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1

Pool octanes via oxygenates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Increasingly stringent antipollution regulations placed on automobile exhaust gases with consequent reduction or complete lead ban from motor gasoline result in octane shortage at many manufacturing sites. Attractive solutions to this problem, especially in conjunction with abundant methanol supplies, are the hydration and etherification of olefins contained in light product streams from cracking unit or produced by field gas dehydrogenation. A comparison is made between oxygenates octane-volume pool contributions and established refinery technologies. Process reviews for bulk manufacture of fuel-grade isopropanol (IPA), secondary butanol (SBA), tertiary butanol (TBA), methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and tertiary amyl methyl ether (TAME) are presented together with the characteristic investment and operating data. The implantation of these processes into a typical FCCU refinery complex with the resulting octane-pool improvement possibilities is descried.

Prezelj, M.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

UNLV Center for Energy Research CER | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

UNLV Center for Energy Research CER UNLV Center for Energy Research CER Jump to: navigation, search Name UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) Place Las Vegas, Nevada Zip 89154 4027 Product The Center for Energy Research is a focus area for research, information exchange, and education in energy topics. References UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) is a company located in Las Vegas, Nevada . References ↑ "UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER)" Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=UNLV_Center_for_Energy_Research_CER&oldid=352568" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations

3

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Breakout Session 1C-Fostering...

4

BiOctane | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Massachusetts Product: Biofuel start-up planning to design and develop a biodiesel and ethanol refinery. References: BiOctane1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

5

Estimate octane numbers using an enhanced method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved model, based on the Twu-Coon method, is not only internally consistent, but also retains the same level of accuracy as the previous model in predicting octanes of gasoline blends. The enhanced model applies the same binary interaction parameters to components in each gasoline cut and their blends. Thus, the enhanced model can blend gasoline cuts in any order, in any combination or from any splitting of gasoline cuts and still yield the identical value of octane number for blending the same number of gasoline cuts. Setting binary interaction parameters to zero for identical gasoline cuts during the blending process is not required. The new model changes the old model`s methodology so that the same binary interaction parameters can be applied between components inside a gasoline cut as are applied to the same components between gasoline cuts. The enhanced model is more consistent in methodology than the original model, but it has equal accuracy for predicting octane numbers of gasoline blends, and it has the same number of binary interaction parameters. The paper discusses background, enhancement of the Twu-Coon interaction model, and three examples: blend of 2 identical gasoline cuts, blend of 3 gasoline cuts, and blend of the same 3 gasoline cuts in a different order.

Twu, C.H.; Coon, J.E. [Simulation Sciences Inc., Brea, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Partial miscibility behavior of the ternary systems methane-propane-n-octane, methane-n-butane-n-octane, and methane-carbon dioxide-n-octane  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The phase behavior of three ternary systems (methane-propane-n-octane, methane-n-butane-n-octane, methane-carbon dioxide-n-octane) was studied in their regions of L/sub 1/-L/sub 2/-V immiscibility. Liquid-phase composition and molar volume data for both liquid phases are presented as a function of temperature and pressure in the three-phase region. The boundaries of the three-phase regions, locl of K points (L/sub 1/-L/sub 2/ = V), LCST points (L/sub 1/ = L/sub 2/-V), and Q points (S-L/sub 1/-L/sub 2/-V) are detailed. A detailed study of the immiscibility behavior of the binary system carbon dioxide-n-octane is also presented.

Hottovy, J.D.; Kohn, J.P.; Luks, K.D.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Gasoline marketing: Octane mislabeling in New York City  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The problem of octane mislabeling at gasoline stations in New York City has grown - from 46 or fewer citations in 1981 to 171 citations in 1986. No single source of octane mislabeling exists but the city has found both gasoline station operators and fuel distributors to blame. The problem does not seem to be unique to any one type of gasoline station but 57 percent of the 171 citations issued involved gasoline sold under the name of a major refiner; the rest involved unbranded gasoline. Octane cheating can be lucrative in New York City. A station intentionally mislabeling its gasoline could realize amounts many times the city's maximum $500 fine for cheating.

Not Available

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

A Vehicle Manufacturer's Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

of octane rating 4 EPA report 420-R-13-011 "Light-Duty Automotive Technology, Carbon Dioxide Emissions, and Fuel Economy Trends: 1975 Through 2013" Technology is evolving rapidly...

9

The Clean Development Mechanism and CER Price Formation in the Carbon Emission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Clean Development Mechanism and CER Price Formation in the Carbon Emission Markets Ren such as the European Union Emissions Trading Scheme (EU ETS) and offset certificates such as CERs generated within historically. Keywords. Environmental risk, energy economics, cap-and-trade, carbon mar- kets, Kyoto protocol

Carmona, Rene

10

A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels A Vehicle Manufacturer’s Perspective on Higher-Octane Fuels Tom Leone, Technical Expert, Powertrain Evaluation and Analysis, Ford Motor Company

11

Molecular Simulation of CO2 Solubility and Its Effect on Octane Swelling  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Molecular Simulation of CO2 Solubility and Its Effect on Octane Swelling ... Carbon dioxide (CO2) flooding is one of the very important industrial processes for enhanced hydrocarbon recovery. ... In this study, CO2 solubility in octane and its effect on octane (n-octane) swelling are investigated by performing configurational-bias Monte Carlo simulations in the osmotic ensemble at two temperatures of 323 and 353 K and a pressure range of 2–10 MPa. ...

Junfang Zhang; Zhejun Pan; Keyu Liu; Nick Burke

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

12

Review of market for octane enhancers: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Crude oil is easily separated into its principal products by simple distillation. However, neither the amounts nor the quality of these natural products matches demand. Today, octane requirements must be achieved by changing the chemical composition of the straight-run gasoline fraction.

J. E. Sinor Consultants, Inc.

2000-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

13

SRC-I naphtha octane study. Final technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Octane numbers were measured by the engine method (RON and MON) and were calculated from gas chromatograms for eighteen gasoline samples comprising SRC-I and petroleum-derived raw gasoline, reformates, and selected blends of these materials. Conclusions derived from this work are: (1) Research and Motor Octane Numbers for blends of SRC-I liquids and of SRC-I liquids with petroleum gasoline components closely agree with the values calculated from linear combination of the measured RON and MON of the individual blend components. Although some interactions among the blend components were observed, these are not major and in all cases the 95% confidence interval of all of the individual points fall within the 95% confidence limits of linear blend correlation; (2) On the basis of octane numbers and blending characteristics, SRC-I straight run gasoline and SRC-I reformates are useful as blending components for the motor gasoline pool. In the case of the straight run gasoline, however, other factors such as its high sulfur content will impose a limitation to its direct use in the pool; and (3) Research Octane Numbers calculated from gas chromatograms agree closely with engine RON data for SRC-I gasolines. Accordingly, the GC method may be equally applicable to coal-derived and petroleum gasoline components.

Not Available

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Centro De Energias Renovables (CER): A Major OpenEI Contributor | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centro De Energias Renovables (CER): A Major OpenEI Contributor Centro De Energias Renovables (CER): A Major OpenEI Contributor Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Graham7781's picture Submitted by Graham7781(1992) Super contributor 18 March, 2010 - 12:25 imported OpenEI OpenEI continues to expand and grow, and recently a new partnership between the Centro De Energias Renovables (CER) in Santiago, Chile and the international group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado has led to the creation of a Latin American gateway on OpenEI.org, where users in Spanish-speaking countries can upload their data. The CER is focused on developing and growing the Latin American community around OpenEI by holding training sessions, and communicating with NREL's international group and community building team on ways to improve the

15

Predict octane numbers using a generalized interaction method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An interaction-based correlation using a new approach can be used to predict research and motor octane numbers of gasoline blends. An ultimately detailed analysis of the gasoline cut is not necessary. This correlation can describe blending behavior over the entire composition range of gasoline cuts. The component-oriented interaction approach is general and will accurately predict, without performing additional blending studies, blending behavior for new gasoline cuts. The proposed correlation fits the data quite closely for blends of many gasoline cuts. The regression gives realistic values for binary interaction parameters between components. A unique set of binary interaction parameters was found for the equation for predicting octane number of any gasoline blend. The binary interaction parameters between components contained in gasoline cuts have been converted to binary interaction parameters between gasoline cuts through a general equation to simplify the calculations. Because of the proposed method`s accuracy, optimum allocation of components among gasoline grades can be obtained and predicted values can be used for quality control of the octane number of marketed gasolines.

Twu, C.H.; Coon, J.E. [Simulation Sciences, Inc., Brea, CA (United States)

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization deer12szybist.pdf More Documents &...

17

The Center for Excellence in Rural Safety (CERS) at the University of Minnesota developed the Rural Highway Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and work-zone safety. · Complements SafeRoadMaps.org, a mapping tool also developed by CERS. · ListsThe Center for Excellence in Rural Safety (CERS) at the University of Minnesota developed the Rural Highway Safety Clearinghouse in 2008 with support from the Federal High- way Administration (FHWA) as part

Minnesota, University of

18

High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels High Octane Fuels Can Make Better Use of Renewable Transportation Fuels Brian West, Deputy Director, Engines and Emissions Research Center; Oak Ridge National Laboratory

19

The chemical origin of octane sensitivity in gasoline fuels containing nitroalkanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental octane measurements are presented for a standard gasoline to which has been added various quantities of nitromethane, nitroethane and 1-nitropropane. The addition of nitroalkanes was found to suppress the Motor Octane Number to a much greater extent than the Research Octane Number. In other words addition of nitroalkanes increases the octane sensitivity of gasoline. Density Functional Theory was used to model the equilibrium thermodynamics and the barrier heights for reactions leading to the break-up of nitroethane. These results were used to develop a chemical kinetic scheme for nitroalkanes combined with a surrogate gasoline (for which a mechanism has been developed previously). Finally the chemical kinetic simulations were combined with a quasi-dimensional engine model in order to predict autoignition in octane rating tests. Our results suggest that the chemical origin of octane sensitivity in gasoline/nitroalkane blends cannot be fully explained on the conventional basis of the extent to which NTC behaviour is absent. Instead we have shown that the contribution of the two pathways leading to autoignition in gasoline containing nitroalkanes becomes much more significant under the more severe conditions of the Motor Octane method than the Research Octane method. (author)

Cracknell, R.F.; McAllister, L.J.; Norton, M.; Walmsley, H.L. [Shell Global Solutions, Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Andrae, J.C.G. [Shell Global Solutions, Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom); Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

20

High-Octane Fuel from Refinery Exhaust Gas: Upgrading Refinery Off-Gas to High-Octane Alkylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Exelus is developing a method to convert olefins from oil refinery exhaust gas into alkylate, a clean-burning, high-octane component of gasoline. Traditionally, olefins must be separated from exhaust before they can be converted into another source of useful fuel. Exelus’ process uses catalysts that convert the olefin to alkylate without first separating it from the exhaust. The ability to turn up to 50% of exhaust directly into gasoline blends could result in an additional 46 million gallons of gasoline in the U.S. each year.

None

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Name Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) Address Agustinas 640, piso 16 Place Santiago, Chile Zip 8320219 Number of employees 11-50 Year founded 2009 Phone number +5624969600 Coordinates -33.4403824°, -70.6459388° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":-33.4403824,"lon":-70.6459388,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

22

CER-ETH -Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series Eidgenössische. Schweitzer a aChair of Systems Design, ETH Zurich, Kreuzplatz 5, CH-8032 Zurich, Switzerland b Technische Hochschule Zürich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich hal-00973077,version1-3Apr2014 #12

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

CER-ETH -Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CER-ETH - Center of Economic Research at ETH Zurich Economics Working Paper Series Eidgenössische for valuable suggestions. Hans Haller gratefully acknowledges the hospitality and support of ETH Zurich, Chair Technische Hochschule Zürich Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich Ordinal Games Jacques Durieu, Hans

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

24

Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining | U.S. DOE  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining Basic Energy Sciences (BES) BES Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of BES Funding Opportunities Basic Energy Sciences Advisory Committee (BESAC) News & Resources Contact Information Basic Energy Sciences U.S. Department of Energy SC-22/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3081 F: (301) 903-6594 E: sc.bes@science.doe.gov More Information » July 2013 Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining A novel metal-organic framework (MOF) efficiently separates higher octane components from the low value ones, offering great potential for significant cost reduction in gasoline production. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

25

The relation of octane number, compression ratio, and exhaust temperature in the gasoline engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE RELATION OF OCTANE NUMHER& COMPRESSION RATIO& AND EXHAUST TEMPERATURE IN THE GASOLINE ENGINE A Tbeaie Donald George Jentsch THE RELATION OF OCTANE NUMBER, COMHKSSION RATIO, EXHAUST TEMPERATURE IN THE GASOLINE ENGINE By Donald George... throttle settings) a. Table VI - Aviation Gasolines 22 26 b. Table VI (a) ? Automotive Gasolines . . . 33 2. Spark set for maximum power at full throttle (Speed 2000 RPH at various throttle settings) a. Table VII ? Aviation Gasolines . . . . . 34 b...

Jentsch, Donald George

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

26

Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) en español | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

en español en español Jump to: navigation, search CER.png El CER es una institución que consolida los esfuerzos del Gobierno de Chile para desarrollar las energías renovables no convencionales (ERNC) y será un núcleo central de información y apoyo a la promoción de inversiones y transferencia tecnológica en esta materia. Este nuevo organismo es resultado del trabajo conjunto de la Comisión Nacional de Energía (CNE) y CORFO. La misión La misión del CER es promover y facilitar el desarrollo de la industria de las ERNC, articulando esfuerzos públicos y privados que optimicen el uso del gran potencial de recursos energéticos renovables no convencionales existentes en Chile, contribuyendo así a lograr un abastecimiento de energía seguro y sustentable económica, ambiental y socialmente.

27

New UOP catalysts plus revamps to meet your octane goals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It appears that the use of lead antiknocks will be completely banned by Congress in the near future. The lead ''phasedown'' threatens to become a lead ''crashdown.'' Light straight run and natural gasoline will require catalytic upgrading, in most refineries, to permit inclusion in the gasoline pool. The UOP Penex process is well-suited to regain much of the octane shortfall through isomerization of C/sub 5//C/sub 6/ normal paraffins in converted units as well as new unit applications. New Penex catalysts, I-8 and I-7, permit state-of-the-art processing capability. For conversions, UOP offers new catalysts capable of yielding, on a once-through basis, an 83-84 RONO Penexate at modest expenditure or, alternatively, a 78-80 RONO product with minimal revamp cost. UOP computer-assisted engineering studies can quickly identify and evaluate the process options available for a given project, so that revamp feasibility can be quickly assessed. This is important in the present climate where regulatory changes must be matched by a timely response from industry. Our studies have consistently shown that there is strong economic justification for addition of Penex isomerization to the refinery flow scheme, whether through new unit design or revamp conversions.

Krueding, A.P.; Johnson, J.A.; Pappas, S.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Use of ethers as high-octane components of gasolines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article reports on a study of the possible utilization of methyl tert-amyl ether (MTAE) as an automotive gasoline component, both by itself and in combination with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE). The naphtha used in these studies consisted of 80% reformer naphtha produced under severe conditions and 20% straight-run IBP-62/sup 0/C cut. The physicochemical properties of the MTAE, the MTBE, and the naphtha base stock are given. It is determined that MTAE, which has a slightly poorer knock resistance than MTBE, is fully equal to MTBE in all other respects and can be used as an automotive gasoline component; that a gasoline blend prepared from 89% naphtha base stock, 5.5% MTAE, and 5.5% MTBE meets all of the requirements of the standard GOST 2084-77 for Grade AI-93 gasoline; and that the use of MTAE offers a means for expanding the resources of high-octane components, lowering the toxicity of the gasolines and the exhaust gas (in comparison with organometallic antiknock agents), and bringing non-petroleum raw materials into the fuel production picture.

Gureev, A.A.; Baranova, G.N.; Korotkov, I.V.; Levinson, G.I.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

YOUNG STARS NEAR EARTH: THE OCTANS-NEAR ASSOCIATION AND CASTOR MOVING GROUP  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All cataloged stellar moving groups and associations with ages ?100 Myr and within 100 pc of Earth have Galactic space motions (UVW) situated in a 'good box' with dimensions ?20 km s{sup –1} on a side. Torres et al. defined the Octans Association as a group of 15 stars with age '20 Myr?' and located ?140 pc from Earth, but with average V space velocity –3.6 km s{sup –1} that is well outside of the good box. We present a list of 14 Hipparcos star systems within 100 pc of Earth that we call {sup O}ctans-Near{sup ;} these systems have UVW similar to those of the much more distant Octans Association. The Octans-Near stars have apparent ages between about 30 and 100 Myr and their relationship to the Octans Association stars is unclear. Six additional star systems have UVW similar to those of Octans-Near stars and likely ages ?200 Myr. These six systems include the late-type binary star EQ Peg—6.2 pc from Earth with likely age ?100 Myr and thus likely to be the nearest known pre-main sequence star system. The UVW of stars in a previously proposed ?200 Myr old Castor moving group are not too dissimilar from the UVW of Octans-Near stars. However, stars in the Castor group—if it exists at all—are mostly substantially older than 200 Myr and thus generally can readily be distinguished from the much younger Octans-Near stars.

Zuckerman, B.; Vican, Laura [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Song, Inseok [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602-2451 (United States); Schneider, Adam, E-mail: ben@astro.ucla.edu, E-mail: lvican@ucla.edu, E-mail: song@uga.edu, E-mail: Adam.Schneider@Utoledo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH 43606 (United States)

2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

30

Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev) International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) International Energy Agency (IEA)

31

Topology of cyclo-octane energy landscape Shawn Martin,1,a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. While this is a very mild assumption, we have discovered an example of an energy landscape whichTopology of cyclo-octane energy landscape Shawn Martin,1,a Aidan Thompson,2 Evangelos A. Coutsias,3 2010 Understanding energy landscapes is a major challenge in chemistry and biology. Although a wide

Coutsias, Evangelos

32

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

61CanCer InformatICs 2014:13(s5) Open Access: Full open access to this and thousands of other papers at http://www.la-press.com. Cancer Informatics Supplementary Issue: Network and Pathway Analysis of Cancer Susceptibility (A) Introduction Cellular signaling generates a chain of protein

Geman, Donald

33

I E L D ESCALATION EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y Y I E L D ESCALATION EVALUATION PROJECT RULISON CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION Las V e g a s , Nevada J u n e 1 5 , ,1972 C o n t r a c t No. AT(26-1) -.429 b e t w e e n t h e U . S . Atomic Energy Commission, t h e U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f t h e I n t e r i o r , A u s t r a l O i l Company, I n c o r p o r a t e d , a n d CER G e o n u c l e a r C o r p o r a t i o n . DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. C O N T E N T S . . ....... . . 1 INTRODUCTION . . . - 7 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 . P U R P O S E OF EVALUATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 R E G R E S S I O N EQUATION D E R I V A T I O N S 4 S E I S M I C PROGRAM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 FREQUENCY P R E D I C T I O N 7 6 . DAMAGE PREDICTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 A P P E N D I X A . E S C A L A T I O N E Q U A T I O N S . . . . . . . . . . 1 3 S c a l

34

Production of high-octane automobile gasolines by the catalytic reforming of straight-run gasoline fractions from mangyshlak crude  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High-octane components for AI-93 and AI-98 automobile gasolines can be obtained in 86 and 82% ... 140, 140–180, and 85–180°C gasoline fractions from Mangyshlak crude.

V. A. Kuprianov; A. A. Timofeev; V. E. Gavrun…

1971-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Process for producing gasoline of high octane number, in particular lead-free gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A process is described for producing gasoline of high octane number from C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ olefinic cuts, such as those obtained by fractional distillation of a C/sub 3/ / C/sub 4/ catalytic cracking cut. It includes the steps of: (A) oligomerizing propylene of the C/sub 3/ cut to obtain a first gasoline fraction, (B) reacting the isobutene of the C/sub 4/ cut with methanol to produce methyl tert.-butyl ether which is separated from the unreacted C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons to form a second gasoline fraction, (C) alkylating said unreacted C/sub 4/ hydrocarbons with isobutane in the presence of an alkylation catalyst such as hydrofluoric acid, to form a third gasoline fraction, and (D) admixing, at least partially, said first, second and third gasoline fractions, so as to obtain gasoline of high octane number.

Chauvin, Y.; Gaillard, J.; Hellin, M.; Torck, B.; Vu, Q.D.

1981-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

The Research and Motor octane numbers of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents an experimental study of the Research (RON) and Motor (MON) octane numbers of Liquefied Petroleum Gas (LPG). A comprehensive set of RON and MON data for mixtures of propane, propylene (propene), n-butane and iso-butane are presented, using a method that is consistent with the currently active ASTM Research and Motor test methods for liquid fuels. Empirical models which relate LPG composition to its RON and MON are then developed, such that the simplest relationships between the constituent species’ mole fractions and the mixture octane rating are achieved. This is used to determine the degree of non-linearity between the composition and the RON and MON of different LPG mixtures. Finally, implications for LPG fuel quality standards are discussed briefly, as part of a suggested, more substantial undertaking by the community which also revisits the standard test procedures for measuring the RON and MON of LPG.

Kai J. Morganti; Tien Mun Foong; Michael J. Brear; Gabriel da Silva; Yi Yang; Frederick L. Dryer

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Three Stages Modeling of n-Octane Reforming Assisted by a Nonthermal Arc Discharge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Three Stages Modeling of n-Octane Reforming Assisted by a Nonthermal Arc Discharge ... After a description of the model and its main assumptions, a parametric analysis of plasma reformer performance addressing the influence of plasma volume, H2O/C ratio, O/C ratio, and input electric power is presented. ... Most of them were particularly dealt with technologies based on arc discharges. ...

José Gonzalez-Aguilar; Guillaume Petitpas; Alexandre Lebouvier; Jean-Damien Rollier; Adeline Darmon; Laurent Fulcheri

2009-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

38

CRC fuel rating program: road octane performance of oxygenates in 1982 model cars  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of the widespread interest in the use of alcohols and ethers as gasoline blending components, this program was conducted to evaluate the effects of several oxygenates on gasoline octane performance and to evaluate the effects of car design features such as engine and transmission type. Five oxygenates were evaluated at two nominal concentrations, 5 and 10 volume%, at both regular- and premium-grade octane levels: methanol (MeOH), ethanol (ETOH), isopropanol (IPA), tertiary butanol (TBA), and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE). A blend of 5% MeOH and 5 percent TBA was also tested at both octane levels. Twenty-eight unleaded fuels, including four hydrocarbon fuels, two hydrocarbon fuels plus toluene, and twenty-two oxygenated fuels, were rated in duplicate in thirty-eight cars using the Modified Uniontown Technique (CRC Designation F-28-75 described in Appendix C), plus some additional instructions. All testing was done on chassis dynamometers. Ratings were obtained at full throttle with all thirty-eight cars, and at the most critical part-throttle condition (occurring with manifold vacuum of 4 in. Hg (13.5 kPa) or greater above the full-throttle vacuum) with nine cars.

Not Available

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Shape selective cracking ofn-octane and 2,2,4-trimethylpentane over an alumina-pillared clay  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A mixture ofn-octane (nC8...) and 2, 2, 4-trimethylpentane (224-TMP) was cracked over an alumina-pillared montmorillonite (Al-PILC) acid catalyst as a means of characterising...8...remaining)/log (fraction of 224...

Christian Doblin; Joseph F. Mathews; Terence W. Turney

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over rhodium catalysts: An experimental, modeling, and simulation study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Catalytic partial oxidation of iso-octane over a rhodium/alumina coated honeycomb monolith is experimentally and numerically studied at short-contact times for varying fuel-to-oxygen ratios. A new experimental set-up with well-defined inlet and boundary conditions is presented. The conversion on the catalyst and in the gas-phase is modeled by detailed reaction mechanisms including 857 gas-phase and 17 adsorbed species. Elementary-step based heterogeneous and homogeneous reaction mechanisms are implemented into two-dimensional flow field description of a single monolith channel. Experiment and simulation provide new insights into the complex reaction network leading to varying product distribution as function of fuel-to-oxygen ratio. At fuel rich conditions, the formation of by-products that can serve as coke precursors is observed and interpreted. (author)

Hartmann, M.; Minh, H.D. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Maier, L. [Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Deutschmann, O. [Institute for Chemical Technology and Polymer Chemistry, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany); Institute for Nuclear and Energy Technology, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Karlsruhe (Germany)

2010-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Use of a thermodynamic cycle simulation to determine the difference between a propane-fuelled engine and an iso-octane-fuelled engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the engine cycle simulation to determine the difference between a propane-fuelled and an iso-octane-fuelled engine for the same operating conditions and engine specifications. A comprehensive parametric investigation was conducted to examine the effects...

Pathak, Dushyant

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

42

Conversion of gas-condensate straight-run gasolines to high-octane gasolines over zeolite catalysts modified with metal nanopowders  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The acid and catalytic properties of zeolite catalysts modified with metal nanopowders (Cu, Zn, and W) were studied in the conversion of gas-condensate straight-run gasolines to high-liquid high-octane gasolines ...

V. I. Erofeev; A. S. Medvedev; I. S. Khomyakov…

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

FT-IR spectroscopy of nitric acid in TBP/octane solution.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Infrared studies for the HNO{sub 3}/0.73 M TBP n-octane system are reported. Two extracted species, TBP {center_dot} HNO{sub 3} and TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3}, were identified in the organic phase. The concentration of the individual species was determined by the analysis of the vibrational band at {approx}1650 cm{sup -1}. The band at 1648 cm{sup -1} was assigned to the monosolvate TBP {center_dot} HNO{sub 3} and the band at 1672 cm{sup -1} to the hemisolvate TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3}. The infrared spectra revealed that with respect to the P{double_bond}O bond, as well to each other, the HNO{sub 3} molecules in the hemisolvate are spectrally non-equivalent. The predominant structure of TBP {center_dot} 2HNO{sub 3} involves the chain HNO{sub 3} dimer. Some ionic NO{sub 3}{sup -} and hydronium ions were identified in this system but only during formation of the monosolvate. The analyses performed in this system can serve for the characterization of HNO{sub 3} in related systems in the presence of metal species.

Ferraro, J. R.; Borkowski, M.; Chiarizia, R.; McAlister, D. R.; Chemistry; Loyola Univ. Chicago

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

New low-mass members of the Octans stellar association and an updated 30-40 Myr lithium age  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Octans association is one of several young stellar moving groups recently discovered in the Solar neighbourhood, and hence a valuable laboratory for studies of stellar, circumstellar disc and planetary evolution. However, a lack of low-mass members or any members with trigonometric parallaxes means the age, distance and space motion of the group are poorly constrained. To better determine its membership and age, we present the first spectroscopic survey for new K and M-type Octans members, resulting in the discovery of 29 UV-bright K5-M4 stars with kinematics, photometry and distances consistent with existing members. Nine new members possess strong Li I absorption, which allow us to estimate a lithium age of 30-40 Myr, similar to that of the Tucana-Horologium association and bracketed by the firm lithium depletion boundary ages of the Beta Pictoris (20 Myr) and Argus/IC 2391 (50 Myr) associations. Several stars also show hints in our medium-resolution spectra of fast rotation or spectroscopic binarity. M...

Murphy, Simon J

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Effects of fuel octane number and inlet air temperature on knock characteristics of a single cylinder engine  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A dual sample rate technique has been developed and applied to measuring in-cylinder pressure and its oscillations due to autoignition. The harmonics of in-cylinder oscillations were found in good agreement with those obtained from the solutions of wave equation in a cylindrical container. The time of knock relative to spark timing was almost independent of the knock intensity, fuel octane number, and inlet air temperature. The knock intensity was almost constant up to the spark advance when about 100% of the cycles were knocking, further spark advance resulted in higher knock intensity. The mass fraction of unburned fuel at the time of knock was about 10% and was independent of the frequency of the cycles knocking. These observations indicated that the phenomenon of knock is a single-site autoignition for intermittent knock and multi-site autoignition for severe knocking.

Haghgooie, M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A complex chemical kinetic mechanism for the oxidation of gasoline surrogate fuels: n heptane, iso octane and toluene - Mechanism development and validation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development and validation against experimental results of a new gasoline surrogate complex kinetic mechanism is presented in this paper. The surrogate fuel is a ternary mixture of n heptane, iso octane and toluene. The full three components mechanism is based on existing n heptane/iso octane (gasoline PRF) and toluene mechanisms which were modified and coupled for the purpose of this work. Mechanism results are compared against available experimental data from the literature. Simulations with the PRF plus toluene mechanism show that its behavior is in agreement with experimental results for most of the tested settings. These include a wide variety of thermodynamic conditions and fuel proportions in experimental configurations such as HCCI engine experiments, rapid compression machines, a shock tube and a jet stirred reactor.

Da Cruz, A Pires; Anderlohr, Jörg; Bounaceur, Roda; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 2. Fuel and EGR Effects on Knock-Limited Load and Speed  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine is used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external-cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to that of 87AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicating mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. The results demonstrate that for all fuels, EGR is a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency but is less useful for knock mitigation with E30 than for 87AKI gasoline or IB24. Under knocking conditions, 15% EGR is found to offer 1 CA of CA50 timing advance with E30, whereas up to 5 CA of CA50 advance is possible with knock-limited 87AKI gasoline. Compared to 87AKI, both E30 and IB24 are found to have reduced adiabatic flame temperature and shorter combustion durations, which reduce knocking propensity beyond that indicated by the octane number. However, E30+0% EGR is found to exhibit the better antiknock properties than either 87AKI+15% EGR or IB24+15% EGR, expanding the knock limited operating range and engine stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. Furthermore, the fuel sensitivity (S) of E30 was attributed to reduced speed sensitivity of E30, expanding the low-speed stoichiometric torque capability at high compression ratio. The results illustrate that intermediate alcohol gasoline blends exhibit exceptional antiknock properties and performance beyond that indicated by the octane number tests, particularly E30.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Experimental Investigation of Spark-Ignited Combustion with High-Octane Biofuels and EGR. 1. Engine Load Range and Downsize Downspeed Opportunity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present study experimentally investigates spark-ignited combustion with 87 AKI E0 gasoline in its neat form and in midlevel alcohol gasoline blends with 24% vol/vol isobutanol gasoline (IB24) and 30% vol/vol ethanol gasoline (E30). A single-cylinder research engine was used with an 11.85:1 compression ratio, hydraulically actuated valves, laboratory intake air, and was capable of external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Experiments were conducted with all fuels to full-load conditions with = 1, using both 0% and 15% external cooled EGR. Higher octane number biofuel blends exhibited increased stoichiometric torque capability at this compression ratio, where the unique properties of ethanol enabled a doubling of the stoichiometric torque capability with E30 as compared to 87 AKI, up to 20 bar IMEPg (indicated mean effective pressure gross) at = 1. EGR provided thermodynamic advantages and was a key enabler for increasing engine efficiency for all fuel types. However, with E30, EGR was less useful for knock mitigation than gasoline or IB24. Torque densities with E30 with 15% EGR at = 1 operation were similar or better than a modern EURO IV calibration turbo-diesel engine. The results of the present study suggest that it could be possible to implement a 40% downsize + downspeed configuration (1.2 L engine) into a representative midsize sedan. For example, for a midsize sedan at a 65 miles/h cruise, an estimated fuel consumption of 43.9 miles per gallon (MPG) (engine out 102 g-CO2/km) could be achieved with similar reserve power to a 2.0 L engine with 87AKI (38.6 MPG, engine out 135 g-CO2/km). Data suggest that, with midlevel alcohol gasoline blends, engine and vehicle optimization can offset the reduced fuel energy content of alcohol gasoline blends and likely reduce vehicle fuel consumption and tailpipe CO2 emissions.

Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Process for reforming naphthene and paraffin-containing hydrocarbons in the naphtha boiling range and isomerizing C sub 5 -C sub 6 normal paraffin feedstock to produce a high octane gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a process for reforming a naphthenic and paraffin-containing hydrocarbon feedstock to produce a reformate product having an increased octane rating by contacting the feedstock with a reforming catalyst in the presence of hydrogen at reforming conditions in a reforming zone, the reforming zone including a naphtha dehydrogenation zone and a paraffin dehydrocyclization zone wherein heated, pressurized hydrogen is added to the effluent stream from the naphtha dehydrogenation zone prior to charging the effluent stream to the paraffin dehydrocyclization zone to produce a first product stream comprising a gasoline range reformate product having an RON octane rating of at least about 90 and hydrogen wherein the reformate product is separated from the hydrogen in a reformate separation zone. It comprises: charging at least a portion of the heated, pressurized hydrogen with a C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} n-paraffin feedstock to an isomerization zone containing an isomerization catalyst at isomerization conditions to produce a second product stream containing an isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product and passing the second product stream to the reformate separation zone and recovering at least a major portion of the isomerized C{sub 5}-C{sub 6} product with the reformate product.

Dalson, M.H.

1990-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

50

Competitive Energy Reduction (CER) Campaign at the University of Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Behavioral Changes in Campus Buildings During April 2009. Chemical & Petroleum Engineering Building (CPE and Petroleum Engineering (CPE) Building. The teams had two weeks of planning and two weeks of campaigning habits that result in inefficient uses of energy. The program was designed to complement the campus

Hofmann, Hans A.

51

Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

articulando esfuerzos pblicos y privados, que optimicen el uso del gran potencial de recursos energticos renovables no convencionales existentes en Chile, contribuyendo as...

52

An Octane-Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...for the adoption of fuel cells for applications...not only reduces fuel consumption but also reduces...emission. Although fuel cells can achieve efficiencies...internal combustion engine, and H 2 is more...is, gasoline and diesel, has not been successful...

Zhongliang Zhan; Scott A. Barnett

2005-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

53

An Experimental Investigation of Low Octane Gasoline in Diesel Engines  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Presentation given at the 16th Directions in Engine-Efficiency and Emissions Research (DEER) Conference in Detroit, MI, September 27-30, 2010.

54

Spatiotemporal mapping of visual attention CerCo, UPS, Universit de Toulouse III, Toulouse, France, &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

spatial distances and temporal delays from a cue in a noisy background. The cue was a non and delay, the background contrast compensation required to keep performance at 75%. The spatiotemporal peripheral sensors. In order to do that, attention can use one or more of the following mechanisms: signal

VanRullen, Rufin

55

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-13-01 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dollars and "real" dollars. Dividing the current dollars by the real dollars yields the GDP Implicit Price and other systems are relevant to magnetic fusion energy (MFE). In the mid 90's, the ARIES Project6 began, such as the U.S. Commerce Department Gross Domestic Product8 (GDP), which is a measure of the output of goods

California at San Diego, University of

56

University of California, San Diego UCSD-CER-05-06 Center for Energy Research  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EUV lithography (EUVL) source, soft x-ray source, and research relevant to laser fusion etc by research on laser fusion and x-ray lasers [4][5] . However, because of the large variety of materials in specific applications of extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL), soft x-ray sources, and laser plasma

Najmabadi, Farrokh

57

The thermodynamic properties of mixtures of normal octane and branched paraffin hydrocarbons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to that predicated by Raoult's law. Eight years later, Nyers (17) measured the vapor- liquid equilibrium data of eighteen binary hydrocarbon mixtures containing naphthene, paraffin and aromatic bina- ry mixtures at 760 mm Hg absolute pressure by using a vapor..., it was shown that the five paraffin-aromatic systems have the greatest deviation from ideality, with activity coeffi- cients ranging from 1. 3 to 1. 8. For the naphthene-aro- matic systems, activity coefficients are slightly lower, varying from 1. 2 to 1. 4...

