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    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Nov Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Jan 2008 2009 2010 Mound Site Transition Created with Timeline Maker Professional on May 06 2008 Sep 2008 Phase I Parcel Deed...

  2. Small- and Medium-Size Building Automation and Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Milestones & Deliverables (Actual) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Oct-Dec) Legend Summary Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q1 (Oct-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 ...

  3. Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Q2 Q3 Season Nominal Prices (dollars per gallon) WTI Crude Oil (Spot) a 1.38 1.11 1.24 1.08 1.06 1.07 -21.4 -4.5 -13.7 Brent Crude Oil Price (Spot) 1.47 1.20 1.33 1.08 1.08 1.08 -26.1 -10.2 -18.8 U.S. Refiner Average Crude Oil Cost 1.37 1.14 1.25 1.00 1.03 1.02 -26.6 -8.8 -18.5 Wholesale Gasoline Price b 2.01 1.84 1.93 1.58 1.46 1.52 -21.6 -20.6 -21.1 Wholesale Diesel Fuel Price b 1.89 1.61 1.75 1.41 1.43 1.42 -25.4 -11.4 -18.8 Regular Gasoline Retail Price c 2.67 2.60

  4. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2016)

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    DOE FOIA Quarterly Reports for Q2 2016. This information will be displayed on the DOJ http://www.foia.gov

  5. Microsoft Word - Draft Option Mod Oct - Dec 2011 rev 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... Incentives 29,875,417 27,501,337 Work for Others 109,778 (est) 61,221 Other Reimbursable Work 538,832 (est) 499,504 Total 30,524,027 28,062,062 October 1, 2006 through ...

  6. Microsoft Word - Draft Option Mod Oct - Dec 2011 rev 1

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Attachment to Modification M231 B&W Pantex Contract No. DE-AC54-00AL66620 Page 2 of 5 The purpose of this Modification is to incorporate FAR 52.217-9; exercise the First Three-Month Option Period; Revise Section F, DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE, paragraph F.1; revise Section F, DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE, paragraph F.3; revise Section F, DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE, Paragraph F.4; revise Section B, SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS, paragraph B.2(a)(2); and, revise Section B, SUPPLIES OR

  7. Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Q2) Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Lone Star I (Q2) Wind Farm Facility Lone Star I (Q2) Sector Wind energy Facility Type Commercial Scale Wind Facility Status In...

  8. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 58 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Origin State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) Destination State Transportation Mode Electricity...

  9. Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons) 1 61 Domestic Coal Distribution 2009 Q2 by Destination State: Alabama (1000 Short Tons)...

  10. Electrolux: ENERGY STAR Referral (GAH105Q2T1)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE referred the matter of Electrolux room air conditioner model GAH105Q2T1 to the EPA for appropriate action after DOE testing showed that the model does not meet the ENERGY STAR specification.

  11. Microsoft Word - S06430_JanMar.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Heavy snow cover inhibits normal use of the park. 1.3 Peripheral Properties (Private and City-Owned) * No land use or supplemental standards compliance issues were observed or ...

  12. SPEAR3 Jan-Mar 03 Qtrly Rpt.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 2 TABLE OF CONTENTS Page A. Project Summary 1. Technical Progress 3 2. Future Reporting 5 2. Current Costs 7 B. Detailed Reports 1.1 Magnets & Supports 10 1.2 Vacuum System 10 1.3 Power Supplies 16 1.4 RF System 18 1.5 Instrumentation & Co ntrols 20 1.6 Cable Plant 22 1.7 Beam Line Front Ends 22 1.8 Facilities 23 1.9 Installation 24 2.1 Accelerator Physics 25 3 A. SPEAR 3 PROJECT SUMMARY 1. Technical Progress In general most of the technical systems have been completed; howeve r,

  13. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345139-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Oct-Dec...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... completed the final conceptual design for Area B NAPL remediation in early ... of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids at the Northeast Site (Area B Conceptual Design) (DOE 2004). ...

  14. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#100069-v1-NAPL_Quarterly_Oct-Dec...

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ... completed the final conceptual design for Area B NAPL remediation in early ... of Non-Aqueous Phase Liquids at the Northeast Site (Area B Conceptual Design) (DOE 2004). ...

  15. Microsoft Word - S09615_oct_dec2012 Quarterly Report.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    31, 2012 January 2013 LMS/MNT/S09615 This page intentionally left blank LMS/MNT/S09615 Monticello, Utah, National Priorities List Sites Federal Facility Agreement (FFA) Quarterly Report: October 1-December 31, 2012 January 2013 This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Monticello NPL Sites FFA Quarterly Report: October-December 2012 January 2013 Doc. No. S09615 Page i Contents Abbreviations

  16. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#100066-v1-Sitewide_Quarterly_Oct-Dec_2004.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    through December 2004 January 2005 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ 2005 - -L 799 U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE-LM/GJ799-2005 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the

  17. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345149-v1-Sitewide_Oct_Dec_2005.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Through December 2005 January 2006 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/GJ1103 2006 - -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management DOE-LM/GJ1103-2006 Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Sitewide Environmental Monitoring Quarterly Progress Report for the

  18. Rooftop Unit Campaign

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Future work Report on first year's impact Final achievement recognitions (November 2014) Q1 (Octt-Dec) Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q1 (Octt-Dec) Legend Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q4 ...

  19. Retrofitting Doors on Open Refrigerated Cases

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Q2 (Jan-Mar) FY2012 FY2013 Legend Q2 (Jan-Mar) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q3 (Apr-Jun) Q4 (Jul-Sep) Q1 (Octt-Dec) * Met all original project milestones to date * Original project ...

  20. Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System - FY13 Q2 This document summarizes the progress of this PNNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013. progress_report_sunshot_pnnl_fy13_q2.pdf (274.11 KB) More Documents & Publications Integrated Solar Thermochemical Reaction System for High Efficiency Production of Electricity Highly Efficient Solar Thermochemical Reaction Systems Integrated

  1. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart Abstract not provided. Authors: Andraka, Charles E. [1] + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States) Publication Date: 2015-04-01 OSTI Identifier: 1178621 Report Number(s): SAND2015-2914R 583301 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000

  2. Microsoft Word - DOE_RM_DM-#345141-v1-4_5_Quarterly_Oct_Dec_2005.DOC

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    4 2006 - -L U.S. Department of Energy Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management. DE-AC01-02GJ79491 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Office of Legacy Management Pinellas Environmental Restoration Project Quarterly Progress Report for the Young - Rainey STAR Center's 4.5 Acre Site October Through December 2005 January 2006 DOE-LM/GJ1104-2006 Pinellas

  3. TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Energy TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls (14.26 KB) More Documents & Publications U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program Homes Weatherized By State through 06/30/2010 (Calendar Year) Homes Weatherized by State March 2010 ARRA Homes Weatherized by Grantee

  4. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2009-12-01

    A high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio µpGEp/GMp in the range Q2 = 0.3–0.7 GeV2/c2 was performed using recoil polarimetry in Jefferson Lab Hall A. In this low Q2 range, previous data from LEDEX [5] along with many fits and calculations [2, 3, 4] indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. In this new measurement, with 80% polarized electron beam for 24 days, we are able to achieve <1% statistical uncertainty. Preliminary results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, indicating a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the improved form factor measurements also have implications for DVCS, determinations of the proton Zemach radius and strangeness form factors through parity violation experiments.

  5. HSEP Committee FY 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY 2016 Work Plan Updated 12/10/2015 during the committee meeting Beryllium program update  Placeholder Annual Employee Concerns Program  Placeholder  Hear from new program director at WRPS  Quarter 1 (Oct-Dec) Quarter 2 (Jan-Mar) Quarter 3 (Apr-Jun) Quarter 4 (July-Sept) Holding Bin Transportation Effects on Worker Safety - draft advice  Review of draft advice Safety culture improvement efforts (joint with TWC)  Discuss Sounding Board for upcoming Board meeting o Review

  6. High Precision Measurement of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio at Low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiaohui Zhan

    2010-01-31

    Experiment E08-007 measured the proton elastic form factor ratio ?pGE/GM in the range of Q2 = 0.3?0.7(GeV/c)2 by recoil polarimetry. Data were taken in 2008 at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility in Virginia, USA. A 1.2 GeV polarized electron beam was scattered off a cryogenic hydrogen target. The recoil proton was detected in the left HRS in coincidence with the elasticly scattered electrons tagged by the BigBite spectrometer. The proton polarization was measured by the focal plane polarimeter (FPP). In this low Q2 region, previous measurement from Jefferson Lab Hall A (LEDEX) along with various fits and calculations indicate substantial deviations of the ratio from unity. For this new measurement, the proposed statistical uncertainty (< 1%) was achieved. These new results are a few percent lower than expected from previous world data and fits, which indicate a smaller GEp at this region. Beyond the intrinsic interest in nucleon structure, the new results also have implications in determining the proton Zemach radius and the strangeness form factors from parity violation experiments.

  7. Report to Congress on abnormal occurrences. Quarterly report Jan-Mar 81

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-07-01

    Section 208 of the Energy Reorganization Act of 1974 identified an abnormal occurrence as an unscheduled incident or event which the Nuclear Regulatory Commission determined to be significant from the standpoint of public health or safety and requires a quarterly report of such events to be made to Congress. This report covers the period January 1 to March 31, 1981. There was one abnormal occurrence at the nuclear power plants licensed to operate; the event involved an inadvertent disconnection of station batteries. There were no abnormal occurrences at the fuel cycle facilities (other than nuclear power plants). There was one abnormal occurrence at other licensee facilities; the event involved occupational overexposures. There were no abnormal occurrences reported by the Agreement States. This report also contains information updating some previously reported abnormal occurrences.

  8. SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q2, FY 15

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 nd Quarter, FY 2015 *Data does not include MOX, Parsons and some small subcontractors SRS Employee Headcount by County of Residence Q2, FY 15 GA County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Burke 34 3 4 0 0 41 Columbia 769 249 102 7 45 1172 Jefferson 2 2 0 0 0 4 Lincoln 9 1 2 0 0 12 McDuffie 9 6 0 0 2 17 Richmond 558 146 103 3 29 839 Screven 23 6 1 0 0 30 Other 36 1 3 0 0 40 GA TOTAL 1440 414 215 10 76 2155 SC County SRNS SRR Centerra Ameresco DOE-SR County Total Aiken 2597 829 360 9

  9. Neutral Pion Electroproduction in the Resonance Region at High $Q^2$

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Villano, A N; Bosted, P E; Connell, S H; Dalton, M M; Jones, M K; Adams, G S; Afanasev, A; Ahmidouch, A; Angelescu, T; Arrington, J; Asaturyan, R; Baker, O K; Benmouna, N; Berman, B L; Breuer, H; Christy, M E; Cui, Y; Danagoulian, S; Day, D; Dodario, T; Dunne, J A; Dutta, D; El Khayari, N; Elliot, B; Ent, R; Fenker, H C; Frolov, V V; Gan, L; Gaskell, D; Gasparian, A; Grullon, S; Hafidi, K; Hinton, W; Holt, R J; Huber, G M; Hungerford, E; Joo, K; Kalantarians, N; Keppel, C E; Kinney, E R; Kubarovsky, V; Li, Y; Liang, Y; Lu, M; Lung, A; Mack, D; Malace, S; Markowitz, P; McKee, P; Meekins, D G; Mkrtchhyan, H; Napolitano, J; Niculescu, G; Niculescu, I; Opper, A K; Pamela, P; Potterveld, D H; Reimer, Paul E; Reinhold, J; Roche, J; Rock, S E; Schulte, E; Segbefia, E; Smith, C; Smith, G R

    2009-09-01

    The process $ep \\to e^{\\prime}p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$ has been measured at $Q^2$ = 6.4 and 7.7 \\ufourmomts in Jefferson Lab's Hall C. Unpolarized differential cross sections are reported in the virtual photon-proton center of mass frame considering the process $\\gamma^{\\ast}p \\to p^{\\prime}\\pi^0$. Various details relating to the background subtractions, radiative corrections and systematic errors are discussed. The usefulness of the data with regard to the measurement of the electromagnetic properties of the well known $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance is covered in detail. Specifically considered are the electromagnetic and scalar-magnetic ratios $R_{EM}$ and $R_{SM}$ along with the magnetic transition form factor $G_M^{\\ast}$. It is found that the rapid fall off of the $\\Delta(1232)$ contribution continues into this region of momentum transfer and that other resonances

  10. High-precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM at low Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhan, X.; Allada, K.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Bertozzi, W.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J. -P.; Chirapatpimol, K.; Choi, S.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2011-10-06

    Here, we report a new high precision measurement of the proton elastic form factor ratio μpGE/GM for the four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.3-0.7 (GeV/c)2. The measurement was performed at Jefferson Lab (JLab) in Hall A using recoil polarimetry. With the achieved ~1% total uncertainty, the new data clearly show that the deviation of the ratio μpGE/GM from unity observed in previous polarization measurements at high Q2 continues down to the lowest Q2 value of this measurement. The updated global fit that includes the new results yields in this Q2 range an electric (magnetic) form factor ~2% smaller (~1% larger)more » than the previous global fit. We obtain new extractions of the proton electric and magnetic radii, which are (rE2)1/2 = 0.875 ± 0.010 fm and (rM2)1/2 = 0.867 ± 0.020 fm. Moreover, the charge radius is consistent with other recent extractions based on the electron-proton interaction, including the atomic hydrogen Lamb shift measruements, which suggests a missing correction in the comparison of measurements of the proton charge radius using electron probes and the recent extraction from the muonic hydrogen Lamb shift.« less

  11. On the determination of the polarized parton distribution in the (x,Q2)-plane: a relativistic quark exchange approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yazdanpanah, M.M.; Modarres, M.

    2005-05-06

    We perform a next-to-leading order QCD analysis of polarized distribution functions of proton in the (x,Q2)-plane within the scheme of the radiative parton model. The flavor-broken light sea quark distributions is investigated and a comparison is made with the corresponding available experimental data.

  12. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p → nπ+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore »using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  13. Measurement of the generalized form factors near threshold via γ*p → nπ+ at high Q2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, K.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Bennett, R. P.; et al

    2012-03-26

    We report the first extraction of the pion-nucleon multipoles near the production threshold for the nπ+ channel at relatively high momentum transfer (Q2 up to 4.2 GeV2). The dominance of the s-wave transverse multipole (E0+), expected in this region, allowed us to access the generalized form factor G1 within the light-cone sum rule (LCSR) framework as well as the axial form factor GA. The data analyzed in this work were collected by the nearly 4π CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) using a 5.754-GeV electron beam on a proton target. The differential cross section and the π-N multipole E0+/GD were measuredmore » using two different methods, the LCSR and a direct multipole fit. The results from the two methods are found to be consistent and almost Q2 independent.« less

  14. Ocean thermal energy at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, quarterly report. Report for Jan-Mar 82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The following are included: Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)--OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; OTEC methanol; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; potential navy sites for GEOTEC systems; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance estimates; and supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

  15. Theoretical investigations of the IO,{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions: Metastability, characterization and spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammami, H.; Yazidi, O.; Ben El Hadj Rhouma, M.; Al Mogren, M. M.; Hochlaf, M.

    2014-07-07

    Using ab initio methodology, we studied the IO{sup q+} (q = 2, 3, 4) multi-charged ions. Benchmark computations on the IO(X{sup 2}Π) neutral species allow validate the current procedure. For IO{sup 2+}, several potential wells were found on the ground and the electronic excited states potentials with potential barriers with respect to dissociation, where this dication can exist in the gas phase as long-lived metastable molecules. We confirm hence the recent observation of the dication by mass spectrometry. Moreover, we predict the existence of the metastable IO{sup 3+} trication, where a shallow potential well along the IO internuclear distance is computed. This potential well supports more than 10 vibrational levels. The IO{sup 3+} excited states are repulsive in nature, as well as the computed potentials for the IO{sup 4+} tetracation. For the bound states, we give a set of spectroscopic parameters including excitation transition energies, equilibrium distances, harmonic and anharmonic vibrational terms, and rotational constants. At the MRCI + Q/aug-cc-pV5Z(-PP) level, the adiabatic double and triple ionization energies of IO are computed to be ∼28.1 eV and ∼55.0 eV, respectively.

  16. Final analysis of proton form factor ratio data at Q2 = 4.0, 4.8, and 5.6 GeV2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Puckett, A. J. R.; Brash, E. J.; Gayou, O.; Jones, M. K.; Pentchev, L.; Perdrisat, C. F.; Punjabi, V.; Aniol, K. A.; Averett, T.; Benmokhtar, F.; et al

    2012-04-11

    Recently published measurements of the proton electromagnetic form factor ratio R = μp GEp/GMp at momentum transfers Q2 up to 8.5 GeV2 in Jefferson Lab Hall C deviate from the linear trend of previous measurements in Jefferson Lab Hall A, favoring a slower rate of decrease of R with Q2. While statistically compatible in the region of overlap with Hall A, the Hall C data hint at a systematic difference between the two experiments. This possibility was investigated in a reanalysis of the Hall A data. We find that the original analysis underestimated the background in the selection of elasticmore » events. The application of an additional cut to further suppress the background increases the results for R, improving the consistency between Halls A and C.« less

  17. Exclusive single pion electroproduction off the proton in the high-lying resonances at Q2 < 5 GeV2 from CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun

    2014-09-01

    The differential cross sections and structure functions for the exclusive electroproduction process ep --> e'n pi+ were measured in the range of the invariantmass for the np+ system 1.6 GeV lte W lte 2.0 GeV, and the photon virtuality 1.8 GeV2 lte Q2 lte 4.0 GeV2 using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, these kinematics are probed in the exclusive p+ production from the protons with nearly full coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the np+ center-of-mass system. In this analysis, approximately 39,000 differential cross-section data points in terms of W, Q2, cosq theta* _ pi, and phi?_p-, were obtained. The preliminary differential cross section and structure function analyses are carried out, which allow us to extract the helicity amplitudes in high-lying resonances.

  18. Measurement of the Neutron (3He) Spin Structure at Low Q2 and the Extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn Sum Rule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ioannis Kominis

    2001-01-31

    This thesis presents the results of E-94010, an experiment at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF) designed to study the spin structure of the neutron at low momentum transfer, and to test the extended Gerasimov-Drell-Hearn (GDH) sum rule. The first experiment of its kind, it was performed in experimental Hall-A of TJNAF using a new polarized 3He facility. It has recently been shown that the GDH sum rule and the Bjorken sum rule are both special examples of a more general sum rule that applies to polarized electron scattering off nucleons. This generalized sum rule, due to Ji and Osborne, reduces to the GDH sum rule at Q2 = 0 and to the Bjorken sum rule at Q2 >> 1 GeV2. By studying the Q2 evolution of the extended GDH sum, one learns about the transition from quark-like behavior to hadronic-like behavior. We measured inclusive polarized cross sections by scattering high energy polarized electrons off the new TJNAF polarized 3He target with both longitudinal and transverse target orientations. The high density 3He target, based on optical pumping and spin exchange, was used as an effective neutron target. The target maintained a polarization of about 35% at beam currents as high as 151tA. We describe the precision 3He polarimetry leading to a systematic uncertainty of the target polarization of 4% (relative). A strained GaAs photocathode was utilized in the polarized electron gun, which provided an electron beam with a polarization of about 70%, known to 3% (relative). By using six different beam energies (between 0.86 and 5.06 GeV) and a fixed scattering angle of 15.5, a wide kinematic coverage was achieved, with 0.02 GeV2< Q2 <1 GcV2 and 0.5 GeV< W < 2.5 GeV for the squared momentum transfer and invariant mass, respectively. From the measured cross sections we extract the 3He spin structure functions He and g1e Finally, we determine the extended GDH sum for the range 0.1 GeV2< Q2 <1 GeV2 for 3He and the neutron.

