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1

Pool octanes via oxygenates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent antipollution regulations placed on automobile exhaust gases with consequent reduction or complete lead ban from motor gasoline result in octane shortage at many manufacturing sites. Attractive solutions to this problem, especially in conjunction with abundant methanol supplies, are the hydration and etherification of olefins contained in light product streams from cracking unit or produced by field gas dehydrogenation. A comparison is made between oxygenates octane-volume pool contributions and established refinery technologies. Process reviews for bulk manufacture of fuel-grade isopropanol (IPA), secondary butanol (SBA), tertiary butanol (TBA), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) are presented together with the characteristic investment and operating data. The implantation of these processes into a typical FCCU refinery complex with the resulting octane-pool improvement possibilities is descried.

Prezelj, M.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Competitive Energy Reduction (CER) Campaign at the University of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Competitive Energy Reduction (CER) Campaign at the University of Texas Scientists and Engineers Reduction Campaign at the University of Texas Energy Reduced by Enlisting Volunteers and Promoting .................................................................................................................................................10 Appendix A ­ Lab Energy Audit Checklist

Hofmann, Hans A.

3

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Breakout Session 1C-Fostering...

4

An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and...

5

Liquid-liquid equilibria for the ternary systems sulfolane + octane + benzene, sulfolane + octane + toluene and sulfolane + octane + p-xylene  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sulfolane is widely used as a solvent for the extraction of aromatic hydrocarbons. Ternary phase equilibrium data are essential for the proper understanding of the solvent extraction process. Liquid-liquid equilibrium data for the systems sulfolane + octane + benzene, sulfolane + octane + toluene and sulfolane + octane + p-xylene were determined at 298.15, 308.15, and 318.15 K. Tie line data were satisfactorily correlated by the Othmer and Tobias method. The experimental data were compared with the values calculated by the UNIQUAC and NRTL models. Good quantitative agreement was obtained with these models. However, the calculated values based on the NRTL model were found to be better than those based on the UNIQUAC model.

Lee, S.; Kim, H. [Seoul National Univ. (Korea, Republic of). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mixture Preparation Chemical Properties Pressure & Temperature (air preheating, Turbo charging, EGR & compression ratio) Octane rating, cetane rating (Fuels & Additives)...

7

Estimate octane numbers using an enhanced method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved model, based on the Twu-Coon method, is not only internally consistent, but also retains the same level of accuracy as the previous model in predicting octanes of gasoline blends. The enhanced model applies the same binary interaction parameters to components in each gasoline cut and their blends. Thus, the enhanced model can blend gasoline cuts in any order, in any combination or from any splitting of gasoline cuts and still yield the identical value of octane number for blending the same number of gasoline cuts. Setting binary interaction parameters to zero for identical gasoline cuts during the blending process is not required. The new model changes the old model`s methodology so that the same binary interaction parameters can be applied between components inside a gasoline cut as are applied to the same components between gasoline cuts. The enhanced model is more consistent in methodology than the original model, but it has equal accuracy for predicting octane numbers of gasoline blends, and it has the same number of binary interaction parameters. The paper discusses background, enhancement of the Twu-Coon interaction model, and three examples: blend of 2 identical gasoline cuts, blend of 3 gasoline cuts, and blend of the same 3 gasoline cuts in a different order.

Twu, C.H.; Coon, J.E. [Simulation Sciences Inc., Brea, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

The Clean Development Mechanism and CER Price Formation in the Carbon Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Clean Development Mechanism and CER Price Formation in the Carbon Emission Markets Ren such as the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) and offset certificates such as CERs generated within historically. Keywords. Environmental risk, energy economics, cap-and-trade, carbon mar- kets, Kyoto protocol

Carmona, Rene

9

The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization...

10

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) en español | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER es una institución

11

A Vehicle Manufacturers Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1CFostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels A Vehicle Manufacturers Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels Tom Leone, Technical Expert, Powertrain Evaluation and Analysis, Ford Motor Company

12

The Center for Excellence in Rural Safety (CERS) at the University of Minnesota developed the Rural Highway Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and work-zone safety. · Complements SafeRoadMaps.org, a mapping tool also developed by CERS. · ListsThe Center for Excellence in Rural Safety (CERS) at the University of Minnesota developed the Rural Highway Safety Clearinghouse in 2008 with support from the Federal High- way Administration (FHWA) as part

Minnesota, University of

13

CER-ETH -Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series Eidgenössische. Schweitzer a aChair of Systems Design, ETH Zurich, Kreuzplatz 5, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland b Technische Hochschule Zürich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich hal-00973077,version1-3Apr2014 #12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

14

CER-ETH -Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series Eidgenössische for valuable suggestions. Hans Haller gratefully acknowledges the hospitality and support of ETH Zurich, Chair Technische Hochschule Zürich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Ordinal Games Jacques Durieu, Hans

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

15

Review of market for octane enhancers: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil is easily separated into its principal products by simple distillation. However, neither the amounts nor the quality of these natural products matches demand. Today, octane requirements must be achieved by changing the chemical composition of the straight-run gasoline fraction.

J. E. Sinor Consultants, Inc.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

16

Predict octane numbers using a generalized interaction method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interaction-based correlation using a new approach can be used to predict research and motor octane numbers of gasoline blends. An ultimately detailed analysis of the gasoline cut is not necessary. This correlation can describe blending behavior over the entire composition range of gasoline cuts. The component-oriented interaction approach is general and will accurately predict, without performing additional blending studies, blending behavior for new gasoline cuts. The proposed correlation fits the data quite closely for blends of many gasoline cuts. The regression gives realistic values for binary interaction parameters between components. A unique set of binary interaction parameters was found for the equation for predicting octane number of any gasoline blend. The binary interaction parameters between components contained in gasoline cuts have been converted to binary interaction parameters between gasoline cuts through a general equation to simplify the calculations. Because of the proposed method`s accuracy, optimum allocation of components among gasoline grades can be obtained and predicted values can be used for quality control of the octane number of marketed gasolines.

Twu, C.H.; Coon, J.E. [Simulation Sciences, Inc., Brea, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

IMPACT OF LOW OCTANE HYDROCARBON BLENDING STREAMS ON "E85" ENGINE OPTIMIZATION Jim Szybist and Brian West Oak Ridge National Laboratory October 19, 2012 Acknowledgement This...

18

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information on PV2009 | Open EnergyHall,as Renovables (CER) Feed Jump

19

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information on PV2009 | Open EnergyHall,as Renovables (CER) Feed

20

Exploring the use of a higher octane gasoline for the U.S. light-duty vehicle fleet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis explores the possible benefits that can be achieved if U.S. oil companies produced and offered a grade of higher-octane gasoline to the consumer market. The octane number of a fuel represents how resistant the ...

Chow, Eric W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The chemical origin of octane sensitivity in gasoline fuels containing nitroalkanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental octane measurements are presented for a standard gasoline to which has been added various quantities of nitromethane, nitroethane and 1-nitropropane. The addition of nitroalkanes was found to suppress the Motor Octane Number to a much greater extent than the Research Octane Number. In other words addition of nitroalkanes increases the octane sensitivity of gasoline. Density Functional Theory was used to model the equilibrium thermodynamics and the barrier heights for reactions leading to the break-up of nitroethane. These results were used to develop a chemical kinetic scheme for nitroalkanes combined with a surrogate gasoline (for which a mechanism has been developed previously). Finally the chemical kinetic simulations were combined with a quasi-dimensional engine model in order to predict autoignition in octane rating tests. Our results suggest that the chemical origin of octane sensitivity in gasoline/nitroalkane blends cannot be fully explained on the conventional basis of the extent to which NTC behaviour is absent. Instead we have shown that the contribution of the two pathways leading to autoignition in gasoline containing nitroalkanes becomes much more significant under the more severe conditions of the Motor Octane method than the Research Octane method. (author)

Cracknell, R.F.; McAllister, L.J.; Norton, M.; Walmsley, H.L. [Shell Global Solutions, Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Andrae, J.C.G. [Shell Global Solutions, Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

22

Vapor-liquid equilibria and excess enthalpies for octane + N-methylacetamide, cyclooctane + N-methylacetamide, and octane + acetic acid anhydride at 125 C  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Isothermal P-x data and excess enthalpies have been measured at approximately 125 C for the binary mixtures of octane + N-methylacetamide, cyclooctane + N-methylacetamide, and octane + acetic anhydride. For each binary system linear temperature dependent interaction parameters were fitted to experimental data using the NRTL model. Activity coefficients at infinite dilution were derived from the P-x data at low concentrations using a flexible Legendre polynomial.

Haan, A.B. de [DSM-Research, Geleen (Netherlands); Heine, A.; Fischer, K.; Gmehling, J. [Univ. Oldenburg (Germany)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The MTBE solution: Octanes, technology, and refinery profitability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper has been developed to provide refiners with business decision insight regarding the production of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) from refinery - (FCC) produced isobutylene. The driving forces making MTBE an attractive investment are examined with regard to the increasing demand for higher octane unleaded gasolines. The decision to proceed with MTBE production depends on the profitability of such an investment and the refiner's ability to meet market demands using available processing equipment, refinery produced streams and external feedstocks. The factors affecting this decision are analyzed in this paper and include: industry ability to meet rising octane demand; profit potential realized by diverting isobutylene to MTBE; availability of technology for producing MTBE; and investment and operating costs required to produce MTBE. Chemical Research and Licensing and NEOCHEM have developed a simple, low cost process to produce MTBE, reducing the excessive equipment and high operating costs that were associated with conventional MTBE designs. The economics and process benefits of installing a CRandL/NEOCHEM MTBE process are examined within the framework of a generalized medium-sized refinery configuration.

Lander, E.P.; Hubbard, J.N.; Smith, L.A.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to this and thousands of other papers at http://www.la-press.com. Cancer Informatics Supplementary Issue: Network and Pathway Analysis of Cancer Susceptibility (A) Introduction Cellular signaling generates a chain of protein

Geman, Donald

26

Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is described for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries. 3 figs.

Sinha, D.N.; Anthony, B.W.

1997-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

27

A near infrared regression model for octane measurements in gasolines which contain MTBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy has emerged as a superior technique for the on-line determination of octane during the blending of gasoline. This results from the numerous advantages that NIR spectroscopy has over conventional on-line instrumentation. Methyl t-butyl ether (MTBE) is currently the oxygenated blending component of choice. MTBE is advantageous because it has a high blending octane, a low Reid vapor pressure, is relatively cheap, and does not form peroxides (1). The goal of this project was to develop a NIR regression model that could be used to predict pump octanes regardless of whether they contained MTBE.

Maggard, S.M. (Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for determining the octane rating of gasoline samples by observing corresponding acoustic resonances therein. A direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the frequency of corresponding acoustic resonances therein has been experimentally observed. Therefore, the octane rating of a gasoline sample can be directly determined through speed of sound measurements instead of by the cumbersome process of quantifying the knocking quality of the gasoline. Various receptacle geometries and construction materials may be employed. Moreover, it is anticipated that the measurements can be performed on flowing samples in pipes, thereby rendering the present method useful in refineries and distilleries.

Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM); Anthony, Brian W. (Clearfield, PA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Proton NMR analysis of octane number for motor gasoline: Part V  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A method to predict the octane number of automobile gasoline containing methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) by proton magnetic resonance (PMR) spectrometry was studied. Samples of gasoline whose octane numbers had been identified according to the ASTM standards (commercially available premium gasoline to which MTBE was added at rates of 7 vol % and 14 vol %) were used in this investigation of the effect of MTBE on the octane number. The findings were utilized to introduce a term regarding MTBE into the previously reported linear regression equation for estimating the octane number from the PMR spectrum, and the appropriateness of the linear regression equation was assessed. As a result the MTBE contents in the sample were determined with satisfactory accuracy by using a standard addition method, and a linear regression equation reflecting the effect of MTBE was obtained. These achievements are reported. 11 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

Ichikawa, M.; Nonaka, N.; Amano, H.; Takada, I.; Ishimori, S. [Suzuki Motor Corp., Hamamatsu (Japan); Andoh, H.; Kumamoto, K. [Showa Shell Sikiyu Tokyo (Japan)

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed research is to synthesize high octane ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from H[sub 2]/CO/CO[sub 2] coal-derived synthesis gas via alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-l-propanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. The last stage of the synthesis involves direct coupling of synthesis gas-derived methanol and isobutanol that has been demonstrated by us to occur over superacid catalysts to yield methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) at moderate pressures and a mixture of methanol and isobutene at low pressures. MIBE is an isomer of MTBE and a process is proposed whereby MTBE from the two alcohols is maximized and MIBE is minimized. This will be achieved by the proper choice of reaction conditions, i.e. intermediate pressures, and of inorganic acid catalysts that are stable at temperatures higher than 200[degree]C, at which the carbonium ion reaction coupling of the two alcohols to MTBE is more effective than the oxonium ion or ester reaction coupling to MIBE. Both organic and inorganic catalysts will be investigated, and the better catalysts of these classes will be subjected to long term performance studies. The long term performance studies of the combined process will extend to 1000 hr and detailed analytical data for all products will be provided.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Feeley, O.C.; Johansson, M.A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

An experimental investigation of low octane gasoline in diesel engines.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional combustion techniques struggle to meet the current emissions norms. In particular, oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) and particulate matter (PM) emissions have limited the utilization of diesel fuel in compression ignition engines. Advance combustion concepts have proved the potential to combine fuel efficiency and improved emission performance. Low-temperature combustion (LTC) offers reduced NO{sub x} and PM emissions with comparable modern diesel engine efficiencies. The ability of premixed, low-temperature compression ignition to deliver low PM and NO{sub x} emissions is dependent on achieving optimal combustion phasing. Diesel operated LTC is limited by early knocking combustion, whereas conventional gasoline operated LTC is limited by misfiring. So the concept of using an unconventional fuel with the properties in between those two boundary fuels has been experimented in this paper. Low-octane (84 RON) gasoline has shown comparable diesel efficiencies with the lowest NO{sub x} emissions at reasonable high power densities (NO{sub x} emission was 1 g/kW h at 12 bar BMEP and 2750 rpm).

Ciatti, S. A.; Subramanian, S. (Energy Systems)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

YOUNG STARS NEAR EARTH: THE OCTANS-NEAR ASSOCIATION AND CASTOR MOVING GROUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All cataloged stellar moving groups and associations with ages ?100 Myr and within 100 pc of Earth have Galactic space motions (UVW) situated in a 'good box' with dimensions ?20 km s{sup 1} on a side. Torres et al. defined the Octans Association as a group of 15 stars with age '20 Myr?' and located ?140 pc from Earth, but with average V space velocity 3.6 km s{sup 1} that is well outside of the good box. We present a list of 14 Hipparcos star systems within 100 pc of Earth that we call {sup O}ctans-Near{sup ;} these systems have UVW similar to those of the much more distant Octans Association. The Octans-Near stars have apparent ages between about 30 and 100 Myr and their relationship to the Octans Association stars is unclear. Six additional star systems have UVW similar to those of Octans-Near stars and likely ages ?200 Myr. These six systems include the late-type binary star EQ Peg6.2 pc from Earth with likely age ?100 Myr and thus likely to be the nearest known pre-main sequence star system. The UVW of stars in a previously proposed ?200 Myr old Castor moving group are not too dissimilar from the UVW of Octans-Near stars. However, stars in the Castor groupif it exists at allare mostly substantially older than 200 Myr and thus generally can readily be distinguished from the much younger Octans-Near stars.

Zuckerman, B.; Vican, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Song, Inseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Schneider, Adam, E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: lvican@ucla.edu, E-mail: song@uga.edu, E-mail: Adam.Schneider@Utoledo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

33

Topology of cyclo-octane energy landscape Shawn Martin,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. While this is a very mild assumption, we have discovered an example of an energy landscape whichTopology of cyclo-octane energy landscape Shawn Martin,1,a Aidan Thompson,2 Evangelos A. Coutsias,3 2010 Understanding energy landscapes is a major challenge in chemistry and biology. Although a wide

Coutsias, Evangelos

34

A study of the physics and chemistry of knock in modern SI engines and their relationship to the octane tests  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Avoiding knock is the major design constraint for spark ignition engines because of the unacceptable noise and engine damage associated with it. Hence, the Research and Motor Octane Number (RON and MON) tests were established ...

Mittal, Vikram

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

CRC fuel rating program: road octane performance of oxygenates in 1982 model cars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the widespread interest in the use of alcohols and ethers as gasoline blending components, this program was conducted to evaluate the effects of several oxygenates on gasoline octane performance and to evaluate the effects of car design features such as engine and transmission type. Five oxygenates were evaluated at two nominal concentrations, 5 and 10 volume%, at both regular- and premium-grade octane levels: methanol (MeOH), ethanol (ETOH), isopropanol (IPA), tertiary butanol (TBA), and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A blend of 5% MeOH and 5 percent TBA was also tested at both octane levels. Twenty-eight unleaded fuels, including four hydrocarbon fuels, two hydrocarbon fuels plus toluene, and twenty-two oxygenated fuels, were rated in duplicate in thirty-eight cars using the Modified Uniontown Technique (CRC Designation F-28-75 described in Appendix C), plus some additional instructions. All testing was done on chassis dynamometers. Ratings were obtained at full throttle with all thirty-eight cars, and at the most critical part-throttle condition (occurring with manifold vacuum of 4 in. Hg (13.5 kPa) or greater above the full-throttle vacuum) with nine cars.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on Ethanol Engine Optimization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol is a very attractive fuel from an end-use perspective because it has a high chemical octane number and a high latent heat of vaporization. When an engine is optimized to take advantage of these fuel properties, both efficiency and power can be increased through higher compression ratio, direct fuel injection, higher levels of boost, and a reduced need for enrichment to mitigate knock or protect the engine and aftertreatment system from overheating. The ASTM D5798 specification for high level ethanol blends, commonly called E85, underwent a major revision in 2011. The minimum ethanol content was revised downward from 68 vol% to 51 vol%, which combined with the use of low octane blending streams such as natural gasoline introduces the possibility of a lower octane E85 fuel. While this fuel is suitable for current ethanol tolerant flex fuel vehicles, this study experimentally examines whether engines can still be aggressively optimized for the resultant fuel from the revised ASTM D5798 specification. The performance of six ethanol fuel blends, ranging from 51-85% ethanol, is compared to a premium-grade certification gasoline (UTG-96) in a single-cylinder direct-injection (DI) engine with a compression ratio of 12.9:1 at knock-prone engine conditions. UTG-96 (RON = 96.1), light straight run gasoline (RON = 63.6), and n-heptane (RON = 0) are used as the hydrocarbon blending streams for the ethanol-containing fuels in an effort to establish a broad range of knock resistance for high ethanol fuels. Results show that nearly all ethanol-containing fuels are more resistant to engine knock than UTG-96 (the only exception being the ethanol blend with 49% n-heptane). This knock resistance allows ethanol blends made with 33 and 49% light straight run gasoline, and 33% n-heptane to be operated at significantly more advanced combustion phasing for higher efficiency, as well as at higher engine loads. While experimental results show that the octane number of the hydrocarbon blend stock does impact engine performance, there remains a significant opportunity for engine optimization when considering even the lowest octane fuels that are in compliance with the current revision of ASTM D5798 compared to premium-grade gasoline.

Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A shock tube study of iso-octane ignition at elevated pressures: The influence of diluent gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ignition of iso-octane/air and iso-octane/O{sub 2}/Ar ({proportional_to}20% O{sub 2}) mixtures was studied in a shock tube at temperatures of 868-1300 K, pressures of 7-58 atm, and equivalence ratios {phi}=1.0, 0.5, and 0.25. Ignition times were determined using endwall OH* emission and sidewall piezoelectric pressure measurements. Measured iso-octane/air ignition times agreed well with the previously published results. Mixtures with argon as the diluent exhibited ignition times 20% shorter, for most conditions, than those with nitrogen as the diluent (iso-octane/air mixtures). The difference in measured ignition times for mixtures containing argon and nitrogen as the diluent gas can be attributed to the differing heat capacities of the two diluent species and the level of induction period heat release prior to ignition. Kinetic model predictions of ignition time from three mechanisms are compared to the experimental data. The mechanisms overpredict the ignition times but accurately capture the influence of diluent gas on iso-octane ignition time, indicating that the mechanisms predict an appropriate amount of induction period heat release. (author)

Shen, Hsi-Ping S.; Vanderover, Jeremy; Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A. [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 Eighth Street, JEC 2049, Troy, NY 12180 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

38

Use of a thermodynamic cycle simulation to determine the difference between a propane-fuelled engine and an iso-octane-fuelled engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the engine cycle simulation to determine the difference between a propane-fuelled and an iso-octane-fuelled engine for the same operating conditions and engine specifications. A comprehensive parametric investigation was conducted to examine the effects...

Pathak, Dushyant

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

39

An experimental and modeling study of iso-octane ignition delay times under homogeneous charge compression ignition conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Autoignition of iso-octane was examined using a rapid compression facility (RCF) with iso-octane, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon mixtures. The effects of typical homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) conditions on the iso-octane ignition characteristics were studied. Experimental results for ignition delay times, t{sub ign}, were obtained from pressure time-histories. The experiments were conducted over a range of equivalence ratios (f=0.25-1.0), pressures (P=5.12-23 atm), temperatures (T=943-1027 K), and oxygen mole fractions ({chi}{sub O{sub 2}}=9-21%), and with the addition of trace amounts of combustion product gases (CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}O). It was found that the ignition delay times were well represented by the expression t{sub ign}=1.3x10{sup -4}P{sup -1.05}f{sup -0.77}{chi}{sub O{sub 2}}{sup -1.41}exp(33,700/R{sub (c} {sub al/mol/K)}T), where P is pressure (atm), T is temperature (K), f is the equivalence ratio (based on iso-octane to O{sub 2} molar ratios), {chi}{sub O{sub 2}} is the oxygen mole percent (%), and t{sub ign} is the ignition delay time (ms). Carbon dioxide was found to have no chemical effect on t{sub ign}. Water was found to systematically decrease t{sub ign} by a small amount (less than 14% for the range of conditions studied). The maximum uncertainty in the measured t{sub ign} is +/-12% with an average uncertainty of +/-6%. The performance of several proposed chemical reaction mechanisms (including detailed, reduced, and skeletal mechanisms) was evaluated in the context of the current experimental results.

He, X.; Donovan, M.T.; Zigler, B.T.; Palmer, T.R.; Walton, S.M.; Wooldridge, M.S.; Atreya, A. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Michigan, 2350 Hayward Street, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2125 (United States)

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Vapor-liquid equilibria of ethanol with 2,2,4-trimethylpentane or octane at 101. 3 kPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor-liquid equilibria (VLE) are required for engineering use such as in the design and operation of separation processes. Isobaric vapor-liquid equilibria were measured for ethanol with 2,2,4-trimethylpentane or octane at 101.3 kPa in an equilibrium still with circulation of both the vapor and liquid phases. The results were correlated with the Wilson and nonrandom two-liquid (NRTL) equations.

Hiaki, Toshihiko; Takahashi, Kenji; Tsuji, Tomoya; Hongo, Masaru (Nihon Univ., Chiba (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry); Kojima, Kazuo (Nihon Univ., Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Industrial Chemistry)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

FT-IR spectroscopy of nitric acid in TBP/octane solution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared studies for the HNO{sub 3}/0.73 M TBP n-octane system are reported. Two extracted species, TBP {center_dot} HNO{sub 3} and TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3}, were identified in the organic phase. The concentration of the individual species was determined by the analysis of the vibrational band at {approx}1650 cm{sup -1}. The band at 1648 cm{sup -1} was assigned to the monosolvate TBP {center_dot} HNO{sub 3} and the band at 1672 cm{sup -1} to the hemisolvate TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3}. The infrared spectra revealed that with respect to the P{double_bond}O bond, as well to each other, the HNO{sub 3} molecules in the hemisolvate are spectrally non-equivalent. The predominant structure of TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3} involves the chain HNO{sub 3} dimer. Some ionic NO{sub 3}{sup -} and hydronium ions were identified in this system but only during formation of the monosolvate. The analyses performed in this system can serve for the characterization of HNO{sub 3} in related systems in the presence of metal species.

Ferraro, J. R.; Borkowski, M.; Chiarizia, R.; McAlister, D. R.; Chemistry; Loyola Univ. Chicago

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

A Computer Generated Reduced Iso-Octane Chemical Kinetic Mechanism Applied to Simulation of HCCI Combustion  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper shows how a computer can systematically remove non-essential chemical reactions from a large chemical kinetic mechanism. The computer removes the reactions based upon a single solution using a detailed mechanism. The resulting reduced chemical mechanism produces similar numerical predictions significantly faster than predictions that use the detailed mechanism. Specifically, a reduced chemical kinetics mechanism for iso-octane has been derived from a detailed mechanism by eliminating unimportant reaction steps and species. The reduced mechanism has been developed for the specific purpose of fast and accurate prediction of ignition timing in an HCCI engine. The reduced mechanism contains 199 species and 383 reactions, while the detailed mechanism contains 859 species and 3606 reactions. Both mechanisms have been used in numerical simulation of HCCI combustion. The simulations show that the reduced mechanism predicts pressure traces and heat release with good accuracy, similar to the accuracy obtained with the detailed mechanism. As may be expected, emissions of hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide are not as well predicted with the reduced mechanism as with the detailed mechanism, since the reduced mechanism was targeted for predicting HCCI ignition and not HC and CO emissions. Considering that the reduced mechanism requires about 25 times less computational time than the detailed mechanism (2 hours vs. 2 days), the ability to automatically generate a problem specific reduced mechanism is an important new tool for combustion research in general.

Aceves, S M; Martinez-Frias, J; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Dibble, R; Chen, J Y

2002-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

43

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Iso-octane SI-HCCI Transition  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a CHEMKIN-based multi-zone model that simulates the expected combustion variations in a single-cylinder engine fueled with iso-octane as the engine transitions from spark-ignited (SI) combustion to homogenous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion. The model includes a 63-species reaction mechanism and mass and energy balances for the cylinder and the exhaust flow. For this study we assumed that the SI-to-HCCI transition is implemented by means of increasing the internal exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) at constant engine speed. This transition scenario is consistent with that implemented in previously reported experimental measurements on an experimental engine equipped with variable valve actuation. We find that the model captures many of the important experimental trends, including stable SI combustion at low EGR (-0.10), a transition to highly unstable combustion at intermediate EGR, and finally stable HCCI combustion at very high EGR (-0.75). Remaining differences between the predicted and experimental instability patterns indicate that there is further room for model improvement.

Havstad, Mark A [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Aceves, Salvador M [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); McNenly, Matthew J [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Piggott, William T [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL); Edwards, Kevin Dean [ORNL; Wagner, Robert M [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL; FINNEY, Charles E A [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

New low-mass members of the Octans stellar association and an updated 30-40 Myr lithium age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Octans association is one of several young stellar moving groups recently discovered in the Solar neighbourhood, and hence a valuable laboratory for studies of stellar, circumstellar disc and planetary evolution. However, a lack of low-mass members or any members with trigonometric parallaxes means the age, distance and space motion of the group are poorly constrained. To better determine its membership and age, we present the first spectroscopic survey for new K and M-type Octans members, resulting in the discovery of 29 UV-bright K5-M4 stars with kinematics, photometry and distances consistent with existing members. Nine new members possess strong Li I absorption, which allow us to estimate a lithium age of 30-40 Myr, similar to that of the Tucana-Horologium association and bracketed by the firm lithium depletion boundary ages of the Beta Pictoris (20 Myr) and Argus/IC 2391 (50 Myr) associations. Several stars also show hints in our medium-resolution spectra of fast rotation or spectroscopic binarity. M...

Murphy, Simon J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of fuel octane number and inlet air temperature on knock characteristics of a single cylinder engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dual sample rate technique has been developed and applied to measuring in-cylinder pressure and its oscillations due to autoignition. The harmonics of in-cylinder oscillations were found in good agreement with those obtained from the solutions of wave equation in a cylindrical container. The time of knock relative to spark timing was almost independent of the knock intensity, fuel octane number, and inlet air temperature. The knock intensity was almost constant up to the spark advance when about 100% of the cycles were knocking, further spark advance resulted in higher knock intensity. The mass fraction of unburned fuel at the time of knock was about 10% and was independent of the frequency of the cycles knocking. These observations indicated that the phenomenon of knock is a single-site autoignition for intermittent knock and multi-site autoignition for severe knocking.

Haghgooie, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A complex chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of gasoline surrogate fuels: n heptane, iso octane and toluene - Mechanism development and validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development and validation against experimental results of a new gasoline surrogate complex kinetic mechanism is presented in this paper. The surrogate fuel is a ternary mixture of n heptane, iso octane and toluene. The full three components mechanism is based on existing n heptane/iso octane (gasoline PRF) and toluene mechanisms which were modified and coupled for the purpose of this work. Mechanism results are compared against available experimental data from the literature. Simulations with the PRF plus toluene mechanism show that its behavior is in agreement with experimental results for most of the tested settings. These include a wide variety of thermodynamic conditions and fuel proportions in experimental configurations such as HCCI engine experiments, rapid compression machines, a shock tube and a jet stirred reactor.

Da Cruz, A Pires; Anderlohr, Jrg; Bounaceur, Roda; Battin-Leclerc, Frdrique

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons From n-Octane to n-Hexadecane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of nine n-alkanes larger than n-heptane, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on our previous mechanisms for the primary reference fuels n-heptane and iso-octane, using the reaction class mechanism construction first developed for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and these mechanisms will be refined further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. These mechanisms are validated through extensive comparisons between computed and experimental data from a wide variety of different sources. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare reactivities of different n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available for download from our web page.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Curran, H J; Silke, E J

2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

48

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the proposed research is to synthesize high octane ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from H{sub 2}/CO/CO{sub 2} coal-derived synthesis gas via alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-l-propanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. The last stage of the synthesis involves direct coupling of synthesis gas-derived methanol and isobutanol that has been demonstrated by us to occur over superacid catalysts to yield methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) at moderate pressures and a mixture of methanol and isobutene at low pressures. MIBE is an isomer of MTBE and a process is proposed whereby MTBE from the two alcohols is maximized and MIBE is minimized. This will be achieved by the proper choice of reaction conditions, i.e. intermediate pressures, and of inorganic acid catalysts that are stable at temperatures higher than 200{degree}C, at which the carbonium ion reaction coupling of the two alcohols to MTBE is more effective than the oxonium ion or ester reaction coupling to MIBE. Both organic and inorganic catalysts will be investigated, and the better catalysts of these classes will be subjected to long term performance studies. The long term performance studies of the combined process will extend to 1000 hr and detailed analytical data for all products will be provided.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Feeley, O.C.; Johansson, M.A.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

A Detailed Chemical Kinetic Reaction Mechanism for n-Alkane Hydrocarbons from n-Octane to n-Hexadecane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed chemical kinetic reaction mechanisms have been developed to describe the pyrolysis and oxidation of the n-alkanes, including n-octane (n-C{sub 8}H{sub 18}), n-nonane (n-C{sub 9}H{sub 20}), n-decane (n-C{sub 10}H{sub 22}), n-undecane (n-C{sub 11}H{sub 24}), n-dodecane (n-C{sub 12}H{sub 26}), n-tridecane (n-C{sub 13}H{sub 28}), n-tetradecane (n-C{sub 14}H{sub 30}), n-pentadecane (n-C{sub 15}H{sub 32}), and n-hexadecane (n-C{sub 16}H{sub 34}). These mechanisms include both high temperature and low temperature reaction pathways. The mechanisms are based on previous mechanisms for n-heptane, using the same reaction class mechanism construction developed initially for n-heptane. Individual reaction class rules are as simple as possible in order to focus on the parallelism between all of the n-alkane fuels included in the mechanisms, and there is an intent to develop these mechanisms further in the future to incorporate greater levels of accuracy and predictive capability. Several of these areas for improvement are identified and explained in detail. These mechanisms are validated through comparisons between computed and experimental data from as many different sources as possible. In addition, numerical experiments are carried out to examine features of n-alkane combustion in which the detailed mechanisms can be used to compare processes in all of the n-alkane fuels. The mechanisms for all of these n-alkanes are presented as a single detailed mechanism, which can be edited to produce efficient mechanisms for any of the n-alkanes included, and the entire mechanism, with supporting thermochemical and transport data, together with an explanatory glossary explaining notations and structural details, will be available on our web page when the paper is accepted for publication.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Herbinet, O; Silke, E J; Curran, H J

2007-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

50

Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 2. Fuel and EGR Effects on Knock-Limited Load and Speed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external-cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to that of 87AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicating mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. The results demonstrate that for all fuels, EGR is a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency but is less useful for knock mitigation with E30 than for 87AKI gasoline or IB24. Under knocking conditions, 15% EGR is found to offer 1 CA of CA50 timing advance with E30, whereas up to 5 CA of CA50 advance is possible with knock-limited 87AKI gasoline. Compared to 87AKI, both E30 and IB24 are found to have reduced adiabatic flame temperature and shorter combustion durations, which reduce knocking propensity beyond that indicated by the octane number. However, E30+0% EGR is found to exhibit the better antiknock properties than either 87AKI+15% EGR or IB24+15% EGR, expanding the knock limited operating range and engine stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. Furthermore, the fuel sensitivity (S) of E30 was attributed to reduced speed sensitivity of E30, expanding the low-speed stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. The results illustrate that intermediate alcohol gasoline blends exhibit exceptional antiknock properties and performance beyond that indicated by the octane number tests, particularly E30.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Vapor-liquid equilibria of binary and ternary mixtures of cyclohexane, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and octane at 101.3 kPa  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Vapor-liquid equilibria were measured at 101.3 kPa for the three binary and one ternary mixtures of cyclohexane, 3-methyl-2-butanone, and octane. The isobaric T-x-y data were reported, including an azeotropic point for the binary mixture cyclohexane + 3-methyl-2-butanone. The virial equation of state truncated after the second coefficient was used to calculate the vapor-phase fugacity coefficients. The Tsonopoulos correlation equation was applied to determine the second virial coefficients. Various activity coefficient models of the Wilson, the NRTL, and the UNIQUAC equations were used to correlate the binary experimental vapor-liquid equilibrium results. Optimally-fitted binary parameters of the activity coefficient models were obtained and those parameters of the NRTL model were employed to predict the ternary vapor-liquid equilibria. Satisfactory results were presented for the correlation and prediction of the vapor-liquid equilibrium data on binary and ternary mixtures.

