a linear function of isobutanol conversion. Doping the catalyst with up to 0.8 wt % potassium showed a modest increase in isobutene selectivity; however, this increase was more than offset by a reduction in activity. Investigations using a mixed alcohols feed (consistent with isobutanol synthesis from syngas) demonstrated a small increase in the C4 iso-olefin selectivity over that observed for a pure isobutanol feed. 55 refs.

Latshaw, B.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Raman Scattering Sensor for Control of the Acid Alkylation Process in Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect

Gasoline refineries utilize a process called acid alkylation to increase the octane rating of blended gasoline, and this is the single most expensive process in the refinery. For process efficiency and safety reasons, the sulfuric acid can only be used while it is in the concentration range of 98 to 86 %. The conventional technique to monitor the acid concentration is time consuming and is typically conducted only a few times per day. This results in running higher acid concentrations than they would like to ensure that the process proceeds uninterrupted. Maintaining an excessively high acid concentration costs the refineries millions of dollars each year. Using SBIR funding, Process Instruments Inc. has developed an inline sensor for real time monitoring of acid concentrations in gasoline refinery alkylation units. Real time data was then collected over time from the instrument and its responses were matched up with the laboratory analysis. A model was then developed to correlate the laboratory acid values to the Raman signal that is transmitted back to the instrument from the process stream. The instrument was then used to demonstrate that it could create real-time predictions of the acid concentrations. The results from this test showed that the instrument could accurately predict the acid concentrations to within ~0.15% acid strength, and this level of prediction proved to be similar or better then the laboratory analysis. By utilizing a sensor for process monitoring the most economic acid concentrations can be maintained. A single smaller refinery (50,000 barrels/day) estimates that they should save over $120,000/year, with larger refineries saving considerably more.

Uibel, Rory, H.; Smith, Lee M.; Benner, Robert, E.

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

376

Synthetic Studies Toward Selected Members of the Pyrrole-imidazole Alkaloids: Axinellamine, Konbuacidin and Palau' amine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The pyrrole imidazole alkaloids (PIA) is an ever-growing family of structurally related natural products isolated from several species of sponges which now features more than one hundred memebrs. Their complex molecular architectures, and in some cases, significant biological activities, have made these alkaloids the synthetic targets of a number of research groups across the world. In our approach, following early biosynthetic proposal by Kinnel and Scheuer and Al-Mourabit and Potier, it was envisioned that several of these alkaloids, namely palauamine, axinellamine, konbuacidin, styloguanidine and massadine, could be derived from a common chlorocyclopentane precursor through different modes of intramolecular cyclization. Building on the work done previously in our research group by Dr. Anja Dilley, Dr. Paul Dransfield, and Dr. Shaohui Wang, my investigations led to the synthesis of the angular aza-triquinane core of axinellamine and the peculiar transazabicyclo[ 3.3.0]octane core of palauamine. In my further studies mono- and bis-pyrrole advanced intermediates were synthesized that contain the complete carbon framework of the target natural products. However, attempts to induce the pivotal, potentially biomimetic cyclizations expected to deliver the cores of the target alkaloids proved to be rather challenging, resulting in inconsistent and irreproducible results and leading to the exploration of an alternative, abiotic approach. My efforts in this direction resulted in the synthesis of a pentacyclic enamine precursor to styloguanidine and a pentacyclic carbinolamine suitable for the synthesis of palauamine. Final attempts to complete the target natural products were however unsuccessful.

Zancanella, Manuel

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Refining and upgrading of synfuels from coal and oil shales by advanced catalytic processes. Quarterly report, July--September 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this program is to determine the feasibility and estimate the economics of hydropreocessing four synthetic fuels to distillate fuels, including high octane gasoline, using presently available technology. The feedstocks include shale oil and three coal-derived synthetic crudes. The first feedstock is Paraho crude shale oil, produced in the indirectly heated mode. Pilot plant studies of hydrofining of whole shale oil with ICR 106 catalyst have been completed. The product resembles the fraction of a waxy petroleum crude boiling below 1000/sup 0/F. There is no 1100/sup 0/F+ residuum. A 3500-hour pilot plant run showed that the catalyst fouling rate is low and demonstrated that a commercial length run is feasible. However, a guard bed is necessary ahead of the catalyst bed to remove arsenic and iron which can cause plugging. Hydrofined shale oil is an excellent feed for a catalytic cracker. Pilot plant studies show that the 650/sup 0/F+ fraction of hydrofined shale oil is very similar to hydrofined Middle Eastern vacuum gas oils in its performance in a catalytic cracker. Process design studies based on pilot plant results indicate that it is desirable to hydrofine the whole shale oil to a nitrogen content of about 500 ppM and then to fractionate the product before conventional downstream processing to produce transportation fuels. An alternate scheme for shale oil processing is the coking of the shale oil followed by hydrofinishing of the coker distillate. Preliminary results appear promising. The second feedstock is solvent refined coal. Studies of the hydrofining of a 50/50 blend of SRC and creosote were continued. A run of 1100 hours was achieved with ICR 106 catalyst without the plugging problem that had plagued an earlier test. The catalyst deactivated at a relatively rapid rate.

Sullivan, R.F.; Rudy, C.E.; Green, D.C.; Chen, H.C.

1977-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Short-time Evolution of Alkane-in-Water Nanoemulsions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The stability of alkane-in-water nanoemulsions during the sub-stationary regime is studied by means of Emulsion Stability Simulations (ESS). The effects of Ostwald ripening, flocculation, coalescence, gravity, and hydration forc- es are considered. According to these calculations flocculation and coalescence are predominant during the first few seconds after the preparation of the emulsion. This favors the generation of a right-skewed Drop Size Distribu- tion (DSD). As the system evolves, the drops grow larger and more repulsive causing a slow down of the flocculation process. In the case of dodecane (C12) and hexadecane (C16) the referred phenomena, reinforce the ripening trend to subvert the initial DSD variation, producing a meta-stable distribution which is preserved during several minutes. After this time, Ostwald ripening dominates: the skirt of the distribution changes progressively from right-skewed to left-skewed. Consistent with these changes, the cube average radius of the emulsion increases rapidly at first, but progressively diminishes generating a concave-downward curve that stabilizes asymptotically. In the case of dodecane and hexadecane the complete dissolution of the drops promoted by ripening is prevented at all times due to coalescence. In the case of octane (C8) a substantial amount of drops is lost by dissolution, forbidding the attain- ment of a stable DSD. In all cases the molecular exchange only favors a decrease of the average radius as a function of time. It is the elimination of drops either by dissolution or coalescence which causes an increase of the average radius of the emulsion.