  19. Attachment 1 - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - PIC Transcribed Flip Chart Notes Final Meeting Summary Page 12 Public Involvement Committee September 4, 2013 Strategic Planning: Quarters by month * Q1: Oct. - Dec. * Q2: Jan - March * Q3: April - June * Q4: July - Sept. Page 1 Strategic Planning: 2014 Topics (Interactive activity) * = priority topic for discussion at meeting; �= priority for future discussion | Quarter prioritized for discussion (Q1, Q2, Q3, Q4) * 100-F Proposed Plan | *** Q2 * 100 D-H Proposed Plan * Draft Land

  20. ACBEDGF1DIH P Q2R§STDVU@DVW RYX1`bacSedVagf ShFiSpaqSTr1H£s)t

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; et al

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV < W < 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure andmore » a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W < 2 GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large x, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.« less

  2. Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron up to Q2 = 3.4 GeV2 using the Reaction He-3(e,e'n)pp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riordan, Seamus; Craver, Brandon; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Miller, Jonathan; Cates, Gordon; Liyanage, Nilanga; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Quimper, Armando Acha; Allada, Kalyan; Anderson, Byron; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Arrington, John; Averett, Todd; Beck, Arie; Bellis, Matthew; Boeglin, Werner; Breuer, Herbert; Calarco, John; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chudakov, Eugene; Coman, Luminita; Crowe, Benjamin; Cusanno, Francesco; Day, Donal; Degtiarenko, Pavel; Dolph, P.A.M.; Dutta, Chiranjib; Ferdi, Catherine; Fernandez-Ramirez, Cezar; Feuerbach, Robert; Fraile Prieto, Luis; Franklin, Gregg; Frullani, Salvatore; Fuchs, Sabine; Garibaldi, Franco; Gevorgyan, Nerses; Gilman, Ronald; Glazmazdin, Oleksandr; Gomez, Javier; Grimm, Klaus; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Herraiz, Joaquin Lopez; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmes, Richard; Holmstrom, Timothy; Howell, David; De Jager, Cornelis; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jones, Mark; Katich, Joseph; Kaufman, Lisa; Khandaker, Mahbubul; Kelly, James; Kiselev, Daniela; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Markowitz, Pete; Margaziotis, Demetrius; May-Tal Beck, Sharon; Mayilyan, Samvel; McCormick, Kathy; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Nanda, Sirish; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Ngo, Tim; Nikolenko, Dmitri; Norum, Blaine; Pentchev, Lubomir; Perdrisat, Charles; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Pomatsalyuk, Roman; Protopoescu, Dan; Puckett, Andrew; Punjabi, Vina; Qian, XIn; Qiang, Yi; Quinn, Brian; Rachek, Igor; Ransome, Ronald; Reimer, Paul; Reitz, Bodo; Roche, Julie; Ron, Guy; Rondon-Aramayo, Oscar; Rosner, Guenther; Saha, Arunava; Sargsian, Misak; Sawatzky, Bradley; Segal, John; Shabestari, Mitra Hashemi; Shahinyan, Albert; Singh, Jaideep; Sirca, Simon; Souder, Paul; Stepanyan, Samuel; Stibunov, Victor; Sulkosky, Vince; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tajima, Shigeyuki; Tobias, William; Moinelo, Jose Udias; Urciuoli, Guido; Vlahovic, Branislav; Voskanyan, Hakob; Wang, Kebin; Wesselmann, Frank; Vignote, Javier Rodriguez; Wood, Stephen; Wright, Justin; Yao, Huan

    2010-12-01

    The electric form factor of the neutron was determined from studies of the reaction \\rea{} in quasi-elastic kinematics in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. Longitudinally polarized electrons were scattered off a polarized target in which the nuclear polarization was oriented perpendicular to the momentum transfer. The scattered electrons were detected in a magnetic spectrometer in coincidence with neutrons that were registered in a large-solid-angle detector. More than doubling the $Q^2$-range over which it is known, we find \\GEn{}$ = 0.0225 \\pm 0.0017 (stat) \\pm 0.0024 (syst)$, $0.0200 \\pm 0.0023 \\pm 0.0018$, and $0.0142 \\pm 0.0019 \\pm 0.0013$ for $Q^2$ = 1.72, 2.48, and 3.41~\\gevsq, respectively.

  3. Beam-Target Double-Spin Asymmetry ALT in Charged Pion Production from Deep Inelastic Scattering on a Transversely Polarized He3 Target at 1.4<Q2<2.7 GeV2

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, J.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.; Katich, J.; Qian, X.; Wang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; et al

    2012-01-01

    We report the first measurement of the double-spin asymmetry ALT for charged pion electroproduction in semi-inclusive deep inelastic electron scattering on a transversely polarized 3He target. The kinematics focused on the valence quark region, 0.16 < x < 0.35 with 1.4 < Q2 < 2.7 GeV2. The corresponding neutron ALT asymmetries were extracted from the measured 3He asymmetries and proton/3He cross section ratios using the effective polarization approximation. These new data probe the transverse momentum dependent parton distribution function g1Tq and therefore provide access to quark spin-orbit correlations. Our results indicate a positive azimuthal asymmetry for π- production on 3Hemore » and the neutron, while our π+ asymmetries are consistent with zero.« less

  4. fu-q(2)-99.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FDTD Scheme for Light Scattering by Dielectric Particles with Large Complex Refractive Index Q. Fu and W. B. Sun Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Numerical solution for light scattering by highly refractive dielectric particles is examined with the finite-difference time domain (FDTD) technique. In the FDTD, the computational domain is truncated using the perfectly matched layer (PML) absorbing boundary condition (Sun et al. 1999). It is found that for dielectric particles with

  5. Q2 External Package.xls

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    376,031 285,072 76% 214,494 57% Interest Expense and (Income) 33 Interest Expense 352,982 351,730 331,697 94% 158,351 45% 34 AFUDC (43,062) (43,204) (45,230) 105% (26,819)...

  6. FOIA Quarterly Reports (Q2 2013)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  7. FOIA QUARTERLY REPORTS (Q2-2014)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The DOE’s mission is to advance the national, economic, and energy security of the United States; to promote scientific and technological innovation in support of that mission; and to ensure the...

  8. Microchannel Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this OSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  9. Flexible Assembly Solar Technology- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this BrightSource project, funded by SunShot, for the first quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  10. SU{sub {ital q}}(2) lattice gauge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bimonte, G.; Stern, A.; Vitale, P.

    1996-07-01

    We reformulate the Hamiltonian approach to lattice gauge theories such that, at the classical level, the gauge group does not act canonically, but instead as a Poisson-Lie group. At the quantum level, the symmetry gets promoted to a quantum group gauge symmetry. The theory depends on two parameters: the deformation parameter {lambda} and the lattice spacing {ital a}. We show that the system of Kogut and Susskind is recovered when {lambda}{r_arrow}0, while QCD is recovered in the continuum limit (for any {lambda}). We, thus, have the possibility of having a two-parameter regularization of QCD. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  11. 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this National Renewable Energy Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  12. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Jet Propulsion Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  13. High-Performance Nanostructured Coating- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCSD project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  14. Shorepower Truck Electrification Project (STEP) - 1Q - 2Q 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2014-02-01

    The Fleet Test and Evaluation Team at the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory is evaluating and documenting the use of shorepower at 50 planned American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA)-funded truck stop electrification (TSE) sites across the nation. Trucks participating in the study have idle-reduction equipment installed that was purchased with rebates through the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved. the ARRA. A total of 5,000 rebates will be approved.

  15. Tensor spin observables and spin stucture at low Q2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slifer, Karl J.

    2015-04-01

    We discuss recent spin structure results from Jefferson Lab, and outline an emerging program to study tensor spin observables using solid deuteron targets. These new experiments open the potential to study hidden color, the tensor nature of short range correlations, and to probe for exotic gluonic states.

  16. NBB Enclosed Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  17. Next-Generation Solar Collectors for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This document summarizes the progress of this 3M project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Low-Cost Metal Hydride Thermal Energy Storage System- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  19. High-Efficiency Thermal Energy Storage System for CSP- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Argonne National Laboratory project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  20. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Andraka, Charles E. 1 + Show Author Affiliations Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), ... Resource Type: Technical Report Research Org: Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), ...

  1. Dish Stirling High Performance Thermal Storage FY15Q2 Quad Chart

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    storage module * Module design complete * Major elements ordered and in fabrication Heat pipe advanced wick development * Complete 5000 hours of wick operation at...

  2. Self-Cleaning CSP Optics with EDS- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Boston University project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  3. Baseload CSP Generation Integrated with Sulfur-Based Thermochemical Heat Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this General Atomics project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  4. High-Temperature Solar Selective Coating Development for Power Tower Receivers- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  5. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this ORNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  6. Dish/Stirling High-Performance Thermal Storage- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  7. Direct s-CO2 Receiver Development- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this NREL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  8. Enclosure - FY 2016 Q2 Metrics Report 2016-05-03.xlsx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    FY 2016 Target 95% 95% 90% 85% 90% 90% FY 2016 2nd Qtr Actual Comment FY 2016 Forecast ... Schedule Compliance, Projects Less Than 5 Years Duration: Projects will meet the project ...

  9. Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Stanford/SLAC project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  10. Advanced Low-Cost Receivers for Parabolic Troughs- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Norwich Technologies project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  11. Lowest Q2 Measurement of the gamma*p-> Delta Reaction: Probing...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    While there is qualitative agreement with the models, there is no quantitative agreement thus indicating the need for further improvement of the models. Temp HTML Storage 2: Stave, ...

  12. The proton and deuteron F2 structure function at low Q2 (Journal...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ; Lorenzon, Wolfgang ; Mammei, Juliette ; Martin, J W ; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet ; Niculescu, Maria-Ioana more ; Piercey, Rodney ; Potterveld, David ; Smith, Gregory ; Spurlock, Kurt ; ...

  13. High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this UCLA project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  14. High-Temperature Falling-Particle Receiver- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this Sandia National Laboratories project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  15. New parton distributions from large-x and low-Q2 data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Alberto Accardi; Christy, M. Eric; Keppel, Cynthia E.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Monaghan, Peter A.; Morfin, Jorge G.; Owens, Joseph F.

    2010-02-11

    We report results of a new global next-to-leading order fit of parton distribution functions in which cuts on W and Q are relaxed, thereby including more data at high values of x. Effects of target mass corrections (TMCs), higher twist contributions, and nuclear corrections for deuterium data are significant in the large-x region. The leading twist parton distributions are found to be stable to TMC model variations as long as higher twist contributions are also included. Furthermore, the behavior of the d quark as x → 1 is particularly sensitive to the deuterium corrections, and using realistic nuclear smearing modelsmore » the d-quark distribution at large x is found to be softer than in previous fits performed with more restrictive cuts.« less

  16. Microsoft Word - EE0003005-2016Q2-Final Technical Report FTR

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    005 RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System RiverHeath LLC Final Technical Report (FTR) for DOE/EERE Project Title: RiverHeath: Neighborhood Loop Geothermal Exchange System Covering Period: January 29, 2010 - June 30, 2015 Approved Project Period: 1/29/2010 - 6/30/2015 Submission Date: Recipient: Website (if available) Award Number: 07/11/2016 RiverHeath LLC 201 S RiverHeath Way, Suite 1800 Appleton Wl 54915 www.riverheath.com DE-EE0003005 PI: Submitted by: (if other than PI)

  17. High-Temperature Thermal Array for Next Generation Solar Thermal Power Production- FY12 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this LANL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  18. Matt Schatzman € Houston € 22 October 2007

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Belgium Japan France Italy Mexico Norway* South Korea Spain Taiwan Turkey UAE US UK India ... Jan Mar May Jul Sep Nov Other Mexico (east) UK EU Main China India Taiwan S Korea Japan ...

  19. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... Paul ; Reinhold, Joerg ; Roche, Julie ; Roos, Philip ; Sarty, Adam ; Shin, Ilkyoung ; Smith, Gregory ; Stepanyan, Stepan ; Tang, Liguang ; Tvaskis, Vladas ; van der Meer, Rob ; ...

  20. Charged pion form factor between $Q^2$=0.60 and 2.45 GeV$^2$...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Paul ; Reinhold, Joerg ; Roche, Julie ; Roos, Philip ; Sarty, Adam ; Shin, Ilkyoung ; Smith, Gregory ; Stepanyan, Stepan ; Tang, Liguang ; Tvaskis, Vladas ; van der Meer, Rob ; ...

  1. Measurement of the Neutron electric form factor at Q2=0.8 2(GeV\\\\c)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Glazier

    2007-09-30

    Nucleon form factors allow a sensitive test for models of the nucleon. Recent experiments utilising polarisation observables have resulted, for the first time, in a model-independent determination of the neutron electric form factor GnE. This method employed an 80% longitudinally polarised, high intensity (10 uA) electon beam (883 MeV) that was quasi-elastically scattered off a liquid deuterium target in the reaction D (e, en)p. A neutron polarimeter was designed and installed to measure the ratio of transverse-to-longitudinal polarisation using neutron scattering asymmetries. This ratio allowed a determination of the neutron elastic form factor, GnE, free of the previous large systematic uncertainties associated with the deuterium wave function. The experiment took place in the A1 experimental hall at MAMI taking advantage of a high resolution magnetic spectrometer. A detailed investigation was carried out into the performance of the neutron polarimeter.

  2. Quarterly Report for LANL Activities: FY12-Q2 National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pawar, Rajesh J.

    2012-04-17

    This report summarizes progress of LANL activities related to the tasks performed under the LANL FWP FE102-002-FY10, National Risk Assessment Partnership (NRAP): Industrial Carbon Capture Program. This FWP is funded through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Overall, the NRAP activities are focused on understanding and evaluating risks associated with large-scale injection and long-term storage of CO{sub 2} in deep geological formations. One of the primary risks during large-scale injection is due to changes in geomechanical stresses to the storage reservoir, to the caprock/seals and to the wellbores. These changes may have the potential to cause CO{sub 2} and brine leakage and geochemical impacts to the groundwater systems. While the importance of these stresses is well recognized, there have been relatively few quantitative studies (laboratory, field or theoretical) of geomechanical processes in sequestration systems. In addition, there are no integrated studies that allow evaluation of risks to groundwater quality in the context of CO{sub 2} injection-induced stresses. The work performed under this project is focused on better understanding these effects. LANL approach will develop laboratory and computational tools to understand the impact of CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical stress by creating a geomechanical test bed using inputs from laboratory experiments, field data, and conceptual approaches. The Geomechanical Test Bed will be used for conducting sensitivity and scenario analyses of the impacts of CO{sub 2} injection. The specific types of questions will relate to fault stimulation and fracture inducing stress on caprock, changes in wellbore leakage due to evolution of stress in the reservoir and caprock, and the potential for induced seismicity. In addition, the Geomechanical Test Bed will be used to investigate the coupling of stress-induced leakage pathways with impacts on groundwater quality. LANL activities are performed under two tasks: (1) develop laboratory and computational tools to understand CO{sub 2}-induced mechanical impacts and (2) use natural analog sites to determine potential groundwater impacts. We are using the Springerville-St. John Dome as a field site for collecting field data on CO{sub 2} migration through faults and groundwater impacts as well as developing and validating computational models. During the FY12 second quarter we have been working with New England Research Company to construct a tri-axial core-holder. We have built fluid control system for the coreflood system that can be ported to perform in-situ imaging of core. We have performed numerical simulations for groundwater impacts of CO{sub 2} and brine leakage using the reservoir model for Springerville-St John's Dome site. We have analyzed groundwater samples collected from Springerville site for major ion chemistry and isotopic composition. We are currently analyzing subsurface core and chip samples acquired for mineralogical composition.

  3. Fundamental Corrosion Studies in High-Temperature Molten Salt Systems for Next-Generation CSP Systems- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SRNL project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  4. A Small-Particle Solar Receiver for High-Temperature Brayton Power Cycles- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this SDSU project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  5. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WORK AUTHORIZED (With FeeProfit) - ACTUAL OR PROJECTED ACTUAL TO DATE APR 13 May 13 Jun 13 Jul-Sep 2013 Oct-Dec 2013 Jan-Feb 2014 Mar 14 AT COMPLETION 0001 3600 175,321 80,428...

  6. Nuclear Transparency and Single Particle Spectral Functions from Quasielastic A(e,e'p) Reactions up to Q2=8.1 GeV2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David McKee

    2003-05-01

    High statistics elastic and quasielastic scattering measurements were performed on hydrogen, deuterium, carbon, and iron at squared momentum transfers up to 8.1 GeV2. Both the nuclear transparency and the single particle spectral functions were extracted by means of comparison with a Plane- Wave Impulse Approximation calculation. Our data provide no evidence of the onset of color transparency within our kinematic range.

  7. A Measurement of the Neutron Electric Form Factor in Dvec (evec,e'n)p Quasielastic Scattering at Q2=0.5(GeV/c)2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hongguo Zhu

    2000-08-01

    The form factors of the neutron give information on fundamental properties of the nucleons and provide a critical testing ground for models based on QCD. In late 1998, Jefferson Lab (JLAB) experiment E93-026 measured the spin-dependent part of the exclusive (e, e'n) scattering cross section from a polarized deuterated ammonia ({sup 15}ND{sub 3}) target at a four momentum transfer squared of Q{sup 2} = 0.5 (GeV/c){sub 2}. A longitudinally polarized electron beam was scattered from the polarized target and the quasi-elastically scattered electron was detected in coincidence with the knocked-out neutron. The data have been analyzed in terms of the spin-correlation parameter, or the electron-deuteron vector asymmetry (A{sub ed}{sup V}), of (e, e'n) to determine the neutron electric form factor G{sub E}{sup n}. The result is consistent with data from existing experiments and shows a good agreement with the Galster parameterization of G{sub E}{sup n} within experimental uncertainty.

  8. Halide and Oxy-Halide Eutectic Systems for High-Performance, High-Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids- FY13 Q2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This document summarizes the progress of this University of Arizona project, funded by SunShot, for the second quarter of fiscal year 2013.

  9. Recoil Polarization Measurements for Neutral Pion Electroproduction at Q^2=1 (GeV/c)^2 Near the Delta Resonance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James Kelly; et. Al.

    2005-09-01

    We measured angular distributions of differential cross section, beam analyzing power, and recoil polarization for neutral pion electroproduction at Q{sup 2} = 1.0 (GeV/c){sup 2} in 10 bins of W across the Delta resonance. A total of 16 independent response functions were extracted, of which 12 were observed for the first time. Comparisons with recent model calculations show that response functions governed by real parts of interference products are determined relatively well near 1.232 GeV, but variations among models is large for response functions governed by imaginary parts and for both increases rapidly with W. We performed a nearly model-independent multipole analysis that adjusts complex multipoles with high partial waves constrained by baseline models. Parabolic fits to the W dependence of the multipole analysis around the Delta mass gives values for SMR = (-6.61 +/- 0.18)% and EMR = (-2.87 +/- 0.19)% that are distinctly larger than those from Legendre analysis of the same data. Similarly, the multipole analysis gives Re(S0+/M1+) = (+7.1 +/- 0.8)% at W=1.232 GeV, consistent with recent models, while the traditional Legendre analysis gives the opposite sign because its truncation errors are quite severe. Finally, using a unitary isobar model (UIM), we find that excitation of the Roper resonance is dominantly longitudinal with S1/2 = (0.05 +/- 0.01) GeV{sup (-1/2)} at Q{sup 2}=1. The ReS0+ and ReE0+ multipoles favor pseudovector coupling over pseudoscalar coupling or a recently proposed mixed-coupling scheme, but the UIM does not reproduce the imaginary parts of 0+ multipoles well.