Chen, C.C.; Tang, M.; Chen, Y.P. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering] [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 1. Engine Load Range and Downsize Downspeed Opportunity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine was used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to 87 AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicated mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. EGR provided thermodynamic advantages and was a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency for all fuel types. However, with E30, EGR was less useful for knock mitigation than gasoline or IB24. Torque densities with E30 with 15% EGR at = 1 operation were similar or better than a modern EURO IV calibration turbo-diesel engine. The results of the present study suggest that it could be possible to implement a 40% downsize + downspeed configuration (1.2 L engine) into a representative midsize sedan. For example, for a midsize sedan at a 65 miles/h cruise, an estimated fuel consumption of 43.9 miles per gallon (MPG) (engine out 102 g-CO2/km) could be achieved with similar reserve power to a 2.0 L engine with 87AKI (38.6 MPG, engine out 135 g-CO2/km). Data suggest that, with midlevel alcohol gasoline blends, engine and vehicle optimization can offset the reduced fuel energy content of alcohol gasoline blends and likely reduce vehicle fuel consumption and tailpipe CO2 emissions.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

A model of reduced oxidation kinetics using constituents and species: Iso-octane and its mixtures with n-pentane, iso-hexane and n-heptane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously described methodology for deriving a reduced kinetic mechanism for alkane oxidation and tested for n-heptane is here shown to be valid, in a slightly modified version, for iso-octane and its mixtures with n-pentane, iso-hexane and n-heptane. The model is still based on partitioning the species into lights, defined as those having a carbon number smaller than 3, and heavies, which are the complement in the species ensemble, and mathematically decomposing the heavy species into constituents which are radicals. For the same similarity variable found from examining the n-heptane LLNL mechanism in conjunction with CHEMKIN II, the appropriately scaled total constituent molar density still exhibits a self-similar behavior over a very wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures in the cold ignition regime. When extended to larger initial temperatures than for cold ignition, the self-similar behavior becomes initial temperature dependent, which indicates that rather than using functional fits for the enthalpy generation due to the heavy species' oxidation, an ideal model based on tabular information extracted from the complete LLNL kinetics should be used instead. Similarly to n-heptane, the oxygen and water molar densities are shown to display a quasi-linear behavior with respect to the similarity variable, but here their slope variation is no longer fitted and instead, their rate equations are used with the ideal model to calculate them. As in the original model, the light species ensemble is partitioned into quasi-steady and unsteady species; the quasi-steady light species mole fractions are computed using the ideal model and the unsteady species are calculated as progress variables using rates extracted from the ideal model. Results are presented comparing the performance of the model with that of the LLNL mechanism using CHEMKIN II. The model reproduces excellently the temperature and species evolution versus time or versus the similarity variable, with the exception of very rich mixtures, where the predictions are still very good but the multivalued aspect of these functions at the end of oxidation is not captured in the reduction. The ignition time is predicted within percentages of the LLNL values over a wide range of equivalence ratios, initial pressures and initial temperatures. (author)

Harstad, Kenneth; Bellan, Josette [California Institute of Technology, Jet Propulsion Laboratory, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, M/S 125-109, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

Process for reforming naphthene and paraffin-containing hydrocarbons in the naphtha boiling range and isomerizing C sub 5 -C sub 6 normal paraffin feedstock to produce a high octane gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for reforming a naphthenic and paraffin-containing hydrocarbon feedstock to produce a reformate product having an increased octane rating by contacting the feedstock with a reforming catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at reforming conditions in a reforming zone, the reforming zone including a naphtha dehydrogenation zone and a paraffin dehydrocyclization zone wherein heated, pressurized hydrogen is added to the effluent stream from the naphtha dehydrogenation zone prior to charging the effluent stream to the paraffin dehydrocyclization zone to produce a first product stream comprising a gasoline range reformate product having an RON octane rating of at least about 90 and hydrogen wherein the reformate product is separated from the hydrogen in a reformate separation zone. It comprises: charging at least a portion of the heated, pressurized hydrogen with a C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} n-paraffin feedstock to an isomerization zone containing an isomerization catalyst at isomerization conditions to produce a second product stream containing an isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product and passing the second product stream to the reformate separation zone and recovering at least a major portion of the isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product with the reformate product.

Dalson, M.H.

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

55

UNLV Center for Energy Research CER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-gTaguspark JumpDetective:ToyoTurkey:S ArmyMeasuringResources |

56

BiOctane | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: Energy ResourcesJersey: EnergyBerthoud,Biodiesel Place:Forge

57

An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartment ofEnergy Natural Gas:Austin,An Evaluation of

58

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-06-01 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of chamber and optic responses in inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants and simulation of those phenomena design concepts and key interfaces in a laser-IFE power plant, and to field both small and medium scale of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, CA 92093-0420 High Average Power Laser Program Optics

Najmabadi, Farrokh

59

Spatiotemporal mapping of visual attention CerCo, UPS, Universit de Toulouse III, Toulouse, France, &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spatial distances and temporal delays from a cue in a noisy background. The cue was a non and delay, the background contrast compensation required to keep performance at 75%. The spatiotemporal peripheral sensors. In order to do that, attention can use one or more of the following mechanisms: signal

VanRullen, Rufin

60

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-06-06 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in-situ real-time PMI diagnostic 9 May 2006 #12;PISCES FY04-06 Progress Report and FY07-09 Proposal move into the burning plasma era, there are a number of plasma material interaction (PMI) issues wall, Carbon for the divertor strike point, and Tungsten for the divertor armor. These edge and SOL PMI

Najmabadi, Farrokh

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-13-01 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dollars and "real" dollars. Dividing the current dollars by the real dollars yields the GDP Implicit Price and other systems are relevant to magnetic fusion energy (MFE). In the mid 90's, the ARIES Project6 began, such as the U.S. Commerce Department Gross Domestic Product8 (GDP), which is a measure of the output of goods

California at San Diego, University of

62

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-05-06 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUV lithography (EUVL) source, soft x-ray source, and research relevant to laser fusion etc by research on laser fusion and x-ray lasers [4][5] . However, because of the large variety of materials in specific applications of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), soft x-ray sources, and laser plasma

Najmabadi, Farrokh

63

I E L D ESCALATION EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartment ofDepartment ofof EnergyYou$0.C. 20545*. . : '* FEB1f\lMUC4cb90,fiom the-,qy4 IY

64

Centro De Energias Renovables (CER): A Major OpenEI Contributor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,

65

Wildland Fire Safety Enhancements  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

OPERATIONS OFFICE MANAGERS DOE FUXD OFFICE MANAGERS BILL RIcHARDsoN L%@ WILDLAND FIRE SAFETY ENHAN&MENTS By memorandum dated October 22000, I directed several actions & part of a...

66

Evaluation of the colossal electroresistance (CER) effect and its application in the non-volatile Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flash memory, the current leading technology for non-volatile memory (NVM), is projected by many to run obsolete in the face of future miniaturization trend in the semiconductor devices due to some of its technical ...

Wicaksono, Aulia Tegar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

CER Technology Fellowship Program 2008 Project Team: Mark Van Doren, Assistant Professor, Biology Department, Krieger School of Arts &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and an associated textbook as a guide. To give students greater access to lecture materials and to enhance: Animation, Courseware (WebCT), Digital Audio, Digital Video, Graphic Design, HTML/Web Design, Macromedia material integrates with the rest of the course, and access supplemental illustrations and resources

Gray, Jeffrey J.

68

High Octane Selling Coffee Shop Strategy That Gets the Job Done  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and meet informally. They are also superior to other options in their brand image and their appeal

Boyce, Richard L.

69

The thermodynamic properties of mixtures of normal octane and branched paraffin hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

static equilibrium flasks and associated mercury manometer 12 2: Diagram of static vapor pressure apparatus . , 13 Schematic diagram of the auxiliary apparatus . 14 4: Static equilibrium flasks and parts of the apparatus 5: Activity coefficients... vapor pressure 0 0 o apparatus. Barker's least square method was employed to calcu- late equilibrium vapor compositions, activity coefficients, and excess thermodynamic functions such as G , H , and TS . The correlation of thermodynamic properties...

Liu, Edward Kou-Shan

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: addition of i-butylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H[sub 2] during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; addition of i-butylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the seventh quarter we continued the shake down experiments for the SBCR and conducted an initial aborted run. We have also re-started experiments on Scheme 1, i.e., the addition of iso-butylene during CO hydrogenation. Using a dual bed arrangement, we have demonstrated the synthesis of MTBE from syngas and iso-butylene.

Marcelin, G.

1992-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

71

The relation of octane number, compression ratio, and exhaust temperature in the gasoline engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the engine consisted of a battery, two induction coils, distributor, spark indicator and spark plug. One induction coil was connected to the spark indicator on which could be read the amount of spark advance or retardation, while the other was connected... into the spark plug circuit. Fuel was supplied to the engine by gravity flow through flexible and copper tubing, a ceramic filter, and a simple float type carburetor from a gallon tank mounted on platform scales, The scales were graduated in hundredths...

Jentsch, Donald George

1951-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energy Usage »of EnergyThe Energy Department Feeds11, 2008 ThePerformance |

73

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeatMulti-Dimensional Subject:Ground Hawaii CleanHeatinHighMetal Removalcost

74

Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched5 IndustrialIsadore Perlman,Bios High EnergyEliane SJuly 2007Fermi

75

A study of PVT relations for carbon dioxide, n-pentane, and n-octane mixtures using a recombination apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide flooding is considered to have a multi- contact miscibility displacement mechanism. It changes the reservoir fluid in a complex manner. This type of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) technique is very economically viable, readily...

Wirawan, Januar Fitri Santo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

EXPERIMENTAL AND MODELING STUDY OF THE AUTOIGNITION OF 1-HEXENE / ISO-OCTANE MIXTURES AT LOW TEMPERATURE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a propane/MTBE mixture has been studied in a shock tube [5], while the oxidation of n-heptane/MTBE and n

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

77

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. [801Methyl tert-butyl ether  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results shown in Figures 10 and 11 demonstrate that the formation of butenes was very sensitive to the alcohol partial pressure. A small elevation of the alcohol pressure suppressed the formation of butenes rather drastically at both 90 and 117{degree}C. The synthesis rates of DME, MIBE, and MTBE ethers were not significantly affected at 90{degree}C, although there was a trend to increase the space time yield of DME as the alcohol pressure was increased. At the reaction temperature of 117{degree}C, all of the ethers showed increasing productivities as the pressure of the reactants was increased (Figure 11). An isotope labelling experiment was carried out to provide mechanistic insight into the manner in which methanol and isobutanol react together to form DME, MIBE, and MTBE ethers and to determine if MTBE were derived from MIBE.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Menszak, J.; Johansson, M.A.; Feeley, O.C.; Kim, D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Premium Gasoline Overbuying in the U.S.: Consumer-Based Choice Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1990), Economics gasoline pool octane of growth, U.S.sensitive to modest is gasoline price shifts. Theprimary1991b), Effect of gasoline octane quality on vehicle

Setiawan, Winardi; Sperling, Daniel

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Premium Gasoline Overbuying in the U.S.: Consumer-Based Choice Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1990), Economics gasoline pool octane of growth, U.S.sensitive to modest is gasoline price shifts. Theprimary1991b), Effect of gasoline octane quality on vehicle

Setiawan, Winardi; Sperling, Daniel

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

ACCESS Magazine Fall 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Oxford University Press, 2009 Cer vero, Robert The Transit Metropolis Island Press, 1998; China Architecture

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

TheGovernanceofCleanDevelopment WorkingPaper003December2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DevelopmentBank ASEAN AssociationofSoutheastAsianNations CDM CleanDevelopmentMechanism CER Certified

Watson, Andrew

83

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 6, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. (2) Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. (3) Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the sixth quarter we completed the construction of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR), conducted initial shake-down experiments in a cold-flow mode, and finalized the selection process of the acid catalysts for conversion of syngas-produced alcohols and isobutylene to MTBE (scheme 2). Tasks 3, 4, and 5 are awaiting complete implementation of the SBCR system.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

84

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 7, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: addition of i-butylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; addition of i-butylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins. During the seventh quarter we continued the shake down experiments for the SBCR and conducted an initial aborted run. We have also re-started experiments on Scheme 1, i.e., the addition of iso-butylene during CO hydrogenation. Using a dual bed arrangement, we have demonstrated the synthesis of MTBE from syngas and iso-butylene.

Marcelin, G.

1992-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

Synthesis of octane enhancer during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, July 1, 1991--September 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1991-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

86

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 9, October 1, 1992--December 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Figure 7 summarizes the carbon selectivities observed towards the main products. During Period IV, the main products observed were the heavy hydrocarbons, with selectivity for MTBE being less than 3--5%. The only time that high MTBE selectivity was noted was during period III, when the i-butylene feed was shut-off. The large amounts of heavy products and the low selectivity to MTBE were surprising in view of our previous experiments in the gas phase and the high methanol-to-i-butylene ratio used in these runs. In the gas-phase and with methanol/i-butylene = 0.5, over 95% selectivity to MTBE was observed with this catalyst at this temperature. The higher level of methanol used here would be expected to further improve the MTBE selectivity. Perhaps one reason for the poor MTBE selectivity relates to the relative solubilities of the reactants in the Synfluid changing the effective methanol/i-butylene ratio. Figure 8 shows the relative molar concentration of i-butylene during Period III. At 180 minutes, the gas supply of that reactant was shut-off, yet the analyses show that i-butylene continued to elute from the reactor for at least an additional 2 hours. It seems reasonable that the i-butylene is highly soluble in the Synfluid since they are both nonpolar hydrocarbons. Likewise, one would expect the methanol to not be quite as soluble and thus the methanol/i-butylene ratio in the liquid medium may be very low, favoring the oligomerization of i-butylene. Indeed, the only time that MTBE selectivity was high was after the i-butylene supply was shut-off. We intend to quantify these solubilities in future experiments.

Marcelin, G.

1993-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

87

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 5, October 1, 1991--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst. Addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1992-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

88

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 8, July 1, 1992--September 30, 1992  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The initial work on the synthesis of MTBE during CO hydrogenation shows that MTBE cannot be formed directly on metal sites and likely requires the presence of an acid site. However, MTBE can be made successfully when an acid site, provided by the zeolites, is present in the vicinity of the methanol-synthesis metal sites. When i-butylene was added during CO hydrogenation over a composite catalyst consisting of Li-Pd/SiO{sub 2} and a hydrogen-zeolite, MTBE was formed in measurable amounts. The major by-product of this reaction scheme was isobutane and the dimer of i-butylene. In general, ZSM-5 was found to be superior to LZ210-12 HY zeolite. CO hydrogenation over a bifunctional PdNaY catalyst shows that branched hydrocarbons as well as MEOH can be made successfully at the same time. Addition of i-butylene over this catalyst only (i.e. without other zeolite) results in the formation of trace amounts of MTBE.

Marcelin, G.

1993-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

89

Synthesis of octane enhancers during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch. Quarterly technical progress report No. 3, April 1, 1991--June 30, 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to investigate three possible routes to the formation of ethers, in particular methyl tert-butytl ether (MTBE), during slurry phase Fischer-Tropsch reaction. The three reaction schemes to be investigated are: (1) Addition of isobutylene during the formation of methanol and/or higher alcohols directly from CO and H{sub 2} during slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch; (2) addition of isobutylene to FT liquid products including alcohols in a slurry-phase reactor containing an MTBE or other acid catalyst; and, (3) addition of methanol to slurry phase FT synthesis making iso-olefins.

Marcelin, G.

1991-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

90

Ring effect on helical twisting power of optically active mesogenic esters derived from benzene, bicyclo[2.2.2]octane and p-carborane carboxylic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

additive to generate a helical phase is defined as helical twisting power (HTP) or bM (yp21 factors that affect the value of HTP. The emerging picture suggests that the most effective dopants'' for induction of a helical structure, and that higher ``biaxiality'' leads to a higher HTP.11 Further

Kaszynski, Piotr

91

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2005.06.029 Solubility of metallic mercury in octane, dodecane and toluene at temperatures between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hg°, HgCl2, CH3Hg and (CH3)2Hg, and con- cluded that the solubility of these species decreases to predict the behavior of nonpolar solutes in polar solvents. This modification involves an adjustment of the Lennard Jones Potential and the hard-sphere diameters of solute and solvent to account for the effects

Long, Bernard

92

Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high-octane components for use in high-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has a important function

Skogestad, Sigurd

93

Alexander Kenneth Raub Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Three immersion liquids were examined: deionized water, cyclo-octane, and Krytox® a Perfluoropolyether

New Mexico, University of

94

Stereotypical Encounters of the Third Kind Colin Atkinson1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Technology, Darmstadt, Germany kuehne@informatik.tu-darmstadt.de 3 University of Technology-Sellers3 1 University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern, Germany colin.atkinson@ieee.org 2 Darmstadt. Finally, we conclude by proposing enhan- cements to the UML which could support all three forms cleanly

Kühne, Thomas

95

Item Weighting Techniques for Collaborative Linas Baltrunas and Francesco Ricci  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of an item for predicting the rating of another item and it is computed as a correlation coefficient between-Bolzano Domeninkanerplatz 3, Bozen, Italy e-mail: {lbaltrunas,fricci}@unibz.it B. Berendt et al. (Eds.): Knowl. Disc. Enhan

Ricci, Francesco

96

Application of conditional sampling for measuring ecosystem-scale carbon dioxide exchange in coastal wetlands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and seasonal carbon cycles in these ecosystems as well as the response of these systems to environmental change. One convenient method for continuously measuring CER in remote ecosystems is tower-based conditional sampling. With conditional sampling, CER...

Cobos, Douglas Russell

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

97

Elastic-plastic analysis of the transition divertor joint for high performance divertor target plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CER) 8. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a

Navaei, Dara

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Capitulo 7 Estudio de la finalizacion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

este caso se debe a desenrollamiento de cadenas polimericas. Por ultimo, los materiales ceramicos o

Romero, Ignacio

99

rstb.royalsocietypublishing.org Cite this article: VanRullen R, Zoefel B, Ilhan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-CerCo, UMR 5549, CHU de Purpan, Toulouse, France 3 Meram Medical Faculty, Konya University, Konya, Turkey

100

VIROLOGY 163, 319-329 (1988) Genetic identification of a Portion of the Herpes Simplex Virus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

., 1982b). The binding of ICP8 to DNA is cooperative under cer- tain conditions in vido (Ruyechan, 1983

Knipe, David M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Tailored net-shape powder composites by spark plasma sintering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structure in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells," Jour. Am. Cer.Pore Structure in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells, International

Khaleghi, Evan Aryan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Aboriginal Business Administration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aboriginal Business Administration Certificate #12;What is the Aboriginal Business Administra on Cer ficate (ABAC) Program? The Aboriginal Business Administra on Cer ficate (ABAC) is designed a cer ficate in business but do not want to study in a four year degree program. ABAC allows Aboriginal

Saskatchewan, University of

103

Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high cases. #12;1 Introduction The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has an important function

Skogestad, Sigurd

104

This article was published in an Elsevier journal. The attached copy is furnished to the author for non-commercial research and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending components to high-octane components for use in high. Introduction The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending components to high-per- formance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has an important function as the producer of hydrogen

Skogestad, Sigurd

105

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-related skin lesions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 | July 2002 729 Family Correlations of Arsenic Methylation Patterns in Children and Parents Summary: various health effects, including can- cers of the bladder, skin, and...

106

FPGA-Based Soft Vector Processors Peter Yiannacouras  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and in the PaCRaT group, it was cer- tainly a pleasure interacting with all my colleagues, thanks for technical

Rose, Jonathan

107

E-Print Network 3.0 - ammonium bromide ctab Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mathematics 3 List of abbreviations Abbreviation Meaning Summary: backwash CER Ceramic CIP Cleaning in place CS Chemical cleaning sequence CTAB Cetyl trimetyl ammonium... bromide...

108

E-Print Network 3.0 - anoxygenic photosynthetic bacteria Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the photosynthetic machinery, mechanistically simpler anoxygenic (non- oxygen-evolving) photosynthesis almost cer... -harvesting chlorosome struc- tures. In contrast, other...

109

Untersuchungen zur phosphatsenkenden Wirkung von Lanthancarbonat im Vergleich zu Aluminiumhydroxid bei der Katze.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Seltene Erde Elemente sind eine Gruppe hnlicher Elemente, zu denen das Lanthan und die 14 im Periodensystem folgenden Elemente Cer, Praeseodym, Neodym, Promethium, Samarium, Europium, (more)

Brugger, Nina Ines

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

E-Print Network 3.0 - actively inflamed liver Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: injection of iNKT activator -galactosylceramide ( -GalCer)...

111

Designing a Carbon Tax: The Introduction of the Carbon-Burned Tax (CBT)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

governmental subsidies, the fossil-fuel industries. The endsubsidy for a number of years, regardless of whether produ- cers reduced their actual fossil fuel

Cristian, Amy C.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Microwave-Assisted Ignition for Improved Internal Combustion Engine Efficiency  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Modeling of Emissions from HCCI Engines using a ConsistentMechanism for Iso-Octane HCCI Combustion With TargetedCharge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engine: Experimental and

DeFilippo, Anthony Cesar

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

HCCI in a Variable Compression Ratio Engine: Effects of Engine...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Fuels Practical Full Time HCCI Operation Will Require Specific HCCI Fuel Low Octane gasoline Experimental Variables Experimental Variables Engine Variables Intake Manifold...

114

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control with ventilation, given current ventilation and filtration system practices, are the indoor-sourced gaseous pollutants with low octanal-air

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Introduction Un rapide examen de la distribution gographique  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

part of Holocene, suggesting an important role of fires in these environmental evolutions. The history of environmental evolution cer- tainly had an impact on the development of human societies in this area. Vannière'un événement d'incendie. Ces évolutions ont cer- tainement eu un impact important sur le développement des

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

116

CENTER FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RADIATION STUDIES Texas Tech University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for advising the government of Iraq on characterizing and decommissioning former nuclear facilities homeland security and international nuclear safety. STRENGTHS: Scientists associated with CERS have been leaders in research at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station in Ukraine since 1992. Recently, CERS

Rock, Chris

117

Integration of lipidomics and transcriptomics data towards a systems biology model of sphingolipid metabolism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f13 k f14 k f15 k f16 k f17 k f18 k f19 k b19 k f20 k b20 kC 16 Cer][Cerk] v 18 = k f18 [C 16 CerP] v 19 = k f19 [C 16

Gupta, Shakti; Maurya, Mano R; Merrill Jr, Alfred H; Glass, Christopher K; Subramaniam, Shankar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Effects of EGR, water/N2/CO2 injection and oxygen enrichment on the availability destroyed due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion of iso octane.................................................................................................... 24 3 Percentage availability destroyed for different ?Cooled? EGR fractions as a function of reactant temperature for constant... volume combustion of iso octane, reactant pressure of 500 kPa......................................................... 24 4 Product temperature for different ?Cooled? EGR fractions as a function of reactant temperature for constant pressure combustion...

Sivadas, Hari Shanker

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

119

Hydrogen Storage -Overview George Thomas, Hydrogen Consultant to SNL*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Forecourt storage (refueling stations) requirements being developed (IHIG) Distribution storage (delivery 75 100 125 hydrogen m ethane ethane propane butane pentane hexane heptane octane (gasoline) cetane (diesel) octane (gasoline) heptane hexane pentane butane ethane propane ethanol m ethane m ethanol am m

120

Combustion and Flame 142 (2005) 266275 www.elsevier.com/locate/combustflame  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

compression ignition (HCCI) conditions on the iso-octane ignition characteristics were studied. Experimental. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Iso-octane; Ignition delay time; HCCI; Rapid.S. Wooldridge). 1. Introduction Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) represents a potential major

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Liquid-liquid equilibria for ternary systems containing hydrocarbons and propylene carbonate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental data of liquid-liquid equillibrium at 20/sup 0/C are reported for six ternary systems containing propylene carbonate with n-hexane-benzene, n-hexane-ethylbenzene, n-heptane-toluene, n-heptane-ethylbenzene, n-octane-o-xylene, and n-octane-ethylbenzene. The data are correlated by means of NRTL and UNIQUAC models and relative parameters are given.

Annesini, M.C.; Gironi, F.; Marrelli, L.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

NATCOR -Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATCOR - Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4.5 for heating to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce all three products. The octane level

Hall, Julian

123

RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE By Michael J. Moran, Mike J. Halde, Rick M. Clawges and John S. Zogorski U in the United States as an octane enhancer and oxygenate in gasoline. Octane enhancement began in the late 1970's with the phase-out of tetraethyl lead from gasoline. The use of oxygenates was expanded

124

4-H Club Officer Handbook-President  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effectively at all club meetings. ? Use basic parliamentary procedure as a tool to conduct effective, orderly meetings. (Refer to the Parliamentar- ian offi cer duties for a brief parliamen- tary procedure guide). ? With assistance from the 4-H club manager..., arrange for a meeting time and place. ? Arrive at least 30 minutes early to set up for each meeting. ? Work with the club manager and of- fi cers to develop an agenda for each meeting. ? Communicate with offi cers, members and leaders about assignments...

Howard, Jeff W.

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

125

FI 4 u 2 mai 95 u page 1 Changement de serveur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- cer ses serveurs Vax par un serveur multifonctions (calcul, fichiers, services de base, périphériques_int92 (contre quelques dizaines pour les Vax) et ses performances en service de fichiers sont estimées à

126

The Transition to a Carbon-Neutral Energy Economy: Exploring UCSD's Role  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Jacobs School, the CER just reduced carbon intensity?Carbon intensity would like to involve more chemistry,and of power. We note that carbon intensity is humanities

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A multi-data comparison of shortwave climate forcing changes E. Palle,1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- tions from ground-based radiometer data from the Global Energy Balance Archive (GEBA) suggest , which is highly climatically significant. The largest discrepancy among the data sets occurs during 2000) and the Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CER

Bago, Enric Palle

128

MILLER INSTITUTE NEWSLETTER Miller Fellow Focus: Matthew Good  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

division (mitosis, see Fig 1A). The spin- dle cannot make mistakes: can- cer and developmental disorders of development or upon the activa- tion of target genes. Alternatively, the size of the spin- dle may

Militzer, Burkhard

129

a amework for change Prepared by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources Board for the State of California D. Nichols Chairman, Air Resources Board James N. Goldstene Executive O cer, Air Resources Board_____________________________________ C-138 Industry____________________________________________C-150 Recycling and Waste

130

a amework for change Prepared by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources Board for the State of California D. Nichols Chairman, Air Resources Board James N. Goldstene Executive O cer, Air Resources Board____________________________________________C-150 Recycling and Waste_________________________________ C-158 Forests

131

Journal of Machine Learning Research 8 (2007) 2443-2466 Submitted 7/07; Published 10/07 The Need for Open Source Software in Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carl Edward Rasmussen CER54@CAM.AC.UK Department of Engineering Trumpington Street Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Pereira, Carl Edward Rasmussen, Gunnar R¨atsch, Bernhard Sch¨olkopf, Alexander Smola, Pascal Vincent

Bottou, Léon

132

Journal of Machine Learning Research 8 (2007) 24432466 Submitted 7/07; Published 10/07 The Need for Open Source Software in Machine Learning  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carl Edward Rasmussen CER54@CAM.AC.UK Department of Engineering Trumpington Street Cambridge, CB2 1PZ Pereira, Carl Edward Rasmussen, Gunnar R? atsch, Bernhard Sch? olkopf, Alexander Smola, Pascal Vincent

Bottou, Léon

133

IEDWorking Paper 6 February 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Economics PEPE, ETH Zurich, Institute for Environmental Decisions IED, CH-8092 Zurich **Economics/Resource Economics, Center of Economic Research CER, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich ***Department of Forest Economics

Fischlin, Andreas

134

InsideIllinoisDec. 5, 2013 Vol. 33, No. 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distinguished ef- forts to advance science or its applications." New fellows will be recognized in a cer- emony research, which seeks to advance science while shaping so- ciety." Boppart, an Abel Bliss professor of en

Lewis, Jennifer

135

Budget Strategy: A Survey of California County Governments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

counties (17.6%) reported budget saving strategies and itD. Straussman. 1981. Budget Control Is Alive and Well: Caseal Association of State Budget Of?cers. National Governors

Sun, Jinping

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

MRIO GUERREIRO SILVA FERREIRA Professor Catedrtico do Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais e Cermica da  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cerâmica da Universidade de Aveiro, Portugal. Linha de Pesquisa: Materiais para aplicações em energia e na poluentes que se encontram muitas veses associadas aos revestimentos, por outras "limpas" tem sido, também

Paraná, Universidade Federal do

137

Century Wind Project Expansion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER es

138

Chad: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER

139

The State of the CDM & its Contribution to SD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distribution of CDM projects 2012 CER Total in the CDM Pipeline kCERs Population per cap. Latin America 609 23 category Renewables 61% Demand-side EE 5% Supply-side EE 11% Fuel sw itch 3% HFCs, PFCs & N2O reduction 2% Supply-side EE 10% CH4 reduction & Cement & Coal mine/bed 20% Renewables 28% HFCs, PFCs & N2O reduction

140

MTBE growth limited despite lead phasedown in gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This month's legislated reduction of the allowable amount of lead additives in gasoline will increase demand strongly for methyl-tert-butyl ether (MTBE) as an octane enhancer, but the economics of the refinery business and the likelihood of rapidly increasing high-octane gasoline imports probably will limit the size of the business in coming years. MTBE will be used to fill the octane gap now, but economics and imports of gasoline later on could hold down demand. The limited growth in sales of MTBE is discussed.

Storck, W.

1985-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

New etherification process commercialized in Finland  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase-out of leaded fuels in Europe, Asia, and parts of Africa and Latin America is increasing demand for octane and octane-bearing fuel components such as ethers. Early solutions to the problem of increasing octane while reducing tailpipe emissions involved use of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). According to Neste, using both tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) and MTBE can give refiners increased blending flexibility for volatility control. But the economics associated with TAME production often make TAME units difficult to justify. The paper discusses the NExTAME process, the unit at the Porvoo refinery and process improvements.

NONE

1997-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

142

A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production: a distillation tower, which  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A blending problem (Taha, Example 2.3-7, almost) An oil refinery has three stages of production **" means "**% octane".) Once crude oil enters the system, it goes fully through the process. The refinery

Galvin, David

143

EWO Mee'ng September 2012 Petrobras Refining Decision-Making Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: - Fuel demands - Diesel and gasoline Sulfur content - Gasoline octane Number 15) PDA extracCon factor model (NL) HDT sulfur reducCon (NL) Rigorous Blending Rules (NL) EquaCons: Volume balance Units TransformaCons (NL) Blending Solver

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

144

Cellulase for commodity products from cellulosic biomass Michael E Himmel*?, Mark F Ruth*1 and Charles E Wymans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dramatically over the past two decades, to the point where the fuel is now competitive for blending with gasoline to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, enhance octane, extend the gasoline supply, and promote more

California at Riverside, University of

145

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1CFostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

146

Phenomena that determine knock onset in spark-ignited engines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experiments were carried out to collect in-cylinder pressure data and microphone signals from a single-cylinder test engine using spark timings before, at, and after knock onset for four different octane-rated toluene ...

Revier, Bridget M. (Bridget Mary)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

School of Mathematical Sciences MTH5122 Statistical Methods Tutorial 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the resistance of petrol to engine knocking. In the UK, the most common petrol types are: Ordinary unleaded - 95 launched "super fuels" - petrol and diesel that have a higher research octane level. These fuels are said

Bogacka, Barbara

148

Industrial Fuel Switching - Emerging NGL Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Removing butanes and pentanes from gasoline to meet local and seasonal regulatory limitations on volatility requires US refiners to make up the lost octane with higher cost alternative components, and challenges them to either: store the liquids...

Cascone, R.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Detailed kinetic models for the low-temperature auto ignition of gasoline surrogates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of the search for gasoline surrogates for kinetic modeling purpose, this paper describes a new model for the low-temperature auto-ignition of n-heptane/iso-octane/hexene/toluene blends for the different linear isomers of hexene. The model simulates satisfactory experimental results obtained in a rapid compression machine for temperatures ranging from 650 to 850 K in the case of binary and ternary mixtures including iso octane, 1-hexene and toluene. Predictive simulations have also been performed for the autoignition of n heptane/iso octane/hexene/toluene quaternary mixtures: the predicted reactivity is close to that of pure iso octane with a retarding effect when going from 1- to 3-alkene.

Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, Ren; Warth, Valrie; Battin-Leclerc, Frdrique

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Novel anisole mixture and gasoline containing the same  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A novel anisole mixture containing anisole and a mixture of alkyl anisoles and liquid hydrocarbon fuels containing said novel anisole mixture in an amount sufficient to increase the octane number of said liquid fuel composition.

Singerman, Gary M. (Monroeville, PA)

1982-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1CFostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility Ryan Haerer, Program Analyst, Alternative Fuels, Office of Underground Storage Tanks, Environmental Protection Agency

152

THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of NO and N02 in a Turbulent Propane/Air Di fusion Flame,"Fuel Methanol Ethanol Ethane Propane i so Octane n - Cetanestage of the secondary Propane, at A spark air line contains

Grosshandler, W.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Parametric examination of the destruction of availability due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of temperature for reactant pressure of 500 kPa and #1; = 1.0, constant pressure combustion................ 19 2 Percentage availability destroyed as a function of reactant temperature for constant pressure combustion of iso-octane, reactant pressure of 500 k... combustion ................................................... 23 6 Percentage availability destroyed for lean equivalence ratios, constant pressure combustion of iso-octane at 500 kPa .......................................................... 24 7...

Chavannavar, Praveen Shivshankar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Midterm Exam: Chemistry 223 McGill University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

will consider to be pure n-octane (C8 H18). As you probably know, a bio-fuel, ethanol (C2 H5OH), is now being added to gasoline. Here we will assess which is the more environmentally friendly fuel, octane) Compound H2O(l) -285.830 CO2(g) -393.509 C2 H5OH(l) -277.69 C8 H18(l) -208.45 c) Which is the greener fuel

Ronis, David M.

155

Using Gamma-Ray Burst Prompt Emission to Probe Relativistic Shock Acceleration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is widely accepted that the prompt transient signal in the 10 keV - 10 GeV band from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) arises from multiple shocks internal to the ultra-relativistic expansion. The detailed understanding of the dissipation and accompanying acceleration at these shocks is a currently topical subject. This paper explores the relationship between GRB prompt emission spectra and the electron (or ion) acceleration properties at the relativistic shocks that pertain to GRB models. The focus is on the array of possible high-energy power-law indices in accelerated populations, highlighting how spectra above 1 MeV can probe the field obliquity in GRB internal shocks, and the character of hydromagnetic turbulence in their environs. It is emphasized that diffusive shock acceleration theory generates no canonical spectrum at relativistic MHD discontinuities. This diversity is commensurate with the significant range of spectral indices discerned in prompt burst emission. Such system diagnostics are now being enhan...

Baring, Matthew G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Mapping surrogate gasoline compositions into RON/MON space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, new experimentally determined octane numbers (RON and MON) of blends of a tri-component surrogate consisting of toluene, n-heptane, i-octane (called toluene reference fuel TRF) arranged in an augmented simplex design are used to derive a simple response surface model for the octane number of any arbitrary TRF mixture. The model is second-order in its complexity and is shown to be more accurate to the standard ''linear-by-volume'' (LbV) model which is often used when no other information is available. Such observations are due to the existence of both synergistic and antagonistic blending of the octane numbers between the three components. In particular, antagonistic blending of toluene and iso-octane leads to a maximum in sensitivity that lies on the toluene/iso-octane line. The model equations are inverted so as to map from RON/MON space back into composition space. Enabling one to use two simple formulae to determine, for a given fuel with known RON and MON, the volume fractions of toluene, n-heptane and iso-octane to be blended in order to emulate that fuel. HCCI engine simulations using gasoline with a RON of 98.5 and a MON of 88 were simulated using a TRF fuel, blended according to the derived equations to match the RON and MON. The simulations matched the experimentally obtained pressure profiles well, especially when compared to simulations using only PRF fuels which matched the RON or MON. This suggested that the mapping is accurate and that to emulate a refinery gasoline, it is necessary to match not only the RON but also the MON of the fuel. (author)

Morgan, Neal; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Smallbone, Andrew; Bhave, Amit [Reaction Engineering Solutions Ltd., 61 Canterbury Street, Cambridge CB4 3QG (United Kingdom); Cracknell, Roger; Kalghatgi, Gautam [Shell Global Solutions, Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

Preliminary assessment of potential CDM early start projects in Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Brazil/US Aspen Global Forum on Climate Change Policies and Programs has facilitated a dialogue between key Brazil and US public and private sector leaders on the subject of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). With support from the US government, a cooperative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Sao Paulo conducted an assessment of a number of projects put forth by Brazilian sponsors. Initially, we gathered information and conducted a screening assessment for ten projects in the energy sector and six projects in the forestry sector. Some of the projects appeared to offer greater potential to be attractive for CDM, or had better information available. We then conducted a more detailed assessment of 12 of these projects, and two other projects that were submitted after the initial screening. An important goal was to assess the potential impact of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) on the financial performance of projects. With the exception of the two forestry-based fuel displacement projects, the impact of CERs on the internal rate of return (IRR) is fairly small. This is true for both the projects that displace grid electricity and those that displace local (diesel-based) electricity production. The relative effect of CERs is greater for projects whose IRR without CERs is low. CERs have a substantial effect on the IRR of the two short-rotation forestry energy substitution projects. One reason is that the biofuel displaces coke and oil, both of which are carbon-intensive. Another factor is that the product of these projects (charcoal and woodfuel, respectively) is relatively low value, so the revenue from carbon credits has a strong relative impact. CERs also have a substantial effect on the NPV of the carbon sequestration projects. Financial and other barriers pose a challenge for implementation of most of the projects. In most cases, the sponsor lacks sufficient capital, and loans are available only at high interest rate and with substantial guarantee. A few of the projects might go ahead without the benefit of CERs, but most probably would not. Whether the projected revenue from CERs would be sufficient to induce sponsors to proceed with the projects is an important issue that requires further investigation. All of the projects contribute to economic development in Brazil. The forestry projects in particular would create a significant number of rural jobs, and contribute income to rural communities. Some of the carbon sequestration projects would provide environmental benefits with respect to protection of biodiversity and soil.

Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.; Lehman, B.; Schumacher, K.; van Vliet, O.; Moreira, J.R.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Century Expansion (08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER es una

159

Century Expansion (4Q07) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER es unaExpansion

160

Century Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER esMidAmerican Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Cerro Gordo Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER esMidAmerican

162

Cerro Prieto Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CER esMidAmericanArea

163

Catalyst and process development for synthesis gas conversion to isobutylene. Quarterly report, October 1, 1993--December 31, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objectives of this project are to develop a new catalyst; the kinetics for this catalyst; reactor models for trickle bed, slurry and fixed bed reactors; and to simulate the performance of fixed bed trickle flow reactors, slurry flow reactors, and fixed bed gas phase reactors for conversion of a hydrogen lean synthesis gas to isobutylene. A hydrogen-lean synthesis gas with a ratio of H{sub 2}/CO of 0.5 to 1.0 is produced from the gasification of coal, lignite, or biomass. Isobutylene is a key reactant in the synthesis of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and of isooctanes. MTBE and isooctanes are high octane fuels used to blend with low octane gasolines to raise the octane number required for modern automobiles. The production of these two key octane boosters is limited by the supply of isobutylene. MTBE, when used as an octane enhancer, also decreases the amount of pollutants emitted from the exhaust of an automobile engine.

Anthony, R.G.; Akgerman, A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Production of Liquid Cluster Ions by Nozzle Beam Source with and without He Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a new type of cluster ion source which could produce various kinds of liquid clusters such as water, methanol, ethanol and octane clusters. When the vapor pressure was larger than one atm, the water and ethanol clusters could be produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon without adding He gas. The peak size of the cluster ions increased with the increase of the vapor pressures. When the source temperature was at room temperature, the water and ethanol clusters were also produced by adding He gas. In another case of producing liquid clusters such as methanol and octane clusters, He gas was added to mix up with vapors of liquid materials. When the He gas pressure was larger than a few atms, the methanol and octane clusters were produced at a vapor pressure of two atm. The peak size increased with increase of the vapor pressure as well as the He gas pressure.

Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Okada, T.; Sugiyama, K. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

165

New processes to recovery methanol and remove oxygenates from Valero MTBE unit  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The refiner today has to evaluate every available option to increase octane in the gasoline pool to make up for the loss in octane created by lead phase down. Production of MTBE is one of the most attractive options. MTBE is produced by selectivity reacting isobutylene with methanol. Valero Refining's refinery at Corpus Christie, Texas (formerly Saber Refining) is one of the most modern refineries built in the last decade to upgrade resids. As part of the gasoline upgrading Valero had built a Butamer Unit to convert normal butane to isobutane upstream of their HF Alkylation Unit. In 1984 as an ongoing optimization of its operations, Valero Refining evaluated various processes to enable it to increase the octane output, and decided to build an MTBE unit. Valero selected the MTBE process licensed by Arco Technology, Inc. and contracted with Jacobs Engineering Group, Inc., Houston, Texas to provide detailed engineering and procurement services.

Hillen, P.; Clemmons, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Modeling HCCI using CFD and Detailed Chemistry with Experimental Validation and a Focus on CO Emissions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Multi-zone CFD simulations with detailed kinetics were used to model engine experiments performed on a diesel engine that was converted for single cylinder, HCCI operation, here using iso-octane as the fuel. The modeling goals were to validate the method (multi-zone combustion modeling) and the reaction mechanism (LLNL 857 species iso-octane), both of which performed very well. The purpose of this paper is to document the validation findings and to set the ground work for further analysis of the results by first looking at CO emissions characteristics with varying equivalence ratio.

Hessel, R; Foster, D; Aceves, S; Flowers, D; Pitz, B; Dec, J; Sjoberg, M; Babajimopoulos, A

2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

167

Process and catalyst for converting synthesis gas to liquid hydrocarbon mixture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Synthesis gas containing CO and H.sub.2 is converted to a high-octane hydrocarbon liquid in the gasoline boiling point range by bringing the gas into contact with a heterogeneous catalyst including, in physical mixture, a zeolite molecular sieve, cobalt at 6-20% by weight, and thoria at 0.5-3.9% by weight. The contacting occurs at a temperature of 250.degree.-300.degree. C., and a pressure of 10-30 atmospheres. The conditions can be selected to form a major portion of the hydrocarbon product in the gasoline boiling range with a research octane of more than 80 and less than 10% by weight aromatics.

Rao, V. Udaya S. (Monroeville, PA); Gormley, Robert J. (Pittsburgh, PA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Distributed ignition method and apparatus for a combustion engine  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus for operating an internal combustion engine is provided. The method comprises the steps of introducing a primary fuel into a main combustion chamber of the engine, introducing a pilot fuel into the main combustion chamber of the engine, determining an operating load of the engine, determining a desired spark plug ignition timing based on the engine operating load, and igniting the primary fuel and pilot fuel with a spark plug at the desired spark plug ignition timing. The method is characterized in that the octane number of the pilot fuel is lower than the octane number of the primary fuel.

Willi, Martin L.; Bailey, Brett M.; Fiveland, Scott B.; Gong, Weidong

2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

169

College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Summer 2011 Volume 7, No. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is interested in investigating powdered green tea as complementary therapy in the treatment of can- cer, but wants to verify the purity of her green tea powders. Dr. William Hanneman is conducting a lab exercise conducted pesticide analysis on tea and rice bran, looking for pesticide residues before these products

Stephens, Graeme L.

170

"No somos juguete de nadie..." es a la vez parte y resultado de un esfuerzo de anlisis comparativo del Programa Mundial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;11 cer vínculos directos con los recursos naturales renova- bles (agua, biodiversidad) y no-renovables recursos naturales. La hipótesis fundamental de la in- vestigación era que las políticas de los movimientos sociales, haciendo que los recursos naturales y los benefi- cios que se derivan de

Richner, Heinz

171

Amyloid -Protein Fibrillogenesis STRUCTURE AND BIOLOGICAL ACTIVITY OF PROTOFIBRILLAR INTERMEDIATES*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a number of forms in vivo (2). Among those forms found in amyloid deposits, 40 and 42 residue long species's disease is characterized by extensive cer- ebral amyloid deposition. Amyloid deposits associated by the formation in the brain of intracellular neurofibrillary tangles and extracellular amyloid deposits (1

Benedek, George B.

172

Comparasion of finite difference and finite element hydrodynamic models applied to the Laguna Madre Estuary, Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and constituent fluxes. The finite difference scheme in SW=D is based on a spatial discretization of the water body as a grid of equal sized, square cers. The model includes the effects of wetting and drying, wind, inflows and return flows, flow barriers...

McArthur, Karl Edward

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Interference effects in photoreflectance and contactless electroreflectance spectra of CdTe films grown on Si substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interference effects in photoreflectance and contactless electroreflectance spectra of CdTe films and contactless electroreflectance CER spectra of CdTe films grown on Si substrate, at energies below the band gap of CdTe. The simultaneous observation of OF in the reflectance (R) spectrum having the same period

Ghosh, Sandip

174

J. Clairambault Theorems to treat cancer? Can theorems help treat cancer?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J. Clairambault Theorems to treat cancer? Can theorems help treat cancer? Jean Clairambault 1 INRIA who treat patients with can- cer? Can mathematics have an impact on cancer biology? Is mathematics more than just a tool in the hands of [a few open-minded] physicians willing to understand and treat

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

175

Volume 3 Issue 11 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis November 2008 A milestone test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on safety Stennis certifies final shuttle flight engine Steam blasts out of the A-2 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center on Oct. 22 as engineers begin a cer- tification test on engine 2061, the last space shuttle main flight engine scheduled to be built (see Page 4 article). Since 1975, Stennis has tested every

176

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

177

The Terminal Abdominal Ganglion of the Wood Cricket Nemobius sylvestris  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

chloride and fluorescent dyes from connectives revealed several small cells and seven pairs of giant. Fillings from the cercal nerves with cobalt chloride and fluorescent dyes revealed the projection the danger. The filiform wind-receptors are among the most sensitive animal mechanoreceptors. Cer- cal

Giron, David - Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, Université François Rabelais

178

Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy 4 Report Introduction 5 Product Types 5 A. Carbon Offsets 5 B. Certified Emission Reductions (CERs. Voluntary Carbon Confusion: A Consumer's Guide to Purchasing Carbon Offsets and Renewable Energy

Hoffman, Andrew J.

179

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Sept. 2006, p. 60706078 Vol. 72, No. 9 0099-2240/06/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.00483-06  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of a strain that rapidly degrades cercosporin (XCZ-3) were generated by ethyl methanesulfonate mutagenesis and uses light energy to produce the activated oxygen species superoxide and singlet oxygen (11, 47). Although cer- cosporin has been shown to produce both activated oxygen species, singlet oxygen appears

Daub, Margaret

180

Kangchendzonga: Secular and Buddhist perceptions of the mountain deity of Sikkim among the Lhopos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-wildness is shared by a long list of supernatural beings who inhab it the local territory and who are thought to provoke illness and mis fortune if offended by the presence of pollution (grib) generated by cer tain human actions such as quarrelling between...

Denjongpa, Anna Balikci

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

GRADUATE CERTIFICATE IN NONPROFIT ADMINISTRATION beginning Fall 2015 at Boise State University  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Decision-Making in Public and Nonprofit Management Pubadm 513 Economics of Public Policy Pubadm 515 Policy 560 State and Local Government Administration Pubadm 570 Public Management Skills and Techniques The new Boise State University Graduate Cer ficate in Nonprofit Administra on draws upon interdisciplinary

Barrash, Warren

182

An Indicator to Evaluate the Thermodynamic Maturity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to find universal principles that would determine the development of a system. A cer- tain success value to stages in a product's life cycle, a value that could be seen as a cost, like a negative the thermodynamic maturity of industrial systems at the level of single process units. The measure can be quantified

Kjelstrup, Signe

183

Revista Iguanazul, Number 6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

etnogrfica, sin ser la misma, pon- derando la creatividad, la origi- nalidad, la intensidad y el talento potico. Fue necesario hacer una investigacin de campo, hemero- grfica y bibliogrfica para cono- cer a fondo la cultura zoque: los zoques de la...

Santopietro, Judith

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Procceedings IFIP IEEE International Workshop on Distributed Systems: Operations and Management, October 15-16 1991, Santa Barbara, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procceedings IFIP IEEE International Workshop on Distributed Systems: Operations and Management that the security o cer of each component system has discretion regarding the trust invested in other component points of security control. #12;2 THE SCHEMATIC PROTECTION MODEL GMU researchers have been active

Sandhu, Ravi

185

Enrollment Form 20142015 ENGLISH AS A SECOND LANGUAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, 2014 (Registra on period is November 10, 2014 ­ January 25, 2015) Strengthening Oral/CC BUDGET APPROVAL TOTAL COST METHOD OF PAYMENT REFUND POLICY If a student withdraws from. By checking this box, I cer fy that I have read and understand the informa on in this form, including

von der Heydt, Rüdiger

186

Free-Space Management In this chapter, we take a small detour from our discussion of virtual-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 Free-Space Management In this chapter, we take a small detour from our discussion of virtual of a process). Specifically, we will discuss the issues surrounding free-space management. Let us make the problem more specific. Managing free space can cer- tainly be easy, as we will see when we discuss

Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi

187

Lessons Learned Quarterly Report, June 2005  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Welcome to the 43rd quarterly report on lessons learned in the NEPA process. In this issue we take a look at our hard-working NEPA Compliance Of?cers, who share bits of wisdom (and a little humor) gained from their lessons learned implementing NEPA. Countless thanks to all NCOs for their dedication, ?exibility, and perseverance.

188

The evolution of a disparity decision in human visual cortex Benoit R. Cottereau a,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The evolution of a disparity decision in human visual cortex Benoit R. Cottereau a,b, , Justin M, France b CNRS, CerCo, Toulouse, France c School of Psychology and Neuroscience, St Mary's Quad, South, Building 01-420, Stanford University, 450 Serra Mall, Stanford, CA 94305, USA a b s t r a c ta r t i c l e

189

TRANSFERGUIDE FOUNDED IN 1829, Rochester Institute of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in RIT residence halls, apartments, or townhouses on campus. On-campus fraterni- ties, sororities social events and activities are sponsored by the College Activities Board, Residence Halls Association's Teams--baseball, basketball, crew, cross country, ice hockey (Division I), lacrosse, soc- cer, swimming

Zanibbi, Richard

190

HPV & head and neck cancer: a descriptive update  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the manuscript. MS, LS, TU, WJ and MBS critically revised the manuscript. References 1. Parkin DM, Bray F: Chapter 2: The burden of HPV-related can- cers. Vaccine 2006, 24(Suppl 3):11-25. 2. Mignogna MD, Fedele S, Lo Russo L: The World Cancer Report...

Goon, Peter K C; Stanley, Margaret A; Ebmeyer, Jorg; Steinstraesser, Lars; Upile, Tahwinder; Jerjes, Waseem; Bernal-Sprekelsen, Manuel; Gorner, Martin; Sudhoff, Holger H

2009-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

191

Gaussian Process Training with Input Noise Andrew McHutchon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University Cambridge, CB2 1PZ ajm257@cam.ac.uk Carl Edward Rasmussen Department of Engineering Cambridge University Cambridge, CB2 1PZ cer54@cam.ac.uk Abstract In standard Gaussian Process regression input intuitive sense: for example, an application in Rasmussen and Williams (2006) [1] is that of modelling CO2

Edinburgh, University of

192

Journal of Machine Learning Research 11 (2010) 3011-3015 Submitted 8/10; Revised 9/10; Published 11/10 Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning (GPML) Toolbox  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/10 Gaussian Processes for Machine Learning (GPML) Toolbox Carl Edward Rasmussen CER54@CAM.AC.UK Department of Engineering University of Cambridge Trumpington Street Cambridge, CB2 1PZ, UK Hannes Nickisch HN and classification Gaussian processes (GPs) (Rasmussen and Williams, 2006) have convenient properties for many

Kaski, Samuel

193

Marc P. Deisenroth, Carl E. Rasmussen, and Jan Peters: Model-Based Reinforcement Learning with  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marc P. Deisenroth, Carl E. Rasmussen, and Jan Peters: Model-Based Reinforcement Learning with Continuous States and Actions Marc P. Deisenroth1 , Carl E. Rasmussen1,2 , and Jan Peters2 1- University of Cambridge - Department of Engineering Trumpington Street, Cambridge CB2 1PZ - UK {mpd37|cer54}@cam.ac.uk 2

Edinburgh, University of

194

Multi-Modal Communications in Underwater Sensor Networks Using Depth Adjustment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

taking energy usage into account. We perform a preliminary analysis of the methods and show counterparts for minimizing energy usage and minimizing hop count. We find that while there are cer- tainly Acoustic communication typically dominates the power us- age in underwater sensor networks. As networks

Farritor, Shane

195

Microsoft Word - Alcoa ROD Attachments.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 0 0 Non-Fed CER (Canada) 137 137 137 137 137 137 141 141 141 141 141 141 139 0 Total Hydro Resources 6,552 7,736 7,440 7,522 6,669 6,224 5,122 8,767 7,446 7,322 7,214 6,490...

196

ACADEMIC CENTER FOR COMPUTING AND MEDIA STUDIES (ACCMS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DNA repair mechanisms maintain life by combating various external and internal threats. http://house.rbc.kyoto-u.ac.jp/english.html CENTER FOR ECOLOGICAL RESEARCH (CER) The approach taken by the Center for Ecological Research combines field studies, theory and experimentation, using methodologies such as the detection of ecological

Takada, Shoji

197

THE CENTER FOR HEALTH AND THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- gram provides Chicago Public Schools students with hands-on experi- ence and mentoring in health careANNUAL REPORT 2012 THE CENTER FOR HEALTH AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO #12 16 KM1 CER 20 CCTS 22 HRSA FAMILY MEDICINE 24 RESEARCH 26 FINDING ANSWERS 29 HEALTH STATISTICS 31

Mateo, Jill M.

198

Perspective The NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL of MEDICINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must slow the growth of health care costs and improve value through payment reforms, including bundling to care delivery, all health care provid- ers must be permitted to practice to the fullest extent cannot cer- tify home health care visits or stays in skilled nursing facilities or hospice, order durable

Shyu, Mei-Ling

199

Use of Cost Estimating Relationships  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

200

Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification Department of ECE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Power Grid Voltage Integrity Verification Maha Nizam Department of ECE University of Toronto devgan@magma-da.com ABSTRACT Full-chip verification requires one to check if the power grid is safe, i.e., if the voltage drop on the grid does not exceed a cer- tain threshold. The traditional simulation-based solution

Najm, Farid N.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Coherent radiation diagnostics Bernhard Schmidt -FLA-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)exp(-it)dt - normalized charge density spectral energy density source characteristics (CSR,CTR,CER,CDR,SP..) - integral, 'longitudinal fingerprint' #12;CR ports at FLASH BC2 CSR port feeding "TOSYLAB" Beamline beeing `revised' new optics, vacuum BC2 CDR port -5-10 mm diffraction radiator - cryst. quartz window - two pyro detectors

202

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--22000000 34 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c ancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer L ung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung can cer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lun g cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cance r Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer

Paxton, Anthony T.

203

Sparkr Blade Test Centre Wind turbines with a rotor diameter exceed-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sparkr Blade Test Centre Wind turbines with a rotor diameter exceed- ing 2 metres must have a type of a wind turbine. Failure of a rotor blade in service often involves damage of the entire turbine operating type cer- tification systems for wind turbines. Reg. no. 427 The Sparkr Blade Test Centre became

204

Curriculum Vitae Professor Anthony O'Hagan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Simultaneous Equations Model" 1974 PhD Statistics Employment 1969­1971 Central Electricity Generating Board Pearson Prizes for statistics 1969 BSc Statistics with First Class Honours 1969 Science Faculty Medal 1971, London. Research O¢ cer. 1973­1975 University of Dundee. Lecturer in Statistics, Department

O'Hagan, Tony

205

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 2009, p. 60876093 Vol. 75, No. 19 0099-2240/09/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.01538-09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glucose liberation and produced ethanol directly from phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose. The final ethanol saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to ethanol can be efficiently accomplished with a yeast strain of simultaneous cellulose saccharification and ethanol fermentation. One attractive candidate is Saccharomyces cer

Chen, Wilfred

206

Alaska Nanooks Blue and Gold Game October 5, 2012 ALASKA POST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- portation and personal property. Renner,whowasnamed the supervisor of the quarter, has the number- one item. Johnson, gar- rison commander. He was talking about the civilian employee recognition program cer- emony, Lincoln Hawkes. In addition, he manages a staff of eight, rated a high- ly satisfactory on his June 2012

207

IOP PUBLISHING ENVIRONMENTAL RESEARCH LETTERS Environ. Res. Lett. 2 (2007) 044005 (8pp) doi:10.1088/1748-9326/2/4/044005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

approximately three billion tons of CO2 equivalents every year. Its growing economy and large population through 2030. Therefore, a large potential of GHG emission reduction in China can be expected. The clean), greenhouse gas (GHG), Kyoto Protocol, certified emission reductions (CERs), China 1. Introduction The Kyoto

Kammen, Daniel M.

208

Green Chemistry Dynamic Article Links Cite this: Green Chem., 2011, 13, 91  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Chemistry Dynamic Article Links Cite this: Green Chem., 2011, 13, 91 www.rsc.org/greenchem PAPER Renewable gasoline from aqueous phase hydrodeoxygenation of aqueous sugar solutions prepared In this paper we demonstrate an integrated process for the production of high octane gasoline from maple wood

California at Riverside, University of

209

Microporous Materials DOI: 10.1002/anie.200502844  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

zeolites have been used to sieve linear from branched alkanes, to boost octane ratings in gasoline.[6. L. Clancy Department of Chemistry University of Texas-Pan American Edinburg, TX 78541-2999 (USA) Fax, Prof. Dr. O. M. Yaghi Materials Design and Discovery Group Department of Chemistry, University

Yaghi, Omar M.

210

Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www.cleantransportation.org North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 8/15/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with gasoline at different levels. E10 (10% ethanol /90% gasoline) is blended in almost all regular 87 octane such as corn, grains, and sugarcane, as well as crop and forestry waste materials. Ethanol is usually blended gasoline where as E85 (85% ethanol / 15% gasoline) is an alternative fuel for flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs

211

Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www.cleantransportation.org I www.ncsc.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7401, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 3/16/12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corn, grains, and crop and forestry waste materials. Ethanol is usually blended with gasoline on either E85 or gasoline, of any blend in between allow vehicle operators the ability to obtain fuel at different levels. E10 is a premium high- octane gasoline for cars and E85 (85% ethanol / 15% gasoline

212

Clean Transportation | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu | 3/13/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and sugarcane, as well as crop and forestry waste materials. Ethanol is usually blended with gasoline at different levels. E10 (10% ethanol /90% gasoline) is blended in almost all regular 87 octane gasoline where as E85 (85% ethanol / 15% gasoline) is an alternative fuel for flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) . What

213

Ethers have good gasoline-blending attributes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of their compatibility with hydrocarbon gasoline-blending components, their high octane blending values, and their low volatility blending values, ethers will grow in use as gasoline blending components. This article discusses the properties of ethers as blending components, and environmental questions.

Unzelman, G.H.

1989-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Wafer-Scale Assembly of Highly Ordered Semiconductor Nanowire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reported dry transfer method,13 is the use of octane and mineral oil (2:1, v:v) mixture as a lubricant a lubricant during the contact printing process which significantly minimizes the NW-NW mechanical patterned resist (Figure 1a and Supporting Information). During the process, NWs are in effect combed

Javey, Ali

215

Diagnostic Implications of the Reactivity of Fluorescence Tracers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of fuel concentration distributions with planar laser induced fluorescence of tracer molecules that are added to a base fuel are commonly used in combustion research and development. It usually is assumed that the tracer concentration follows the parent fuel concentration if physical properties such as those determining evaporation are matched. As an example to address this general issue a computational study of combustion of biacetyl/iso-octane mixtures was performed to investigate how well the concentration of biacetyl represents the concentration of iso-octane. For premixed mixture conditions with flame propagation the spatial concentration profiles of the two species in the flame front are separated by 110 {micro}m at 1 bar and by 11 {micro}m at 10 bar. For practical applications this spatial separation is insignificantly small. However, for conditions that mimic ignition and combustion in diesel and HCCI-like operation the differences in tracer and fuel concentration can be significant, exceeding hundreds of percent. At low initial temperature biacetyl was found to be more stable whereas at higher temperature (>1000K) iso-octane is more stable. Similar findings were obtained for a multi-component fuel comprised of iso-octane, n-heptane, methylcyclohexane, and toluene. It may be assumed that similar differences can exist for other tracer/fuel combinations. Caution has therefore to be applied when interpreting PLIF measurements in homogeneous reaction conditions such as in HCCI engine studies.

Sick, V; Westbrook, C

2008-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

216

Railroad Environmental Conference University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to Locate Contaminant Beneath Railroad Track Jim Hyslip ­ Hy for Ethanol 2% - 5% Natural Gasoline (Low octane) Contains BTEX which are the regulated compounds Geology Elevated track bed with perched water Below track bed is a 35 foot clay later about 10 feet below grade

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

217

Clearing the air with natural gas engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the increased popularity of natural gas vehicles which has spurred engine designers to manipulate fuel-air ratios, compression ratios, ignition timing, and catalytic converters in ways to minimize exhaust pollutants. The topics of the article include reducing pollutants, high-octane engineering, diesel to natural gas, and the two-fuel choice.

O'Connor, L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Standard version Advanced version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Minimum octane 8.5 7 4.5 To produce these products, Margaret purchases crude oil at a price of £11 per version Margaret Oil - basic (2) Before crude can be used to produce products for sale, it must version Advanced version Margaret Oil - basic (3) Crude Distill Naphtha Gasoline Distilled 1 Jet fuel

Hall, Julian

219

New Perspectives for light alkanes isomerization. Robert Hubaut*  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is an important challenge for petroleum refining industry. According to the literature, such a transformation, into the high octane number di-branched alkanes is an important challenge for petroleum refining industry and the other a protonic acid function. From this point of view, hetero- polyacids (HPAs) in mixing with one

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

220

90% of new cars have engines specially designed to run on hydrous ethanol. This avoids the expense of remov-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

competes with gasoline (petrol), diesel and MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether, added to gasoline to MTBE, however, ethanol is comparable regarding price per energy unit and has considerable environmental advantages. MTBE is added to gasoline as an octane booster, replac- ing the lead formerly used

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

UMass scientists tackle gas spills Underground microbesseenas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spills of the gasoline additive MTBE. First added to gasoline to enhance octane, and later in much larger by the federal Environmental Protection Agency found that even if use of MTBE was immediately curtailed, it would take decades to remove the contamination. MTBE's effect on humans is still being studied

Lovley, Derek

222

Petroleum: An energy profile, 1999  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report prepared by the Energy Information Administration covers the following topics: petroleum production and end-use sectors; resources and reserves; exploration and production; LPG sources and processing; motor gasoline octane enhancement; constructing pipelines; the strategic petroleum reserve; imports and exports; marketing; district descriptions and maps; and refinery processes and facilities. 33 figs., 7 tabs.

NONE

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Nonlinear effects of stretch on the flame front propagation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In all experimental configurations, the flames are affected by stretch (curvature and/or strain rate). To obtain the unstretched flame speed, independent of the experimental configuration, the measured flame speed needs to be corrected. Usually, a linear relationship linking the flame speed to stretch is used. However, this linear relation is the result of several assumptions, which may be incorrected. The present study aims at evaluating the error in the laminar burning speed evaluation induced by using the traditional linear methodology. Experiments were performed in a closed vessel at atmospheric pressure for two different mixtures: methane/air and iso-octane/air. The initial temperatures were respectively 300 K and 400 K for methane and iso-octane. Both methodologies (linear and nonlinear) are applied and results in terms of laminar speed and burned gas Markstein length are compared. Methane and iso-octane were chosen because they present opposite evolutions in their Markstein length when the equivalence ratio is increased. The error induced by the linear methodology is evaluated, taking the nonlinear methodology as the reference. It is observed that the use of the linear methodology starts to induce substantial errors after an equivalence ratio of 1.1 for methane/air mixtures and before an equivalence ratio of 1 for iso-octane/air mixtures. One solution to increase the accuracy of the linear methodology for these critical cases consists in reducing the number of points used in the linear methodology by increasing the initial flame radius used. (author)

Halter, F.; Tahtouh, T.; Mounaim-Rousselle, C. [Institut PRISME, Universite d'Orleans, 8 rue Leonard de Vinci, 45072 Orleans Cedex 2 (France)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

224

NATCOR -Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATCOR - Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4. Distilled naphtha can be used only to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce

Hall, Julian

225

C-C Activation in Biphenylene. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of (C5Me5)2M2(2,2-biphenyl) (M ) Rh, Co)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 Received December 17, 1996X Carbon-carbon bond remains an elusive target in organometallic chemistry. A few examples have appeared over the past 20 years by sublimation before use. The reaction of 1 with biphenylene was examined in n-octane-d18.11 Biphenylene reacts

Jones, William D.