Liu, Edward Kou-Shan

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

High Octane Selling Coffee Shop Strategy That Gets the Job Done  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and meet informally. They are also superior to other options in their brand image and their appeal

Boyce, Richard L.

59

Hydrogen-free domestic technologies for conversion of low-octane gasoline distillates on zeolite catalysts  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This review is devoted to the problem of the Russian domestic manufacture of high-quality motor fuels using hydrogen-free catalytic conversion of straight-run gasoline on zeolites with a high content of...

L. M. Velichkina

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Production of high-octane gasoline on a semi-industrial catalytic reforming plant  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Experiments have been carried out on the catalytic reforming at a pressure of 20 atm of a wide, straight-run gasoline fraction on an experimental industrial plant.

A. P. Fedorov; G. N. Maslyanskii…

1967-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

CER Technology Fellowship Program 2008 Project Team: Mark Van Doren, Assistant Professor, Biology Department, Krieger School of Arts &  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and an associated textbook as a guide. To give students greater access to lecture materials and to enhance: Animation, Courseware (WebCT), Digital Audio, Digital Video, Graphic Design, HTML/Web Design, Macromedia material integrates with the rest of the course, and access supplemental illustrations and resources

Gray, Jeffrey J.

62

Evaluation of the colossal electroresistance (CER) effect and its application in the non-volatile Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flash memory, the current leading technology for non-volatile memory (NVM), is projected by many to run obsolete in the face of future miniaturization trend in the semiconductor devices due to some of its technical ...

Wicaksono, Aulia Tegar

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

CER Technology Fellowship Program 2008 Project Team: Cila Herman, Professor, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering, Johns Hopkins University; Muge Pirtini, Graduate Student, Mechanical Engineering, Whiting School of Engineering Project Title: An Interactive Online Tutorial/C++, WebCT, Digital Audio, Digital Video, Graphic Design, HTML/Web Design, MatLab, PHP, Power

Gray, Jeffrey J.

64

A study of PVT relations for carbon dioxide, n-pentane, and n-octane mixtures using a recombination apparatus  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon dioxide flooding is considered to have a multi- contact miscibility displacement mechanism. It changes the reservoir fluid in a complex manner. This type of Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) technique is very economically viable, readily...

Wirawan, Januar Fitri Santo

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Quarterly technical progress report, April--June 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results shown in Figures 10 and 11 demonstrate that the formation of butenes was very sensitive to the alcohol partial pressure. A small elevation of the alcohol pressure suppressed the formation of butenes rather drastically at both 90 and 117{degree}C. The synthesis rates of DME, MIBE, and MTBE ethers were not significantly affected at 90{degree}C, although there was a trend to increase the space time yield of DME as the alcohol pressure was increased. At the reaction temperature of 117{degree}C, all of the ethers showed increasing productivities as the pressure of the reactants was increased (Figure 11). An isotope labelling experiment was carried out to provide mechanistic insight into the manner in which methanol and isobutanol react together to form DME, MIBE, and MTBE ethers and to determine if MTBE were derived from MIBE.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.; Menszak, J.; Johansson, M.A.; Feeley, O.C.; Kim, D.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

High octane ethers from synthesis gas-derived alcohols. Final technical report, September 25, 1990--December 24, 1993  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of the research was to develop the methodology for the catalytic synthesis of ethers, primarily methyl isobutyl ether (MIBE) and methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE), directly from alcohol mixtures that are rich in methanol and 2-methyl-1-propanol (isobutanol). The overall scheme involves gasification of coal, purification and shifting of the synthesis gas, higher alcohol synthesis, and direct synthesis of ethers. The last stage of the synthesis involves direct coupling of synthesis gas-derived methanol and isobutanol that has been previously demonstrated by us to occur over superacid catalysts to yield MIBE and smaller amounts of MTBE at moderate pressures and a mixture of methanol and isobutene at low pressures. A wide range of organic resin catalysts and inorganic oxide and zeolite catalysts have been investigated for activity and selectivity in directly coupling alcohols, principally methanol and isobutanol, to form ethers and in the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in the presence of methanol. All of these catalysts are strong acids, and it was found that the organic and inorganic catalysts operate in different, but overlapping, temperature ranges, i.e. mainly 60--120{degrees}C for the organic resins and 90--175{degrees}C for the inorganic catalysts. For both types of catalysts, the presence of strong acid centers is required for catalytic activity, as was demonstrated by lack of activity of fully K{sup +} ion exchanged Nafion resin and zirconia prior to being sulfated by treatment with sulfuric acid.

Klier, K.; Herman, R.G.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Mechanical energy dissipation using carbon fiber polymer–matrix structural composites with filler incorporation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Continuous carbon fiber composites with enhanced mechanical energy dissipation (vibration damping ... /MWCNT), halloysite nanotube (HNT), or nanoclay as sole fillers in enhancing the loss ... a loss tangent-enhan...

Seungjin Han; D. D. L. Chung

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The MAGS Integrated Modeling System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Mackenzie GEWEX Study (MAGS) integrated modeling system was developed to couple, with full feedback, selected atmospheric and hydrologic models, with the expectation that the imposed consistency will enhan...

E. D. (Ric) Soulis; Frank R. Seglenieks

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

high octane fuels being considered as possible path forward Storing high octane ethanol blended fuels will require careful consideration of material compatibility issues...

70

ACCESS Magazine Fall 2011  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability Oxford University Press, 2009 Cer vero, Robert The Transit Metropolis Island Press, 1998; China Architecture

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

TheGovernanceofCleanDevelopment WorkingPaper003December2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DevelopmentBank ASEAN AssociationofSoutheastAsianNations CDM CleanDevelopmentMechanism CER Certified

Watson, Andrew

72

doi:10.1016/j.gca.2005.06.029 Solubility of metallic mercury in octane, dodecane and toluene at temperatures between  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hg°, HgCl2, CH3Hg and (CH3)2Hg, and con- cluded that the solubility of these species decreases to predict the behavior of nonpolar solutes in polar solvents. This modification involves an adjustment of the Lennard Jones Potential and the hard-sphere diameters of solute and solvent to account for the effects

Long, Bernard

73

Template mineralization of self-assembled anisotropic lipid microstructures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... outlined in Fig. 1. Mixtures of galactocerebrosides such as a-hydroxy fatty acid galactocerebroside (HFA-Cer) and non-hydroxy fatty acid galactocerebroside (NFA-Cer) form a range of ... of anionic sulphated galactocerebroside (S-Cer, sulpha-tide) into the neutral lipid microstructures of HFA-Cer and NFA-Cer, without significant disruption of their morphologies19. Lipid cylinders of variable ...

Douglas D. Archibald; Stephen Mann

1993-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

74

Alexander Kenneth Raub Electrical Engineering and Computer Engineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Three immersion liquids were examined: deionized water, cyclo-octane, and Krytox® a Perfluoropolyether

New Mexico, University of

75

Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high-octane components for use in high-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has a important function

Skogestad, Sigurd

76

Cost-Effectiveness Ratio  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The cost?effectiveness ratio (CER) is a calculation that summarizes the intervention's net cost and effectiveness. The three types of CER are: the average cost?effectiveness ratio (ACER), the marginal cost?...

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Long-chain Ceramide Produced in Response to N-Hexanoylsphingosine does not Induce Apoptosis in CHP-100 Cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been previously reported that treatment of CHP-100 human neuroepithelioma cells with N...-hexanoylsphingosine (C6-Cer) induces intracellular accumulation of long-chain ceramide (LC-Cer) and apoptosis. Here...

Adriano Mancinetti; Sabrina Di Bartolomeo; Angelo Spinedi

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Stereotypical Encounters of the Third Kind Colin Atkinson1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

University of Technology, Darmstadt, Germany kuehne@informatik.tu-darmstadt.de 3 University of Technology-Sellers3 1 University of Kaiserslautern, Kaiserslautern, Germany colin.atkinson@ieee.org 2 Darmstadt. Finally, we conclude by proposing enhan- cements to the UML which could support all three forms cleanly

KĂĽhne, Thomas

79

Elastic-plastic analysis of the transition divertor joint for high performance divertor target plate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CER) 8. International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (to International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is a

Navaei, Dara

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Data reconciliation and optimal operation of a catalytic naphtha reformer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail:skoge@chemeng.ntnu.no) #12;Abstract The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo- nents to high cases. #12;1 Introduction The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending compo-octane components for use in high-performance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has an important function

Skogestad, Sigurd

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

This article was published in an Elsevier journal. The attached copy is furnished to the author for non-commercial research and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending components to high-octane components for use in high. Introduction The naphtha reforming process converts low-octane gasoline blending components to high-per- formance gasoline fuels. The reformer also has an important function as the producer of hydrogen

Skogestad, Sigurd

82

Three-Phase Vapor?Liquid?Liquid Equilibria for Methane + n-Octane + Monoethylene Glycol + Water at Pressures from (3.1 to 15.0) MPa and Temperatures from (281 to 363) K  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

There are several commercial processes available for the dehydration of gas, such as the use of liquid or solid desiccants and expansion refrigeration. ... The gaseous part of the liquid samples, and the gas phase samples direct from the equilibrium cell, were expanded into a series of evacuated vessels of known volume from which the total amount of substance was determined from the perfect gas equation using the measured low-pressure PVT data. ... To predict the losses of MEG in processes for the dehydration of natural gas, the concentrations of MEG in the vapor phase are of interest to the gas industry. ...

Stanley J. Ashcroft; Gerd Brunner; Hansjörg Vollmer; Christopher W. Sweeney

2009-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

83

Effect of UV activation on acid and catalytic properties of zeolite-containing catalysts in conversion of gas-condensate straight-run gasolines to high-octane gasolines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Effect of activation by UV radiation with different wavelengths on the acid and catalytic properties of the N-TsKE-G zeolite catalyst in conversion of straight-run gasolines from the gas condensate of the Myl’...

V. I. Erofeev; A. S. Medvedev; L. M. Koval’…

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplifies alterations induced Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for my application, current feedback or voltage feedback... ) are not apparent. Today's CFB and VFB amplifiers have comparable performance, but there are cer- tain unique Source:...

85

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplify amplify shotgun Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for my application, current feedback or voltage feedback... ) are not apparent. Today's CFB and VFB amplifiers have comparable performance, but there are cer- tain unique Source:...

86

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplifies stroke-induced oligodendrogenesis...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for my application, current feedback or voltage feedback... ) are not apparent. Today's CFB and VFB amplifiers have comparable performance, but there are cer- tain unique Source:...

87

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplified temperature dependence Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for my application, current feedback or voltage feedback... ) are not apparent. Today's CFB and VFB amplifiers have comparable performance, but there are cer- tain unique Source:...

88

E-Print Network 3.0 - amplifiers Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for my application, current feedback or voltage feedback... ) are not apparent. Today's CFB and VFB amplifiers have comparable performance, but there are cer- tain unique Source:...

89

E-Print Network 3.0 - arsenic-related skin lesions Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

7 | July 2002 729 Family Correlations of Arsenic Methylation Patterns in Children and Parents Summary: various health effects, including can- cers of the bladder, skin, and...

91

Compressor and Chicane Radiation Studies at the ATF  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

OAP lenses CER spectrum CCR spectrum Conclusions * RTI has demonstrated operations at CO2 and THz regimes * Bunch length monitor - Calibrate against other methods - Online...

92

Untersuchungen zur phosphatsenkenden Wirkung von Lanthancarbonat im Vergleich zu Aluminiumhydroxid bei der Katze.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Seltene Erde Elemente sind eine Gruppe ähnlicher Elemente, zu denen das Lanthan und die 14 im Periodensystem folgenden Elemente Cer, Praeseodym, Neodym, Promethium, Samarium, Europium,… (more)

Brugger, Nina Ines

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

E-Print Network 3.0 - actively inflamed liver Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Diverse Roles of Invariant Natural Killer T Cells in Liver Injury and Fibrosis Induced by Carbon Tetrachloride Summary: injection of iNKT activator -galactosylceramide ( -GalCer)...

94

Developing evidence-based prescriptive ventilation rate standards for commercial buildings in California: a proposed framework  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

control with ventilation, given current ventilation and filtration system practices, are the indoor-sourced gaseous pollutants with low octanal-air

Mendell, Mark J.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

X:\\L6046\\Data_Publication\\Pma\\current\\ventura\\pma.vp  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

antiknock performance in motor vehicle engines. The two recognized laboratory engine test methods for determining the antiknock rating, i.e., octane rat- ing, of gasolines are...

96

Sustainable use of California biomass resources can help meet state and national bioenergy targets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In addition to ethanol, other energy types might emerge inthe higher octane of ethanol offsets the energy penalty forto increase ethanol yields. Energy uses for biomass Fig. 4.

Jenkins, Bryan M; Williams, Robert B; Gildart, Martha C; Kaffka, Stephen R.; Hartsough, Bruce; Dempster, Peter G

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Anomaly in electric resistance of binary liquids near the critical point  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric resistance in critical solutions of nitrobenzene inn-hexane,n-heptane andn-octane was measured. The resistance near the critical point was studied and...

B Matuszewska

1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Low-cost options for upgrading light straight run naphtha  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Of the many alternatives available for gasoline pool octane improvement, light straight run naphtha isomerization is among the most attractive. Recent catalyst and process developments have improved the cost effectiveness and flexibility of the Penex process for achieving octane improvement. Two new commercial catalysts have been developed, the first obtains maximum once-through octane on desulfurized feeds in new or revamped units, the second allows operation at feed sulfur levels above 100 ppm. New process developments permit low cost product recycle to achieve maximum octane. An isomerization unit may be designed for once-through operation initially with postponed investment for recycle operation.

Schmidt, R.J.; Weiszmann, J.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 40, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 1994 Shaping of Multidimensional Signal Constellations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the y,, CER, relationship. In shaping, one tries to reduce the average energy of a signal constellation energy (measured by the shaping gain, y,) involves: i) an increase in the factor CER,,' (constellation Signal Constellations Using a Lookup Table A. K. Khandani and P. Kabal Abstract-This paper describes

Kabal, Peter

100

Chronic Ethanol Consumption Profoundly Alters Regional Brain Ceramide and Sphingomyelin Content in Rodents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chronic Ethanol Consumption Profoundly Alters Regional Brain Ceramide and Sphingomyelin Content in Rodents ... In a mouse model of chronic alcohol exposure, 16 CER and 18 sphingomyelin (SM) concentrations from whole brain lipid extracts were measured using electrospray mass spectrometry. ... Most of the CER and SM quantified in whole brain extracts were detected in MILDI images. ...

Aurelie Roux; Ludovic Muller; Shelley N. Jackson; Katherine Baldwin; Virginia Womack; John G. Pagiazitis; Joseph R. O’Rourke; Panayotis K. Thanos; Carey Balaban; J. Albert Schultz; Nora D. Volkow; Amina S. Woods

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Screening for Pancreatic Cancer in High-Risk Individuals: A Call for Endoscopic Ultrasound  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...biomarkers of breast cancer risk. Thirty-first San Antonio...sedentary lifestyle), is a risk factor for breast cancer. Observational...CER) and exercise reduce risk, particularly of postmenopausal...tumours. IER may also be more acceptable than CER which has been difficult...

Alberto Larghi; Elizabeth C. Verna; Piera Giuseppina Lecca; and Guido Costamagna

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

102

Integration of lipidomics and transcriptomics data towards a systems biology model of sphingolipid metabolism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

f13 k f14 k f15 k f16 k f17 k f18 k f19 k b19 k f20 k b20 kC 16 Cer][Cerk] v 18 = k f18 [C 16 CerP] v 19 = k f19 [C 16

Gupta, Shakti; Maurya, Mano R; Merrill Jr, Alfred H; Glass, Christopher K; Subramaniam, Shankar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Effects of EGR, water/N2/CO2 injection and oxygen enrichment on the availability destroyed due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

combustion of iso octane.................................................................................................... 24 3 Percentage availability destroyed for different ?Cooled? EGR fractions as a function of reactant temperature for constant... volume combustion of iso octane, reactant pressure of 500 kPa......................................................... 24 4 Product temperature for different ?Cooled? EGR fractions as a function of reactant temperature for constant pressure combustion...

Sivadas, Hari Shanker

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

104

RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE By Michael J. Moran, Mike J. Halde, Rick M. Clawges and John S. Zogorski U in the United States as an octane enhancer and oxygenate in gasoline. Octane enhancement began in the late 1970's with the phase-out of tetraethyl lead from gasoline. The use of oxygenates was expanded

105

NATCOR -Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATCOR - Xpress case study Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4.5 for heating to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce all three products. The octane level

Hall, Julian

106

4-H Club Officer Handbook-President  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

effectively at all club meetings. ? Use basic parliamentary procedure as a tool to conduct effective, orderly meetings. (Refer to the Parliamentar- ian offi cer duties for a brief parliamen- tary procedure guide). ? With assistance from the 4-H club manager..., arrange for a meeting time and place. ? Arrive at least 30 minutes early to set up for each meeting. ? Work with the club manager and of- fi cers to develop an agenda for each meeting. ? Communicate with offi cers, members and leaders about assignments...

Howard, Jeff W.

2006-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

107

Early Chinese Rice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... books allude somewhat vaguely to this rice. "Le Rapport sur les CerŁales: Exposition Universelle"(Paris, 1878), mentions the above story and offers the alternative name riz ...

HUGH NICOL

1930-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

108

Experimental Study on Sludge Dewatering under Additives Conditioning  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The key difficulty of sludge dewatering is the gelatification among water and solid particles, which leads to the difficult removal of floc water. The way of sludge ... it is shown that sludge conditioning by cer...

Guolu Yang; Shentang Dou; Shifu Qin…

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Acclimation response of spring wheat in a free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) atmosphere with variable soil nitrogen regimes. 3. Canopy architecture and gas exchange  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The response of whole-canopy net CO2 exchange rate (CER) and canopy architecture to CO2 enrichment and N stress during 1996 and 1997 for open-field-grown wheat ecosystem (Triticum aestivum L. cv. Yecora Rojo) are...

Talbot J. Brooks; Gerard W. Wall; Paul J. Pinter Jr.…

110

a amework for change Prepared by  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a amework for change Prepared by the California Air Resources Board for the State of California D. Nichols Chairman, Air Resources Board James N. Goldstene Executive O cer, Air Resources Board____________________________________________C-150 Recycling and Waste_________________________________ C-158 Forests

111

includes gravity, there are other interesting consequences of this line of argument. One  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

includes gravity, there are other interesting consequences of this line of argument. One f there is any truth to the adage that `practice makes perfect', we should cer- tainly be near

Murray, Richard

112

WELLS, MARK L., NEIL M. PRICE, AND KENNETH W. BRULAND ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Sep 2, 1993 ... fuel Synechococcus growth in the control. Cer- tainly, the maximum 59Fe uptake rate of 9.2. pM Fe h-l (Fig. 1) supports arguments that ...

1999-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

IEDWorking Paper 6 February 2009  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Economics PEPE, ETH Zurich, Institute for Environmental Decisions IED, CH-8092 Zurich **Economics/Resource Economics, Center of Economic Research CER, ETH Zurich, CH-8092 Zurich ***Department of Forest Economics

Fischlin, Andreas

114

InsideIllinoisDec. 5, 2013 Vol. 33, No. 11  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distinguished ef- forts to advance science or its applications." New fellows will be recognized in a cer- emony research, which seeks to advance science while shaping so- ciety." Boppart, an Abel Bliss professor of en

Lewis, Jennifer

115

Theater SBI cost-effectiveness ratios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To address M missiles spaced at intervals longer than the constillation reconstitution time t, the defense needs at the absentee ratio N{sub a} of SBIs to fill the belt plus the M SBIs needed for the intercepts; the resulting cost effectiveness scales as M/(M + N{sub a}). N{sub a} is large and CER small for small ranges and numbers of missiles. For several-hundred missile threats, CERs are greater than unity for ranges of interest.

Canavan, G.H.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Retail Gasoline and Diesel Surveys Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Area Any area that does not require the sale of reformulated gasoline. All types of finished motor gasoline may be sold in this area. Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the reformulated gasoline category. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Note: this survey designates all motor gasoline collected within a conventional area as conventional gasoline (see conventional area). Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

117

Epilogue: Rational Exuberance for Renewable Energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ethanol as a fuel/fuel-blend has been a success story in Brazil and select other countries; ethanol is an octane enhancer and fuel-ethanol blends help reduce hydrocarbon, carbon-di-oxide and nitrogen oxide emi...

Srinivasan Sunderasan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

DOE 2014 Biomass Conference  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels DOE 2014 Biomass Conference Jim Williams, Senior Manager, American Petroleum Institute

119

E85 Optimized Engine  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

benefit with DI due to high latent heat of vaporization and high octane rating Allows knock-free operation at high CR and high BMEP with very high thermal efficiency but... Low...

120

School of Mathematical Sciences MTH5122 Statistical Methods Tutorial 8  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the resistance of petrol to engine knocking. In the UK, the most common petrol types are: Ordinary unleaded - 95 launched "super fuels" - petrol and diesel that have a higher research octane level. These fuels are said

Bogacka, Barbara

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Breakout Session 1C—Fostering Technology Adoption I: Building the Market for Renewables with High Octane Fuels Underground Storage Tanks: New Fuels and Compatibility Ryan Haerer, Program Analyst, Alternative Fuels, Office of Underground Storage Tanks, Environmental Protection Agency

122

Fluid Beds: At Last, Challenging Two Entrenched Practices  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...FLUIDIZED-BED COMBUSTOR, JOURNAL...FLUIDIZED COAL COMBUSTOR, COMBUSTION...NONCATALYTIC GAS-SOLID REACTIONS...PARTICLES AT HIGH VELOCITIES...SATIJA, S, PRESSURE-FLUCTUATIONS...gasoline has a higher octane number...to convert natural gas to gasoline...

Arthur M. Squires; Mooson Kwauk; Amos A. Avidan

1985-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

123

EWO Mee'ng September 2012 Petrobras Refining Decision-Making Design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: - Fuel demands - Diesel and gasoline Sulfur content - Gasoline octane Number 15) PDA extracCon factor model (NL) HDT sulfur reducCon (NL) Rigorous Blending Rules (NL) EquaCons: Volume balance Units TransformaCons (NL) Blending Solver

Grossmann, Ignacio E.

124

Cellulase for commodity products from cellulosic biomass Michael E Himmel*?, Mark F Ruth*1 and Charles E Wymans  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

dramatically over the past two decades, to the point where the fuel is now competitive for blending with gasoline to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, enhance octane, extend the gasoline supply, and promote more

California at Riverside, University of

125

Regulatory and Commercial Barriers to Introduction of Renewable...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

b13mccormick2-b.pdf More Documents & Publications The Impact of Low Octane Hydrocarbon Blending Streams on "E85" Engine Optimization Mid-Blend Ethanol Fuels - Implementation...

126

Can Nutrition Explain the Pattern of International Epidemiology of Hormone-dependent Cancers?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...breast cancer and per capita consumption of total fat, animal protein...would obtain running a diesel engine on high-octane airplane fuel. The onset and frequency...Mortality Data and per capita Food Consumption. Brit. J. Cancer, 29...

John W. Berg

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Can Nutrition Explain the Pattern of International Epidemiology of Hormone-dependent Cancers?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...breast cancer and per capita consumption of total fat, animal protein...one would obtain running a diesel engine on high-octane airplane fuel. The onset and frequency...Data and per capita Food Consumption. Brit. J. Cancer, 29...

John W. Berg

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

THE FURNACE COMBUSTION AND RADIATION CHARACTERISTICS OF METHANOL AND A METHANOL/COAL SLURRY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of NO and N02 in a Turbulent Propane/Air Di fusion Flame,"Fuel Methanol Ethanol Ethane Propane i so Octane n - Cetanestage of the secondary Propane, at A spark air line contains

Grosshandler, W.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Non-Born-Oppenheimer Wavepacket Revivals in a Polyatomic Molecule  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Non-Born-Oppenheimer wavepacket revivals have been observed in 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy. Upon photoexcitation, he wavepacket...

Boguslavskiy, Andrey E; Townsend, Dave; Schuurman, Michael S; Stolow, Albert

130

Partnering with Industry to Develop Advanced Biofuels  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

10,000 gallons of 89-92 octane gasoline > 61-65% syngas to motor fuel conversion (LHV energy basis) > Engine emissions from 80% biogasoline blend were 'substantially similar' to...

131

In-Cylinder Mechanisms of PCI Heat-Release Rate Control by Fuel...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Timing: -10 ATDC Equivalence ratio: 0.42 Iso-octane mass %: 64 AHRR Jdeg 30 mm * Laser ignition is most consistent at the 30 mm location - Equivalence ratio increases with...

132

S. S. Sazhin1 T. Kristyadi  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of gasoline fuel (BP Pump Grade 95 RON ULG (research octane number unleaded gasoline)), 2,2,4-trimethylpentane and gasoline fuels. The values of the average absorption efficiency factor for all fuels are approximated

133

Detailed kinetic models for the low-temperature auto ignition of gasoline surrogates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of the search for gasoline surrogates for kinetic modeling purpose, this paper describes a new model for the low-temperature auto-ignition of n-heptane/iso-octane/hexene/toluene blends for the different linear isomers of hexene. The model simulates satisfactory experimental results obtained in a rapid compression machine for temperatures ranging from 650 to 850 K in the case of binary and ternary mixtures including iso octane, 1-hexene and toluene. Predictive simulations have also been performed for the autoignition of n heptane/iso octane/hexene/toluene quaternary mixtures: the predicted reactivity is close to that of pure iso octane with a retarding effect when going from 1- to 3-alkene.

Bounaceur, Roda; Fournet, René; Warth, Valérie; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Destructive hydroisomerization – A new method of reducing benzine content in commercial gasoline  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A destructive process of hydroisomerization of straight-run 85–185°C gasoline fraction followed by close fractionation of the ... submitted to catalytic reforming under mild conditions. Gasoline with octane numbe...

Kh. I. Abad-Zade; Z. A. Gasymova…

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Conversion of the straight-run gasoline fraction of high-paraffin oil on a zeolite catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The conversion of the straight-run gasoline fraction of high-paraffin crude oil into the high-octane gasoline over niobium-zirconium-aluminosilicate catalyst with the ... composition, and performance characterist...

A. V. Vosmerikov; B. Ulzii; Ya. E. Barbashin; L. L. Korobitsina…

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A study on the solubility of heavy hydrocarbons in liquid methane and methane containing mixtures.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The solubilities of the hydrocarbons n-butane, n-pentane, n-hexane, n-octane, and n-nonane in liquid methane and of n-hexane in the mixed solvents of methane and ethane… (more)

Brew, T. C. L.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Parametric examination of the destruction of availability due to combustion for a range of conditions and fuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of temperature for reactant pressure of 500 kPa and #1; = 1.0, constant pressure combustion................ 19 2 Percentage availability destroyed as a function of reactant temperature for constant pressure combustion of iso-octane, reactant pressure of 500 k... combustion ................................................... 23 6 Percentage availability destroyed for lean equivalence ratios, constant pressure combustion of iso-octane at 500 kPa .......................................................... 24 7...

Chavannavar, Praveen Shivshankar

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

8 Modern refining concepts-an update on naphtha-isomerization to modern gasoline manufacture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter discusses several major refinery processes to improve RON. These include naphtha-isomerization, reforming, addition of FCC-Naphtha, alkylation, addition of oxygenates or polygas or butanes. Naphtha isomerization is a simple and very cost effective technology for octane replacement. Isomerization of light naphtha streams rich in C5's and C6's typically results in an increase of 10 to 20 octane numbers. The octane increase depends upon the feed composition and the octane need of the refiner. Proper selection of the isomerization technology is an assurance against lack of octane and surplus of benzene in the gasoline pool. Normal C5's and C6's typically are abundant in streams from gas condensate units, light raffinate from aromatics extraction units, and light straight-run naphtha from atmospheric distillation. Even benzene containing feedstocks became potential sources for isomerization as modern catalysts help to manage the benzene surplus through saturation and ring opening reactions to high octane product. This conversion of benzene is an added benefit of isomerization to refiners' economics, especially in those countries where extra credit is given for benzene reduction in the gasoline pool. The isomerization reaction takes place over a catalyst under relatively mild conditions in the presence of hydrogen.

Hartmut Weyda; Ernst Köhler

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Mapping surrogate gasoline compositions into RON/MON space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, new experimentally determined octane numbers (RON and MON) of blends of a tri-component surrogate consisting of toluene, n-heptane, i-octane (called toluene reference fuel TRF) arranged in an augmented simplex design are used to derive a simple response surface model for the octane number of any arbitrary TRF mixture. The model is second-order in its complexity and is shown to be more accurate to the standard ''linear-by-volume'' (LbV) model which is often used when no other information is available. Such observations are due to the existence of both synergistic and antagonistic blending of the octane numbers between the three components. In particular, antagonistic blending of toluene and iso-octane leads to a maximum in sensitivity that lies on the toluene/iso-octane line. The model equations are inverted so as to map from RON/MON space back into composition space. Enabling one to use two simple formulae to determine, for a given fuel with known RON and MON, the volume fractions of toluene, n-heptane and iso-octane to be blended in order to emulate that fuel. HCCI engine simulations using gasoline with a RON of 98.5 and a MON of 88 were simulated using a TRF fuel, blended according to the derived equations to match the RON and MON. The simulations matched the experimentally obtained pressure profiles well, especially when compared to simulations using only PRF fuels which matched the RON or MON. This suggested that the mapping is accurate and that to emulate a refinery gasoline, it is necessary to match not only the RON but also the MON of the fuel. (author)

Morgan, Neal; Kraft, Markus [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3RA (United Kingdom); Smallbone, Andrew; Bhave, Amit [Reaction Engineering Solutions Ltd., 61 Canterbury Street, Cambridge CB4 3QG (United Kingdom); Cracknell, Roger; Kalghatgi, Gautam [Shell Global Solutions, Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

140

Wetland Water Cooling Partnership: The Use of Restored Wetlands to Enhance Thermoelectric Power Plant Cooling and Mitigate the Demand on Surface Water Use  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pierina noceti Pierina noceti Project Manager National Energy Technology Laboratory 626 Cochrans Mill Road P.O. Box 10940 Pittsburgh, PA 15236-0940 412-386-5428 pierina.noceti@netl.doe.gov steven I. apfelbaum Principal Investigator Applied Ecological Services, Inc. 17921 Smith Road P.O. Box 256 Brodhead, WI 53520 608-897-8641 steve@appliedeco.com Wetland Water Cooling PartnershiP: the Use of restored Wetlands to enhanCe thermoeleCtriC PoWer Plant Cooling and mitigate the demand on sUrfaCe Water Use Background Thermoelectric power plants require a significant volume of water to operate, accounting for 39 percent of freshwater (136 billion gallons per day) withdrawn in the United States in 2000, according to a U.S. Geological Survey study. This significant use of water ranks second only to the agricultural sector

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Institution Name Institution Name Address Place Zip Notes Website Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Incubator Austin Clean Energy Incubator West Braker Incubator Austin Clean Energy Incubator West Braker Lane Austin Texas http www ati utexas edu clean energy clean energy html Texas Area Bank of Italy Bank of Italy Via nazionale Rome Italy http www bancaditalia Brookhaven National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory William Floyd Parkway Upton New York http www bnl gov Northeast NY NJ CT PA Area Centro de Energ as Renovables CER Centro de Energ as Renovables CER Agustinas piso Santiago Chile http www cer gov cl Clean Start McClellan Technology Incubator Clean Start McClellan Technology Incubator Bailey Loop McClellan California http www sarta org go cs Bay Area Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory Colorado Renewable Energy Collaboratory th Street Suite Denver Colorado http www coloradocollaboratory org

142

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Legal Background Legal Background Book 1 . . Project Rulison :.Contract: . . AEC, Austral Oil Company, and CER Geonuclear Corporation, . . . . , . . . . , . . February 1969 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. PROJECT RULISON CONTRACT NO. UNITED STATES OF AMERICA REPRESENTED BY THE ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION and THE DEPARTMENT. OF THE INTERIOR and AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY INCORPORATED and CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION Prepared by OFFICE OF THE CHIEF COUNSEL NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE FEBRUARY 1969 This page intentionally left blank UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION . NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE TABLE OF CONTENTS VII VIII XV XVI XVII SUBJECT - PAGE Definitions 2 Description of Project ~ulisdn 3

143

Heat pipe transient measurements incorporating visual methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, but were sufficient for the pur pose of this design. Prior to sunning the code, cer tain constr aints wer e already placed on the design: the heater section could be no more than 22. 75 241 inches in length and two inches in width, the over all length..., but were sufficient for the pur pose of this design. Prior to sunning the code, cer tain constr aints wer e already placed on the design: the heater section could be no more than 22. 75 241 inches in length and two inches in width, the over all length...

DeHart, Mark David

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

144

Preliminary assessment of potential CDM early start projects in Brazil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Brazil/US Aspen Global Forum on Climate Change Policies and Programs has facilitated a dialogue between key Brazil and US public and private sector leaders on the subject of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM). With support from the US government, a cooperative effort between Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and the University of Sao Paulo conducted an assessment of a number of projects put forth by Brazilian sponsors. Initially, we gathered information and conducted a screening assessment for ten projects in the energy sector and six projects in the forestry sector. Some of the projects appeared to offer greater potential to be attractive for CDM, or had better information available. We then conducted a more detailed assessment of 12 of these projects, and two other projects that were submitted after the initial screening. An important goal was to assess the potential impact of Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) on the financial performance of projects. With the exception of the two forestry-based fuel displacement projects, the impact of CERs on the internal rate of return (IRR) is fairly small. This is true for both the projects that displace grid electricity and those that displace local (diesel-based) electricity production. The relative effect of CERs is greater for projects whose IRR without CERs is low. CERs have a substantial effect on the IRR of the two short-rotation forestry energy substitution projects. One reason is that the biofuel displaces coke and oil, both of which are carbon-intensive. Another factor is that the product of these projects (charcoal and woodfuel, respectively) is relatively low value, so the revenue from carbon credits has a strong relative impact. CERs also have a substantial effect on the NPV of the carbon sequestration projects. Financial and other barriers pose a challenge for implementation of most of the projects. In most cases, the sponsor lacks sufficient capital, and loans are available only at high interest rate and with substantial guarantee. A few of the projects might go ahead without the benefit of CERs, but most probably would not. Whether the projected revenue from CERs would be sufficient to induce sponsors to proceed with the projects is an important issue that requires further investigation. All of the projects contribute to economic development in Brazil. The forestry projects in particular would create a significant number of rural jobs, and contribute income to rural communities. Some of the carbon sequestration projects would provide environmental benefits with respect to protection of biodiversity and soil.

Meyers, S.; Sathaye, J.; Lehman, B.; Schumacher, K.; van Vliet, O.; Moreira, J.R.