  10. NEAMS Quarterly Report for October-December 2013 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    3 NEAMS Quarterly Report for October-December 2013 The Nuclear Energy Advanced Modeling and Simulation (NEAMS) quarterly report includes updates, highlights, fuels and reactors product line accomplishments, integration accomplishments, recent and upcoming milestones. NEAMS_QuarterlyReport_Oct-Dec13.pdf (1.89 MB) More Documents & Publications NEAMS Quarterly Report for April-June 2014 NEAMS Quarterly Report for January-March

  11. U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Weatherization Assistance Program Homes Weatherized By State through 03/31/2010 (Calendar Year) *State Total Number of Homes Weatherized 2009 Calendar Year Number of Homes Weatherized in 1st Quarter 2010 Total Number Homes Weatherized through March 2010 Total Number of Homes Weatherized through March 2010 (Calendar Year 2009 - March 2010) ***January 2010 February 2010 March 2010 **Breakdown of Homes Weatherized in 1st Quarter 2010 (Jan-Mar) [Recovery Act] 2009 Calendar Year [Recovery Act] 1st

  12. 1Q/2Q00 M-Area and Metallurgical Laboratory Hazardous Waste Management Facilities Groundwater Monitoring and Corrective-Action Report - First and Second Quarters 2000 - Volumes I, II, and II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chase, J.

    2000-10-24

    This report describes the groundwater monitoring and corrective-action program at the M-Area Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) and the Metallurgical Laboratory (Met Lab) HWMF at the Savannah River site (SRS) during first and second quarters of 2000.

  13. Measurements of the Proton Electromagnetic Form Factor Ratio From Elastic e + p -> e + p Scattering at Momentum Transfer Q^2 = 2.5, 5.2, 6.7 and 8.5 (GeV/c)^2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arthur Mkrtchyan

    2012-05-31

    Among the fundamental observables of nucleon structure, electromagnetic form factors are a crucial benchmark for modern calculations describing the strong interaction dyna mics of the nucleon's quark constituents. Electromagnetic probes are traditionally preferered to the hadronic beams. The electromagnetic interaction is a powerful tool for investigating the nucleon structure since it is well understood and it reveals observables that can be directly interpreted in terms of the current carried by the quarks. Elastic scattering leads to the form factors that describe the spatial charge a nd current distributions inside the nucleon. The reaction mechanism is assumed to be one photon exchange, the electromagnetic interaction is exactly calculable in QED, and one can safely extract the information on the hadronic vertex. The most important feature of early measurements of proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} with recoil polarization technique at Q{sup 2} up to 5.6 (GeV/c){sup 2} is the sharp decline of the ratio with Q{sup 2} increases, indicating that G{sub E}{sup p} falls much faster than G{sub M}{sup p}. This contradicts to data obtained by Rosenbluth separation method. An intriguing question was whether G{sub E}{sup p} will continue to decrease or become constant when Q{sup 2} increases. New set of measurements of proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} at Q{sup 2} = 2.5, 5.2, 6.7 and 8.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} have been conducted at JLab Hall C using {approx}85% longitudinally polarized electron elastic scattering from unpolarized hydrogen target. Recoil protons were detected in the HMS magnetic spectrometer with the standard detector package, combined with newly installed trigger scintillators and Focal Plane Polarimeter. The BigCal electromagnetic calorimeter (1744 channel) have been used for electron detection. Data obtained in this experiment show that G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} ratio continued to drop with Q{sup 2} and may cross 'zero' at Q{sup 2} > 10-15 (GeV/c){sup 2}. Intensive theoretical and experimental efforts over the past decade have aimed at explaining the discrepancy between data for the proton form factor ratio G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} obtained from cross section and polarization measurements. It was assumed that the two photon exchange contribution might be responsible for difference of G{sub E}{sup p}/G{sub M}{sup p} ratio obtained by Rosenbluth separation method and recoil polarization technique. The kinematical dependence of polarization transfer observables in elastic electron-proton scattering at Q{sup 2} = 2.5 (GeV/c){sup 2} have been used in search of effects of 2{gamma} contribution. For a wide range of values of the virtual photon polarization {epsilon} ({epsilon} = 0.15, 0.63, and 0.77), the proton form factor ratio and longitudinal polarization transfer component were measured with statistical uncertainties of {+-}0.01 and {+-}0.005, respectively. Our data provide significant constraints on models of nucleon structure.

  14. The Salt Defense Disposal Investigations (SDDI)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Q4 Q2 Q1 Q3 Task Name ID 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Mine and Construct the Test Commit to Major Procurements...

  15. Measurements of the neutron electric to magnetic form-factor ratio G(En) / G(Mn) via the H-2(polarized-e, e-prime,polarized-n)H-1 reaction to Q**2 = 1.45-(GeV/c)**2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley Plaster; A.Yu. Semenov; A. Aghalaryan; Erick Crouse; Glen MacLachlan; Shigeyuki Tajima; William Tireman; Abdellah Ahmidouch; Brian Anderson; Hartmuth Arenhovel; Razmik Asaturyan; O. Baker; Alan Baldwin; David Barkhuff; Herbert Breuer; Roger Carlini; Michael Christy; Steve Churchwell; Leon Cole; Samuel Danagoulian; Donal Day; T. Eden; Mostafa Elaasar; Rolf Ent; Manouchehr Farkhondeh; Howard Fenker; John Finn; Liping Gan; Ashot Gasparian; Kenneth Garrow; Paul Gueye; Calvin Howell; Bitao Hu; Mark Jones; James Kelly; Cynthia Keppel; Mahbubul Khandaker; Wooyoung Kim; Stanley Kowalski; Allison Lung; David Mack; Richard Madey; D. Manley; Pete Markowitz; Joseph Mitchell; Hamlet Mkrtchyan; Allena Opper; Charles Perdrisat; Vina Punjabi; Brian Raue; Tilmann Reichelt; Joerg Reinhold; Julie Roche; Yoshinori Sato; Nikolai Savvinov; Irina Semenova; Wonick Seo; Neven Simicevic; Gregory Smith; Stepan Stepanyan; Vardan Tadevosyan; Liguang Tang; Shawn Taylor; Paul Ulmer; William Vulcan; John Watson; Steven Wells; Frank Wesselmann; Stephen Wood; Seunghoon Yang; Lulin Yuan; Wei-Ming Zhang; Hong Guo Zhu; Xiaofeng Zhu

    2006-02-01

    We report values for the neutron electric to magnetic form factor ratio, G{sub En}/G{sub Mn}, deduced from measurements of the neutron's recoil polarization in the quasielastic {sup 2}H({rvec e}, e{prime}{rvec n}) {sup 1}H reaction, at three Q{sup 2} values of 0.45, 1.13, and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2}. The data at Q{sup 2} = 1.13 and 1.45 (GeV/c){sup 2} are the first direct experimental measurements of GEn employing polarization degrees of freedom in the Q{sup 2} > 1 (GeV/c){sup 2} region and stand as the most precise determinations of GEn for all values of Q{sup 2}.

  16. Energy Information Administration - Commercial Energy Consumption...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... 8 Q 2 1 Q 2 Q Q Q 1 Principal Building Activity Education ... 386 Q 21 34 29 87 Q 56 39 97 Food Sales...

  17. DC Fast Charge Effects on Battery Life and Performance Study - 50,000 Mile Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    11 L2 4582 L2 2183 DCFC 2078 DCFC 0-10k Miles (Oct-Jan) 28.6 28.6 32.7 32.5 10-20k Miles (Jan-Mar) 22.7 22.5 27.6 27.3 20-30k Miles (Apr-Jul) 35.7 36.0 39.8 39.5 30-40k Miles (Jul-Oct) 38.2 38.4 40.8 40.6 40-50k Miles (Oct-Mar) 23.2 23.6 27.3 26.8 1. Capacity and Peak Power tests based on tests from USABC Electric Vehicle Battery Test Procedures Manual Revision 2. Electric Vehicle Power Characterization test adapted from the Hybrid Pulse Power Characterization Test from the FreedomCAR Battery

  18. Slide 1

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... Nigeria - 2.9 Trinidad &Tobago - 2.1 Equitorial Guinea - 0.5 Oman - 1.5 UAE - 0.8 USA - 0.2 Peru - 0.6 Source: Waterborne, Cheniere Research 26 Q4 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q1 Q2 Q2 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q2 ...

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    ... detail and add significantly to the DIS data set at low to moderate Q2 and moderate to ... detail and add significantly to the DIS data set at low to moderate Q2 and moderate to ...

  20. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Management Advisory Board Meeting May 11, 2016 1 We do the right thing. Nuclear Workforce Initiative Larry Ling Chief of Staff Acting Director of Administrative Services Savannah River Remediation Environmental Management Advisory Board Meeting May 11, 2016 2 We do the right thing. SRR Contract Headcount 0 500 1000 1500 2000 2500 3000 Q4-09 Q2-10 Q4-10 Q2-11 Q4-11 Q2-12 Q4-12 Q2-13 Q4-13 Q2-14 Q4-14 Q1-15 Q2-15 Q3-15 Q4-15 Q1-16 SRR Headcount (December 31, 2009 through March 2016) All data at

  2. compare_tables.xlsx

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    ... Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2014 2015 2016 2017 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 U.S. Petroleum WTI spot (barrel) Current 48.48 57.85 46.55 41.94 33.35 44.52 46.00 47.00 ...

  3. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Direct + Diffuse Direct (all sky) Direct (clear sky) Diffuse (all sky) > Diffuse (clear sky) Q2: Reflectance Enhancement Enhancement (3D-1D) depends on cloud...

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    79 Q N Q Q Food Service ...... 297 282 125 171 Q Q 31 Q Health Care ...... 129 124 62 68 Q 2 Q Q Inpatient ...

  5. Implementation of ORR Groundwater Strategy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ... modeling * Summary of progress in annual Remediation Effectiveness Report Groundwater Program ... * first sampling event in FY 2015 Q2 was successfully completed ...

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    committee and introductions were made. The committee approved the June meeting summary. ... Assessment, Q2 * Natural Gas Pipeline Environmental Impact Statement (EIS), Q3 ...

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    ...circ in the scaled differential cross section, s7 fracdsigmadt. ... The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio (Gsub Esup pGsub Msup p) at Q2 ...

  8. NREL-BA Team CARB

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    & Review; Q2 3. Project Execution and Ongoing Evaluation; ... 2 Purpose and Objectives Problem Statement: * Builders , ... cost-effective efficiency strategy - maximize insulation * ...

  9. Building America - IBACOS

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    & Review; Q2 3. Project Execution and Ongoing Evaluation; ... - IBACOS Focus Areas Problem Statement: Support RBI ... in low load homes, regardless of HVAC system strategy. ...

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    ... of National Environmental Policy Act (United States) USDOE ... F2 and, by including other world data, we studied the Q2 ... phenomenological analysis indicates an excess of the ...

  11. Empirical Fit to Precision Inclusive Electron-Proton Cross Sections in the Resonance Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M.E. Christy; Peter Bosted

    2010-05-01

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-proton cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<8$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.1<3.1$ GeV. The fit is constrained by the recent high precision longitudinal and transverse (L/T) separated cross section measurements from Jefferson Lab Hall C, un-separated Hall C measurements up to $Q^2$ $\\approx 7.5$ ${\\rm GeV}^2$, and photoproduction data at $Q^2 = 0$. Compared to previous fits, the present fit covers a wider kinematic range, fits both transverse and longitudinal cross sections, and features smooth transitions to the photoproduction data at $Q^2=0$ and DIS data at high $Q^2$ and $W$.

  12. SYNTHESIS OF METHYL METHACRYLATE FROM COAL-DERIVED SYNGAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BEN W.-L. JANG; GERALD N. CHOI; JAMES J. SPIVEY; JOSPEH R. ZOELLER; RICHARD D. COLBERG

    1999-01-20

    Research Triangle Institute (RTI), Eastman Chemical Company, and Bechtel collectively are developing a novel three-step process for the synthesis of methyl methacrylate (MMA) from coal-derived syngas that consists of the steps of synthesis of a propionate, its condensation with formaldehyde to form methacrylic acid (MAA), and esterification of MAA with methanol to produce MMA. The research team has completed the research on the three-step methanol-based route to MMA. Under an extension to the original contract, we are currently evaluating a new DME-based process for MMA. The key research need for DME route is to develop catalysts for DME partial oxidation reactions and DME condensation reactions. Over the last quarter(Oct.-Dec./98), we have investigated the condensation between methyl propionate and formaldehyde (MP/HCHO=4.5/1) at various reaction temperatures(280-360EC) over 5%, 10%, and 20% Nb O /SiO catalysts. The conversion of HCHO increases with reaction 2 5 2 temperature and niobium loading. MMA+MAA selectivity goes through a maximum with the temperature over both 10% and 20% Nb O /SiO . The selectivities to MMA+MAA are 67.2%, 2 5 2 72.3%and 58.1% at 320EC over 5%, 10%, 20% Nb O /SiO , respectively. However, the 2 5 2 conversion of formaldehyde decreases rapidly with time on stream. The results suggest that silica supported niobium catalysts are active and selective for condensation of MP with HCHO, but deactivation needs to be minimized for the consideration of commercial application. We have preliminarily investigated the partial oxidation of dimethyl ether(DME) over 5% Nb O /SiO catalyst. Reactant gas mixture of 0.1% DME, 0.1% O and balance nitrogen is 2 5 2 2 studied with temperature ranging from 200°C to 500°C. The conversion of DME first increases with temperature reaching an maximum at 400°C then decreases. The selectivity to HCHO also increases with reaction temperature first. But the selectivity to HCHO decreases at temperature above 350

  13. file://C:\\Documents and Settings\\bh5\\My Documents\\Energy Effici

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Metals 758 646 529 332 Fabricated Metal Products 3 1 1 333 Machinery Q 2 * 334 Computer and Electronic Products * 1 1 335 Electrical Equip., Appliances, and Components 27 69...

  14. Electrolux Gibson Air Conditioner and Equator Clothes Washer Fail DOE Energy Star Testing

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE testing in support of the ENERGY STAR program has revealed that an Electrolux Gibson air conditioner (model GAH105Q2T1) and an Equator clothes washer (model EZ 3720 CEE), both of which claimed...

  15. Stuart R Hudson | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    was introduced. After completing his doctorate, Stuart worked as a Research Fellow at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. During this time, he studied the overlap of q2...

  16. MHK Projects/CETO La Reunion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the single, stand-alone unit due in Q2 2012. Stage 1 has been awarded 5M of French Government funding. Project Installed Capacity (MW) 0 Number of Devices Deployed 1...

  17. c21.xls

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Q 14.5 18.7 Buildings without Cooling ... 11 8 Q 2,142 2,757 Q 5.2 2.8 7.7 Water-Heating Energy Sources Electricity ... 88 163...

  18. --No Title--

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 110 52 88 6,834 3,186 6,328 16.1 16.4 13.9 Other Excluding Electricity ... Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Q Buildings without Cooling ... Q 2...

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    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

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    differential cross section, ssup 7(dsigmadt) and a rapid fall-off in a ... The proton electric to magnetic form factor ratio (Gsub Esup pGsub Msup p) at Q2 ...

  1. Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators - FY13 Q1 | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    KB) More Documents & Publications Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrator Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators

  2. Low-Cost Light Weigh Thin Film Solar Concentrators | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    313ganapathi.pdf (6.65 MB) More Documents & Publications Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost, Lightweight Solar Concentrators FY13 Q2

  3. Financial Management for Retail Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Budget History April 9, 2015 - FY 2015 (past) FY 2016 (current) FY 2017 - Dec. 31, 2018 ... retail financial calendars 3.1 Program Benchmarking Calls Q1, Q2 Q1 delayed less than a ...

  4. Atmospheric Pressure Deposition for Electrochromic Windows

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Study of Doped NiO Counter Electrode Materials FY12-Q2 Milestone: Synthesize VO2 Nanoparticles and Charcaterize Performance FY12-Q4 Milestone: Demonstration Liquid Phase Spray ...

  5. --No Title--

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    Distributed System ... Q 120 244 Q 2,566 5,478 Q 46.9 44.6 Energy-Related Space Functions (more than one may apply) Commercial Food Preparation ... 185 298 483...

  6. Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    the PEM Stack Transport Studies Transport Studies Enabling Efficiency Optimization of Cost-Competitive Fuel Cell ... 11 Q1 12 Q2 12 Q3 12 1. Systems Analysis NFC 2. Test ...

  7. PowerPoint Presentation - FY13 Q1 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors - FY13 Q2 Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors Self-Cleaning CSP Optics ...

  8. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

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    to continued declines in profits. * Capital expenditure per barrel produced was the ... Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 Capital expenditure decreased 11 billion since ...

  9. SENDECO2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: SENDECO2 Place: Barcelona, Spain Zip: 11 08034 Sector: Carbon Product: A Spanish exchange for CO2 allowances and carbon credits, intended to go live by the end of Q2...

  10. Electrolux Gibson Air Conditioner and Equator Clothes Washer...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ENERGY STAR program has revealed that an Electrolux Gibson air conditioner (model GAH105Q2T1) and an Equator clothes washer (model EZ 3720 CEE), both of which claimed ENERGY STAR...

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  12. DOE MURI: Hig-Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for...

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    High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids - FY13 Q2 High Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for Solar Thermal Power Generation FY13 Q1 Corrosion in Very ...

  13. HUD Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 HUD Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 HUD Updated Supplemental Lists - February 18, 2016 Updated_supplemental_lists_1Q_2Q_ 2-18-16.xlsx (23.23 KB) More Documents & Publications updated_supplemental_lists_1n-2n-3m_07-06-2012.xlsx updated_supplemental_lists_1m-2m-3l-04-05-2012.xlsx updated_supplemental_lists_1p_2p_3o_04302013.xlsx

  14. $$B\\to Kl^+l^-$$ decay form factors from three-flavor lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2016-01-27

    We compute the form factors for the B → Kl+l- semileptonic decay process in lattice QCD using gauge-field ensembles with 2+1 flavors of sea quark, generated by the MILC Collaboration. The ensembles span lattice spacings from 0.12 to 0.045 fm and have multiple sea-quark masses to help control the chiral extrapolation. The asqtad improved staggered action is used for the light valence and sea quarks, and the clover action with the Fermilab interpretation is used for the heavy b quark. We present results for the form factors f+(q2), f0(q2), and fT(q2), where q2 is the momentum transfer, together with a comprehensivemore » examination of systematic errors. Lattice QCD determines the form factors for a limited range of q2, and we use the model-independent z expansion to cover the whole kinematically allowed range. We present our final form-factor results as coefficients of the z expansion and the correlations between them, where the errors on the coefficients include statistical and all systematic uncertainties. Lastly, we use this complete description of the form factors to test QCD predictions of the form factors at high and low q2.« less

  15. Clean measurements of the nucleon axial-vector and free-neutron magnetic form factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deur, Alexandre P.