226

Observational Study Designs for Comparative Effectiveness Research: An Alternative Approach to Close Evidence Gaps in Head-and-Neck Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Comparative effectiveness research (CER) has emerged as an approach to improve quality of care and patient outcomes while reducing healthcare costs by providing evidence to guide healthcare decisions. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have represented the ideal study design to support treatment decisions in head-and-neck (H and N) cancers. In RCTs, formal chance (randomization) determines treatment allocation, which prevents selection bias from distorting the measure of treatment effects. Despite this advantage, only a minority of patients qualify for inclusion in H and N RCTs, which limits the validity of their results to the broader H and N cancer patient population seen in clinical practice. Randomized controlled trials often do not address other knowledge gaps in the management of H and N cancer, including treatment comparisons for rare types of H and N cancers, monitoring of rare or late toxicity events (eg, osteoradionecrosis), or in some instances an RCT is simply not feasible. Observational studies, or studies in which treatment allocation occurs independently of investigators' choice or randomization, may address several of these gaps in knowledge, thereby complementing the role of RCTs. This critical review discusses how observational CER studies complement RCTs in generating the evidence to inform healthcare decisions and improve the quality of care and outcomes of H and N cancer patients. Review topics include a balanced discussion about the strengths and limitations of both RCT and observational CER study designs; a brief description of design and analytic techniques to handle selection bias in observational studies; examples of observational studies that inform current clinical practices and management of H and N cancers; and suggestions for relevant CER questions that could be addressed by an observational study design.

Goulart, Bernardo H.L., E-mail: bhg@uw.edu [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Public Health Sciences, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research (HICOR), Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Ramsey, Scott D. [Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Division of Public Health Sciences, Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research (HICOR), Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Parvathaneni, Upendra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States)

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Non-destructive thermal wave method applied to study thermal properties of fast setting time endodontic cement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal wave method is applied for thermal properties measurement in fast endodontic cement (CER). This new formula is developed upon using Portland cement in gel and it was successfully tested in mice with good biocompatibility and stimulated mineralization. Recently, thermal expansion and setting time were measured, conferring to this material twice faster hardening than the well known Angelus Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) the feature of fast hardening (?7?min) and with similar thermal expansion (?12??strain/?C). Therefore, it is important the knowledge of thermal properties like thermal diffusivity, conductivity, effusivity in order to match thermally the tissue environment upon its application in filling cavities of teeth. Photothermal radiometry technique based on Xe illumination was applied in CER disks 600 ?m thick for heating, with prepared in four particle sizes (25, 38, 45, and 53) ?m, which were added microemulsion gel with variation volumes (140, 150, 160, and 170) ?l. The behavior of the thermal diffusivity CER disks shows linear decay for increase emulsion volume, and in contrast, thermal diffusivity increases with particles sizes. Aiming to compare to MTA, thermal properties of CER were averaged to get the figure of merit for thermal diffusivity as (44.2 3.6) 10{sup ?3} cm{sup 2}/s, for thermal conductivity (228 32) mW/cm K, the thermal effusivity (1.09 0.06) W s{sup 0.5}/cm{sup 2} K and volume heat capacity (5.2 0.7) J/cm{sup 3} K, which are in excellent agreement with results of a disk prepared from commercial MTA-Angelus (grain size < 10 ?m using 57 ?l of distilled water)

Picolloto, A. M.; Mariucci, V. V. G.; Szpak, W.; Medina, A. N.; Baesso, M. L.; Astrath, N. G. C.; Astrath, F. B. G.; Bento, A. C., E-mail: acbento@uem.br [Departamento de Fsica, Grupo de Espectroscopia Fotoacstica e Fototrmica, Universidade Estadual de Maring UEM, Av. Colombo 5790, 87020-900 Maring, Paran (Brazil); Santos, A. D.; Moraes, J. C. S. [Departamento de Fsica e Qumica, Universidade Estadual Paulista Jlio de Mesquita Filho UNESP, Av. Brasil 56, 15385-000 Ilha Solteira, SP (Brazil)

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

228

Common variation in EMSYand risk of breast and ovarian cancer: a case-control study using HapMap tagging SNPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as breast or ovarian can- cer: a difference in allele frequency is sought between affected individuals and unrelated controls [16]. Two approaches have been proposed. The traditional, hypoth- esis-driven approach is to investigate single... -base pair putative promoter starting 500 base pairs upstream the gene was identified with gene2promoter http://www.genomatix.de, a pro- gram that allows for automated extraction of groups of promoters from a list of accession numbers or gene IDs...

Benusiglio, Patrick R; Lesueur, Fabienne; Luccarini, Craig; McIntosh, Joan; Luben, Robert; Smith, Paula; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Ponder, Bruce A J; Pharoah, Paul D P

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

229

Photon detection efficiency of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The photon detection efficiencies of multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes manufactured by different produ cers are estimated. A new fit method of the response spectra to low-intensity light, taking into ac count after-pulse and cross-talk effects is proposed to yield the initial number of photons. The value of photon detection efficiency is calculated using a calibrated photodetector as a reference.

Simonetta Gentile; Ekaterina Kuznetsova; Franco Meddi

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Three-dimensional seismic study of structures and salt tectonics of Eugene Island Area offshore Louisiana, Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AdtM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content by: oel S. Watkins (Chair of Commits) . S cer (Mem Ronald M. Brimhall (Member) Steve L. Dorobek (Member) )ii& v... L. Dorobek, Dr. Ronald M, Brimhall for their time and useful comments in reviewing this document. I would like to thank Newfield Inc. for their seismic data. In addition, my thanks are given to Andra Trikania, Fangjian Xue, Ilyas Najmudin...

Xiong, Ye

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

231

A study of the relationship between emotional history and the incidence of cancer in human subjects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Tarlou and Smalheisee (1951) found that patients with cancer of the breast had no overt sexual conflicts, whereas patients with cancer of the cer- vix had much more overt sexual conflicts. Leshan and Worthington (1957) found four factors which... recurrent life history patterns observed in patients with malignant disease. Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, 1957, 124, 460-465. Marmorston, J. Urinary hormone metabolite levels in pa- tients with cancer of the breast, prostate and lung. Annals...

Sebastian, Henry Andrew

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Action de l'manation du radium sur les sels de thorium Par HERCHFINKEL  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

417 Action de l'émanation du radium sur les sels de thorium Par HERCHFINKEL [Faculté des Sciences'une solution d'azotate de thorium abandonnée a elle-même pendant plusieurs mois dégage une cer- taine quantité'on fait agir une forte quantité d'émanation de radium sur le même sPl de thorium il se produit en- core

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

233

A, Science S?i.vice Feature Released u?on receipt  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~IWTLP'SICE-CAP Several journeys have been macle across the great ice-cap o r "inland ice'' wxhr &ich Greenland l i e, but the depth of the ice has hitherto re:zij.;md a mystery. The first steps toward getting positive inforination; off a charge of dynamite at a cer,tain Point on thc surface of the ice and recordirg tho shock

234

INTRAMURAL GOLF TOURAMENT ALL DIVISIONS Fall 2011 Division Sunday Sept. 18  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

INTRAMURAL GOLF TOURAMENT ALL DIVISIONS Fall 2011 Division Sunday Sept. 18 GOLF M W Team Member ?? EMAIL Tee-Time FIRST NAME LAST NAME or F TEAM NAME @psu.edu 9:00 AM Matt McTague M last round mim5187 Frankie Kehs M last round fjk5012 Chase Roman M Tiger Wood cer197 Dustin Hartzel M Tiger Wood dnh124 9

Omiecinski, Curtis

235

Chamberlain Wind Project | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CERChai Energy

236

Chameleon Optics Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El CERChai

237

Chaparral, New Mexico: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png El

238

Characterization of geothermal reservoir crack patterns using shear-wave  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png ElTemperatures

239

Characterization of the Upper Arkansas Basin, Chafee County, Colorado |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png ElTemperaturesreservoir

240

Characterization of the upper Arkansas Basin, Chaffee County, Colorado |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.png

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Charles City (1Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat Basin- A

242

Charlottesville, Virginia: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat Basin-

243

Chasing the Sun: Solar Adventures Around the World | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat

244

Chemical Logging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreatChateau Tebeau

245

Chemical and Isotopic Composition of Casa Diablo Hot Spring: Magmatic CO2  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreatChateau Tebeaunear

246

Chemical and Isotopic Prediction of Aquifer Temperatures in the Geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreatChateau

247

Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreatChateaufluids:

248

Chemical and light-stable isotope characteristics of waters from the raft  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreatChateaufluids:river

249

4.5 A Carnot cycle uses 1.00 mol of a monatomic perfect gas as the working substance from an initial state of 10.0 atm and 600 K. It expands isothermally to a pressure of 1.00 atm (step 1),  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, write +, -, or ? as appropriate. 4.15 Suppose that an internal combustion engine runs on octane, for which the enthalpy of combustion is -5512 kJ mol-1 , and take the mass of 1 gallon of fuel as 3 kg. What.00 gallon of fuel given that the engine cylinder temperature is 2000°C and the exit temperature is 800°C? 4

Findley, Gary L.

250

Self-ignition of S.I. engine model fuels: A shock tube investigation at high pressure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The self-ignition of several spark-ignition (SI) engine fuels (iso-octane, methanol, methyl tert-butyl ether and three different mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane), mixed with air, was investigated experimentally under relevant engine conditions by the shock tube technique. Typical modes of the self-ignition process were registered cinematographically. For temperatures relevant to piston engine combustion, the self-ignition process always starts as an inhomogeneous, deflagrative mild ignition. This instant is defined by the ignition delay time, {tau}{sub defl}. The deflagration process in most cases is followed by a secondary explosion (DDT). This transition defines a second ignition delay time, {tau}{sub DDT}, which is a suitable approximation for the chemical ignition delay time, if the change of the thermodynamic conditions of the unburned test gas due to deflagration is taken into account. For iso-octane at p = 40 bar, a NTC (negative temperature coefficient), behavior connected with a two step (cool flame) self-ignition at low temperatures was observed. This process was very pronounced for rich and less pronounced for stoichiometric mixtures. The results of the {tau}{sub DDT} delays of the stoichiometric mixtures were shortened by the primary deflagration process in the temperature range between 800 and 1,000 K. Various mixtures of iso-octane and n-heptane were investigated. The results show a strong influence of the n-heptane fraction in the mixture, both on the ignition delay time and on the mode of self-ignition. The self-ignition of methanol and MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) is characterized by a very pronounced initial deflagration. For temperatures below 900 K (methanol: 800 K), no secondary explosion occurs. Taking into account the pressure increase due to deflagration, the measured delays {tau}{sub DDT} of the secondary explosion are shortened by up to one order of magnitude.

Fieweger, K.; Blumenthal, R.; Adomeit, G. [RWTH, Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Allegemeine Mechanik] [RWTH, Aachen (Germany). Inst. fuer Allegemeine Mechanik

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Toxic species evolution from guayule fireplace logs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

those identified are compounds belonging to the chemical 23 TABLE 1 Gases Used to Calibrate Gas Chromatograph COMPOUND TIME WINDOIIP Hydrogen Propane Propene Isobutane N-butane Bute ne Trans-butane Cis-butane Carbon Dioxide Ethene Oxygen... MATERIAL COMBUSTION PRODUCT Natural Matenals Formaldehydes Acetaldehydes Acro(ein Wood Methane Propane Butane Hexane Heptane Octane 1, 3 - Butadiene Sultur dioxide Red Oak Nitrogen dioxide White Pine Methane Ethylene Propylene Methyl alcohol...

Soderman, Kristi Lee

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

U.S. Energy Situation, Ethanol, and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 1 U.S. Energy Situation, Ethanol, and Energy Policy Wally Tyner #12;Slide 2 Breakeven Corn Corn ($/bu) Crude($/bbl) Energy basis Price premium for octane/oxygen With subsidy and price premium.25 2.5 2.75 3 3.25 3.5 3.75 4 4.25 4.5 4.75 5 Corn ($/bu) Crude($/bbl) Energy basis Price premium

253

Kompetenscentrum Frbrnningsprocesser Centre of Competence Combustion Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Project 20 2.1 Quantative In-Cylinder Fuel Measurements in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine using-Off Length in an Optical Heavy-Duty DI Diesel Engine 21 2.3 LES of Jet-Jet Interaction Effects on Multi a Scania D13 truck size diesel engine with PPC using diesel fuel as well as gasoline in the 69-99 octane

254

Combustion behavior of gasoline and gasoline/ethanol blends in a modern direct-injection 4-cylinder engine.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early in 2007 President Bush announced in his State of the Union Address a plan to off-set 20% of gasoline with alternative fuels in the next ten years. Ethanol, due to its excellent fuel properties for example, high octane number, renewable character, etc., appears to be a favorable alternative fuel from an engine perspective. Replacing gasoline with ethanol without any additional measures results in unacceptable disadvantages mainly in terms of vehicle range.

Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A. (Energy Systems)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Increasing Biofuel Deployment and Utilization through Development of Renewable Super Premium: Infrastructure Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high octane fuel and specialized vehicle are under consideration as a market opportunity to meet federal requirements for renewable fuel use and fuel economy. Infrastructure is often cited as a barrier for the introduction of a new fuel. This report assesses infrastructure readiness for E25 (25% ethanol; 75% gasoline) and E25+ (more than 25% ethanol). Both above-ground and below-ground equipment are considered as are the current state of stations, codes and regulations, and materials compatibility.

Moriarty, K.; Kass, M.; Theiss, T.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Fuel-Specific Effect of Exhaust Gas Residuals on HCCI Combustion: A Modeling Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A modeling study was performed to investigate fuel-specific effects of exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) components on homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion at conditions relevant to the negative valve overlap (NVO) strategy using CHEMKIN-PRO. Four single-component fuels with well-established kinetic models were chosen: n-heptane, iso-octane, ethanol, and toluene. These fuels were chosen because they span a wide range of fuel chemistries, and produce a wide compositions range of complete stoichiometric products (CSP). The simulated engine conditions combined a typical spark ignition engine compression ratio (11.34) and high intake charge temperatures (500-550 K) that are relevant to NVO HCCI. It was found that over the conditions investigated, all the fuels had overlapping start of combustion (SOC) phasing, despite the wide range in octane number (RON = 0 to 120). The effect of the EGR components CO2 and H2O was to suppress the compression temperature because of their higher heat capacities, which retarded SOC. For a concentration of O2 higher than the stoichiometric amount, or excess O2, there was an effect of advancing SOC for n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene, but SOC for ethanol was not advanced. Low temperature heat release (LTHR) for n-heptane was also found to be highly dependent on excess O2, and mild endothermic reaction was observed for cases when excess O2 was not present.

Szybist, James P [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Add MTBE unit ahead of alkylation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Approximately three years ago, the people at Diamond Shamrock's Sunray, Texas, refinery recognized a growing demand for high octane super premium unleaded gasoline in their regional marketing area. It was apparent that they would need to change their processing scheme to meet this growing demand. After investigating several options, they decided to install an MTBE (methyl tert-butyl ether) unit upstream of their existing sulfuric acid (H/sub 2/SO/sub 4/) aklylation unit. The new unit would process olefin feed before it entered the alkylation unit. The MTBE unit was expected to improve Diamond Shamrock's gasoline pool in two ways. First, the MTBE would be an additional high octane blending stock for the gasoline pool. Second, the MTBE unit would improve the quality of the olefin stream going to the alkylation unit. Diamond Shamrock brought their MTBE unit onstream in December, 1985. The results of the combined operation exceeded expectations, producing alkylate in excess of 98 RON (Research octane number) and MTBE of 118 RON. These components significantly upgraded the refinery's capability to produce a super premium unleaded gasoline.

Masters, K.R.; Prohaska, E.A.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Reforming petroleum-based fuels for fuel cell vehicles : composition-performance relationships.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Onboard reforming of petroleum-based fuels, such as gasoline, may help ease the introduction of fuel cell vehicles to the marketplace. Although gasoline can be reformed, it is optimized to meet the demands of ICEs. This optimization includes blending to increase the octane number and addition of oxygenates and detergents to control emissions. The requirements for a fuel for onboard reforming to hydrogen are quite different than those for combustion. Factors such as octane number and flame speed are not important; however, factors such as hydrogen density, catalyst-fuel interactions, and possible catalyst poisoning become paramount. In order to identify what factors are important in a hydrocarbon fuel for reforming to hydrogen and what factors are detrimental, we have begun a program to test various components of gasoline and blends of components under autothermal reforming conditions. The results indicate that fuel composition can have a large effect on reforming behavior. Components which may be beneficial for ICEs for their octane enhancing value were detrimental to reforming. Fuels with high aromatic and naphthenic content were more difficult to reform. Aromatics were also found to have an impact on the kinetics for reforming of paraffins. The effects of sulfur impurities were dependent on the catalyst. Sulfur was detrimental for Ni, Co, and Ru catalysts. Sulfur was beneficial for reforming with Pt catalysts, however, the effect was dependent on the sulfur concentration.

Kopasz, J. P.; Miller, L. E.; Ahmed, S.; Devlin, P. R.; Pacheco, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

259

The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

260

High temperature solution growth of pseudobrookite, Fe?TiO?, single crystals  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

if one were to consider an induction furnace, a constraint is faced in crucible materials. Crucibles of very high melting temperature such as platinum or iridium are quite costly. In order to lower the temperature at which the material becomes liquid.... J. M. . Principles of Induction Melting . American Foundrymen's Society, Inc. . Des Plaines, Illinois, 1977. Taylor. R. W. , Liquidus temperatures in the system FeO-FesOs-TiOs. J. of Arn. Cer. Soc. , 46, 276-279, 1963. Wanklyn, B. M. , Two new...

Baird, Bobbie Ann

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

May 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 14-16, 2013, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location CER #1 Black Sulphur. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods.

None

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

An ecological study of Brownseed paspalum (Paspalum plicatulum Michx.)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(Leon, 1946). Au. rtralia the species does uot occur naturally, but many int- oductions have been made . Inca 1930 (Bryan and Sha!r, 1964) . In Aust r. ai is P. plicotu raa has grown we11 from 1st. 1 7'S to 1st. 28'S In areas of sum?or rain; ail... seeds examined only 92 (2. 3 perce. . r) were normal good s&'ed . Most of the remaining 3, 908 seeds were destroyed by a fungus ;linens 1:nown as "ergot". Sr:ed smut angus on P. PLicatzzZum llichx. collected in ltinas Cer is, Braail, w. "s date...

Da Costa, Benedito Marques

1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

The late Victorian and Edwardian intellectual influence on the Wolfenden Report of 1957  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in England. Tne men in oositions of in& luence in the mid- wen:ieth cer, tury were influenced. oy the writens of the Sdwa-:lian pe"- od. The?afore, the wr itin~s of Oscar Wilde, Gco. "!. , e Hennand Shaw, Arthur Pin r o, Pdwand Garpenten, G, E. I.... Moore; the two leading playwrights, A. W. P1nero and. G. B. Shaw; and, finally, the leading literary figure of the day, Oscar Wilde. Each is handled in a slightly different way, dictated by the style of literary form they have used. CHAPTEH II...

McIntosh, Craig Lee

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Steam Trap Application  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ ~ [EMPERATURE ~ -Surface pyrometer may indicate fluctuation due to expected in termittent discharge. -Blow down strainer, -Look for other leaks 5 ~e~7;~~rP~;i;~h~d~~:cer ~ l/month most process ~ l/week critical process ~ and air heaters in winter... valves must be -Small leaks undetected condensate & steam arf being trap line size -Electrical safety-some discharged simultaneorsly -Added cost of test tee,valves devices -Some devices need cal~bration en nipples, etc_ -Infra red devices nee~ cali- Z...

Murphy, J. J.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

On social organization and behavior of nilgai antelope, Boselaphus tragocamelus (Pallas), in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thorough field behavior studies of bovids which were published before my field research began and which I used for guidance include: Schenkel (1966), impala, ~Ae cer- ~1(L. LDL t*t ); d 9 dp tt (1966), 3 p 1 of Kobus; Buechner and Schloeth (1965...), January through April 1969 59 10 Number of single females seen with 0, 1, 2, or 3 calves, January through April 1969, and 29 March to 4 April 1972 61 Adult sex ratios, by month 12 Frequency of flight as a function of distance from truck to nilgai...

Fall, Bruce Alan

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

A comparative study of women in early modern England and their contemporaries in the Ottoman Empire  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the pubescent male (oglan), and the sexually mature but Peircc, Leslie P. "Seniority, Sexuality, aud Social Order: The Vocabulary of Gender in Early Modern Ottoman Society, " in Zilfi, Madeliue C. , ed. Women in the Ottoman Empire: Middle Eastern Women m... the Early Modern Era, Brill, Lcideu/New York/Koln, 1997, p. 172 Ibid. , p. 172 Ibid. , p. 173 Ibid. , p. 173 Abmed, Leila, p. 104 Peirce, Leslie P. , p. 181 Ibid. , p. 176 unmarried young man (the Turkish ergen, or mii cerred, excogitated from...

Jackson, Emily Anne

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

267

Department  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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268

Chai Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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269

Challenge Submissions | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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270

Chamca Holdings | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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271

Champaign, Illinois: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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272

Champepaden | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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273

Champion (Roscoe II) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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274

Chanarambie Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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275

Chandler Hills Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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276

Chandler, Arizona: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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277

Changes in Surficial Features Associated with Geothermal Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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278

Characteristics of Basin and Range Geothermal Systems with Fluid  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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279

Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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280

Characterization Of Geothermal Resources Using New Geophysical Technology |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Characterization of Fractures in Geothermal Reservoirs Using Resistivity |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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282

Characterization of a geothermal system in the Upper Arkansas Valley | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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283

Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso geothermal  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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284

Characterization of the Upper Arkansas Basin, Chaffee County, Colorado |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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285

Characterizing Structural Controls of Geothermal Fields in the Northwestern  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat Basin- A Progress

286

Charles City (2Q08) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat Basin- A8) Wind Farm

287

Charleston, South Carolina: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat Basin- A8) Wind

288

Charlestown Wind Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat Basin- A8)

289

Chase Tow Tank | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreat Basin-Overseeing

290

Chateau Tebeau LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWindSyracuse,CER.pngGreatChateau Tebeau LLC Jump

291

Chemical Consortium Holdings Inc ChemCon | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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292

Chemical Evolution and Chemical State of the Long Valley Magma Chamber |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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293

Centrotec Econcern JV | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

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294

LIDEM unit for the production of methyl tert-butyl ether from butanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the basic problems in the production of motor fuels is how to obtain high-octane unleaded gasolines that will meet today`s ecological requirements. The term {open_quotes}reformulated gasolines{close_quotes} has come into general use throughout the world to denote fuels with a certain chemical composition. These gasolines consist of preselected components; as shown by worldwide experience, they must include oxygen-containing compounds that are distinguished by high octane numbers and low reactivities. Standards in effect in the United States, Japan, and certain Western European countries require that automotive gasolines must contain at least 2-4% by weight of oxygen-containing compounds (calculated as oxygen). In the last 15 years, in order to meet these requirements, production has been set up in various countries for the manufacture of high-octane oxygen-containing components known as oxygenates. The most common of these is methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), obtained by etherification of isobutene by methanol. Process technology developed by this last organization was used as the basis for constructing a unit in the Nizhnekamskneftekhim Production Association and at the Mazheikyai Petroleum Refinery in Lithuania. MTBE production has been held back mainly by a shortage of isobutene, which is obtained mainly from butane-butene cuts produced in cat crackers. In order to alleviate this shortage, it has been proposed that MTBE should be obtained from saturated C{sub 4} hydrocarbons that are recovered in processing oilfield associated gas, and also in the refinery from primary distillation units, catalytic reformers, and hydrocrackers. A working design was developed in 1991-1992 by Lengiproneftekhim for a basically new combination unit designed for the processing of saturated C{sub 4} hydrocarbons, which has been termed the LIDEM unit (Leningrad - isomerization - dehydrogenation - MTBE).

Rudin, M.G.; Zadvornov, M.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Catalytic oxidative coupling of methane over Li/MgO using N2O as an oxidant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for methanol synthesis at 240 to 260 C and 5 to 10 MPa pressure. In the second step, HZSM ? 5 zeolite is used as a catalyst, to synthesize gasoline from methanol at. about 360 to 415 C and 2. 0 MPa pressure. The latter part, of this technology was developed... is converted to synthesis gas by steam reforming and the methanol synthesis uses conventional technology. The advent of this technology (MTG process), which synthesizes high octane gasoline from methanol, may be contrasted with the Fischer ? Tropsch process...

Yamamoto, Hiroshi

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Development of dynamic models of reactive distillation columns for simulation and determination of control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

are numbered from bottom to top. Hydrogen is required for the reaction and is fed as a separate stream above tray 25. There are three products coming out of the column. The vapor stream leaving the condenser mainly contains the unreacted hydrogen. The top... liquid product contains a roughly 30% of cyclohexane produced from the hydrogenation of benzene. The bottom product is also liquid and constitutes the main product stream as it has the desired octane properties due to the high percentage of toluene...

Chakrabarty, Arnab

2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

297

An experimental investigation of the burning characteristics of water-oil emulsions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted on the combustion characteristics of droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-hexadecane and iso-octane emulsified with various amount of water and freely falling in a furnace of controlled temperature. Results demonstrate the intricate influences of water emulsification on the ignition, extinction and micro-explosion of the droplet response, and that the droplet burning time can be significantly reduced through judicious fuel blending so as to minimize the ignition delay and advance the onset of micro-explosion.

Wang, C.H.; Chen, J.T. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Molecular mechanics calculations of five-membered and pseudo-four-membered rings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. 0]hept-6-ene. . . . . . 96 IV-6 Newman projection drawings of chair and boat conformations of bicyclic molecules. 107 IV-7 Boat, chair and half-planar conformations of tricyclo[3. 2. 1. 0' ]octane. 110 IV-8 Dihedral angles, c, p and r define... and C, ) 1. 2 1637 this work MM1 14 Ab-initio 3. 5 1644 1977 force field. 10 2225 1967 force field. 9 1669 6-31G basis set. 11 1808 2-D PE surface used. 8 MIRC, R 0 1824(50) Free pseudorot- 5 ation assumed. 2-D PE surface used. 1932 Free...

Cooper, Carol Rae

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Diffusion in associated and non-associated homologous series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and carbon dioxide and of the alkanes n-octane, n ? decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, and n-hexadecane in the solvents n ? heptane, n-dodecane, and n-hexadecane. Values of Vn and P for each solute-solvent pair were determined. For the dissolved gases, Vn... consisted of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, cycloheptane, methylcyclopentane, and cycloheptane. The data were interpreted using the Wilke-Chang diffusivity equation. Haluska and Clover (1971) used a...

Alhamid, Khalid A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline (Released in the STEO October 1999)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an increase in MTBE production between 1990 and 1994. MTBE demand increased from 83,000 in 1990 to 161,000 barrels per day in 1994. The reformulated gasoline (RFG) program provided a further boost to oxygenate blending. The MTBE contained in motor gasoline increased to 269,000 barrels per day by 1997.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

ETBE as a gasoline blending component. The experience of Elf Aquitaine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study, led by Elf Aquitaine for several years, shows the possibility to use ETBE instead of MTBE as a gasoline component and compares properties of these two ethers regarding different parameters like octanes, volatility, engine cleanliness, stability of the ethers themselves and of gasoline blends, lubricant compatibility and toxicological data. ETBE appears at least as good as MTBE and sometimes better, as ETBE is chemically more similar to hydrocarbons than MTBE and can be used advantageously as a gasoline oxygenated component. 9 refs., 4 figs., 8 tabs.

Chatin, L.; Fombarlet, C.; Bernasconi, C.; Gauthier, A.; Schmelzle, P.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

MTBE: Capacity boosts on hold amid demand concerns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Uncertainty reigns in the methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) market. {open_quotes}We have no choice but to put our expansion plans on the back burner,{close_quotes} says one producer. {open_quotes}Because of government actions, there are no MTBE plants being built or expanded.{close_quotes} Spot MTBE prices have risen ti 82 cts- 83 cts/gal from 76 cts-78 cts/gal earlier this month as the demand for octane enhancement increases for the summer driving season. Some observers say EPA may relax different oxygen requirements for gasoline in different seasons. That would simplify production and supply for MTBE makers.

NONE

1995-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

303

Total to withdraw from Qatar methanol - MTBE?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total is rumored to be withdrawing from the $700-million methanol and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) Qatar Fuel Additives Co., (Qafac) project. The French company has a 12.5% stake in the project. Similar equity is held by three other foreign investors: Canada`s International Octane, Taiwan`s Chinese Petroleum Corp., and Lee Change Yung Chemical Industrial Corp. Total is said to want Qafac to concentrate on methanol only. The project involves plant unit sizes of 610,000 m.t./year of MTBE and 825,000 m.t./year of methanol. Total declines to comment.

NONE

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

305

Gasoline marketing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Consumers have the option of purchasing several different grades of unleaded gasoline regular, mid-grade, and premium which are classified according to an octane rating. Because of concern that consumers may be needlessly buying higher priced premium unleaded gasoline for their automobiles when regular unleaded gasoline would meet their needs, this paper determines whether consumers were buying premium gasoline that they may not need, whether the higher retail price of premium gasoline includes a price mark-up added between the refinery and the retail pump which is greater than that included in the retail price for regular gasoline, and possible reasons for the price differences between premium and regular gasoline.

Metzenbaum, H.M.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for the production of branched C.sub.4+ oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

Barger, Paul T. (Arlington Heights, IL)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Process for the conversion of lower alcohols to higher branched oxygenates  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process is provided for the production of branched C{sub x} oxygenates from lower alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, propanol and mixtures thereof. The process comprises contacting the lower alcohols with a solid catalyst comprising a mixed metal oxide support having components selected from the group consisting of oxides of zinc, magnesium, zirconia, titanium, manganese, chromium, and lanthanides, and an activation metal selected from the group consisting of Group VIII metal, Group IB metals, and mixtures thereof. The advantage of the process is improved yields and selectivity to isobutanol which can subsequently be employed in the production of high octane motor gasoline.

Barger, P.T.

1996-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

308

Isomerization of hydrocarbons in the presence of zeolite-containing catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Y-type zeolites with 97% of the sodium removed and after aluminium removal (modulus close to 8) and without precious metal activation - are active and fairly selective catalysts for the isomerization of paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons at 200/sup 0/-280/sup 0/C. The isomerization activity of HY and HM zeolites correlates with the concentration of strong acid sites; the isomerization of paraffins requires stronger centres sites than are needed for the isomerization of naphthenes. HY Catalysts may be used for increasing the octane number of refined oils in catalytic reforming.

Zhorov, Yu.M.; Kartashev, Yu.N.; Panchenkov, G.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Three-stage autoignition of gasoline in an HCCI engine: An experimental and chemical kinetic modeling investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alternative HCCI combustion mode presents a possible means for decreasing the pollution with respect to conventional gasoline or diesel engines, while maintaining the efficiency of a diesel engine or even increasing it. This paper investigates the possibility of using gasoline in an HCCI engine and analyzes the autoignition of gasoline in such an engine. The compression ratio that has been used is 13.5, keeping the inlet temperature at 70 C, varying the equivalence ratio from 0.3 to 0.54, and the EGR (represented by N{sub 2}) ratio from 0 to 37 vol%. For comparison, a PRF95 and a surrogate containing 11 vol% n-heptane, 59 vol% iso-octane, and 30 vol% toluene are used. A previously validated kinetic surrogate mechanism is used to analyze the experiments and to yield possible explanations to kinetic phenomena. From this work, it seems quite possible to use the high octane-rated gasoline for autoignition purposes, even under lean inlet conditions. Furthermore, it appeared that gasoline and its surrogate, unlike PRF95, show a three-stage autoignition. Since the PRF95 does not contain toluene, it is suggested by the kinetic mechanism that the benzyl radical, issued from toluene, causes this so-defined ''obstructed preignition'' and delaying thereby the final ignition for gasoline and its surrogate. The results of the kinetic mechanism supporting this explanation are shown in this paper. (author)

Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert (France)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

In-Cylinder Reaction Chemistry and Kinetics During Negative Valve Overlap Fuel Injection Under Low-Oxygen Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel injection into the negative valve overlap (NVO) period is a common method for controlling combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as well as other forms of advanced combustion. During this event, at least a portion of the fuel hydrocarbons can be converted to products containing significant levels of H2 and CO, as well as other short chain hydrocarbons by means of thermal cracking, water-gas shift, and partial oxidation reactions, depending on the availability of oxygen and the time-temperature-pressure history. The resulting products alter the autoignition properties of the combined fuel mixture for HCCI. Fuel-rich chemistry in a partial oxidation environment is also relevant to other high efficiency engine concepts (e.g., the dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept from SWRI). In this study, we used a unique 6-stroke engine cycle to experimentally investigate the chemistry of a range of fuels injected during NVO under low oxygen conditions. Fuels investigated included iso-octane, iso-butanol, ethanol, and methanol. Products from NVO chemistry were highly dependent on fuel type and injection timing, with iso-octane producing less than 1.5% hydrogen and methanol producing more than 8%. We compare the experimental trends with CHEMKIN (single zone, 0-D model) predictions using multiple kinetic mechanisms available in the current literature. Our primary conclusion is that the kinetic mechanisms investigated are unable to accurately predict the magnitude and trends of major species we observed.