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

NK T cells provide lipid antigen-specific cognate help for B cells  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...0801375105 5 of 7 IgM IgG1 IgG2b IgG2c IgG3 1000 10000 100000 1000000 NP-GC KO NP-KLH KO NP-GC WT NP-KLH WT Isotype /1retiT m edia CI +re Cla G N-P L04 D C la G C +re P N-0 5 10 15 20 25 B cells T cells detulidESFC% A B Fig. S6. GalCer plus NPGalCer...

Elizabeth A. Leadbetter; Manfred Brigl; Petr Illarionov; Nadia Cohen; Megan C. Luteran; Shiv Pillai; Gurdyal S. Besra; Michael B. Brenner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

PSADEFS.CHP:Corel VENTURA  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Definitions Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH 3 - (CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usu- ally refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gaso- line. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, buty- lene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product, alkylate, an isoparaffin, has high octane value and is blended with motor and aviation gasoline to improve the antiknock

147

Glossary - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

petroleum petroleum Alcohol: The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH(3)-(CH(2))n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate: The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high-octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation: A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of anacid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product alkylate, an isoparaffin, has high octane value and is blended with motor and aviation gasoline to

148

Production of Liquid Cluster Ions by Nozzle Beam Source with and without He Gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We developed a new type of cluster ion source which could produce various kinds of liquid clusters such as water, methanol, ethanol and octane clusters. When the vapor pressure was larger than one atm, the water and ethanol clusters could be produced by an adiabatic expansion phenomenon without adding He gas. The peak size of the cluster ions increased with the increase of the vapor pressures. When the source temperature was at room temperature, the water and ethanol clusters were also produced by adding He gas. In another case of producing liquid clusters such as methanol and octane clusters, He gas was added to mix up with vapors of liquid materials. When the He gas pressure was larger than a few atms, the methanol and octane clusters were produced at a vapor pressure of two atm. The peak size increased with increase of the vapor pressure as well as the He gas pressure.

Takaoka, G. H.; Ryuto, H.; Okada, T.; Sugiyama, K. [Photonics and Electronics Science and Engineering Center, Kyoto University, Nishikyo, Kyoto 615-8510 (Japan)

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

149

Total isomerization process -- the flexible approach for upgrading light straight run gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA's recent decision to reduce the maximum lead level in gasoline to 0.1 gram per gallon by January 1, 1986, will leave the U.S. refining industry in an octane ''crunch.'' This government action comes at a critical time as refined product margins are slim or non-existent and funds for capital expenditure are scarce. One of the most economical means of adding back the lost octane is to isomerize light straight run (LSR), but many refiners will not have the time or the capital to install a new unit. The Total Isomerization Process (TIP) offers a highly flexible approach to coping with the octane problem. During the past 15 years, refiners around the world have adapted TIP to their particular needs and managed to implement isomerization capacity both quickly and inexpensively.

Mackler, S.E.; Holcombe, T.C.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Isom process gets first U. S. application  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Cooperative Refinery Association (NCRA) is operating the first total isomerization process (TIP) unit in the U.S. at its McPherson, Kan. refinery. The unit is designed to process 8,300 b/d of pentanes and hexanes from a light straight-run (LSR), natural gasoline and light coker naphtha. The total isomerate has an unleaded research octane number (RON) of 89, which is about 17 numbers above the feed. This extra octane has permitted NCRA to reduce its reformer severity and improve reformer yield. TIP is practiced overseas to upgrade the octane of C/sub 5//C/sub 6/ feedstocks. Units have been built in Japan, Switzerland, Germany, Italy, and Norway. But NCRA is the first to operate one in the U.S.

Holcombe, T.C.; Pederson, M.L.

1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

151

Selective hydrocracking of light naphtha cuts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For the production of high-quality automotive gasolines, technology has been developed for a combined ''isoreforming'' process, in which hydrocracking of a heavy straight-run naphtha cut to give a high-octane component with an octane number of 84-86 (MM) is combined with catalytic reforming of the residual fraction from hydrocracking. The ''isoreforming'' technology can be used to produce AI-93 automotive gasolines with aromatic hydrocarbon contents of 45-49% by weight, without TEL, in yields of 78-82% by weight on the original feed. The authors also discuss a catalytic upgrading process for light straight-run naphtha distillates or raffinates from catalytic reforming. The influence of the depth of reaction in hydrocracking n-paraffins in the straight-run 62-105 degrees C cut on the yield of the C5-EP cut and its octane number is investigated.

Koslov, I.T.; Khavkin, V.A.; Nefedov, B.K.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0 0 December 2011 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

153

Petroleum Supply Monthly  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

September 2013 September 2013 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst,

154

Use of Cost Estimating Relationships  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Cost Estimating Relationships (CERs) are an important tool in an estimator's kit, and in many cases, they are the only tool. Thus, it is important to understand their limitations and characteristics. This chapter discusses considerations of which the estimator must be aware so the Cost Estimating Relationships can be properly used.

1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ris6 Report No. 145 Danish Atomic Energy Commission  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

related to the flash welding process and cer- tain types of fusion welding are treated in more detail. SAP welding process and by certain types of fusion welding, andan evaluation of the weld- ments, including of fusion welding, sound joints are obtained by using aluminium as filler material under closely controlled

156

Metastasis-associated Murine Melanoma Cell Surface Galactosyltransferase: Characterization of Enzyme Activity and Identification of the Major Surface Substrates  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Dowex AC 1X8 ion-exchange columns (phosphate...Gal01-4Glc0-Cer). In addition, all of the...DEAE-Sephadex A-25 resin (data not...sylation. In addition, exogenously...the recent demonstration of two forms...cells. In addition, other workers...

Antonino Passaniti and Gerald W. Hart

1990-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

157

aallll IIrreell aanndd ccaanncceerr ssttaattiissttiiccss sseeccoonndd rreeppoorrtt 11999988--22000000 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

--22000000 34 Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung c ancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer L ung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung can cer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lun g cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cance r Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer Lung cancer

Paxton, Anthony T.

158

Efficient Addressing of Multi-dimensional Signal Constellations Using a Lookup Table  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constellation. 1 Introduction In shaping, one tries to reduce the average energy of a signal constellation energy (measured by the shaping gain, 7,)involves: (i) an increase in the factor CERS2, (ConstellationEfficient Addressing of Multi-dimensional Signal Constellations Using a Lookup Table A. K

Kabal, Peter

159

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON INFORMATION THEORY, VOL. 39, NO. 6, NOVEMBER 1993 1799 Shaping Multidimensional Signal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the average energy of the constellation for a given number of points from a given packing. The reduction such a constellation for signaling over a channel, the energy associated with different signal points is not the same by the factor constellation-expansion ratio (CER,). To expand the constellation, some points of higher energy

Kabal, Peter

160

Delivering real solutions while dealing with new  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

affected the lighting design (or the customer decided to go for LEED in mid process)? Have you ever been-Québec, the ministère des Ressources naturelles du Québec and Statistique Canada ...EVEN IN QUEBEC #12;3 ENERGY PRICES's LEED cer2fica2on mandatory in MassachuseMs California has enacted the first

California at Davis, University of

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161

Curriculum Vitae Professor Anthony O'Hagan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the Simultaneous Equations Model" 1974 PhD Statistics Employment 1969­1971 Central Electricity Generating Board Pearson Prizes for statistics 1969 BSc Statistics with First Class Honours 1969 Science Faculty Medal 1971, London. Research O¢ cer. 1973­1975 University of Dundee. Lecturer in Statistics, Department

O'Hagan, Tony

162

VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS, AND ASYMPTOTICS FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VISCOSITY SOLUTIONS OF HAMILTON-JACOBI EQUATIONS, AND ASYMPTOTICS FOR HAMILTONIAN SYSTEMS DIOGO. In this paper we apply the theory of viscosity solu- tions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations to understand) with cer- tain minimizing properties) and viscosity solutions of Hamilton-Jacobi equations (2) H(P + Dxu, x

163

Procceedings IFIP IEEE International Workshop on Distributed Systems: Operations and Management, October 15-16 1991, Santa Barbara, CA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Procceedings IFIP IEEE International Workshop on Distributed Systems: Operations and Management that the security o cer of each component system has discretion regarding the trust invested in other component points of security control. #12;2 THE SCHEMATIC PROTECTION MODEL GMU researchers have been active

Sandhu, Ravi

164

Phase I Evaluation and Pharmacokinetic Study of Pyrazine-2-diazohydroxide Administered as a Single Bolus Intravenous Injection in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...dose; AUC, area under plasma concentration-time...cer, LXFL529 large-cell lung cancer...Determination of PZDH in Plasma Chemicals. The...still under an atmosphere of dry argon...resolution (270 MHz) proton nuclear...5 (xg/ml. Plasma standards (1-50...

Jeffrey G. Supko; S. P. Balcerzak; and Eric H. Kraut

1993-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Regularity in chaotic reaction paths III: Ar6 local invariances at the reaction bottleneck  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. © 2001 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1385152 I. INTRODUCTION The questions, ``How does that the rate of this reaction is con- trolled by the flux through quantized thresholds within a cer- tain enough energy to pass through the transition state, the systems' trajectories become collimated

Berry, R. Stephen

166

978-1-4673-1813-6/13/$31.00 2013 IEEE 1 The Modeling and Evaluation of Interplanetary Manned  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

....................................................... 16 ACRONYMS ADG ­ Architectural Decision Graph AOS ­ Algebra of Systems CER ­ Cost Estimating ­ International Space Station JPL ­ Jet Propulsion Laboratory LCC ­ Lifecycle Cost LOX/LCH4 ­ Liquid Oxygen Administration NEA ­ Near Earth Asteroid NP ­ Non-Polynomial NTR ­ Nuclear Thermal Rocket SAP ­ Systems

de Weck, Olivier L.

167

Fall/Winter CONCERNED ABOUT COLON CANCER?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRADITIONS Fall/Winter 2005 #12;CONCERNED ABOUT COLON CANCER? PREVENTION IS POSSIBLE. Introducing the Colon C ancer Prevention Program at UConn Health C enter IT'S TRUE: C OLON CANCER MAY BE PREVENTED colon cancer prevention pl an sta rts w ith a phone call to the new Colon C an cer Prevention P r ogr am

Holsinger, Kent

168

CRYPTOCHROME2 in Vascular Bundles Regulates Flowering in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...the control of the UNUSUAL FLORAL ORGAN (UFO) (for the shoot apex) (Ingram et al...CAB3, SUC2, Sultr1;3, At ML1, CER6, UFO, At3g25820/25830, and CRY2 promoters...and 3). In addition, we employed the UFO and At3g25820/25830 promoters for the...

Motomu Endo; Nobuyoshi Mochizuki; Tomomi Suzuki; Akira Nagatani

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

169

Rulison Open  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

t o r ) ; Los A1 a m s Sci e n t i - i f - 3 f i c Laboratory ( s c i e n t i f i c advisor) ; lsthaijes, A Teledyne Company (tech- "y '- n i c a l gas sample analyses); CER...

170

Current vs. Voltage Feedback Amplifiers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

?' In most applications, the differences between current feedback (CFB) and voltage feedback (VFB) are not apparent. Today's CFB and VFB amplifiers have comparable performance, but there are cer- tain unique Performance · Feedback Freedom Aside from the well-known attribute of CFB amplifiers, gain

Lanterman, Aaron

171

UCSF Fo Undation AnnuAl RepoR t on pRivAte SuppoR t 20062007 Building for  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;OFFiCERS J. Michael Bishop, MD President Bruce W. Spaulding Executive Vice President James W. Asp II A. Derzon Roger Evans Kenneth S. Fong K. Bruce Friedman Robert J. Gallo Ann Gilbert Getty Meg P Lester Anthony C. Lincoln James P. Livingston Ronnie Lott James J. Ludwig Susan McLaughlin Alexander R

Soloveichik, David

172

The State of the CDM & its Contribution to SD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Welfare Learning Employment Growth Energy Balance of Payment Sustainability tax Corporate social 34% Transport 0,2% #12;Sectoral distribution of CDM projects Sectors behind: · Demand-side Energy,43 Number 2012 kCERs All CDM Projects in the Pipeline in Brazil + Mexico + India + China as a fraction

173

G. WAYNE CLOUGH UNdErGrAdUAtE LEArNiNG COMMONS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Tech may be in the form of cash, securities, real estate, or personal property. In addition to outright-centered academic services; and n sustainable design features that will enable cer- tification as a LEED (Leadership million)--will create and sustain an undergraduate community focused on integrating technology

Li, Mo

174

College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences Summer 2011 Volume 7, No. 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is interested in investigating powdered green tea as complementary therapy in the treatment of can- cer, but wants to verify the purity of her green tea powders. Dr. William Hanneman is conducting a lab exercise conducted pesticide analysis on tea and rice bran, looking for pesticide residues before these products

Stephens, Graeme L.

175

"No somos juguete de nadie..." es a la vez parte y resultado de un esfuerzo de anlisis comparativo del Programa Mundial  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;11 cer vĂ­nculos directos con los recursos naturales renova- bles (agua, biodiversidad) y no-renovables recursos naturales. La hipĂłtesis fundamental de la in- vestigaciĂłn era que las polĂ­ticas de los movimientos sociales, haciendo que los recursos naturales y los benefi- cios que se derivan de

Richner, Heinz

176

Profiling translatomes of discrete cell populations resolves altered cellular priorities during hypoxia in Arabidopsis  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...small subunit (pRBCS1A) Cotyledon and leaf epidermis Cuticular wax gene (pCER5) Cotyledon and leaf guard cells K + channel (pKAT1...publicly available CEL files (21-25) were analyzed using the pipeline described above. The RMA normalization step was always applied...

Angelika Mustroph; M. Eugenia Zanetti; Charles J. H. Jang; Hans E. Holtan; Peter P. Repetti; David W. Galbraith; Thomas Girke; Julia Bailey-Serres

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Interference effects in photoreflectance and contactless electroreflectance spectra of CdTe films grown on Si substrate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interference effects in photoreflectance and contactless electroreflectance spectra of CdTe films and contactless electroreflectance CER spectra of CdTe films grown on Si substrate, at energies below the band gap of CdTe. The simultaneous observation of OF in the reflectance (R) spectrum having the same period

Ghosh, Sandip

178

Volume 3 Issue 11 www.nasa.gov/centers/stennis November 2008 A milestone test  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on safety Stennis certifies final shuttle flight engine Steam blasts out of the A-2 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center on Oct. 22 as engineers begin a cer- tification test on engine 2061, the last space shuttle main flight engine scheduled to be built (see Page 4 article). Since 1975, Stennis has tested every

179

Project Year Project Team  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-year section of the summer project will cost $1344.) This project will be measured by the CER surveys conductedProject Year 2005 Project Team Sean Greenberg, Faculty, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences; Kevin Clark, Student, Philosophy Department, Krieger School of Arts & Sciences Project

Gray, Jeffrey J.

180

Allelochemics: Chemical Interactions between Species  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...hosts. Cer-tain water mites tha-t live...releases into the water a substance that...release substances that reduce the surface tension...moves through the water with a random threshing...selected out of the gene pool. Some of these wastes...Se-lection by reduced consumption of more effectively...

R. H. Whittaker; P. P. Feeny

1971-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

RAS ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING:  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......been appointed as Scrutineers of the Ballot for Offi- cers and Council for the ensuing year. The meeting then agreed to pro- ceed to the ballot and, after an interval, approved its closure. The Narrative Report of Council for the year 1996 was presented......

Minutes of the 177th AGM: of 9 May 1997

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Testing for Chaos in Deterministic Systems with Noise  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Testing for Chaos in Deterministic Systems with Noise Georg A. Gottwald School of Maths and Stats Guildford GU2 7XH, UK 24 November, 2004 Abstract Recently, we introduced a new test for distinguishing regular from chaotic dynamics in deterministic dynamical systems and argued that the test had cer- tain

Gottwald, Georg A.

183

Yttrium-90-labeled anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody therapy of recurrent B-cell lymphoma.  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...an average energy of 0.935 MeV. The mean ranges of the 3 particles from `s'! and 90y in tissue are-0.4 and-2.5 mm...Can-cer Res., 28: 388, 1987. 24. Knox, S. J., Gods, M. L., Trisler. K. D.. Davis, T. A., Liles, T-M...

S J Knox; M L Goris; K Trisler; R Negrin; T Davis; T M Liles; A Grillo-López; P Chinn; C Varns; S C Ning; S Fowler; N Deb; M Becker; C Marquez; and R Levy

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Free-Space Management In this chapter, we take a small detour from our discussion of virtual-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

17 Free-Space Management In this chapter, we take a small detour from our discussion of virtual of a process). Specifically, we will discuss the issues surrounding free-space management. Let us make the problem more specific. Managing free space can cer- tainly be easy, as we will see when we discuss

Arpaci-Dusseau, Remzi

185

Interleukin-1? and Interleukin-6 Act Additively to Inhibit Growth of MCF-7 Breast Cancer Cells in Vitro  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...MDA-MB-435 breast can cer cells were kindly provided by Dr. Janet Price, M. D. Anderson Hospital, Houston, TX. All cell lines were...Steroid Biochem.. 34: 479 "481.1989. Snyers, L.. De Wit. L.. and Content, J. Glucocorticoid up-regulation of high-affinity...

David N. Danforth, Jr. and Magdalene K. Sgagias

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

TRANSFERGUIDE FOUNDED IN 1829, Rochester Institute of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in RIT residence halls, apartments, or townhouses on campus. On-campus fraterni- ties, sororities social events and activities are sponsored by the College Activities Board, Residence Halls Association's Teams--baseball, basketball, crew, cross country, ice hockey (Division I), lacrosse, soc- cer, swimming

Zanibbi, Richard

187

School of Environmental Sciences Annual Report 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Climate Change Research · Centre for Environmental Risk (CER) The School hosts two companies · Weather and Atmospheric Chemistry (LGMAC) · Climatic Research Unit (CRU) · Centre for Ecology Evolution and Conservation of Environmental Sciences and an international leader in interdisciplinary environmental research and teaching

Watson, Andrew

188

Multi-Modal Communications in Underwater Sensor Networks Using Depth Adjustment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

taking energy usage into account. We perform a preliminary analysis of the methods and show counterparts for minimizing energy usage and minimizing hop count. We find that while there are cer- tainly Acoustic communication typically dominates the power us- age in underwater sensor networks. As networks

Farritor, Shane

189

Microsoft Word - Alcoa ROD Attachments.doc  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

0 0 0 0 Non-Fed CER (Canada) 137 137 137 137 137 137 141 141 141 141 141 141 139 0 Total Hydro Resources 6,552 7,736 7,440 7,522 6,669 6,224 5,122 8,767 7,446 7,322 7,214 6,490...

190

APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Oct. 2009, p. 60876093 Vol. 75, No. 19 0099-2240/09/$08.00 0 doi:10.1128/AEM.01538-09  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

glucose liberation and produced ethanol directly from phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose. The final ethanol saccharification and fermentation of cellulose to ethanol can be efficiently accomplished with a yeast strain of simultaneous cellulose saccharification and ethanol fermentation. One attractive candidate is Saccharomyces cer

Chen, Wilfred

191

THE CENTER FOR HEALTH AND THE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- gram provides Chicago Public Schools students with hands-on experi- ence and mentoring in health careANNUAL REPORT 2012 THE CENTER FOR HEALTH AND THE SOCIAL SCIENCES THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO #12 16 KM1 CER 20 CCTS 22 HRSA FAMILY MEDICINE 24 RESEARCH 26 FINDING ANSWERS 29 HEALTH STATISTICS 31

Mateo, Jill M.

192

Perspective The NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL of MEDICINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

must slow the growth of health care costs and improve value through payment reforms, including bundling to care delivery, all health care provid- ers must be permitted to practice to the fullest extent cannot cer- tify home health care visits or stays in skilled nursing facilities or hospice, order durable

Shyu, Mei-Ling

193

Culture-Independent Analysis of Aerosol Microbiology in a Metropolitan Subway System  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Colorado School of Medicine, Aurora, Colorado, USA c * Present address: Laura K...Front Range Community College, Longmont, Colorado, USA. C.E.R. and L.K.B. contributed...for indoor air quality assessments of flood reclamation.J. Aerosol Sci. 36 :763-783...

Charles E. Robertson; Laura K. Baumgartner; J. Kirk Harris; Kristen L. Peterson; Mark J. Stevens; Daniel N. Frank; Norman R. Pace

2013-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

194

TENSOR PRODUCTS OF OPERATOR SYSTEMS ALI KAVRUK, VERN I. PAULSEN, IVAN G. TODOROV, AND MARK TOMFORDE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TENSOR PRODUCTS OF OPERATOR SYSTEMS ALI KAVRUK, VERN I. PAULSEN, IVAN G. TODOROV, AND MARK TOMFORDE Abstract. The purpose of the present paper is to study tensor prod- ucts of operator systems. After giving induced by a cer- tain canonical inclusion of an operator space into an operator system. We examine

195

COMMUNICATIONS OF THE ACM March 2005/Vol. 48, No. 3 15 y friend John Hennessy and I recently  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

traveled to Japan to accept the Com- puter and Communication (C&C) Prize from NEC Corporation. The cer as business embraced the Web five years ago, criminals are doing so now. In 2004, 1% of U.S. households were

California at Berkeley, University of

196

Coherent radiation diagnostics Bernhard Schmidt -FLA-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

)exp(-it)dt - normalized charge density spectral energy density source characteristics (CSR,CTR,CER,CDR,SP..) - integral, 'longitudinal fingerprint' #12;CR ports at FLASH BC2 CSR port feeding "TOSYLAB" Beamline beeing `revised' new optics, vacuum BC2 CDR port -5-10 mm diffraction radiator - cryst. quartz window - two pyro detectors

197

Proceedings of the 88th Annual Meeting (held June 18-23 in San Antonio, TX), Air and Waste Management Association, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, June 1995 Paper No. 95-7.02 1995 H.C. Frey  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-fired power generating systems.1 The concept incorporates the highly efficient gas turbine combined cycle of a suitable heat exchanger which would allow for a sufficiently high gas turbine inlet temperature. Recent developments in ceramic heat exchanger (CerHx) technology for use in the EFCC process have been promising

Frey, H. Christopher

198

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Motor Gasoline Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

199

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Prime Supplier Sales Volume Prime Supplier Sales Volume Definitions Key Terms Definition Conventional Gasoline Finished motor gasoline not included in the oxygenated or reformulated gasoline categories. Excludes reformulated gasoline blendstock for oxygenate blending (RBOB) as well as other blendstock. Finished Aviation Gasoline A complex mixture of relatively volatile hydrocarbons with or without small quantities of additives, blended to form a fuel suitable for use in aviation reciprocating engines. Fuel specifications are provided in ASTM Specification D 910 and Military Specification MIL-G-5572. Note: Data on blending components are not counted in data on finished aviation gasoline. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

200

C-C Activation in Biphenylene. Synthesis, Structure, and Reactivity of (C5Me5)2M2(2,2-biphenyl) (M ) Rh, Co)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Chemistry, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627 Received December 17, 1996X Carbon-carbon bond remains an elusive target in organometallic chemistry. A few examples have appeared over the past 20 years by sublimation before use. The reaction of 1 with biphenylene was examined in n-octane-d18.11 Biphenylene reacts

Jones, William D.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Green Chemistry Dynamic Article Links Cite this: Green Chem., 2011, 13, 2549  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Green Chemistry Dynamic Article Links Cite this: Green Chem., 2011, 13, 2549 www,6-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane core. The reaction took place efficiently in ionic liquid solvents instead of toluene as a heterogeneous catalyst in the preliminary study in molecular solvents, could be totally excluded thanks

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

202

Neutron Scattering Investigations on a Bimodal Polymer Gel  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

As these clusters are both large and chemically different from the surrounding polymer, they scatter strongly at small values of q, thereby giving rise to the feature described by the length ?2. ... For gels swollen in octane, the scattered light and the smallest angle neutron response are dominated by scattering from aggregates of polymd. ...

Anne-Marie Hecht; Ferenc Horkay; Erik Geissler

2001-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

203

Clearing the air with natural gas engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article examines the increased popularity of natural gas vehicles which has spurred engine designers to manipulate fuel-air ratios, compression ratios, ignition timing, and catalytic converters in ways to minimize exhaust pollutants. The topics of the article include reducing pollutants, high-octane engineering, diesel to natural gas, and the two-fuel choice.

O'Connor, L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

LETTER 2911 Stability Relationships in Bicyclic Ketones  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Intuitively, most of us are aware that bicyclo[3.3.0]octanes prefer cis fusion by a sufficient energy margin is to provide calculated energy differences of bicyclo[m.3.0]alkanones as iso- meric pairs with respect Stuttgart · New York Abstract: Calculated energy differences between cis- and trans- fused bicyclic ketones

Hudlicky, Tomas

205

Thermodynamic Analysis of Alternative Approaches to Chemical Looping Combustion  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Thermodynamic Analysis of Alternative Approaches to Chemical Looping Combustion ... Because H2 and syngas have similar combustion irreversibilities, when reforming is done optimally (with TR close to 650 K), iso-octane can be combusted with the same efficiency as that of preheated, isothermal H2 combustion. ... A loop of chem. ...

V. Kalyana Chakravarthy; C. Stuart Daw; Josh A. Pihl

2011-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

206

Green Chemistry Dynamic Article Links Cite this: Green Chem., 2011, 13, 91  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of different gasoline range products; table of methods of hydrogenation of mono-, di- and polysaccharides. See In this paper we demonstrate an integrated process for the production of high octane gasoline from maple wood with acids produced mainly xylose and acetic acid. The hydrolysis co-product was a solid enriched

California at Riverside, University of

207

Flame/Wall interactions : laminar study of unburnt HC formation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for an important part to the sources of hydrocarbon (HC) emission in a combustion chamber. The aim of this work in gasoline engine. A skeletal mechanism (29 species and 48 reactions) mimicking iso-octane combustion is used, wall heat flux, quench distances as well as HC families are investigated by varying parameters like

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

208

New Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber and solvents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

environmentally friendly products including octane- boosting gas and rubber for tires. #12;WHAT'S NEXT? FutureNew Catalyst Might Expand Bio-Ethanol's Usefulness Possible uses: fuel additives, rubber it first, potentially keeping costs lower and production times faster. Reported by researchers

209

Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www.cleantransportation.org North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 8/15/13  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with gasoline at different levels. E10 (10% ethanol /90% gasoline) is blended in almost all regular 87 octane such as corn, grains, and sugarcane, as well as crop and forestry waste materials. Ethanol is usually blended gasoline where as E85 (85% ethanol / 15% gasoline) is an alternative fuel for flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs

210

Clean Transportation Program | 919-515-3480 | www.cleantransportation.org I www.ncsc.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7401, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.ncsc.ncsu.edu | 3/16/12  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

corn, grains, and crop and forestry waste materials. Ethanol is usually blended with gasoline on either E85 or gasoline, of any blend in between allow vehicle operators the ability to obtain fuel at different levels. E10 is a premium high- octane gasoline for cars and E85 (85% ethanol / 15% gasoline

211

Clean Transportation | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu North Carolina State University, Campus Box 7409, Raleigh, NC 27695 | 919-515-3480 | www.nccleantech.ncsu.edu | 3/13/14  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and sugarcane, as well as crop and forestry waste materials. Ethanol is usually blended with gasoline at different levels. E10 (10% ethanol /90% gasoline) is blended in almost all regular 87 octane gasoline where as E85 (85% ethanol / 15% gasoline) is an alternative fuel for flexible fuel vehicles (FFVs) . What

212

Ethers have good gasoline-blending attributes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of their compatibility with hydrocarbon gasoline-blending components, their high octane blending values, and their low volatility blending values, ethers will grow in use as gasoline blending components. This article discusses the properties of ethers as blending components, and environmental questions.

Unzelman, G.H.

1989-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

PETROLEUM, PAST, PRESENT AND FUTURE  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...quality of motor fuel is concerned is octane...composition of its fuels; it can also be...large, parallels the engine builder's increase...obtained per unit of fuel. As a result of...States and their consumption of gasoline. of...fuel oil (includes Diesel and other gas oil...

PER K. FROLICH

1943-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

214

Railroad Environmental Conference University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to Locate Contaminant Beneath Railroad Track Jim Hyslip ­ Hy for Ethanol 2% - 5% Natural Gasoline (Low octane) Contains BTEX which are the regulated compounds Geology Elevated track bed with perched water Below track bed is a 35 foot clay later about 10 feet below grade

Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, University of

215

Checking the Pulse of PitCon '88  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...was unclear at the meeting. Zymark's price-tag for a core robot and its controller...both the sulfur and chlorine content of oil. This year's version of the company's...octane ofa gasoline, for example. But oil contains sulfur. "Sulfur actually embeds...

1988-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

216

Developing the Fuels of the Future Road transport accounts for 21% of the CO2 emissions of the UK  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(-1) + Su,2(-1)2 + Su,3(-1)3 + Su,4(-1)4] x TP T = Tu / 298 K = 0 + (-1) 1 P = Pu / 1 bar = 0 + (-1) 1 bar; x r = 0 Temperature (K) BurningVelocity(cm/s) Figure 9 Iso-octane correlation for Pu = 1 bar

217

Facile Lewis Acid Catalyzed Synthesis of C4 Symmetric Resorcinarenes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Lewis acid catalyzed condensation of 3-methoxyphenol with octanal produced the C4 symmetric calix[4]resorcinarene 2, in high yield. Of the numerous stereo- and regioisomers possible, the rccc isomer with C4 symmetry was the only product isolated (as a ...

Matthew J. McIldowie; Mauro Mocerino; Brian W. Skelton; Allan H. White

2000-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

218

Can Nutrition Explain the Pattern of International Epidemiology of Hormone-dependent Cancers?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...such as a virus or a general enhancement of host susceptibility...would obtain running a diesel engine on high-octane...overnutrition is a general evil favoring endocrine...Prospective Study in General Practice on Breast-Cancer...McArthur, J. W. Menstrual Cycles: Fatness as a Determinant...

John W. Berg

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Can Nutrition Explain the Pattern of International Epidemiology of Hormone-dependent Cancers?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...it seems to be in the general population. It is not...such as a virus or a general enhancement of host susceptibility...would obtain running a diesel engine on high-octane airplane...overnutrition is a general evil favoring endocrine...

John W. Berg

1975-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

NATCOR -Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATCOR - Xpress case study (advanced) Margaret Oil produces three products: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be at least 8.5 for gasoline, 7 for jet fuel, and 4. Distilled naphtha can be used only to produce gasoline or jet fuel. Distilled oil can be used to produce

Hall, Julian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

UMass scientists tackle gas spills Underground microbesseenas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on earth could be the newest , weapon against gasoline spills. Researchers at the University spills of the gasoline additive MTBE. First added to gasoline to enhance octane, and later in much larger on sulfur, the UMass team has been. able to remove benzene, a carcino- genic component of gasoline and other

Lovley, Derek

222

Tufts University Department of Mathematics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

refineries. They sell a range of refined products that can be grouped into gasolines (of various octanes refinery is a mixture of gasoline, light and heavy fuel oils, and salable residues that depends on which that offers two refining processes, a low gasoline yield process and a high gasoline yield process. These can

MacLachlan, Scott

223

Standard version Advanced version  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

: gasoline, jet fuel, and heating oil. The average octane levels must be: Gasoline Jet fuel Heating oil Distilled 2 Naphtha Distill (barrels) 0.25 0.25 0.5 Distilled naphtha can be used only to produce gasoline version Advanced version Margaret Oil - basic (3) Crude Distill Naphtha Gasoline Distilled 1 Jet fuel

Hall, Julian

224

Convergent synthesis of panclicin-D via intramolecular SN2 displacement approach  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A convergent enantioselective synthesis of panclicin-D has been reported from simple octanal using syn aldol reaction via intramolecular SN2 displacement reaction for the first time towards the construction of anti-?-lactones in panclicin-D. The key steps involved are C-allylation, asymmetric aldolization under Crimmins condition, intramolecular SN2 displacement, and Mitsunobu esterification reaction.

Jhillu Singh Yadav; Soma Shekar Dachavaram; Adithya Peddapuram; Saibal Das

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Membrane reactor technology for C5/C6 hydroisomerization  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...produce high octane, clean-burning gasoline. Many of the recent attempts to improve...the case for the hydroisomerization of straight chain paraffins. Currently in industry...with H2 during the catalytic reaction runs was required because hydrogen also takes...

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Motor Gasoline Prices by Grade and Sales Type Definitions Key Terms Definition Bulk Sales Wholesale sales of gasoline in individual transactions which exceed the size of a truckload. Dealer Tank Wagon Sales (DTW) Wholesale sales of gasoline priced on a delivered basis to a retail outlet. Gas Plant Operator Any firm, including a gas plant owner, which operates a gas plant and keeps the gas plant records. A gas plant is a facility in which natural gas liquids are separated from natural gas or in which natural gas liquids are fractionated or otherwise separated into natural gas liquid products or both. For the purposes of this survey, gas plant operator data are contained in the refiner categories. Gasoline Grades The classification of gasoline by octane ratings. Each type of gasoline (conventional and reformulated) is classified by three grades - regular, midgrade, and premium. Note: gasoline sales are reported by grade in accordance with their classification at the time of sale. In general, automotive octane requirements are lower at high altitudes. Therefore, in some areas of the United States, such as the Rocky Mountain States, the octane ratings for the gasoline grades may be 2 or more octane points lower.

227

PROJECT RULISON A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O A GOVERNMENT- INDUSTRY NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 O N S T I M U L A T I O N EXPERIMENT U S I N G A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE Issued By PROJECT RULISON JOINT OFFICE OF INFORMATION U. S. ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION - AUSTRAL OIL COMPANY, INCORPORATED THE DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR - CER GEONUCLEAR CORPORATION May 1, 1969 OBSERVATION AREA J SURFACE GROUND ZERO AREA S C A L E - I inch e q u a l s approximatly I 2 m i l e s Project Rulison Area Map PROJECT RULISON A N INDUSTRY-GOVERNMENT NATURAL GAS PRODUCT1 ON STIMULATION EXPERIMENT USING A NUCLEAR EXPLOSIVE I. INTRODUCTION Project Rulison is o joint experiment sponsored by Austral O i l Company, Incorporated, of Houston, Texas, the U. S. Atomic Energy Commission and the Department o f the Interior, w i t h the Program Management provided b y CER Geonuclear Corporotion of L

228

NEPA Lessons Learned Second Quarter FY 2006  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6 1 6 1 (continued on page 4) Second Quarter FY 2006 June 1, 2006; Issue No. 47 National Environmental Policy Act U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY QUARTERLY REPORT LESSONS LEARNED LEARNED LESSONS N E P A Quality + Leadership = NEPA Success NEPA 35 Earns Special Award from NAEP; see page 3 DOE's NEPA Compliance Offi cers discussed quality assurance during the interactive meeting of more than

229

Common variation in EMSYand risk of breast and ovarian cancer: a case-control study using HapMap tagging SNPs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as breast or ovarian can- cer: a difference in allele frequency is sought between affected individuals and unrelated controls [16]. Two approaches have been proposed. The traditional, hypoth- esis-driven approach is to investigate single... -base pair putative promoter starting 500 base pairs upstream the gene was identified with gene2promoter http://www.genomatix.de, a pro- gram that allows for automated extraction of groups of promoters from a list of accession numbers or gene IDs...