    2013-11-01

    We discuss the feasibility of a weak charged current experiment using a low energy electron beam. A first goal is to measure the Q^2 dependence of the axial-vector form factor g_a(Q^2). It can be measured model-independently and as robustly as for electromagnetic form factors from typical electron scattering experiments, in contrast to the methods used so far to measure g_a(Q^2). If g_a(Q^2) follows a dipole form, the axial mass can be extracted with a better accuracy than the world data altogether. The most important detection equipment would be a segmented neutron detector with good momentum and angular resolution that is symmetric about the beam direction, and covers a moderate angular range. A high intensity beam (100 uA) is necessary. Beam polarization is highly desirable as it provides a clean measurement of the backgrounds. Beam energies between 70 and 110 MeV are ideal. This range would provide a Q^2 mapping of g_a between 0.01

  16. Precision Measurements of the Proton Elastic Form Factor Ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Douglas Higinbotham

    2010-08-01

    New high precision polarization measurements of the proton elastic form factor ratio in the Q^2 from 0.3 to 0.7 [GeV/c]^2 have been made. These elastic H(e,e'p) measurementswere done in Jefferson Lab's Hall A using 80% longitudinally polarized electrons and recoil polarimetry. For Q^2 greater than 1 [GeV/c]^2, previous polarization data indicated a strong deviation of the form factor ratio from unity which sparked renewed theoretical and experimental interest in how two-photon diagrams have been taken into account. The new high precision data indicate that the deviation from unity, while small, persists even at Q^2 less than 1 [GeV/c]^2.

  17. Impact of hadronic and nuclear corrections on global analysis of spin-dependent parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jimenez-Delgado, Pedro; Accardi, Alberto; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2014-02-01

    We present the first results of a new global next-to-leading order analysis of spin-dependent parton distribution functions from the most recent world data on inclusive polarized deep-inelastic scattering, focusing in particular on the large-x and low-Q^2 regions. By directly fitting polarization asymmetries we eliminate biases introduced by using polarized structure function data extracted under nonuniform assumptions for the unpolarized structure functions. For analysis of the large-x data we implement nuclear smearing corrections for deuterium and 3He nuclei, and systematically include target mass and higher twist corrections to the g_1 and g_2 structure functions at low Q^2. We also explore the effects of Q^2 and W^2 cuts in the data sets, and the potential impact of future data on the behavior of the spin-dependent parton distributions at large x.

  18. Measurements of $ep \\to e^\\prime π^+n$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive process $e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $\\pi^+ n$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $I = {1\\over 2}$ resonances $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$, $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ and $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ were extracted atmore »different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$ in the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $A_{3/2}$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $A_{1/2}$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $S_{1/2}$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude at $Q^2 « less

  19. Measurements of $ep \\to e^\\prime ?^+n$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A. S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Fassi, L. El; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fersch, R.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Joo, H. S.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S. E.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Lenisa, P.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; MacGregor, I. J.; Markov, N.; Martinez, D.; McKinnon, B.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Moutarde, H.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paolone, M.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J. J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A. J.; Raue, B. A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati??, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Smith, E. S.; Smith, G. D.; Sparveris, N.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tang, W.; Taylor, C. E.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Watts, D. P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive process $e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $\\pi^+ n$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $n\\pi^+$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $I = {1\\over 2}$ resonances $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$, $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ and $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ were extracted at different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$ in the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $A_{3/2}$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $A_{1/2}$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $S_{1/2}$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $A_{1/2}$ amplitude at $Q^2 < 2.5$ GeV$^2$.

  20. Measurements of $$ep \\to e^\\prime π^+n$$ at W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV and extraction of nucleon resonance electrocouplings at CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Kijun; Aznauryan, I. G.; Burkert, V. D.; Adhikari, K. P.; Amaryan, M. J.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Battaglieri, M.; Badui, R.; Bedlinskiy, I.; et al

    2015-04-01

    Differential cross sections of the exclusive processmore » $$e p \\to e^\\prime \\pi^+ n$$ were measured with good precision in the range of the photon virtuality $Q^2 = 1.8 - 4.5$ GeV$^2$, and the invariant mass range of the $$\\pi^+ n$$ final state W = 1.6 - 2.0 GeV using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Data were collected with nearly complete coverage in the azimuthal and polar angles of the $$n\\pi^+$$ center-of-mass system. More than 37,000 cross section points were measured. The contributions of the isospin $$I = {1\\over 2}$$ resonances $$N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$$, $$N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$$ and $$N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$$ were extracted at different values of $Q^2$ using a single-channel, energy-dependent resonance amplitude analysis. Two different approaches, the unitary isobar model and the fixed-$t$ dispersion relations, were employed in the analysis. We observe significant strength of the $$N(1675){5\\over 2}^-$$ in the $$A_{1/2}$$ amplitude, which is in strong disagreement with quark models that predict both transverse amplitudes to be strongly suppressed. For the $$N(1680){5\\over 2}^+$$ we observe a slow changeover from the dominance of the $$A_{3/2}$$ amplitude at the real photon point ($Q^2=0$) to a $Q^2$ where $$A_{1/2}$$ begins to dominate. The scalar amplitude $$S_{1/2}$$ drops rapidly with $Q^2$ consistent with quark model prediction. For the $$N(1710){1\\over 2}^+$$ resonance our analysis shows significant strength for the $$A_{1/2}$$ amplitude at $Q^2 < 2.5$ GeV$^2$.« less

  1. New insight on global QCD fits using Regge theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soyez, G.

    2005-06-14

    In global QCD fits, one has to choose an initial parton distribution at Q{sup 2} = Q{sub 0}{sup 2}. I shall argue that the initial condition chosen in usual standard sets is inconsistent with analytic S-matrix theory. I shall show how one can combine these two approaches, leading to a Regge-compatible next-to-leading order global QCD fit. This allows one to extend the parametrisation in the low-Q2 region. Finally, I shall discuss how it it possible to use the Dokshitzer-Gribov-Lipatov-Altarelli-Parisi (DGLAP) equation to obtain information on Regge models at high Q2.

  2. Unitary constraints on neutral pion electroproduction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Laget, J -M

    2011-01-01

    At large virtualitymore » $Q^2$, the coupling to the vector meson production channels provides us with a natural explanation of the surprisingly large cross section of the neutral pion electroproduction recently measured at Jefferson Laboratory, without destroying the good agreement between the Regge pole model and the data at the real photon point. Elastic rescattering of the $$\\pi^0$$ provides us with a way to explain why the node, that appears at $$t\\sim -0.5$$~GeV$^2$ at the real photon point, disappears as soon as $Q^2$ differs from zero.« less

  3. Directives Quarterly Updates - DOE Directives, Delegations, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Quarterly Updates by Diane Johnson Listings of new Justification Memoranda and new or revised Directives that have been posted to the DOE Directives, Delegations, and Requirements Portal. Updated quarterly. FY2016 FY 16, Q2 - January through March 2016 FY2015 FY15, Q1 - October through December 2014 FY15, Q3 - April through June 2015 FY15, Q4 - July through September 2015 FY 2014 FY14, Q1 - October through December 2013 FY14, Q2 - January through March 2014 FY14, Q3 - April

  4. c35.xls

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Water ... 574 40 47 Q 2,577 1,652 2,380 1,081 0.22 0.02 0.02 Q Separate Computer Area ... 560 41 59 35 3,623 1,957 2,916 1,756 0.15 0.02 0.02 Q HVAC...

  5. Hard diffractive production of vector mesons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirschner, R.

    2005-06-14

    The large Q2 behaviour of diffractive electroproduction and the large t behaviour of diffractive photoproduction are considered relying on models of the meson and real photon light-cone wave functions. The large size quark-antiquark dipole contribution to the impact factors of all helicity configurations are discussed.

  6. table2.2_02.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Total United States RSE Column Factors: 1.4 0.4 1.6 1.2 1.2 1.1 0.7 1.2 ... 0 0 * 0 324 Petroleum and Coal Products 3,689 * 2 * 0 Q 2 3,407 4.4 324110 Petroleum Refineries 3,307 0 0 0 ...

  7. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. ... (APS) Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron up to Q2 3.4 GeV2 using ...

  8. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.72 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. ... (APS) Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron up to Q2 3.4 GeV2 using ...

  9. Jefferson Lab Hosts 2012 SPAFOA Members Meeting (Meyer Cryogenic, Vacuum

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Pressure Technologies) | Jefferson Lab Hosts 2012 SPAFOA Members Meeting (Meyer Cryogenic, Vacuum and Pressure Technologies) External Link: http://ourmailer.com/Z2U-TRYV-D24Q2F5T0E/cr.aspx?b=32

  10. Build-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Air Condi- tioners","District Chilled Water","Central Chillers","Pack- aged Air Condi- ...Q",2,13,25,15,8,"Q","Q" "District Chilled Water ......",33,33,"Q",1,2,33,"Q",4,"Q","Q" ...

  11. Study of quasielastic scattering using charged-current νμ-iron interactions in the MINOS near detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.

    2015-01-08

    Kinematic distributions from an inclusive sample of 1.41×106 charged-current νμ interactions on iron, obtained using the MINOS near detector exposed to a wide-band beam with peak flux at 3 GeV, are compared to a conventional treatment of neutrino scattering within a Fermi gas nucleus. Results are also used to guide the selection of a subsample enriched in quasielastic νμFe interactions, containing an estimated 123,000 quasielastic events of incident energies 1 < Eν < 8 GeV, with < Eν > = 2.79 GeV. Four additional subsamples representing topological and kinematic sideband regions to quasielastic scattering are also selected for the purposemore » of evaluating backgrounds. Comparisons using subsample distributions in four-momentum transfer Q2 show the Monte Carlo model to be inadequate at low Q2. Its shortcomings are remedied via inclusion of a Q2-dependent suppression function for baryon resonance production, developed from the data. A chi-square fit of the resulting Monte Carlo simulation to the shape of the Q2 distribution for the quasielastic-enriched sample is carried out with the axial-vector mass MA of the dipole axial-vector form factor of the neutron as a free parameter. Furthermore, the effective MA which best describes the data is 1.23+0.13-0.09(fit)+0.12-0.15(syst) GeV.« less

  12. Table 5.14. U.S. Vehicle Fuel Consumption by Vehicle Type, 1994

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or More ... 11.9 7.0 6.6 0.4 0.7 1.4 Q 2.0 Q 23.6 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 6.9 4.9 4.6 0.3 Q Q Q 1.2 Q...

  13. Characteristics RSE Column Factor: All Vehicle Types

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    or More ... 19.1 13.0 12.3 0.7 1.0 1.7 Q 2.7 Q 21.8 Below Poverty Line 100 Percent ... 12.4 9.5 8.9 0.5 Q Q Q 1.8 Q...

  14. Induced polarization of Lambda(1116) in kaon electroproduction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gabrielyan, M.; Raue, B.A.; Carman, D.S.; Park, K.; Adhikari, K.P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M.J.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Baturin, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.S.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Cao, T.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; DAngelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; ElFassi, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Goetz, J.T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, W.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Meyer, C.A.; Mestayer, M.D.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munevar, E.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Paremuzyan, R.; Pasyuk, E.; Peng, P.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J.W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Rimal, D.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Sabatie, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Stepanyan, S.; Strakovsky, I.I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.P.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.

    2014-09-01

    We have measured the induced polarization of the ?(1116) in the reaction ep?e?K+?, detecting the scattered e? and K+ in the final state along with the proton from the decay ??p??.The present study used the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS), which allowed for a large kinematic acceptance in invariant energy W (1.6?W?2.7 GeV) and covered the full range of the kaon production angle at an average momentum transfer Q2=1.90 GeV2.In this experiment a 5.50 GeV electron beam was incident upon an unpolarized liquid-hydrogen target. We have mapped out the W and kaon production angle dependencies of the induced polarization and found striking differences from photoproduction data over most of the kinematic range studied. However, we also found that the induced polarization is essentially Q2 independent in our kinematic domain, suggesting that somewhere below the Q2 covered here there must be a strong Q2 dependence. Along with previously published photo- and electroproduction cross sections and polarization observables, these data are needed for the development of models, such as effective field theories, and as input to coupled-channel analyses that can provide evidence of previously unobserved s-channel resonances.

  15. Separated response functions in exclusive, forward π± electroproduction on deuterium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huber, G. M.; Blok, H. P.; Butuceanu, C.; Gaskell, D.; Horn, T.; Mack, D. J.; Abbott, D.; Aniol, K.; Anklin, H.; Armstrong, C.; et al

    2015-01-07

    Background: Measurements of forward exclusive meson production at different squared four-momenta of the exchanged virtual photon, Q2, and at different four-momentum transfer, t, can be used to probe QCD's transition from meson-nucleon degrees of freedom at long distances to quark-gluon degrees of freedom at short scales. Ratios of separated response functions in π⁻ and π⁺ electroproduction are particularly informative. Ratio for transverse photons may allow this transition to be more easily observed, while the ratio for longitudinal photons provides a crucial verification of the assumed pole dominance, needed for reliable extraction of the pion form factor from electroproduction data. Method:more » Data were acquired with 2.6-5.2 GeV electron beams and the HMS+SOS spectrometers in Jefferson Lab Hall C, at central Q2 values of 0.6, 1.0, 1.6 GeV2 at W=1.95 GeV, and Q2=2.45 GeV2 at W=2.22 GeV. There was significant coverage in Φ And ϵ, which allowed separation of σL,T,LT,TT. Results: σL shows a clear signature of the pion pole, with a sharp rise at small -t. In contrast, σT is much flatter versus t. The longitudinal/transverse ratios evolve with Q2 and t, and at the highest Q2=2.45 GeV2 show a slight enhancement for π⁻ Production compared to π⁺. The π⁻/π⁺+ ratio for transverse photons exhibits only a small Q2-dependence, following a nearly universal curve with t, with a steep transition to a value of about 0.25, consistent with s-channel quark knockout. The σTT/σT ratio also drops rapidly with Q2, qualitatively consistent with s-channel helicity conservation. The π⁻/π⁺ ratio for longitudinal photons indicates a small isoscalar contamination at W=1.95 GeV, consistent with what was observed in our earlier determination of the pion form factor at these kinematics.« less

  16. $$B \\to \\pi \\ell \

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Flynn, J. M.; Izubuchi, T.; Kawanai, T.; Lehner, C.; Soni, A.; Van de Water, R. S.; Witzel, O.

    2015-04-14

    We calculate the form factors for B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν decay in dynamical lattice quantum chromodynamics (QCD) using domain-wall light quarks and relativistic b-quarks. We use the (2+1)-flavor gauge-field ensembles generated by the RBC and UKQCD collaborations with the domain-wall fermion action and Iwasaki gauge action. For the b-quarks we use the anisotropic clover action with a relativistic heavy-quark interpretation. We analyze data at two lattice spacings of a ≈ 0.11, 0.086 fm with unitary pion masses as light as Mπ ≈ 290 MeV. We simultaneously extrapolate our numerical results to the physical light-quark masses and tomore » the continuum and interpolate in the pion/kaon energy using SU(2) “hard-pion” chiral perturbation theory for heavy-light meson form factors. We provide complete systematic error budgets for the vector and scalar form factors f + (q2) and f0(q2) for both B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν at three momenta that span the q2 range accessible in our numerical simulations. Next we extrapolate these results to q2 = 0 using a model-independent z-parametrization based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2)as the coefficients of the series in z and the matrix of correlations between them; this provides a parametrization of the form factors valid over the entire allowed kinematic range. Our results agree with other three-flavor lattice-QCD determinations using staggered light quarks, and have comparable precision, thereby providing important independent cross-checks. Both B → πℓν and Bs → Kℓν decays enable determinations of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |Vub|. Furthermore, we perform a combined z-fit of our numerical B → πℓν form-factor data with the experimental measurements of the branching fraction from BABAR and Belle leaving the relative normalization as a free parameter; we obtain |Vub| = 3.61(32)×10-3, where the error includes statistical and all

  17. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holt, R. J.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalker, S. S.; et al

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included themore » color transparency effects.« less

  18. Polarization Transfer in 4He(e-vector,e[prime]p-vector)3H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Paolone

    2007-10-01

    Polarization transfer in quasi-elastic nucleon knockout is sensitive to the properties of the nucleon in the nuclear medium, including possible modification of the nucleon form factor and/or spinor. In our recently completed experiment E03-104 at Jefferson Lab we measured the proton recoil polarization in the 4He(e-vector,e[prime]p-vector)3H reaction at a Q2 of 0.8 (GeV/c)2 and 1.3 (GeV/c)2 with unprecedented precision. These data complement earlier data between 0.4 and 2.6 (GeV/c)2 from both Mainz and Jefferson Lab, in which the measured ratio of polarization-transfer coefficients differs from a fully relativistic DWIA calculation. Preliminary results hint at a possible unexpected Q2 dependence in the polarization transfer coefficient ratio. Final analysis will help constrain FSI models

  19. Comparative study of nuclear effects in polarized electron scattering from 3He

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ethier, Jacob James; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2013-11-04

    We present a detailed analysis of nuclear effects in inclusive electron scattering from polarized 3He nuclei for polarization asymmetries, structure functions and their moments, both in the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions. We compare the results of calculations within the weak binding approximation at finite Q2 with the effective polarization ansatz often used in experimental data analyses, and explore the impact of Δ components in the nuclear wave function and nucleon off-shell corrections on extractions of the free neutron structure. Using the same framework we also make predictions for the Q2 dependence of quasielastic scattering from polarized 3He, data onmore » which can be used to constrain the spin-dependent nuclear smearing functions in 3He.« less

  20. Exclusive pi^0 electroproduction at W > 2 GeV with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedlinskiy, I.; Kubarovsky, V.; Niccolai, S.; Stoler, P.; Adhikari, K.P.; Anderson, M.D.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Baltzell, N.A.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Biselli, A.S.; Boiarinov, S.; Bono, J.; Briscoe, W.J.; Brooks, W.K.; Burkert, V.D.; Carman, D.S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Cortes, O.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Doughty, D.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fleming, J.A.; Forest, T.A.; Garillon, B.; Garcon, M.; Gavalian, G.; Gevorgyan, N.; Ghandilyan, Y.; Gilfoyle, G.P.; Giovanetti, K.L.; Girod, F.X.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.W.; Griffioen, K.A.; Guegan, B.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ireland, D.G.; Ishkhanov, B.S.; Isupov, E.L.; Jenkins, D.; Jo, H.S.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.J.; Koirala, S.; Kuhn, S.E.; Kuleshov, S.V.; Lenisa, P.; Levine, W.I.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.Y.; MacGregor, I.J.D.; Markov, N.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.A.; Moody, C.I.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.I.; Pappalardo, L.L.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Phelps, E.; Phelps, W.; Phillips, J.J.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.W.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Procureur, S.; Puckett, A.J.R.; Raue, B.A.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B.G.; Rizzo, A.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.A.; Seder, E.; Senderovich, I.; Sharabian, Y.G.; Simonyan, A.; Smith, G.D.; Sober, D.I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S.S.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tang, W.; Tian, Ye; Ungaro, M.; Vlassov, A.V.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.K.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L.B.; Yurov, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.W.; Zonta, I.

    2014-08-01

    Exclusive neutral-pion electroproduction (ep-->e'p'pi0) was measured at Jefferson Lab with a 5.75-GeV electron beam and the CLAS detector. Differential cross sections d4sigma/dtdQ2dxBdphipi and structure functions sigmaT+epsilonsigmaL,sigmaTT and ?LT as functions of t were obtained over a wide range of Q2 and xB. The data are compared with Regge and handbag theoretical calculations. Analyses in both frameworks find that a large dominance of transverse processes is necessary to explain the experimental results. For the Regge analysis it is found that the inclusion of vector meson rescattering processes is necessary to bring the magnitude of the calculated and measured structure functions into rough agreement. In the handbag framework, there are two independent calculations, both of which appear to roughly explain the magnitude of the structure functions in terms of transversity generalized parton distributions.