Kalaskar, Vickey B [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

THE ECONOMICAL PRODUCTION OF ALCOHOL FUELS FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNTHESIS GAS. Includes quarterly technical progress report No.25 from 10/01/1997-12/31/1997, and quarterly technical progress report No.26 from 01/01/1998-03/31/1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This project was divided into two parts. One part evaluated possible catalysts for producing higher-alcohols (C{sub 2} to C{sub 5+}) as fuel additives. The other part provided guidance by looking both at the economics of mixed-alcohol production from coal-derived syngas and the effect of higher alcohol addition on gasoline octane and engine performance. The catalysts studied for higher-alcohol synthesis were molybdenum sulfides promoted with potassium. The best catalysts produced alcohols at a rate of 200 g/kg of catalyst/h. Higher-alcohol selectivity was over 40%. The hydrocarbon by-product was less than 20%. These catalysts met established success criteria. The economics for mixed alcohols produced from coal were poor compared to mixed alcohols produced from natural gas. Syngas from natural gas was always less expensive than syngas from coal. Engine tests showed that mixed alcohols added to gasoline significantly improved fuel quality. Mixed-alcohols as produced by our catalysts enhanced gasoline octane and decreased engine emissions. Mixed-alcohol addition gave better results than adding individual alcohols as had been done in the 1980's when some refiners added methanol or ethanol to gasoline.

None

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Fiftieth CCR reformer goes on stream in Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fiftieth continuous catalytic reformer built since this technology was introduced by UOP Process Division in 1971 has gone on stream in West Germany. The 21,300-b/sd unit is in Deutsche Shell AG's Godorf refinery. It is the sixth such unit put in service by Shell International. Others are in refineries at Harburg, West Germany; Shellhaven, England; Palau Bokum, Singapore; Pernis, Netherlands; and Geelong, Australia. CCR units operate at much higher severity than older reforming units. Severity is a function of higher octane, lower pressure, and feedstock. The operating severity or catalyst deactivation rate may be 20 times that of high pressure, low octane units. Continuous catalyst regeneration is then the key for maintaining long-term operations at steady state conditions. To facilitate continuous catalyst regeneration, the three reactors are stacked. This design permits the catalyst to move in essentially plug flow through the reactors at a rate determined by the rate of catalyst withdrawal to the regeneration section.

Not Available

1985-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Global developments in MTBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper is intended to provide an overview of some of the recent developments in MTBE demand growth worldwide and the impact of these developments on MTBE demand in the future. It provides a perspective of the influence of developments in the US on the worldwide MTBE markets. The public`s outcry regarding oxygenates in gasoline, and specifically MTBE, that has been evolving in the US during the past several months is in response to a politically mandated requirement for a fuel that contains oxygen that is provided by MTBE or ethanol. This public unrest had negatively impacted the market price for MTBE at the time this paper was being prepared. However, the author believes that MTBE, because of its clean octane capabilities, will continue to be used as an octane blendstock for gasoline in increasing quantities worldwide as we move through lead phasedown in West Europe and other countries that are experiencing pollution problems relating to exhaust emissions from internal combustion engines. The objectives of this paper are as follows: review developments in MTBE demand 1990--2000; identify regions where MTBE demand growth will occur; review production growth for MTBE, both historical and forecast; examine world trade patterns during the period; assess methanol demand growth during the period; analyze MTBE`s regional price bias; and provide a forecast of future MTBE price trends.

Feller, L.W. [CMAI, Houston, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

315

DME-to-oxygenates process studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of the production of hydrocarbons from dimethyl ether (DNM) has been illustrated in a fixed bed micro-reactor as well as a bench scale fluidized bed reactor by the University of Akron/EPRI DME-to-Hydrocarbon (DTG) Process. The DTG process has distinct advantages over its methanol based counterpart. Specifically, the DTG process excels in the area of higher productivity, higher per-pass conversion, and lower heat duties than the MTG process. Also of special importance is the production of oxygenates -- including MTBE, ETBE, and TAME. DME may be reacted with isobutylene to produce a mixture of MTBE and ETBE. The properties of ETBE excel over MTBE in the areas of lower RVP and higher RON. According to industrial reports, MTBE is the fastest growing chemical (1992 US capacity 135,350 BPD, with expected growth of 34%/year to 1997). Also, recent renewed interest as an octane-enhancer and as a source of oxygen has spurred a growing interest in nonrefinery synthesis routes to ETBE. TAME, with its lower RVP and higher RON has proven useful as a gasoline blending agent and octane enhancer and may also be produced directly from DME. DME, therefore, serves as a valuable feedstock in the conversion of may oxygenates with wide-scale industrial importance. It should be also noted that the interest in the utilization of DME as process feedstock is based on the favorable process economics of EPRI/UA`s liquid phase DME process.

Tartamella, T.L.; Sardesai, A.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Kulik, C.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

316

Acute toxicity of methyl-tertiary-butyl ether (MTBE) to aquatic organisms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Due to the recent amendment of the Clean Air Act, oxygenates are now being added to gasolines to boost octane and reduce air pollution from combustion in heavily populated areas. Oxygenates such as alcohols (i.e. methanol) and ethers (methyl-tertiary-butyl ether, MTBE) are commonly being used. A series of bioassay studies have been conducted with MTBE, one of the most commonly used octane-enhancing additives. Freshwater and marine studies were conducted with fish, invertebrates and algae to determine the impact of this material on the environment following accidental spills. Static-renewal studies were run to ensure maintenance of MTBE, a highly volatile material in the test containers. Chemical confirmation of exposure concentrations demonstrated the adequacy of the exposure system. Mysid shrimp were highly sensitive to MTBE, with significantly less effect observed with the other species evaluated. These data have implications for spill response, particularly since MTBE is slow to biodegrade and will rapidly move through groundwater. Comparative data for other oxygenates will also be discussed.

BenKinney, M.T.; Barbieri, J.F.; Gross, J.S.; Naro, P.A. [Stonybrook Labs. Inc., Princeton, NJ (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

317

[98e]-Catalytic reforming of gasoline and diesel fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Argonne National Laboratory is developing a fuel processor for converting liquid hydrocarbon fuels to a hydrogen-rich product suitable for a polymer electrolyte fuel cell stack. The processor uses an autothermal reformer to convert the feed to a mixture of hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and water with trace quantities of other components. The carbon monoxide in the product gas is then converted to carbon dioxide in water-gas shift and preferential oxidation reactors. Fuels that have been tested include standard and low-sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel, and Fischer-Tropsch fuels. Iso-octane and n-hexadecane were also examined as surrogates for gasoline and diesel, respectively. Complete conversion of gasoline was achieved at 750 C in a microreactor over a novel catalyst developed at Argonne. Diesel fuel was completely converted at 850 C over this same catalyst. Product streams contained greater than 60% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis with iso-octane, gasoline, and n-hexadecane. For a diesel fuel, product streams contained >50% hydrogen on a dry, nitrogen-free basis. The catalyst activity did not significantly decrease over >16 hours operation with the diesel fuel feed. Coke formation was not observed. The carbon monoxide fraction of the product gas could be reduced to as low as 1% on a dry, nitrogen-free basis when the water-gas shift reactors were used in tandem with the reformer.

Pereira, C.; Wilkenhoener, R.; Ahmed, S.; Krumpelt, M.

2000-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

318

STAG UK Newsletter Issue 16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C' Few.,People H8d Gone :Before, I thought I hed it msde. Even allowed myself en hour for theh81f-hour journey to Beth's for my l'ift. And for once 811 went 'right . .. ' Into Beth' s gleeming white cer we piled, clutching our monies ~~d g60dies... simila,r events h8vE;prev;iousl,y done - m8ny, people heving tole8ve earl'y in order to c 8i{c'htr8in,s, c08ches, etc.. " S,~.A,G~ s~~es, ~ere ex~ellent, meking B fun-d~y into 8 profit~~l~ one as 'well. : We m8de 8 total of ?62; in' gr8'ti tude to ee...

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Design and performance of atomizing nozzles for spray calcination of high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key aspect of high-level liquid-waste spray calcination is waste-feed atomization by using air atomizing nozzles. Atomization substantially increases the heat transfer area of the waste solution, which enhances rapid drying. Experience from the spray-calciner operations has demonstrated that nozzle flow conditions that produce 70-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required for small-scale spray calciners (drying capacity less than 80 L/h). For large-scale calciners (drying capacity greater than 300 L/h), nozzle flow conditions that produce 100-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required. Mass flow ratios of 0.2 to 0.4, depending on nozzle size, are required for proper operation of internal-mix atomizing nozzles. Both internal-mix and external-mix nozzles have been tested at PNL. Due to the lower airflow requirements and fewer large droplets produced, the internal-mix nozzle has been chosen for primary development in the spray calciner program at PNL. Several nozzle air-cap materials for internal-mix nozzles have been tested for wear resistance. Results show that nozzle air caps of stainless steel and Cer-vit (a machineable glass ceramic) are suceptible to rapid wear by abrasive slurries, whereas air caps of alumina and reaction-bonded silicon nitride show only slow wear. Longer-term testing is necessary to determine more accurately the actual frequency of nozzle replacement. Atomizing nozzle air caps of alumina are subject to fracture from thermal shock, whereas air caps of silicon nitride and Cer-vit are not. Fractured nozzles are held in place by the air-cap retaining ring and continue to atomize satisfactorily. Therefore, fractures caused by thermal shocking do not necessarily result in nozzle failure.

Miller, F.A.; Stout, L.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Photoimageable composition  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The use of selected buffering amines in a photoimageable composition prevents process bias which with conventional photoresists causes designed features to be distorted, especially in corners and high resolution features. It is believed that the amines react with the catalysts, e.g., photoacids, generated to create an inert salt. The presence of the amines also increases resolution. Suitable photoimageable compositions includes: (a) a multifunctional polymeric epoxy resin that is dissolved in an organic solvent wherein the epoxy resin comprises oligomers of bisphenol A that is quantitatively protected by glycidyl ether and wherein the oligomers have an average functionality that ranges from about 3 to 12; (b) a photoactive compound; and (c) an amine that is selected from the group consisting of triisobutylamine, 1,8-bis(dimethylamino)naphthalene (also known as PROTON SPONGET.TM.), 2,2'-diazabicyclo[2.2.2] octane and mixtures thereof. The photoimageable composition is particularly suited for producing high aspect ratio metal microstructures.

Simison, Kelby Liv; Dentinger, Paul

2003-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Ashland puts emphasis on higher technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is reported that Ashland will be switching away from commodity-type petroleum projects, such as gasoline, and toward high-technology items, such as synthetic fuels, lubricants and speciality petrochemicals. New projects involved in the shift toward higher technology include a 5,000 bbl/day lubricating-oil plant at Rabigh, Saudi Arabia, the startup of the big new ethanol plant at South Point, Ohio, and the proposed $260 million acquisition of U.S. Filter. Ashland plans to sell some of the ethanol to be produced in the 3,500 bbl/day corn-based plant in Ohio, but will use the ethanol as an octane-boosting component in premium unleaded gasoline.

Not Available

1980-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

322

Development of FCC catalyst magnetic separation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic separation has been historically active in several different industries, yet has not been utilized in petroleum refining until recently. Development of economical permanent magnets with high magnetic strength has led to a new process known as MagnaCat{reg_sign}. The MagnaCat{reg_sign}. Process separates less active (high metals) particles catalyst from equilibrium Fluid Catalytic Cracking (FCC) catalyst, producing a higher activity/lower metals catalyst for recycle. Pilot FCC studies showed lower hydrogen, dry gas, and coke make with higher wet gas and octane from catalyst separated by MagnaCat{reg_sign}. With the use of a MagnaCat{reg_sign} Process unit, a refiner would produce an economic advantage of $0.20 to $0.40/Barrel of FCC charge and enhance unit operability.

Goolsby, T.L.; Moore, H.F. [Ashland Petroleum Co., KY (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

Pawel, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moore, D. [USCAR

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

324

Susceptibility of Aluminum Alloys to Corrosion in Simulated Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined was accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

energy savings by the use of mtbe to replace alkylate in automotive gasolines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents data on the differences in energy consumption in the production of leaded and unleaded AI-93 gasolines with various blend components. The authors investigate as high-octane components certain products that are more effective in use and less energy-consuming in production in comparison with alkylate. In particular, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is discussed; it is not poisonous, it has a high heat of combustion, and it does not attack materials of construction. The addition of 11% MTBE to gasoline lowers the cold start temperature of engines by 10-12 degrees. Moreover, no adjustment of the carburetor is required for the changeover to gasoline with 11% MTBE.

Englin, B.A.; Emel'yanov, V.E.; Terent'ev, G.A.; Vinogradov, A.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Autoignition of gasoline surrogates mixtures at intermediate temperatures and high pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition times were determined in high-pressure shock-tube experiments for various stoichiometric mixtures of two multicomponent model fuels in air for the validation of ignition delay simulations based on chemical kinetic models. The fuel blends were n-heptane (18%)/isooctane (62%)/ethanol (20%) by liquid volume (14.5%/44.5%/41% by mole fraction) and n-heptane (20%)/toluene (45%)/isooctane (25%)/diisobutylene (10%) by liquid volume (17.5%/55%/19.5%/8.0% by mole fraction). These fuels have octane numbers comparable to a standard European gasoline of 95 RON and 85 MON. The experimental conditions cover temperatures from 690 to 1200 K and pressures at 10, 30, and 50 bar. The obtained ignition time data are scaled with respect to pressure and compared to previous results reported in the literature. (author)

Fikri, M.; Herzler, J.; Starke, R.; Schulz, C.; Roth, P. [IVG, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Kalghatgi, G.T. [Shell Global Solutions U.K., P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

327

The Development of a Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for Diisobutylene and Comparison to Shock Tube Ignition Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is much demand for chemical kinetic models to represent practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel and aviation fuel. These blended fuels contain hundreds of components whose identity and amounts are often unknown. A chemical kinetic mechanism that would represent the oxidation of all these species with accompanying chemical reactions is intractable with current computational capabilities, chemical knowledge and manpower resources. The use of surrogate fuels is an approach to make the development of chemical kinetic mechanisms for practical fuels tractable. A surrogate fuel model consists of a small number of fuel components that can be used to represent the practical fuel and still predict desired characteristics of the practical fuel. These desired fuel characteristics may include ignition behavior, burning velocity, fuel viscosity, fuel vaporization, and fuel emissions (carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, soot and nitric oxides). Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, alkenes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, and aromatics. One approach is to use a fuel surrogate that has a single component from each class of hydrocarbon in gasoline so that the unique molecular structure of each class is represented. This approach may lead to reliable predictions of many of the combustion properties of the practical fuel. In order to obtain a fuel surrogate mechanism, detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms must be developed for each component in the surrogate. In this study, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is developed for diisobutylene, a fuel intended to represent alkenes in practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel. The fuel component diisobutylene usually consists of a mixture of two conjugate olefins of iso-octane: 1- or 2-pentene, 2,4,4-trimethyl. Diisobutylene has a similar molecular structure to iso-octane, so that its kinetics offers insight into the effect of including a double bond in the carbon skeletal structure of iso-octane. There are few previous studies on diisobutylene. Kaiser et al. [1] examined the exhaust emission from a production spark ignition engine with neat diisobutylene and with it mixed with gasoline. They found the exhaust emissions of diisobutylene to be similar to that of iso-octane. They saw a significant increase in the amount of 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene measured in the exhaust of the engine. They also found appreciable amount of propene in the exhaust, but could not explain the source of this product as they did others in terms of C-C bond beta scission of alkyl radicals. Risberg et al. [2] studied a number of fuel blends to evaluate their autoignition quality for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine, using diisobutylene to represent olefins in one of their test fuels. In this study, experiments on the shock tube ignition of both isomers of diisobutylene will be described. Then, the development of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the two isomers of diisobutylene will be discussed.

Metcalfe, W; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Autoignition behavior of lean mixtures: Chemical and thermodynamics effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knock characteristics of natural gas (NG), 89 octane unleaded gasoline, 2,2-dimethyl butane (22DMB), and methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) in stoichiometric and lean fuel-air mixtures were studied in a production 4-cylinder automotive engine. The Intake Temperature at the Knock Limit (ITKL) was different for each fuel but always higher in lean mixtures. Gasoline and 22DMB exhibited much greater increases in ITKL than MTBE and NG at lean conditions. Surprisingly, for lean mixtures 22DMB exhibited higher ITKL than MTBE and was almost as high as NG. Comparison with detailed numerical modelling was very favorable. Computations show that both differences in chemistry and end-gas temperature and pressure histories are responsible for these trends. This behavior is interpreted in terms of the Negative Temperature Coefficient behavior of hydrocarbon oxidation. The implication of these results for the specification of optimal fuels for lean-burn engine is discussed.

Ronney, P.D.; Shoda, M.; Waida, S.T. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering; Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1992-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

329

The evolution of fuel: A dissertation on MTBE and elastomers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper begins with a history of the development of the internal combustion engine and the need for a fuel octane booster that would also be non-polluting. The use of ethers as fuel additives cause a compatibility problem with valve sealing materials. The main purpose of this presentation is to address this compatibility problem. The paper makes specific recommendations for the author`s General Twin Seal, describing the seal components (slip seal, bonnet and lower plate O-rings, gland O-rings, bearing retainer O-rings, and pressure relief device seals) and which materials these components should be manufactured from to be compatible with the following fuel additives: toluene, MTBE, and various mixtures of toluene and MTBE.

Smith, G.M. [General Valve Co., Brookshire, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

330

MTBE: The headache of cleaner air  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) has been sold in the United States since 1979, when it was added to fuels as an octane enhancer after lead was phased out of motor fuels. Recently it has been introduced as a means of reducing carbon monoxide emissions during the winter months in targeted US cities. However, there is concern over health complaints including headaches, dizziness and nausea from residents of some areas. These reports have launched an era of assidious research by scientists and public health officials across the country to learn more about MTBE`s short-term and long-term, and possibly carcinogenic, health effects. New research should help weigh the risk of MTBE as a possible carcinogen and the effectiveness of MTBE-blended fuels in reducing carbon monoxide levels. The question is whether, in minimizing one risk, is another risk - however small - being introduced?

Kneiss, J.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Equilibrium thermodynamic analysis of liquid-phase ethyl tert-butylether (ETBE) synthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) is now the second largest volume organic chemical, only behind ethylene, produced in the U.S. This is remarkable since its commercial production began barely two decades ago. Although MTBE is currently the industry standard, it has been proposed that ethanol and other renewable additives make up to 30% of the oxygenate market. As a result, ethyl tertiary butyl ether (ETBE, or 2-ethyoxy 2-methyl propane), derived from renewable ethanol and isobutylene, has emerged as a promising new oxygenate. ETBE also has a somewhat lower blending Reid vapor pressure as well as a higher octane number than MTBE. This paper describes the thermodynamic equilibrium constant for the production of ETBE.

Jensen, K.L.; Datta, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Effects of Fuel Composition and Compression Ratio on Thermal Efficiency in an HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of variable compression ratio (CR) and fuel composition on thermal efficiency were investigated in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine using blends of n-heptane and toluene with research octane numbers (RON) of 0 to 88. Experiments were conducted by performing CR sweeps at multiple intake temperatures using both unthrottled operation, and constant equivalence ratio conditions by throttling to compensate for varying air density. It was found that CR is effective at changing and controlling HCCI combustion phasing midpoint, denoted here as CA 50. Thermal efficiency was a strong function of CA 50, with overly advanced CA 50 leading to efficiency decreases. Increases in CR at a constant CA 50 for a given fuel composition did, in most cases, increase efficiency, but the relationship was weaker than the dependence of efficiency on CA 50. The increase in efficiency with higher CR was fuel-dependent, so that the fuels requiring a higher CR to achieve ignition did not gain a proportionate efficiency increase. For example, n-heptane achieved an indicated thermal efficiency (ITE) of 38% at a CR of 9:1, whereas a 50 wt% blend of toluene with n-heptane required a CR of 12:1 to achieve the same ITE. A simple heat balance around the engine showed that higher toluene content fuels had higher cooling losses. The high toluene fuels exhibited higher rates of maximum pressure rise than the lower octane fuels. The increased cooling losses can be attributed to the higher pressure rise rates, which are a driving force for heat transfer.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Fuel Composition Effects at Constant RON and MON in an HCCI Engine Operated with Negative Valve Overlap  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effects of fuel properties on gasoline HCCI operation have been investigated in a single cylinder, 500 cc, 11.3 CR port fuel injected research engine, operated at lambda=1 and equipped with hydraulic valve actuation. HCCI is promoted by early exhaust valve closing to retain hot exhaust in the cylinder, thereby increasing the cylinder gas temperature. Test fuels were formulated with pure components to have the same RON, MON, and octane sensitivity as an indolene reference fuel, but with a wide range of fuel composition differences. Experiments have been carried out to determine if fuel composition plays a role in HCCI combustion properties, independent of octane numbers. Fuel economy, emissions, and combustion parameters have been measured at several fixed speed/load conditions over a range of exhaust valve closing angles. When the data are compared at constant combustion phasing, fuel effects on emissions and other combustion properties are small. However, when compared at constant exhaust valve closing angle, fuel composition effects are more pronounced, specifically regarding ignition. Operability range differences are also related to fuel composition. An all-paraffinic (normal, iso, and cycloparaffins) fuel exhibited distinctly earlier combustion phasing, increased rate of cylinder pressure rise, and increased rate of maximum heat release compared to the indolene reference fuel. Conversely, olefin-containing fuels exhibited retarded combustion phasing. The fuels with the most advanced ignition showed a wider operating range in terms of engine speed and load, irrespective of exhaust closing angle. These ignition differences reflect contributions from both fuel and EGR kinetics, the effects of which are discussed. The fuel composition variables are somewhat inter-correlated, which makes the experimental separation their effects imprecise with this small set of fuels, though clear trends are evident. The overall effects of fuel composition on engine performance and emissions are small. However, the results suggest that the effects on combustion phasing and engine operability range may need to be considered in the practical implementation of HCCI for fuels with large compositional variations.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Farrell, John T [Exxon Mobil Research and Engineering

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Combustion, Control, and Fuel Effects in a Spark Assisted HCCI Engine Equipped with Variable Valve Timing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Widespread implementation of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines is presently hindered by stability, control, and load range issues. Although the operable HCCI speed/load range is expanding, it is likely that the initial HCCI engines will rely on conventional combustion for part of the operating cycle. In the present study, we have investigated the role of fuel properties and chemistry on the operation of a spark-assisted gasoline HCCI engine. The engine employed is a single cylinder, 500 cc, port fuel injected research engine, operating near lambda = 1.0 and equipped with hydraulic variable valve actuation. HCCI is initiated by early exhaust valve closing to retain exhaust in the cylinder, thereby increasing the cylinder gas temperature. This is also referred to as a 'negative overlap' strategy. A total of 10 custom blended gasolines and three different batches of indolene from two suppliers were run at 5 speed-load combinations and performance was characterized by timing sweeps. Within the quality of the data set, we can say the all fuels provided equivalent combustion and performance characteristics when compared at the same combustion phasing. The fuels did, however, require different degrees of retained exhaust as measured by exhaust valve closing angle to achieve the same combustion phasing. Fuels with higher octane sensitivity were found to ignite more easily or more quickly and to burn more quickly than fuels with lower octane sensitivity. This is an expected result since the engine is naturally aspirated and operates with high compression temperatures due to the high retained exhaust fraction and recompression.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

High conversion of coal to transportation fuels for the future with low HC gas production. Progress report No. 14, January 1--March 31, 1996  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this project is to produce a synthetic crude from coal at a cost lower than $30.00 per barrel (Task A). A second objective, reflecting a recent change in direction in the synthetic fuels effort of DOE, is to produce a fuel which is low in aromatics, yet of sufficiently high octane number for use in the gasoline- burning transportation vehicles of today. To meet this second objective, research was proposed, and funding awarded, for conversion of the highly-aromatic liquid product from coal conversion to a product high in isoparaffins, which compounds in the gasoline range exhibit a high octane number (Task B). Experimental coal liquefaction studies conducted in a batch microreactor in our laboratory have demonstrated potential for high conversions of coal to liquids with low yields of hydrocarbon (HC) gases, hence small consumption of hydrogen in the primary liquefaction step. Ratios of liquids/HC gases as high as 30/1, at liquid yields as high as 82% of the coal by weight, have been achieved. The principal objective of this work is to examine how nearly we may approach these results in a continuous- flow system, at a size sufficient to evaluate the process concept for production of transportation fuels from coal. A continuous system has been constructed and operated, with a one-half inch inside diameter (ID) tube as the reaction vessel. As the work in this project proceeded toward its conclusion, an unexpected benefit was discovered. As the residence times were decreased to values of 10 seconds or less, ratios of liquids/HC gases of 20/1 or higher were achieved. But very importantly, it was discovered that the chemical reactions which produce the primary liquids can be carried to high conversions at pressures much lower than reported, and indeed required, in the processes at longer times.

Wiser, W.H.; Oblad, A.G.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Motor gasolines, winter 1981-1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical data for 905 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 30 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.4 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 88.9 for leaded below 93.0. Only one sample was reported as 93.0 for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above.

Shelton, E M

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Catalytic Synthesis of Oxygenates: Mechanisms, Catalysts and Controlling Characteristics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research focused on catalytic synthesis of unsymmetrical ethers as a part of a larger program involving oxygenated products in general, including alcohols, ethers, esters, carboxylic acids and their derivatives that link together environmentally compliant fuels, monomers, and high-value chemicals. The catalysts studied here were solid acids possessing strong Br???????¸nsted acid functionalities. The design of these catalysts involved anchoring the acid groups onto inorganic oxides, e.g. surface-grafted acid groups on zirconia, and a new class of mesoporous solid acids, i.e. propylsulfonic acid-derivatized SBA-15. The former catalysts consisted of a high surface concentration of sulfate groups on stable zirconia catalysts. The latter catalyst consists of high surface area, large pore propylsulfonic acid-derivatized silicas, specifically SBA-15. In both cases, the catalyst design and synthesis yielded high concentrations of acid sites in close proximity to one another. These materials have been well-characterization in terms of physical and chemical properties, as well as in regard to surface and bulk characteristics. Both types of catalysts were shown to exhibit high catalytic performance with respect to both activity and selectivity for the bifunctional coupling of alcohols to form ethers, which proceeds via an efficient SN2 reaction mechanism on the proximal acid sites. This commonality of the dual-site SN2 reaction mechanism over acid catalysts provides for maximum reaction rates and control of selectivity by reaction conditions, i.e. pressure, temperature, and reactant concentrations. This research provides the scientific groundwork for synthesis of ethers for energy applications. The synthesized environmentally acceptable ethers, in part derived from natural gas via alcohol intermediates, exhibit high cetane properties, e.g. methylisobutylether with cetane No. of 53 and dimethylether with cetane No. of 55-60, or high octane properties, e.g. diisopropylether with blending octane No. of 105, and can replace aromatics in liquid fuels.

Kamil Klier; Richard G. Herman

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

339

Development of high-spatial and high-mass resolution mass spectrometric imaging (MSI) and its application to the study of small metabolites and endogenous molecules of plants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-spatial and high-mass resolution laser desorption ionization (LDI) mass spectrometric (MS) imaging technology was developed for the attainment of MS images of higher quality containing more information on the relevant cellular and molecular biology in unprecedented depth. The distribution of plant metabolites is asymmetric throughout the cells and tissues, and therefore the increase in the spatial resolution was pursued to reveal the localization of plant metabolites at the cellular level by MS imaging. For achieving high-spatial resolution, the laser beam size was reduced by utilizing an optical fiber with small core diameter (25 ?m) in a vacuum matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-linear ion trap (vMALDI-LTQ) mass spectrometer. Matrix application was greatly improved using oscillating capillary nebulizer. As a result, single cell level spatial resolution of ~ 12 ?m was achieved. MS imaging at this high spatial resolution was directly applied to a whole Arabidopsis flower and the substructures of an anther and single pollen grains at the stigma and anther were successfully visualized. MS imaging of high spatial resolution was also demonstrated to the secondary roots of Arabidopsis thaliana and a high degree of localization of detected metabolites was successfully unveiled. This was the first MS imaging on the root for molecular species. MS imaging with high mass resolution was also achieved by utilizing the LTQ-Orbitrap mass spectrometer for the direct identification of the surface metabolites on the Arabidopsis stem and root and differentiation of isobaric ions having the same nominal mass with no need of tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS). MS imaging at high-spatial and high-mass resolution was also applied to cer1 mutant of the model system Arabidopsis thaliana to demonstrate its usefulness in biological studies and reveal associated metabolite changes in terms of spatial distribution and/or abundances compared to those of wild-type. The spatial distribution of targeted metabolites, mainly waxes and flavonoids, was systematically explored on various organs, including flowers, leaves, stems, and roots at high spatial resolution of ~ 12-50 ?m and the changes in the abundance level of these metabolites were monitored on the cer1 mutant with respect to the wild-type. This study revealed the metabolic biology of CER1 gene on each individual organ level with very detailed high spatial resolution. The separate MS images of isobaric metabolites, i.e. C29 alkane vs. C28 aldehyde could be constructed on both genotypes from MS imaging at high mass resolution. This allows tracking of abundance changes for those compounds along with the genetic mutation, which is not achievable with low mass resolution mass spectrometry. This study supported previous hypothesis of molecular function of CER1 gene as aldehyde decarbonylase, especially by displaying hyper accumulation of aldehydes and C30 fatty acid and decrease in abundance of alkanes and ketones in several plant organs of cer1 mutant. The scope of analytes was further directed toward internal cell metabolites from the surface metabolites of the plant. MS profiling and imaging of internal cell metabolites were performed on the vibratome section of Arabidopsis leaf. Vibratome sectioning of the leaf was first conducted to remove the surface cuticle layer and it was followed by enzymatic treatment of the section to induce the digestion of primary cell walls, middle lamella, and expose the internal cells underneath to the surface for detection with the laser by LDI-MS. The subsequent MS imaging onto the enzymatically treated vibratome section allowed us to map the distribution of the metabolites in the internal cell layers, linolenic acid (C18:3 FA) and linoleic acid (C18:2 FA). The development of an assay for relative quantification of analytes at the single subcellular/organelle level by LDI-MS imaging was attempted and both plausibility and significant obstacles were seen. As a test system, native plant organelle, chloroplasts isolated from the spinach leaves were used

Jun, Ji Hyun

2011-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

340

Measurement of the Nickel/Nickel Oxide Transition in Ni-Cr-Fe Alloys and Updated Data and Correlations to Quantify the Effect of Aqueous Hydrogen on Primary Water SCC  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Alloys 600 and X-750 have been shown to exhibit a maximum in primary water stress corrosion cracking (PWSCC) susceptibility, when testing is conducted over a range of aqueous hydrogen (H{sub 2}) levels. Contact electric resistance (CER) and corrosion coupon testing using nickel specimens has shown that the maximum in SCC susceptibility occurs in proximity to the nickel-nickel oxide (Ni/NiO) phase transition. The measured location of the Ni/NiO transition has been shown to vary with temperature, from 25 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 360 C to 4 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 288 C. New CER measurements show that the Ni/NiO transition is located at 2 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 260 C. An updated correlation of the phase transition is provided. The present work also reports CER testing conducted using an Alloy 600 specimen at 316 C. A large change in resistance occurred between 5 and 10 scc/kg H{sub 2}, similar to the results obtained at 316 C using a nickel specimen. This result adds confidence in applying the Ni/NiO transition measurements to Ni-Cr-Fe alloys. The understanding of the importance of the Ni/NiO transition to PWSCC has been used previously to quantify H{sub 2} effects on SCC growth rate (SCCGR). Specifically, the difference in the electrochemical potential (EcP) of the specimen or component from the Ni/NiO transition (i.e., EcP{sub Ni/NiO}-EcP) has been used as a correlating parameter. In the present work, these SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations, which were based on SCCGR data obtained at relatively high test temperatures (338 and 360 C), are evaluated via SCCGR tests at a reduced temperature (316 C). The 316 C data are in good agreement with the predictions, implying that the SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations extrapolate well to reduced temperatures. The SCCGR-H{sub 2} correlations have been revised to reflect the updated Ni/NiO phase transition correlation. New data are presented for EN82H weld metal (also known as Alloy 82) at 338 C. Similar to other nickel alloys, SCC of EN82H is a function of the aqueous H{sub 2} level, with the SCCGR exhibiting a maximum near the Ni/NiO transition. For example, the SCCGR at 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} is {approx} 81 x higher than at 60 scc/kg H{sub 2}. The 8 scc/kg H{sub 2} condition is near the Ni/NiO transition (located at {approx} 14 scc/kg H{sub 2} at 338 C), while 60 scc/kg H{sub 2} is well into the nickel metal regime. A hydrogen-SCCGR correlation is provided for EN82H. The data and understanding obtained from the present work show that SCC can be mitigated by adjusting the aqueous H{sub 2} level. For example, SCCGR is typically minimized at relatively high aqueous H{sub 2} levels, that are well into the nickel metal regime (i.e., far from the Ni/NiO transition).