German Urbina-Villalba; Kareem Rahn-Chique

2013-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

379

Effects of engine speed, fueling rate, and combustion phasing on the thermal stratification required to limit HCCI knocking intensity.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal stratification has the potential to reduce pressure-rise rates and allow increased power output for HCCI engines. This paper systematically examines how the amount of thermal stratification of the core of the charge has to be adjusted to avoid excessive knock as the engine speed and fueling rate are increased. This is accomplished by a combination of multi-zone chemical-kinetics modeling and engine experiments, using iso-octane as the fuel. The experiments show that, for a low-residual engine configuration, the pressure traces are self-similar during changes to the engine speed when CA50 is maintained by adjusting the intake temperature. Consequently, the absolute pressure-rise rate measured as bar/ms increases proportionally with the engine speed. As a result, the knocking (ringing) intensity increases drastically with engine speed, unless counteracted by some means. This paper describes how adjustments of the thermal width of the in-cylinder charge can be used to limit the ringing intensity to 5 MW/m2 as both engine speed and fueling are increased. If the thermal width can be tailored without constraints, this enables smooth operation even for combinations of high speed, high load, and combustion phasing close to TDC. Since large alterations of the thermal width of the charge are not always possible, combustion retard is considered to reduce the requirement on the thermal stratification. The results show that combustion retard carries significant potential since it amplifies the benefit of a fixed thermal width. Therefore, the thermal stratification required for operation with an acceptable knocking intensity can be decreased substantially by the use of combustion retard. This enables combinations of high engine speed and high fueling rate even for operation with the naturally occurring thermal stratification. However, very precise control of the combustion phasing will likely be required for such operation.

Sjoberg, Magnus; Dec, John E.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Effects of Fuel Characteristics on Stoichiometric Spark-Assisted HCCI  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The characteristics of fuel lean HCCI operation using a variety of fuels are well known and have been demonstrated using different engine concepts in the past. In contrast, stoichiometric operation of HCCI is less well documented. Recent studies have highlighted the benefits of operating at a stoichiometric condition in terms of load expansion combined with the applicability of three way catalyst technology to reduce NOx emissions. In this study the characterization of stoichiometric HCCI using gasoline-like fuels was undertaken. The fuels investigated are gasoline, a 50 vol% blend of iso-butanol and gasoline (IB50), and an 85% vol blend of ethanol and gasoline (E85). A single cylinder engine operating with direct injection and spark assist combined with a fully variable hydraulic valve actuation system allowed a wide range of operating parameters to be studied. This included the effects of negative valve overlap duration, intake valve closing and valve lift. Furthermore, the interaction between fuel injection timing and spark and how they can affect the required valve timing to achieve stoichiometric HCCI combustion are also studied. A comprehensive combustion and emissions analysis is conducted using gasoline, IB50 and E85 at an engine speed of 2000rpm over a range of operating loads. The resultant fuel properties which differed in terms of octane rating, fuel oxygenation and heat of vaporization show that stoichiometric HCCI is possible using a range of fuels but that these fuel characteristics do have some effect on the combustion characteristics. How these fuel properties can enable an increased engine operating envelope to be achieved, in comparison with both fuel lean HCCI and conventional spark ignited combustion, is then discussed.

Weall, Adam J [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Assessment of ether and alcohol fuels from coal. Volume 2. Technical report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A unique route for the indirect liquefaction of coal to produce transportation fuel has been evaluated. The resultant fuel includes alkyl tertiary alkyl ethers and higher alcohols, all in the gasoline boiling range. When blended into gasoline, the ether fuel provides several advantages over the lower alcohols: (1) lower chemical oxygen content, (2) less-severe water-separation problems, and (3) reduced front-end volatility effects. The ether fuel also has high-octane quality. Further, it can be utilized as a gasoline substitute in all proportions. Production of ether fuel combines several steps, all of which are or have been practiced on an industrial scale: (1) coal gasification, (2) gas cleanup and shift to desired H/sub 2/:CO ratio, (3) conversion of synthesis gas to isobutanol, methanol, and higher alcohols, (4) separation of alcohols, (5) chemical dehydration of isobutanol to isobutylene, and (6) etherification of isobutylene with methanol. A pilot-plant investigation of the isobutanol synthesis step was performed. Estimates of ether-fuel manufacturing costs indicate this process route is significantly more costly than synthesis of methanol. However, the fuel performance features provide incentive for developing the necessary process and catalyst improvements. Co-production of higher-molecular-weight co-solvent alcohols represents a less-drastic form of methanol modification to achieve improvement in the performance of methanol-gasoline blends. Costs were estimated for producing several proportions of methanol plus higher alcohols from coal. Estimated fuel selling price increases regularly but modestly with higher alcohol content.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI  

SciTech Connect

The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect

The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

Andile B. Mzinyati [Sasol Technology Research and Development, Sasolburg (South Africa). Fischer-Tropsch Refinery Catalysis

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

385

Contribution of liver mitochondrial membrane-bound glutathione transferase to mitochondrial permeability transition pores  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We recently reported that the glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membranes (mtMGST1) is activated by S-glutathionylation and the activated mtMGST1 contributes to the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) pore and cytochrome c release from mitochondria [Lee, K.K., Shimoji, M., Quazi, S.H., Sunakawa, H., Aniya, Y., 2008. Novel function of glutathione transferase in rat liver mitochondrial membrane: role for cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Toxcol. Appl. Pharmacol. 232, 109-118]. In the present study we investigated the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS), generator gallic acid (GA) and GST inhibitors on mtMGST1 and the MPT. When rat liver mitochondria were incubated with GA, mtMGST1 activity was increased to about 3 fold and the increase was inhibited with antioxidant enzymes and singlet oxygen quenchers including 1,4-diazabicyclo [2,2,2] octane (DABCO). GA-mediated mtMGST1 activation was prevented by GST inhibitors such as tannic acid, hematin, and cibacron blue and also by cyclosporin A (CsA). In addition, GA induced the mitochondrial swelling which was also inhibited by GST inhibitors, but not by MPT inhibitors CsA, ADP, and bongkrekic acid. GA also released cytochrome c from the mitochondria which was inhibited completely by DABCO, moderately by GST inhibitors, and somewhat by CsA. Ca{sup 2+}-mediated mitochondrial swelling and cytochrome c release were inhibited by MPT inhibitors but not by GST inhibitors. When the outer mitochondrial membrane was isolated after treatment of mitochondria with GA, mtMGST1 activity was markedly increased and oligomer/aggregate of mtMGST1 was observed. These results indicate that mtMGST1 in the outer mitochondrial membrane is activated by GA through thiol oxidation leading to protein oligomerization/aggregation, which may contribute to the formation of ROS-mediated, CsA-insensitive MPT pore, suggesting a novel mechanism for regulation of the MPT by mtMGST1.