  1. Cross sections for the exclusive photon electroproduction on the proton and Generalized Parton Distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jo, Hyon -Suk

    2015-11-17

    Unpolarized and beam-polarized four-fold cross sectionsmore » $$\\frac{d^4 \\sigma}{dQ^2 dx_B dt d\\phi}$$ for the $$ep\\to e^\\prime p^\\prime \\gamma$$ reaction were measured using the CLAS detector and the 5.75-GeV polarized electron beam of the Jefferson Lab accelerator, for 110 ($Q^2,x_B,t$) bins over the widest phase space ever explored in the valence-quark region. Several models of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) describe the data well at most of our kinematics. This increases our confidence that we understand the GPD $H$, expected to be the dominant contributor to these observables. Thus, through a leading-twist extraction of Compton Form Factors, these results reveal a tomographic image of the nucleon.« less

  2. Measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon at $$\\langle E_{\

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wolcott, J.

    2016-02-25

    The first direct measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielasticlike scattering on hydrocarbon in the few-GeV region of incident neutrino energy has been carried out using the MINERvA detector in the NuMI beam at Fermilab. The flux-integrated differential cross sections in the electron production angle, electron energy, and Q2 are presented. The ratio of the quasielastic, flux-integrated differential cross section in Q2 for νe with that of similarly selected νμ-induced events from the same exposure is used to probe assumptions that underpin conventional treatments of charged-current νe interactions used by long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiments. Furthermore, the data are found tomore » be consistent with lepton universality and are well described by the predictions of the neutrino event generator GENIE.« less

  3. Evidence for the onset of color transparency in ρ0 electroproduction off nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guo, L.; Hanretty, C.; Hicks, K.; Holt, R. J.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalker, S. S.; et al

    2012-05-11

    We have measured the nuclear transparency of the incoherent diffractive A(e,e'ρ0) process in 12C and 56Fe targets relative to 2H using a 5 GeV electron beam. The nuclear transparency, the ratio of the produced {rho}{sup 0}'s on a nucleus relative to deuterium, which is sensitive to ρA interaction, was studied as function of the coherence length (Ic), a lifetime of the hadronic fluctuation of the virtual photon, and the four-momentum transfer squared (Q2). Thus, while the transparency for both 12C and 56Fe showed no Ic dependence, a significant Q2 dependence was measured, which is consistent with calculations that included themore »color transparency effects.« less

  4. Electroexcitation of the Δ(1232)3/2+ and Δ(1600)3/2+ in a light-front relativistic quark model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aznauryan, Inna G.; Burkert, Volker D.

    2015-09-30

    The magnetic-dipole form factor and the ratios REM and RSM for the γ* N → Δ(1232)3/2+ transition are predicted within light-front relativistic quark model up to photon virtuality Q2=12 GeV2. Furthermore, we predict the helicity amplitudes of the γ* N → Δ(1600)3/2+ transition assuming the Δ(1600)3/2+ is the first radial excitation of the ground state Delta(1232)3/2+.

  5. Table B6. Building Size, Number of Buildings, 1999

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,657 2,348 1,110 708 257 145 59 23 7 Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327 119 61 52 49 30 10 5 Q Food Sales .................................................. 174 138 Q Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ............................................... 349 251 71 23 Q Q Q N N Health Care ................................................. 127 64 Q 10 8 4 2 2 1 Inpatient ..................................................... 11 N N Q Q Q 2 2 1

  6. Measurement of pretzelosity asymmetry of charged pion production in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering on a polarized He target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Y.; Qian, X.; Allada, K.; Dutta, C.

    2014-11-01

    An experiment to measure single-spin asymmetries in semi-inclusive production of charged pions in deep-inelastic scattering on a transversely polarized He target was performed at Jefferson Lab in the kinematic region of 0.16 < x < 0.35 and 1.4 < Q < 2.7 GeV. Our results show that both ? on He3 and on neutron pretzelosity asymmetries are consistent with zero within experimental uncertainties.

  7. New Measurements of High-Momentum Nucleons and Short-Range Structures in Nuclei

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fomin, N.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, R.; Benmokhtar, F.; Boeglin, W.; Bosted, P.; Bruell, A.; Bukhari, M. H. S.; Christy, M. E.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2012-02-01

    We present new, high-Q2 measurements of inclusive electron scattering from high-momentum nucleons in nuclei. This yields an improved extraction of the strength of two-nucleon correlations for several nuclei, including light nuclei where clustering effects can, for the first time, be examined. The data extend to the kinematic regime where three-nucleon correlations are expected to dominate and we observe significantly greater strength in this region than previous measurements.

  8. set3.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    4,657 2,348 1,110 708 257 145 59 23 7 Principal Building Activity Education .................................................... 327 119 61 52 49 30 10 5 Q Food Sales .................................................. 174 138 Q Q Q Q Q N N Food Service ............................................... 349 251 71 23 Q Q Q N N Health Care ................................................. 127 64 Q 10 8 4 2 2 1 Inpatient ..................................................... 11 N N Q Q Q 2 2 1

  9. Hanford Advisory Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 8-9, 2016 Attachment 7: Transcript of Sounding Board comments The following paragraphs are transcribed member responses from Hanford Advisory Board's (HAB or Board) June Safety Culture Sounding Board. The follow responses do not represent consensus views of the Board. Each Board seat was provided with up to four minutes to respond to two safety culture framing questions: Q1: What does safety culture mean to you? Q2: Given the information provided at the April Board meeting, are there any

  10. S:\\VM3\\RX97\\TBL_LIST.WPD

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ... 1.3 Q 2.5 Q Q Q 15.3 Steam or Hot-Water System ...... 7.2 9.2 12.8 10.9 Q 1.0 ... 20.2 10.8 18.8 1.1 Q 16.9 Steam or Hot-Water System ...... 5.1 7.0 5.6 13.2 Q Q 18.8 ...

  11. NERSC-ScienceHighlightSlidesJune2011.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 NERSC Science Highlights NERSC Scientific Accomplishments, Q2CY2011 2 Energy Resources NERSC users have explained the cause of LED droop; this may lead to less-expensive higher efficiency LED lighting. (Kioupakis / Van de Walle, UC SB) Fusion Energy Magnetic reconnection simulations done at NERSC along with NASA Voyager probe data help shake up prevailing views of the solar system's outer reaches. (J. Drake, U. Maryland) Nuclear Theory Computations done primarily at NERSC suggest the possible

  12. Carbon Fiber Technology Facility

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Carbon Fiber Technology Facility Dave Warren, PI Cliff Eberle, Presenter Technology Development Manager Polymer Matrix Composites Oak Ridge National Laboratory May 16, 2012 Project ID # LM003 Status as of March 30, 2012 This presentation does not contain any proprietary, confidential, or otherwise restricted information 2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Carbon Fiber Technology Facility (CFTF) ARRA CAPITAL Project Overview * Funds received FY10Q2 * Scheduled finish FY13Q4

  13. FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    fi.q 2, I: * FORMERLY UTILIZED SITES REMEDIAL ACTION PROGRAM ELIMINATION REPORT FOR WESTINGHOUSE ATOMIC POWER DEVELOPMENT PLANT EAST PITTSBURGH PLANT FOREST HILLS PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Office of Remedial Action and Waste Technology Division of Facility and Site Decommissioning Projects INTRODUCTION BACKGROUND CONTENTS Site Function Site Description Radiological History and Status ELIMINATION ANALYSIS REFERENCES Page 1 4 iii ELIMINATION REPORT

  14. High Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Control | Department of Energy Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow Control High Flux Microchannel Solar Receiver Development with Adaptive Flow Control This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042313_drost.pdf (1.81 MB) More Documents & Publications Microchannel Receiver Development - FY12 Q4 Microchannel Receiver Development - FY13 Q2

  15. Final-state interactions in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Cosyn, Wim; Melnitchouk, Wally; Sargsian, Misak M.

    2014-01-16

    We explore the role of final-state interactions (FSI) in inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from the deuteron. Relating the inclusive cross section to the deuteron forward virtual Compton scattering amplitude, a general formula for the FSI contribution is derived in the generalized eikonal approximation, utilizing the diffractive nature of the effective hadron-nucleon interaction. The calculation uses a factorized model with a basis of three resonances with mass W~<2 GeV and a continuum contribution for larger W as the relevant set of effective hadron states entering the final-state interaction amplitude. The results show sizeable on-shell FSI contributions for Bjorken x ~> 0.6 andmore » Q2 < 10 GeV2 increasing in magnitude for lower Q2, but vanishing in the high-Q2 limit due to phase space constraints. The off-shell rescattering contributes at x ~> 0.8 and is taken as an uncertainty on the on-shell result.« less

  16. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; Amaryan, M.; Anderson, M.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Bono, J.; Boiarinov, S.; Briscoe, W.; Burkert, V.; Carman, D.; Careccia, S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; De Vita, R.; De Sanctis, E.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G.; Dupre, R.; Egiyan, H.; El Alaoui, A.; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J.; Fradi, A.; Garillon, B.; Gilfoyle, G.; Giovanetti, K.; Girod, F.; Goetz, J.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R.; Griffioen, K.; Guegan, B.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S.; Hyde, C. E.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D.; Ishkhanov, B.; Jenkins, D.; Jiang, H.; Jo, H.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Kalantarians, N.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F.; Koirala, S.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuhn, S.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H.; MacGregor, I.; Markov, N.; Mattione, P.; Mayer, M.; McKinnon, B.; Mestayer, M.; Meyer, C.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R.; Moody, C.; Moutarde, H.; Movsisyan, A.; Camacho, C. Munoz; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J.; Procureur, S.; Prok, Y.; Protopopescu, D.; Puckett, A.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R.; Seder, E.; Sharabian, Y.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, I.; Smith, E.; Smith, G.; Sober, D.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Stepanyan, S.; Stoler, P.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Taiuti, M.; Tian, Ye; Trivedi, A.; Ungaro, M.; Voskanyan, H.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N.; Watts, D.; Wei, X.; Wood, M.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z.; Zonta, I.

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentum transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.

  17. completed_td_projects | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Forecast: August 9, 2016; Previous Forecast: July 12, 2016 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 2014 2015 2016 2017 2014-2015 2015-2016 2016-2017 U.S. Energy Supply U.S. Crude Oil Production (million barrels per day) Current 9.48 9.50 9.43 9.32 9.17 8.87 8.45 8.44 8.42 8.36 8.16 8.29 8.71 9.43 8.73 8.31 8.3% -7.4% -4.9% Previous 9.48 9.50 9.43 9.32 9.17 8.79 8.26 8.23 8.24 8.21 8.09 8.27 8.71 9.43 8.61 8.20 8.3% -8.7% -4.8% Percent Change 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.0% 0.1% 0.9% 2.3% 2.5% 2.2% 1.8% 0.9%

  18. Measurement of the target-normal single-spin asymmetry in quasielastic scattering from the reaction He3↑(e,e')

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Y. -W.; Long, E.; Mihovilovič, M.; Jin, G.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R. M.; Averett, T.; Ayerbe-Gayoso, C.; Boeglin, W.; et al

    2015-10-22

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry, Ay, in quasi-elastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He↑ (e,e') on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton scattering plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero for one-photon exchange. A non-zero Ay can arise from the interference between the one- and two-photon exchange processes which is sensitive to the details of the sub-structure of the nucleon. An experiment recently completed at Jefferson Lab yielded asymmetries with high statistical precision at Q2= 0.13, 0.46 and 0.97 GeV2. These measurements demonstrate, for the first time, that the 3Hemore » asymmetry is clearly non-zero and negative with a statistical significance of (8-10)σ. Using measured proton-to-3He cross-section ratios and the effective polarization approximation, neutron asymmetries of -(1-3)% were obtained. The neutron asymmetry at high Q2 is related to moments of the Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs). Our measured neutron asymmetry at Q2=0.97 GeV2 agrees well with a prediction based on two-photon exchange using a GPD model and in addition provides a new independent constraint on these distributions.« less

  19. PARAMETRIC EFFECTS OF ANTI-FOAM COMPOSITION, SIMULANT PROPERTIES AND NOBLE METALS ON THE GAS HOLDUP AND RELEASE OF A NON-NEWTONIAN WASTE SLURRY SIMULANT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guerrero, H; Charles Crawford, C; Mark Fowley, M

    2008-08-07

    Gas holdup tests were performed in bench-scale and small-scale mechanically-agitated mixing systems at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) for a simulant of waste from the Hanford Tank 241-AZ-101. These featured additions of DOW Corning Q2-3183A anti-foam agent. Results indicated that this anti-foam agent (AFA) increased gas holdup in the waste simulant by about a factor of four and, counter-intuitively, that the holdup increased as the non-newtonian simulant shear strength decreased (apparent viscosity decreased). Such results raised the potential of increased flammable gas retention in Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) vessels mixed by air sparging and pulse-jet mixers (PJMs) during a Design Basis Event (DBE). Additional testing was performed to determine the effects of simulant properties, composition of alternate AFAs, and presence of trace noble metals. Key results are that: (1) Increased gas holdup resulting from addition of Q2-3183A is due to a decrease in surface tension that supports small bubbles which have low rise velocities. (2) Dow Corning 1520-US AFA shows it to be a viable replacement to Dow Corning Q2-3183A AFA. This alternative AFA, however, requires significantly higher dosage for the same anti-foam function. (3) Addition of noble metals to the AZ-101 waste simulant does not produce a catalytic gas retention effect with the AFA.

  20. Towards a Resolution of the Proton Form Factor Problem: New Electron and Positron Scattering Data

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adikaram, D.; Rimal, D.; Weinstein, L. B.; Raue, B.; Khetarpal, P.; Bennett, R.; Arrington, J.; Brooks, W.; Adhikari, K.; Afanasev, A.; et al

    2015-02-10

    There is a significant discrepancy between the values of the proton electric form factor, GpE, extracted using unpolarized and polarized electron scattering. Calculations predict that small two-photon exchange (TPE) contributions can significantly affect the extraction of GpE from the unpolarized electron-proton cross sections. We determined the TPE contribution by measuring the ratio of positron-proton to electron-proton elastic scattering cross sections using a simultaneous, tertiary electron-positron beam incident on a liquid hydrogen target and detecting the scattered particles in the Jefferson Lab CLAS detector. This novel technique allowed us to cover a wide range in virtual photon polarization (epsilon) and momentummore » transfer (Q2) simultaneously, as well as to cancel luminosity-related systematic errors. The cross section ratio increases with decreasing ε at Q2=1.45 GeV2. This measurement is consistent with the size of the form factor discrepancy at Q2≈1.75 GeV2 and with hadronic calculations including nucleon and Delta intermediate states, which have been shown to resolve the discrepancy up to 2-3 GeV2.« less

  1. Measurement of the nucleon structure function F2 in the nuclear medium and evaluation of its moments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Osipenko, M.

    2010-06-01

    We report on the measurement of inclusive electron scattering off a carbon target performed with CLAS at Jefferson Laboratory. A combination of three different beam energies 1.161, 2.261 and 4.461 GeV allowed us to reach an invariant mass of the final-state hadronic system W ≈ 2.4 GeV with four-momentum transfers Q2 ranging from 0.2 to 5 GeV2. These data, together with previous measurements of the inclusive electron scattering off proton and deuteron, which cover a similar continuous two-dimensional region of Q2 and Bjorken variable x, permit the study of nuclear modifications of the nucleon structure. By using these, as wellmore » as other world data, we evaluated the F2 structure function and its moments. Using an OPE-based twist expansion, we studied the Q2-evolution of the moments, obtaining a separation of the leading-twist and the total higher-twist terms. The carbon-to-deuteron ratio of the leading-twist contributions to the F2 moments exhibits the well known EMC effect, compatible with that discovered previously in x-space. The total higher-twist term in the carbon nucleus appears, although with large systematic uncertainites, to be smaller with respect to the deuteron case for n < 7, suggesting partial parton deconfinement in nuclear matter. Lastly, we speculate that the spatial extension of the nucleon is changed when it is immersed in the nuclear medium.« less

  2. MEASUREMENT OF THE STRANGE QUARK CONTRIBUTION TO THE VECTOR STRUCTURE OF THE PROTON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarah Phillips

    2007-11-30

    The goal of the G0 experiment is to determine the contribution of the strange quarks in the quark-antiquark sea to the structure of the nucleon. To this end, the experiment measured parityviolating asymmetries from elastic electron-proton scattering from 0.12 ≤ Q2 ≤ 1.0 (GeV/c)2 at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. These asymmetries come from the interference of the electromagnetic and neutral weak interactions, and are sensitive to the strange quark contributions in the proton. The results from the forward-angle measurement, the linear combination of the strange electric and magnetic form factors GsE +ηGsM, suggest possible non-zero, Q2 dependent, strange quark contributions and provide new information to understand the magnitude of the contributions. This dissertation presents the analysis and results of the forward-angle measurement. In addition, the G0 experiment measured the beam-normal single-spin asymmetry in the elastic scattering of transversely polarized 3 GeV electrons from unpolarized protons at Q2 = 0.15, 0.25 (GeV/c)2 as part of the forward-angle measurement. The transverse asymmetry provides a direct probe of the imaginary component of the two-photon exchange amplitude, the complete description of which is important in the interpretation of data from precision electron-scattering experiments. The results of the measurement indicate that calculations using solely the elastic nucleon intermediate state are insufficient and generally agree with calculations that include significant inelastic hadronic intermediate state contributions. This dissertation presents the analysis and results of this measurement.

  3. Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page "Measurement of Muon Neutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Ev ~ 3.5 GeV" Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 022502, hep-ex/1305.2243 Data Ancillary data files for this result are given here, and supercede the ones originally associated with the arXiv entry: they have been updated with MINERvA's best estimate of the NuMI neutrino flux. The available data files have the following format: The columns are Q2 bins, first the 8 neutrino and

  4. Electron Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electron Neutrino CCQE Data Release Page Measurement of electron neutrino quasielastic and quasielastic-like scattering on hydrocarbon at ⟨Eν⟩ = 3.6 GeV Phys. Rev. Lett. 116, 081802 (2016) and hep-ex/1509.05729 Data Ancillary files for this result are available at http://arxiv.org/src/1509.05729v6/anc The available data files are: Cross Section as a function of Electron Angle Cross Section as a function of Electron Energy Cross Section as a function of Q2 Covariance Matrix as a function of

  5. QR, I UNITED STA-I' ES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION W~I-WdOTDN 2B. D. D.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    QR, I UNITED STA-I' ES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION W~I-WdOTDN 2B. D. D. h-cc I./, ~.C,.dL c rj' f' . 5 7c 3 70-147 LRL:JCD I JAN 2 81958 K+ci; q;- 2-i" Oregon Metellurgical Corporation P. 0. Box 484 Albeny, Oregon Attention: Mr. Stephen M. Shelton General Manager Gentlemen: Enclosed is Special Nuclear Material License No. SNM-144, as amended. Very Ebuly yours, !:. i.:, s p~pt 'SC- Lyall Johnson Chief, Licensing Branch Division of Licensing & Regulation Enclosure: SNM-144, as amended

  6. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt-bar production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  7. Antineutrino CCQE Data Release Page

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antineutrino CCQE Data Release Page "Measurement of Muon Antineutrino Quasi-Elastic Scattering on a Hydrocarbon Target at Ev ~ 3.5 GeV" Phys. Rev. Lett. 111 (2013) 022501, hep-ex/1305.2234 Data Ancillary data files for this result are given here, and supercede the ones originally associated with the arXiv entry: they have been updated with MINERvA's best estimate of the NuMI neutrino flux. The available data files have the following format: The columns are Q2 bins, first the 8 neutrino

  8. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain themore » $$\\pi BB'$$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.« less

  9. Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Coatings for CSP Collectors This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042413_hunter.pdf (5.38 MB) More Documents & Publications PowerPoint Presentation - FY13 Q1 Low-Cost Self-Cleaning Reflector Coatings for CSP Collectors - FY13 Q2 Urban Heat Islands: Anti-Soiling Cool Roof Coatings

  10. Low-Cost, Highly Transparent Flexible low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Berland, bberland@itnes.com ITN Energy Systems Low-Cost, Highly Transparent Flexible low-e Coating Film to Enable Electrochromic Windows with Increased Energy Savings 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: October 1, 2013 Planned end date: September 30, 2014 Key Milestones 1.Low-e Film: 90% T,vis & R,ir (100 cm 2 ) (Q2) 2.Low-e Film: 90% T,vis & R,ir (2m long, %T,%R variation < 2% cross web) (Q3) 3.Demonstrate Low-e/EC Film (Q3) Budget:

  11. Cleanable and Hardcoat Coatings for Increased Durability of Silvered Polymeric Mirrors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padiyath, Raghunath

    2013-04-01

    We have successfully developed coating formulations which significantly increasethe abrasion resistance of mirror films. We have demonstrated manufacturing scale-up of these films to full width andproduction volumes. Implementation of these films in commercial test sites is planned for Q2 2013(Abengoa, Gossamer Space Frames). This slide show outlines the background and objectives of the project, technical approach and results, and key lessons. It also presents the need and opportunity for reduction of costs for CSP and collectors. It also presents an approach for a large aperture parabolic trough collector with reflective film and a high concentration factor, including demonstration and results.