Steven A. Attanasio; David S. Morton

2003-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Spectroscopic and chemical-kinetic analysis of the phases of HCCI autoignition and combustion for single- and two-stage ignition fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The temporal phases of autoignition and combustion in an HCCI engine have been investigated in both an all-metal engine and a matching optical engine. Gasoline, a primary reference fuel mixture (PRF80), and several representative real-fuel constituents were examined. Only PRF80, which is a two-stage ignition fuel, exhibited a ''cool-flame'' low-temperature heat-release (LTHR) phase. For all fuels, slow exothermic reactions occurring at intermediate temperatures raised the charge temperature to the hot-ignition point. In addition to the amount of LTHR, differences in this intermediate-temperature heat-release (ITHR) phase affect the fuel ignition quality. Chemiluminescence images of iso-octane show a weak and uniform light emission during this phase. This is followed by the main high-temperature heat-release (HTHR) phase. Finally, a ''burnout'' phase was observed, with very weak uniform emission and near-zero heat-release rate (HRR). To better understand these combustion phases, chemiluminescence spectroscopy and chemical-kinetic analysis were applied for the single-stage ignition fuel, iso-octane, and the two-stage fuel, PRF80. For both fuels, the spectrum obtained during the ITHR phase was dominated by formaldehyde chemiluminescence. This was similar to the LTHR spectrum of PRF80, but the emission intensity and the temperature were much higher, indicating differences between the ITHR and LTHR phases. Chemical-kinetic modeling clarified the differences and similarities between the LTHR and ITHR phases and the cause of the enhanced ITHR with PRF80. The HTHR spectra for both fuels were dominated by a broad CO continuum with some contribution from bands of HCO, CH, and OH. The modeling showed that the CO+ O{yields}CO{sub 2}+h{nu} reaction responsible for the CO continuum emission tracks the HTHR well, explaining the strong correlation observed experimentally between the total chemiluminescence and HRR during the HTHR phase. It also showed that the CO continuum does not contribute to the ITHR and LTHR chemiluminescence. Bands of H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2} in the red and IR regions were also detected during the HTHR, which the data indicated were most likely due to thermal excitation. The very weak light emission in the ''burnout'' phase also appeared to be thermal emission from H{sub 2}O and O{sub 2}. (author)

Hwang, Wontae; Dec, John; Sjoeberg, Magnus [Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

342

Ethanol oxidation on metal oxide-supported platinum catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on Ethanol is a renewable fuel that can be used as an additive to gasoline (or its substitute) with the advantage of octane enhancement and reduced carbon monoxide exhaust emissions. However, on the standard three-way catalysts, the conversion of unburned ethanol is low because both ethanol and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.and some of its partially oxidized derivatives are highly resistant to oxidation. A combination of first-principles density-functional theory (DFT) based calculations and in-situ diffuse reflectance infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) analysis was applied to uncover some of the fundamental phenomena associated with ethanol oxidation on Pt containing catalysts. In particular, the objective was to analyze the role of the oxide (i.e., ?-Al2O3 or SiO2) substrate on the ethanol oxidation activity. The results showed that Pt nanoparticles trap and accumulate oxygen at their surface and perimeter sites and play the role of stoves that burn ethanol molecules and their partially oxidized derivatives to the final products. The ?-Al2O3 surfaces provided higher mobility of the fragments of ethanol molecules than the SiO2 surface and hence increased the supply rate of these objects to the Pt particles. This will in turn produce a higher conversion rate of unburned ethanol.

L. M. Petkovic 090468; Sergey N. Rashkeev; D. M. Ginosar

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Energy Efficient Catalytic Activation of Hydrogen peroxide for Green Chemical Processes: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new, highly energy efficient approach for using catalytic oxidation chemistry in multiple fields of technology has been pursued. The new catalysts, called TAML® activators, catalyze the reactions of hydrogen peroxide and other oxidants for the exceptionally rapid decontamination of noninfectious simulants (B. atrophaeus) of anthrax spores, for the energy efficient decontamination of thiophosphate pesticides, for the facile, low temperature removal of color and organochlorines from pulp and paper mill effluent, for the bleaching of dyes from textile mill effluents, and for the removal of recalcitrant dibenzothiophene compounds from diesel and gasoline fuels. Highlights include the following: 1) A 7-log kill of Bacillus atrophaeus spores has been achieved unambiguously in water under ambient conditions within 15 minutes. 2) The rapid total degradation under ambient conditions of four thiophosphate pesticides and phosphonate degradation intermediates has been achieved on treatment with TAML/peroxide, opening up potential applications of the decontamination system for phosphonate structured chemical warfare agents, for inexpensive, easy to perform degradation of stored and aged pesticide stocks (especially in Africa and Asia), for remediation of polluted sites and water bodies, and for the destruction of chemical warfare agent stockpiles. 3) A mill trial conducted in a Pennsylvanian bleached kraft pulp mill has established that TAML catalyst injected into an alkaline peroxide bleach tower can significantly lower color from the effluent stream promising a new, more cost effective, energy-saving approach for color remediation adding further evidence of the value and diverse engineering capacity of the approach to other field trials conducted on effluent streams as they exit the bleach plant. 4) Dibenzothiophenes (DBTs), including 4,6-dimethyldibenzothiophene, the most recalcitrant sulfur compounds in diesel and gasoline, can be completely removed from model gasoline (octane or decane) at low temperature and ambient pressure via treatment with a TAML activator and hydrogen peroxide in a two-phase system consisting of the fuel as the first phase and a water/tertiary butanol second phase. The DBTs are oxidized to sulphones (or sulfoxides), which then completely extract into the water/t-butanol phase. Treatment of commercial diesel spiked with DBT under the same conditions results in compete DBT oxidation. In contrast with the octane and decane experiments, removal to the water/t-butanol phase is not yet complete and is being further optimized. Analysis by the sulfur specific GC-FPD technique suggests that >70% sulfur compounds are removed from unspiked diesel after one treatment. Further treatments are being investigated. The GC-FPD results will be checked by total sulfur analysis methodology.

Collins, Terrence J.; Horwitz, Colin

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: A guide to record series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide describes record series that pertain to epidemiologic and health-related studies at the Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). These records document the health and safety monitoring of employees and contract employees of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of the DOE and its epidemiologic research program, and the history of the Oak Ridge Reservation and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. It also furnishes information on the procedures that HAI sued to select, inventory, and describe pertinent records; the methodology used to produce the guide; the arrangement of the record series descriptions; the location of the records; and procedures for accessing records repositories.

NONE

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Detection of a Hypercharge Axion in ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Master of Science thesis treats the hypercharge axion, which is a hypothetical pseudo-scalar particle with electroweak interactions. First, the theoretical context and the motivations for this study are discussed. In short, the hypercharge axion is introduced to explain the dominance of matter over antimatter in the universe and the existence of large-scale magnetic fields. Second, the phenomenological properties are analyzed and the distinguishing marks are underlined. These are basically the products of photons and $Z^0$s with high transverse momenta and invariant mass equal to that of the axion. Third, the simulation is carried out with two photons producing the axion which decays into $Z^0$s and/or photons. The event simulation is run through the simulator ATLFAST of ATLAS (A Toroidal Large Hadron Collider ApparatuS) at CERN. Finally, the characteristics of the axion decay are analyzed and the criteria for detection are presented. A study of the background is also included. The result is that for cer...

Elfgren, E

346

Western Gas Sands Project. Status report, April-June 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress during April, May and June 1982, of government-sponsored projects to increase gas production from low permeability gas sands of the Western United States, is summarized in this edition of the WGSP Quarterly Status Report. In an effort to eliminate wellbore storage during the testing of tight reservoirs and substantially reduce time and cost of testing, CER Corporation is investigating downhole shut-off to develop a shut-off tool. During the quarter, the University of Oklahoma completed the two-dimensional lenticular well simulator model and submitted a final report. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, work is complete on the 2-D crack model and work has begun on developing a pseudo 3-D crack model. Preparations have begun at Los Alamos National Laboratory to test the 6-in. permanent magnet pre-prototype tool in the American Petroleum Institute test pit at the University of Houston. At Sandia National Laboratories, an analytical version of the Surface Electrical Potential (SEP) mathematical model has been completed. The data provided by DOE Well Test Facility's drill stem test (DST) of MWX-1 indicated wellbore storage was predominant during the buildup period of the test and essentially masks the pressure transient normally used in the DST analysis. For the Multi-Well Experiment program, cased hole logging, directional surveys and two geophysical surveys were accomplished this quarter. 38 figures.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

An on sun parametric study of solar hydrogen production using WO{sub 3} photoanodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar production of hydrogen using photoactive electrodes is a topic receiving much attention in recent years. The use of thin metal oxide films as photoanodes allows the water splitting reaction to occur at a much lower applied voltage than would be necessary with a straight electrolysis process. The University of Nevada Las Vegas in collaboration with the UK based firm Hydrogen Solar and funded by the United States Department of Energy, has developed a prototype of this type of cell using a WO{sub 3} photoanode. An on-sun test facility has been constructed by the UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) where a study is being conducted with regard to the effects various design parameters on the rate of hydrogen evolution. Parameters being studied include electrolyte temperature, electrolyte flow rate, electrolyte resistivity, applied voltage, and membrane to electrode spacing. The data collected is used in a parametric study of the cell performance. The results of this study are then used to establish general trends as to the effects of these parameters on the performance of the cells outside of a laboratory environment. (author)

Halford, Christopher K. [UNLV Center for Energy Research, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Boehm, Robert F. [UNLV Center for Energy Research, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, UNLV Box 454027, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4027 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

348

Hope or Hype? What is Next for Biofuels? (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Science at the Theater: From the sun to your gas tank: A new breed of biofuels may help solve the global energy challenge and reduce the impact of fossil fuels on global warming. KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who are developing ways to convert the solar energy stored in plants into liquid fuels. Jay Keasling is one of the foremost authorities in the ?eld of synthetic biology. He is applying this research toward the production of advanced carbon-neutral biofuels that can replace gasoline on a gallon-for-gallon basis. Keasling is Berkeley Labs Acting Deputy Director and the Chief Executive Of?cer of the U.S. Department of Energys Joint BioEnergy Institute. Jim Bristow is deputy director of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility in Walnut Creek, CA. He developed and implemented JGIs Community Sequencing Program, which provides large-scale DNA sequencing and analysis to advance genomics related to bioenergy and environmental characterization and cleanup. Susanna Green Tringe is a computational biologist with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). She helped pioneer the ?eld of metagenomics, a new strategy for isolating, sequencing, and characterizing DNA extracted directly from environmental samples, such as the contents of the termite gut, which yielded enzymes responsible for breakdown of wood into fuel.

Keasling, Jay; Bristow, Jim; Tringe, Susannah Green

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

349

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

350

Influence of the conditions of preparation on the catalytic properties of A1-pillared montmorillonites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pillared clays (PILC) are obtained by exchanging the original cations of a smectite by inorganic cationic polymers. The size of the pillaring species determines the porosity of the resulting material. Pore openings of 8-17 {angstrom} can me obtained with many cations, including A1, Zr, Cr, and Ti. The interest in PILC was heightened by the report that they are more active than Y zeolites for bulky molecules. Indeed, Lussier et al. observed good activity for cracking of heavy gas oil. Clays produced less gasoline than zeolites, but the octane number was higher. Occelli reports a gasoline yield comparable to that of zeolites using a lighter charge stock. The high selectivity for coke was attributed to iron impurities by Lussier et al., but Occelli found no influence of the iron content of the clay on the coke make. The thermal stability is apparently controlled by small details of the preparation, since clear differences appear between A1-PILC or Zr-PILC, according to the authors. We present here a synthesis concerning our work on preparation, characterization and testing of montmorillonites pillared by A1{sub 13} polymers, including the influence of particle size of the original clay on the properties of the resulting PILC.

Tichit, D.; Fajula, F.; Figueras, F.; Gueguen, C.; Bousquet, J. (CNRS ENSCM, Montpellier (France))

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Ashland's new process could boost gasoline yield  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

According to O. E. Atkins (Ashland Oil Co.), Ashland's new fluid catalytic cracking process will convert heavy residual oil to (% by vol) 11% fuel gas, 4.8% LNG, 75.7% gasoline (if all the produced olefins are converted to gasoline), 9% distillates, and 8.1% heavy fuel oil. Ashland is building a $70 million, 40,000 bbl/day unit at its 215,000 bbl/day Catlettsburg, Ky., refinery which will increase the present 90,000 bbl/day gasoline yield by 25,000 bbl/day for the same amount of feedstock. The increased gasoline yield (no-lead octane rating of 94) is expected to increase the net margin on a barrel of feed from $8 up to $12, at the present prices of $11.50/bbl of residual oil and $40/bbl of gasoline. Ashland has not disclosed detailed information on the new process, which: can accommodate atmospheric residua that are high in sulfur and metals; is a high temperature, low (about 1 atm) pressure process; does not use hydrogen; uses a proprietary new crystalline silica-alumina microspherical (zeolite) catalyst which, via a proprietary passivating technique, will demetalize crude oil fractions of vanadium and nickel. Residuum cracking processes developed by other companies are briefly discussed.

Atkins, O.E.

1980-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

352

Cracking blends of gas oil and residual oil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a catalytic cracking process unit wherein a gas oil feed is cracked in a cracking zone at an elevated temperature in the presence of a cracking catalyst, the cracking catalyst is regenerated in a regeneration zone by burning coke of the catalyst, and catalyst is circulated between the cracking zone and the regeneration zone. The improvement is described for obtaining a naphtha product of improved octane number comprising introducing sufficient of a nickel and vanadium metals-containing heavy feedstock with the gas oil feed introduced into the cracking zone to deposit nickel and vanadium metals on the catalyst and raise the nickel and metals-content of the catalyst to a level ranging from about 1500 to about 6000 parts per million of the metals expressed as equivalent nickel, based on the weight of the catalyst, and maintaining the nickel and vanadium metals level on the catalyst by withdrawing high nickel and vanadium metals containing catalyst and adding low nickel and vanadium metals-containing catalyst to the regeneration zone.

Myers, G.D.

1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Modeling of autoignition and NO sensitization for the oxidation of IC engine surrogate fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach for modeling with one single kinetic mechanism the chemistry of the autoignition and combustion processes inside an internal combustion engine, as well as the chemical kinetics governing the postoxidation of unburned hydrocarbons in engine exhaust gases. Therefore a new kinetic model was developed, valid over a wide range of temperatures including the negative temperature coefficient regime. The model simulates the autoignition and the oxidation of engine surrogate fuels composed of n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene, which are sensitized by the presence of nitric oxides. The new model was obtained from previously published mechanisms for the oxidation of alkanes and toluene where the coupling reactions describing interactions between hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} were added. The mechanism was validated against a wide range of experimental data obtained in jet-stirred reactors, rapid compression machines, shock tubes, and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Flow rate and sensitivity analysis were performed in order to explain the low temperature chemical kinetics, especially the impact of NO{sub x} on hydrocarbon oxidation. (author)

Anderlohr, J.M. [IFP, 1 et 4, Ave. Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil Malmaison Cedex (France)]|[Departement de Chimie-Physique des Reactions, UMR No. 7630 CNRS, INPL-ENSIC, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Bounaceur, R.; Battin-Leclerc, F. [Departement de Chimie-Physique des Reactions, UMR No. 7630 CNRS, INPL-ENSIC, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Pires Da Cruz, A. [IFP, 1 et 4, Ave. Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil Malmaison Cedex (France)

2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

The Use of Fuel Chemistry and Property Variations to Evaluate the Robustness of Variable Compression Ratio as a Control Method for Gasoline HCCI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

On a gasoline engine platform, homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) holds the promise of improved fuel economy and greatly reduced engine-out NOx emissions, without an increase in particulate matter emissions. In this investigation, a variable compression ratio (CR) engine equipped with a throttle and intake air heating was used to test the robustness of these control parameters to accommodate a series of fuels blended from reference gasoline, straight run refinery naptha, and ethanol. Higher compression ratios allowed for operation with higher octane fuels, but operation could not be achieved with the reference gasoline, even at the highest compression ratio. Compression ratio and intake heat could be used separately or together to modulate combustion. A lambda of 2 provided optimum fuel efficiency, even though some throttling was necessary to achieve this condition. Ethanol did not appear to assist combustion, although only two ethanol-containing fuels were evaluated. The increased pumping work from throttling was minimal compared to the efficiency increases that were the result of lower unburned hydrocarbon (HC) and carbon monoxide (CO) emissions. Low temperature heat release was present for all the fuels, but could be suppressed with a higher intake air temperature. Results will be used to design future fuels and combustion studies with this research platform.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Spatial Analysis of Emissions Sources for HCCI Combustion at Low Loads Using a Multi-Zone Model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have conducted a detailed numerical analysis of HCCI engine operation at low loads to investigate the sources of HC and CO emissions and the associated combustion inefficiencies. Engine performance and emissions are evaluated as fueling is reduced from typical HCCI conditions, with an equivalence ratio f = 0.26 to very low loads (f = 0.04). Calculations are conducted using a segregated multi-zone methodology and a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for iso-octane with 859 chemical species. The computational results agree very well with recent experimental results. Pressure traces, heat release rates, burn duration, combustion efficiency and emissions of hydrocarbon, oxygenated hydrocarbon, and carbon monoxide are generally well predicted for the whole range of equivalence ratios. The computational model also shows where the pollutants originate within the combustion chamber, thereby explaining the changes in the HC and CO emissions as a function of equivalence ratio. The results of this paper contribute to the understanding of the high emission behavior of HCCI engines at low equivalence ratios and are important for characterizing this previously little explored, yet important range of operation.

Aceves, S M; Flowers, D L; Espinosa-Loza, F; Martinez-Frias, J; Dec, J E; Sjoberg, M; Dibble, R W; Hessel, R P

2004-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

356

A reduced chemical kinetic model for IC engine combustion simulations with primary reference fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reduced chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of primary reference fuel (PRF) has been developed and applied to model internal combustion engines. Starting from an existing reduced reaction mechanism for n-heptane oxidation, a new reduced n-heptane mechanism was generated by including an additional five species and their relevant reactions, by updating the reaction rate constants of several reactions pertaining to oxidation of carbon monoxide and hydrogen, and by optimizing reaction rate constants of selected reactions. Using a similar approach, a reduced mechanism for iso-octane oxidation was built and combined with the n-heptane mechanism to form a PRF mechanism. The final version of the PRF mechanism consists of 41 species and 130 reactions. Validation of the present PRF mechanism was performed with measurements from shock tube tests, and HCCI and direct injection engine experiments available in the literature. The results show that the present PRF mechanism gives reliable performance for combustion predictions, as well as computational efficiency improvements for multidimensional CFD simulations. (author)

Ra, Youngchul; Reitz, Rolf D. [Engine Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 1500 Engineering Drive, ERB 1016B, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Effects of Fuel Characteristics on Stoichiometric Spark-Assisted HCCI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of fuel lean HCCI operation using a variety of fuels are well known and have been demonstrated using different engine concepts in the past. In contrast, stoichiometric operation of HCCI is less well documented. Recent studies have highlighted the benefits of operating at a stoichiometric condition in terms of load expansion combined with the applicability of three way catalyst technology to reduce NOx emissions. In this study the characterization of stoichiometric HCCI using gasoline-like fuels was undertaken. The fuels investigated are gasoline, a 50 vol% blend of iso-butanol and gasoline (IB50), and an 85% vol blend of ethanol and gasoline (E85). A single cylinder engine operating with direct injection and spark assist combined with a fully variable hydraulic valve actuation system allowed a wide range of operating parameters to be studied. The resultant fuel properties which differed in terms of octane rating, fuel oxygenation and heat of vaporization show that stoichiometric HCCI is possible using a range of fuels but that these fuel characteristics do have some effect on the combustion characteristics. How these fuel properties can enable an increased engine operating envelope to be achieved, in comparison with both fuel lean HCCI and conventional spark ignited combustion, is then discussed.

Weall, Adam J [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Detailed Chemical Kinetic Modeling of Surrogate Fuels for Gasoline and Application to an HCCI Engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons, such as paraffins, olefins, aromatics, and cycloalkanes. In this study, a surrogate gasoline reaction mechanism is developed, and it has one representative fuel constituent from each of these classes. These selected constituents are iso-octane, n-heptane, 1-pentene, toluene, and methyl-cyclohexane. The mechanism was developed in a step-wise fashion, adding submechanisms to treat each fuel component. Reactions important for low temperature oxidation (<1000K) and cross-reactions among different fuels are incorporated into the mechanism. The mechanism consists of 1214 species and 5401 reactions. A single-zone engine model is used to evaluate how well the mechanism captures autoignition behavior for conditions corresponding to homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine operation. Experimental data are available for both how the combustion phasing changes with fueling at a constant intake temperature, and also how the intake temperature has to be changed with pressure in order to maintain combustion phasing for a fixed equivalence ratio. Three different surrogate fuel mixtures are used for the modeling. Predictions are in reasonably good agreement with the engine data. In addition, the heat release rate is calculated and compared to the data from experiments. The model predicts less low-temperature heat release than that measured. It is found that the low temperature heat-release rate depends strongly on engine speed, reactions of RO{sub 2}+HO{sub 2}, fuel composition, and pressure boost.

Naik, C V; Pitz, W J; Sj?berg, M; Dec, J E; Orme, J; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

359

Phase equilibrium measurements on twelve binary mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Phase equilibrium measurements have been performed on twelve binary mixtures. The PTx method was used to obtain vapor-liquid equilibrium data for the following binary systems at two temperatures each: ethanethiol + propylene; nitrobenzene + methanol; pyridine + ethyl acetate; octane + tert-amyl methyl ether; diisopropyl ether + butane; 1,3-dichloro-2-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 2,3-dichloro-1-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 2,3-epoxy-1-propanol + epichlorohydrin; 3-chloro-1,2-propanediol + epichlorohydrin; methanol + hydrogen cyanide. For these systems, equilibrium vapor and liquid phase compositions were derived from the PTx data using the Soave equation of state to represent the vapor phase and the Wilson, NRTL, or Redlich-Kister activity coefficient model to represent the liquid phase. The infinite dilution activity coefficient of methylamine in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone was determined at three temperatures by performing PTx measurements on the N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone was determined at three temperatures by performing PTx measurements on the N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone-rich half of the binary. Liquid-liquid equilibrium studies were made on the triethylene glycol + 1-pentene system at two temperatures by directly analyzing samples taken from each liquid phase.

Giles, N.F. [Wiltec Research Co., Inc., Provo, UT (United States)] [Wiltec Research Co., Inc., Provo, UT (United States); Wilson, H.L.; Wilding, W.V. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.] [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Chemical Engineering Dept.

1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Ignition of Isomers of Pentane: An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon ignition is an important element in many practical combustion systems, including internal combustion engines, detonations, pulse combustors, and flame initiation. The rapid compression machine (RCM) is used frequently to study the kinetics of hydrocarbon autoignition [e.g., 1-7], since the reactive gas temperatures and time histories are similar to those seen in automotive engines during Diesel ignition and end gas autoignition leading to engine knock in spark-ignition engines. The RCM provides a rich environment for study of the theory of hydrocarbon oxidation, including degenerate chain branching, alkylperoxy radical isomerization and effects of thermal feedback [8]. The literature of hydrocarbon oxidation studies in the RCM has been summarized recently [9,10], and many classes of fuels have been studied. Detailed kinetic modeling is another tool available to study hydrocarbon oxidation in the RCM [4,11]. The aim of the present work is to determine experimentally the influence of variations in fuel molecular structure on autoignition, and to use a kinetic model to understand the reasons for those variations. This study is unique in that while other studies have addressed variations in pressure and equivalence ratio on ignition [11], this work addresses effects of variations in fuel molecular structure for all of the isomers of a single fuel formula, pentane, in a RCM. The three isomers of pentane possess many of the structural elements that determine such autoignition characteristics as octane number and variability in cool flame production, so this study will benefit our efforts to describe these effects.

Ribaucour, M; Minetti, R; Sochet, L R; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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361

FEASIBILITY STUDY FOR A PETROLEUM REFINERY FOR THE JICARILLA APACHE TRIBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A feasibility study for a proposed petroleum refinery for the Jicarilla Apache Indian Reservation was performed. The available crude oil production was identified and characterized. There is 6,000 barrels per day of crude oil production available for processing in the proposed refinery. The proposed refinery will utilize a lower temperature, smaller crude fractionation unit. It will have a Naphtha Hydrodesulfurizer and Reformer to produce high octane gasoline. The surplus hydrogen from the reformer will be used in a specialized hydrocracker to convert the heavier crude oil fractions to ultra low sulfur gasoline and diesel fuel products. The proposed refinery will produce gasoline, jet fuel, diesel fuel, and a minimal amount of lube oil. The refinery will require about $86,700,000 to construct. It will have net annual pre-tax profit of about $17,000,000. The estimated return on investment is 20%. The feasibility is positive subject to confirmation of long term crude supply. The study also identified procedures for evaluating processing options as a means for American Indian Tribes and Native American Corporations to maximize the value of their crude oil production.

John D. Jones

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

In situ retorting or oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved method of in situ retorting of oil shale wherein a cavern of crushed shale is created within an oil shale deposit, preferably by igniting a powerful explosion within the oil shale deposit, thereby creating a localized area or cavern of rubblized oil shale. Combustion gases are injected into the bottom of this cavern and particulate material, preferably a cracking catalyst, is deposited into a void at the top of the cavern and allowed to trickle down and fill the voids in the rubblized cavern. The oil shale is ignited at the bottom of the cavern and a combustion zone proceeds upwardly while the particulate material is caused by gas flow to percolate downwardly. A fluidized bed of particulate material is thereby formed at the combustion zone providing a controlled, evelny advancing combustion zone. This, in turn, efficiently retorts oil shale, provides increased recovery of hydrocarbon while ismultaneously producing a catalytically cracked volatile, high octane gasoline exiting from the top of the retort.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Synthesis of higher alcohols from carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a slurry reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher, i.e. C{sub 2{sup +}}, alcohols are desired as gasoline additives, feedstocks for producing ethers and as alternative fuels for automobiles. In all cases, the backbone branching of an alcohol improves octane rating, which is essential for good engine performance. These types of branched, higher alcohols are the desired products for a process converting synthesis gas, a CO and H{sub 2} mixture, often generated from coal gasification. Based on this premise, promoted ZnCr oxide catalysts appear to be as one of the best avenues for further investigation. Once this investigation is complete, a natural extension is to replace the Cr in the ZnCr oxide catalyst with Mo and W, both in the same elemental triad with Cr. Mo has already been shown as an active HAS catalyst, both on a SiO{sub 2} support and in the MoS{sub 2} form. The three catalyst combinations, ZnMo, ZnW, and MnCr oxides will be tested in the stirred autoclave system. However, if none of the three indicate any comparable activity and/or selectivity toward higher alcohols as compared with other HAS catalysts, then an investigation of the effects of Cs promotion on the ZnCr oxide methanol catalysts will be executed.

McCutchen, M.S.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

364

Low temperature iron- and nickel-catalyzed reactions leading to coalbed gas formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon hydrogenolysis and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in the presence of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were evaluated as potential mechanisms contributing to natural gas formation in coalbeds. The hydrocarbons used as reactants in hydrogenolysis included butane, octane, 1-octene, and 1-dodecene. The reactions carried out in a laboratory batch reactor produced gas that contained methane concentrations greater than 90%, which resembles the composition of natural gas. Reaction temperatures were selected to resemble natural coalbed conditions. Evidence is presented to show that iron and nickel minerals, which can be present in coals at levels of 2,000 and 10 ppm, respectively, can become active under geologic conditions. The oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO) used as precursors of the active catalysts (Fe and Ni metals) were reduced at 200 C under a hydrogen atmosphere. Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that ca. 6% of the iron oxide was converted to the metal; in the case of nickel, oxygen titration showed that the extent of reduction to the metal was ca. 29%. The resultant fractions of the active metals in coals are adequate to catalyze generation of appreciable amounts of methane over geologic time.

Medina, J.C.; Butala, S.J.; Bartholomew, C.H.; Lee, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described.

Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Almos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Apparatus and method for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus and method are disclosed for comparing corresponding acoustic resonances in liquids. The present invention permits the measurement of certain characteristics of liquids which affect the speed of sound therein. For example, a direct correlation between the octane rating of gasoline and the speed of sound in a gasoline sample has been experimentally observed. Therefore, changes in the speed of sound therein can be utilized as a sensitive parameter for determining changes in composition of a liquid sample. The present apparatus establishes interference patterns inside of a liquid without requiring the use of very thin, rigorously parallel ceramic discs, but rather uses readily available piezoelectric transducers attached to the outside surface of the usual container for the liquid and located on the same side thereof in the vicinity of one another. That is, various receptacle geometries may be employed, and the driving and receiving transducers may be located on the same side of the receptacle. The cell may also be constructed of any material that is inert to the liquid under investigation. A single-transducer embodiment, where the same transducer provides the excitation to the sample container and receives signals impressed therein, is also described. 5 figs.

Sinha, D.N.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

367

PRODUCTION, STORAGE AND PROPERTIES OF HYDROGEN AS INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE FUEL: A CRITICAL REVIEW  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the age of ever increasing energy demand, hydrogen may play a major role as fuel. Hydrogen can be used as a transportation fuel, whereas neither nuclear nor solar energy can be used directly. The blends of hydrogen and ethanol have been used as alternative renewable fuels in a carbureted spark ignition engine. Hydrogen has very special properties as a transportation fuel, including a rapid burning speed, a high effective octane number, and no toxicity or ozone-forming potential. A stoichiometric hydrogenair mixture has very low minimum ignition energy of 0.02 MJ. Combustion product of hydrogen is clean, which consists of water and a little amount of nitrogen oxides (NOx). The main drawbacks of using hydrogen as a transportation fuel are huge on-board storage tanks. Hydrogen stores approximately 2.6 times more energy per unit mass than gasoline. The disadvantage is that it needs an estimated 4 times more volume than gasoline to store that energy. The production and the storage of hydrogen fuel are not yet fully standardized. The paper reviews the different production techniques as well as storage systems of hydrogen to be used as IC engine fuel. The desirable and undesirable properties of hydrogen as IC engine fuels have also been discussed.

368

Catalytic conversion of light alkanes - phase V. Topical report, February 1993--October 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made excellent progress toward a practical route from field butanes to MTBE, the oxygenate of choice for high-octane, clean-burning, environmentally acceptable reformulated gasoline. We have evaluated two proprietary process possibilities with a potential commercial partner and have conducted a joint catalyst evaluation program. The first of the two potential processes considered during the past quarter utilizes a two-step route from isobutane to tert-butyl alcohol, TBA. Not only is TBA an intermediate for MTBE production but is equally applicable for ETBE-an oxygenate which utilizes renewable ethanol in its` manufacture. In the two-step process, isobutane is oxidized in a non-catalytic reaction to a roughly equal mixture of TBA and tert-butyl hydroperoxide. TBHP, eq. 1. We have developed an inexpensive new catalyst system based on an electron-deficient macrocyclic metal complex that selectively converts TBHP to TBA, eq. 2, and meets or exceeds all of the process criteria that we have set.

NONE

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Exposure to methyl tert-butyl ether and benzene among service station attendants and operators  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Concerns for atmospheric pollution from auto exhaust have led to the blending of {open_quotes}oxygenates{close_quotes} with motor fuels. The most common oxygenate, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is currently required within several metropolitan areas (Denver and Phoenix) in the range of 12% of the motor fuel. Amendments to the Clean Air Act may expand this requirement to as many as 44 other areas of the United States in the near future. In consideration of the magnitude of potential uncontrolled exposures from its extensive use and a related concern involving the potential influence of MTBE blending on exposures to other constituents of gasoline (particularly benzene), an evaluation of exposures among service station attendants and operators was undertaken at the request, and in cooperation with, the American Petroleum Institute during the latter part of 1990. For application of the survey results to a broad audience, three categories or types of service stations were identified with regard to MTBE use and exposure potential: (a) service stations that do not use MTBE or use it only as an octane enhancer, (b) service stations with seasonal requirements to use 12-15% MTBE (the Denver, Colorado, and Phoenix, Arizona, metropolitan areas), and (c) service stations equipped with stage II (active) vapor recovery systems (several coastal areas, most notably Southern California). 4 refs., 4 tabs.

Hartle, R. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

ISOBUTANOL FROM SYNGAS IN A THREE PHASE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With growing interest in oxygenates as octane booster for automotive fuels, various synthesis routes for these chemicals are being investigated. Among others, alternative routes to isobutene, the C4-components in MTBE-synthesis are under investigation. A promising path to isobutene is the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol with following dehydration (Fig. 1). As shown by thermodynamical studies, the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol is not expected to experience any thermodynamic constraints. However, heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO is a very exothermic process, a problem which can only be partly solved when being conducted in a plug flow reactor. When carried out in reaction vessels with moving catalyst bed (e.g. three phase stirred tank), heat transfer problems can be resolved, along with additional benefits connected with this reactor type. Several heterogeneous catalytic systems have been under investigation for their capability of isobutanol synthesis from syngas. Most promising catalysts for an active and selective isobutanol synthesis from CO are modified high temperature methanol catalysts.