Hossain, Quazi Sohel [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pharmacology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Ulziikhishig, Enkhbaatar; Lee, Kang Kwang [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pharmacology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Yamamoto, Hideyuki [Department of Biochemistry, School of Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan); Aniya, Yoko [Laboratory of Molecular Genetics and Pharmacology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa 903-0215 (Japan)], E-mail: yaniya@med.u-ryukyu.ac.jp

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first-stage (when observed) and second-stage ignition delay times and of heat release rate. The experimental and computational results are used to gain insight into low and intermediate temperature processes during gasoline ignition.

Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

387

Investigation of Knock limited Compression Ratio of Ethanol Gasoline Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ethanol offers significant potential for increasing the compression ratio of SI engines resulting from its high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. A study was conducted to determine the knock limited compression ratio of ethanol gasoline blends to identify the potential for improved operating efficiency. To operate an SI engine in a flex fuel vehicle requires operating strategies that allow operation on a broad range of fuels from gasoline to E85. Since gasoline or low ethanol blend operation is inherently limited by knock at high loads, strategies must be identified which allow operation on these fuels with minimal fuel economy or power density tradeoffs. A single cylinder direct injection spark ignited engine with fully variable hydraulic valve actuation (HVA) is operated at WOT conditions to determine the knock limited compression ratio (CR) of ethanol fuel blends. The geometric compression ratio is varied by changing pistons, producing CR from 9.2 to 13.66. The effective CR is varied using an electro-hydraulic valvetrain that changed the effective trapped displacement using both Early Intake Valve Closing (EIVC) and Late Intake Valve Closing (LIVC). The EIVC and LIVC strategies result in effective CR being reduced while maintaining the geometric expansion ratio. It was found that at substantially similar engine conditions, increasing the ethanol content of the fuel results in higher engine efficiency and higher engine power. These can be partially attributed to a charge cooling effect and a higher heating valve of a stoichiometric mixture for ethanol blends (per unit mass of air). Additional thermodynamic effects on and a mole multiplier are also explored. It was also found that high CR can increase the efficiency of ethanol fuel blends, and as a result, the fuel economy penalty associated with the lower energy content of E85 can be reduced by about a third. Such operation necessitates that the engine be operated in a de-rated manner for gasoline, which is knock-prone at these high CR, in order to maintain compatibility. By using EIVC and LIVC strategies, good efficiency is maintained with gasoline, but power is reduced by about 34%.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Youngquist, Adam D [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Moore, Wayne [Delphi; Foster, Matthew [Delphi; Confer, Keith [Delphi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect

New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well established and uncertainties still remain in the mechanism. This is especially true in the low temperature regime (< 850K). In these conditions, the toluene reactivity is too low to be conveniently investigated. Nonetheless, gasoline surrogates work in the engine at low temperatures, because of the presence of very reactive alkanes. The effect of these component interactions have to be taken into account. This work's aim is to present the model activity carried out by two different research groups, comparing the main pathways and results, matching data carried out in different devices both for pure toluene and mixtures. This is the starting point for a further activity to improve the two kinetic schemes.

Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

389

Propane vehicles : status, challenges, and opportunities.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Propane as an auto fuel has a high octane value and has key properties required for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. To operate a vehicle on propane as either a dedicated fuel or bi-fuel (i.e., switching between gasoline and propane) vehicle, only a few modifications must be made to the engine. Until recently propane vehicles have commonly used a vapor pressure system that was somewhat similar to a carburetion system, wherein the propane would be vaporized and mixed with combustion air in the intake plenum of the engine. This leads to lower efficiency as more air, rather than fuel, is inducted into the cylinder for combustion (Myers 2009). A newer liquid injection system has become available that injects propane directly into the cylinder, resulting in no mixing penalty because air is not diluted with the gaseous fuel in the intake manifold. Use of a direct propane injection system will improve engine efficiency (Gupta 2009). Other systems include the sequential multi-port fuel injection system and a bi-fuel 'hybrid' sequential propane injection system. Carbureted systems remain in use but mostly for non-road applications. In the United States a closed-loop system is used in after-market conversions. This system incorporates an electronic sensor that provides constant feedback to the fuel controller to allow it to measure precisely the proper air/fuel ratio. A complete conversion system includes a fuel controller, pressure regulator valves, fuel injectors, electronics, fuel tank, and software. A slight power loss is expected in conversion to a vapor pressure system, but power can still be optimized with vehicle modifications of such items as the air/fuel mixture and compression ratios. Cold start issues are eliminated for vapor pressure systems since the air/fuel mixture is gaseous. In light-duty propane vehicles, the fuel tank is typically mounted in the trunk; for medium- and heavy-duty vans and trucks, the tank is located under the body of the vehicle. Propane tanks add weight to a vehicle and can slightly increase the consumption of fuel. On a gallon-to-gallon basis, the energy content of propane is 73% that of gasoline, thus requiring more propane fuel to travel an equivalent distance, even in an optimized engine (EERE 2009b).