  12. Hadron mass corrections in semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Guerrero Teran, Juan Vicente; Ethier, James J.; Accardi, Alberto; Casper, Steven W.; Melnitchouk, Wally

    2015-09-24

    We found that the spin-dependent cross sections for semi-inclusive lepton-nucleon scattering are derived in the framework of collinear factorization, including the effects of masses of the target and produced hadron at finite Q2. At leading order the cross sections factorize into products of parton distribution and fragmentation functions evaluated in terms of new, mass-dependent scaling variables. Furthermore, the size of the hadron mass corrections is estimated at kinematics relevant for current and future experiments, and the implications for the extraction of parton distributions from semi-inclusive measurements are discussed.

  13. Nx-TEC: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Nx-TEC: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion Nx-TEC: Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042313_melosh.pdf (3.66 MB) More Documents & Publications Next-Generation Thermionic Solar Energy Conversion - FY13 Q2 Final Report - Technology Enabling Ultra High Concentration Multi-Junction Cells

  14. PowerPoint Presentation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Schwartz, pschwartz@tm-lift.com DE-FOA-0000823 Grantee The Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review FREE Heat from Ambient (10 kW) Heat from Burner (15 kW) Combined Heat Delivered (25 kW) New Project 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2013 (8/1/2013) Planned end date: 9/30/2014 Key Milestones 1. Concept & CAD model; Q1 FY2014 2. Thermal Simulation; Q2 FY2014 3. 20kW Demonstrator; Q3-Q4 FY2014 4. Testing at Oak Ridge; Q4 FY2014? Budget:

  15. Prototype Development for Self-Cleaning CSP Collectors | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Prototype Development for Self-Cleaning CSP Collectors Prototype Development for Self-Cleaning CSP Collectors This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042413_mazumder.pdf (2.39 MB) More Documents & Publications Final Report - Prototype Development and Evaluation of Self-Cleaning Concentrated Solar Power Collectors Self-Cleaning CSP Optics with EDS - FY13 Q2

  16. Microsoft Word - 2015_0211_Joint FY2015HABWorkPlan_TWC Issue Managers.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated February 11, 2015; incorporates comments from February 2015 EIC discussion Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2015 Work Plan (FY 2015 Action Overview) - ISSUE MANAGER ASSIGNMENTS Topic Committee Assignment Issue managers (lead in bold) Potential FY 2015 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1 Deferred Maintenance Plan RAP/HSEP Discussion; sounding board x 2 100 D/H Proposed Plan for ROD RAP Public involvement x 3 Central Plateau Inner Area Principles RAP Policy discussion; advice x x x x 4

  17. Microsoft Word - 2015_0914_FY2016HABWorkPlan_v1.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan Updated October 22, 2015 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x 5. ERDF RAP Project update x 6.

  18. New results from the studies of the Ν (1440) 1/2+, Ν (1520) 3/2–, and Δ (1620) 1/2– resonances in exclusive ep → e'p'π+π– electroproduction with the CLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mokeev, Viktor I.; Burkert, Volker D.; Carman, Daniel S.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Fedotov, Gleb V.; Golovatch, Evgeny N.; Gothe, Ralf W.; Hicks, Ken; Ishkhanov, Boris S.; Isupov, Evgeny L.; et al

    2016-02-25

    In this study, the transition helicity amplitudes from the proton ground state to the N(1440)1/2+, N(1520)3/2–, and Δ(1620)1/2– resonances (γvpN* electrocouplings) were determined from the analysis of nine independent onefold differential π+π–p electroproduction cross sections off a proton target, taken with CLAS at photon virtualities 0.5GeV2 < Q2 < 1.5 GeV2. The phenomenological reaction model employed for separation of the resonant and nonresonant contributions to this exclusive channel was further developed.

  19. Bridging the Gap to 64-bit Computing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Opteron and AMD64 A Commodity 64 bit x86 SOC Fred Weber Vice President and CTO Computation Products Group Advanced Micro Devices 22 April 2003 AMD - Salishan HPC 2003 2 Opteron/AMD64 Launch - Today! * Official Launch of AMD64 architecture and Production Server/Workstation CPUs - Series 200 (2P) available today - Series 800 (4P+) available later in Q2 * Oracle, IBM-DB2, Microsoft, RedHat, SuSe software support - And many others * Dozens of server system vendors - System builder availability this

  20. Heating Oil and Propane Update

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Respondents Q1: What is the purpose of this survey? The U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Form EIA-877, "Winter Heating Fuels Telephone Survey," is designed to collect data on State-level stocks and residential prices of No. 2 heating oil and propane during the heating season. The data are used to monitor the prices of propane and No. 2 heating oil during the heating season, and to report to the Congress and others when requested. Q2: How does the survey work? The EIA-877

  1. PowerPoint Presentation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Paul Schwartz, pschwartz@tm-lift.com DE-FOA-0000823 Grantee The Natural Gas Heat Pump and Air Conditioner 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review FREE Heat from Ambient (10 kW) Heat from Burner (15 kW) Combined Heat Delivered (25 kW) New Project 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2013 (8/1/2013) Planned end date: 9/30/2014 Key Milestones 1. Concept & CAD model; Q1 FY2014 2. Thermal Simulation; Q2 FY2014 3. 20kW Demonstrator; Q3-Q4 FY2014 4. Testing at Oak Ridge; Q4 FY2014?

  2. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated 05.18.16 *Indicates lead committee 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year Draft 2017 Work Plan (FY 2017 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2017 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Advice [X] 2. Critical Infrastructure Updates *RAP/HSEP/TWC Advice [X] 3. PFP Progress *RAP/HSEP Agency briefing X 4. Sludge retrieval RAP Agency briefing X 5. WESF preparations to move capsules to dry storage RAP Agency briefing, advice [X] 6. Risk-based retrieval,

  3. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 24, 2015) 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Informational x x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Informational x x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. 324 Waste Sites RAP Informational 5. 618-10 VPU remediation RAP Informational 6. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Informational x 7. ERDF RAP

  4. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adopted by the Hanford Advisory Board on 11/5/2015, updated 12/21/15 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview and RAP Issue Manager Assignments) Topic Committee Assignment Issue Managers (lead noted in bold) Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Mattson, Suyama x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Engstrom, Mattson, Garnant, Leckband x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Cimon, Mattson x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Cimon, Catrell,

  5. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 19, 2015June 18, 2015) 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x 5. ERDF RAP Project update x 6. Groundwater updates RAP Project update 7.

  6. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated December 21, 2015 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x 5. ERDF RAP Project update x 6. Groundwater updates RAP Project update 7.

  7. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan Working draft - reflects comments received from PIC, HSEP, TWC and RAP committees (updated October 22, 2015) 1 Hanford Advisory Board Draft Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area

  8. Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Updated 8/31/2016 * Indicates lead committee 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year Draft 2017 Work Plan (FY 2017 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2017 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Agency briefing, advice [x] 2. Sludge retrieval RAP Agency briefing x x 3. WESF preparations to move capsules to dry storage RAP Agency briefing, advice [x] 4. River Corridor updates RAP Agency briefing 5. Groundwater updates RAP Agency briefing x x x x 6. Central

  9. 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Project | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Project 10 MW Supercritical CO2 Turbine Project This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042313_turchi.pdf (1.86 MB) More Documents & Publications 10-Megawatt Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Turbine - FY13 Q2 10-MW Supercritical-CO2 Turbine Degradation Mechanisms and Development of Protective Coatings for TES and HTF Containment Materials

  10. request.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advisory Board Draft Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan Adopted March 18, 2016; updated per EIC discussion 01.13.16 1 Hanford Advisory Board Fiscal Year 2016 Work Plan (FY 2016 Action Overview) Topic Committee Assignment Potential FY 2016 Action/Product Action Q1 Q2 Q3 Q4 1. 100 Area retrieval process, K Basin RAP Project update x 2. 100 D/H Proposed Plan RAP Project update x x 3. 100-N Proposed Plan RAP Policy discussion, Potential Advice x 4. Central Plateau Inner Area Guidelines RAP Project update x

  11. thesis.dvi

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Shigeyuki Tajima 2003 Measurements of the Electric Form Factor of the Neutron at Q 2 =0.45 and 1.13 (GeV/c) 2 by Shigeyuki Tajima Department of Physics Duke University Date Approved: Calvin R. Howell, Supervisor Richard Madey, Co-Supervisor Ashutosh V. Kotwal Roxanne P. Springer Stephen W. Teitsworth Richard L. Walter Dissertation submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics in the Graduate School of Duke University 2003

  12. S:\VM3\RX97\TBL_LIST.WPD [PFP#201331587]

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    b. Air Conditioning by Four Most Populated States, Percent of U.S. Households, 1997 Air Conditioning Characteristics RSE Column Factor: Total Four Most Populated States RSE Row Factors New York California Texas Florida 0.4 1.3 1.4 1.2 1.2 Households With Electric Air-Conditioning Equipment ...................... 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 100.0 0.0 Central Equipment Not Used ....................... 0.5 Q 2.9 0.6 1.2 28.9 Room Air Conditioners Not Used ................ 1.0 Q Q Q 1.2 40.5 Households

  13. U.S. Dept of Energy's EECBG-SEP Technical Assistance Program Webinar - Interior Lighting Efficiency for Municipalities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Weatherized By State through 06/30/2010 (Calendar Year) | Department of Energy detailling the number of homes that have been weatherized by state. U.S. Department of Energy Weatherization Assistance Program Homes Weatherized By State through 06/30/2010 (Calendar Year) (14.26 KB) More Documents & Publications TOTAL ARRA Homes Weatherized thru Q2 2010 8.19.10.xls Homes Weatherized by State March 2010 ARRA Homes Weatherized by Grantee 2016 Collegiate Wind Competition | Department of

  14. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at √s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  15. Appendix 12: Frequently Asked Questions

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    12: Frequently Asked Questions Q1: If a Recipient's grant is closed out, do they have to continue to report? A1: Yes. As long as the funds remain in a Financing Program, they retain their federal character, and the Recipient must continue to report. Q2: A Recipient determines that there is no longer demand for their residential RLF for energy efficiency upgrades. The Recipient would like to repurpose the funds for an energy audit and lighting upgrade of City Hall. What are the responsibilities

  16. Assistance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    General Questions from RACEE Phase 2 Notice of Technical Assistance (NOTA) Webinar on Technical Assistance Q1: What is meant by non-responsive? A1: Applications that are outside the scope of the Notice of Technical Assistance (NOTA) are considered non-responsive. For example, an application from an entity that is ineligible to apply, or in a topic area outside the scope of the NOTA topic area. Non-responsive applications will not be reviewed or considered. Q2: Does the Tech Assistance in Phase 2

  17. DOE MURI: Hig-Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for CSD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Applications | Department of Energy DOE MURI: Hig-Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for CSD Applications DOE MURI: Hig-Operating Temperature Heat Transfer Fluids for CSD Applications This presentation was delivered at the SunShot Concentrating Solar Power (CSP) Program Review 2013, held April 23-25, 2013 near Phoenix, Arizona. csp_review_meeting_042513_ju.pdf (3.41 MB) More Documents & Publications High Operating Temperature Liquid Metal Heat Transfer Fluids - FY13 Q2 High

  18. Measurement of the antineutrino neutral-current elastic differential cross section

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aguilar-Arevalo, A.  A.; Brown, B.  C.; Bugel, L.; Cheng, G.; Church, E.  D.; Conrad, J.  M.; Dharmapalan, R.; Djurcic, Z.; Finley, D.  A.; Ford, R.; et al

    2015-01-08

    We report the measurement of the flux-averaged antineutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross section (dσν-barN→ν-barN/dQ2) on CH2 by the MiniBooNE experiment using the largest sample of antineutrino neutral current elastic candidate events ever collected. The ratio of the antineutrino to neutrino neutral current elastic scattering cross sections and a ratio of the antineutrino neutral current elastic to antineutrino charged current quasi elastic cross sections are also presented.

  19. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  20. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in tt-bar production in pp collisions at ?s = 7 TeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, S.

    2015-05-19

    Erratum to: Eur. Phys. J. C (2014) 74:3014 DOI 10.1140/epjc/s10052-014-3014-0 Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is Normalised differential tt production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. The statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. The main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalization and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table Q2/Match./Had.).

  1. Erratum to: Measurement of jet multiplicity distributions in $$\\mathrm {t}\\overline{\\mathrm {t}}$$ production in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s} = 7\\,\\text {TeV} $$

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2015-05-19

    Table 4 was incorrectly captioned in the originally published version. The correct caption is ‘Normalised differential tt- production cross section as a function of the number of additional jets with pT > 30 GeV in the lepton+jets channel. Furthermore, the statistical, systematic, and total uncertainties are also shown. Finally, the main experimental and model systematic uncertainties are displayed: JES and the combination of renormalisation and factorisation scales, jet-parton matching threshold, and hadronisation (in the table “Q2/Match./Had.”)’.

  2. The CJ12 parton distributions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Accardi, Alberto; Owens, Jeff F.

    2013-07-01

    Three new sets of next-to-leading order parton distribution functions (PDFs) are presented, determined by global fits to a wide variety of data for hard scattering processes. The analysis includes target mass and higher twist corrections needed for the description of deep-inelastic scattering data at large x and low Q^2, and nuclear corrections for deuterium targets. The PDF sets correspond to three different models for the nuclear effects, and provide a more realistic uncertainty range for the d quark PDF compared with previous fits. Applications to weak boson production at colliders are also discussed.

  3. CO2 Heat Pump Water Heater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CO 2 Heat Pump Water Heater 2016 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Kyle Gluesenkamp, gluesenkampk@ornl.gov Oak Ridge National Laboratory Evaporator 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: Oct 1, 2009 Planned end date: Sep 30, 2016 Key Milestones 1. Go/No-Go: Price premium <$750 compared to baseline HFC HPWH; FY15Q2 (MET) 2. Go/No-Go: EF>2.0 and FHR>50 gallon to meet ENERGY STAR qualification criteria; FY14Q4 (MET) Budget: Total DOE to Date: $2,367k Total Project: $2,435k Key

  4. Transverse beam asymmetries from $^4$He and hydrogen targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lisa Kaufman

    2007-07-01

    The HAPPEX Collaboration at Jefferson Lab has measured the transverse beam spin asymmetries ($A_T$) for elastic electron scattering from proton and $^4$He targets. The experiment was conducted using a vertically polarized electron beam of energy ~3 GeV at $Q^2$ ~0.1 GeV$^2$ and a scattering angle $\\theta_{lab}$ ~6$^{\\circ}$. The preliminary results are reported here. The $^4$He measurement is non-neglible; therefore, it will be necessary to make measurements of $A_T$ for future parity-violating experiments using nuclear targets

  5. Precision Measurement of the p(e, e´p) π⁰ Reaction at Threshold

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chirapatpimol, K.; Shabestari, M.H.; Lindgren, R. A.; Smith, L. C.; Annand, J. R. M.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Moffit, B.

    2015-05-01

    New results are reported from a measurement ofmore » $$\\pi^0$$ electroproduction near threshold using the p(e, e´p) π⁰ reaction. The experiment was designed to determine precisely the energy dependence of $s-$ and $p-$wave electromagnetic multipoles as a stringent test of the predictions of Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). The data were taken with an electron beam energy of 1192 MeV using a two-spectrometer setup in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, complete coverage of the $$\\phi^*_{\\pi}$$ and $$\\theta^*_{\\pi}$$ angles in the $$p \\pi^0$$ center-of-mass was obtained for invariant energies above threshold from 0.5 MeV up to 15 MeV. The 4-momentum transfer $Q^2$ coverage ranges from 0.05 to 0.155 (GeV/c)$^2$ in fine steps. A simple phenomenological analysis of our data shows strong disagreement with $p-$wave predictions from ChPT for $Q^2>0.07$ (GeV/c)$^2$, while the $s-$wave predictions are in reasonable agreement.« less

  6. Pion transverse charge density and the edge of hadrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmignotto, Marco; Horn, Tanja; Miller, Gerald A.

    2014-08-01

    We use the world data on the pion form factor for space-like kinematics and a technique used to extract the proton transverse densities, to extract the transverse pion charge density and its uncertainty due to experimental uncertainties and incomplete knowledge of the pion form factor at large values of Q2. The pion charge density at small values of b<0.1 fm is dominated by this incompleteness error while the range between 0.1-0.3 fm is relatively well constrained. A comparison of pion and proton charge densities shows that the pion is denser than the proton for values of b<0.2 fm. The pion and proton distributions seem to be the same for values of b=0.2-0.6 fm. Future data from Jlab 12 GeV and the EIC will increase the dynamic extent of the data to higher values of Q2 and thus reduce the uncertainties in the extracted pion charge density.

  7. Exclusive processes at JLab at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Andrey

    2015-01-01

    Deeply virtual exclusive reactions provide a unique opportunity to probe the complex internal structure of the nucleon. They allow to access information about the correlations between parton transverse spatial and longitudinal momentum distributions from experimental observables. Dedicated experiments to study Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS) and Deeply Virtual Meson Production (DVMP) have been carried out at Jefferson Lab using continuous electron beam with energies up to 6 GeV. Unpolarized cross sections, beam, target and double spin asymmetries have been measured for DVCS as well as for ?0 exclusive electroproduction. The data from Hall B provide a wide kinematic coverage with Q2=1-4.5 GeV2, xB=0.1-0.5, and ?t up to 2 GeV2. Hall A data have limited kinematic range partially overlapping with Hall B kinematics but provide a high accuracy measurements. Scaling tests of the DVCS cross sections provide solid evidence of twist-2 dominance, which makes chiral-even GPDs accessible even at modest Q2. We will discuss the interpretation of these data in terms of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) model. Successful description of the recent CLAS ?0 exclusive production data within the framework of the GPD-based model provides a unique opportunity to access the chiral-odd GPDs.

  8. Investigation into the semimagic nature of the tin isotopes through electromagnetic moments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allmond, J. M.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Radford, D. C.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, M. E.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; Pain, S. D.; Stone, N. J.; Varner, R. L.; Yu, C. -H.