Peter Tijrn

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

371

Relationship between MTBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The relationship between MBE-blended gasoline properties and warm-up driveability is investigated by focusing on the transient combustion air-fuel ratio that strongly relates to the combustion state of the engine. As a result, although warm-up driveability of MTBE-free gasoline has a high correlation with 50% distillation temperature (T50) and a high correlation with 100 C distillation volume (E100), the correlation is found to be low when blended with MTBE. Various formulas that improve correlation with peak excess air ratio ({lambda}) by correcting T50 and E100 for the amount of MTBE blended are examined. The formula for which the highest determination coefficient is obtained is proposed as a new driveability index (DI) that can also be applied to MTBE-blended gasoline. In addition, the effect on driveability by gasoline base materials using this new DI also is investigated. The results indicate that the new DI worsen when heavy reformate containing large amounts of aromatics or MTBE, an oxygen-containing compound, is used for the octane improver, leaving the balance of the volatility out of consideration.

Suzawa, Takumi; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Kashiwabara, Kimito [Mitsubishi Motors Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Fujisawa, Norihiro; Matsubara, Michiro

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

373

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, heptanol, 1-hexadecanol, 2-methyl-pentanol, 4-methyl-2-penthanol (methylisobutyl carbinol), n-octanol, s-octanol, and cyclohexanol as probe compounds are utilized to evaluate hydrophilicity of coals and coal minerals. N-alkanes such as hexane, heptane and octane, and stearic acid are employed as probe compounds to evaluate hydrophobicity of coals and coal minerals. Aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene as probe compounds are used to examine aromaticity of coal surface. Aromatic acids such as o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, phenol and B-naphthol are used to detect aromatic acidic sites of coal surface. Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromaticity of surfaces for either raw coals or treated coals in water are relatively determined by evaluating both equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption and dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on various raw coals and treated coals to compare affinities of coals for water.

Kwon, K.C.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Liquid chromatographic analysis of coal surface properties. Quarterly progress report, September--December 1991  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The main objectives of this proposed research are to refine further the inverse liquid chromatography technique for the study of surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals in water, to evaluate relatively surface properties of raw coals, treated coals and coal minerals by inverse liquid chromatography, and to evaluate floatability of various treated coals in conjunction with surface properties of coals. Alcohols such as methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, isobutanol, tert-butanol, heptanol, 1-hexadecanol, 2-methyl-pentanol, 4-methyl-2-penthanol (methylisobutyl carbinol), n-octanol, s-octanol, and cyclohexanol as probe compounds are utilized to evaluate hydrophilicity of coals and coal minerals. N-alkanes such as hexane, heptane and octane, and stearic acid are employed as probe compounds to evaluate hydrophobicity of coals and coal minerals. Aromatic compounds such as benzene and toluene as probe compounds are used to examine aromaticity of coal surface. Aromatic acids such as o-cresol, m-cresol, p-cresol, phenol and B-naphthol are used to detect aromatic acidic sites of coal surface. Hydrophilicity, hydrophobicity and aromaticity of surfaces for either raw coals or treated coals in water are relatively determined by evaluating both equilibrium physical/chemical adsorption and dynamic adsorption of probe compounds on various raw coals and treated coals to compare affinities of coals for water.

Kwon, K.C.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

375

Clipped random wave analysis of isometric lamellar microemulsions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have made small angle neutron scattering studies of C{sub 10}E{sub 4}-D{sub 2}O-octane isometric microemulsions in the lamellar phase at the hydrophile-lipophile balance temperature. The scattering intensity distributions were then analyzed with a particular choice of a spectral density function (SDF) derived by maximization of generalized entropy. The model agrees well with the measured intensities on an absolute scale, and allowed us to derive various length scales associated with the microemulsion mesoscopic structure as well as the average interfacial curvatures. We also used the experimentally determined SDF to generate a three-dimensional snapshot of the fluctuating microemulsion microstructure. Unlike conventional pictures of extended lamellar planes, we observed small domains which were internally lamellar but randomly oriented with respect to each other. Finally, we computed the probability distributions of the mean curvature H and the Gaussian curvature K on the oil-water interface. The former showed a symmetric distribution centered around H = 0, while the latter showed a skewed distribution peaked at a negative value of K, but with a wing extending to positive values. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

Choy, Dawen [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Chen, Sow-Hsin [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)] [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Intermediate Alcohol-Gasoline Blends, Fuels for Enabling Increased Engine Efficiency and Powertrain Possibilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in mid-level alcohol-gasoline blends with 24% vol./vol. iso-butanol-gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol./vol. ethanol-gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with a low and high compression ratio of 9.2:1 and 11.85:1 respectively. The engine is equipped with hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and is capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). All fuels are operated to full-load conditions with =1, using both 0% and 15% external cooled EGR. The results demonstrate that higher octane number bio-fuels better utilize higher compression ratios with high stoichiometric torque capability. Specifically, the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with the 11.85:1 compression ratio using E30 as compared to 87 AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg at =1 (with 15% EGR, 18.5 bar with 0% EGR). EGR was shown to provide thermodynamic advantages with all fuels. The results demonstrate that E30 may further the downsizing and downspeeding of engines by achieving increased low speed torque, even with high compression ratios. The results suggest that at mid-level alcohol-gasoline blends, engine and vehicle optimization can offset the reduced fuel energy content of alcohol-gasoline blends, and likely reduce vehicle fuel consumption and tailpipe CO2 emissions.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

The autoignition of iso-cetane at high to moderate temperatures and elevated pressures: Shock tube experiments and kinetic modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iso-cetane (2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, C{sub 16}H{sub 34}) is a highly branched alkane reference compound for determining cetane ratings. It is also a candidate branched alkane representative in surrogate mixtures for diesel and jet fuels. Here new experiments and kinetic modeling results are presented for the autoignition of iso-cetane at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to combustion in internal combustion engines. Ignition delay time measurements were made in reflected shock experiments in a heated shock tube for {phi} = 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5 iso-cetane/air mixtures at temperatures ranging from 879 to 1347 K and pressures from 8 to 47 atm. Ignition delay times were measured using electronically excited OH emission, monitored through the shock tube end wall, and piezoelectric pressure transducer measurements, made at side wall locations. A new kinetic mechanism for the description of the oxidation of iso-cetane is presented that is developed based on a previous mechanism for iso-octane. Computed results from the mechanism are found in good agreement with the experimental measurements. To our knowledge, the ignition time measurements for iso-cetane presented here are the first of their kind. (author)

Oehlschlaeger, Matthew A.; Steinberg, Justin [Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Nuclear Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th St., JEC 2049, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Westbrook, Charles K.; Pitz, William J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

The Autoignition of iso-Cetane: Shock Tube Experiments and Kinetic Modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Iso-cetane (2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane, C{sub 16}H{sub 34}) is a highly branched alkane reference compound for determining cetane ratings. It is also a candidate branched alkane representative in surrogate mixtures for diesel and jet fuels. Here new experiments and kinetic modeling results are presented for the autoignition of iso-cetane at elevated temperatures and pressures relevant to combustion in internal combustion engines. Ignition delay time measurements were made in reflected shock experiments in a heated shock tube for {Phi} = 0.5 and 1.0 iso-cetane/air mixtures at temperatures ranging from 953 to 1347 K and pressures from 8 to 47 atm. Ignition delay times were measured using electronically excited OH emission, monitored through the shock tube end wall, and piezoelectric pressure transducer measurements, made at side wall locations. A new kinetic mechanism for the description of the oxidation of iso-cetane is presented that is developed based on a previous mechanism for iso-octane. Computed results from the mechanism are found in good agreement with the experimental measurements. To our knowledge, the ignition time measurements and detailed kinetic mechanism for isocetane presented here are the first of their kind.

Oehlschlaeger, M A; Steinberg, J; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

379

Analysis of leaded and unleaded gasoline pricing. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the evaluation of the cost price relation between the two fuels. The original scope of work identified three separate categories of effort: Gather and organize available data on the wholesale and retail prices of gasoline at a national level for the past 5 years. Using the data collected in Subtask 1, develop models of pricing practices that aid in explaining retail markups and price differentials for different types and grades of gasoline at different retail outlets in the current gasoline market. Using the data from Subtask 1 and the analysis framework from Subtask 2, analyze the likely range of future retail markups and price differentials for different grades of leaded and unleaded gasoline. The report is organized in a format that is different than suggested by the subtasks outlined above. The first section provides a characterization of the problem - data available to quantify cost and price of the fuels as well as issues that directly affect this relationship. The second section provides a discussion of issues likely to affect this relation in the future. The third section postulates a model that can be used to quantify the relation between fuels, octane levels, costs and prices.

Not Available

1985-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

Effects of droplet fluctuations on the scattering of neutrons and light by microemulsions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Beginning from the first neutron spin-echo study of the shape fluctuations of microemulsion droplets [J.S. Huang, S.T. Milner, B. Farago, and D. Richter, Phys. Rev. Lett. 59, 2600 (1987)] these experiments are incorrectly interpreted in the literature. This is due to an inappropriate account for the fluctuations and the erroneous application of the original theory to the experiments (see [V. Lisy and B. Brutovsky, Czech. J. Phys. 50, 239 (2000)]). In the presented work both these shortcomings are corrected. We develop the theory of static and dynamic light and neutron scattering from droplet microemulsions. The fluids inside and out of the droplets are separated by a surfactant layer of arbitrary thickness. The scattering functions consistently take into account thermal fluctuations of the shapes of such double-layered spheres to the second order in the changes of their radius. The relaxation times and correlation functions of the fluctuations are found within the Helfrich's theory of interfacial elasticity. The theory is applied to the quantitative description of small-angle neutron scattering, neutron spin-echo spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering experiments. Basic characteristics of the microemulsions, extracted from the fits to the experimental data, significantly differ from those determined in the original works. We include into the consideration the viscosity of the surface layer and give its estimation for the octane-C10E5- water microemulsion.

V. Lisy; B. Brutovsky

2000-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Utilization of Renewable Oxygenates as Gasoline Blending Components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the use of higher alcohols and several cellulose-derived oxygenates as blend components in gasoline. Material compatibility issues are expected to be less severe for neat higher alcohols than for fuel-grade ethanol. Very little data exist on how blending higher alcohols or other oxygenates with gasoline affects ASTM Standard D4814 properties. Under the Clean Air Act, fuels used in the United States must be 'substantially similar' to fuels used in certification of cars for emission compliance. Waivers for the addition of higher alcohols at concentrations up to 3.7 wt% oxygen have been granted. Limited emission testing on pre-Tier 1 vehicles and research engines suggests that higher alcohols will reduce emissions of CO and organics, while NOx emissions will stay the same or increase. Most oxygenates can be used as octane improvers for standard gasoline stocks. The properties of 2-methyltetrahydrofuran, dimethylfuran, 2-methylfuran, methyl pentanoate and ethyl pentanoate suggest that they may function well as low-concentration blends with gasoline in standard vehicles and in higher concentrations in flex fuel vehicles.

Yanowitz, J.; Christensen, E.; McCormick, R. L.

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Duality of the Interfacial Thermal Conductance in Graphene-based Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductance of graphene-matrix interfaces plays a key role in controlling the thermal transport properties of graphene-based nanocomposites. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the interfacial thermal conductance depends strongly on the mode of heat transfer at the graphene-matrix interfaces: if heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and immediately leaves the graphene through the other side, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(across), is large; if heat enters graphene from both sides of its basal plane and leaves the graphene at a position far away on its basal plane, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(non-across), is small. For a single-layer graphene immersed in liquid octane, G(across) is ~150 MW/m2K while Gnon-across is ~5 MW/m2K. G(across) decreases with increasing multi-layer graphene thickness (i.e., number of layers in graphene) and approaches an asymptotic value of 100 MW/m2K for 7-layer graphenes. G(non-across) increases only marginally as the graphene sheet thickness increases. Such a duality of the interface thermal conductance for different probing methods and its dependence on graphene sheet thickness can be traced ultimately to the unique physical and chemical structure of graphene materials. The ramifications of these results in areas such as experimental measurement of thermal conductivity of graphene and the design of graphene-based thermal nanocomposites are discussed.

Liu, Ying [Clemson University] [Clemson University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Bao [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Clemson University] [Clemson University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Refiners boost crude capacity; Petrochemical production up  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Continuing demand strength in refined products and petrochemical markets caused refiners to boost crude-charging capacity slightly again last year, and petrochemical producers to increase production worldwide. Product demand strength is, in large part, due to stable product prices resulting from a stabilization of crude oil prices. Crude prices strengthened somewhat in 1987. That, coupled with fierce product competition, unfortunately drove refining margins negative in many regions of the U.S. during the last half of 1987. But with continued strong demand for gasoline, and an increased demand for higher octane gasoline, margins could turn positive by 1989 and remain so for a few years. U.S. refiners also had to have facilities in place to meet the final requirements of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's lead phase-down rules on Jan. 1, 1988. In petrochemicals, plastics demand dept basic petrochemical plants at good utilization levels worldwide. U.S. production of basics such as ethylene and propylene showed solid increases. Many of the derivatives of the basic petrochemical products also showed good production gains. Increased petrochemical production and high plant utilization rates didn't spur plant construction projects, however. Worldwide petrochemical plant projects declined slightly from 1986 figures.

Corbett, R.A.

1988-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

384

METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In conjunction with shakedown, operation, and desulfurization testing at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) 10 in. Fluid Bed Gasification and Cleanup facility, a series of tests was completed in cooperation with the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M). This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between METC and 3M was to evaluate exposure of 3M SICONEX{trademark} fiber-reinforced ceramic and NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabric materials to a gasifying environment at high temperatures (1000--1100{degree}F) and high pressure (300 psia). Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M) provided two 60 mm I.D. {times} 0.5 m SICONEX{trademark} spools and one each of the NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabrics for exposure to coal gas from the METC gasifier. METC installed the materials in a vessel existing in the METC Cleanup Facility and provided process data in exchange for ceramic filter and ash/char characterization. Details of the CRADA are found in CRADA 94-024. This report contains METC`s contribution to CRADA 94-024. Four gasifier runs were conducted over a five month period to accumulate 483 hours of operation. During this time, 2 LayCer{trademark} 70/3 filters were used for filtering the coal gas while the SICONEX{trademark} and NEXTEL{trademark} were exposed along side of the filters. During one 89 hour test, one Laycer{trademark} 70/3 candle was installed with a 3M ceramic composite filter. The face velocity through the candles was maintained nominally at 2.5 ft/min throughout the testing.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

The Clinical Development of Molecularly Targeted Agents in Combination With Radiation Therapy: A Pharmaceutical Perspective  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary: This paper explores historical and current roles of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of clinical trials testing radiation therapy combinations with molecularly targeted agents and attempts to identify potential solutions to expediting further combination studies. An analysis of clinical trials involving a combination of radiation therapy and novel cancer therapies was performed. Ongoing and completed trials were identified by searching the (clinicaltrials.gov) Web site, in the first instance, with published trials of drugs of interest identified through American Society of Clinical Oncology, European CanCer Organisation/European Society for Medical Oncology, American Society for Radiation Oncology/European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology, and PubMed databases and then cross-correlated with (clinicaltrials.gov) protocols. We examined combination trials involving radiation therapy with novel agents and determined their distribution by tumor type, predominant molecular mechanisms examined in combination to date, timing of initiation of trials relative to a novel agent's primary development, and source of sponsorship of such trials. A total of 564 studies of targeted agents in combination with radiation therapy were identified with or without concomitant chemotherapy. Most studies were in phase I/II development, with only 36 trials in phase III. The tumor site most frequently studied was head and neck (26%), followed by non-small cell lung cancer. Pharmaceutical companies were the sponsors of 33% of studies overall and provided support for only 16% of phase III studies. In terms of pharmaceutical sponsorship, Genentech was the most active sponsor of radiation therapy combinations (22%), followed by AstraZeneca (14%). Most radiation therapy combination trials do not appear to be initiated until after drug approval. In phase III studies, the most common (58%) primary endpoint was overall survival. Collectively, this analysis suggests that such trials are not given priority by pharmaceutical companies. The potential reasons for this and some challenges and possible solutions are discussed.

Ataman, Ozlem U., E-mail: ouataman@hotmail.com [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Sambrook, Sally J. [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom)] [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Wilks, Chris [Innovative Medicines, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom)] [Innovative Medicines, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Lloyd, Andrew [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom)] [Global Medicines Development, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Taylor, Amanda E. [Yellow Delaney Communications Ltd, Wilmslow, Cheshire (United Kingdom)] [Yellow Delaney Communications Ltd, Wilmslow, Cheshire (United Kingdom); Wedge, Stephen R. [Innovative Medicines, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom)] [Innovative Medicines, AstraZeneca, Alderley Park, Macclesfield, Cheshire (United Kingdom)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

386

Clean Coal Technology III: 10 MW Demonstration of Gas Suspension Absorption final project performance and economics report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) program is a government and industry co-funded technology development. The objective of the project is to demonstrate the performance of the GSA system in treating a 10 MW slipstream of flue gas resulting from the combustion of a high sulfur coal. This project involves design, fabrication, construction and testing of the GSA system. The Project Performance and Economics Report provides the nonproprietary information for the ``10 MW Demonstration of the Gas Suspension Absorption (GSA) Project`` installed at Tennessee Valley Authority`s (TVA) Shawnee Power Station, Center for Emissions Research (CER) at Paducah, Kentucky. The program demonstrated that the GSA flue-gas-desulfurization (FGD) technology is capable of achieving high SO{sub 2} removal efficiencies (greater than 90%), while maintaining particulate emissions below the New Source Performance Standards (NSPS), without any negative environmental impact (section 6). A 28-day test demonstrated the reliability and operability of the GSA system during continuous operation. The test results and detailed discussions of the test data can be obtained from TVA`s Final Report (Appendix A). The Air Toxics Report (Appendix B), prepared by Energy and Environmental Research Corporation (EERC) characterizes air toxic emissions of selected hazardous air pollutants (HAP) from the GSA process. The results of this testing show that the GSA system can substantially reduce the emission of these HAP. With its lower capital costs and maintenance costs (section 7), as compared to conventional semi-dry scrubbers, the GSA technology commands a high potential for further commercialization in the United States. For detailed information refer to The Economic Evaluation Report (Appendix C) prepared by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors.

Hsu, F.E.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

CRADA Final Report for CRADA Number ORNL00-0605: Advanced Engine/Aftertreatment System R&D  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Navistar and ORNL established this CRADA to develop diesel engine aftertreatment configurations and control strategies that could meet emissions regulations while maintaining or improving vehicle efficiency. The early years of the project focused on reducing the fuel penalty associated with lean NOx trap (LNT), also known as NOx adsorber catalyst regeneration and desulfation. While Navistar pursued engine-based (in-cylinder) approaches to LNT regeneration, complementary experiments at ORNL focused on in-exhaust fuel injection. ORNL developed a PC-based controller for transient electronic control of EGR valve position, intake throttle position, and actuation of fuel injectors in the exhaust system of a Navistar engine installed at Oak Ridge. Aftertreatment systems consisting of different diesel oxidation catalysts (DOCs) in conjunction with a diesel particle filter and LNT were evaluated under quasi-steady-state conditions. Hydrocarbon (HC) species were measured at multiple locations in the exhaust system with Gas chromatograph mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under full-load, rated speed conditions, injection of fuel upstream of the DOC reduced the fuel penalty for a given level of NOx reduction by 10-20%. GC-MS showed that fuel compounds were 'cracked' into smaller hydrocarbon species over the DOC, particularly light alkenes. GC-MS analysis of HC species entering and exiting the LNT showed high utilization of light alkenes, followed by mono-aromatics; branched alkanes passed through the LNT largely unreacted. Follow-on experiments at a 'road load' condition were conducted, revealing that the NOx reduction was better without the DOC at lower temperatures. The improved performance was attributed to the large swings in the NOx adsorber core temperature. Split-injection experiments were conducted with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuel and three pure HC compounds: 1-pentene, toluene, and iso-octane. The pure compound experiments confirmed the previous results regarding hydrocarbon reactivity: 1-pentene was the most efficient LNT reductant, followed by toluene. Injection location had minimal impact on the reactivity of these two compounds. Iso-octane was an ineffective LNT reductant, requiring high doses (resulting in high HC emissions) to achieve reasonable NOx conversions. Diesel fuel reactivity was sensitive to injection location, with the best performance achieved through fuel injection downstream of the DOC. This configuration generated large LNT temperature excursions, which probably improved the efficiency of the NOx storage/reduction process, but also resulted in very high HC emissions. The ORNL team demonstrated an LNT desulfation under 'road load' conditions using throttling, EGR, and in-pipe injection of diesel fuel. Flow reactor characterization of core samples cut from the front and rear of the engine-aged LNT revealed complex spatially dependent degradation mechanisms. The front of the catalyst contained residual sulfates, which impacted NOx storage and conversion efficiencies at high temperatures. The rear of the catalyst showed significant sintering of the washcoat and precious metal particles, resulting in lower NOx conversion efficiencies at low temperatures. Further flow reactor characterization of engine-aged LNT core samples established that low temperature performance was limited by slow release and reduction of stored NOx during regeneration. Carbon monoxide was only effective at regenerating the LNT at temperatures above 200 C; propene was unreactive even at 250 C. Low temperature operation also resulted in unselective NOx reduction, resulting in high emissions of both N{sub 2}O and NH{sub 3}. During the latter years of the CRADA, the focus was shifted from LNTs to other aftertreatment devices. Two years of the CRADA were spent developing detailed ammonia SCR device models with sufficient accuracy and computational efficiency to be used in development of model-based ammonia injection control algorithms.ORNL, working closely with partners at Navistar and Mi

Pihl, Josh A [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Adelman, Brad [Navistar; Derybowski, Edward [Navistar

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the first six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts, acquisition and installation of a research gasoline engine, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of fuel oil indicates that the fuel is somewhere in between a No. 4 and a No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates the fuel burns similarly to these two fuels, but trace metals for the coal-based material are different than petroleum-based fuel oils. Co-coking studies using cleaned coal are highly reproducible in the pilot-scale delayed coker. Evaluation of the coke by Alcoa, Inc. indicated that while the coke produced is of very good quality, the metals content of the carbon is still high in iron and silica. Coke is being evaluated for other possible uses. Methods to reduce metal content are being evaluated.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

389

Substitution for petroleum products in Brasil: Urgent issues  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Brazililan energy policy during the last decade has focused on the replacement of imported petroleum with domestic energy sources, combined with efforts at conservation. The substitution results, however, have been more spectacular by far. The strategy of replacement is based on two elements. first, to increase domestic petroleum exploration and production. Second, to promote non-petroleum fuels as alternatives to the industrial and transportation sectors, for the substitution of fuel oil and gasoline, respectively. A combination of the substitution strategy, the country's petroleum refining structure, and the composition of the substitution strategy, the country's petroleum refining structure, and the composition of demand, has resulted in large surpluses of both gasoline and fuel oil, while diesel has become the most used among petroleum products. The surpluses are not easily exportable because there is ample availability of fuel oil in the world market, and because the low octane number of the gasoline produced in Brasil is not compatible with the engines of cars elsewhere in the region and in the world. Furthermore, although gasoline might be upgraded, the question remains that prospects for the world market are not encouraging, and an export-based strategy does not seem justified in view of the growing surpluses. The objective of this analysis is to review the mechanisms of themajor petroleum-substitution programs currently in existence, identifying their past impact on the energy market and the possible consequences of changes in the goals and operating conditions of these programs, in the light of the new prospects for increased domestic oil production and self-sufficiency. 23 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

de Araujo, J.L.; Ghirardi, A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

FT-IR study of third phase formation in the U(VI) or Th(IV)HNO{sub 3}, TBP/alkane systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared reflectance spectra of the third phases formed in the systems UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/HNO{sub 3}/20%TBP in n-dodecane and Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}/20%TBP in n-octane gave evidence for the presence in solution of a significant amount of weakly bonded molecular nitric acid. From the correlation between the ratio of the areas of the bands at 1672 cm-1 and 1648 cm-1, characteristic of weakly intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded nitric acid and nitric acid strongly bonded to TBP, respectively, the molecular HNO{sub 3} concentration was determined. The presence of these two bands in the spectra of the third phase samples provides evidence that only part of the HNO{sub 3} is directly and strongly bound to the TBP phosphoryl group. The ratio of the weakly intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded HNO3 to that bound directly to P=O group of TBP was much higher for the uranium than for the thorium third phases formed under comparable conditions. The estimated amounts of the weakly intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded HNO{sub 3} were about 47% and 30% of the total HNO{sub 3} present in the uranium and thorium systems, respectively. In the uranium third phase, the TBP hemisolvate of HNO{sub 3} (TBP{dot c}2HNO{sub 3}) was recognized as the predominant species with accompanying very small amount of monosolvate (TBP{dot c}HNO{sub 3}). In the thorium system the hemisolvate of HNO{sub 3} was also present, but the monosolvate was found to be the major species. When the thorium concentration in the third phase was increased, a conversion of monosolvate into hemisolvate was observed. Analysis of the infrared spectra for both systems indicated that the nitrate anions form bidentate chelates with the studied metals.

Borkowski, M.; Ferraro, J. R.; Chiarizia, R.; McAlister, D. R.; Chemistry; Loyola Univ.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Raman Scattering Sensor for Control of the Acid Alkylation Process in Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline refineries utilize a process called acid alkylation to increase the octane rating of blended gasoline, and this is the single most expensive process in the refinery. For process efficiency and safety reasons, the sulfuric acid can only be used while it is in the concentration range of 98 to 86 %. The conventional technique to monitor the acid concentration is time consuming and is typically conducted only a few times per day. This results in running higher acid concentrations than they would like to ensure that the process proceeds uninterrupted. Maintaining an excessively high acid concentration costs the refineries millions of dollars each year. Using SBIR funding, Process Instruments Inc. has developed an inline sensor for real time monitoring of acid concentrations in gasoline refinery alkylation units. Real time data was then collected over time from the instrument and its responses were matched up with the laboratory analysis. A model was then developed to correlate the laboratory acid values to the Raman signal that is transmitted back to the instrument from the process stream. The instrument was then used to demonstrate that it could create real-time predictions of the acid concentrations. The results from this test showed that the instrument could accurately predict the acid concentrations to within ~0.15% acid strength, and this level of prediction proved to be similar or better then the laboratory analysis. By utilizing a sensor for process monitoring the most economic acid concentrations can be maintained. A single smaller refinery (50,000 barrels/day) estimates that they should save over $120,000/year, with larger refineries saving considerably more.

Uibel, Rory, H.; Smith, Lee M.; Benner, Robert, E.

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

392

Modelling cycle to cycle variations in an SI engine with detailed chemical kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents experimental results and a new computational model that investigate cycle to cycle variations (CCV) in a spark ignition (SI) engine. An established stochastic reactor model (SRM) previously used to examine homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion has been extended by spark initiation, flame propagation and flame termination sub-models in order to simulate combustion in SI engines. The model contains a detailed chemical mechanism but relatively short computation times are achieved. The flame front is assumed to be spherical and centred at the spark location, and a pent roof and piston bowl geometry are accounted for. The model is validated by simulating the pressure profile and emissions from an iso-octane fuelled single cylinder research engine that showed low CCV. The effects of key parameters are investigated. Experimental results that show cycle to cycle fluctuations in a four-cylinder naturally aspirated gasoline fuelled SI engine are presented. The model is then coupled with GT-Power, a one-dimensional engine simulation tool, which is used to simulate the breathing events during a multi-cycle simulation. This allows an investigation of the cyclic fluctuations in peak pressure. The source and magnitude of nitric oxide (NO) emissions produced by different cycles are then investigated. It was found that faster burning cycles result in increased NO emissions compared with cycles that have a slower rate of combustion and that more is produced in the early stages of combustion compared with later in the cycle. The majority of NO was produced via the thermal mechanism just after combustion begins. (author)

Etheridge, Jonathan; Mosbach, Sebastian; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering and Biotechnology, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom); Wu, Hao; Collings, Nick [Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge (United Kingdom)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

The Effects of Fuel Characteristics on Stoichiometric Spark-Assisted HCCI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The characteristics of fuel lean HCCI operation using a variety of fuels are well known and have been demonstrated using different engine concepts in the past. In contrast, stoichiometric operation of HCCI is less well documented. Recent studies have highlighted the benefits of operating at a stoichiometric condition in terms of load expansion combined with the applicability of three way catalyst technology to reduce NOx emissions. In this study the characterization of stoichiometric HCCI using gasoline-like fuels was undertaken. The fuels investigated are gasoline, a 50 vol% blend of iso-butanol and gasoline (IB50), and an 85% vol blend of ethanol and gasoline (E85). A single cylinder engine operating with direct injection and spark assist combined with a fully variable hydraulic valve actuation system allowed a wide range of operating parameters to be studied. This included the effects of negative valve overlap duration, intake valve closing and valve lift. Furthermore, the interaction between fuel injection timing and spark and how they can affect the required valve timing to achieve stoichiometric HCCI combustion are also studied. A comprehensive combustion and emissions analysis is conducted using gasoline, IB50 and E85 at an engine speed of 2000rpm over a range of operating loads. The resultant fuel properties which differed in terms of octane rating, fuel oxygenation and heat of vaporization show that stoichiometric HCCI is possible using a range of fuels but that these fuel characteristics do have some effect on the combustion characteristics. How these fuel properties can enable an increased engine operating envelope to be achieved, in comparison with both fuel lean HCCI and conventional spark ignited combustion, is then discussed.

Weall, Adam J [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Effects of engine speed, fueling rate, and combustion phasing on the thermal stratification required to limit HCCI knocking intensity.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Thermal stratification has the potential to reduce pressure-rise rates and allow increased power output for HCCI engines. This paper systematically examines how the amount of thermal stratification of the core of the charge has to be adjusted to avoid excessive knock as the engine speed and fueling rate are increased. This is accomplished by a combination of multi-zone chemical-kinetics modeling and engine experiments, using iso-octane as the fuel. The experiments show that, for a low-residual engine configuration, the pressure traces are self-similar during changes to the engine speed when CA50 is maintained by adjusting the intake temperature. Consequently, the absolute pressure-rise rate measured as bar/ms increases proportionally with the engine speed. As a result, the knocking (ringing) intensity increases drastically with engine speed, unless counteracted by some means. This paper describes how adjustments of the thermal width of the in-cylinder charge can be used to limit the ringing intensity to 5 MW/m2 as both engine speed and fueling are increased. If the thermal width can be tailored without constraints, this enables smooth operation even for combinations of high speed, high load, and combustion phasing close to TDC. Since large alterations of the thermal width of the charge are not always possible, combustion retard is considered to reduce the requirement on the thermal stratification. The results show that combustion retard carries significant potential since it amplifies the benefit of a fixed thermal width. Therefore, the thermal stratification required for operation with an acceptable knocking intensity can be decreased substantially by the use of combustion retard. This enables combinations of high engine speed and high fueling rate even for operation with the naturally occurring thermal stratification. However, very precise control of the combustion phasing will likely be required for such operation.

Sjoberg, Magnus; Dec, John E.

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

HCCI experiments with toluene reference fuels modeled by a semidetailed chemical kinetic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A semidetailed mechanism (137 species and 633 reactions) and new experiments in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine on the autoignition of toluene reference fuels are presented. Skeletal mechanisms for isooctane and n-heptane were added to a detailed toluene submechanism. The model shows generally good agreement with ignition delay times measured in a shock tube and a rapid compression machine and is sensitive to changes in temperature, pressure, and mixture strength. The addition of reactions involving the formation and destruction of benzylperoxide radical was crucial to modeling toluene shock tube data. Laminar burning velocities for benzene and toluene were well predicted by the model after some revision of the high-temperature chemistry. Moreover, laminar burning velocities of a real gasoline at 353 and 500 K could be predicted by the model using a toluene reference fuel as a surrogate. The model also captures the experimentally observed differences in combustion phasing of toluene/n-heptane mixtures, compared to a primary reference fuel of the same research octane number, in HCCI engines as the intake pressure and temperature are changed. For high intake pressures and low intake temperatures, a sensitivity analysis at the moment of maximum heat release rate shows that the consumption of phenoxy radicals is rate-limiting when a toluene/n-heptane fuel is used, which makes this fuel more resistant to autoignition than the primary reference fuel. Typical CPU times encountered in zero-dimensional calculations were on the order of seconds and minutes in laminar flame speed calculations. Cross reactions between benzylperoxy radicals and n-heptane improved the model predictions of shock tube experiments for {phi}=1.0 and temperatures lower than 800 K for an n-heptane/toluene fuel mixture, but cross reactions had no influence on HCCI simulations. (author)

Andrae, J.C.G. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Brinck, T. [Department of Physical Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Kalghatgi, G.T. [Shell Global Solutions (UK), P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

396

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels at elevated pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines, the premixed burn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, they must understand the chemical kinetic processes that lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF) n-heptane and iso-octane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine like conditions in a high-pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments, and comparisons of experimentally measured and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690-1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed model.