Rood Werpy, M.; Burnham, A.; Bertram, K.; Energy Systems

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

390

A jet fuel surrogate formulated by real fuel properties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An implicit methodology based on chemical group theory to formulate a jet aviation fuel surrogate by the measurements of several combustion related fuel properties is tested. The empirical formula and derived cetane number of an actual aviation fuel, POSF 4658, have been determined. A three component surrogate fuel for POSF 4658 has been formulated by constraining a mixture of n-decane, iso-octane and toluene to reproduce the hydrogen/carbon ratio and derived cetane number of the target fuel. The validity of the proposed surrogate is evaluated by experimental measurement of select combustion properties of POSF 4658, and the POSF 4658 surrogate. (1)A variable pressure flow reactor has been used to chart the chemical reactivity of stoichiometric mixtures of POSF 4658/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} and POSF 4658 surrogate/O{sub 2}/N{sub 2} at 12.5 atm and 500-1000 K, fixing the carbon content at 0.3% for both mixtures. (2)The high temperature chemical reactivity and chemical kinetic-molecular diffusion coupling of POSF 4658 and POSF 4658 surrogate have been evaluated by measurement of the strained extinction limit of diffusion flames. (3)The autoignition behavior of POSF 4658 and POSF 4658 surrogate has been measured with a shock tube at 674-1222 K and with a rapid compression machine at 645-714 K for stoichiometric mixtures of fuel in air at pressures close to 20 atm. The flow reactor study shows that the character and extent of chemical reactivity of both fuels at low temperature (500-675 K) and high temperature (900 K+) are extremely similar. Slight differences in the transition from the end of the negative temperature coefficient regime to hot ignition are observed. The diffusion flame strained extinction limits of the fuels are observed to be indistinguishable when compared on a molar basis. Ignition delay measurements also show that POSF 4658 exhibits NTC behavior. Moreover, the ignition delays of both fuels are also extremely similar over the temperature range studied in both shock tube and rapid compression machine experiments. A chemical kinetic model is constructed and utilized to interpret the experimental observations and provides a rationale as to why the real fuel and surrogate fuel exhibit such similar reactivity. (author)

Dooley, Stephen; Won, Sang Hee; Chaos, Marcos; Heyne, Joshua; Ju, Yiguang; Dryer, Frederick L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Kumar, Kamal; Sung, Chih-Jen [School of Engineering, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Wang, Haowei; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY (United States); Santoro, Robert J.; Litzinger, Thomas A. [Propulsion Engineering Research Center, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Experimental and theoretical investigation of nucleation and growth of atmospheric aerosols  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aerosol particles have profound impacts on human health, atmospheric radiation, and cloud microphysics and these impacts are strongly dependent on particle sizes. However, formation and growth of atmospheric particles are currently not well understood. In this work, laboratory and theoretical studies have been performed to investigate the formation and growth of atmospheric particles. The first two parts of the dissertation are a laboratory investigation of new particle formation and growth, and a theoretical study of atmospheric molecular complexes and clusters. The nucleation rate was considerably enhanced in the presence of cis-pinonic acid and ammonia. The composition of the critical cluster was estimated from the dependence of the nucleation rate on the precursor concentration and the time evolution of the clusters was then simulated using molecular dynamic simulations. Results from quantum chemical calculations and quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) reveal that formation of strong hydrogen bonding between an organic acid and sulfuric acid is likely responsible for a reduction of the nucleation barrier by modifying the hydrophobic properties of the organic acid and allowing further addition of hydrophilic species (e.g., H2SO4, H2O, and possibly NH3) to the hydrophilic side of the clusters. This promotes growth of the nascent cluster to overcome the nucleation barrier and thus enhances the nucleation in the atmosphere. The last part of this dissertation is the laboratory investigation of heterogeneous interactions of atmospheric carbonyls with sulfuric acid. Direct measurement has been performed to investigate the heterogeneous uptake of atmospheric carbonyls on sulfuric acid. Important parameters have been obtained from the time-dependent or timeindependent uptake profiles. The results indicated that the acid-catalyzed reactions of larger aldehydes (e.g. octanal and 2, 4-hexadienal) in sulfuric acid solution were attributed to aldol condensation in high acidity. However such reactions do not contribute much to secondary organic aerosol (SOA) formation due to the low acidity under tropospheric conditions. On the other hand, heterogeneous reactions of light dicarbonyl such as methylglyoxal likely contribute to SOA formation in slightly acidic media. The reactions of methylglyoxal in the atmospheric aerosol-phase involve hydration and subsequent polymerization, which are dependent on the hygroscopicity, rather than the acidity of the aerosols.

Zhao, Jun

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Fundamental kinetic modeling of the catalytic reforming process  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a fundamental kinetic model for the catalytic reforming process has been developed. The complex network of elementary steps and molecular reactions occurring in catalytic reforming has been generated through a computer algorithm characterizing the various species by vectors and Boolean relation matrices. The algorithm is based on the fundamental chemistry occurring on both acid and metal sites of the catalyst. Rates are expressed for each of the elementary steps involved in the transformation of the intermediates. The Hougen-Watson approach is used to express the rates of the molecular reactions occurring on the metal sites of the catalyst. The single event approach is used to account for the effect of structure of reactant and activated complex on the rate coefficients of the elementary steps occurring on the acid sites. This approach recognizes that even if the number of elementary steps is very large they belong to a very limited number of types, and therefore it is possible to express the kinetics of elementary steps by a reduced number of parameters. In addition, the single event approach leads to rate coefficients that are independent of the feedstock, due to their fundamental chemical nature. The total number of parameters at isothermal conditions is 45. To estimate these parameters, an objective function based upon the sum of squares of the residuals was minimized through the Marquardt algorithm. Intraparticle mass transport limitations and deactivation of the catalyst by coke formation are considered in the model. Both the Wilke and the Stefan-Maxwell approaches were used to calculate the concentration gradients inside of the particle. The heterogeneous kinetic model was applied in the simulation of the process for typical industrial conditions for both axial and radial flow fixed bed reactors. The influence of the main process variables on the octane number and reformate volume was investigated and optimal conditions were obtained. Additional aspects studied with the kinetic model are the reduction of aromatics, mainly benzene. The results from the simulations agree with the typical performance found in the industrial process.