    2015-10-19

    A complete set of electromagnetic moments, B(E2;0+1 2+1), Q(2+1), and g(2+1), have been measured from Coulomb excitation of semi-magic 112,114,116,118,120,122,124Sn (Z = 50) on natural carbon and titanium targets. The magnitude of the B(E2) values, measured to a precision of ~4%, disagree with a recent lifetime study [Phys. Lett. B 695, 110 (2011)] that employed the Doppler- shift attenuation method. The B(E2) values show an overall enhancement compared with recent theoretical calculations and a clear asymmetry about midshell, contrary to naive expectations. A new static electric quadrupole moment, Q(2+1), has been measured for 114Sn. The static quadrupole moments are generally consistent with zero but reveal an enhancement near midshell; this had not been previously observed. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous measurements and show a near monotonic decrease in value with neutron number. The current theory calculations fail to reproduce the electromagnetic moments of the tin isotopes. The role of 2p-2h and 4p-4h intruders, which are lowest in energy at mid shell and outside of current model spaces, needs to be investigated in the future.

  9. Investigation into the semimagic nature of the tin isotopes through electromagnetic moments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Allmond, J. M.; Stuchbery, A. E.; Galindo-Uribarri, A.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Radford, D. C.; Batchelder, J. C.; Bingham, C. R.; Howard, M. E.; Liang, J. F.; Manning, B.; et al

    2015-10-19

    A complete set of electromagnetic moments, B(E2;0+1 2+1), Q(2+1), and g(2+1), have been measured from Coulomb excitation of semi-magic 112,114,116,118,120,122,124Sn (Z = 50) on natural carbon and titanium targets. The magnitude of the B(E2) values, measured to a precision of ~4%, disagree with a recent lifetime study [Phys. Lett. B 695, 110 (2011)] that employed the Doppler- shift attenuation method. The B(E2) values show an overall enhancement compared with recent theoretical calculations and a clear asymmetry about midshell, contrary to naive expectations. A new static electric quadrupole moment, Q(2+1), has been measured for 114Sn. The static quadrupole moments are generallymore » consistent with zero but reveal an enhancement near midshell; this had not been previously observed. The magnetic dipole moments are consistent with previous measurements and show a near monotonic decrease in value with neutron number. The current theory calculations fail to reproduce the electromagnetic moments of the tin isotopes. The role of 2p-2h and 4p-4h intruders, which are lowest in energy at mid shell and outside of current model spaces, needs to be investigated in the future.« less

  10. All

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 15,952 13,077 4,630 11,330 4,557 12,239 5,559 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 1,520 1,127 1,031 730 572 391 498 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 1,663 1,329 1,051 1,052 790 353 536 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 2,012 2,331 1,253 1,821 1,443 1,212 1,108 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 2,333 1,814 607 1,648 926 1,492 861 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 2,203 1,632 Q 1,909 585 3,363 627 100,001 to 200,000 12,415 2,054 1,946 Q 2,178 Q 3,020 553 200,001 to 500,000 10,724 1,946 1,827 Q 1,264 Q 2,358 748

  11. Updates on the studies of N* structure with CLAS and the prospects with CLAS12

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mokeev, V. I.

    2016-06-16

    Here, the recent results onmore » $$\\gamma_vpN^*$$ electrocouplings from analyses of the data on exclusive meson electroproduction off protons measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. The impact of these results on the exploration of the excited nucleon state structure and non-perturbative strong interaction dynamics behind its formation is outlined. The future extension of these studies in the experiments with the CLAS12 detector in the upgraded Hall-B at JLab will provide for the first time $$\\gamma_vpN^*$$ electrocouplings of all prominent resonances at the still unexplored distance scales that correspond to extremely low (0.05~GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 0.5~GeV$^2$) and the highest photon virtualities (5.0~GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 12.0~GeV$^2$) ever achieved in the exclusive electroproduction measurements. The expected results will address the most important open problems of the Standard Model: on the nature of more than 98\\% of hadron mass, quark-gluon confinement and emergence of the excited nucleon state structure from the QCD Lagrangian, as well as allowing a search for the new states of hadron matter predicted from the first principles of QCD, the so-called hybrid baryons.« less

  12. Eltron Research & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard; Faull, John

    2014-03-01

    This topical report covers technical work conducted under contract DE-FC26-05NT42469 between FY06 Q1 through FY14 Q2. The project evolved through several budget periods, budget revisions and continuation applications. This report covers work performed under the “base” program. In 2010 ARRA funding was added to the project. A separate report covering the ARRA portion of the project was submitted to DOE. The original project was focused on research and development for scale-up of hydrogen separation membrane for a FutureGen type power plant. The work included membrane testing and evaluation of metal alloy flat plates vs. tubes and metal membranes vs. cermet membranes. In addition, economic analysis and process modeling was performed. The original project team included CoorsTek, NORAM, and Praxair. In FY10Q2 a continuation application was filed for conducting a scale-up test at Eastman Chemical. In this part of the project a Subscale Engineering Prototype (SEP) membrane skid was designed, fabricated, and operated on a gasified coal slip-stream on Eastman’s site in Kingsport, TN. Following operation, the project was reorganized and a second continuation application with a new statement of work was initiated in FY12Q1. Finally, based on DOE’s decision not to proceed with a Process Development Unit (PDU) field test, a third continuation application and statement of work was initiated in FY13Q1 to close out the project.

  13. Energy dependence of jet transport parameter and parton saturationin quark-gluon plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Wang, Xin-Nian

    2007-06-24

    We study the evolution and saturation of the gluondistribution function in the quark-gluon plasma as probed by apropagating parton and its effect on the computation of jet quenching ortransport parameter $\\hat q $. For thermal partons, the saturation scale$Q2_s$ is found to be proportional to the Debye screening mass $\\mu_D2$.For hard probes, evolution at small $x=Q2_s/6ET$ leads to jet energydependence of hat q. We study this dependence for both a conformal gaugetheory in weak and strong coupling limit and for (pure gluon) QCD. Theenergy dependence can be used to extract the shear viscosity $\\eta$ ofthe medium since $\\eta$ can be related to the transport parameter forthermal partons in a transport description. We also derive upper boundson the transport parameter for both energetic and thermal partons. Thelater leads to a lower bound on shear viscosity-to-entropy density ratiowhich is consistent with the conjectured lower bound $\\eta/s\\geq 1/4\\pi$.Implications on the study of jet quenching at RHIC and LHC and the bulkproperties of the dense matter are discussed.

  14. Precision Measurement of the p(e, e´p) π⁰ Reaction at Threshold

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chirapatpimol, K.; Shabestari, M.H.; Lindgren, R. A.; Smith, L. C.; Annand, J. R. M.; Higinbotham, D. W.; Moffit, B.

    2015-05-01

    New results are reported from a measurement of $\\pi^0$ electroproduction near threshold using the p(e, e´p) π⁰ reaction. The experiment was designed to determine precisely the energy dependence of $s-$ and $p-$wave electromagnetic multipoles as a stringent test of the predictions of Chiral Perturbation Theory (ChPT). The data were taken with an electron beam energy of 1192 MeV using a two-spectrometer setup in Hall A at Jefferson Lab. For the first time, complete coverage of the $\\phi^*_{\\pi}$ and $\\theta^*_{\\pi}$ angles in the $p \\pi^0$ center-of-mass was obtained for invariant energies above threshold from 0.5 MeV up to 15 MeV. The 4-momentum transfer $Q^2$ coverage ranges from 0.05 to 0.155 (GeV/c)$^2$ in fine steps. A simple phenomenological analysis of our data shows strong disagreement with $p-$wave predictions from ChPT for $Q^2>0.07$ (GeV/c)$^2$, while the $s-$wave predictions are in reasonable agreement.

  15. Foaming/antifoaming in WTP Tanks Equipped with Pulse Jet Mixer and Air Spargers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HASSAN, NEGUIB

    2004-06-29

    The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using actual Hanford waste and simulants subjected to air sparging. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated in SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming and ultrafiltration studies and commercial antifoam DOW Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels, HLW Concentrate Receipt Vessel, and the Ultrafiltration Vessels to assist the performance of the Jet Pulse Mixers (JPM). Sparging of air into WTP tanks will induce a foam layer within the process vessels. The air dispersion in the waste slurries and generated foams could present problems during plant operation. Foam in the tanks could also adversely impact hydrogen removal and mitigation. Antifoam (DOW Q2-3183A) will be used to control foaming in Hanford sparged waste processing tanks. These tanks will be mixed by a combination of pulse-jet mixers and air spargers. The percent allowable foaminess or freeboard in WTP tanks are shown in tables.

  16. Qweak: First Direct Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuruzzaman, NFN

    2014-04-01

    The Qweak experiment at Hall C of Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has made the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, QWp, through a precision measurement of the parity-violating asymmetry in elastic e-p scattering at low momentum transfer Q2= 0.025 (GeV/c)2 with incident electron beam energy of 1.155 GeV. The Qweak experiment, along with earlier results of parity violating elastic scattering experiments, is expected to determine the most precise value of QWp which is suppressed in the Standard Model. If this result is further combined with the 133Cs atomic parity violation (APV) measurement, significant constraints on the weak charge of the up quark, down quark, and neutron can be extracted. This data will also be used to determine the weak-mixing angle, sin2 ?W, with a relative uncertainty of < 0.5% that will provide a competitive measurement of the running of sin2 ?W to low Q2. An overview of the experiment and its results using the commissioning dataset, constituting approximately 4% of the data collected in the experiment, are reported here.

  17. Nonperturbative QCD Coupling and its $$\\beta$$-function from Light-Front Holography

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brodskey, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy; Deur, Alexandre P.

    2010-05-28

    The light-front holographic mapping of classical gravity in AdS space, modified by a positive-sign dilaton background, leads to a non-perturbative effective couplingmore » $$\\alpha_s^{AdS}(Q^2)$$. It agrees with hadron physics data extracted from different observables, such as the effective charge defined by the Bjorken sum rule, as well as with the predictions of models with built-in confinement and lattice simulations. It also displays a transition from perturbative to nonperturbative conformal regimes at a momentum scale $$ \\sim 1$$ GeV. The resulting $$\\beta$$-function appears to capture the essential characteristics of the full $$\\beta$$-function of QCD, thus giving further support to the application of the gauge/gravity duality to the confining dynamics of strongly coupled QCD. Commensurate scale relations relate observables to each other without scheme or scale ambiguity. In this paper we extrapolate these relations to the nonperturbative domain, thus extending the range of predictions based on $$\\alpha_s^{AdS}(Q^2)$$.« less

  18. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; et al

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction (more » $$\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.« less

  19. E00-110 experiment at Jefferson Lab Hall A: Deeply virtual Compton scattering off the proton at 6 GeV

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Defurne, M.; Amaryan, M.; Aniol, K. A.; Beaumel, M.; Benaoum, H.; Bertin, P.; Brossard, M.; Camsonne, A.; Chen, J. -P.; Chudakov, E.; Craver, B.; Cusanno, F.; de Jager, C. W.; Deur, A.; Feuerbach, R.; Ferdi, C.; Fieschi, J. -M.; Frullani, S.; Fuchey, E.; Garçon, M.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gavalian, G.; Gilman, R.; Gomez, J.; Gueye, P.; Guichon, P. A. M.; Guillon, B.; Hansen, O.; Hayes, D.; Higinbotham, D.; Holmstrom, T.; Hyde, C. E.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jiang, X.; Jo, H. S.; Kaufman, L. J.; Kelleher, A.; Keppel, C.; Kolarkar, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; Laveissière, G.; LeRose, J. J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Lu, H. -J.; Margaziotis, D. J.; Mazouz, M.; Meziani, Z. -E.; McCormick, K.; Michaels, R.; Michel, B.; Moffit, B.; Monaghan, P.; Muñoz Camacho, C.; Nanda, S.; Nelyubin, V.; Paremuzyan, R.; Potokar, M.; Qiang, Y.; Ransome, R. D.; Réal, J. -S.; Reitz, B.; Roblin, Y.; Roche, J.; Sabatié, F.; Saha, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Subedi, R.; Sulkosky, V.; Ulmer, P. E.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2015-11-03

    We present final results on the photon electroproduction ($\\vec{e}p\\rightarrow ep\\gamma$) cross section in the deeply virtual Compton scattering (DVCS) regime and the valence quark region from Jefferson Lab experiment E00-110. Results from an analysis of a subset of these data were published before, but the analysis has been improved which is described here at length, together with details on the experimental setup. Furthermore, additional data have been analyzed resulting in photon electroproduction cross sections at new kinematic settings, for a total of 588 experimental bins. Results of the $Q^2$- and $x_B$-dependences of both the helicity-dependent and helicity-independent cross sections are discussed. The $Q^2$-dependence illustrates the dominance of the twist-2 handbag amplitude in the kinematics of the experiment, as previously noted. Thanks to the excellent accuracy of this high luminosity experiment, it becomes clear that the unpolarized cross section shows a significant deviation from the Bethe-Heitler process in our kinematics, compatible with a large contribution from the leading twist-2 DVCS$^2$ term to the photon electroproduction cross section. The necessity to include higher-twist corrections in order to fully reproduce the shape of the data is also discussed. The DVCS cross sections in this study represent the final set of experimental results from E00-110, superseding the previous publication.

  20. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element dn2: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posik, Matthew; Flay, David; Parno, Diana; Allada, Kalyan; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Chiranjib; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Franklin, Gregg; Friend, Megan; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Gomez, Javier; Guo, Lei; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, J; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jin, Ge; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lukhanin, Oleksandr; Mamyan, Vahe; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Moffit, Bryan; Muangma, Navaphon; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Oh, Yongseok; Peng, Jen-chieh; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Troth, Wolfgang; Wang, Diancheng; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2014-07-01

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x (0.25 lte x lte 0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized 3He target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g2 on 3He was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-three matrix element dn2 was measured at ?Q2? of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2/c2, with an absolute precision of about 10?5. Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ?Q2?= 5 GeV2/c2. Combining dn2 and a newly extracted twist-four matrix element, fn2, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 60 MeV/fm in magnitude.

  1. Updates on the Studies of $$${\\varvec{N}}^\\mathbf{*}$$$ N * Structure with CLAS and the Prospects with CLAS12

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mokeev, V. I.

    2016-06-16

    Here, the recent results onmore » $$\\gamma_vpN^*$$ electrocouplings from analyses of the data on exclusive meson electroproduction off protons measured with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab are presented. The impact of these results on the exploration of the excited nucleon state structure and non-perturbative strong interaction dynamics behind its formation is outlined. The future extension of these studies in the experiments with the CLAS12 detector in the upgraded Hall-B at JLab will provide for the first time $$\\gamma_vpN^*$$ electrocouplings of all prominent resonances at the still unexplored distance scales that correspond to extremely low (0.05~GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 0.5~GeV$^2$) and the highest photon virtualities (5.0~GeV$^2 < Q^2 <$ 12.0~GeV$^2$) ever achieved in the exclusive electroproduction measurements. The expected results will address the most important open problems of the Standard Model: on the nature of more than 98\\% of hadron mass, quark-gluon confinement and emergence of the excited nucleon state structure from the QCD Lagrangian, as well as allowing a search for the new states of hadron matter predicted from the first principles of QCD, the so-called hybrid baryons.« less

  2. A fresh look at electron cyclotron current drive power requirements for stabilization of tearing modes in ITER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Haye, R. J.

    2015-12-10

    ITER is an international project to design and build an experimental fusion reactor based on the “tokamak” concept. ITER relies upon localized electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) at the rational safety factor q=2 to suppress or stabilize the expected poloidal mode m=2, toroidal mode n=1 neoclassical tearing mode (NTM) islands. Such islands if unmitigated degrade energy confinement, lock to the resistive wall (stop rotating), cause loss of “H-mode” and induce disruption. The International Tokamak Physics Activity (ITPA) on MHD, Disruptions and Magnetic Control joint experiment group MDC-8 on Current Drive Prevention/Stabilization of Neoclassical Tearing Modes started in 2005, after which assessments were made for the requirements for ECCD needed in ITER, particularly that of rf power and alignment on q=2 [1]. Narrow well-aligned rf current parallel to and of order of one percent of the total plasma current is needed to replace the “missing” current in the island O-points and heal or preempt (avoid destabilization by applying ECCD on q=2 in absence of the mode) the island [2-4]. This paper updates the advances in ECCD stabilization on NTMs learned in DIII-D experiments and modeling during the last 5 to 10 years as applies to stabilization by localized ECCD of tearing modes in ITER. This includes the ECCD (inside the q=1 radius) stabilization of the NTM “seeding” instability known as sawteeth (m/n=1/1) [5]. Recent measurements in DIII-D show that the ITER-similar current profile is classically unstable, curvature stabilization must not be neglected, and the small island width stabilization effect from helical ion polarization currents is stronger than was previously thought [6]. The consequences of updated assumptions in ITER modeling of the minimum well-aligned ECCD power needed are all-in-all favorable (and well-within the ITER 24 gyrotron capability) when all effects are included. However, a “wild card” may be broadening of the localized

  3. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Second Quarter of 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-07-29

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the second quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010Q1+Q2). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010Q1+Q2 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010Q1+Q2. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $119 billion dollars invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.1 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first two quarters of 2010 is close to $1.8 billion accounting for 17% of all venture capital investments during the first two quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $1.8 billion (30% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first two quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $1.9 billion (19% of all US venture capital investments made during the first half of 2010). Between 2004 and 2009, U.S. venture capital

  4. Trends in U.S. Venture Capital Investments Related to Energy: 1980 through the Third Quarter of 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dooley, James J.

    2010-11-08

    This report documents trends in U.S. venture capital investments over the period 1980 through the third quarter of calendar year 2010 (2010 Q1+Q2+Q3). Particular attention is given to U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector over the period 1980-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3 as well as in the more recently created cross-cutting category of CleanTech over the period 1995-2010 Q1+Q2+Q3. During the early 1980s, U.S. venture capital investments in the energy/industrial sector accounted for more than 20% of all venture capital investments. However subsequent periods of low energy prices, the deregulation of large aspects of the energy industry, and the emergence of fast growing new industries like computers (both hardware and software), biotechnology and the Internet quickly reduced the priority accorded to energy/industrial investments. To wit, venture capital investments related to the energy/industrial sector accounted for only 1% of the $132 billion (in real 2010 US$) invested in 2000 by the U.S. venture capital community. The significant increase in the real price of oil that began in 2003-2004 correlates with renewed interest and increased investment by the venture capital community in energy/industrial investment opportunities. Venture capital investments for 2009 for the energy/industrial sector accounted for $2.4 billion or slightly more than 13% of all venture capital invested that year. The total venture capital invested in energy/industrial during the first three quarters of 2010 is close to $2.4 billion accounting for slightly less than 15% of all venture capital investments during the first three quarters of 2010. In 2009, the aggregate amount invested in CleanTech was $2.1 billion (11% of the total US venture capital invested in that lean year) and for the first three quarters of 2010 US venture capital investments in CleanTech have already exceeded $2.8 billion (18% of all US venture capital investments made during the first three quarters of

  5. Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant (EECBG): Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Donnelly, Kat A.