Benusiglio, Patrick R; Lesueur, Fabienne; Luccarini, Craig; McIntosh, Joan; Luben, Robert; Smith, Paula; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Ponder, Bruce A J; Pharoah, Paul D P

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

230

LANL: AOT & LANSCE The Pulse December 2010  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

BeAms iN situ ChArACterizA- tioN oF multiphAse polymeriC mAteriAls upoN DeFormAtioN 5 NeutroN sCAtteriNg reveAls the AtomiC motioN iN A NeW ClAss oF CerAmiC- metAl mAteriAls...

231

Photon detection efficiency of Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The photon detection efficiencies of multi-pixel Geiger-mode avalanche photodiodes manufactured by different produ cers are estimated. A new fit method of the response spectra to low-intensity light, taking into ac count after-pulse and cross-talk effects is proposed to yield the initial number of photons. The value of photon detection efficiency is calculated using a calibrated photodetector as a reference.

Simonetta Gentile; Ekaterina Kuznetsova; Franco Meddi

2010-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

232

The effect of different harvest rates on gray and fox squirrel reproduction  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

~ Beasom An evaluation was made on the effects of differential fall and spring hunting pressure on gray squirrel (Sciurus carolinensis) and fox squirrel (S ~?Cer) productivity on two study areas located on the Gus Engeling Wildlife Management Area... in East Texas Two years of base- line data~ ending with the 1974 fall hunt~ were collected from Pastures 19 and 4 during the bi-annual public hunts Prior to the first ex- perimental hunt (1975 spring hunt) in which differential hunting pres- sure...

Smith, Charles Scott

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

@Title = Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Definitions of Petroleum Products and Other Terms (Revised January 2010) Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH 3 - (CH 2 )n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Alkylation. A refining process for chemically combining isobutane with olefin hydrocarbons (e.g., propylene, butylene) through the control of temperature and pressure in the presence of an acid catalyst, usually sulfuric acid or hydrofluoric acid. The product, alkylate, an

234

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Production Capacity of Operable Petroleum Refineries Definitions Key Terms Definition Alkylate The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in blending high octane gasoline. Aromatics Hydrocarbons characterized by unsaturated ring structures of carbon atoms. Commercial petroleum aromatics are benzene, toluene, and xylene (BTX). Asphalt A dark-brown-to-black cement-like material containing bitumens as the predominant constituent obtained by petroleum processing; used primarily for road construction. It includes crude asphalt as well as the following finished products: cements, fluxes, the asphalt content of emulsions (exclusive of water), and petroleum distillates blended with asphalt to make cutback asphalts. Note: The conversion factor for asphalt is 5.5 barrels per short ton.

235

Motor gasolines, summer 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical data for 2401 samples of motor gasoline, from service stations throughout the country, were collected and analyzed under agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center and the American Petroleum Institute. The samples represent the products of 48 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing areas and districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1949. Twelve octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded, regular, and premium grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index ((R + M)/2) averages of gasoline sold in this country were 88.6, 89.3, and 93.7 unleaded, regular, and premium grades of gasolines, respectively.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

High Temperature Chemical Kinetic Combustion Modeling of Lightly Methylated Alkanes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum jet and diesel fuels, as well as alternative Fischer-Tropsch (FT) fuels and hydrotreated renewable jet (HRJ) fuels, contain high molecular weight lightly branched alkanes (i.e., methylalkanes) and straight chain alkanes (n-alkanes). Improving the combustion of these fuels in practical applications requires a fundamental understanding of large hydrocarbon combustion chemistry. This research project presents a detailed high temperature chemical kinetic mechanism for n-octane and three lightly branched isomers octane (i.e., 2-methylheptane, 3-methylheptane, and 2,5-dimethylhexane). The model is validated against experimental data from a variety of fundamental combustion devices. This new model is used to show how the location and number of methyl branches affects fuel reactivity including laminar flame speed and species formation.

Sarathy, S M; Westbrook, C K; Pitz, W J; Mehl, M

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Weekly Petroleum Status Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

5 5 Alcohol. The family name of a group of organic chemical compounds composed of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. The series of molecules vary in chain length and are composed of a hydrocarbon plus a hydroxyl group; CH3-(CH2)n-OH (e.g., methanol, ethanol, and tertiary butyl alcohol). Alkylate. The product of an alkylation reaction. It usually refers to the high octane product from alkylation units. This alkylate is used in

238

Increasing Biofuel Deployment and Utilization through Development of Renewable Super Premium: Infrastructure Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A high octane fuel and specialized vehicle are under consideration as a market opportunity to meet federal requirements for renewable fuel use and fuel economy. Infrastructure is often cited as a barrier for the introduction of a new fuel. This report assesses infrastructure readiness for E25 (25% ethanol; 75% gasoline) and E25+ (more than 25% ethanol). Both above-ground and below-ground equipment are considered as are the current state of stations, codes and regulations, and materials compatibility.

Moriarty, K.; Kass, M.; Theiss, T.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Kompetenscentrum Frbrnningsprocesser Centre of Competence Combustion Processes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Diesel Project 20 2.1 Quantative In-Cylinder Fuel Measurements in a Heavy-Duty Diesel Engine using-Off Length in an Optical Heavy-Duty DI Diesel Engine 21 2.3 LES of Jet-Jet Interaction Effects on Multi a Scania D13 truck size diesel engine with PPC using diesel fuel as well as gasoline in the 69-99 octane

240

Basic studies in the displacement of residual oil by chemical flooding. Annual report, February 1, 1978-January 31, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research studies at the University of Houston are concerned with (1) the role of dynamic interfacial properties on the displacement and reconnection processes occurring in surfactant flooding processes and (2) the analytical description of multiphase displacement dynamics using ganglia population balance models and simulation algorithms. Tests on oil-water-surfactant systems using both a drop deformation and orientation method and the viscous traction method indicate the largest interfacial viscosities at salt concentrations in the neighborhood of the optimal salinity. Values of interfacial viscosities for crude oil systems were considerably larger than those associated with iso-octane systems. A new technique involving the use of a spinning drop apparatus has been developed for controlled coalescence tests. Tests to date on several iso-octane-brine-surfactant systems and one crude oil-brine-surfactant system indicate that the fastest coalescence occurs at salt concentrations near the point of optimal salinity. Also, the crude oil systems coalesce at significantly slower rates than the iso-octane systems. Capillary displacement tests involving iso-octane drops being displaced by water have been attempted in both constant pressure drop and constant displacement rate systems. Work has continued in the development of a theoretical description of the dynamics of mobilized oil ganglia, their breakup, coalescence, and entrapment. Improvements in the mobilization criteria have been effected, and hundreds of computer-aided stochastic realizations have been performed for solitary ganglia of all sizes of interest moving in a 100 x 200 sandpack. These realizations show clearly that a solitary ganglion gets slenderized as it moves, and that either it gets restranded whole after a few rheons, or that it first breaks into two daughter ganglia, which eventually get stranded.

Flumerfelt, R.W.; Payatakes, A.C.; Tham, M.K.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

U.S. Energy Situation, Ethanol, and Energy Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Slide 1 U.S. Energy Situation, Ethanol, and Energy Policy Wally Tyner #12;Slide 2 Breakeven Corn Corn ($/bu) Crude($/bbl) Energy basis Price premium for octane/oxygen With subsidy and price premium.25 2.5 2.75 3 3.25 3.5 3.75 4 4.25 4.5 4.75 5 Corn ($/bu) Crude($/bbl) Energy basis Price premium

242

Catalytic oxidative coupling of methane over Li/MgO using N2O as an oxidant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by Mobil and is known as t, he methanol ? to ? gasoline process (MTG), The first commercial plant using th&s process was const. ructed at, Motunui, New Zealand and began operation in 1985 with 14, 000 barrel per day capacity. Off ? shore natural gas... is converted to synthesis gas by steam reforming and the methanol synthesis uses conventional technology. The advent of this technology (MTG process), which synthesizes high octane gasoline from methanol, may be contrasted with the Fischer ? Tropsch process...

Yamamoto, Hiroshi

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

243

Optimizing Cooling Tower Performance Refrigeration Systems, Chemical Plants, and Power Plants All Have A Resource Quietly Awaiting Exploitation-Cold Water!!  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cooling water rate could be used to proquce approximately 1000 additional bbl (159 m 3 ) Iday of lead-free. high-octane gasoline. The savings in plot area and new construction would more than offset the labor and materials invoived in excavating.... This rejected heat must be continuously removed at the same rate it is generated or the compressor will overheat and shut down. Reducing the operating temperature of the compressor will proportionately reduce the energy input requirements. In other words...

Burger, R.

244

Combustion behavior of gasoline and gasoline/ethanol blends in a modern direct-injection 4-cylinder engine.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Early in 2007 President Bush announced in his State of the Union Address a plan to off-set 20% of gasoline with alternative fuels in the next ten years. Ethanol, due to its excellent fuel properties for example, high octane number, renewable character, etc., appears to be a favorable alternative fuel from an engine perspective. Replacing gasoline with ethanol without any additional measures results in unacceptable disadvantages mainly in terms of vehicle range.

Wallner, T.; Miers, S. A. (Energy Systems)

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Cheap and simple straight run naphtha isomerization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low cost approach to LSR naptha isomerization is presented. Prospects for realizing the approach is encouraging, and is currently being pursued through a commercial demonstration in Cincinnati. The real challenge has been put to the process companies. The authors hope to build the state-of-the-art isomerization process, but lack the capital. They realize there will be no guarantees at Cincinnati, but no matter which catalyst is selected, they will have more octane-barrels than they did before.

Suchanek, A.J.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Reforming petroleum-based fuels for fuel cell vehicles : composition-performance relationships.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Onboard reforming of petroleum-based fuels, such as gasoline, may help ease the introduction of fuel cell vehicles to the marketplace. Although gasoline can be reformed, it is optimized to meet the demands of ICEs. This optimization includes blending to increase the octane number and addition of oxygenates and detergents to control emissions. The requirements for a fuel for onboard reforming to hydrogen are quite different than those for combustion. Factors such as octane number and flame speed are not important; however, factors such as hydrogen density, catalyst-fuel interactions, and possible catalyst poisoning become paramount. In order to identify what factors are important in a hydrocarbon fuel for reforming to hydrogen and what factors are detrimental, we have begun a program to test various components of gasoline and blends of components under autothermal reforming conditions. The results indicate that fuel composition can have a large effect on reforming behavior. Components which may be beneficial for ICEs for their octane enhancing value were detrimental to reforming. Fuels with high aromatic and naphthenic content were more difficult to reform. Aromatics were also found to have an impact on the kinetics for reforming of paraffins. The effects of sulfur impurities were dependent on the catalyst. Sulfur was detrimental for Ni, Co, and Ru catalysts. Sulfur was beneficial for reforming with Pt catalysts, however, the effect was dependent on the sulfur concentration.

Kopasz, J. P.; Miller, L. E.; Ahmed, S.; Devlin, P. R.; Pacheco, M.

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

247

FCC Tail Gas olefins conversion to gasoline via catalytic distillation with aromatics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of every refiner is to continually improve profitability by such means as increasing gasoline production, increasing gasoline octane pool and in cases where fuel balance becomes a problem, decreasing refinery fuel gas production. A new refinery process is currently being developed which accomplish these goals. Chemical Research and Licensing Company (CR and L) developed Catalytic Distillation technology in 1978 to produce MTBE. They have since used the Catalytic Distillation technique to produce cumene. CR and L has further developed this technology to convert olefin gases currently consumed as refinery fuel, to high octane gasoline components. The process, known as CATSTILL, alkylates olefin gases such as ethylene, propylene and butylene, present in FCC Tail Gas with light aromatics such as benzene, toluene and xylene, present in reformate, to produce additional quantities of high octane gasoline components. A portable CATSTILL demonstration plant has been constructed by Brown and Root U.S.A., under an agreement with CR and L, for placement in a refinery to further develop data necessary to design commercial plants. This paper presents current data relative to the CATSTILL development.

Partin, E.E. (Brown and Root U.S.A., Inc., Houston, TX (US))

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Successfully cope with FCC catalyst  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) process converts straight-run atmospheric gas oil, vacuum gas oils, certain atmospheric residues, and heavy stocks recovered from other operations into high-octane gasoline, light fuel oils, and olefin-rich light gases. The main features of the FCC processes are long-term reliability and operating adjustability, allowing the refinery to easily adapt their product yields to an ever changing market. The produced gasoline, for example, has an excellent front-end octane number and good overall octane characteristics. The cracking reactions are carried out in a vertical reactor vessel in which vaporized oil rises and carries along with it in intimate contact small fluidized catalyst particles. The reactions are very rapid, and a contact time of only a few seconds is enough for most applications. During the cracking a carbonaceous material of low hydrogen-to-carbon ratio, coke, forms and deposits on the catalyst. The coke blocks the access to the internal structure of the catalyst particle and thus reduces its activity. The spent catalyst is separated from the cracking products in a catalyst stripper/disengager, and the catalyst is transported to a separate vessel, the regenerator, where the coke is burned off reactivating the catalyst. The regenerated catalyst is then transported to the bottom of the reactor riser, where the cycle begins again.

Lindstrom, T.H.; Hashemi, R.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

The Impact of Alternative Fuels on Combustion Kinetics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The research targets the development of detailed kinetic models to quantitatively characterize the impact of alternative fuels on the performance of Navy turbines and diesel engines. Such impacts include kinetic properties such as cetane number, flame speed, and emissions as well as physical properties such as the impact of boiling point distributions on fuel vaporization and mixing. The primary focus will be Fischer-Tropsch liquids made from natural gas, coal or biomass. The models will include both the effects of operation with these alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional petroleum-based fuels. The team will develop the requisite kinetic rules for specific reaction types and incorporate these into detailed kinetic mechanisms to predict the combustion performance of neat alternative fuels as well as blends of these fuels with conventional fuels. Reduced kinetic models will be then developed to allow solution of the coupled kinetics/transport problems. This is a collaboration between the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The CSM/LLNL team plans to build on the substantial progress made in recent years in developing accurate detailed chemical mechanisms for the oxidation and pyrolysis of conventional fuels. Particular emphasis will be placed upon reactions of the isoalkanes and the daughter radicals, especially tertiary radicals, formed by abstraction from the isoalkanes. The various components of the program are described. We have been developing the kinetic models for two iso-dodecane molecules, using the same kinetic modeling formalisms that were developed for the gasoline and diesel primary reference fuels. These mechanisms, and the thermochemical and transport coefficient submodels for them, are very close to completion at the time of this report, and we expect them to be available for kinetic simulations early in the coming year. They will provide a basis for prediction and selection of desirable F-T molecules for use in jet engine simulations, where we should be able to predict the ignition, combustion and emissions characteristics of proposed fuel components. These mechanisms include the reactions and chemical species needed to describe high temperature phenomena such as shock tube ignition and flammability behavior, and they will also include low temperature kinetics to describe other ignition phenomena such as compression ignition and knocking. During the past years, our hydrocarbon kinetics modeling group at LLNL has focused a great deal on fuels typical of gasoline and diesel fuel. About 10 years ago, we developed kinetic models for the fuel octane primary reference fuels, n-heptane [1] and iso-octane [2], which have 7 and 8 carbon atoms and are therefore representative of typical gasoline fuels. N-heptane represents the low limit of knock resistance with an octane number of 0, while iso-octane is very knock resistant with an octane number of 100. High knock resistance in iso-octane was attributed largely to the large fraction of primary C-H bonds in the molecule, including 15 of the 18 C-H bonds, and the high bond energy of these primary bonds plays a large role in this knock resistance. In contrast, in the much more ignitable n-heptane, 10 of its 16 C-H bonds are much less strongly bound secondary C-H bonds, leading to its very low octane number. All of these factors, as well as a similarly complex kinetic description of the equally important role of the transition state rings that transfer H atoms within the reacting fuel molecules, were quantified and collected into large kinetic reaction mechanisms that are used by many researchers in the fuel chemistry world.

Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

250

Joint Implementation Network Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Network Feed Network Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

251

UNEP-Risoe Centre Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre Feed Centre Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

252

2004 ORAU/ORISE Bibliography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

4 Bibliography 4 Bibliography Prepared by Communications, Printing and Design P.O. Box 117, MS 44 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 Table of Contents Basic and Applied Research Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) ORISE Radioactive Beam Studies (ORIBS) Business Operations Communications, Printing, and Design (CPD) Health, Safety, and Emergency Management Medical Education and Outreach (MEO) National Security Operations Center for Human Reliability Studies (CHRS) Radiation Emergency Response and Dose Assessment Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS) Radiological Safety, Assessments, and Training Environmental Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) Atmospheric Turbulence and Diffusion Division (ATDD) Science and Engineering Education

253

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Agency/Company /Organization: Sandbag Sector: Energy, Land Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Forestry, Geothermal, Hydrogen, Industry, Solar, Wind Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Website: sandbag.org.uk/carbondata/cers Sandbag Carbon Offset Map Screenshot References: Sandbag Carbon Offset Map[1] Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a massive issue and personal actions like switching off lights and unplugging televisions can feel like small contributions. Background "Thinking about climate change can be a depressing occupation. It's a

254

Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank Feed | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Bank Feed World Bank Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

255

ORAU/ORISE Bibliography of 2007 Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Associated Universities/ Oak Ridge Associated Universities/ Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education 2007 Bibliography Prepared by ORAU Communications and Marketing (Formerly Communications, Printing and Design) P.O. Box 117, MS 44 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 www.orau.org/about/pubs/ Table of Contents Business Operations (BusOps) Communications and Marketing (CM) (Formerly Communications, Printing and Design [CPD]) 1 Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV) Survey Projects and Health Physics 1 National Security and Emergency Management Program (NSEMP) Center for Human Reliability Studies (CHRS) 3 Occupational Exposure and Worker Health (OEWH) Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) 4 Professional and Technical Training (PTT)

256

Climate Technology Initiative Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Initiative Feed Initiative Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

257

Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development Feed Development Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

258

Ecofys Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ecofys Feed Ecofys Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

259

Netherlands Development Organisation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organisation Feed Organisation Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

260

German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cooperation (GIZ) Feed Cooperation (GIZ) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

On social organization and behavior of nilgai antelope, Boselaphus tragocamelus (Pallas), in south Texas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

thorough field behavior studies of bovids which were published before my field research began and which I used for guidance include: Schenkel (1966), impala, ~Ae cer- ~1(L. LDL t*t ); d 9 dp tt (1966), 3 p 1 of Kobus; Buechner and Schloeth (1965...), January through April 1969 59 10 Number of single females seen with 0, 1, 2, or 3 calves, January through April 1969, and 29 March to 4 April 1972 61 Adult sex ratios, by month 12 Frequency of flight as a function of distance from truck to nilgai...

Fall, Bruce Alan

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

A stochastic model to mimic periodic surface currents in embayments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and the names and positions of responsible local, state and federal agency o%cers charged with commu- nity protection, This complex network must be available to respond within hours of a spill. Consequently, both the Coast Guard and industry have developed... instruments are needing to accurately determine how the tide moves throughout the bay. In addition wind can pile up water in areas adding to the tidal height. Tidal currents are even more difficult to measure. Since wind along coasts is usually persistent...

Paternostro, Christopher Lee

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

263

May 2013 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site (Data Validation Package)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual sampling was conducted at the Rio Blanco, Colorado, site for the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program May 14-16, 2013, to monitor groundwater and surface water for potential radionuclide contamination. Sampling and analyses were conducted as specified in Sampling and Analysis Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management Sites (LMS/PRO/S04351, continually updated). A duplicate sample was collected from location CER #1 Black Sulphur. Samples were analyzed for gamma-emitting radionuclides by high-resolution gamma spectrometry and for tritium using the conventional and enrichment methods.

None

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

On the Banks of the Karakoro  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

triggered anxiety that I had to justify the time and money spent at not-making money and prolonging childhood. The questions always suggested to me that life was something I was supposed to figure out, a quadratic equation composed of constants... in Kankossa II where he was a full-time gardener, but also worked as a tailor in the market. I’d spent nights with him traveling around the countryside teaching women’s cooperatives in villages how to make CerAmine, a more nutritional flour made from...

Miller, Jeremiah

2012-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

GROUNDLOOPEVAPORATIVEFLUIDCOOLERCHILLERTOGROUNDLOOP CHILLERTOGROUNDLOOP&  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BTU/SF26kBTU/SF 101kBTU/SF40kBTU/SF TOTAL TOTAL SITE EUI SOURCE EUI RADIANT VS. DOAS CONDITIONING SITE EUI AND SOURCE EUI BUILDING SITE ENERGY BUILDING CONDITIONING SOURCE 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0 3.5 4.0 4.5 0 LEED Cer fied CBECS N onal Average EnergyUseIntensity(kBTU/SF) Site EUI Source EUI Gallagher LEED Plat

California at Davis, University of

266

The electrolysis of sea water  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

water in a cell having a mer- cer@ cathode is described, In tnis section there are data from a spectrographic analysis of the materials deposited on ths mercury cathode~ Ths concentration and recovery factors "or so:~ of the t. race elements... SCREW G ? MERCURY CATHODE - 65, 5 Gms. ANODE AREA = 0. 32 Sq In CATHODE AREA = 2. 37 Sq. In. X O O N c 8 ( ? ) 4 16 MERCURY CATHODE CELL F IGURE ? I A ~ A Japanese patent covering an electrolytic cell and diaphragm useful in the production...

Stoddard, William Bull

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

267

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Mitigation Action Implementation Network (MAIN) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

268

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline (Released in the STEO October 1999)  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an increase in MTBE production between 1990 and 1994. MTBE demand increased from 83,000 in 1990 to 161,000 barrels per day in 1994. The reformulated gasoline (RFG) program provided a further boost to oxygenate blending. The MTBE contained in motor gasoline increased to 269,000 barrels per day by 1997.

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Physicochemical and Mechanical Properties of Experimental Coextruded Food-Packaging Films Containing a Buried Layer of Recycled Low-Density Polyethylene  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Environmental protection in conjunction with waste reduction considerations have oriented industry, research, and government authorities toward recycling and/or reuse of packaging materials, especially plastics (1, 2). ... Technical processes such as blending or coextrusion of recycled plastics with virgin polymer resins are being developed for the most widely used polymers, namely, polyethylene, polypropylene, poly(ethylene terephthalate), and polystyrene (3?7). ... For iso-octane the temperature/time of plastic/simulant contact was 20 ± 0.5 °C for 2 days (14). ...

Anastasia Badeka; Antonios E. Goulas; Antigoni Adamantiadi; Michael G. Kontominas

2003-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

270

Producing a trimethylpentanoic acid using hybrid polyketide synthases  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides for a polyketide synthase (PKS) capable of synthesizing trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a host cell comprising the PKS and when cultured produces the trimethylpentanoic acid. The present invention also provides for a method of producing the trimethylpentanoic acid, comprising: providing a host cell of the present invention, and culturing said host cell in a suitable culture medium such that the trimethylpentanoic acid is produced, optionally isolating the trimethylpentanoic acid, and optionally, reducing the isolated trimethylpentanoic acid into a trimethylpentanol or an iso-octane.

Katz, Leonard; Fortman, Jeffrey L; Keasling, Jay D

2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

271

Isomerization of hydrocarbons in the presence of zeolite-containing catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Y-type zeolites with 97% of the sodium removed and after aluminium removal (modulus close to 8) and without precious metal activation - are active and fairly selective catalysts for the isomerization of paraffinic and naphthenic hydrocarbons at 200/sup 0/-280/sup 0/C. The isomerization activity of HY and HM zeolites correlates with the concentration of strong acid sites; the isomerization of paraffins requires stronger centres sites than are needed for the isomerization of naphthenes. HY Catalysts may be used for increasing the octane number of refined oils in catalytic reforming.

Zhorov, Yu.M.; Kartashev, Yu.N.; Panchenkov, G.M.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

An experimental investigation of the burning characteristics of water-oil emulsions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An experimental investigation was conducted on the combustion characteristics of droplets of n-heptane, n-decane, n-dodecane, n-hexadecane and iso-octane emulsified with various amount of water and freely falling in a furnace of controlled temperature. Results demonstrate the intricate influences of water emulsification on the ignition, extinction and micro-explosion of the droplet response, and that the droplet burning time can be significantly reduced through judicious fuel blending so as to minimize the ignition delay and advance the onset of micro-explosion.

Wang, C.H.; Chen, J.T. [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering] [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (Taiwan, Province of China). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Long-term historical trends in gasoline properties are charted  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Trends in motor gasolines between 1942 and 1981 have been evaluated based upon data contained in motor gasoline surveys that have been prepared and published by the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). These surveys have been published twice annually since 1935 describing the properties of motor gasolines from throughout the country. They have been conducted in cooperation with the American Petroleum Institute since 1949. A typical report covers 2,400 samples from service stations throughout the country representing some 48 companies that manufacture and supply gasoline. The reports include trend charts, octane plots and properties obtained from a dozen different tests.

Shelton, E.M.; Whisman, M.L.; Woodward, P.W.

1982-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

Diffusion in associated and non-associated homologous series  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and carbon dioxide and of the alkanes n-octane, n ? decane, n-dodecane, n-tetradecane, and n-hexadecane in the solvents n ? heptane, n-dodecane, and n-hexadecane. Values of Vn and P for each solute-solvent pair were determined. For the dissolved gases, Vn... consisted of methane, ethane, propane, n-butane, n-pentane, benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, cycloheptane, methylcyclopentane, and cycloheptane. The data were interpreted using the Wilke-Chang diffusivity equation. Haluska and Clover (1971) used a...

Alhamid, Khalid A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Zeolite pore size determination by methanol-to-gasoline conversion test  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The conversion of methanol over a shape selective zeolite to high octane gasoline is a well known process. In this work, a methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) conversion test is utilized for the pore size determination of zeolites with active sites. The dimension of a zeolite`s pores is revealed by the size distribution of its MTG hydrocarbon products. A simple fixed bed MTG test unit capable of on-line sampling for direct gas chromatographic analysis and the collection of liquid and gaseous products for GC-MS analysis is described. The size distributions of MTG hydrocarbon products are presented for several small, intermediate, and large pore zeolites.

Yuen, L.; Zones, S.I. [Chevron Research and Technology Co., Richmond, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Development of a partition function for polymer systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

eT = 3 -2U Coefficient of' Compressibility (K) 3y definition K = ? ? ( ? ) 1 3V V tIp T ) but again V = Nxv ) = = v? ) and from (4) 0v Qv Therefore, K = ? ~(~)T vp p T From the equation of state, with T constant, -v and v + v p + + ~53 3..., but with the accuracy with which &x, p, and K are known, it is impossible to calculate the reduced vol- umes with the needed precision. 22 PIGURE I Reduced temperature versus reduced volume for octane and butyl rubber. AB = dv at 15, 000 ib/in -M 2 CD = Qv at p...

Oliver-Labra, Pedro Aurelio

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ethylene from NGL feedstocks. Part 1-Trends favoring NGL feedstocks  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses current trends that are making natural gas liquids (NGL) more attractive feedstocks for olefin plants than mid-distillates and heavier oils. Two of the trends examined involve motor gasoline production: that the volume consumed is decreasing and the percent of unleaded gasoline is increasing. This means that it will be difficult to blend light straight-run gasoline, natural gasoline and aromatics plant raffinate into the gasoline pool, due to the very low octane of each material. It is indicated, however, that they will make excellent feedstocks for ethylene plants.

Zack, R.S.; Skamser, R.O.

1983-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Total Isomerization Process - A flexible alternative for meeting the lead phase-down  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The EPA has recently decided to reduce the maximum lead in gasoline to 0.1 gram per gallon by January 1, 1986. One of the most economical means of adding back the lost octane is to isomerize light straight run naphtha (LSR). Union Carbide Corporation's Total Isomerization Process (TIP) offers a quick, low-cost highly flexible approach to isomerization. During the past 15 years, refiners around the world have discovered numerous ways to adapt the rugged, halide-free TIP technologies to their particular needs. These many applications have permitted refining companies to install isomerization both quickly and inexpensively.

Holcombe, T.C.; Mackler, S.E.; Sager, T.C.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Combination process for upgrading naphtha  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A straight-run naphtha is fractionated at about 66/sup 0/C, which is just below the boiling point of methylcyclopentane. The 66/sup 0/C+ fraction is reformed, and at least a portion of the reformate combined with the 66/sup 0/C- fraction and reacted under aromatization conditions over a zsm-5-type catalyst to form a C5+ product rich in aromatics. The C5+ aromaticized product and the remaining reformate can be either sent for BTx recovery or used as a high-octane component of a gasoline blending pool.

Hughes, T.R.; Miller, S.J.

1980-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

EFRCs Science Highlights  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

highlights/ The Office of Science is the highlights/ The Office of Science is the single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, providing more than 40 percent of total funding for this vital area of national importance. It oversees - and is the principal federal funding agency of - the Nation's research programs in high-energy physics, nuclear physics, and fusion energy sciences. en {F258B204-092C-455E-8B98-75B03053E1E3}http://science.energy.gov/bes/highlights/2013/bes-2013-07-a/ Fewer Steps to Higher Octane Gasoline in Petroleum Refining A novel metal-organic framework (MOF) efficiently separates higher octane

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Motor gasolines, winter 1979-1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical data for 1857 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 48 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report shows marketing areas districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1949. Twelve octane distribution percent charts for areas, 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded, regular, and premium grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index ((R+M)/2) averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.9, 92.1, 89.0, and 93.3 unleaded below 90.0, unleaded 90.0 and above, regular, and premium grades of gasolines, respectively.

Shelton, E.M.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Motor gasolines, summer 1980  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical data for 2062 samples of motor gasoline were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 48 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1949. Twelve octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded, regular, and premium grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The anitknock (octane) index ((R + M)/2) averages of gasolines sold in this country were 87.8 for the unleaded below 90.0, 91.6 for the unleaded 90.0 and above, 88.9 for the regular, and 92.8 for the premium grades of gasoline.

Shelton, E.M.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Motor gasolines, Winter 1980-81  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical data for 546 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 23 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1959. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.6 unleaded below 90.0, 91.4 unleaded 90.0 and above, 89.1 leaded below 93.0, and 93.3 leaded 93.0 and above grades of gasoline.

Shelton, E.M.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Motor gasolines, Summer 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The samples were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The analytical data for 796 samples of motor gasoline, were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). They represent the products of 22 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1959. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R + M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.3 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, 89.0 for leaded below 93.0, and no data in this report for 93.0 and above grades of leaded gasoline.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Fiftieth CCR reformer goes on stream in Germany  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The fiftieth continuous catalytic reformer built since this technology was introduced by UOP Process Division in 1971 has gone on stream in West Germany. The 21,300-b/sd unit is in Deutsche Shell AG's Godorf refinery. It is the sixth such unit put in service by Shell International. Others are in refineries at Harburg, West Germany; Shellhaven, England; Palau Bokum, Singapore; Pernis, Netherlands; and Geelong, Australia. CCR units operate at much higher severity than older reforming units. Severity is a function of higher octane, lower pressure, and feedstock. The operating severity or catalyst deactivation rate may be 20 times that of high pressure, low octane units. Continuous catalyst regeneration is then the key for maintaining long-term operations at steady state conditions. To facilitate continuous catalyst regeneration, the three reactors are stacked. This design permits the catalyst to move in essentially plug flow through the reactors at a rate determined by the rate of catalyst withdrawal to the regeneration section.

Not Available

1985-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

287

DME-to-oxygenates process studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The feasibility of the production of hydrocarbons from dimethyl ether (DNM) has been illustrated in a fixed bed micro-reactor as well as a bench scale fluidized bed reactor by the University of Akron/EPRI DME-to-Hydrocarbon (DTG) Process. The DTG process has distinct advantages over its methanol based counterpart. Specifically, the DTG process excels in the area of higher productivity, higher per-pass conversion, and lower heat duties than the MTG process. Also of special importance is the production of oxygenates -- including MTBE, ETBE, and TAME. DME may be reacted with isobutylene to produce a mixture of MTBE and ETBE. The properties of ETBE excel over MTBE in the areas of lower RVP and higher RON. According to industrial reports, MTBE is the fastest growing chemical (1992 US capacity 135,350 BPD, with expected growth of 34%/year to 1997). Also, recent renewed interest as an octane-enhancer and as a source of oxygen has spurred a growing interest in nonrefinery synthesis routes to ETBE. TAME, with its lower RVP and higher RON has proven useful as a gasoline blending agent and octane enhancer and may also be produced directly from DME. DME, therefore, serves as a valuable feedstock in the conversion of may oxygenates with wide-scale industrial importance. It should be also noted that the interest in the utilization of DME as process feedstock is based on the favorable process economics of EPRI/UA`s liquid phase DME process.

Tartamella, T.L.; Sardesai, A.; Lee, S. [Univ. of Akron, OH (United States); Kulik, C.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Production of synthetic gasoline and diesel fuel from nonpetroleum resources  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In late 1985, the New Zealand Gas-to-Gasoline Complex was successfully streamed producing high octane gasoline from natural gas. The heart of this complex is the Mobil fixed-bed Methanol-to-Gasoline (MTG) section which represents one of several newly developed technologies for production of synthetic gasoline and diesel fuels. All of these technologies are based on production of methanol by conventional technology, followed by conversion of the methanol to transportation fuel. The fixed-bed (MTG) process has been developed and commercialized. The fluid-bed version of the MTG process, which is now also available for commercial license, has a higher thermal efficiency and possesses substantial yield and octane number advantages over the fixed-bed. Successful scale-up was completed in 1984 in a 100 BPD semi-works plant in Wesseling, Federal Republic of Germany. The project was funded jointly by the U.S. and German governments and by the industrial participants: Mobil, Union Rheinsche Braunkohlen Kraftstoff, AG; and Uhde, GmbH. This fluid-bed MTG project was extended recently to demonstrate a related fluid-bed process for selective conversion of methanol to olefins (MTO). The MTO process can be combined with Mobil's commercially available olefins conversion process (Mobil-Olefins-to-Gasoline-and-Distillate, MOGD) for coproduction of high quality gasoline and distillate via methanol. This MTO process was also successfully demonstrated at the Wesseling semiworks with this project being completed in late 1985.

Tabak, S.A.; Avidan, A.A.; Krambeck, F.J.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

In-Cylinder Reaction Chemistry and Kinetics During Negative Valve Overlap Fuel Injection Under Low-Oxygen Conditions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fuel injection into the negative valve overlap (NVO) period is a common method for controlling combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as well as other forms of advanced combustion. During this event, at least a portion of the fuel hydrocarbons can be converted to products containing significant levels of H2 and CO, as well as other short chain hydrocarbons by means of thermal cracking, water-gas shift, and partial oxidation reactions, depending on the availability of oxygen and the time-temperature-pressure history. The resulting products alter the autoignition properties of the combined fuel mixture for HCCI. Fuel-rich chemistry in a partial oxidation environment is also relevant to other high efficiency engine concepts (e.g., the dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept from SWRI). In this study, we used a unique 6-stroke engine cycle to experimentally investigate the chemistry of a range of fuels injected during NVO under low oxygen conditions. Fuels investigated included iso-octane, iso-butanol, ethanol, and methanol. Products from NVO chemistry were highly dependent on fuel type and injection timing, with iso-octane producing less than 1.5% hydrogen and methanol producing more than 8%. We compare the experimental trends with CHEMKIN (single zone, 0-D model) predictions using multiple kinetic mechanisms available in the current literature. Our primary conclusion is that the kinetic mechanisms investigated are unable to accurately predict the magnitude and trends of major species we observed.