Sotelo-Boyas, Rogelio

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray-Optimized DIG, VCR and Variable Valvetrain  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of biofuels for internal combustion engines has several well published advantages. The biofuels, made from biological sources such as corn or sugar cane, are renewable resources that reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. Fuels from agricultural sources can therefore reduce a countries energy dependency on other nations. Biofuels also have been shown to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere compared to traditional fossil based fuels. Because of these benefits several countries have set targets for the use of biofuels, especially ethanol, in their transportation fuels. Small percentages of ethanol are common place in gasoline but are typically limited to 5 to 8% by volume. Greater benefits are possible from higher concentrations and some countries such as the US and Sweden have encouraged the production of vehicles capable of operating on E85 (85% denatured ethanol and 15% gasoline). E85 capable vehicles are normally equipped to run the higher levels of ethanol by employing modified fuel delivery systems that can withstand the highly corrosive nature of the alcohol. These vehicles are not however equipped to take full advantage of ethanol's properties during the combustion process. Ethanol has a much higher blend research octane number than gasoline. This allows the use of higher engine compression ratios and spark advance which result in more efficient engine operation. Ethanol's latent heat of vaporization is also much higher that gasoline. This higher heat of vaporization cools the engine intake charge which also allows the engine compression ratio to be increased even further. An engine that is optimized for operation on high concentrations of ethanol therefore will have compression ratios that are too high to avoid spark knock (pre-ignition) if run on gasoline or a gasoline/ethanol blend that has a low percentage alcohol. An engine was developed during this project to leverage the improved evaporative cooling and high octane of E85 to improve fuel economy and offset E85's lower energy content. A 2.0 L production Direct Injection gasoline, (DIg) engine employing Dual Independent Cam Phasing, (DICP) and turbo charging was used as the base engine. Modified pistons were used to increase the geometric compression ratio from 9.2:1 to 11.85:1 by modifying the pistons and adding advanced valvetrain to proved control of displacement and effective compression ratio through valve timing control. The advanced valvetrain utilized Delphi's two step valvetrain hardware and intake cam phaser with increased phasing authority of 80 crank angle degrees. Using this hardware the engine was capable of operating knock free on all fuels tested from E0-E85 by controlling effective compression ratio using a Late Intake Valve Closing, (LIVC) strategy. The LIVC strategy results in changes in the trapped displacement such that knock limited torque for gasoline is significantly lower than E85. The use of spark retard to control knock enables higher peak torque for knock limited fuels, however a loss in efficiency results. For gasoline and E10 fuels, full effective displacement could not be reached before spark retard produced a net loss in torque. The use of an Early Intake Valve Closing, (EIVC) strategy resulted in an improvement of engine efficiency at low to mid loads for all fuels tested from E0- E85. Further the use of valve deactivation, to a single intake valve, improved combustion stability and enabled throttle-less operation down to less than 2 bar BMEP. Slight throttling to trap internal residual provided additional reductions in fuel consumption. To fully leverage the benefits of E85, or ethanol blends above E10, would require a vehicle level approach that would take advantage of the improved low end torque that is possible with E85. Operating the engine at reduced speeds and using advanced transmissions (6 speeds or higher) would provide a responsive efficient driving experience to the customer. The vehicle shift and torque converter lockup points for high ethanol blends could take advantage of the significant efficiency ad

Keith Confer; Harry Husted

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

394

Phytoplankton distributions and species composition across the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during two flow regimes of the Mississippi River  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phytoplankton abundance and species composition were examined over the Texas-Louisiana continental shelf during May 1992 and May 1993, as part of a phytoplankton diversity study funded by the Office of Naval Research. Phytoplankton distribution data were assessed in relation to the hydrography and physical processes on the shelf, which were studied as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX A). Phytoplankton group distributions from 1992 , which was an average flow year for the Mississippi River, were compared with observations from 1993, which was a record flow year. Water samples for phytoplankton determinations were examined at 22 locations on cross-shelf transacts from 90.5' to 94.0'W longitude. Samples were collected at the surface and the chlorophyll maximum from Niskin bottles attached to a Sea-Bird SBE911plus CTD, preserved in 1% glutaraldehyde, and analyzed using the Uterm6hl method and the inverted-microscope technique. Unique phytoplankton distributions and regionspecific hydrography and physical processes were found on the inner, middle, and outer shelf during both flow regimes. Some differences were found in May 1993 due to the record river discharge. In 1992 and 1993, the inner shelf was diatom dominated, and was characterized by the highest nutrient and lowest safety values. River discharge and associated nutrients were focused by the localized downcoast flow predominant on the inner shelf area during the month of May. Water column stability decreased moving from the eastern part of the shelf to the western part in May 1992. The opposite regime was present in May 1993. Inner shelf nutrient concentrations in May 1993 were approximately double those in May 1992. The increased river discharge in 1993 caused a dramatic shift in dominant diatom species to Skeletonema costatum (Grevifle) Grunow, which is found in a range of salinities, temperatures, and depths. Chain-forming diatom and others were predominant in both years. On the middle shelf, the presence of tychopelagic diatoms reflected the possibility of benthic regeneration of nutrients and resuspension into the upper water column. This flux from the benthos supported the phytoplankton community on the middle shelf, where a near-bottom chlorophyll maximum was found. Lower concentrations of phytoplankton were present on the middle shelf than the inner shelf during both years. The upper 30-70 m of the water column on the middle shelf were found to be oligotrophic, so smaller or more motile cers such as dinoflagenates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids became more dominant. The outer shelf upper water column was nutrient-poor as well during both years, and dinoflageuates, microflagellates, and coccolithophorids were even more dominant than on the middle shelf. The diatom population decreased more moving from the middle to the outer shelf. Effects of a warm core Loop Current eddy were evident on the outer shelf area. Upwelling processes shallower than 100 m may provide a means of supporting the phytoplankton population at the chlorophyll maximum on the outer shelf. The location of the increased volume of river water across the shelf in May 1993 was identified based on the increase in overall phytoplankton abundance in May 1993.

Bontempi, Paula Susan

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Optimally Controlled Flexible Fuel Powertrain System  