Callahan, C V; Curran, H J; Dryer, F L; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Assessment of ether and alcohol fuels from coal. Volume 2. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A unique route for the indirect liquefaction of coal to produce transportation fuel has been evaluated. The resultant fuel includes alkyl tertiary alkyl ethers and higher alcohols, all in the gasoline boiling range. When blended into gasoline, the ether fuel provides several advantages over the lower alcohols: (1) lower chemical oxygen content, (2) less-severe water-separation problems, and (3) reduced front-end volatility effects. The ether fuel also has high-octane quality. Further, it can be utilized as a gasoline substitute in all proportions. Production of ether fuel combines several steps, all of which are or have been practiced on an industrial scale: (1) coal gasification, (2) gas cleanup and shift to desired H/sub 2/:CO ratio, (3) conversion of synthesis gas to isobutanol, methanol, and higher alcohols, (4) separation of alcohols, (5) chemical dehydration of isobutanol to isobutylene, and (6) etherification of isobutylene with methanol. A pilot-plant investigation of the isobutanol synthesis step was performed. Estimates of ether-fuel manufacturing costs indicate this process route is significantly more costly than synthesis of methanol. However, the fuel performance features provide incentive for developing the necessary process and catalyst improvements. Co-production of higher-molecular-weight co-solvent alcohols represents a less-drastic form of methanol modification to achieve improvement in the performance of methanol-gasoline blends. Costs were estimated for producing several proportions of methanol plus higher alcohols from coal. Estimated fuel selling price increases regularly but modestly with higher alcohol content.

Not Available

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Ethanol Demand in United States Production of Oxygenate-limited Gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ethanol competes with methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) to satisfy oxygen, octane, and volume requirements of certain gasolines. However, MTBE has water quality problems that may create significant market opportunities for ethanol. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has used its Refinery Yield Model to estimate ethanol demand in gasolines with restricted use of MTBE. Reduction of the use of MTBE would increase the costs of gasoline production and possibly reduce the gasoline output of U.S. refineries. The potential gasoline supply problems of an MTBE ban could be mitigated by allowing a modest 3 vol percent MTBE in all gasoline. In the U.S. East and Gulf Coast gasoline producing regions, the 3 vol percent MTBE option results in costs that are 40 percent less than an MTBE ban. In the U.S. Midwest gasoline producing region, with already high use of ethanol, an MTBE ban has minimal effect on ethanol demand unless gasoline producers in other regions bid away the local supply of ethanol. The ethanol/MTBE issue gained momentum in March 2000 when the Clinton Administration announced that it would ask Congress to amend the Clean Air Act to provide the authority to significantly reduce or eliminate the use of MTBE; to ensure that air quality gains are not diminished as MTBE use is reduced; and to replace the existing oxygenate requirement in the Clean Air Act with a renewable fuel standard for all gasoline. Premises for the ORNL study are consistent with the Administration announcement, and the ethanol demand curve estimates of this study can be used to evaluate the impact of the Administration principles and related policy initiatives.

Hadder, G.R.

2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

399

Microbial Diversity and Bioremediation of aHydrocarbon-Contaminated Aquifer (Vega Baja, Puerto Rico)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon contamination of groundwater resources hasbecome a major environmental and human health concern in many parts ofthe world. Our objectives were to employ both culture andculture-independent techniques to characterize the dynamics of microbialcommunity structure within a fluidized bed reactor used to bioremediate adiesel-contaminated groundwater in a tropical environment. Under normaloperating conditions, 97 to 99 percent of total hydrocarbons were removedwith only 14 min hydraulic retention time. Over 25 different cultureswere isolated from the treatment unit (96 percent which utilized dieselconstituents as sole carbon source). Approximately 20 percent of theisolates were also capable of complete denitrification to nitrogen gas.Sequence analysis of 16S rDNA demonstrated ample diversity with mostbelonging to the infinity, beta and gamma subdivision of theProteobacteria, Bacilli, and Actinobacteria groups. Moreover, the geneticconstitution of the microbial community was examined at multiple timepoints with a Functional Gene Array (FGA) containing over 12,000 probesfor genes involved in organic degradation and major biogeochemicalcycles. Total community DNA was extracted and amplified using anisothermal phi29 polymerase-based technique, labeled with Cy5 dye, andhybridized to the arrays in 50 percent formimide overnight at 50 degreesC. Cluster analysis revealed comparable profiles over the course oftreatment suggesting the early selection of a very stable microbialcommunity. A total of 270 genes for organic contaminant degradation(including naphthalene, toluene [aerobic and anaerobic], octane,biphenyl, pyrene, xylene, phenanthrene, and benzene); and 333 genesinvolved in metabolic activities (nitrite and nitrous oxide reductases[nirS, nirK, and nosZ], dissimilatory sulfite reductases [dsrAB],potential metal reducing C-type cytochromes, and methane monooxygenase[pmoA]) were repeatedly detected. Genes for degradation of MTBE,nitroaromatics and chlorinated compounds werealso present, indicating abroad catabolic potential of the treatment unit. FGA's demonstrated theearly establishment of a diverse community with concurrent aerobic andanaerobic processes contributing to the bioremediationprocess.

Rodriguez-Martinez, E.M.; Perez, Ernie X.; Schadt, ChristopherW.; Zhou, Jizhong; Massol-Deya, Arturo A.

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

The economical production of alcohol fuels from coal-derived synthesis gas. Quarterly technical progress report Number 8, 1 July, 1993--30 September, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Task 1, the preparation of catalyst materials, is proceeding actively. At WVU, catalysts based on Mo are being prepared using a variety of approaches to alter the oxidation state and environment of the Mo. At UCC and P, copper-based zinc chromite spinel catalysts will be prepared and tested. The modeling of the alcohol-synthesis reaction in a membrane reactor is proceeding actively. Under standard conditions, pressure drop in the membrane reactor has been shown to be negligible. In Task 2, base case designs had previously been completed with a Texaco gasifier. Now, similar designs have been completed using the Shell gasifier. A comparison of the payback periods or production cost of these plants shows significant differences among the base cases. However, a natural gas only design, prepared for comparison purposes, gives a lower payback period or production cost. Since the alcohol synthesis portion of the above processes is the same, the best way to make coal-derived higher alcohols more attractive economically than natural gas-derived higher alcohols is by making coal-derived syngas less expensive than natural gas-derived syngas. The maximum economically feasible capacity for a higher alcohol plant from coal-derived syngas appears to be 32 MM bbl/yr. This is based on consideration of regional coal supply in the eastern US, coal transportation, and regional product demand. The benefits of economics of scale are illustrated for the base case designs. A value for higher alcohol blends has been determined by appropriate combination of RVP, octane number, and oxygen content, using MTBE as a reference. This analysis suggests that the high RVP of methanol in combination with its higher water solubility make higher alcohols more valuable than methanol.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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401

Saber's heavy oil cracking refinery project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Perhaps more than any other industry, petroleum refining has been subjected to the radical swings in business and political climates of the past several decades. Because of the huge investments and long lead times to construct refining facilities, stable government policies, predictable petroleum prices, secure feedstock supplies and markets, and reliable cost estimates are necessary ingredients to effectively plan new refinery projects. However, over the past ten years the political and economic climates have provided anything but these conditions. Yet, refiners have demonstrated a willingness to undertake risks by continuing to expand and modernize their refineries. The refining business -- just as most businesses -- responds to economic incentives. These incentives, when present, result in new technology and capacity additions. In the 1940's, significant technology advances were commercialized to refine higher-octane motor gasolines. Such processes as continuous catalytic cracking (Houdry Process Corporation), fluid catalytic cracking (Standard Oil Development Company), HF alkylation (UOP and Phillips Petroleum Company), and catalytic reforming (UOP) began to supply a growing gasoline market, generated from the war effort and the ever increasing numbers of automobiles on the road. The post-war economy of the 1950's and 1960's further escalated demand for refined products, products which had to meet higher performance specifications and be produced from a wider range of raw materials. The refining industry met the challenge by introducing hydro-processing technology, such as hydrocracking developed in 1960. But, the era must be characterized by the large crude processing capacity additions, required to meet demand from the rapidly expanding U.S. economy. In 1950, refining capacity was 6.2 million BPD. By 1970, capacity had grown to 11.9 million BPD, an increase of 91%.

Benefield, C.S.; Glasscock, W.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

SRC-II process  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Extensive laboratory and pilot plant experimental work on the Solvent Refined Coal Process has led to the development of an improved version of the process known as SRC-II. This work has shown considerable promise and plans are being made to demonstrate the SRC-II process using commercial size equipment in a 6000 T/D plant to be located near Morgantown, West Virginia. On the basis of recent economic studies, the products (both liquid and gas) from a future large-scale commercial plant are expected to have an overall selling price of $4.00 to 5.00 per million Btu (first quarter 1980 basis). The major product of the primary process is distillate fuel oil of less than 0.3% sulfur for use largely as a non-polluting fuel for generating electrical power and steam, especially in the east where utilities and industry are presently using petroleum products. For the longer term, the major growth opportunity for SRC-II fuel oil in the generation of electric power will probably be through advanced combustion turbine units with heat recovery boilers (combined cycle units). The light liquid fractions (naphtha and middle distillate) produced by the SRC-II process can be upgraded to a high octane unleaded gasoline to supplement petroleum-derived supplies. Significant quantities of pipeline gas are also produced at a cost which should be competitive with SNG from direct coal gasification. Light hydrocarbons (ethane, propane) from the process may be effectively converted to ethylene in conventional cracking plants to offset ethylene demand from petroleum-derived naphtha and gas oil, both of which could otherwise be used for other refinery products. In addition, certain fraction of the fuel oil might also be used in medium speed diesel engines and automotive gas turbines.

Schmid, B.K.; Jackson, D.M.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Novel Characterization of GDI Engine Exhaust for Gasoline and Mid-Level Gasoline-Alcohol Blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer improved fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet more stringent fuel economy standards. GDI engines typically emit the most particulate matter (PM) during periods of rich operation such as start-up and acceleration, and emissions of air toxics are also more likely during this condition. A 2.0 L GDI engine was operated at lambda of 0.91 at typical loads for acceleration (2600 rpm, 8 bar BMEP) on three different fuels; an 87 anti-knock index (AKI) gasoline (E0), 30% ethanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel (E30), and 48% isobutanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel. E30 was chosen to maximize octane enhancement while minimizing ethanol-blend level and iBu48 was chosen to match the same fuel oxygen level as E30. Particle size and number, organic carbon and elemental carbon (OC/EC), soot HC speciation, and aldehydes and ketones were all analyzed during the experiment. A new method for soot HC speciation is introduced using a direct, thermal desorption/pyrolysis inlet for the gas chromatograph (GC). Results showed high levels of aromatic compounds were present in the PM, including downstream of the catalyst, and the aldehydes were dominated by the alcohol blending.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL] [ORNL; Eibl, Mary A [ORNL] [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Kaul, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Development of Detailed Kinetic Models for Fischer-Tropsch Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels can be synthesized from a syngas stream generated by the gasification of biomass. As such they have the potential to be a renewable hydrocarbon fuel with many desirable properties. However, both the chemical and physical properties are somewhat different from the petroleum-based hydrocarbons that they might replace, and it is important to account for such differences when considering using them as replacements for conventional fuels in devices such as diesel engines and gas turbines. FT fuels generally contain iso-alkanes with one or two substituted methyl groups to meet the pour-point specifications. Although models have been developed for smaller branched alkanes such as isooctane, additional efforts are required to properly capture the kinetics of the larger branched alkanes. Recently, Westbrook et al. developed a chemical kinetic model that can be used to represent the entire series of n-alkanes from C{sub 1} to C{sub 16} (Figure 1). In the current work, the model is extended to treat 2,2,4,4,6,8,8-heptamethylnonane (HMN), a large iso-alkane. The same reaction rate rules used in the iso-octane mechanism were incorporated in the HMN mechanism. Both high and low temperature chemistry was included so that the chemical kinetic model would be applicable to advanced internal combustion engines using low temperature combustion strategies. The chemical kinetic model consists of 1114 species and 4468 reactions. Concurrently with this effort, work is underway to improve the details of specific reaction classes in the mechanism, guided by high-level electronic structure calculations. Attention is focused upon development of accurate rate rules for abstraction of the tertiary hydrogens present in branched alkanes and properly accounting for the pressure dependence of the ?-scission, isomerization, and R + O{sub 2} reactions.

Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Carstensen, H; Dean, A M

2008-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

407

Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged Y zeolite in a silica-alumina matrix. X-ray fluorescence analyses showed that the rare earths used in preparing the catalysts were a mixture of lanthanum and cerium. Antimony found in the spent catalyst was added during operation of the FCC unit as a way to suppress the adverse effects of deposited nickel. The fresh HDS samples consisted of sulfided nickel and molybdenum on an alumina support. The spent catalyst showed nearly 10% vanadium on the catalyst and a modest increase in nickel and sulfur on the catalyst as a result of operations. Hydrocracking catalysts were not available for this study.

CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

Andile B. Mzinyati [Sasol Technology Research and Development, Sasolburg (South Africa). Fischer-Tropsch Refinery Catalysis

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

409

Gasoline surrogate modeling of gasoline ignition in a rapid compression machine and comparison to experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of gasoline in homogeneous charge compression ignition engines (HCCI) and in duel fuel diesel - gasoline engines, has increased the need to understand its compression ignition processes under engine-like conditions. These processes need to be studied under well-controlled conditions in order to quantify low temperature heat release and to provide fundamental validation data for chemical kinetic models. With this in mind, an experimental campaign has been undertaken in a rapid compression machine (RCM) to measure the ignition of gasoline mixtures over a wide range of compression temperatures and for different compression pressures. By measuring the pressure history during ignition, information on the first stage ignition (when observed) and second stage ignition are captured along with information on the phasing of the heat release. Heat release processes during ignition are important because gasoline is known to exhibit low temperature heat release, intermediate temperature heat release and high temperature heat release. In an HCCI engine, the occurrence of low-temperature and intermediate-temperature heat release can be exploited to obtain higher load operation and has become a topic of much interest for engine researchers. Consequently, it is important to understand these processes under well-controlled conditions. A four-component gasoline surrogate model (including n-heptane, iso-octane, toluene, and 2-pentene) has been developed to simulate real gasolines. An appropriate surrogate mixture of the four components has been developed to simulate the specific gasoline used in the RCM experiments. This chemical kinetic surrogate model was then used to simulate the RCM experimental results for real gasoline. The experimental and modeling results covered ultra-lean to stoichiometric mixtures, compressed temperatures of 640-950 K, and compression pressures of 20 and 40 bar. The agreement between the experiments and model is encouraging in terms of first-stage (when observed) and second-stage ignition delay times and of heat release rate. The experimental and computational results are used to gain insight into low and intermediate temperature processes during gasoline ignition.

Mehl, M; Kukkadapu, G; Kumar, K; Sarathy, S M; Pitz, W J; Sung, S J

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

410

Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well established and uncertainties still remain in the mechanism. This is especially true in the low temperature regime (< 850K). In these conditions, the toluene reactivity is too low to be conveniently investigated. Nonetheless, gasoline surrogates work in the engine at low temperatures, because of the presence of very reactive alkanes. The effect of these component interactions have to be taken into account. This work's aim is to present the model activity carried out by two different research groups, comparing the main pathways and results, matching data carried out in different devices both for pure toluene and mixtures. This is the starting point for a further activity to improve the two kinetic schemes.

Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

412

HCCI experiments with gasoline surrogate fuels modeled by a semidetailed chemical kinetic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine have been conducted with four gasoline surrogate fuel blends. The pure components in the surrogate fuels consisted of n-heptane, isooctane, toluene, ethanol and diisobutylene and fuel sensitivities (RON-MON) in the fuel blends ranged from two to nine. The operating conditions for the engine were p{sub in}=0.1 and 0.2 MPa, T{sub in}=80 and 250 C, {phi}=0.25 in air and engine speed 1200 rpm. A semidetailed chemical kinetic model (142 species and 672 reactions) for gasoline surrogate fuels, validated against ignition data from experiments conducted in shock tubes for gasoline surrogate fuel blends at 1.0{<=} p{<=}5.0MPa, 700{<=} T{<=}1200 K and {phi}=1.0, was successfully used to qualitatively predict the HCCI experiments using a single zone modeling approach. The fuel blends that had higher fuel sensitivity were more resistant to autoignition for low intake temperature and high intake pressure and less resistant to autoignition for high intake temperature and low intake pressure. A sensitivity analysis shows that at high intake temperature the chemistry of the fuels ethanol, toluene and diisobutylene helps to advance ignition. This is consistent with the trend that fuels with the least Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) behavior show the highest octane sensitivity, and become less resistant to autoignition at high intake temperatures. For high intake pressure the sensitivity analysis shows that fuels in the fuel blend with no NTC behavior consume OH radicals and acts as a radical scavenger for the fuels with NTC behavior. This is consistent with the observed trend of an increase in RON and fuel sensitivity. With data from shock tube experiments in the literature and HCCI modeling in this work, a correlation between the reciprocal pressure exponent on the ignition delay to the fuel sensitivity and volume percentage of single-stage ignition fuel in the fuel blend was found. Higher fuel sensitivity and single-stage fuel content generally gives a lower value of the pressure exponent. This helps to explain the results obtained while boosting the intake pressure in the HCCI engine. (author)

Andrae, J.C.G. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Head, R.A. [Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

413

Propane vehicles : status, challenges, and opportunities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propane as an auto fuel has a high octane value and has key properties required for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. To operate a vehicle on propane as either a dedicated fuel or bi-fuel (i.e., switching between gasoline and propane) vehicle, only a few modifications must be made to the engine. Until recently propane vehicles have commonly used a vapor pressure system that was somewhat similar to a carburetion system, wherein the propane would be vaporized and mixed with combustion air in the intake plenum of the engine. This leads to lower efficiency as more air, rather than fuel, is inducted into the cylinder for combustion (Myers 2009). A newer liquid injection system has become available that injects propane directly into the cylinder, resulting in no mixing penalty because air is not diluted with the gaseous fuel in the intake manifold. Use of a direct propane injection system will improve engine efficiency (Gupta 2009). Other systems include the sequential multi-port fuel injection system and a bi-fuel 'hybrid' sequential propane injection system. Carbureted systems remain in use but mostly for non-road applications. In the United States a closed-loop system is used in after-market conversions. This system incorporates an electronic sensor that provides constant feedback to the fuel controller to allow it to measure precisely the proper air/fuel ratio. A complete conversion system includes a fuel controller, pressure regulator valves, fuel injectors, electronics, fuel tank, and software. A slight power loss is expected in conversion to a vapor pressure system, but power can still be optimized with vehicle modifications of such items as the air/fuel mixture and compression ratios. Cold start issues are eliminated for vapor pressure systems since the air/fuel mixture is gaseous. In light-duty propane vehicles, the fuel tank is typically mounted in the trunk; for medium- and heavy-duty vans and trucks, the tank is located under the body of the vehicle. Propane tanks add weight to a vehicle and can slightly increase the consumption of fuel. On a gallon-to-gallon basis, the energy content of propane is 73% that of gasoline, thus requiring more propane fuel to travel an equivalent distance, even in an optimized engine (EERE 2009b).

Rood Werpy, M.; Burnham, A.; Bertram, K.; Energy Systems

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

414

E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray-Optimized DIG, VCR and Variable Valvetrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of biofuels for internal combustion engines has several well published advantages. The biofuels, made from biological sources such as corn or sugar cane, are renewable resources that reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. Fuels from agricultural sources can therefore reduce a countries energy dependency on other nations. Biofuels also have been shown to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere compared to traditional fossil based fuels. Because of these benefits several countries have set targets for the use of biofuels, especially ethanol, in their transportation fuels. Small percentages of ethanol are common place in gasoline but are typically limited to 5 to 8% by volume. Greater benefits are possible from higher concentrations and some countries such as the US and Sweden have encouraged the production of vehicles capable of operating on E85 (85% denatured ethanol and 15% gasoline). E85 capable vehicles are normally equipped to run the higher levels of ethanol by employing modified fuel delivery systems that can withstand the highly corrosive nature of the alcohol. These vehicles are not however equipped to take full advantage of ethanol's properties during the combustion process. Ethanol has a much higher blend research octane number than gasoline. This allows the use of higher engine compression ratios and spark advance which result in more efficient engine operation. Ethanol's latent heat of vaporization is also much higher that gasoline. This higher heat of vaporization cools the engine intake charge which also allows the engine compression ratio to be increased even further. An engine that is optimized for operation on high concentrations of ethanol therefore will have compression ratios that are too high to avoid spark knock (pre-ignition) if run on gasoline or a gasoline/ethanol blend that has a low percentage alcohol. An engine was developed during this project to leverage the improved evaporative cooling and high octane of E85 to improve fuel economy and offset E85's lower energy content. A 2.0 L production Direct Injection gasoline, (DIg) engine employing Dual Independent Cam Phasing, (DICP) and turbo charging was used as the base engine. Modified pistons were used to increase the geometric compression ratio from 9.2:1 to 11.85:1 by modifying the pistons and adding advanced valvetrain to proved control of displacement and effective compression ratio through valve timing control. The advanced valvetrain utilized Delphi's two step valvetrain hardware and intake cam phaser with increased phasing authority of 80 crank angle degrees. Using this hardware the engine was capable of operating knock free on all fuels tested from E0-E85 by controlling effective compression ratio using a Late Intake Valve Closing, (LIVC) strategy. The LIVC strategy results in changes in the trapped displacement such that knock limited torque for gasoline is significantly lower than E85. The use of spark retard to control knock enables higher peak torque for knock limited fuels, however a loss in efficiency results. For gasoline and E10 fuels, full effective displacement could not be reached before spark retard produced a net loss in torque. The use of an Early Intake Valve Closing, (EIVC) strategy resulted in an improvement of engine efficiency at low to mid loads for all fuels tested from E0- E85. Further the use of valve deactivation, to a single intake valve, improved combustion stability and enabled throttle-less operation down to less than 2 bar BMEP. Slight throttling to trap internal residual provided additional reductions in fuel consumption. To fully leverage the benefits of E85, or ethanol blends above E10, would require a vehicle level approach that would take advantage of the improved low end torque that is possible with E85. Operating the engine at reduced speeds and using advanced transmissions (6 speeds or higher) would provide a responsive efficient driving experience to the customer. The vehicle shift and torque converter lockup points for high ethanol blends could take advantage of the significant efficiency ad

Keith Confer; Harry Husted

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the second six months of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts and examination of carbon material, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking. Investigation of coal extraction as a method to produce RCO continues; the reactor modifications to filter the products hot and to do multi-stage extraction improve extraction yields from {approx}50 % to {approx}70%. Carbon characterization of co-cokes for use as various carbon artifacts continues.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre' Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2006-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

416

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during the no cost extension period of the third year of the project to assess the properties and performance of coal based products. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. Specific areas of progress include generation of coal based material that has been fractionated into the desired refinery cuts for a third round of testing, the use of a research gasoline engine to test coal-based gasoline, and modification of diesel engines for use in evaluating diesel produced in the project. At the pilot scale, the hydrotreating process was modified to separate the heavy components from the LCO and RCO fractions before hydrotreating in order to improve the performance of the catalysts in further processing. Hydrotreating and hydrogenation of the product has been completed, and due to removal of material before processing, yield of the jet fuel fraction has decreased relative to an increase in the gasoline fraction. Characterization of the gasoline fuel indicates a dominance of single ring alkylcycloalkanes that have a low octane rating; however, blends containing these compounds do not have a negative effect upon gasoline when blended in refinery gasoline streams. Characterization of the diesel fuel indicates a dominance of 3-ring aromatics that have a low cetane value; however, these compounds do not have a negative effect upon diesel when blended in refinery diesel streams. Both gasoline and diesel continue to be tested for combustion performance. The desulfurization of sulfur containing components of coal and petroleum is being studied so that effective conversion of blended coal and petroleum streams can be efficiently converted to useful refinery products. Activated carbons have proven useful to remove the heavy sulfur components, and unsupported Ni/Mo and Ni/Co catalysts have been very effective for hydrodesulfurization. Equipment is now in place to begin fuel oil evaluations to assess the quality of coal based fuel oil. Combustion and characterization of the latest fuel oil (the high temperature fraction of RCO from the latest modification) indicates that the fraction is heavier than a No. 6 fuel oil. Combustion efficiency on our research boiler is {approx}63% for the heavy RCO fraction, lower than the combustion performance for previous co-coking fuel oils and No. 6 fuel oil. Emission testing indicates that the coal derived material has more trace metals related to coal than petroleum, as seen in previous runs. An additional coal has been procured and is being processed for the next series of delayed co-coking runs. The co-coking of the runs with the new coal have begun, with the coke yield similar to previous runs, but the gas yield is lower and the liquid yield is higher. Characterization of the products continues. Work continues on characterization of liquids and solids from co-coking of hydrotreated decant oils; liquid yields include more saturated and hydro- aromatics, while the coke quality varies depending on the conditions used. Pitch material is being generated from the heavy fraction of co-coking.

Caroline E. Burgess Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2007-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

417

Optimally Controlled Flexible Fuel Powertrain System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A multi phase program was undertaken with the stated goal of using advanced design and development tools to create a unique combination of existing technologies to create a powertrain system specification that allowed minimal increase of volumetric fuel consumption when operating on E85 relative to gasoline. Although on an energy basis gasoline / ethanol blends typically return similar fuel economy to straight gasoline, because of its lower energy density (gasoline ~ 31.8MJ/l and ethanol ~ 21.1MJ/l) the volume based fuel economy of gasoline / ethanol blends are typically considerably worse. This project was able to define an initial engine specification envelope, develop specific hardware for the application, and test that hardware in both single and multi-cylinder test engines to verify the ability of the specified powertrain to deliver reduced E85 fuel consumption. Finally, the results from the engine testing were used in a vehicle drive cycle analysis tool to define a final vehicle level fuel economy result. During the course of the project, it was identified that the technologies utilized to improve fuel economy on E85 also enabled improved fuel economy when operating on gasoline. However, the E85 fueled powertrain provided improved vehicle performance when compared to the gasoline fueled powertrain due to the improved high load performance of the E85 fuel. Relative to the baseline comparator engine and considering current market fuels, the volumetric fuel consumption penalty when running on E85 with the fully optimized project powertrain specification was reduced significantly. This result shows that alternative fuels can be utilized in high percentages while maintaining or improving vehicle performance and with minimal or positive impact on total cost of ownership to the end consumer. The justification for this project was two-fold. In order to reduce the US dependence on crude oil, much of which is imported, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) developed the Renewable Fuels Standard (RFS) under the Energy Policy Act of 2005. The RFS specifies targets for the amount of renewable fuel to be blended into petroleum based transportation fuels. The goal is to blend 36 billion gallons of renewable fuels into transportation fuels by 2022 (9 billion gallons were blended in 2008). The RFS also requires that the renewable fuels emit fewer greenhouse gasses than the petroleum fuels replaced. Thus the goal of the EPA is to have a more fuel efficient national fleet, less dependent on petroleum based fuels. The limit to the implementation of certain technologies employed was the requirement to run the developed powertrain on gasoline with minimal performance degradation. The addition of ethanol to gasoline fuels improves the fuels octane rating and increases the fuels evaporative cooling. Both of these fuel property enhancements make gasoline / ethanol blends more suitable than straight gasoline for use in downsized engines or engines with increased compression ratio. The use of engine downsizing and high compression ratios as well as direct injection (DI), dual independent cam phasing, external EGR, and downspeeding were fundamental to the fuel economy improvements targeted in this project. The developed powertrain specification utilized the MAHLE DI3 gasoline downsizing research engine. It was a turbocharged, intercooled, DI engine with dual independent cam phasing utilizing a compression ratio of 11.25 : 1 and a 15% reduction in final drive ratio. When compared to a gasoline fuelled 2.2L Ecotec engine in a Chevrolet HHR, vehicle drive cycle predictions indicate that the optimized powertrain operating on E85 would result in a reduced volume based drive cycle fuel economy penalty of 6% compared to an approximately 30% penalty for current technology engines.

Duncan Sheppard; Bruce Woodrow; Paul Kilmurray; Simon Thwaite

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

418

The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities conducted for the project The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuels characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the projects objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

419

Characterization of the Sources and Concentrations of Formaldehyde and other volatile organic compounds in four new manufactured houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The concentrations of formaldehyde, 52 individual volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and total VOCs (TVOC) were measured in four new manufactured houses on three occasions over a period of approximately nine months following completion of their construction. The houses were furnished, but unoccupied, model homes produced by a single U.S. manufacturer. Several of the houses incorporated interior finish materials with lower VOC emissions than standard materials. One house had a modified ventilation system. Ventilation rates were measured concurrently with the collection of air samples. A steady-state mass-balance model was used to calculate the area-specific emission rates of the target compounds and TVOC. The emissions of formaldehyde and VOCs from a specimen of plywood used as the floor sheeting were additionally quantified. The median formaldehyde concentration in the four houses was 37 parts-per-billion ( ppb). The formaldehyde concentrations were all less than the most restrictive guideline for this compound of 50 ppb. The concentrations of many of the target VOCs were low. Thirty-one of the VOCs had median concentrations that were at or below 1 ppb. Seven of the compounds were among the most abundant VOCs in all four houses. These compounds were alpha-pinene, beta-pinene, 3-carene, ethylene glycol, hexanal, 2-butanone, and acetic acid. The concentrations of the aldehydes, hexanal, octanal and nonanal, in the four houses were either near or exceeded their respective odor thresholds. The concentrations of acetic acid increased with time. In the final sampling period, the odor threshold for acetic acid was exceeded in all of the houses. The range of TVOC concentrations in the four houses was 0.8 to 3 mg m{sup -3}, with a median value of 1.6 mg m{sup -3}. These concentrations were somewhat lower than TVOC concentrations previously measured in several new site-built houses, and the median concentration was only about twice the typical value for existing residences. The house with the modified ventilation system and several lower emitting materials had consistently low TVOC concentrations that were near 1 mg m{sup -3}. There were no large decreases with time in the emission rates of the individual VOCs or TVOC during the course of the study. However, the emission rates were often lowest in the final sampling with the notable exception of the acetic acid emission rate that increased with time. The source of the aldehydes was most likely engineered wood products, such as the plywood floor sheeting and possibly other structural or interior components. The source of the acetic acid was uncertain. The effects of the source substitution treatments were measurable but turned out to be relatively minor due to the predominance of other sources.

Hodgson, A.T.; Beal, D.; Chandra, S.

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Refinery Integration of By-Products from Coal-Derived Jet Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The final report summarizes the accomplishments toward project goals during length of the project. The goal of this project was to integrate coal into a refinery in order to produce coal-based jet fuel, with the major goal to examine the products other than jet fuel. These products are in the gasoline, diesel and fuel oil range and result from coal-based jet fuel production from an Air Force funded program. The main goal of Task 1 was the production of coal-based jet fuel and other products that would need to be utilized in other fuels or for non-fuel sources, using known refining technology. The gasoline, diesel fuel, and fuel oil were tested in other aspects of the project. Light cycle oil (LCO) and refined chemical oil (RCO) were blended, hydrotreated to removed sulfur, and hydrogenated, then fractionated in the original production of jet fuel. Two main approaches, taken during the project period, varied where the fractionation took place, in order to preserve the life of catalysts used, which includes (1) fractionation of the hydrotreated blend to remove sulfur and nitrogen, followed by a hydrogenation step of the lighter fraction, and (2) fractionation of the LCO and RCO before any hydrotreatment. Task 2 involved assessment of the impact of refinery integration of JP-900 production on gasoline and diesel fuel. Fuel properties, ignition characteristics and engine combustion of model fuels and fuel samples from pilot-scale production runs were characterized. The model fuels used to represent the coal-based fuel streams were blended into full-boiling range fuels to simulate the mixing of fuel streams within the refinery to create potential 'finished' fuels. The representative compounds of the coal-based gasoline were cyclohexane and methyl cyclohexane, and for the coal-base diesel fuel they were fluorine and phenanthrene. Both the octane number (ON) of the coal-based gasoline and the cetane number (CN) of the coal-based diesel were low, relative to commercial fuels ({approx}60 ON for coal-based gasoline and {approx}20 CN for coal-based diesel fuel). Therefore, the allowable range of blending levels was studied where the blend would achieve acceptable performance. However, in both cases of the coal-based fuels, their ignition characteristics may make them ideal fuels for advanced combustion strategies where lower ON and CN are desirable. Task 3 was designed to develop new approaches for producing ultra clean fuels and value-added chemicals from refinery streams involving coal as a part of the feedstock. It consisted of the following three parts: (1) desulfurization and denitrogenation which involves both new adsorption approach for selective removal of nitrogen and sulfur and new catalysts for more effective hydrotreating and the combination of adsorption denitrogenation with hydrodesulfurization; (2) saturation of two-ring aromatics that included new design of sulfur resistant noble-metal catalysts for hydrogenation of naphthalene and tetralin in middle distillate fuels, and (3) value-added chemicals from naphthalene and biphenyl, which aimed at developing value-added organic chemicals from refinery streams such as 2,6-dimethylnaphthalene and 4,4{prime}-dimethylbiphenyl as precursors to advanced polymer materials. Major advances were achieved in this project in designing the catalysts and sorbent materials, and in developing fundamental understanding. The objective of Task 4 was to evaluate the effect of introducing coal into an existing petroleum refinery on the fuel oil product, specifically trace element emissions. Activities performed to accomplish this objective included analyzing two petroleum-based commercial heavy fuel oils (i.e., No. 6 fuel oils) as baseline fuels and three co-processed fuel oils, characterizing the atomization performance of a No. 6 fuel oil, measuring the combustion performance and emissions of the five fuels, specifically major, minor, and trace elements when fired in a watertube boiler designed for natural gas/fuel oil, and determining the boiler performance when firing the five fuels. Two

Caroline Clifford; Andre Boehman; Chunshan Song; Bruce Miller; Gareth Mitchell

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

Peter J. Tijrn

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z