Kalaskar, Vickey B [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Splitter, Derek A [ORNL] [ORNL; Pihl, Josh A [ORNL] [ORNL; Gao, Zhiming [ORNL] [ORNL; Daw, C Stuart [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Three-stage autoignition of gasoline in an HCCI engine: An experimental and chemical kinetic modeling investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The alternative HCCI combustion mode presents a possible means for decreasing the pollution with respect to conventional gasoline or diesel engines, while maintaining the efficiency of a diesel engine or even increasing it. This paper investigates the possibility of using gasoline in an HCCI engine and analyzes the autoignition of gasoline in such an engine. The compression ratio that has been used is 13.5, keeping the inlet temperature at 70 C, varying the equivalence ratio from 0.3 to 0.54, and the EGR (represented by N{sub 2}) ratio from 0 to 37 vol%. For comparison, a PRF95 and a surrogate containing 11 vol% n-heptane, 59 vol% iso-octane, and 30 vol% toluene are used. A previously validated kinetic surrogate mechanism is used to analyze the experiments and to yield possible explanations to kinetic phenomena. From this work, it seems quite possible to use the high octane-rated gasoline for autoignition purposes, even under lean inlet conditions. Furthermore, it appeared that gasoline and its surrogate, unlike PRF95, show a three-stage autoignition. Since the PRF95 does not contain toluene, it is suggested by the kinetic mechanism that the benzyl radical, issued from toluene, causes this so-defined ''obstructed preignition'' and delaying thereby the final ignition for gasoline and its surrogate. The results of the kinetic mechanism supporting this explanation are shown in this paper. (author)

Machrafi, Hatim; Cavadias, Simeon [UPMC Universite Paris 06, LGPPTS, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris (France); UPMC Universite Paris 06, Institut Jean Le Rond D'Alembert (France)

2008-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

291

United Nations Environment Programme Feed | Open Energy Information  

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United Nations Environment Programme Feed United Nations Environment Programme Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

292

International Atomic Energy Agency Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Atomic Energy Agency Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

293

International Energy Agency Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

294

LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory LEDS Capacity Building and Training Inventory Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve LEDS Capacity Building and Training Activities and Resources Upcoming Capacity Building Events CLEAN shares capacity building activity information to encourage technical institutions to better coordinate efforts and avoid duplication of effort. If you are aware of an upcoming LEDS-related training or capacity building event please add it to the calendar below. Add Capacity Building or Training Event Webinars Title Developer Biopower Tool Webinar National Renewable Energy Laboratory United States Department of Energy Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) CESC-Webinar: Building an Innovation and Entrepreneurship Driven Economy: How Policies Can Foster Risk Capital Investment in Renewable Energy Clean Energy Solutions Center

295

ClimateWorks Feed | Open Energy Information  

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ClimateWorks Feed ClimateWorks Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

296

Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 As-Built Report DISCLAIMER  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 Multi-Well Experiment MWX-3 As-Built Report DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Category No. UC-92a SAND84-7132 Unlimited Distribution Printed May 1984 MULTI-WELL EXPERIMENT MWX-3 AS-BUILT REPORT Contract Sponsor: SANDIA CORPORATION Division 6253 Albuquerque, N M 871 85 Multi-Well Experiment Project Contract Number: 6 1-3428 Prepared By: CER CORPORATION 2225 E. Flamingo Rd, Suite 300 Las Vegas, NV 89 109 February 1984 ABSTRACT The Multi-Well Experiment, sponsored by the Department o f Energy, has two overall objectives: (1) characterize low-permeability lenticular gas sands and (2) develop and evaluate technology for the production of natural gas from them. The third well o

297

Institute of Development Studies Feed | Open Energy Information  

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Institute of Development Studies Feed Institute of Development Studies Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

298

OpenEI International Sponsors and Partners | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

International Sponsors and Partners International Sponsors and Partners Jump to: navigation, search Overview OpenEI partners with a variety of international organizations to enhance its content, services and data offerings. Additionally, some partners share data bi-directionally with OpenEI. Below is a list of OpenEI sponsor organizations, partnerships and notable data consumers. Sponsors Department of Energy National Renewable Energy Laboratory Reegle logo.png Partners REEEP-big.png Reegle logo.png Illinois State University Logo.png UNEP.JPG CDKN.png Clean energy ministerial logo.png IRENA logo trans.png CER.png Cesc logo.gif ArgonneNationalLaboratory logo.png OakRidgeNationalLaboratory logo.png ISGAN logo.png Notable data consumers Beopt logo with text.png Sam screenshot.jpg Should your organization or application be listed in any of these sections?

299

Research Centre for Sustainable Development (RCSD), Chinese Academy of  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

300

Tecmed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tecmed Tecmed Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Tecmed Name Tecmed Place Hermosillo, Mexico Zip 83210 Sector Biomass Product CER Website http://www.tecmedmx.com/ Coordinates 29.0891857°, -110.9613299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":29.0891857,"lon":-110.9613299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Topics: Resource assessment Resource Type: Maps, Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials Website: en.openei.org/wiki/GsT Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/geospatial-toolkit-gst Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Technical Assistance References: Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar[1] Logo: Geospatial Toolkit (GsT) Webinar This webinar provides an overview, and also demonstrates usage of the Geospatial Toolkit. Webinar Video

302

International Institute for Sustainable Development Feed | Open Energy  

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Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

303

Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed | Open Energy Information  

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Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

304

Information for Development Program (infoDev) Feed | Open Energy  

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for Development Program (infoDev) Feed for Development Program (infoDev) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

305

Unendo Energia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Unendo Energia Unendo Energia Jump to: navigation, search Name Unendo Energia Place Milano, Italy Zip 20152 Sector Biomass, Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product Milano-based developer of clean energy projects within the wind, solar, biomass, CERS, and small hydro sectors. Coordinates 45.468945°, 9.18103° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.468945,"lon":9.18103,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

306

Third Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed | Open Energy Information  

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Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed Generation Environmentalism (E3G) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

307

Kumasi Institute of Technology and Environment Feed | Open Energy  

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Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

308

Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Wind Topics: Implementation, Policies/deployment programs Resource Type: Webinar References: WPA[1] Logo: Wind Powering America: Opportunities from Chile and the Region This webinar provides an overview of the Department of Energy's Wind Powering America program, key program areas, and success stories that might be of interest to policy makers and stakeholders interested in adapting this program for Chile and other countries in Latin America. Watch Click here to view this webinar

309

u.s. DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY DEP_~nIENT OF ENERGY EERE PROJECT MAN AGEMENT CENTER NFPA DETERMINATION RECIPIENT:SarTec Corporation Page I of2 STATE: MN PROJECf TITLE : Use of Inedible Energy Crops for Production of Advanced Bioruels with the Mcgyan Process Funding Opportunity Announcement Number Procuremenllnstrument Number NEPA Control Number em NumbeT DE-FOA-000380 DE-EEOOO3127 GF()"()()()3127 -001 EE3127 Based on my review oftbe information concerning the proposed action, as NEPA Compliance Off'tCer (authorized under DOE Order 4SI.IA), I han made the following determination: ex, EA, [IS APPENDIX AND NUMBER: Description: B3.8 Outdoor ecological and other environmental research (including siting , oonstruction , and operation of a small-scale laboratory building or renovation of a room in an existing building for sample analysis) in a small area (generally less

310

Biopower Tool Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biopower Tool Webinar Biopower Tool Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biopower Tool Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biofuels Resource Type: Maps, Training materials, Webinar References: Biopower Tool Webinar[1] Logo: Biopower Tool Webinar This webinar demonstrates uses for the Bio-power Tool, an interactive geospatial application allowing users to view biomass resources, infrastructure, and other relevant information, as well as query the data and conduct initial screening analyses. Webinar Video BATscreen.JPG Presentation Biopower Assessment Tool Presentation Announcement Wednesday, December 1, 2010 12-1 p.m. Golden, CO

311

Action Memo for NSEP-TP-2007-1  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

EXEC-2007-009892 EXEC-2007-009892 September 7,2007 MEMORANDUM FOR THOMAS P. D'AGOSTINO UNDER SECRETARY FOR NUCLEAR SECUHTY CLARENCE H. ALBRIGHT, JR. UNDER SECRETARY OF ENERGY RAYMOND L. ORBACH UNDER SECRETARY FOR SCIENCE FROM: CER OFFICE OF SUBJECT: . ACTION: Technical Position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to Meet DOE Order 420. lB, Facility Safety ISSUE: The attached technical position on the Use of National Consensus and Building Codes to meet Department of Energy (DOE) Order 420.1B, Facility Safety, clarifies the use of national consensus and building codes consistent with the requirements of DOE 0 420.1B. BACKGROUND: The attached technical position was developed in response to line organization requests for clarification and it will be posted on the Office of

312

DOE_34181R06.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND RIVERTON DOME GAS EXPLORATION AND STIMULATION TECHNOLOGY DEMONSTRATION, WIND RIVER BASIN, WYOMING Final Technical Progress Report, Revised Reporting Period Start Date: October 1, 1997 Reporting Period End Date: March 5, 1999 Dr. Ronald C. Surdam Project Manager & Principal Investigator August 1999 D.O.E. Contract No. DE-FC26-97FT34181 Department of Energy Contracting Of cer: Ms. Mary Beth Pearse Institute for Energy Research Dr. Ronald Steel, Interim Director University of Wyoming Laramie, Wyoming 82071 iii Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government, nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or

313

1pagertmplt.qxd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Right: Images Right: Images from the stud- ies carried out on APS beam- line 2-ID-E. a) X-ray fluo- rescence maps of a cell trans- fected with "free" titanium oxide (Ti) crys- tals, showing that most of the Ti nanoparticles (green) are located outside the cells. b) X-ray fluorescence maps of a cell transfected with titanium oxide nanocomposites, showing introduction of the nanocompos- ites in the cell. Inset: The hard x- ray microscope at 2-ID-E. The specimen is located inside the orange enclosure. A novel, light-activated hybrid "nanodevice" composed of titani- um oxide nanocrystals and carefully selected segments of DNA could one day be used to target the defective genes that play a role in can- cer, neurological diseases, and other conditions. The work that has

314

rulison.cdr  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Rulison Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on the north flank of Battlement Mesa in western Colorado, about 12 miles southwest of the town of Rifle and 8 miles southeast of the town of Parachute. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8,426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas from the fine-grained, low-permeability sandstone of the Williams Fork Formation. This was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. Austral Oil Company of Houston, Texas, and the nuclear engineering firm CER Geonuclear Corporation of Las Vegas, Nevada, proposed the project. Those two firms and AEC jointly

315

EA-1622: Final Environmental Assessment | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

22: Final Environmental Assessment 22: Final Environmental Assessment EA-1622: Final Environmental Assessment Proposed Solar Technology Center Boulder City, Nevada The Department of Energy is proposing to provide funding to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Research Foundation to construct and operate the Solar Technology Center (STC) in collaboration with the UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER). The STC, hereinafter referred to as the Proposed Action, would operate for research and development, educational training, and as a center for renewable energy and conservation information. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Solar Technology Center Boulder City, Nevada, DOE/EA-1622, January 2009 More Documents & Publications EA-1622: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1960: Final Environmental Assessment

316

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

317

German Aerospace Center (DLR)Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

318

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER), United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar Resource Type: Software/modeling tools, Webinar, Training materials References: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model[1] Logo: Webinar-Terrestrial Solar Spectral Modeling for Renewable Energy: SMARTS Model Webinar Video SMARTSwebinar.JPG Announcement " Monday, December 6, 2010 11-12 a.m. Golden, CO 1-2 p.m., Washington, D.C. 3-4 p.m., Santiago, Chile

319

R U S O N PROJECT  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

R R U S O N PROJECT Austral (X1 Company 25-95 A Hasward u s o n Field Garfield County, Colorado .. 10 3/4" Caaing to 8701 Feet DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. Representatives Present During Operations Austral O i l Company AEC Continental. O i l C - C.E.R. Fenix & Scisson, Inc. Iamb, Inc. Dresser Atlas Representative Miles Reynolds U b e r t Veronie Alvin Toniette Don Dahle C. m m l e y R. Bmdahaw Francis West R. V. Quim D. Mitchell Carl Schwab larrg Meam & Crew R. Smith N. Pomerenke B. McDonald K. Daaldns W. Bains & Crew 28'' OPEN HOLE T O 37' POLYMER XP-20 SPERSENE WIRE LINE MEASUREMENTS WT. - 9.1 USING KELLY BUSHING AS VIS.- 68 ZERO REFERENCE. GROUND

320

I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Y ~L.ho-I . Y ~L.ho-I . I CLASSiFtCArlON CHANiED FAIJC-ABC-286 : This dooumetlt consists 0.f 3 pages E end p. t' &ures. No. a of &copies. a Seriee A. 7 Novembar 6, 1944 Subject: Visit to Fansteel Netallurgical Corporaticn, North Chicago, Novembar 4, 1944 - AwAlabilityof~lnmbium!kkl Chapin, Simmons end I discussed witb~. C. N. B&e (ResearchDirector) . end LIr. F.L.Hunter (Chief&ineer, TanteInmDivision) availability, purity, and @co of columbiwn,metel. columbium metal is of particular interest to the Project because tuballoy-columbium alloys containing about 4$ or more of columbium are remarkably corrosion resistant. An 'order has &ready been &.ced for 30 lbs. of columbium metal, end it is cerW that large qutnititicsof them&al willbeneededin order that

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

rulison.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on Rulison Site is located 8,154 feet above sea level on the north flank of Battlement Mesa in western Colorado, about 12 miles southwest of the town of Rifle and 8 miles southeast of the town of Parachute. On September 10, 1969, the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), detonated a 40-kiloton nuclear device 8,426 feet below the ground surface in an attempt to release commercially marketable quantities of natural gas from the fine-grained, low-permeability sandstone of the Williams Fork Formation. This was the second natural gas reservoir stimulation experiment in the Plowshare Program, which was designed to develop peaceful uses for nuclear energy. Austral Oil Company of Houston, Texas, and the nuclear engineering firm CER

322

Nevada's 1st congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1st congressional district: Energy Resources 1st congressional district: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. This page represents a congressional district in Nevada. US Recovery Act Smart Grid Projects in Nevada's 1st congressional district NV Energy, Inc. Smart Grid Project Registered Energy Companies in Nevada's 1st congressional district Algodyne Ethanol Energy Inc Bio Solutions Manufacturing Inc Innovative Energy Solutions Inc Li ion Motors Corp formerly EV Innovations Inc Merlin Contracting Power Efficiency Corporation PEFF Powered by Renewables formerly Nevada Wind Renewable Capital Renewable Energy Resources Inc Renewable Powertech Inc Sol-Up USA, LLC Summit Energy Ventures LLC UNLV Center for Energy Research CER

323

ENDA Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENDA Feed ENDA Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

324

Organization of American States (OAS) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Organization of American States (OAS) Feed Organization of American States (OAS) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

325

2008 ORAU/ORISE Bibliography  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

9-CM-0135 9-CM-0135 2008 Bibliography Prepared by ORAU Communications and Marketing P.O. Box 117, MS 44 Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831-0117 www.orau.org/about/pubs/ Contents Business Operations (BusOps)  Communications and Marketing (CM) 1 Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification (IEAV)  Survey Projects and Health Physics 1 National Security and Emergency Management Program (NSEMP)  Center for Human Reliability Studies (CHRS) 2 Occupational Exposure and Worker Health (OEWH)  Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) 2 3 Professional and Technical Training (PTT)  Medical Education and Outreach (MEO) 4 Radiation Emergency Medicine (REM)  Radiation Emergency Assistance Center/Training Site (REAC/TS)

326

Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

327

United Nations Industrial Development Organization Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

328

World Watch Institute Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Watch Institute Feed World Watch Institute Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

329

Latin America Energy Organization Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Latin America Energy Organization Feed Latin America Energy Organization Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

330

Newsletter7.09  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

and 4 packages should be submitted six and 4 packages should be submitted six weeks in advance. If these conditions above are not met, certifica- tion actions on those packages will not be con- sidered until the next Board meeting. Please communicate with your respective Program Secretarial Officer (PSO)-internal PMCDP point- of-contact to coordinate the necessary amount of time needed to develop and submit your package to ensure that certification actions will be conducted in a timely manner. * The CRB released a Policy Flash for this change which can be viewed at http:// management.energy.gov/1675.htm. * For additional information of the PMCDP cer- tification process, please contact your PSO-

331

Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed Environment and National Security at Scripps Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

332

Coalition for Rainforest Nations Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

333

BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

BioCF T3) BioCF T3) Jump to: navigation, search Name BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3) Agency/Company /Organization World Bank Sector Climate, Land Focus Area Renewable Energy, Agriculture, Biomass Topics Finance, Low emission development planning Website http://climate-l.iisd.org/news References BioCarbon Fund (BioCF T3)[1] "...the BioCF T3, focuses on reforestation and agriculture projects that facilitates decreased soil erosion and increased land fertility. In particular, the initiatives focus on agriculture directly and improving access to energy. They will facilitate the purchase of certified emission reductions (CERs) from various projects such as household biogas systems in Nepal, cook stoves in Africa, reforestation in the Democratic Republic of Congo, soil carbon in Kenya, and municipal solid waste in Uganda."

334

The Energy and Resources Institute (TERI) Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

335

United Nations Foundation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

336

Category:CLEAN Partner | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CLEAN Partner CLEAN Partner Jump to: navigation, search This page contains current Coordinated Low Emission Assistance Network (CLEAN) partners. Pages in category "CLEAN Partner" The following 44 pages are in this category, out of 44 total. C Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) D Deutsche Gesellschaft fĂĽr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH E Ecofys ECOWAS Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency (ECREEE) Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM)

337

Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

338

Savannah River National Laboratory Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Savannah River National Laboratory Feed Savannah River National Laboratory Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

339

NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT Management Review Team Conc~~rrence Sign-Off April 24,2001 ACTION: DRAFT ENVIRONMENT ASSESSMENT OF GROUND WATER COMPLIANCE ACTIVITIES AT THE URANIUM MILL TAILINGS SITE, SHIPROCK, NEW MEXICO ISSUE: DraR Environmental Assessment of Ground Water Compliance at the Uranium Mill Tailings Site, Shiprock, New Mexico, to the Navajo Nation, federal and tribal regulatoly agencies, and other interested stakeholders for review and comment. RECOMMENDATION: The Management Review Team and the DOE-AL NEPA Compliance Off~cer have determined that this E A meets the requirements of 10 CFR 1021 and implementing g u i d a n p q d is adequate for transmittal to the external stakeholders. DOE-GJO ~ocumen&ana~er ' D. Metzler WE-& NCO J. Robbins

340

International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de Energías Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

National Renewable Energy Laboratory Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Feed Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP) Information for Development Program (infoDev)

342

EA-1622: Finding of No Significant Impact | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

2: Finding of No Significant Impact 2: Finding of No Significant Impact EA-1622: Finding of No Significant Impact University of Nevada, Las Vegas Research Foundation Solar Technology Center The Department of Energy is proposing to provide funding to the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) Research Foundation to construct and operate the Solar Technology Center (STC) in collaboration with the UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER). The STC, hereinafter referred to as the Proposed Action, would operate for research and development, educational training, and as a center for renewable energy and conservation information. Environmental Assessment for the Proposed Solar Technology Center Boulder City, Nevada, DOE/EA-1622, January 2009, Finding of No Significant Impact More Documents & Publications

343

Examination of the recurrent species groups and abundances of the calanoid copepoda in the epipelagic waters of the Gulf of Mexico  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ger, ?r], '~?rg& 7-, ? i g&&11 ~ &vr&3 . ' . . c . 1 iii. . ' ) 7'iii !, r'. '7 rii "":" ':r 1'' 7 . . :i\\ of thc- r&) r?, &l'. icil r'&7 3D r)L o "ill 7 r, , c cs i 1 ) l, , oss 7 hi ' '. i. &" ')Oc p, 1) ': 7;- il) Dci ' r, 73 Ii" o i. t ci a..., altho . Bh due to t). e many seeminply cou d not be . -. . de wi'-h cer . .infy. &In press 6 Described in deta' -' by T. E(incllo ('n press n i ot?1 c, 0&di ?. &7 i. -&?fr) i"): c) cs ):. r&te&eci&xi&. i& d & r&&&rii-. a i&i 1' ilies ) ) ?1"-i...

Livingston, Gerald Parker

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

344

STAG UK Newsletter Issue 16  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

C' Few.,People H8d Gone :Before, I thought I hed it msde. Even allowed myself en hour for theh81f-hour journey to Beth's for my l'ift. And for once 811 went 'right . .. ' Into Beth' s gleeming white cer we piled, clutching our monies ~~d g60dies... simila,r events h8vE;prev;iousl,y done - m8ny, people heving tole8ve earl'y in order to c 8i{c'htr8in,s, c08ches, etc.. " S,~.A,G~ s~~es, ~ere ex~ellent, meking B fun-d~y into 8 profit~~l~ one as 'well. : We m8de 8 total of ?62; in' gr8'ti tude to ee...

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed The Children's Investment Fund Foundation Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

346

World Resources Institute Feed | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

World Resources Institute Feed World Resources Institute Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ) Global Village Energy Partnership (GVEP)

347

CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar CSP: Perspectives and Opportunities Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Concentrating Solar Power Overview Webinar Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy, Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) Sector: Energy Focus Area: Solar, - Concentrating Solar Power Resource Type: Webinar, Training materials Website: www.nrel.gov/csp/ References: Concentrating Solar Power Overview [1] Webinar Video Click here to watch the webinar https://mmancusa.webex.com/mmancusa/ldr.php?AT=pb&SP=MC&rID=42294577&rKey=2b8c3800c9c1c824 Presentation Speaker Biography Craig S. Turchi-Senior Engineer II Ph.D. Chemical Engineering, North Carolina State University B.S. Chemical Engineering, Texas A&M University

348

Regional Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed Centre for Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

349

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Project Rio Blanco - CO 0-09  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Project Rio Blanco - CO 0-09 Project Rio Blanco - CO 0-09 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Project Rio Blanco (CO.0-09) Eliminated from consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: None Location: ~ 52 miles north of Grand Junction, Co. , Rio Blanco County , Colorado CO.0-09-1 Evaluation Year: 1985 CO.0-09-1 Site Operations: The project was a cooperative research effort undertaken in 1973 between CER Geonuclear Corp, Continental Oil Co (Conoco), and the US Energy Research and Development Administration Nevada Operations Office (ERDA/NV) to assess the commercial feasibility of using nuclear explosives to recover natural gas from low permeability formations in the Rocky Mountains. CO.0-09-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Radiation levels below criteria CO.0-09-1

350

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency Partnership Feed Jump to: navigation, search Home | About | Inventory | Partnerships | Capacity Building | Webinars | Reports | Events | News | List Serve CLEAN Member Feeds Center for Environment and National Security at Scripps Centro de EnergĂ­as Renovables (CER) The Children's Investment Fund Foundation (CIFF) Climate and Development Knowledge Network (CDKN) Climate Technology Initiative (CTI) ClimateWorks Foundation Coalition for Rainforest Nations (CfRN) Ecofys Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) Energy Sector Management Assistance Program of the World Bank (ESMAP) Environment and Development Action in the Third World (ENDA-TM) German Aerospace Center (DLR) German Agency for International Cooperation (GIZ)

351

F O L E  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Box, z Box, z ,* 2-10-5 F O L ~ E @ \o d P!LC 5 Historical Information H. 1 General, . . . ' Book 1 : ; Economics of Nuclear Gas,. . Stimulation DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. ABSTRACT ECONOMICS O F NUCLEAR GAS STIMULATION G. W . F r a n k A u s t r a l Oil Company I n c o r p o r a t e d Houston, T e x a s H. F. Coffer CER Geonuclear C o r p o r a t i o n Las V e g a s , Nevada G. R . Luetkehans CER Geonuclear C o r p o r a t i o n Las V e g a s , Nevada Nuclear s t i m u l a t i o n of the M e s a v e r d e F o r m a t i o n i n t h e P i c e a n c e B a s i n a p - p e a r s to b e t h e only a v a i l a b l e method t h a t can r e l e a s e the contained gas economically. ' In the R u l i s o n F i e l d alone e s t i m a t e s show s i x t o eight t r i l - lion cubic f e e t of g a s m

352

Design and performance of atomizing nozzles for spray calcination of high-level wastes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A key aspect of high-level liquid-waste spray calcination is waste-feed atomization by using air atomizing nozzles. Atomization substantially increases the heat transfer area of the waste solution, which enhances rapid drying. Experience from the spray-calciner operations has demonstrated that nozzle flow conditions that produce 70-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required for small-scale spray calciners (drying capacity less than 80 L/h). For large-scale calciners (drying capacity greater than 300 L/h), nozzle flow conditions that produce 100-..mu.. median-volume-diameter or smaller spray droplets are required. Mass flow ratios of 0.2 to 0.4, depending on nozzle size, are required for proper operation of internal-mix atomizing nozzles. Both internal-mix and external-mix nozzles have been tested at PNL. Due to the lower airflow requirements and fewer large droplets produced, the internal-mix nozzle has been chosen for primary development in the spray calciner program at PNL. Several nozzle air-cap materials for internal-mix nozzles have been tested for wear resistance. Results show that nozzle air caps of stainless steel and Cer-vit (a machineable glass ceramic) are suceptible to rapid wear by abrasive slurries, whereas air caps of alumina and reaction-bonded silicon nitride show only slow wear. Longer-term testing is necessary to determine more accurately the actual frequency of nozzle replacement. Atomizing nozzle air caps of alumina are subject to fracture from thermal shock, whereas air caps of silicon nitride and Cer-vit are not. Fractured nozzles are held in place by the air-cap retaining ring and continue to atomize satisfactorily. Therefore, fractures caused by thermal shocking do not necessarily result in nozzle failure.

Miller, F.A.; Stout, L.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Research Institutions in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional Research Institutions in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district Massachusetts Technology Collaborative - Renewable Energy Trust Registered Energy Companies in Massachusetts's 3rd congressional district American Superconductor Corporation AMSC Aspen Aerogels Aspen Aerogels Inc Atmosclear Climate Club BiOctane Biomass Combustion Systems Inc Boston Power CTP Hydrogen CellTech Power Inc Conservation Services Group Evergreen Solar, Inc. Guardian Energy Management Solutions Hy9 Hy9 Corporation Mass Megawatts Wind Power Inc Massachusetts Electric Company Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust MRET Noresco LLC Northern Energy Services Inc Protonex Technology Corporation ThermoEnergy Corporation Trenergi Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Massachusetts%27s_3rd_congressional_district&oldid=193518

354

Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Propane Propane Transportation Fuel Basics - Propane July 30, 2013 - 4:31pm Addthis Photo of a man standing next to a propane fuel pump with a tank in the background. Propane, also known as liquefied petroleum gas (LPG or LP-gas), or autogas in Europe, is a high-energy alternative fuel. It has been used for decades to fuel light-duty and heavy-duty propane vehicles. Propane is a three-carbon alkane gas (C3H8). Stored under pressure inside a tank, propane turns into a colorless, odorless liquid. As pressure is released, the liquid propane vaporizes and turns into gas that is used for combustion. An odorant, ethyl mercaptan, is added for leak detection. Propane has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic and presents no threat to soil,

355

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

Renewable Fuels Renewable Fuels Mandate to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Fuels Mandate on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Fuels Mandate All gasoline sold in the state must be blended with 10% ethanol (E10). Gasoline with an octane rating of 91 or above is exempt from this mandate,

356

Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

P-Series to someone by P-Series to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: P-Series on AddThis.com... More in this section... Biobutanol Drop-In Biofuels Methanol P-Series Renewable Natural Gas xTL Fuels P-Series P-Series fuels are blends of natural gas liquids (pentanes plus), ethanol, and methyltetrahydrofuran (MeTHF), a biomass co-solvent. P-Series fuels are clear, colorless, 89-93 octane, liquid blends used either alone or mixed with gasoline in any proportion in flexible fuel vehicles. These fuels are

357

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Status and Impact of State MTBE Bans Background As a result of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (CAAA90), the year-round use of reformulated gasoline (RFG) has been required in cities with the worst smog problems since 1995 (Figure 1). One of the requirements of RFG specified by CAAA90 is a 2- percent oxygen requirement, which is met by blending "oxygenates," 1 including methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) and ethanol, into the gasoline. MTBE is the oxygenate used in almost all RFG outside of the Midwest. Ethanol is currently used in the Midwest as an oxygenate in RFG and as an octane booster and volume extender in conventional gasoline. Several years ago, MTBE was detected in water supplies scattered throughout the country, but predominantly in areas using RFG. MTBE from RFG was apparently

358

MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

MTBE, Oxygenates, and MTBE, Oxygenates, and Motor Gasoline Contents * Introduction * Federal gasoline product quality regulations * What are oxygenates? * Who gets gasoline with oxygenates? * Which areas get MTBE? * How much has been invested in MTBE production capacity? * What does new Ethanol capacity cost? * What would an MTBE ban cost? * On-line information resources * Endnotes * Summary of revisions to this analysis Introduction The blending of methyl tertiary butyl ether (MTBE) into motor gasoline has increased dramatically since it was first produced 20 years ago. MTBE usage grew in the early 1980's in response to octane demand resulting initially from the phaseout of lead from gasoline and later from rising demand for premium gasoline. The oxygenated gasoline program stimulated an

359

Table Definitions, Sources, and Explanatory Notes  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Processing of Fresh Feed Input Processing of Fresh Feed Input Definitions Key Terms Definition Barrel A unit of volume equal to 42 U.S. gallons. Catalytic Cracking The refining process of breaking down the larger, heavier, and more complex hydrocarbon molecules into simpler and lighter molecules. Catalytic cracking is accomplished by the use of a catalytic agent and is an effective process for increasing the yield of gasoline from crude oil. Catalytic cracking processes fresh feeds and recycled feeds. Catalytic Hydrocracking A refining process that uses hydrogen and catalysts with relatively low temperatures and high pressures for converting middle boiling or residual material to high-octane gasoline, reformer charge stock, jet fuel, and/or high grade fuel oil. The process uses one or more catalysts, depending upon product output, and can handle high sulfur feedstocks without prior desulfurization.

360

NREL: Energy Sciences - David K. Johnson  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

K. Johnson K. Johnson Senior Scientist Photo of David K. Johnson Phone: (303) 384-6263 Email: david.johnson@nrel.gov At NREL Since: 1982 David Johnson joined NREL in 1982. He has extensive knowledge and practical experience of electrochemistry, biomass composition and analysis, biomass pyrolysis oil fractionation and analysis, lignin chemistry, high-temperature and high-pressure lignin hydrotreating, supercritical fluid separations, and high-performance liquid and size exclusion chromatographies. He has guided research into conversion of lignin into high-octane gasoline blending components via based catalyzed depolymerization followed by catalytic hydrotreating. He has also led research into the effects of harvesting and storage on the composition of biomass feedstocks and the effect of these changes on the interaction

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361

Definition: Ethanol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ethanol Ethanol A colorless, flammable liquid produced by fermentation of sugars. While it is also the alcohol found in alcoholic beverages, it can be denatured for fuel use. Fuel ethanol is used principally for blending in low concentrations with motor gasoline as an oxygenate or octane enhancer. In high concentrations, it is used to fuel alternative-fuel vehicles specially designed for its use.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Ethanol fuel is ethanol (ethyl alcohol), the same type of alcohol found in alcoholic beverages. It is most often used as a motor fuel, mainly as a biofuel additive for gasoline. World ethanol production for transport fuel tripled between 2000 and 2007 from 17 billion to more than 52 billion liters. From 2007 to 2008, the share of ethanol in global gasoline type

362

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels (Redirected from - Biofuels) Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

363

NETL: Gasifipedia  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Gasification plant in Sasolburgh, South Africa Gasification plant in Sasolburgh, South Africa Sasol I Gasification plant in Sasolburgh, South Africa (source: Sasol) Post WWII Development Following World War II, many countries had access to large supplies of low-cost gasoline and diesel fuel resulting in a decreased role for gasification as a means of energy production. However, South Africa's political and geographic isolation led to the development of a large coal-to-liquid fuels industry. In 1950, the South African government sponsored the South African Coal, Oil and Gas Corporation Limited's (SASOL) construction of a gasification plant (SASOL I) which used both American and German processes to produce diesel fuel, medium octane gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas, and a number of chemicals. Following operational

364

Biofuel Basics | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics Biofuel Basics July 30, 2013 - 11:38am Addthis Text Version Photo of a woman in goggles handling a machine filled with biofuels. Biofuels are liquid or gaseous fuels produced from biomass. Most biofuels are used for transportation, but some are used as fuels to produce electricity. The expanded use of biofuels offers an array of benefits for our energy security, economic growth, and environment. Current biofuels research focuses on new forms of biofuels such as ethanol and biodiesel, and on biofuels conversion processes. Ethanol Ethanol-an alcohol-is made primarily from the starch in corn grain. It is most commonly used as an additive to petroleum-based fuels to reduce toxic air emissions and increase octane. Today, roughly half of the gasoline sold in the United States includes 5%-10% ethanol.