SciTech Connect

A multi phase program was undertaken with the stated goal of using advanced design and development tools to create a unique combination of existing technologies to create a powertrain system specification that allowed minimal increase of volumetric fuel consumption when operating on E85 relative to gasoline. Although on an energy basis gasoline / ethanol blends typically return similar fuel economy to straight gasoline, because of its lower energy density (gasoline ~ 31.8MJ/l and ethanol ~ 21.1MJ/l) the volume based fuel economy of gasoline / ethanol blends are typically considerably worse. This project was able to define an initial engine specification envelope, develop specific hardware for the application, and test that hardware in both single and multi-cylinder test engines to verify the ability of the specified powertrain to deliver reduced E85 fuel consumption. Finally, the results from the engine testing were used in a vehicle drive cycle analysis tool to define a final vehicle level fuel economy result. During the course of the project, it was identified that the technologies utilized to improve fuel economy on E85 also enabled improved fuel economy when operating on gasoline. However, the E85 fueled powertrain provided improved vehicle performance when compared to the gasoline fueled powertrain due to the improved high load performance of the E85 fuel. Relative to the baseline comparator engine and considering current market fuels, the volumetric fuel consumption penalty when running on E85 with the fully optimized project powertrain specification was reduced significantly. This result shows that alternative fuels can be utilized in high percentages while maintaining or improving vehicle performance and with minimal or positive impact on total cost of ownership to the end consumer. The justification for this project was two-fold. In order to reduce the US dependence on crude oil, much of which is imported, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) under the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The RFS specifies targets for the amount of renewable fuel to be blended into petroleum based transportation fuels. The goal is to blend 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels into transportation fuels by 2022 (9 billion gallons were blended in 2008). The RFS also requires that the renewable fuels emit fewer greenhouse gasses than the petroleum fuels replaced. Thus the goal of the EPA is to have a more fuel efficient national fleet, less dependent on petroleum based fuels. The limit to the implementation of certain technologies employed was the requirement to run the developed powertrain on gasoline with minimal performance degradation. The addition of ethanol to gasoline fuels improves the fuels octane rating and increases the fuels evaporative cooling. Both of these fuel property enhancements make gasoline / ethanol blends more suitable than straight gasoline for use in downsized engines or engines with increased compression ratio. The use of engine downsizing and high compression ratios as well as direct injection (DI), dual independent cam phasing, external EGR, and downspeeding were fundamental to the fuel economy improvements targeted in this project. The developed powertrain specification utilized the MAHLE DI3 gasoline downsizing research engine. It was a turbocharged, intercooled, DI engine with dual independent cam phasing utilizing a compression ratio of 11.25 : 1 and a 15% reduction in final drive ratio. When compared to a gasoline fuelled 2.2L Ecotec engine in a Chevrolet HHR, vehicle drive cycle predictions indicate that the optimized powertrain operating on E85 would result in a reduced volume based drive cycle fuel economy penalty of 6% compared to an approximately 30% penalty for current technology engines.

Duncan Sheppard; Bruce Woodrow; Paul Kilmurray; Simon Thwaite

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

396

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

397

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

398

PROGRESS RELATING TO CIVILIAN APPLICATIONS DURING JANUARY, 1959  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal-conductivity measurements are in progress on an unirradiated, unclad, natural U specimen. Data are presented on thermal conductivity measurements performed on UO/sub 2/. The creep properties of annealed and of 15% cold-worked Zircaloy-2 are being studied. A program was initiated to evaluate loss-of-coolant incidents in the PRTR by means of simulation on a digital computer. Research on the casting of hollow Al-35 wt. extrusion billets is reported. Further refinement of the method developed for the analysis of Mg in cement is in progress. The infrared and gaschromatography analysis of irradiated dodecane, decane, cetane. and octane, and their urea complexes, were continued. The manner in which U metal solidifies in cylindrical graphite molds is under study. Work has continued on development of a stabilized hightemperature nuclear fuel capable of operation in either oxidizing or reducing atmospheres. Progress in the stud of potential fueled moderators has continued with the determination of hydrogen-absorption isotherms for the Zr-25 wt. alloy. The effect of fast-neutron flux on the mechanical properties of AISI Tvpe 347 stainless steel are being determined and evaluated. The forging of Nb-U alloys is reported. Thorium-uranium alloys are being studied for the purpose of developing improved corrosion resistance and irradiation stability of the alloy by means of alloying and control of processing variables. The causes of fission-gas loss from refractory fuel materials is being investigated. Cermet fuel materials consisting of from 60 to 90 vol. % U0/sub 2/, UN, or UC dispersed in a stainless steel or Nb matrix are being investigated. The gas-pressure bonding technique is being investigated for cladding and bonding Nband Mo-base fuel elements and assemblies. Dispersion fuels consisting of UC and UN dispersed in stainless steel were irradiated in the WTR. Stress-cycling tests were continued on Inconel specimens at 1300 and 1500 F, cycled at 1 cps. The investigation of temperature and frequency dependence of fatigue properties of INOR-8 alloy is being investigated, Studies of U compounds and the mechanism of thermal migration of hydrogen in zirconium are in progress. In the research on thermal migration of H/sub 2/ in Zr, new data on the diffusion coefficients of H/sub 2/ in beta Zr were obtained. Data are presented on postirradiation examination of three pairs of fueled-graphite spheres. The evaluation of materials of construction for use in the Darex, SulfexThorex, Zirflex. and Fluoride-Volatility processes of nuclear fuel recovery was continued. Uranium carbide containing 5 wt. % carbon is being studied as a fuel for the SRE. A study of the properties of Ta-W alloys is continuing. A compartmentalized flat-plate Zircaloy2-clad fuel element containing UO/sub 2/ cores is being considered for PWR Core-2. Techniques for the fabrication of graphite-matrix fuel cores containing 20 vol. % UC in form of UC and UC/sub 2/ are reported. (For preceding period see BMI-1307.) (W.L.H.)

Dayton, R.W.; Tipton, C.R. Jr.

1959-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Characterization of the Sources and Concentrations of Formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds in four new manufactured houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concentrations of formaldehyde, 52 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total VOCs (TVOC) were measured in four new manufactured houses on three occasions over a period of approximately nine months following completion of their construction. The houses were furnished, but unoccupied, model homes produced by a single U.S. manufacturer. Several of the houses incorporated interior finish materials with lower VOC emissions than standard materials. One house had a modified ventilation system. Ventilation rates were measured concurrently with the collection of air samples. A steady-state mass-balance model was used to calculate the area-specific emission rates of the target compounds and TVOC. The emissions of formaldehyde and VOCs from a specimen of plywood used as the floor sheeting were additionally quantified. The median formaldehyde concentration in the four houses was 37 parts-per-billion ( ppb). The formaldehyde concentrations were all less than the most restrictive guideline for this compound of 50 ppb. The concentrations of many of the target VOCs were low. Thirty-one of the VOCs had median concentrations that were at or below 1 ppb. Seven of the compounds were among the most abundant VOCs in all four houses. These compounds were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, ethylene glycol, hexanal, 2-butanone, and acetic acid. The concentrations of the aldehydes, hexanal, octanal and nonanal, in the four houses were either near or exceeded their respective odor thresholds. The concentrations of acetic acid increased with time. In the final sampling period, the odor threshold for acetic acid was exceeded in all of the houses. The range of TVOC concentrations in the four houses was 0.8 to 3 mg m{sup -3}, with a median value of 1.6 mg m{sup -3}. These concentrations were somewhat lower than TVOC concentrations previously measured in several new site-built houses, and the median concentration was only about twice the typical value for existing residences. The house with the modified ventilation system and several lower emitting materials had consistently low TVOC concentrations that were near 1 mg m{sup -3}. There were no large decreases with time in the emission rates of the individual VOCs or TVOC during the course of the study. However, the emission rates were often lowest in the final sampling with the notable exception of the acetic acid emission rate that increased with time. The source of the aldehydes was most likely engineered wood products, such as the plywood floor sheeting and possibly other structural or interior components. The source of the acetic acid was uncertain. The effects of the source substitution treatments were measurable but turned out to be relatively minor due to the predominance of other sources.