365

Apps for Vehicles: Why should I care what data is in my car and what can be  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Why should I care what data is in my car and what can be Why should I care what data is in my car and what can be done with this data (examples)? Home > Groups > Developer This question relates to energy hackathons and the OpenXC platform. More information at http://en.openei.org/wiki/Help:Energy_Hackathon_Resources Submitted by Rmckeel on 24 September, 2012 - 10:36 3 answers Points: 0 The goal of the Open Data initiative is to empower customers to use their data to their individual advantage. An eco-conscious individual may focus on data that reveals how driving patterns affect GHG emissions. Someone interested in vehicle performance may use it to compare engine operations given different oil weights or gasoline octane ratings to determine what engine inputs provide optimal performance. With the magnitude of data

366

Biofuels | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biofuels Biofuels Jump to: navigation, search Biofuels are a wide range of fuels which are in some way derived from biomass. The term covers solid biomass, liquid fuels and various biogases.[1] Biofuels are gaining increased public and scientific attention, driven by factors such as oil price spikes and the need for increased energy security. Bioethanol is an alcohol made by fermenting the sugar components of plant materials and it is made mostly from sugar and starch crops. With advanced technology being developed, cellulosic biomass, such as trees and grasses, are also used as feedstocks for ethanol production. Ethanol can be used as a fuel for vehicles in its pure form, but it is usually used as a gasoline additive to increase octane and improve vehicle emissions. Bioethanol is

367

New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Styrofoam cups are one of many Styrofoam cups are one of many products made from styrene monomer. Exelus Inc. (Livingston, NJ), established in 2000, develops and licenses "Cleaner-by- Design" chemical technologies to produce a vast array of products and materials used in consumer goods, transportation, and food processing. Currently, the company's principal process technologies are: ExSact - a refining technology that overcomes the environmental concerns, safety hazards and rising costs associated with conventional liquid acid technologies ExSyM - energy efficient, low cost SM production technology BTG - efficient, cost-effective conversion of biomass to clean, high-octane, gasoline-compatible fuel http://www.exelusinc.com/ New Process for Producing Styrene Cuts Costs, Saves Energy, and Reduces

368

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can Radiotracers currently produced at Brookhaven. Note that other radiotracers that are described in the literature can also be transferred to our laboratory. Molecular Target/use Radiotracer Name Structure Chemical Name Hexokinase/glucose metabolism, cancer, brain function 18 FDG 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose Dopamine D2/D3 receptors/addiction, psychiatric disorders [ 11 C]raclopride 3,5-dichloro-N-{[(2S)-1-ethylpyrrolidin- 2-yl]methyl}-2-hydroxy-6- [ 11 C]methoxybenzamide Dopamine transporters / cocaine pharmacokinetics, addiction, neurological disorders [ 11 C]cocaine methyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-s(benzoyloxy)- 8-[ 11 C]methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1] octane-2-carboxylate Blood flow/nicotine pharmacokinetics [ 11 C]nicotine 3-[(2S)-1-[ 11 C]methylpyrrolidin-2-

369

 

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

The City of Moline Public Works location has a 24 hour central fueling facility to provide fueling resources for the City's entire fleet of vehicles. This The City of Moline Public Works location has a 24 hour central fueling facility to provide fueling resources for the City's entire fleet of vehicles. This facility provides 100% of the fueling needs for the City of Moline. Available at this facility is 87 octane unleaded, E85 Ethanol and B20 Biodiesel. This facility never closes. Because of the constant flow of vehicles and equipment using the facility, lighting is a requirement from dusk until dawn. The light not only provides security for the employees using the facility, but also allows them the light necessary to use the dispensers and equipment. Currently there are 12 individual light fixtures that are equipped with 400 watt bulbs in each fixture. On an annual basis, these light are illuminated

370

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains hydrocarbons such as ethane and propane and other gases such as nitrogen,

371

CX-005266: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

6: Categorical Exclusion Determination 6: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005266: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Efficiency Retrofits CX(s) Applied: B2.5, B5.1 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Moline, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program. The City of Moline Public Works location has a 24 hour central fueling facility to provide fueling resources for the City's entire fleet of vehicles. This facility provides 100% of the fueling needs for the City of Moline. Available at this facility is 87 octane unleaded, E85 Ethanol, and B20 Biodiesel. This facility never closes. Because of the constant flow of vehicles and equipment using the facility, lighting is a requirement from dusk until dawn. The light not only provides security for the employees using the

372

CX-005265: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

5: Categorical Exclusion Determination 5: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-005265: Categorical Exclusion Determination Hybrid Vehicle Purchase Project CX(s) Applied: A1, B5.1 Date: 02/10/2011 Location(s): Moline, Illinois Office(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy The City of Moline has a practice of reassigning retired Police Cruisers to other non-pursuit assignments. These assignments can vary from administrative to transportation for inspectors. These units are exposed to constant stop and go driving as the result of the assignments. These units are also used almost exclusively in the city limits of Moline and rarely if ever leave the community. The vehicles are all equipped with a 4.6 liter engine. They are all currently operating on 87 octane, unleaded fuel. The model year of all these units to be replaced is 2005. In order to reduce

373

energy savings by the use of mtbe to replace alkylate in automotive gasolines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents data on the differences in energy consumption in the production of leaded and unleaded AI-93 gasolines with various blend components. The authors investigate as high-octane components certain products that are more effective in use and less energy-consuming in production in comparison with alkylate. In particular, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE) is discussed; it is not poisonous, it has a high heat of combustion, and it does not attack materials of construction. The addition of 11% MTBE to gasoline lowers the cold start temperature of engines by 10-12 degrees. Moreover, no adjustment of the carburetor is required for the changeover to gasoline with 11% MTBE.

Englin, B.A.; Emel'yanov, V.E.; Terent'ev, G.A.; Vinogradov, A.M.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Chapter 8 - Natural Gas  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Although natural gas is a nonrenewable resource, it is included for discussion because its sudden growth from fracking will impact the development and use of renewable fuels. Firms who are engaged in the development of processes that employ synthesis gas as an intermediate have concluded that the synthesis gas is more economically obtainable by steam reforming of natural gas than by gasification of waste cellulose. In some instances, firms have largely abandoned the effort to produce a renewable fuel as such, and in others firms are developing hybrid processes that employ natural gas in combination with a fermentation system. Moreover, natural gas itself is an attractive fuel for internal combustion engines since it can be the least expensive option on a cost per joule basis. It is also aided by its high octane number of 130.

Arthur M. Brownstein

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Fabrication and characterization of nanoclay composites using synthesized polymeric thiol surfactants assembled on gold nanoparticles  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In the present work, the nanoclay composites were fabricated using the synthesized poly 6-(3-aminophenoxy) hexane-1-thiol, poly 8-(3-aminophenoxy) octane-1-thiol and poly 10-(3-aminophenoxy) decane-1-thiol surfactants with gold nanoparticles. The polymeric thiol surfactants were first assembled on gold nanoparticles and then impregnated into the clay matrix. Different spectroscopic and microscopic techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and Transmission microscope (TEM) were used to characterize the fabricated nanoclay composites. The results showed that the polymeric thiol surfactants assembled on gold nanoparticles are located in the interlayer space of the clay mineral and affected the clay structure.

E.M.S. Azzam; S.M. Sayyah; A.S. Taha

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

Pawel, Steve [Oak Ridge National Laboratory; Moore, D. [USCAR

2013-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

378

Susceptibility of Aluminum Alloys to Corrosion in Simulated Fuel Blends Containing Ethanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined was accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

Thomson, Jeffery K [ORNL; Pawel, Steven J [ORNL; Wilson, Dane F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Integrated process offers lower gas-to-gasoline investment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many natural gas fields are in remote locations and of a size which cannot justify construction of a pipeline or liquified natural gas (LNG) plant. In these situations, the natural gas price can be low and the manufacture of gasoline an attractive alternative to producing ammonia or other petro-chemicals. Haldor Topsoe A/S has developed an integrated process scheme to convert natural-gas-derived synthesis gas to gasoline in a single loop. The process, Topsoe integrated gasoline synthesis (Tigas), incorporates Mobil's methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. The first step is a synthesis of oxygenates. The second step is the MTG process run at conditions selected to achieve optimum operation of the integrated loop. An industrial pilot plant has been in operation since January 1984. The plant has been running successfully, with long catalyst life, producing high-octane gasoline.

Topp-Jorgensen, J.; Rostrup-Nielsen, J.R.

1986-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

380

Autoignition of gasoline surrogates mixtures at intermediate temperatures and high pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ignition times were determined in high-pressure shock-tube experiments for various stoichiometric mixtures of two multicomponent model fuels in air for the validation of ignition delay simulations based on chemical kinetic models. The fuel blends were n-heptane (18%)/isooctane (62%)/ethanol (20%) by liquid volume (14.5%/44.5%/41% by mole fraction) and n-heptane (20%)/toluene (45%)/isooctane (25%)/diisobutylene (10%) by liquid volume (17.5%/55%/19.5%/8.0% by mole fraction). These fuels have octane numbers comparable to a standard European gasoline of 95 RON and 85 MON. The experimental conditions cover temperatures from 690 to 1200 K and pressures at 10, 30, and 50 bar. The obtained ignition time data are scaled with respect to pressure and compared to previous results reported in the literature. (author)

Fikri, M.; Herzler, J.; Starke, R.; Schulz, C.; Roth, P. [IVG, Universitaet Duisburg-Essen, D-47048 Duisburg (Germany); Kalghatgi, G.T. [Shell Global Solutions U.K., P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

The Development of a Detailed Chemical Kinetic Mechanism for Diisobutylene and Comparison to Shock Tube Ignition Times  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is much demand for chemical kinetic models to represent practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel and aviation fuel. These blended fuels contain hundreds of components whose identity and amounts are often unknown. A chemical kinetic mechanism that would represent the oxidation of all these species with accompanying chemical reactions is intractable with current computational capabilities, chemical knowledge and manpower resources. The use of surrogate fuels is an approach to make the development of chemical kinetic mechanisms for practical fuels tractable. A surrogate fuel model consists of a small number of fuel components that can be used to represent the practical fuel and still predict desired characteristics of the practical fuel. These desired fuel characteristics may include ignition behavior, burning velocity, fuel viscosity, fuel vaporization, and fuel emissions (carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, soot and nitric oxides). Gasoline consists of many different classes of hydrocarbons including n-alkanes, alkenes, iso-alkanes, cycloalkanes, cycloalkenes, and aromatics. One approach is to use a fuel surrogate that has a single component from each class of hydrocarbon in gasoline so that the unique molecular structure of each class is represented. This approach may lead to reliable predictions of many of the combustion properties of the practical fuel. In order to obtain a fuel surrogate mechanism, detailed chemical kinetic mechanisms must be developed for each component in the surrogate. In this study, a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is developed for diisobutylene, a fuel intended to represent alkenes in practical fuels such as gasoline, diesel, and aviation fuel. The fuel component diisobutylene usually consists of a mixture of two conjugate olefins of iso-octane: 1- or 2-pentene, 2,4,4-trimethyl. Diisobutylene has a similar molecular structure to iso-octane, so that its kinetics offers insight into the effect of including a double bond in the carbon skeletal structure of iso-octane. There are few previous studies on diisobutylene. Kaiser et al. [1] examined the exhaust emission from a production spark ignition engine with neat diisobutylene and with it mixed with gasoline. They found the exhaust emissions of diisobutylene to be similar to that of iso-octane. They saw a significant increase in the amount of 2-methyl-1,3-butadiene measured in the exhaust of the engine. They also found appreciable amount of propene in the exhaust, but could not explain the source of this product as they did others in terms of C-C bond beta scission of alkyl radicals. Risberg et al. [2] studied a number of fuel blends to evaluate their autoignition quality for use in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine, using diisobutylene to represent olefins in one of their test fuels. In this study, experiments on the shock tube ignition of both isomers of diisobutylene will be described. Then, the development of a detailed chemical kinetic mechanism for the two isomers of diisobutylene will be discussed.

Metcalfe, W; Curran, H J; Simmie, J M; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

382

Mild hydrocracking for middle distillate production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty years ago the first Unicracking plant was installed at Union Oil Company's Los Angeles Refinery. Since that time, 58 Unicracking plants have been installed, converted from other technologies, or are in engineering. The Unicracking process installed at Los Angeles Refinery was pioneering in a number of ways. In particular, it was the first hydrocracking process to use molecular sieve based catalysts. It was also the first hydrocracking process to use integral process technology, namely, the total hydrofined product from the hydrotreater passed without separation into the cracking reactor. The original process was primarily designed to produce high yields of high octane gasoline. Since that time, there have been many changes in the requirements of refinery upgrading units due to changes in and availability of feedstocks, and due to changing product distribution slates. In response to these changing objectives, many modifications have occurred in the Unicracking process and catalysts. Some of the process and catalyst innovations recently implemented are discussed in this paper.

Tippett, T.W.; Ward, J.W.

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Oxidation and stabilization of hydrocarbon fuels in contact with rock salt  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Underground storage is the most ecologically clean and economical method for extended storage of natural gas, crude oil, and petroleum products. Such storage reservoirs are created in stable rock (granites, gneisses, limestone, etc.), rock salt deposits, clays, abandoned mines, and permafrost formations. In this investigation of the influence of rock salt deposits on the oxidation of hydrocarbons (summer-grade straight-run diesel fuel L and automotive gasoline A-76 [unleaded, low-octane]), the authors carried out a kinetic study of hydroperoxide accumulation during the oxidation of these fuels after contact with a saturated solution of rock salt (brine). The experiments were performed in a bubbler-type unit with various ratios of brine to fuel.

Klinaeva, E.V.; Golubeva, I.A.; Tolstykh, L.I. [and others

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas Transportation Fuel Basics - Natural Gas July 30, 2013 - 4:40pm Addthis Only about one tenth of one percent of all of the natural gas in the United States is currently used for transportation fuel. About one third of the natural gas used in the United States goes to residential and commercial uses, one third to industrial uses, and one third to electric power production. Natural gas has a high octane rating and excellent properties for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. It is nontoxic, non-corrosive, and non-carcinogenic. It presents no threat to soil, surface water, or groundwater. Natural gas is a mixture of hydrocarbons, predominantly methane (CH4). As delivered through the nation's pipeline system, it also contains

385

LNG liquid-liquid immiscibility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although natural gas species rarely exhibit liquid-liquid immiscibility in binary systems, the presence of additional components can extend the domain of immiscibility in those few binary systems where it already exists or produce immiscibility in binary systems where it had not existed. If the solute has the proper molecular relation to the solvent mixture background, liquid-liquid-vapor (LLV) behavior will occur; such phenomena greatly complicate the design of LNG processing equipment. To aid LNG engineers, researchers mapped the thermodynamic behavior of four ternary LLV systems and examined the effects of the second solvents - ethane, propane, n-butane, and CO/sub 2/ - on the binary methane + n-octane system.

Luks, K.D.; Kohn, J.P.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Motor gasolines, winter 1981-1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical data for 905 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 30 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.4 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.7 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 88.9 for leaded below 93.0. Only one sample was reported as 93.0 for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above.

Shelton, E M

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Motor gasolines, winter 1982-83  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analytical data for 1330 samples of motor gasoline, were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The data were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). The samples represent the products of 28 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report, shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since winter 1959-1960 survey for the leaded gasolines, and since winter 1979-1980 survey for the unleaded gasolines. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R + M/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R + M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.3 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.5 for unleaded 90.0 and above, and 89.1 for leaded below 93.0, and no data was reported in this report for leaded gasolines with an antiknock index (R + M)/2 93.0 and above. 21 figures, 5 tables.

Shelton, E.M.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Motor gasolines, summer 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The samples were collected from service stations throughout the country and were analyzed in the laboratories of various refiners, motor manufacturers, and chemical companies. The analytical data for 715 samples of motor gasoline were submitted to the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center for study, necessary calculations, and compilation under a cooperative agreement between the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC) and the American Petroleum Institute (API). They represent the products of 33 companies, large and small, which manufacture and supply gasoline. These data are tabulated by groups according to brands (unlabeled) and grades for 17 marketing included in this report shows marketing districts into which the country is divided. A map included in this report shows marketing areas, districts and sampling locations. The report also includes charts indicating the trends of selected properties of motor fuels since 1959. Sixteen octane distribution percent charts for areas 1, 2, 3, and 4 for unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 90.0, unleaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 90.0 and above, leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 below 93.0, and leaded antiknock index (R+M)/2 93.0 and above grades of gasoline are presented in this report. The antiknock (octane) index (R+M)/2 averages of gasoline sold in this country were 87.4 for unleaded below 90.0, 91.3 for unleaded 90.0 and above, 89.0 for leaded below 93.0, and no data in this report for 93.0 and above grades of leaded gasoline.

Shelton, E.M.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Fluid-bed studies of olefin production from methanol  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With newly developed technology, conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons represents the final link in the production of premium transportation fuels from coal or natural gas. The methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process has been developed. The more readily scaled fixed-bed version is the heart of the New Zealand Gas-to-gasoline complex, which will produce 14,000 BPD high octane gasoline from 120 million SCFD gas. The fluid-bed version of the process, which is also available for commercial license, has a higher thermal efficiency and possesses substantial yield and octane advantages over the fixed-bed. Successful scale-up was completed in 1984 in a 100 BPD semi-works plant near Cologne, West Germany. The project funded jointly by the U.S. and German governments and an industrial consortium comprised of Mobil; Union Rheinsche Braunkohlen Kraftstoff, AG; and Uhde, GmbH. The 100 BPD MTG project was extended recently to demonstrate a related fluid bed process for selective conversion of methanol to light olefins (MTO). The products of the MTO reaction make an excellent feed to the commercially available Mobile-Olefins-to-Gasoline-and-Distillate process (MOGD) which selectively converts olefins to premium transportation fuels . A schematic of the combined processes is shown. Total liquid fuels production is typically greater than 90 wt% of hydrocarbon in the feed. Distillate/gasoline product ratios from the plant can be adjusted over a wide range to meet seasonal demands. This paper describes the initial scale-up of the MTO process from a micro-fluid-bed reactor (1-10 grams of catalyst) to a large pilot unit (10-25 kilograms of catalyst).

Socha, R.F.; Chang, C.D.; Gould, R.M.; Kane, S.E.; Avidan, A.A.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Chemical kinetic modeling of component mixtures relevant to gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detailed kinetic models of pyrolysis and combustion of hydrocarbon fuels are nowadays widely used in the design of internal combustion engines and these models are effectively applied to help meet the increasingly stringent environmental and energetic standards. In previous studies by the combustion community, such models not only contributed to the understanding of pure component combustion, but also provided a deeper insight into the combustion behavior of complex mixtures. One of the major challenges in this field is now the definition and the development of appropriate surrogate models able to mimic the actual features of real fuels. Real fuels are complex mixtures of thousands of hydrocarbon compounds including linear and branched paraffins, naphthenes, olefins and aromatics. Their behavior can be effectively reproduced by simpler fuel surrogates containing a limited number of components. Aside the most commonly used surrogates containing iso-octane and n-heptane only, the so called Primary Reference Fuels (PRF), new mixtures have recently been suggested to extend the reference components in surrogate mixtures to also include alkenes and aromatics. It is generally agreed that, including representative species for all the main classes of hydrocarbons which can be found in real fuels, it is possible to reproduce very effectively in a wide range of operating conditions not just the auto-ignition propensity of gasoline or Diesel fuels, but also their physical properties and their combustion residuals [1]. In this work, the combustion behavior of several components relevant to gasoline surrogate formulation is computationally examined. The attention is focused on the autoignition of iso-octane, hexene and their mixtures. Some important issues relevant to the experimental and modeling investigation of such fuels are discussed with the help of rapid compression machine data and calculations. Following the model validation, the behavior of mixtures is discussed on the basis of computational results.

Mehl, M; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Dooley, S; Westbrook, C K

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

391

DOE Project 18546, AOP Task 1.1, Fuel Effects on Advanced Combustion Engines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in 2011 was focused on diesel range fuels and diesel combustion and fuels evaluated in 2011 included a series of oxygenated biofuels fuels from University of Maine, oxygenated fuel compounds representing materials which could be made from sewage, oxygenated marine diesel fuels for low emissions, and a new series of FACE fuel surrogates and FACE fuels with detailed exhaust chemistry and particulate size measurements. Fuels obtained in late 2011, which will be evaluated in 2012, include a series of oil shale derived fuels from PNNL, green diesel fuel (hydrotreated vegetable oil) from UOP, University of Maine cellulosic biofuel (levulene), and pyrolysis derived fuels from UOP pyrolysis oil, upgraded at University of Georgia. We were able to demonstrate, through a project with University of Wisconsin, that a hybrid strategy for fuel surrogates provided both accurate and rapid CFD combustion modeling for diesel HCCI. In this strategy, high molecular weight compounds are used to more accurately represent physical processes and smaller molecular weight compounds are used for chemistry to speed chemical calculations. We conducted a small collaboration with sp3H, a French company developing an on-board fuel quality sensor based on near infrared analysis to determine how to use fuel property and chemistry information for engine control. We were able to show that selected outputs from the sensor correlated to both fuel properties and to engine performance. This collaboration leveraged our past statistical analysis work and further work will be done as opportunity permits. We conducted blending experiments to determine characteristics of ethanol blends based on the gasoline characteristics used for blending. Results indicate that much of the octane benefits gained by high level ethanol blending can be negated by use of low octane gasoline blend stocks, as allowed by ASTM D5798. This may limit ability to optimize engines for improved efficiency with ethanol fuels. Extensive data from current and previous years was leveraged into participation with several large proposal teams, as our fuels database covers a very wide range of conventional and emerging fuels and biofuels.

Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Part-load performance and emissions of a spark ignition engine fueled with RON95 and RON97 gasoline: Technical viewpoint on Malaysia’s fuel price debate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Due to world crude oil price hike in the recent years, many countries have experienced increase in gasoline price. In Malaysia, where gasoline are sold in two grades; RON95 and RON97, and fuel price are regulated by the government, gasoline price have been gradually increased since 2009. Price rise for RON97 is more significant. By 2014, its per liter price is 38% more than that of RON95. This has resulted in escalated dissatisfaction among the mass. People argued they were denied from using a better fuel (RON97). In order to evaluate the claim, there is a need to investigate engine response to these two gasoline grades. The effect of gasoline RON95 and RON97 on performance and exhaust emissions in spark ignition engine was investigated on a representative engine: 1.6L, 4-cylinder Mitsubishi 4G92 engine with CR 11:1. The engine was run at constant speed between 1500 and 3500 rpm with 500 rpm increment at various part-load conditions. The original engine ECU, a hydraulic dynamometer and control, a combustion analyzer and an exhaust gas analyzer were used to determine engine performance, cylinder pressure and emissions. Results showed that RON95 produced higher engine performance for all part-load conditions within the speed range. RON95 produced on average 4.4% higher brake torque, brake power, brake mean effective pressure as compared to RON97. The difference in engine performance was more significant at higher engine speed and loads. Cylinder pressure and ROHR were evaluated and correlated with engine output. With RON95, the engine produces 2.3% higher fuel conversion efficiency on average but RON97 was advantageous with 2.3% lower brake specific fuel consumption throughout all load condition. In terms of exhaust emissions, RON95 produced 7.7% lower \\{NOx\\} emission but higher CO2, CO and HC emissions by 7.9%, 36.9% and 20.3% respectively. Higher octane rating of gasoline may not necessarily beneficial on engine power, fuel economy and emissions of polluting gases. Even though there is some advantage using RON97 in terms of emission reduction of CO2, CO and HC, the 38% higher price and higher \\{NOx\\} emission is more expensive in the long run. Therefore using RON95 is economically better and environmentally friendlier. The findings provide some techno-economic evaluation on the fuel price debate that surround the Malaysia’s population in the recent years. The increased of fuel price may have limited their ability to use higher octane gasoline but it did not negatively affecting the users as they perceive.

Taib Iskandar Mohamad; Heoy Geok How

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

RNK Capital LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

RNK Capital LLC RNK Capital LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name RNK Capital LLC Place Wilmington, Delaware Zip 19808 Sector Renewable Energy Product RNK intends to invest money in the purchase of CERs to be delivered during the 2008-2012 commitment period under the Kyoto Protocol and the US domestic renewable energy market. Coordinates 42.866922°, -72.868494° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.866922,"lon":-72.868494,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

394

Project Rulison  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Rulison 1970 Environmerstal Surveillance Summary Report J - - Colorado Department of Health DIVISION OF OCCUPATIONAL AND RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. STATE OF COLORADO P R O J E C T R U L I S O N Environments 1 S u r v e i l l a n c e Summary R e p o r t C o l o r a d o D e p a r t m e n t o f H e a l t h D i v i s i o n o f O c c u p a t i o n a l and R a d i o l o g i c a l 3 e a l t h This page intentionally left blank FOREWORD Project Rulison is an experimental Plowshare project undertaken cooperatively by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and the Department of Interior for the government, and Austral Oil Company and CER Geo- nuclear Corporation for private industry. As required by law, the AEC

395

Regional  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

3 3 AÇORIANO ORIENTAL SEGUNDA-FEIRA, 5 DE MARÇO DE 2012 PUB Da Graciosa para a Índia graças à estação atmosférica Carlos está atualmente a trabalhar na estação atmosférica móvel instalada na Índia, a dois mil metros de altitude Estar no lugar certo na hora cer- ta pode mudar radicalmente a vida de uma pessoa. Foi isso que aconteceu ao graciosense Carlos Sousa, de 41 anos, que começou por ser trabalhador daconstrução civil antes de emigrar para os Es- tados Unidos da América. No regresso à sua ilha, foi ain- Começou na construção e foi emigrante nos EUA. Hoje trabalha com equipamento de ponta no estudo do clima RUI JORGE CABRAL rcabral@acorianooriental.pt da gerente de um restaurante e, graças aum encontro improvável, é hoje técnico das Estações de Me- dição da Radiação Atmosférica que os americanos têm espalha- das pelo mundo para estudar as alterações

396

101112-FINAL.indd  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Voice 918-595-6600 Fax 918-595-6656 www.swpa.gov The UPDATE is published by and for customers, retirees, and employees of Southwestern Power Administration like: Linda Mummey Realty Offi cer Tulsa, Oklahoma Special thanks to: Scott Carpenter Vicki Clarke Gary Cox Ruben Garcia Larry Harp William Hiller Beth Nielsen Kathy O'Neal Carrie Quick Angela Summer Mike Wech Jon Worthington U P DAT E S O U T H W E S T E R N P O W E R A D M I N I S T R A T I O N O C T O B E R - D E C E M B E R 2 0 0 8 Keystone Switchyard Switches Hands Keystone Dam Switchyard, located approximately 20 miles west of Southwestern's downtown Tulsa headquarters, became the fi rst switchyard to be transferred from the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Tulsa District (Corps) to Southwestern under a new Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) executed November 5, 2008.

397

Hope or Hype? What is Next for Biofuels? (LBNL Science at the Theater)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Science at the Theater: From the sun to your gas tank: A new breed of biofuels may help solve the global energy challenge and reduce the impact of fossil fuels on global warming. KTVU Channel 2 health and science editor John Fowler will moderate a panel of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory scientists who are developing ways to convert the solar energy stored in plants into liquid fuels. Jay Keasling is one of the foremost authorities in the ?eld of synthetic biology. He is applying this research toward the production of advanced carbon-neutral biofuels that can replace gasoline on a gallon-for-gallon basis. Keasling is Berkeley Labs Acting Deputy Director and the Chief Executive Of?cer of the U.S. Department of Energys Joint BioEnergy Institute. Jim Bristow is deputy director of programs for the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI), a national user facility in Walnut Creek, CA. He developed and implemented JGIs Community Sequencing Program, which provides large-scale DNA sequencing and analysis to advance genomics related to bioenergy and environmental characterization and cleanup. Susanna Green Tringe is a computational biologist with the U.S. Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute (JGI). She helped pioneer the ?eld of metagenomics, a new strategy for isolating, sequencing, and characterizing DNA extracted directly from environmental samples, such as the contents of the termite gut, which yielded enzymes responsible for breakdown of wood into fuel.

Keasling, Jay; Bristow, Jim; Tringe, Susannah Green

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education: A guide to record series supporting epidemiologic studies conducted for the Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This guide describes record series that pertain to epidemiologic and health-related studies at the Center for Epidemiologic Research (CER) of the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE). These records document the health and safety monitoring of employees and contract employees of the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, the Manhattan Engineer District (MED), the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), and the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project, HAI`s role in the project, the history of the DOE and its epidemiologic research program, and the history of the Oak Ridge Reservation and the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. It also furnishes information on the procedures that HAI sued to select, inventory, and describe pertinent records; the methodology used to produce the guide; the arrangement of the record series descriptions; the location of the records; and procedures for accessing records repositories.

NONE

1995-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

399

Western Gas Sands Project, status report, October-November-December 1981  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This WGSP Quarterly Report summarizes the progress of government-sponsored projects aimed at recovering gas from low permeability gas sands in the Western United States during October, November and December 1981. CK GeoEnergy released the final report for Development of Techniques for Optimizing Selection and Completion of Western Gas Sands. For CER's Reservoir Simulation Model Development, primary emphasis during the quarter was placed on extending the previous work to include effects of massive hydraulic fractures intersecting multiple lenses. During the quarter, the University of Oklahoma completed the two-dimensional reservoir simulator for BETC. A simplified two-dimensional hydraulic fracturing model is being developed by LLL. A major activity this quarter at Los Alamos was redesigning the NMR receiver system, making it capable of being repackaged for downhole use. Sandia summarizes the analysis of five saturated rock samples that were measured for dielectric constant. The drilling, coring, logging and casing of MWX-1 was accomplished this quarter; quality of output, mainly core, core data and logs, has been good.

Crawley, A.; Atkinson, C.H.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Western Gas Sands Subprogram. Status report, October-November-December 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The progress during October, November and December 1982 of government-sponsored projects to increase gas production from low permeability gas sands of the Western United States, is summarized in this edition of the Western Gas Sands Subprogram (WGSS) Quarterly Status Report. During the quarter, major changes were made in the management of the subprogram. Personnel in the Division of Petroleum Projects Management at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) assumed the role of management for the Western Gas Sands Subprogram that had been performed by the Bartlesville Energy Technology Center (BETC). BETC continued in-house research on the fluid and proppant problems of fracture conductivity, and management of the Multi-Well Experiment (MWX). Owing to economic constraints, all efforts at the Sandia National Laboratory that were not directly related to the performance of MWX were terminated. The projects at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the Los Alamos National Laboratory were reduced by approximately 50 percent. The efforts at the USGS were reduced by 70 percent. Significant progress was made in the MWX project. Both the Upper and Lower Cozzette zones were production tested. Interference tests run on the Upper Cozzette showed much higher in situ permeability than core and log analysis indicated. This higher permeability has been attributed to the natural fractures. The site was closed for the winter on December 22 and the test trailer moved to CER Corporation, Las Vegas, for maintenance and upgrading. 40 figures, 16 tables.

Crawley, A. (comp.)

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Detection of a Hypercharge Axion in ATLAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This Master of Science thesis treats the hypercharge axion, which is a hypothetical pseudo-scalar particle with electroweak interactions. First, the theoretical context and the motivations for this study are discussed. In short, the hypercharge axion is introduced to explain the dominance of matter over antimatter in the universe and the existence of large-scale magnetic fields. Second, the phenomenological properties are analyzed and the distinguishing marks are underlined. These are basically the products of photons and $Z^0$s with high transverse momenta and invariant mass equal to that of the axion. Third, the simulation is carried out with two photons producing the axion which decays into $Z^0$s and/or photons. The event simulation is run through the simulator ATLFAST of ATLAS (A Toroidal Large Hadron Collider ApparatuS) at CERN. Finally, the characteristics of the axion decay are analyzed and the criteria for detection are presented. A study of the background is also included. The result is that for cer...

Elfgren, E

402

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

403

YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, is a novel regulator of myoblast differentiation that interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Precisely controlled cellular differentiation is essential for the proper development of vertebrate embryo and deregulated differentiation is a major cause of many human congenital diseases as well as cancer. Msx1 is a member of the homeoprotein family implicated in these processes, which inhibits the differentiation of skeletal muscle and other cell types, presumably by regulating transcription of target genes through interaction with other cellular factors. We presently show that YB1/p32, a nuclear Y-box binding protein 1, interacts with Msx1 homeoprotein and functions as a regulator of C2C12 myoblast differentiation. We demonstrate that YB1/p32 functionally interacts with Msx1 through its N-terminal region and colocalizes with Msx1 at the nuclear periphery. Moreover, we find that YB1/p32 is competent for inhibition of C2C12 myoblast differentiation, which is correlated with its activity as a negative regulator of MyoD gene expression and binding to the MyoD core enhancer region (CER). Furthermore, YB1/p32 cooperates with Msx1 in transcriptional repression and knocking down the expression of endogenous YB1 attenuates the effects of Msx1. Taken together, our study has uncovered a new function of YB1/p32, a regulator of skeletal muscle differentiation.

Song, Young Joon [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Science, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon, Korea, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Science, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon, Korea, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hansol, E-mail: hlee@inha.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Science, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon, Korea, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Biological Sciences, College of Natural Science, Inha University, 253 Yonghyun-dong, Nam-Gu, Incheon, Korea, 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

An on sun parametric study of solar hydrogen production using WO{sub 3} photoanodes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The solar production of hydrogen using photoactive electrodes is a topic receiving much attention in recent years. The use of thin metal oxide films as photoanodes allows the water splitting reaction to occur at a much lower applied voltage than would be necessary with a straight electrolysis process. The University of Nevada Las Vegas in collaboration with the UK based firm Hydrogen Solar and funded by the United States Department of Energy, has developed a prototype of this type of cell using a WO{sub 3} photoanode. An on-sun test facility has been constructed by the UNLV Center for Energy Research (CER) where a study is being conducted with regard to the effects various design parameters on the rate of hydrogen evolution. Parameters being studied include electrolyte temperature, electrolyte flow rate, electrolyte resistivity, applied voltage, and membrane to electrode spacing. The data collected is used in a parametric study of the cell performance. The results of this study are then used to establish general trends as to the effects of these parameters on the performance of the cells outside of a laboratory environment. (author)

Halford, Christopher K. [UNLV Center for Energy Research, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, Las Vegas, NV 89154 (United States); Boehm, Robert F. [UNLV Center for Energy Research, 4505 S. Maryland Parkway, UNLV Box 454027, Las Vegas, NV 89154-4027 (United States)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

405

In-Situ Real Time Measurements of Molten Glass Properties, Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy Research Company (ERCo) of Staten Island, NY has developed a sensor capable of measuring in situ and in real time, both the elemental composition and the temperature of molten glass. A prototype sensor has been designed, constructed and tested in ERCo's laboratory. The sensor was used to collect atomic emission spectra from molten fiberglass via Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS). From these spectra, we were able to readily identify all elements of interest (B, Si, Ca, Fe, Mg, Na, Sr, Al). The high signal-to-background signals achieved suggest that data from the sensor can be used to determine elemental concentrations, either through calibration curves or using ERCo's calibrationless method. ERCo's technology fits in well with DOE's Glass Industry Technology Roadmap which emphasizes the need for accurate process and feedstock sensors. Listed first under technological barriers to increased production efficiency is the 'Inability to accurately measure and control the production process'. A large-scale glass melting furnace, developed by SenCer Inc. of Penn Yan, NY was installed in ERCo's laboratory to ensure that a large enough quantity of glass could be melted and held at temperature in the presence of the water-cooled laser sensor without solidifying the glass.

Robert De Saro; Joe Craparo

2007-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

406

Renova Energy Plc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Plc Energy Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name Renova Energy Plc Place London, United Kingdom Zip W1B 1PN Product Producer of ethanol used as a motor fuel that is blended with gasoline either as an additive to reduce exhaust emissions or as a lower cost high octane substitute. However, it went bankrupt in June 2008. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

407

Synthesis of higher alcohols from carbon monoxide and hydrogen in a slurry reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Higher, i.e. C{sub 2{sup +}}, alcohols are desired as gasoline additives, feedstocks for producing ethers and as alternative fuels for automobiles. In all cases, the backbone branching of an alcohol improves octane rating, which is essential for good engine performance. These types of branched, higher alcohols are the desired products for a process converting synthesis gas, a CO and H{sub 2} mixture, often generated from coal gasification. Based on this premise, promoted ZnCr oxide catalysts appear to be as one of the best avenues for further investigation. Once this investigation is complete, a natural extension is to replace the Cr in the ZnCr oxide catalyst with Mo and W, both in the same elemental triad with Cr. Mo has already been shown as an active HAS catalyst, both on a SiO{sub 2} support and in the MoS{sub 2} form. The three catalyst combinations, ZnMo, ZnW, and MnCr oxides will be tested in the stirred autoclave system. However, if none of the three indicate any comparable activity and/or selectivity toward higher alcohols as compared with other HAS catalysts, then an investigation of the effects of Cs promotion on the ZnCr oxide methanol catalysts will be executed.

McCutchen, M.S.