Hodgson, A.T.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Experimental and analytical studies of hydrocarbon yields under dry-, steam-, and steam with propane-distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experimental and simulation studies -conducted at the Department of Petroleum Engineering at Texas A&M University - confirm oil production is accelerated when propane is used as an additive during steam injection. To better understand this phenomenon, distillation experiments were performed using seven-component synthetic oil consisting of equal weights of the following alkanes: n-C5, n-C6, n-C7, n-C8, n-C9, nC10, and n-C15. For comparison purposes, three distillation processes were investigated: dry-, steam-, and steam-propane-distillation, the latter at a propane:steam mass ratio of 0.05. The injection rate of nitrogen during dry-and steam-distillation was the same as that of propane during steam-propane distillation, 0.025 g/min, with steam injection rate kept at 0.5 g/min. The distillation temperatures ranged from 115C to 300C and were increased in steps of 10C. The cell was kept at each temperature plateau (cut) for 30 minutes. Distillation pressures ranged from 0 psig for dry distillation to 998 psig for steam-and steam-propane distillation. The temperature-pressure combination used represented 15C superheated steam conditions. Distillate samples were collected at each cut, and the volume and weight of water and hydrocarbon measured. In addition, the composition of the hydrocarbon distillate was measured using a gas chromatograph. Main results of the study may be summarized as follows. First, the hydrocarbon yield at 125C is highest with steam-propane distillation (74 wt%) compared to steam distillation (58 wt%), and lowest with dry distillation (36 wt%). This explains in part the oil production acceleration observed in steam-propane displacement experiments. Second, the final hydrocarbon yield at 300C however is the same for the three distillation processes. This observation is in line with the fact that oil recoveries were very similar in steam- and steam-propane displacement experiments. Third, based on the yields of individual hydrocarbon components, steam-propane distillation lowers the apparent boiling points of the hydrocarbons significantly. This phenomenon may be the most fundamental effect of propane on hydrocarbon distillation, which results in a higher yield during steam-propane distillation and oil production acceleration during steam-propane displacement. Fourth, experimental K-values are higher in distillations with steam-propane for the components n-hexane, n-heptane, n-octane, and n-nonane. Fifth, vapor fugacity coefficients for each component are higher in distillations with steam-propane than with steam. Finally, Gibbs excess energy is overall lower in distillations with steam-propane than with steam. The experimental results clearly indicate the importance of distillation on oil recovery during steam-or steam-propane injection. The experimental procedure and method of analysis developed in this study (for synthetic oil) will be beneficial to future researchers in understanding the effect of propane as steam additive on actual crude oils.

Ramirez Garnica, Marco Antonio

2003-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Collaboration on DIII-D Five Year Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) plan for fusion research on the DIII-D Tokamak, located at General Atomics (GA) in San Diego, California, in the time period FY04-FY08. This document is a companion document to the DIII-D Five-Year Program Plan; which hereafter will be referred to as the ''D3DPP''. The LLNL Collaboration on DIII-D is a task-driven program in which we bring to bear the full range of expertise needed to complete specific goals of plasma science research on the DIII-D facility. This document specifies our plasma performance and physics understanding goals and gives detailed plans to achieve those goals in terms of experimental leadership, code development and analysis, and diagnostic development. Our program is designed to be consistent with the long-term mission of the DIII-D program as documented in the D3DPP. The overall DIII-D Program mission is ''to establish the scientific basis for the optimization of the tokamak approach to fusion energy production''. LLNL Magnetic Fusion Energy (MFE) supports this mission, and we contribute to two areas of the DIII-D program: divertor physics and advanced tokamak (AT) physics. We lead or contribute to the whole cycle of research: experimental planning, diagnostic development, execution of experiments, and detailed analysis. We plan to continue this style in the next five years. DIII-D has identified three major research themes: AT physics, confinement physics, and mass transport. The LLNL program is part of the AT theme: measurement of the plasma current profile, and the mass transport theme: measurement and modeling of plasma flow. In the AT area, we have focused on the measurement and modeling of the current profile in Advanced Tokamak plasmas. The current profile, and it's effect on MHD stability of the high-{beta} ''AT'' plasma are at the heart of the DIII-D program. LLNL has played a key role in the development of the Motional Stark Effect (MSE) diagnostic. Starting with a single channel, the system has grown to 40 channels with three separate systems. We have continually developed new calibration techniques, with a goal of accuracy in the magnetic field pitch angle measurements of {approx}0.1 degree. Measurements of the radial electric field E{sub r} have also been achieved. In the next five year period, GA plans on rotating one of the neutral beams so that it injects opposite to the sense of the plasma current (counter-injection). This enables two orthogonal MSE views of the neutral beam so that J(r) and E{sub r} can be obtained directly. In addition, the new views can be optimized so that increased spatial resolution will be obtained. Our plan is to install these new systems when the neutral beam is reoriented, and continue to provide high-resolution, ''state of the art'' current profile measurements for the DIII-D AT program. In the divertor physics area, our goal is the development of a model of the scrapeoff layer (SOL) and divertor plasmas which is benchmarked with data. We have identified the need for measurements of SOL flow and ion temperature. Working with GA, we are proposing a new edge Charge Exchange Recombination (CER) diagnostic. The understanding of SOL flow is important for understanding the tritium inventory problem in ITER. In addition, using plasma flow to ''entrain'' impurities in the divertor region (enabling a low density radiative divertor) is the current AT divertor heat flux control scenario. We are also augmenting our edge modeling capabilities with a coupled UEDGE (fluid code) with the BOUT (edge turbulence) code. Further work, funded through LLNL theory, is planned to develop a kinetic treatment of the edge. All of these efforts contribute to the understanding of the edge pedestal in the tokamak, an important AT and ITER topic. A secondary goal is the understanding of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs), which are also important in the ITER design, as the repetitive bursts of heat flux can cause increased erosion and damage to the divertor plates. The modeling effort, particularly the kinetic treatme