1992-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

408

Spin dynamics and spin counting in the 13C CP/MAS analysis of Argonne Premium coals  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The carbonyl-labelled compound, [3.2.1]bicyclo-4-pyrrolidino-N-methyl-octan-8-one triflate (13CO-123), has been used as an intensity standard for quantitative 13C cross-polarization magic angle spinning (CP/MAS) nuclear magnetic resonance (n.m.r.) analysis (including spin counting) of Argonne Premium coals. The cross-polarization time constants, TCH, and the rotating-frame proton spin-lattice relaxation times, T1?H, have been determined for each major 13C peak of each coal via a combination of variable contact-time and variable spin-lock experiments. Two or three components of rotating-frame 1H relaxation decay and two or three components of TCH behaviour have been observed for each major 13C peak of each coal. These data have been used to determine the number of carbon atoms detected in each coal; these values are in the range 77–87% of the amount of carbon known to be in each coal from elemental analysis data, except for Pocahontas No. 3, for which only 50% of the carbon was detected.

Antoni Jurkiewicz; Gary E. Maciel

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

In situ retorting or oil shale  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An improved method of in situ retorting of oil shale wherein a cavern of crushed shale is created within an oil shale deposit, preferably by igniting a powerful explosion within the oil shale deposit, thereby creating a localized area or cavern of rubblized oil shale. Combustion gases are injected into the bottom of this cavern and particulate material, preferably a cracking catalyst, is deposited into a void at the top of the cavern and allowed to trickle down and fill the voids in the rubblized cavern. The oil shale is ignited at the bottom of the cavern and a combustion zone proceeds upwardly while the particulate material is caused by gas flow to percolate downwardly. A fluidized bed of particulate material is thereby formed at the combustion zone providing a controlled, evelny advancing combustion zone. This, in turn, efficiently retorts oil shale, provides increased recovery of hydrocarbon while ismultaneously producing a catalytically cracked volatile, high octane gasoline exiting from the top of the retort.

Hettinger, W.P. Jr.

1984-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

410

Ignition of Isomers of Pentane: An Experimental and Kinetic Modeling Study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon ignition is an important element in many practical combustion systems, including internal combustion engines, detonations, pulse combustors, and flame initiation. The rapid compression machine (RCM) is used frequently to study the kinetics of hydrocarbon autoignition [e.g., 1-7], since the reactive gas temperatures and time histories are similar to those seen in automotive engines during Diesel ignition and end gas autoignition leading to engine knock in spark-ignition engines. The RCM provides a rich environment for study of the theory of hydrocarbon oxidation, including degenerate chain branching, alkylperoxy radical isomerization and effects of thermal feedback [8]. The literature of hydrocarbon oxidation studies in the RCM has been summarized recently [9,10], and many classes of fuels have been studied. Detailed kinetic modeling is another tool available to study hydrocarbon oxidation in the RCM [4,11]. The aim of the present work is to determine experimentally the influence of variations in fuel molecular structure on autoignition, and to use a kinetic model to understand the reasons for those variations. This study is unique in that while other studies have addressed variations in pressure and equivalence ratio on ignition [11], this work addresses effects of variations in fuel molecular structure for all of the isomers of a single fuel formula, pentane, in a RCM. The three isomers of pentane possess many of the structural elements that determine such autoignition characteristics as octane number and variability in cool flame production, so this study will benefit our efforts to describe these effects.

Ribaucour, M; Minetti, R; Sochet, L R; Curran, H J; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

2000-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

411

Duality of the Interfacial Thermal Conductance in Graphene-based Nanocomposites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The thermal conductance of graphene-matrix interfaces plays a key role in controlling the thermal transport properties of graphene-based nanocomposites. Using classical molecular dynamics simulations, we found that the interfacial thermal conductance depends strongly on the mode of heat transfer at the graphene-matrix interfaces: if heat enters graphene from one side of its basal plane and immediately leaves the graphene through the other side, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(across), is large; if heat enters graphene from both sides of its basal plane and leaves the graphene at a position far away on its basal plane, the corresponding interfacial thermal conductance, G(non-across), is small. For a single-layer graphene immersed in liquid octane, G(across) is ~150 MW/m2K while Gnon-across is ~5 MW/m2K. G(across) decreases with increasing multi-layer graphene thickness (i.e., number of layers in graphene) and approaches an asymptotic value of 100 MW/m2K for 7-layer graphenes. G(non-across) increases only marginally as the graphene sheet thickness increases. Such a duality of the interface thermal conductance for different probing methods and its dependence on graphene sheet thickness can be traced ultimately to the unique physical and chemical structure of graphene materials. The ramifications of these results in areas such as experimental measurement of thermal conductivity of graphene and the design of graphene-based thermal nanocomposites are discussed.

Liu, Ying [Clemson University] [Clemson University; Huang, Jingsong [ORNL] [ORNL; Yang, Bao [University of Maryland] [University of Maryland; Sumpter, Bobby G [ORNL] [ORNL; Qiao, Rui [Clemson University] [Clemson University

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Torque modelling for optimising fuel economy in variable compression engines  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fuel optimal control of a variable compression engine is studied and it is shown that a crucial component is the model for the engine torque. A model for the produced work that captures the important effects of ignition and compression ratio is proposed and investigated. The main task for the model is to be a mean for determining the fuel optimal control signals, for each requested engine torque and speed. The contribution is a model suitable for finding this optimal combination. This model consists of well-known components, and the novelty lies in the compilation and validation of the control-oriented efficiency model for a variable compression engine. The modelling and validation is performed on a multicylinder variable compression engine using two fuels with different octane rating. Despite the models simplicity, it describes the indicated work with good accuracy, and suits its purpose of finding optimal control signals. In the evaluation, it is shown that a fuel optimal controller based on the proposed model captures the optimal IMEP to within 1.2%. This corresponds to a loss in engine efficiency that is in the range of 0.5% units or less.

Ylva Nilsson; Lars Eriksson; Martin Gunnarsson

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

Hadder, G.R.

1998-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

Influence of the conditions of preparation on the catalytic properties of A1-pillared montmorillonites  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Pillared clays (PILC) are obtained by exchanging the original cations of a smectite by inorganic cationic polymers. The size of the pillaring species determines the porosity of the resulting material. Pore openings of 8-17 {angstrom} can me obtained with many cations, including A1, Zr, Cr, and Ti. The interest in PILC was heightened by the report that they are more active than Y zeolites for bulky molecules. Indeed, Lussier et al. observed good activity for cracking of heavy gas oil. Clays produced less gasoline than zeolites, but the octane number was higher. Occelli reports a gasoline yield comparable to that of zeolites using a lighter charge stock. The high selectivity for coke was attributed to iron impurities by Lussier et al., but Occelli found no influence of the iron content of the clay on the coke make. The thermal stability is apparently controlled by small details of the preparation, since clear differences appear between A1-PILC or Zr-PILC, according to the authors. We present here a synthesis concerning our work on preparation, characterization and testing of montmorillonites pillared by A1{sub 13} polymers, including the influence of particle size of the original clay on the properties of the resulting PILC.

Tichit, D.; Fajula, F.; Figueras, F.; Gueguen, C.; Bousquet, J. (CNRS ENSCM, Montpellier (France))

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

High-temperature iso-butene absorption diagnostic for shock tube kinetics using a pulsed quantum cascade laser near 11.3 ?m  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract A high-bandwidth absorption sensing technique for iso-butene (iC4H8) was developed to measure transient species concentration behind reflected shock waves for combustion kinetics studies. Direct measurements of iC4H8 were enabled by monitoring absorption in the infrared near 11.3 ?m using a novel pulsed external-cavity quantum cascade laser (ECQCL) with a repetition rate of 600 kHz. Optimal wavelength selection for high-temperature combustion gases was first determined by a spectral survey at 1000 K near the peak of the absorption band (878 cm?1 to 892 cm?1) using the ECQCL. Absorption cross section measurements of iC4H8 at 881.4 cm?1, the selected high-temperature wavelength, were then conducted from 800 K to 1800 K behind reflected shocks to characterize temperature dependence at modest pressures (4–8 atm). The species-specific technique was subsequently demonstrated by time-resolved (100 kHz) measurements of iso-butene decay during thermal decomposition (1280–1480 K). First-ever shock tube measurements of iC4H8 yields from iso-octane pyrolysis (1070–1300 K) were also produced, with a detection limit of ?100 ppm. Experimental results were compared to recent kinetic models to illustrate the potential of this diagnostic for analyzing combustion chemistry.

R.M. Spearrin; S. Li; D.F. Davidson; J.B. Jeffries; R.K. Hanson

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

ISOBUTANOL FROM SYNGAS IN A THREE PHASE SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With growing interest in oxygenates as octane booster for automotive fuels, various synthesis routes for these chemicals are being investigated. Among others, alternative routes to isobutene, the C4-components in MTBE-synthesis are under investigation. A promising path to isobutene is the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol with following dehydration (Fig. 1). As shown by thermodynamical studies, the heterogeneously catalyzed CO-hydrogenation to isobutanol is not expected to experience any thermodynamic constraints. However, heterogeneous hydrogenation of CO is a very exothermic process, a problem which can only be partly solved when being conducted in a plug flow reactor. When carried out in reaction vessels with moving catalyst bed (e.g. three phase stirred tank), heat transfer problems can be resolved, along with additional benefits connected with this reactor type. Several heterogeneous catalytic systems have been under investigation for their capability of isobutanol synthesis from syngas. Most promising catalysts for an active and selective isobutanol synthesis from CO are modified high temperature methanol catalysts.

Peter Tijrn

2002-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Improving Energy Efficiency and Enabling Water Recycle in Biorefineries Using Bioelectrochemical Cells.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Improving biofuel yield and water reuse are two important issues in further development of biorefineries. The total energy content of liquid fuels (including ethanol and hydrocarbon) produced from cellulosic biomass via biochemical or hybrid bio-thermochemical routes can vary from 49% to 70% of the biomass entering the biorefinery, on an energy basis. Use of boiler for combustion of residual organics and lignin results in significant energy and water losses. An alternate process to improve energy recovery from the residual organic streams is via use of bioelectrochemical systems such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs) microbial electrolysis cells (MECs). The potential advantages of this alternative scheme in a biorefinery include minimization of heat loss and generation of a higher value product, hydrogen. The need for 5-15 gallons of water per gallon of ethanol can be reduced significantly via recycle of water after MEC treatment. Removal of inhibitory byproducts such as furans, phenolics and acetate in MFC/MECs to generate energy, thus, has dual advantages including improvements in energy efficiency and ability to recycle water. Conversion of the sugar- and lignin- degradation products to hydrogen is synergistic with biorefinery hydrogen requirements for upgrading F-T liquids and other byproducts to high-octane fuels and/or high value products. Some of these products include sorbitol, succinic acid, furan and levulinate derivatives, glycols, polyols, 1,4-butenadiol, phenolics polymers, etc. Potential process alternatives utilizing MECs in biorefineries capable of improving energy efficiency by up to 30% are discussed.

Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Low temperature iron- and nickel-catalyzed reactions leading to coalbed gas formation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon hydrogenolysis and CO{sub 2} hydrogenation in the presence of Fe/SiO{sub 2} and Ni/SiO{sub 2} catalysts were evaluated as potential mechanisms contributing to natural gas formation in coalbeds. The hydrocarbons used as reactants in hydrogenolysis included butane, octane, 1-octene, and 1-dodecene. The reactions carried out in a laboratory batch reactor produced gas that contained methane concentrations greater than 90%, which resembles the composition of natural gas. Reaction temperatures were selected to resemble natural coalbed conditions. Evidence is presented to show that iron and nickel minerals, which can be present in coals at levels of 2,000 and 10 ppm, respectively, can become active under geologic conditions. The oxides (Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and NiO) used as precursors of the active catalysts (Fe and Ni metals) were reduced at 200 C under a hydrogen atmosphere. Moessbauer spectroscopy showed that ca. 6% of the iron oxide was converted to the metal; in the case of nickel, oxygen titration showed that the extent of reduction to the metal was ca. 29%. The resultant fractions of the active metals in coals are adequate to catalyze generation of appreciable amounts of methane over geologic time.

Medina, J.C.; Butala, S.J.; Bartholomew, C.H.; Lee, M.L.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

First methanol-to-gasoline plant nears startup in New Zealand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sometime during the summer 1985, New Zealand Synthetic Fuels Co. was scheduled to begin operating its new plant at Motunui, New Zealand. It marks the first commercial application of the Mobil methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process. Moreover, as the result of a modular approach directed by Bechtel Corp. personnel, the plant represents a major construction success. It is also the first example of a new technology that may seriously challenge traditional Fischer-Tropsch chemistry as a route to synthetic fuels and organic feedstocks. The MTG plant will produce 14,000 barrels per day of gasoline with an octane number rating of 92 to 94 (according to research results). This amount is about one third of present New Zealand demand. The gasoline will be made by catalytic conversion of methanol coming from two plants, each producing about 220 metric tons per day for the single-train MTG plant. The methanol, in turn, is derived from reforming of natural gas from offshore fields in the Tasman Sea.

Haggin, J.

1985-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

420

Extended end-point distillate fuels from shale oil by hydrotreating coupled with catalytic dewaxing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is generally accepted that shale oils derived by either surface or in situ retorting of western oil shale require relatively severe hydrotreatment as a consequence of their high oxygen, nitrogen and olefin contents. However, the hydrotreated syn crudes so produced typically possess pour points on the order of 20-30/sup 0/C which may require transport in heated pipelines. In addition distillates derived from the hydrotreated shale oil may also be unacceptable as jet and diesel fuels as a consequence of their poor low temperature fluidity characteristics. The authors report here a relatively simple process modification which overcomes these problems, i.e., addition of a shape-selective ZSM-5 dewaxing reactor in series with the conventional hydrotreating reactor. This process scheme is shown to be operative without interstage separation of light products from the hydrotreater including ammonia. Processing conditions for the dewaxing reactor are compatible with those of the hydrotreater. Surprisingly low levels of zeolite acidity are required for substantial pour point reduction. As a result of such processing, naphthas with octanes higher than those typically obtained by hydrocracking are produced in addition to a high yield of extended end point distillate which meets essentially all requirements for acceptable diesel fuel.

LaPierre, R.B.; Gorring, R.L.; Smith, R.L.

1986-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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421

Fluid catalytic cracking feed hydrotreatment and its severity impact on product yields and quality  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper investigates the effect of fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) feed hydrotreatment and its severity increase on product yields and quality obtained in a commercial and a laboratory MAT FCC units. The hydrotreatment of Ural heavy vacuum gas oil reduces not only sulfur, nitrogen, Conradson carbon and metals content in the FCC feed but also increases the mononuclear aromatic hydrocarbons content by 8% absolute at almost no change in the total aromatics content. Regardless of this 8% increase of the mononuclear aromatics in the hydrotreated FCC feed the conversion increase in both commercial and laboratory MAT units was only 2%. The severity increase in the FCC feed hydrotreater leads to a higher conversion in the FCC, higher hydrogen transfer rate that results in higher isobutane/butylenes ratio, lower gasoline olefins content, and higher gasoline motor octane number. The hydrotreatment of the Ural heavy vacuum gas oil exhibited the same changes in FCC catalyst selectivities: lower coke and LCO selectivities and higher gasoline selectivity in both commercial riser FCC unit that has between 2 and 3 s time on stream, and the fixed bed reactor MAT unit, that has 30 s time on stream.

Dicho S. Stratiev; Ivelina K. Shishkova; Dimitar S. Dobrev

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

EDS coal liquefaction process development: Phase V. Final technical progress report, Volume I  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

All objectives in the EDS Cooperative Agreement for Phases III-B through V have been achieved for the RCLU pilot plants. EDS operations have been successfully demonstrated in both the once-through and bottoms recycle modes for coals of rank ranging from bituminous to lignitic. An extensive data base detailing the effects of process variable changes on yields, conversions and product qualities for each coal has been established. Continuous bottoms recycle operations demonstrated increased overall conversion and improved product slate flexibility over once-through operations. The hydrodynamics of the liquefaction reactor in RCLU were characterized through tests using radioactive tracers in the gas and slurry phases. RCLU was shown to have longer liquid residence times than ECLP. Support work during ECLP operations contributed to resolving differences between ECLP conversions and product yields and those of the small pilot plants. Solvent hydrogenation studies during Phases IIIB-V of the EDS program focused on long term activity maintenance of the Ni-MO-10 catalyst. Process variable studies for solvents from various coals (bituminous, subbituminous, and lignitic), catalyst screening evaluations, and support of ECLP solvent hydrogenation operations. Product quality studies indicate that highly cyclic EDS naphthas represent unique and outstanding catalytic reforming feedstocks. High volumes of high octane motor gasoline blendstock are produced while liberating a considerable quantity of high purity hydrogen.

None

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Production of Mixed Alcohols from Bio-syngas over Mo-based Catalyst  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A series of Mo-based catalysts prepared by sol-gel method using citric acid as complexant were successfully applied in the high efficient production of mixed alcohols from bio-syngas derived from the biomass gasification. The Cu1Co1Fe1Mo1Zn0.5? 6%K catalyst exhibited a higher activity on the space-time yield of mixed alcohols compared with the other Mo-based catalysts. The carbon conversion significantly increases with rising temperature below 340 °C but the alcohol selectivity has an opposite trend. The maximum mixed alcohols yield derived from biomass gasification is 494.8 g/(kgcatal·h) with the C2+ (C2—C6 higher alcohols) alcohols of 80.4% under the tested conditions. The alcohol distributions are consistent with the Schulz-Flory plots except methanol. In the alcohols products the C2+ alcohols (higher alcohols) dominate with a weight ratio of 70%–85%. The Mo-based catalysts have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and N2 adsorption/desorption. The clean bio-fules of mixed alcohols derived from bio-syngas with higher octane values could be used as transportation fuels or petrol additives.

Song-bai Qiu; Wei-wei Huang; Yong Xu; Lu Liu; Quan-xin Li

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Selective hydrocracking of heavy straight run naphtha bottoms for T90 reduction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Refiners are being presented with a major challenge to meet proposed stringent specifications for reformulated gasoline to lower auto exhaustive emissions. Among the specifications proposed to be regulated by EPA, the T90 boiling point of gasoline is found to have a great influence on hydrocarbon emissions. T90 reduction of naphtha streams by hydrocracking has been identified as a processing scheme to upgrade the heavy naphtha fraction before blending with other refining streams. In this paper, a commercially available catalyst was evaluated for the T90 reduction of the heavy fraction of heavy straight run naphtha with an ASTM D-86 boiling range of 275-386F (HSRN). The catalyst was found to be effective in lowering the T90 of HSRN from 344F to 300F under reaction conditions of 2 LHSV/1000 psig/650 F or 4 LHSV/1000 psig/695 F. The product yield shift by hydrocracking was from C9-C11 hydrocarbons to C4-C6 components, particularly C4 and C5 isoparaffins. Both RON and MON of the liquid products were increased significantly from 36 and 42 up to 78 and 74, respectively. The increase of octane numbers is a function of hydrocracking severity. The liquid product yield was about 75 vol% with a T90 of 300F. The liquid product sulfur and nitrogen contents were less than 30 and 0.15 wppm, respectively.

Hsing, L.H.; Nelson, R.G. [Texaco Research and Development, Port Arthur, TX (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Forecast of U. S. Refinery Demand for NGL's (natural gas liquids) in 1978-1985  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A forecast of U.S. Refinery Demand for NGL's (Natural Gas Liquids) in 1978-1985 is based on a predicted 1.4%/yr decline in motor gasoline consumption from 7.4 to 6.7 million bbl/day (Mbd), including a 2.6%/yr reduction from 5.3 to 4.4 Mbd for automobiles and a 1.3%/yr growth from 2.1 to 2.3 Mbd for trucks, because of slow growth rates in the U.S. automobile fleet (1.1%/yr) and average annual miles driven (0.9%/yr), a 3.9%/yr growth in average mileage from 14.2 to 18.6 mpg, and diesel penetration to the automobile market which should increase from 0.3 to 3.3%. Leaded gasoline's share is expected to decline from 68% of the market (5.1 Mbd, including 0.8 Mbd leaded premium) to 24% (1.7 Mbd, leaded regular only), including a drop from 56 to 6% for automobiles and from approx. 100 to 60% for trucks. This will require increased production of clean-octane reformates and alkylates and reduce the need for straight-run gasolines, but because of the decline in the total gasoline demand, these changes should be minimal. Butane demand from outside-refinery production should decrease by 5-6%/yr, and natural gasoline will be consumed according to available production as an isopentane source.

Laskosky, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Fractionation of reformate: A new variant of gasoline production technology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Novo-Ufa Petroleum Refinery is the largest domestic producer of the unique high-octane unleaded automotive gasolines AI-93 and AI-95 and the aviation gasolines B-91/115 and B-92. The base component for these gasolines is obtained by catalytic reforming of wide-cut naphtha; this basic component is usually blended with certain other components that are expensive and in short supply: toluene, xylenes, and alkylate. For example, the unleaded gasoline AI-93 has been prepared by blending reformate, alkylate, and toluene in a 65:20:15 weight ratio; AI-95 gasoline by blending alkylate and xylenes in an 80:20 weight ratio; and B-91/115 gasoline by compounding a reformate obtained with light straight-run feed, plus alkylate and toluene, in a 55:35:10 weight ratio. Toluene and xylenes have been obtained by process schemes that include the following consecutive processes: redistillation of straight-run naphtha cuts to segregate the required narrow fraction; catalytic reforming (Platforming) of the narrow toluene-xylene straight-run fraction; azeotropic distillation of the reformate to recover toluene and xylenes. A new technology based on the use of reformate fractions is proposed.

Karakuts, V.N.; Tanatarov, M.A.; Telyashev, G.G. [and others

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Transportation fuels from synthetic gas  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Twenty-five experimental Fischer-Tropsch synthesis runs were made with 14 different catalysts or combinations of catalysts using a Berty reactor system. Two catalysts showed increased selectivity to transportation fuels compared to typical Fischer-Tropsch catalysts. With a catalyst consisting of 5 wt % ruthenium impregnated on a Y zeolite (run number 24), 63 to 70 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the gasoline boiling range. Using a 0.5 wt % ruthenium on alumina catalyst (run number 22), 64 to 78 wt % of the hydrocarbon product was in the diesel fuel boiling range. Not enough sample was produced to determine the octane number of the gasoline from run number 24, but it is probably somewhat better than typical Fischer-Tropsch gasoline (approx. 50) and less than unleaded gasoline (approx. 88). The diesel fuel produced in run number 22 consisted of mostly straight chained paraffins and should be an excellent transportation fuel without further refining. The yield of transportation fuels from biomass via gasification and the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis with the ruthenium catalysts identified in the previous paragraph is somewhat less, on a Btu basis, than methanol (via gasification) and wood oil (PERC and LBL processes) yields from biomass. However, the products of the F-T synthesis are higher quality transportation fuels. The yield of transportation fuels via the F-T synthesis is similar to the yield of gasoline via methanol synthesis and the Mobil MTG process.

Baker, E.G.; Cuello, R.

1981-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Legal Background  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Summary of Summary of Property Damage Complaints andlor Claims \ P R O J E C T R U L I S O N I - S U M M A R Y O F P R O P E R T Y D A M A G E C O M P L A I N T S A N D / O R C L A I M S AS OF MARCH 31, 1970 'E: The m a t e r i a l contained h e r e i n i s n o t t o be p u b l i c l y d i s t r i b u t e d w i t h o u t t h e p r i o r Office ( ~ E c ) , y o @ oplc-9 - Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 -- Prepared By: % & c n U a i l b 0. Brush Approved: Las Vegas Branch General Adjustment Bureau, Inc. P r o j e c t R u l i s o n Summary o f Property Damage Complaints and/or Claims DISTRIBUTION: H. E. G r i e r , President, CER Geonuclear Corp., Las Vegas, Nev. (4) G. W. Frank, A u s t r a l O i l Co., Houston, Texas (4) W. E. Ogle, LASL, Los Alamos, N. !4. (2) H. L. Reynolds, LRL, Livermore, C a l i f . ( 2 ) Fred Holzer/Gene C. Rizer, LRL, Livermore, C a l i f . ( 2 ) L l o v d A. Lee, J. A. Blume & Assoc.. San Francisco. C

429

TH?B?110?01: Informatics in Radiation Oncology  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Informatics covers not only the information technology (IT) and infrastructure required to support data collection and management but also the computer science concepts that turn data into knowledge. In radiation oncology medical physicists need to be familiar with the basic IT infrastructure that makes it possible to transfer and transform data through clinical processes that ultimately control radiation treatment delivery. The application of informatics continues with patient outcomes. Typically this happens through participation in national protocols (e.g. RTOG). While they provide a framework for evidence?based medicine the data are often limited to parameters that were designed to test a pre?defined hypothesis. As the ability to acquire and distribute data increases we may be able to adopt data mining approaches to discover knowledge even without asking specific questions. While simple database queries can efficiently provide statistical information (e.g. the NCI Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results SEER) data mining seeks hidden patterns through clustering classification regression and association. These principles can be applied to large volumes of concisely described data sets similar to what can be found in clinical trials. Researchers in radiation oncologyinformatics are developing the infrastructure to acquire large data sets. The Radiation Oncology Data Alliance (RODA) initiative aims to provide online aggregate de?identified data from participating users of the MOSAIQ EMR. Borrowing from the field of astronomy researchers from Johns Hopkins used the SkyServer framework to build the OncoSpace project. The NCI caBIG (Cancer Bioinformatics Grid) also provides infrastructure support. Data analytics have also been developing in parallel with researchers structuring the data collection phases to answer questions in Comparative Effectiveness Research (CER). While a majority of researchers look for links between treatment and outcome others have used informatics to improve not only the efficiency and business of providing care but also its quality and safety which ultimately affects outcome.

R Siochi

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

METC/3M Cooperative Agreement CRADA 94-024 high temperature high pressure filter materials exposure test program. Volume 1, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In conjunction with shakedown, operation, and desulfurization testing at the Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) 10 in. Fluid Bed Gasification and Cleanup facility, a series of tests was completed in cooperation with the Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M). This cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA) between METC and 3M was to evaluate exposure of 3M SICONEX{trademark} fiber-reinforced ceramic and NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabric materials to a gasifying environment at high temperatures (1000--1100{degree}F) and high pressure (300 psia). Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing Company (3M) provided two 60 mm I.D. {times} 0.5 m SICONEX{trademark} spools and one each of the NEXTEL{trademark} 312 and 550 ceramic fabrics for exposure to coal gas from the METC gasifier. METC installed the materials in a vessel existing in the METC Cleanup Facility and provided process data in exchange for ceramic filter and ash/char characterization. Details of the CRADA are found in CRADA 94-024. This report contains METC`s contribution to CRADA 94-024. Four gasifier runs were conducted over a five month period to accumulate 483 hours of operation. During this time, 2 LayCer{trademark} 70/3 filters were used for filtering the coal gas while the SICONEX{trademark} and NEXTEL{trademark} were exposed along side of the filters. During one 89 hour test, one Laycer{trademark} 70/3 candle was installed with a 3M ceramic composite filter. The face velocity through the candles was maintained nominally at 2.5 ft/min throughout the testing.

NONE

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Oxidation of automotive primary reference fuels at elevated pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Automotive engine knock limits the maximum operating compression ratio and ultimate thermodynamic efficiency of spark-ignition (SI) engines. In compression-ignition (CI) or diesel cycle engines, the premixed burn phase, which occurs shortly after injection, determines the time it takes for autoignition to occur. In order to improve engine efficiency and to recommend more efficient, cleaner-burning alternative fuels, they must understand the chemical kinetic processes that lead to autoignition in both SI and CI engines. These engines burn large molecular-weight blended fuels, a class to which the primary reference fuels (PRF) n-heptane and iso-octane belong. In this study, experiments were performed under engine like conditions in a high-pressure flow reactor using both the pure PRF fuels and their mixtures in the temperature range 550-880 K and 12.5 atm pressure. These experiments not only provide information on the reactivity of each fuel but also identify the major intermediate products formed during the oxidation process. A detailed chemical kinetic mechanism is used to simulate these experiments, and comparisons of experimentally measured and model predicted profiles for O{sub 2}, CO, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}O and temperature rise are presented. Intermediates identified in the flow reactor are compared with those present in the computations, and the kinetic pathways leading to their formation are discussed. In addition, autoignition delay times measured in a shock tube over the temperature range 690-1220 K and at 40 atm pressure were simulated. Good agreement between experiment and simulation was obtained for both the pure fuels and their mixtures. Finally, quantitative values of major intermediates measured in the exhaust gas of a cooperative fuels research engine operating under motored engine conditions are presented together with those predicted by the detailed model.

Callahan, C V; Curran, H J; Dryer, F L; Pitz, W J; Westbrook, C K

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Chemicals for enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly report, April 1, 1979-June 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-2-ethyloleate of higher purity has been prepared. The shift in alkane number of lowest interfacial tension with increasing surfactant concentration is no longer seen. Interfacial tensions in the millidyne/cm range are still observed, but the minimum for top vs bottom phases appears to be slightly above nonane for both 0.01 M and 0.05 M surfactant, 0.5 M NaCl and 5% ibutyl alcohol, pH 9.8, (the initial aqueous phase). Previously, the minima appeard to be about undecane for 0.01 M surfactant and about octane for 0.05 M. In direct sulfonation of oleamide with SO/sub 3/-tributylphosphate complex, an unsaturated sulfonated amide was obtained in yield greater than 90%. Addition of ethoxylated tall oils to petroleum sulfonates broadened the region of three phase behavior. No ultralow interfacial tensions have yet been observed with these mixtures, however. Further studies on the effect of bleach plant effluent from the draft process for pulping of wood in reducing the adsorption of petroleum sulfonates on montmorillonite and on Berea sandstone have clarified some earlier results. Displacment of previously adsorbed surfactant from clay be contact with solutions containing bleach plant effluent was confirmed. Batch bench scale tests of Sporotrichum dimorphosporum QM 806 exolaminarinase showed an improvement in the stability of enzyme activity on scleroglucan in the presence of 10 mM added magnesium. Activity variation with pH was different for scleroglucan and laminarin substrates, with activity maxima at pH3 and 5, respectively. Temperature maxima were above 70 C in both cases.

Compere, A.L.; Crenshaw, J.M.; Fowler, C.M.

1980-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Chemicals for enhanced oil recovery. Quarterly report, 1 July 1979-30 September 1979  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In work on biopolymers, emphasis was on methods of biomass separation from fermentation broth adaptable to field production. A microstrainer is a gravity filter screen mounted on a rotating drum, with feed introduced into the center. A microstrainer pilot unit was tested with the broth from two 300 liter batch fermentations. Screen apertures of 1, 6, and 21..mu..m were evaluated. Biopolymer appeared to pass through the screen in all cases, except for some rejection in a second-stage polishing with a 1..mu..m screen of 21..mu..m effluent. Removal of 80% or more of biomass was attained in most cases. Analysis of results of these runs is continuing, but it appears that microscreens can be useful as an element in biopolymer separation. The filtrate should be much more easily freed of plugging components, even if no suitable alternative to diatomaceous earth filtration is found. Modifications of spinning-drop equipment, particularly temperature control, and procedures have improved consistency of results. With better pH control by substitution of Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/-NaHCO/sub 3/ for part of the NaCl, the preferred alkane for minimum interfacial tension for systems containing sodium-2-ethyl oleate, 0.5 M Na/sup +/, 5% i-butyl alcohol (pH 9.8), and a hydrocarbon was octane, about one carbon number lower than reported last quarter. Results between heptane and decane were consistent with the triangular inequality rule for interfacial tensions.The increase in fraction of total volume in middle phases caused by substitution of ethoxylated tall oils for part of a petroleum sulfonate surfactant was confirmed. Preliminary conductivity measurements of solutions of sodium p(1-heptylnonyl)benzenesulfonate (Texas No. 1) at 45 C suggest a critical micelle concentration of about 7 x 10/sup -4/M.

Compere, A.L.; Crenshaw, J.M.; Greene, S.V.

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Study of the potential oxidative stress induced by six solvents in the rat brain  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The mechanisms of action involved in the neurotoxicity of solvents are poorly understood. In vitro studies have suggested that the effects of some solvents might be due to the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). This study assesses hydroxyl radical (OH) generation and measures malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in the cerebral tissue of rats exposed to six solvents (n-hexane, n-octane, toluene, n-butylbenzene, cyclohexane and 1,2,4-trimethylcyclohexane). Three of these solvents have been shown to generate ROS in studies carried out in vitro on granular cell cultures from rat cerebellum. We assessed OH production by quantifying the rate of formation of 3,4-dihydroxybenzoic acid using a trapping agent, 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, infused via the microdialysis probe, into the prefrontal cortex of rats exposed intraperitoneally to the solvents. Extracellular MDA was quantified in microdialysates collected from the prefrontal cortex of rats exposed, 6 h/day for ten days, to 1000 ppm of the solvents (except for n-butylbenzene, generated at 830 ppm) in inhalation chambers. Tissue levels of free and total MDA were measured in different brain structures for rats acutely (intraperitoneal route) and sub-acutely (inhalation) exposed to solvents. None of the six solvents studied increased the production of hydroxyl radicals in the prefrontal cortex after acute administration. Nor did they increase extracellular or tissue levels of MDA after 10 days’ inhalation exposure. On the other hand, a decrease in the concentrations of free MDA in brain structures was observed after acute administration of n-hexane, 1,2,4-trimethylcyclohexane, toluene and n-butylbenzene. Therefore, data of this study carried out in vivo did not confirm observations made in vitro on cell cultures.

Monique Chalansonnet; Nathalie Carabin; Stéphane Boucard; Frédéric Cosnier; Hervé Nunge; François Gagnaire

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

FT-IR study of third phase formation in the U(VI) or Th(IV)HNO{sub 3}, TBP/alkane systems.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The infrared reflectance spectra of the third phases formed in the systems UO{sub 2}(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}/HNO{sub 3}/20%TBP in n-dodecane and Th(NO{sub 3}){sub 4}/HNO{sub 3}/20%TBP in n-octane gave evidence for the presence in solution of a significant amount of weakly bonded molecular nitric acid. From the correlation between the ratio of the areas of the bands at 1672 cm-1 and 1648 cm-1, characteristic of weakly intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded nitric acid and nitric acid strongly bonded to TBP, respectively, the molecular HNO{sub 3} concentration was determined. The presence of these two bands in the spectra of the third phase samples provides evidence that only part of the HNO{sub 3} is directly and strongly bound to the TBP phosphoryl group. The ratio of the weakly intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded HNO3 to that bound directly to P=O group of TBP was much higher for the uranium than for the thorium third phases formed under comparable conditions. The estimated amounts of the weakly intermolecularly hydrogen-bonded HNO{sub 3} were about 47% and 30% of the total HNO{sub 3} present in the uranium and thorium systems, respectively. In the uranium third phase, the TBP hemisolvate of HNO{sub 3} (TBP{dot c}2HNO{sub 3}) was recognized as the predominant species with accompanying very small amount of monosolvate (TBP{dot c}HNO{sub 3}). In the thorium system the hemisolvate of HNO{sub 3} was also present, but the monosolvate was found to be the major species. When the thorium concentration in the third phase was increased, a conversion of monosolvate into hemisolvate was observed. Analysis of the infrared spectra for both systems indicated that the nitrate anions form bidentate chelates with the studied metals.

Borkowski, M.; Ferraro, J. R.; Chiarizia, R.; McAlister, D. R.; Chemistry; Loyola Univ.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Raman Scattering Sensor for Control of the Acid Alkylation Process in Gasoline Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline refineries utilize a process called acid alkylation to increase the octane rating of blended gasoline, and this is the single most expensive process in the refinery. For process efficiency and safety reasons, the sulfuric acid can only be used while it is in the concentration range of 98 to 86 %. The conventional technique to monitor the acid concentration is time consuming and is typically conducted only a few times per day. This results in running higher acid concentrations than they would like to ensure that the process proceeds uninterrupted. Maintaining an excessively high acid concentration costs the refineries millions of dollars each year. Using SBIR funding, Process Instruments Inc. has developed an inline sensor for real time monitoring of acid concentrations in gasoline refinery alkylation units. Real time data was then collected over time from the instrument and its responses were matched up with the laboratory analysis. A model was then developed to correlate the laboratory acid values to the Raman signal that is transmitted back to the instrument from the process stream. The instrument was then used to demonstrate that it could create real-time predictions of the acid concentrations. The results from this test showed that the instrument could accurately predict the acid concentrations to within ~0.15% acid strength, and this level of prediction proved to be similar or better then the laboratory analysis. By utilizing a sensor for process monitoring the most economic acid concentrations can be maintained. A single smaller refinery (50,000 barrels/day) estimates that they should save over $120,000/year, with larger refineries saving considerably more.

Uibel, Rory, H.; Smith, Lee M.; Benner, Robert, E.

2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

437

Dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene in a slurry reactor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The April 1990 Alternative Fuels Proposal to the Department of Energy involved the development of new technology, based on the liquid phase process, for conversion of coal-derived synthesis gas to oxygenated hydrocarbon fuels, fuel additives, and fuel intermediates. The objective of this work was to develop a slurry reactor based process for the dehydration of isobutanol to isobutene. The isobutene can serve as a feedstock for the high octane oxygenated fuel additive methyl tertiary-butyl either (MTBE). Alumina catalysts were investigated because of their wide use as a dehydration catalyst. Four commercially available alumina catalysts (Catapal B, Versal B, Versal GH, and Al-3996R) were evaluated for both activity and selectivity to the branched olefin. All four catalysts demonstrated conversions greater than 80% at 290 C, while conversions of near 100% could be obtained at 330 C. The reaction favors low pressures and moderate to low space velocities. A yield of 0.90 mole isobutene per mole reacted isobutanol or better was obtained at conversions of 60--70% and higher. From 75 to 98% conversion, the four catalysts all provide isobutene yields ranging from 0.92 to 0.94 with the maximum occurring around 90% conversion. At low conversions, the concentration of diisobutyl ether becomes significant while the concentration of linear butenes is essentially a linear function of isobutanol conversion. Doping the catalyst with up to 0.8 wt % potassium showed a modest increase in isobutene selectivity; however, this increase was more than offset by a reduction in activity. Investigations using a mixed alcohols feed (consistent with isobutanol synthesis from syngas) demonstrated a small increase in the C4 iso-olefin selectivity over that observed for a pure isobutanol feed. 55 refs.

Latshaw, B.E.

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H[sub 2] and CO, usually containing CO[sub 2]) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. (Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Status and future opportunities for conversion of synthesis gas to liquid energy fuels: Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The manufacture of liquid energy fuels from syngas (a mixture of H{sub 2} and CO, usually containing CO{sub 2}) is of growing importance and enormous potential because: (1) Abundant US supplies of coal, gas, and biomass can be used to provide the needed syngas. (2) The liquid fuels produced, oxygenates or hydrocarbons, can help lessen environmental pollution. Indeed, oxygenates are required to a significant extent by the Clean Air Act Amendments (CAAA) of 1990. (3) Such liquid synfuels make possible high engine efficiencies because they have high octane or cetane ratings. (4) There is new, significantly improved technology for converting syngas to liquid fuels and promising opportunities for further improvements. This is the subject of this report. The purpose of this report is to provide an account and evaluative assessment of advances in the technology for producing liquid energy fuels from syngas and to suggest opportunities for future research deemed promising for practical processes. Much of the improved technology for selective synthesis of desired fuels from syngas has resulted from advances in catalytic chemistry. However, novel process engineering has been particularly important recently, utilizing known catalysts in new configurations to create new catalytic processes. This report is an update of the 1988 study Catalysts for Fuels from Syngas: New Directions for Research (Mills 1988), which is included as Appendix A. Technology for manufacture of syngas is not part of this study. The manufacture of liquid synfuels is capital intensive. Thus, in evaluating advances in fuels technology, focus is on the potential for improved economics, particularly on lowering plant investment costs. A second important criteria is the potential for environmental benefits. The discussion is concerned with two types of hydrocarbon fuels and three types of oxygenate fuels that can be synthesized from syngas. Seven alternative reaction pathways are involved.

Mills, G. [Delaware Univ., Newark, DE (United States). Center for Catalytic Science and Technology

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Advanced thermally stable jet fuels. Technical progress report, April 1994--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research continued on coal-based, thermally stable, jet fuels. Significant progress has been made on the detection of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons present in highly stressed fuels, using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection. Gas chromatography is not able to detect compounds with {>=}6 fused aromatic rings, but such compounds can be identified using the HPLC method. The concentration of such compounds is low in comparison to aromatics of 1-3 rings, but the role of the large compounds in the formation of solid deposits may be crucial in determining the thermal stability of a fuel. The unusual properties of fluid fuels in the near-critical region appear to have significant effects on their thermal decomposition reactions. This issue has been investigated in the present reporting period using n-tetradecane as a model compound for fuel decomposition. Temperature-programmed retention indices are very useful for gas chromatographic and gas chromatography/mass spectrometric analysis of coal and petroleum derived jet fuels. We have demonstrated this in the identification of components in two JP-8 fuels and their liquid chromatographic fractions. The role of activated carbon surfaces as catalysts in the thermal stressing of jet fuel was investigated using n-dodecane and n-octane as model compounds. In some cases the reactions were spiked with addition of 5% decalin to test the ability of the carbon to catalyze the transformation of decalin to naphthalene. We have previously shown that benzyl alcohol and 1,4-benzenedimethanol are effective stabilizers at temperatures {>=}400{degrees}C for jet fuels and the model compound dodecane. The addition of ethanol to hydrocarbon/benzyl alcohol mixtures has a significant effect on the thermal stabilization of jet fuels above 400{degrees}C. Ethanol appears to function by reducing the benzaldehyde formed during the degradation of the benzyl alcohol. This reduction regenerates the benzyl alcohol.

Schobert, H.H.; Eser, S.; Song, C. [and others

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "octane enhan cer" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Novel Characterization of GDI Engine Exhaust for Gasoline and Mid-Level Gasoline-Alcohol Blends  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Gasoline direct injection (GDI) engines can offer improved fuel economy and higher performance over their port fuel-injected (PFI) counterparts, and are now appearing in increasingly more U.S. and European vehicles. Small displacement, turbocharged GDI engines are replacing large displacement engines, particularly in light-duty trucks and sport utility vehicles, in order for manufacturers to meet more stringent fuel economy standards. GDI engines typically emit the most particulate matter (PM) during periods of rich operation such as start-up and acceleration, and emissions of air toxics are also more likely during this condition. A 2.0 L GDI engine was operated at lambda of 0.91 at typical loads for acceleration (2600 rpm, 8 bar BMEP) on three different fuels; an 87 anti-knock index (AKI) gasoline (E0), 30% ethanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel (E30), and 48% isobutanol blended with the 87 AKI fuel. E30 was chosen to maximize octane enhancement while minimizing ethanol-blend level and iBu48 was chosen to match the same fuel oxygen level as E30. Particle size and number, organic carbon and elemental carbon (OC/EC), soot HC speciation, and aldehydes and ketones were all analyzed during the experiment. A new method for soot HC speciation is introduced using a direct, thermal desorption/pyrolysis inlet for the gas chromatograph (GC). Results showed high levels of aromatic compounds were present in the PM, including downstream of the catalyst, and the aldehydes were dominated by the alcohol blending.

Storey, John Morse [ORNL] [ORNL; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur [ORNL] [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL] [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL] [ORNL; Barone, Teresa L [ORNL] [ORNL; Eibl, Mary A [ORNL] [ORNL; Nafziger, Eric J [ORNL] [ORNL; Kaul, Brian C [ORNL] [ORNL

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Method for the operation of internal combustion engines. [gasification reactor for reforming gasoline  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a method for the operation of internal combustion engines which is designed to decontaminate the exhaust gases. The method includes: feeding a gasification air stream into a gasification reactor; feeding fuel into the same gasification reactor; combining the fuel with the gasification air into a homogeneous fuel-air mixture in the gasification reactor; and converting the fuel-air mixture by partial combustion into a soot -free reformed gas. Then, the reformed gas is fed from the gasification reactor to a mixer where the reformed gas is mixed with combustion air and the reformed gas-air mixture is fed to the internal combustion engine for further combustion with the result that there is intensive decontamination of the exhaust gases which thereby reduces air pollution. The reformed gas temperature is adjusted low for maximum engine output, and is adjusted higher for lower engine temperatures in order to obtain a reformed gas which is richer in hydrogen and thereby produce exhaust gases which are lower in harmful substances. In reference to the exhaust gases in an internal combustion engine, this method achieves the highest possible degree of decontamination, not only of the carbon monoxide and hydrocarbons , but also of the nitrous oxides in the exhaust gases. Using this method, the internal combustion engine can be operated not only with high-test, no-knock gasoline, but also with cheap, lead-free low octane, straight-run gasoline which is low in aromatics and olefins, which normally do not have no-knock properties, and the internal combustion engine can be operated with the lowest possible fuel consumption. The gasification reactor operates through chemical reaction in the presence of a catalyst. Optionally, this method may include a return of part of the reformed gas to the input of the gasification reactor.

Muhlberg, E.

1980-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

443

Kinetic Modeling of Toluene Oxidation for Surrogate Fuel Applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

New environmental issues, like the effect of combustion-generated greenhouse gases, provide motivation to better characterize oxidation of hydrocarbons. Transportation, in particular, significantly contributes to energy consumption and CO{sub 2} emissions. Kinetic studies about the combustion of fuels under conditions typical of internal combustion engines provides important support to improve mechanism formulation and to eventually provide better computational tools that can be used to increase the engine performance. It is foreseeable that at least in the next 30 years the main transportation fuels will be either gasoline or diesel. Unfortunately, these fuels are very complex mixtures of many components. Moreover, their specifications and performance requirements significantly change the composition of these fuels: gasoline and diesel mixtures are different if coming from different refineries or they are different from winter to summer. At the same time a fuel with a well defined and reproducible composition is needed for both experimental and modeling work. In response to these issues, surrogate fuels are proposed. Surrogate fuels are defined as mixtures of a small number of hydrocarbons whose relative concentrations is adjusted in order to approximate the chemical and physical properties of a real fuel. Surrogate fuels are then very useful both for the design of reproducible experimental tests and also for the development of reliable kinetic models. The primary reference fuels (PRF) are a typical and old example of surrogate fuel: n-heptane and iso-octane mixtures are used to reproduce antiknock propensity of complex mixtures contained in a gasoline. PRFs are not able to surrogate gasoline in operating conditions different from standard ones and new surrogates have been recently proposed. Toluene is included in all of them as a species able to represent the behavior of aromatic compounds. On the other side, the toluene oxidation chemistry is not so well established and uncertainties still remain in the mechanism. This is especially true in the low temperature regime (< 850K). In these conditions, the toluene reactivity is too low to be conveniently investigated. Nonetheless, gasoline surrogates work in the engine at low temperatures, because of the presence of very reactive alkanes. The effect of these component interactions have to be taken into account. This work's aim is to present the model activity carried out by two different research groups, comparing the main pathways and results, matching data carried out in different devices both for pure toluene and mixtures. This is the starting point for a further activity to improve the two kinetic schemes.

Frassoldati, A; Mehl, M; Fietzek, R; Faravelli, T; Pitz, W J; Ranzi, E

2009-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

444

Chemistry Impacts in Gasoline HCCI  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion in internal combustion engines is of interest because it has the potential to produce low oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions while providing diesel-like efficiency. In HCCI combustion, a premixed charge of fuel and air auto-ignites at multiple points in the cylinder near top dead center (TDC), resulting in rapid combustion with very little flame propagation. In order to prevent excessive knocking during HCCI combustion, it must take place in a dilute environment, resulting from either operating fuel lean or providing high levels of either internal or external exhaust gas recirculation (EGR). Operating the engine in a dilute environment can substantially reduce the pumping losses, thus providing the main efficiency advantage compared to spark-ignition (SI) engines. Low NOx and PM emissions have been reported by virtually all researchers for operation under HCCI conditions. The precise emissions can vary depending on how well mixed the intake charge is, the fuel used, and the phasing of the HCCI combustion event; but it is common for there to be no measurable PM emissions and NOx emissions <10 ppm. Much of the early HCCI work was done on 2-stroke engines, and in these studies the CO and hydrocarbon emissions were reported to decrease [1]. However, in modern 4-stroke engines, the CO and hydrocarbon emissions from HCCI usually represent a marked increase compared with conventional SI combustion. This literature review does not report on HCCI emissions because the trends mentioned above are well established in the literature. The main focus of this literature review is the auto-ignition performance of gasoline-type fuels. It follows that this discussion relies heavily on the extensive information available about gasoline auto-ignition from studying knock in SI engines. Section 2 discusses hydrocarbon auto-ignition, the octane number scale, the chemistry behind it, its shortcomings, and its relevance to HCCI. Section 3 discusses the effects of fuel volatility on fuel and air mixing and the consequences it has on HCCI. The effects of alcohol fuels on HCCI performance, and specifically the effects that they have on the operable speed/load range, are reviewed in Section 4. Finally, conclusions are drawn in Section 5.

Szybist, James P [ORNL; Bunting, Bruce G [ORNL

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Regeneration of Hydrotreating and FCC Catalysts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydrotreating, hydrocracking, and fluid catalytic cracking (FCC) catalysts are important components of petroleum refining processes. Hydrotreating and hydrocracking catalysts are used to improve the yield of high-quality light oil fractions from heavier crude oil and petroleum feedstocks containing high levels of impurities. FCC catalysts improve the yield of higher octane gasoline from crude oil. Residuum hydrotreating and cracking catalysts are susceptible to irreversible deactivation caused by adsorption of sulfur and by metals impurities, such as vanadium and nickel. The gradual buildup of these impurities in a hydrotreating catalyst eventually plugs the pores and deactivates it. Nickel and vanadium adversely affect the behavior of cracking catalysts, reducing product yield and quality. Replacing deactivated catalysts represents a significant cost in petroleum refining. Equally important are the costs and potential liabilities associated with treating and disposing spent catalysts. For example, recent US Environmental Protection Agency rulings have listed spent hydrotreating and hydrorefining catalysts as hazardous wastes. FCC catalysts, though more easily disposed of as road-base or as filler in asphalt and cement, are still an economic concern mainly because of the large volumes of spent catalysts generated. New processes are being considered to increase the useful life of catalysts or for meeting more stringent disposal requirements for spent catalysts containing metals. This report discusses a collaborative effort between Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) and Phillips Petroleum, Inc., to identify promising chemical processes for removing metals adhered to spent hydrodesulfurization (HDS, a type of hydrotreating catalyst) and FCC catalysts. This study, conducted by PNNL, was funded by the US Department of Energy's Bartlesville Project Office. Fresh and spent catalysts were provided by Phillips Petroleum. The FCC catalyst was a rare-earth exchanged Y zeolite in a silica-alumina matrix. X-ray fluorescence analyses showed that the rare earths used in preparing the catalysts were a mixture of lanthanum and cerium. Antimony found in the spent catalyst was added during operation of the FCC unit as a way to suppress the adverse effects of deposited nickel. The fresh HDS samples consisted of sulfided nickel and molybdenum on an alumina support. The spent catalyst showed nearly 10% vanadium on the catalyst and a modest increase in nickel and sulfur on the catalyst as a result of operations. Hydrocracking catalysts were not available for this study.

CM Wai; JG Frye; JL Fulton; LE Bowman; LJ Silva; MA Gerber

1999-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Fuel-blending stocks from the hydrotreatment of a distillate formed by direct coal liquefaction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The direct liquefaction of coal in the iron-catalyzed Suplex process was evaluated as a technology complementary to Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. A distinguishing feature of the Suplex process, from other direct liquefaction processes, is the use of a combination of light- and heavy-oil fractions as the slurrying solvent. This results in a product slate with a small residue fraction, a distillate/naphtha mass ratio of 6, and a 65.8 mass % yield of liquid fuel product on a dry, ash-free coal basis. The densities of the resulting naphtha (C{sub 5}-200{sup o}C) and distillate (200-400{sup o}C) fractions from the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction were high (0.86 and 1.04 kg/L, respectively). The aromaticity of the distillate fraction was found to be typical of coal liquefaction liquids, at 60-65%, with a Ramsbottom carbon residue content of 0.38 mass %. Hydrotreatment of the distillate fraction under severe conditions (200{sup o}C, 20.3 MPa, and 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1}) with a NiMo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst gave a product with a phenol content of {lt}1 ppm, a nitrogen content {lt}200 ppm, and a sulfur content {lt}25 ppm. The temperature was found to be the main factor affecting diesel fraction selectivity when operating at conditions of WHSV = 0.41 g{sub feed} h{sup -1} g{sub catalyst}{sup -1} and PH{sub 2} = 20.3 MPa, with excessively high temperatures (T {gt} 420{sup o}C) leading to a decrease in diesel selectivity. The fuels produced by the hydroprocessing of the straight-run Suplex distillate fraction have properties that make them desirable as blending components, with the diesel fraction having a cetane number of 48 and a density of 0.90 kg/L. The gasoline fraction was found to have a research octane number (RON) of 66 and (N + 2A) value of 100, making it ideal as a feedstock for catalytic reforming and further blending with Fischer-Tropsch liquids. 44 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

Andile B. Mzinyati [Sasol Technology Research and Development, Sasolburg (South Africa). Fischer-Tropsch Refinery Catalysis

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

447

Propane vehicles : status, challenges, and opportunities.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Propane as an auto fuel has a high octane value and has key properties required for spark-ignited internal combustion engines. To operate a vehicle on propane as either a dedicated fuel or bi-fuel (i.e., switching between gasoline and propane) vehicle, only a few modifications must be made to the engine. Until recently propane vehicles have commonly used a vapor pressure system that was somewhat similar to a carburetion system, wherein the propane would be vaporized and mixed with combustion air in the intake plenum of the engine. This leads to lower efficiency as more air, rather than fuel, is inducted into the cylinder for combustion (Myers 2009). A newer liquid injection system has become available that injects propane directly into the cylinder, resulting in no mixing penalty because air is not diluted with the gaseous fuel in the intake manifold. Use of a direct propane injection system will improve engine efficiency (Gupta 2009). Other systems include the sequential multi-port fuel injection system and a bi-fuel 'hybrid' sequential propane injection system. Carbureted systems remain in use but mostly for non-road applications. In the United States a closed-loop system is used in after-market conversions. This system incorporates an electronic sensor that provides constant feedback to the fuel controller to allow it to measure precisely the proper air/fuel ratio. A complete conversion system includes a fuel controller, pressure regulator valves, fuel injectors, electronics, fuel tank, and software. A slight power loss is expected in conversion to a vapor pressure system, but power can still be optimized with vehicle modifications of such items as the air/fuel mixture and compression ratios. Cold start issues are eliminated for vapor pressure systems since the air/fuel mixture is gaseous. In light-duty propane vehicles, the fuel tank is typically mounted in the trunk; for medium- and heavy-duty vans and trucks, the tank is located under the body of the vehicle. Propane tanks add weight to a vehicle and can slightly increase the consumption of fuel. On a gallon-to-gallon basis, the energy content of propane is 73% that of gasoline, thus requiring more propane fuel to travel an equivalent distance, even in an optimized engine (EERE 2009b).

Rood Werpy, M.; Burnham, A.; Bertram, K.; Energy Systems

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

448

HCCI experiments with gasoline surrogate fuels modeled by a semidetailed chemical kinetic model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experiments in a homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engine have been conducted with four gasoline surrogate fuel blends. The pure components in the surrogate fuels consisted of n-heptane, isooctane, toluene, ethanol and diisobutylene and fuel sensitivities (RON-MON) in the fuel blends ranged from two to nine. The operating conditions for the engine were p{sub in}=0.1 and 0.2 MPa, T{sub in}=80 and 250 C, {phi}=0.25 in air and engine speed 1200 rpm. A semidetailed chemical kinetic model (142 species and 672 reactions) for gasoline surrogate fuels, validated against ignition data from experiments conducted in shock tubes for gasoline surrogate fuel blends at 1.0{<=} p{<=}5.0MPa, 700{<=} T{<=}1200 K and {phi}=1.0, was successfully used to qualitatively predict the HCCI experiments using a single zone modeling approach. The fuel blends that had higher fuel sensitivity were more resistant to autoignition for low intake temperature and high intake pressure and less resistant to autoignition for high intake temperature and low intake pressure. A sensitivity analysis shows that at high intake temperature the chemistry of the fuels ethanol, toluene and diisobutylene helps to advance ignition. This is consistent with the trend that fuels with the least Negative Temperature Coefficient (NTC) behavior show the highest octane sensitivity, and become less resistant to autoignition at high intake temperatures. For high intake pressure the sensitivity analysis shows that fuels in the fuel blend with no NTC behavior consume OH radicals and acts as a radical scavenger for the fuels with NTC behavior. This is consistent with the observed trend of an increase in RON and fuel sensitivity. With data from shock tube experiments in the literature and HCCI modeling in this work, a correlation between the reciprocal pressure exponent on the ignition delay to the fuel sensitivity and volume percentage of single-stage ignition fuel in the fuel blend was found. Higher fuel sensitivity and single-stage fuel content generally gives a lower value of the pressure exponent. This helps to explain the results obtained while boosting the intake pressure in the HCCI engine. (author)

Andrae, J.C.G. [Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology, Royal Institute of Technology (KTH), SE-100 44 Stockholm (Sweden); Head, R.A. [Shell Technology Centre Thornton, P.O. Box 1, Chester CH1 3SH (United Kingdom)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

449

E85 Optimized Engine through Boosting, Spray-Optimized DIG, VCR and Variable Valvetrain  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The use of biofuels for internal combustion engines has several well published advantages. The biofuels, made from biological sources such as corn or sugar cane, are renewable resources that reduce the dependence on fossil fuels. Fuels from agricultural sources can therefore reduce a countries energy dependency on other nations. Biofuels also have been shown to reduce CO2 emissions into the atmosphere compared to traditional fossil based fuels. Because of these benefits several countries have set targets for the use of biofuels, especially ethanol, in their transportation fuels. Small percentages of ethanol are common place in gasoline but are typically limited to 5 to 8% by volume. Greater benefits are possible from higher concentrations and some countries such as the US and Sweden have encouraged the production of vehicles capable of operating on E85 (85% denatured ethanol and 15% gasoline). E85 capable vehicles are normally equipped to run the higher levels of ethanol by employing modified fuel delivery systems that can withstand the highly corrosive nature of the alcohol. These vehicles are not however equipped to take full advantage of ethanol's properties during the combustion process. Ethanol has a much higher blend research octane number than gasoline. This allows the use of higher engine compression ratios and spark advance which result in more efficient engine operation. Ethanol's latent heat of vaporization is also much higher that gasoline. This higher heat of vaporization cools the engine intake charge which also allows the engine compression ratio to be increased even further. An engine that is optimized for operation on high concentrations of ethanol therefore will have compression ratios that are too high to avoid spark knock (pre-ignition) if run on gasoline or a gasoline/ethanol blend that has a low percentage alcohol. An engine was developed during this project to leverage the improved evaporative cooling and high octane of E85 to improve fuel economy and offset E85's lower energy content. A 2.0 L production Direct Injection gasoline, (DIg) engine employing Dual Independent Cam Phasing, (DICP) and turbo charging was used as the base engine. Modified pistons were used to increase the geometric compression ratio from 9.2:1 to 11.85:1 by modifying the pistons and adding advanced valvetrain to proved control of displacement and effective compression ratio through valve timing control. The advanced valvetrain utilized Delphi's two step valvetrain hardware and intake cam phaser with increased phasing authority of 80 crank angle degrees. Using this hardware the engine was capable of operating knock free on all fuels tested from E0-E85 by controlling effective compression ratio using a Late Intake Valve Closing, (LIVC) strategy. The LIVC strategy results in changes in the trapped displacement such that knock limited torque for gasoline is significantly lower than E85. The use of spark retard to control knock enables higher peak torque for knock limited fuels, however a loss in efficiency results. For gasoline and E10 fuels, full effective displacement could not be reached before spark retard produced a net loss in torque. The use of an Early Intake Valve Closing, (EIVC) strategy resulted in an improvement of engine efficiency at low to mid loads for all fuels tested from E0- E85. Further the use of valve deactivation, to a single intake valve, improved combustion stability and enabled throttle-less operation down to less than 2 bar BMEP. Slight throttling to trap internal residual provided additional reductions in fuel consumption. To fully leverage the benefits of E85, or ethanol blends above E10, would require a vehicle level approach that would take advantage of the improved low end torque that is possible with E85. Operating the engine at reduced speeds and using advanced transmissions (6 speeds or higher) would provide a responsive efficient driving experience to the customer. The vehicle shift and torque converter lockup points for high ethanol blends could take advantage of the significant efficiency ad

Keith Confer; Harry Husted

2011-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

450

The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimize Fuel Economy and Minimize Emission in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes activities conducted for the project “The Use of Exhaust Gas Recirculation to Optimized Fuel Economy and Minimize Emissions in Engines Operating on E85 Fuel” under COOPERATIVE AGREEMENT NUMBER DE-FC26-07NT43271, which are as outlined in the STATEMENT OF PROJECT OBJECTIVES (SOPO) dated March 2007 and in the supplemental SOPO dated October 2010. The project objective was to develop and demonstrate an internal combustion engine that is optimized for E85 (85% ethanol and 15% gasoline) fuel operation to achieve substantially improved fuel economy while operating with E85 fuel and that is also production viable in the near- to medium-term. The key engine technology selected for research and development was turbocharging, which is known to improve fuel economy thru downsizing and is in particular capable of exploiting ethanol fuel’s characteristics of high octane number and high latent heat of vaporization. The engine further integrated synergistic efficiency improving technologies of cooled exhaust gas recirculation (EGR), direct fuel injection and dual continuously variable intake and exhaust cam phasers. On the vehicle level, fuel economy was furthered thru powertrain system optimization by mating a state-of-the-art six-speed automatic transmission to the engine. In order to achieve the project’s objective of near- to medium-term production viability, it was essential to develop the engine to be flex-fuel capable of operating with fuels ranging from E0 (0% ethanol and 100% gasoline) to E85 and to use three-way type of catalyst technology for exhaust aftertreatment. Within these scopes, various technologies were developed through systems approach to focus on ways to help accelerate catalyst light-off. Significant amount of development took place during the course of the project within General Motors, LLC. Many prototype flex-fuel engines were designed, built and developed with various hardware configurations selected to achieve the project goals. Several flex-fuel demonstration vehicles were designed and built for carrying out calibration development and final testing to quantify the technology merits. Based on the extensive test results collected from dynamometer and vehicle testing, the fuel economy benefits of cooled EGR from the intended level of turbocharger technology were quantified. When combined with turbo downsizing, the FE benefits are considered large enough for E0 fuel as well as for E85 fuel to warrant further development of the technology beyond the current proof-of-concept level to a level that can meet production driveability quality and durability requirements in order to meet customers’ expectations. Cold-start cart test results from the emissions segment of the project were positive, confirming the assumption of faster thermal response of turbo exhaust system for emissions reductions for both E0 and E85 fuels. Vehicle emissions test results directionally correlated to the cold-start cart findings. The limited number of test runs did demonstrate the potentials of meeting stringent emission standards, however, they did not comprehend the factors such as hardware variability and long-term durability, 3 which are essential for mass production to satisfy customers’ expectations. It is therefore recommended, moving forward, durability concerns over turbocharger, EGR system and aftertreatment system, which would likely impact production viability, should be addressed. The data moreover suggested that further FE increase is likely with turbocharger technology advancement.

Wu, Ko-Jen

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

451

DEVELOPMENT OF ALTERNATIVE FUELS AND CHEMICALS FROM SYNTHESIS GAS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Final Report for Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-95PC93052, the ''Development of Alternative Fuels and Chemicals from Synthesis Gas,'' was prepared by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (Air Products), and covers activities from 29 December 1994 through 31 July 2002. The overall objectives of this program were to investigate potential technologies for the conversion of synthesis gas (syngas), a mixture primarily of hydrogen (H{sub 2}) and carbon monoxide (CO), to oxygenated and hydrocarbon fuels and industrial chemicals, and to demonstrate the most promising technologies at the LaPorte, Texas Alternative Fuels Development Unit (AFDU). Laboratory work was performed by Air Products and a variety of subcontractors, and focused on the study of the kinetics of production of methanol and dimethyl ether (DME) from syngas, the production of DME using the Liquid Phase Dimethyl Ether (LPDME{trademark}) Process, the conversion of DME to fuels and chemicals, and the production of other higher value products from syngas. Four operating campaigns were performed at the AFDU during the performance period. Tests of the Liquid Phase Methanol (LPMEOH{trademark}) Process and the LPDME{trademark} Process were made to confirm results from the laboratory program and to allow for the study of the hydrodynamics of the slurry bubble column reactor (SBCR) at a significant engineering scale. Two campaigns demonstrated the conversion of syngas to hydrocarbon products via the slurry-phase Fischer-Tropsch (F-T) process. Other topics that were studied within this program include the economics of production of methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), the identification of trace components in coal-derived syngas and the means to economically remove these species, and the study of systems for separation of wax from catalyst in the F-T process. The work performed under this Cooperative Agreement has continued to promote the development of technologies that use clean syngas produced from any one of a variety of sources (including coal) for the production of a spectrum of alternative fuels (hydrocarbons and oxygenate fuels), octane enhancers, and chemicals and chemical intermediates. In particular, the data from the 1995 LPMEOH{trademark} campaign provided confirmation of assumptions used in the design of the catalyst reduction system at the Kingsport LPMEOH{trademark} Commercial Demonstration Project, and the alternate methanol catalyst has been in use there since late 1998. The kinetic model was also expanded to allow for more accurate prediction of methanol production and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) conversion, and more accurate modeling of by-product formation for the alternate methanol catalyst. The outstanding performance results of the LPMEOH{trademark} Process at Kingsport can be attributed in large part to the body of work performed since 1981 in collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Air Products. In addition, a pilot-plant-tested LPDME{trademark} Process has been demonstrated, and the product cost of DME from coal-derived syngas can be competitive in certain locations and applications. The need for liquid fuels will continue to be a critical concern for this nation in the 21st century. Efforts are needed to ensure the development and demonstration of economically competitive, efficient, environmentally responsible technologies that produce clean fuels and chemicals from coal under DOE's Vision 21 concept. These liquids will be a component of the fuel mix that will provide the transition from the current reliance on carbon-based fuels to the ultimate use of H{sub 2} as a means of energy transport. Indirect liquefaction, which converts the syngas (H{sub 2} and CO) produced by the gasification of coal to sulfur- and nitrogen-free liquid products, is a key component of the Vision 21 initiative. The results from this current program provide continued support to the objectives for the conversion of domestic coal to electric power and co-produced clean liquid fuels and chemicals in an environmentally superior manner.

Peter J. Tijrn

2003-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

452

Rate constants for OH with selected large alkanes : shock-tube measurements and an improved group scheme.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High-temperature rate constant experiments on OH with the five large (C{sub 5}-C{sub 8}) saturated hydrocarbons n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-tetramethylbutane (2,2,3,3-TMB), n-pentane, n-hexane, and 2,3-dimethylbutane (2,3-DMB) were performed with the reflected-shock-tube technique using multipass absorption spectrometric detection of OH radicals at 308 nm. Single-point determinations at {approx}1200 K on n-heptane, 2,2,3,3-TMB, n-hexane, and 2,3-DMB were previously reported by Cohen and co-workers; however, the present work substantially extends the database to both lower and higher temperature. The present experiments span a wide temperature range, 789-1308 K, and represent the first direct measurements of rate constants at T > 800 K for n-pentane. The present work utilized 48 optical passes corresponding to a total path length of {approx}4.2 m. As a result of this increased path length, the high OH concentration detection sensitivity permitted pseudo-first-order analyses for unambiguously measuring rate constants. The experimental results can be expressed in Arrhenius form in units of cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} as follows: K{sub OH+n-heptane} = (2.48 {+-} 0.17) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1927 {+-} 69 K)/T] (838-1287 K); k{sub OH+2,2,3,3-TMB} = (8.26 {+-} 0.89) x 10{sup -11} exp[(-1337 {+-} 94 K)/T] (789-1061 K); K{sub OH+n-pentane} = (1.60 {+-} 0.25) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1903 {+-} 146 K)/T] (823-1308 K); K{sub OH+n-hexane} = (2.79 {+-} 0.39) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-2301 {+-} 134 K)/T] (798-1299 K); and k{sub OH+2,3-DMB} = (1.27 {+-} 0.16) x 10{sup -10} exp[(-1617 {+-} 118 K)/T] (843-1292 K). The available experimental data, along with lower-T determinations, were used to obtain evaluations of the experimental rate constants over the temperature range from {approx}230 to 1300 K for most of the title reactions. These extended-temperature-range evaluations, given as three-parameter fits, are as follows: k{sub OH+n-heptane} = 2.059 x 10{sup -5}T{sup 1.401} exp(33 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (241-1287 K); k{sub OH+2,2,3,3-TMB} = 6.835 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.886} exp(-365 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (290-1180 K); k{sub OH+n-pentane} = 2.495 x 10{sup -16}T{sup 1.649} exp(80 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (224-1308 K); k{sub OH+n-hexane} = 3.959 x 10{sup -18}T{sup 2.218} exp(443 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (292-1299 K); and k{sub OH+2,3-DMB} = 2.287 x 10{sup -17}T{sup 1.958} exp(365 K/T) cm{sup 3} molecule{sup -1} s{sup -1} (220-1292 K). The experimental data and the evaluations obtained for these five larger alkanes in the present work were used along with prior data/evaluations obtained in this laboratory for H abstractions by OH from a series of smaller alkanes (C{sub 3}?C{sub 5}) to devise rate rules for abstractions from various types of primary, secondary, and tertiary H atoms. Specifically, the current scheme was applied with good success to H abstractions by OH from a series of n-alkanes (n-octane through n-hexadecane). The total rate constants using this group scheme for reactions of OH with selected large alkanes are given as three-parameter fits in this article. The rate constants for the various abstraction channels in any large n-alkane can also be obtained using the groups listed in this article. The present group scheme serves to reduce the uncertainties in rate constants for OH + alkane reactions.

Sivaramakrishnan, R.; Michael, J. V.; Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z