Allen, S

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

Peter J. Tijrn

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

403

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

404

Oxygenates vs. synthesis gas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methanol synthesis from H{sub 2}/CO has been carried out at 7.6 MPa over zirconia-supported copper catalysts. Catalysts with nominal compositions of 10/90 mol% and 30/70 mol% Cu/ZrO{sub 2} were used in this study. Additionally, a 3 mol% cesium-doped 10/90 catalyst was prepared to study the effect of doping with heavy alkali, and this promoter greatly increased the methanol productivity. The effects of CO{sub 2} addition, water injection, reaction temperature, and H{sub 2}/C0 ratio have been investigated. Both CO{sub 2} addition to the synthesis gas and cesium doping of the catalyst promoted methanol synthesis, while inhibiting the synthesis of dimethyl ether. Injection of water, however, was found to slightly suppress methanol and dimethyl ether formation while being converted to CO{sub 2} via the water gas shift reaction over these catalysts. There was no clear correlation between copper surface area and catalyst activity. Surface analysis of the tested samples revealed that copper tended to migrate and enrich the catalyst surface. The concept of employing a double-bed reactor with a pronounced temperature gradient to enhance higher alcohol synthesis was explored, and it was found that utilization of a Cs-promoted Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a first lower temperature bed and a Cs-promoted ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst as a second high-temperature bed significantly promoted the productivity of 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol) from H{sub 2}/CO synthesis gas mixtures. While the conversion of CO to C{sub 2+} oxygenates over the double-bed configuration was comparable to that observed over the single Cu-based catalyst, major changes in the product distribution occurred by the coupling to the zinc chromite catalyst; that is, the productivity of the C{sub 1}-C{sub 3} alcohols decreased dramatically, and 2-methyl branched alcohols were selectively formed. The desirable methanol/2-methyl oxygenate molar ratios close to 1 were obtained in the present double-bed system that provides the feedstock for the synthesis of high octane and high cetane ethers, where the isobutanol productivity was as high as 139 g/kg cat/hr. Higher alcohol synthesis has been investigated over a Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at temperatures higher (up to 703K) than those previously utilized, and no sintering of the catalyst was observed during the short-term testing. However, the higher reaction temperatures led to lower CO conversion levels and lower yield of alcohols, especially of methanol, because of equilibrium limitations. With the double catalyst bed configuration, the effect of pressure in the range of 7.6--12.4 MPa on catalyst activity and selectivity was studied. The upper bed was composed of the copper-based catalyst at 598K, and the lower bed consisted of a copper-free Cs-ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at a high temperature of 678K. High pressure was found to increase CO conversion to oxygenated products, although the increase in isobutanol productivity did not keep pace with that of methanol. It was also shown that the Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst could be utilized to advantage as the second-bed catalyst at 613--643K instead of the previously used copper-free Cs-ZnO/ Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst at higher temperature, With double Cs/Cu/ZnO/Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts, high space time yields of up to 202 g/kg cat/hr, with high selectivity to isobutanol, were achieved.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman; Alessandra Beretta; Maria A. Burcham; Qun Sun; Yeping Cai; Biswanath Roy

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Rate constants for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-temperature rate constant experiments on OH with the five large (C{sub 5}-C{sub 8}) saturated hydrocarbons n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2,2,3,3-TMB), n-pentane, n-hexane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane (2,3-DMB) were performed with the reflected-shock-tube technique using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. Single-point determinations at {approx}1200 K on n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-TMB, n-hexane, and 2,3-DMB were previously reported by Cohen and co-workers; however, the present work substantially extends the database to both lower and higher temperature. The present experiments span a wide temperature range, 789-1308 K, and represent the first direct measurements of rate constants at T > 800 K for n-pentane. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of {approx}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high OH concentration detection sensitivity permitted pseudo-first-order analyses for unambiguously measuring rate constants. The experimental results can be expressed in Arrhenius form in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} as follows: K{sub OH+n-heptane} = (2.48 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1927 {+-} 69 K)/T] (838-1287 K); k{sub OH+2,2,3,3-TMB} = (8.26 {+-} 0.89) x 10{sup -11} exp[(-1337 {+-} 94 K)/T] (789-1061 K); K{sub OH+n-pentane} = (1.60 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1903 {+-} 146 K)/T] (823-1308 K); K{sub OH+n-hexane} = (2.79 {+-} 0.39) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-2301 {+-} 134 K)/T] (798-1299 K); and k{sub OH+2,3-DMB} = (1.27 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1617 {+-} 118 K)/T] (843-1292 K). The available experimental data, along with lower-T determinations, were used to obtain evaluations of the experimental rate constants over the temperature range from {approx}230 to 1300 K for most of the title reactions. These extended-temperature-range evaluations, given as three-parameter fits, are as follows: k{sub OH+n-heptane} = 2.059 x 10{sup -5}T{sup 1.401} exp(33 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (241-1287 K); k{sub OH+2,2,3,3-TMB} = 6.835 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.886} exp(-365 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (290-1180 K); k{sub OH+n-pentane} = 2.495 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.649} exp(80 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (224-1308 K); k{sub OH+n-hexane} = 3.959 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.218} exp(443 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (292-1299 K); and k{sub OH+2,3-DMB} = 2.287 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.958} exp(365 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (220-1292 K). The experimental data and the evaluations obtained for these five larger alkanes in the present work were used along with prior data/evaluations obtained in this laboratory for H abstractions by OH from a series of smaller alkanes (C{sub 3}?C{sub 5}) to devise rate rules for abstractions from various types of primary, secondary, and tertiary H atoms. Specifically, the current scheme was applied with good success to H abstractions by OH from a series of n-alkanes (n-octane through n-hexadecane). The total rate constants using this group scheme for reactions of OH with selected large alkanes are given as three-parameter fits in this article. The rate constants for the various abstraction channels in any large n-alkane can also be obtained using the groups listed in this article. The present group scheme serves to reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for OH + alkane reactions.

Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z