    2014-01-10

    The Neighbor to Neighbor Energy Challenge (N2N) brought together a consortium of 14 leading clean energy rural, suburban, and low income communities throughout Connecticut. N2N was awarded $4.2 million from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) competitive BetterBuildings Neighborhood Program on August 10, 2010 to run a two-year pilot program (plus one year of transition and evaluation) (Award No. EMCBC- 00969-10). N2N tested innovative program models and hypotheses for improving Connecticut’s existing residential energy efficiency programs that are overseen by the ratepayer fund board and administered by CT utilities. N2N’s original goal was to engage 10 percent of households in participating communities to reduce their energy usage by 20 percent through energy upgrades and clean energy measures. N2N planned for customers to complete more comprehensive whole-home energy efficiency and clean energy measures and to achieve broader penetration than existing utility-administered regulated programs. Since this was an ARRA award, we report the following figures on job creation in Table 1. Since N2N is not continuing in its current form, we do not provide figures on job retention. Table 1 N2N Job Creation by Quarter Jobs Created 2010 Q4 6.65 2011 Q1 7.13 2011 Q2 4.98 2011 Q3 9.66 2011 Q4 5.43 2012 Q1 11.11 2012 Q2 6.85 2012 Q3 6.29 2012 Q4 6.77 2013 Q1 5.57 2013 Q2 8.35 2013 Q3 6.52 Total 85.31 The N2N team encountered several gaps in the existing efficiency program performance that hindered meeting N2N’s and DOE’s short-term program goals, as well as the State of Connecticut’s long-term energy, efficiency, and carbon reduction goals. However, despite the slow program start, N2N found evidence of increasing upgrade uptake rates over time, due to delayed customer action of one to two years from N2N introduction to completion of deeper household upgrades. Two main social/behavioral principles have contributed to driving deeper upgrades in CT: 1. Word of mouth

  6. Feasibility of vibro-acoustography with a quasi-2D ultrasound array transducer for detection and localizing of permanent prostate brachytherapy seeds: A pilot ex vivo study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mehrmohammadi, Mohammad; Kinnick, Randall R.; Fatemi, Mostafa; Alizad, Azra; Davis, Brian J.

    2014-09-15

    Purpose: Effective permanent prostate brachytherapy (PPB) requires precise placement of radioactive seeds in and around the prostate. The impetus for this research is to examine a new ultrasound-based imaging modality, vibro-acoustography (VA), which may serve to provide a high rate of PPB seed detection while also effecting enhanced prostate imaging. The authors investigate the ability of VA, implemented on a clinical ultrasound (US) scanner and equipped with a quasi-2D (Q2D) array US transducer, to detect and localize PPB seeds in excised prostate specimens. Methods: Nonradioactive brachytherapy seeds were implanted into four excised cadaver prostates. A clinical US scanner equipped with a Q2D array US transducer was customized to acquire both US and C-scan VA images at various depths. The VA images were then used to detect and localize the implanted seeds in prostate tissue. To validate the VA results, computed tomography (CT) images of the same tissue samples were obtained to serve as the reference by which to evaluate the performance of VA in PPB seed detection. Results: The results indicate that VA is capable of accurately identifying the presence and distribution of PPB seeds with a high imaging contrast. Moreover, a large ratio of the PPB seeds implanted into prostate tissue samples could be detected through acquired VA images. Using CT-based seed identification as the standard, VA was capable of detecting 74%–92% of the implanted seeds. Additionally, the angular independency of VA in detecting PPB seeds was demonstrated through a well-controlled phantom experiment. Conclusions: Q2DVA detected a substantial portion of the seeds by using a 2D array US transducer in excised prostate tissue specimens. While VA has inherent advantages associated with conventional US imaging, it has the additional advantage of permitting detection of PPB seeds independent of their orientation. These results suggest the potential of VA as a method for PPB imaging that

  7. Total...................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Floorspace (Square Feet) Total Floorspace 1 Fewer than 500............................................ 3.2 0.4 Q 0.6 1.7 0.4 500 to 999................................................... 23.8 4.8 1.4 4.2 10.2 3.2 1,000 to 1,499............................................. 20.8 10.6 1.8 1.8 4.0 2.6 1,500 to 1,999............................................. 15.4 12.4 1.5 0.5 0.5 0.4 2,000 to 2,499............................................. 12.2 10.7 1.0 0.2 Q Q 2,500 to

  8. High Temperature ESP Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jack Booker; Brindesh Dhruva

    2011-06-20

    The objective of the High Temperature ESP Monitoring project was to develop a downhole monitoring system to be used in wells with bottom hole well temperatures up to 300C for measuring motor temperature, formation pressure, and formation temperature. These measurements are used to monitor the health of the ESP motor, to track the downhole operating conditions, and to optimize the pump operation. A 220 C based High Temperature ESP Monitoring system was commercially released for sale with Schlumberger ESP motors April of 2011 and a 250 C system with will be commercially released at the end of Q2 2011. The measurement system is now fully qualified, except for the sensor, at 300 C.

  9. Test of fundamental symmetries via the Primakoff effect

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Liping

    2014-06-01

    The three neutral pseudoscalar mesons, pi^0, eta and eta', represent one of the most interesting systems in strong interaction physics. A study of the electromagnetic properties of these mesons provides a sensitive probe of the symmetry structure of QCD at low energy. A comprehensive experimental program at Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab) is aimed at gathering high precision measurements on the two-photon decay widths and transition form factors at low Q^2 of pi^0, eta and eta' via the Primakoff effect. The completed experiments on the pi^0 radiative decay width at Jlab 6 GeV, and other planned measurements at Jlab 12 GeV will provide a rich laboratory to test the chiral anomaly and to study the origin and dynamics of chiral symmetry breaking at the confinement scale of QCD.

  10. A numerical test of KPZ scaling; Potts models coupled to two-dimensional quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baillie, C.F. , 91 - Nozay ); Johnston, D.A. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1992-06-07

    In this paper, the authors perform Monte-Carlo simulations using the Wolff cluster algorithm of the q = 2 (Ising), 3, 4 and q = 10 Potts models on dynamical phi-cubed graphs of spherical topology with up to 5000 nodes. The authors find that the measured critical exponents are in reasonable agreement with those from the exact solution of the Ising model and with those calculated from KPZ scaling for q = 3, 4 where no exact solution is available. Using Binder's cumulant, the authors find that the q = 10 Potts model displays a first order phase transition on a dynamical graph, as it does on a fixed lattice. The authors also examine the internal geometry of the graphs generated in the simulation, finding a linear relationship between ring length probabilities and the central charge of the Potts model.

  11. All

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 1,819 1,252 5,826 2,374 1,781 1,440 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 10,000 16,941 1,429 557 299 N 510 331 10,001 to 100,000 39,940 390 562 2,739 282 927 557 Over 100,000 30,212 N Q 2,788 2,092 345 552 Year constructed Before 1946 10,008 318 Q 375 Q Q Q 1946 to 1979 28,589 592 393 1,953 1,191 416 452 1980 to 1999 29,033 616 449 2,244 518 681 600 2000 to 2012 19,462 293 317 1,253 603 550 252 Census region Northeast 15,534 292 316 1,007 538 529 345 Midwest 18,919 369 174 1,058 496

  12. All

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5,557 302 504 735 502 1,091 370 786 338 929 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,777 141 231 372 273 535 202 423 175 426 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 72 100 144 113 245 83 164 72 239 10,001 to 25,000 884 57 95 115 68 174 49 103 62 159 25,001 to 50,000 332 18 29 55 27 64 15 48 13 62 50,001 to 100,000 199 9 28 27 14 43 15 30 10 24 100,001 to 200,000 90 3 15 13 4 20 4 13 3 14 200,001 to 500,000 38 2 5 8 2 7 2 4 3 5 Over 500,000 8 Q 2 1 (*) 2 Q 1 1 1 Principal building activity Education 389

  13. Orientation and alignment effects in ion-induced fragmentation of water: A triple coincidence study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rajput, Jyoti; Safvan, C. P.

    2014-10-28

    The technique of recoil ion momentum spectroscopy is employed to determine the complete momentum vectors for three fragment dissociation channels, [D{sub 2}O]{sup (q+2)} ? (D{sup +} + D{sup +} + O{sup q+}) with q = 1, 2, or 3 formed in collisions of isolated water molecules with 450 keV Xe{sup 9+} ions. The kinetic energy released in each of these dissociation channels is measured and angular correlations between the fragment momenta are determined. From the angular correlations of the three fragment ions with the direction of the incoming beam, a strong anisotropy in the emission of recoil fragments is reported. It is inferred that the molecular plane prefers to lie orthogonal to the incoming beam direction with certain orientations being more preferred than others and a clear signature of non-coplanar dissociation is also observed.

  14. New limits on intrinsic charm in the nucleon from global analysis of parton distributions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Hobbs, T. J.; Londergan, J. T.; Melnitchouk, W.

    2015-02-27

    We present a new global QCD analysis of parton distribution functions, allowing for possible intrinsic charm (IC) contributions in the nucleon inspired by light-front models. The analysis makes use of the full range of available high-energy scattering data for Q2 ≥ 1 GeV2 and W2 ≥ 3.5 GeV2, including fixed-target proton and deuteron deep cross sections at lower energies that were excluded in previously global analyses. The expanded data set places more stringent constraints on the momentum carried by IC, with (x)IC at most 0.5% (corresponding to an IC normalization of ~1%) at the 4σ level for ΔX2 = 1.more » We also assess the impact of older EMC measurements of Fc2c at large x, which favor a nonzero IC, but with very large X2 values.« less

  15. Quarterly Report: Microchannel-Assisted Nanomaterial Deposition Technology for Photovoltaic Material Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palo, Daniel R.

    2011-04-26

    Quarterly report to ITP for Nanomanufacturing program. Report covers FY11 Q2. The primary objective of this project is to develop a nanomanufacturing process which will reduce the manufacturing energy, environmental discharge, and production cost associated with current nano-scale thin-film photovoltaic (PV) manufacturing approaches. The secondary objective is to use a derivative of this nanomanufacturing process to enable greener, more efficient manufacturing of higher efficiency quantum dot-based photovoltaic cells now under development. The work is to develop and demonstrate a scalable (pilot) microreactor-assisted nanomaterial processing platform for the production, purification, functionalization, and solution deposition of nanomaterials for photovoltaic applications. The high level task duration is shown. Phase I consists of a pilot platform for Gen II PV films along with parallel efforts aimed at Gen III PV quantum dot materials. Status of each task is described.

  16. Phase Diagram of the Two-Leg Kondo Ladder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xavier, Jose C; Miranda, E.; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2004-01-01

    The phase diagram of the two-leg Kondo ladder is investigated using computational techniques. Ferromagnetism is present, but only at small conduction electron densities and robust Kondo coupling J. For densities n{>=}0.4 and any Kondo coupling, a paramagnetic phase is found. We also observed spin dimerization at densities n=1/4 and n=1/2. The spin-structure factor at small J peaks at q=(2n0){pi} for n{<=}0.5, and at q=(n,1){pi} for n{>=}0.5. The charge structure factor suggests that electrons behave as free particles with spin -1/2 (spin-0) for small (large) J.

  17. Self-regulated oscillation of transport and topology of magnetic islands in toroidal plasmas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ida, K.; Kobayashi, T.; Evans, T. E.; Inagaki, S.; Austin, M. E.; Shafer, M. W.; Ohdachi, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Itoh, S. -I.; Itoh, K.

    2015-11-04

    The coupling between the transport and magnetic topology is an important issue because the structure of magnetic islands, embedded in a toroidal equilibrium field, depends on the nature of the transport at the edge of the islands. Measurements of modulated heat pulse propagation in the DIII-D tokamak have revealed the existence of self-regulated oscillations in the radial energy transport into magnetic islands that are indicative of bifurcations in the island structure and transport near the q = 2 surface. Large amplitude heat pulses are seen in one state followed by small amplitude pulses later in the discharge resulting in amore » repeating cycle of island states. These two states are interpreted as a bifurcation of magnetic island with high and low heat pulse accessibility. In conclusion, this report describes the discovery of a bifurcation in the coupled dynamics between the transport and topology of magnetic islands in tokamak plasmas.« less

  18. Empirical Fit to Inelastic Electron-Deuteron and Electron-Neutron Resonance Region Transverse Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peter Bosted; M. E. Christy

    2007-11-08

    An empirical fit is described to measurements of inclusive inelastic electron-deuteron cross sections in the kinematic range of four-momentum transfer $0 \\le Q^2<10$ GeV$^2$ and final state invariant mass $1.2<3$ GeV. The deuteron fit relies on a fit of the ratio $R_p$ of longitudinal to transverse cross sections for the proton, and the assumption $R_p=R_n$. The underlying fit parameters describe the average cross section for proton and neutron, with a plane-wave impulse approximation (PWIA) used to fit to the deuteron data. Pseudo-data from MAID 2007 were used to constrain the average nucleon cross sections for $W<1.2$ GeV. The mean deviation of data from the fit is 3\\%, with less than 5\\% of the data points deviating from the fit by more than 10\\%.

  19. Measurement of the Electric Charge of the Top Quark in $\\boldsymbol{t\\bar{t}}$ Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2014-09-08

    We present a measurement of the electric charge of top quarks using $t\\bar{t}$ events produced in $p\\bar{p}$ collisions at the Tevatron. The analysis is based on fully reconstructed $t\\bar{t}$ pairs in lepton+jets final states. Using data corresponding to 5.3 $\\rm fb^{-1}$ of integrated luminosity, we exclude the hypothesis that the top quark has a charge of $Q=-4/3\\,e$ at a significance greater than 5 standard deviations. We also place an upper limit of 0.46 on the fraction of such quarks that can be present in an admixture with the standard model top quarks ($Q=+2/3\\,e$) at a 95\\% confidence level.

  20. The ^2H(e,e'p)n Reaction at High Four-Momentum Transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hassan Ibrahim

    2006-12-31

    This dissertation presents the highest four-momentum transfer, Q^2,quasielastic (x_Bj = 1) results from Experiment E01-020 which systematically explored the 2He(e,e'p)n reaction ("Electro-disintegration" of the deuteron) at three different four-momentum transfers, Q^2 = 0.8, 2.1, and 3.5 GeV^2 and missing momenta, P_miss = 0, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 GeV including separations of the longitudinal-transverse interference response function, R_LT, and extractoin of the longitudinal-transverse asymmetry, A_LT. This systematic approach will help to understand the reaction mechanism and the deuteron structure down to the short range part of the nucleon-nucleon interaction which is one of the fundamental missions of nuclear physics. By studying the very short distance structure of the deuteron, one may also determine whether or to what extent the description of nuclei in terms of nucleon/meson degrees of freedom must be supplemented by inclusion of explicit quark effects. The unique combination of energy, current, duty factor, and control of systematics for Hall A at Jefferson Lab made Jefferson Lab the only facility in the world where these systematic studies of the deuteron can be undertaken. This is especially true when we want to understand the short range structure of the deuteron where high energies and high luminosity/duty factor are needed. All these features of Jefferson Lab allow us to examine large missing momenta (short range scales) at kinematics where the effects of final state interactions (FSI), meson exchange currents (MEC), and isobar currents (IC) are minimal, making the extraction of the deuteron structure less model-dependent. Jefferson Lab also provides the kinematical flexibility to perform the separation of R_LT over a broad range of missing momenta and momentum transfers. Experiment E01-020 use the standard Hall A equipment in coincidence configuration in addition to the cryogenic target system. The low and middle Q^2 kinematics were completed

  1. b13.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    67,338 54,994 37,785 15,596 1,613 12,343 1,797 3,391 7,156 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 6,189 4,040 1,686 463 585 Q Q 467 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 7,466 5,179 1,827 Q 772 Q Q 509 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 9,655 6,736 2,656 264 1,498 177 233 1,088 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 7,264 4,577 2,496 Q 2,047 Q 732

  2. b18.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64,783 49,421 23,591 23,914 1,916 15,363 1,956 3,808 9,599 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 6,043 2,682 3,162 199 746 Q 206 498 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,827 2,858 2,791 Q 758 Q Q 620 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,738 5,028 4,530 Q 1,797 Q 604 1,044 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 6,659 3,197 3,141 Q 2,009 Q 531 1,327 50,001 to 100,000

  3. b35.pdf

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    .. 67,338 58,474 8,329 9,147 14,276 2,750 12,909 36,527 2,219 1,312 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 .............................................. 6,774 4,879 890 700 962 Q Q 2,613 253 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ............................................ 8,238 6,212 1,606 707 1,396 Q Q 3,197 181 Q 10,001 to 25,000 .......................................... 11,153 9,530 1,420 1,270 2,482 Q 307 6,031 207 Q 25,001 to 50,000 .......................................... 9,311 8,116 860 1,304

  4. b41.xls

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    64,783 56,940 11,035 9,041 12,558 2,853 11,636 29,969 1,561 1,232 Building Floorspace (Square Feet) 1,001 to 5,000 ................................... 6,789 5,007 1,568 675 972 Q Q 1,957 179 Q 5,001 to 10,000 ................................. 6,585 5,408 1,523 563 1,012 Q Q 2,741 207 Q 10,001 to 25,000 ............................... 11,535 9,922 2,173 1,441 1,740 Q 456 5,260 378 Q 25,001 to 50,000 ............................... 8,668 7,776 1,683 1,155 2,301 240 729 4,264 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000

  5. Measurement of the proton A_1 and A_2 spin asymmetries: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armstrong, Whitney

    2015-05-01

    The Spin Asymmetries of the Nucleon Experiment (SANE) measured the proton spin structure function g_2 in a range of Bjorken x, 0.3 < 0.8, where extraction of the twist-3 matrix element d_2^p (an integral of g_2 weighted by x^2) is most sensitive. The data was taken from Q^2 equal to 2.5 GeV^2 up to 6.5 GeV^2. In this polarized electron scattering off a polarized hydrogen target experiment, two double spin asymmetries, Apar and Aperp were measured using the BETA (Big Electron Telescope Array) Detector. BETA consisted of a scintillator hodoscope, gas Cerenkov counter, lucite hodoscope and a large lead glass electromagnetic calorimeter. With a unique open geometry, a threshold gas Cerenkov detector allowed BETA to cleanly identify electrons for this inclusive experiment. A measurement of d_2^p is is compared to lattice QCD calculations.

  6. Demonstration of a novel technique to measure two-photon exchange effects in elastic e±p scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moteabbed, Maryam; Niroula, Megh; Raue, Brian A.; Weinstein, Lawrence B.

    2013-08-30

    The discrepancy between proton electromagnetic form factors extracted using unpolarized and polarized scattering data is believed to be a consequence of two-photon exchange (TPE) effects. However, the calculations of TPE corrections have significant model dependence, and there is limited direct experimental evidence for such corrections. The TPE contributions depend on the sign of the lepton charge in e±p scattering, but the luminosities of secondary positron beams limited past measurement at large scattering angles, where the TPE effects are believe to be most significant. We present the results of a new experimental technique for making direct e±p comparisons, which has themore » potential to make precise measurements over a broad range in Q2 and scattering angles. We use the Jefferson Laboratory electron beam and the Hall B photon tagger to generate a clean but untagged photon beam. The photon beam impinges on a converter foil to generate a mixed beam of electrons, positrons, and photons. A chicane is used to separate and recombine the electron and positron beams while the photon beam is stopped by a photon blocker. This provides a combined electron and positron beam, with energies from 0.5 to 3.2 GeV, which impinges on a liquid hydrogen target. The large acceptance CLAS detector is used to identify and reconstruct elastic scattering events, determining both the initial lepton energy and the sign of the scattered lepton. The data were collected in two days with a primary electron beam energy of only 3.3 GeV, limiting the data from this run to smaller values of Q2 and scattering angle. Nonetheless, this measurement yields a data sample for e±p with statistics comparable to those of the best previous measurements. We have shown that we can cleanly identify elastic scattering events and correct for the difference in acceptance for electron and positron scattering. Because we ran with only one polarity for the chicane, we are unable to study the difference

  7. Million U.S. Housing Units Total....................................................................................

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    33.0 8.0 3.4 5.9 14.4 1.2 Cooking Appliances Frequency of Hot Meals Cooked 3 or More Times A Day................................................. 8.2 3.4 1.0 0.4 0.6 1.2 Q 2 Times A Day.............................................................. 24.6 8.6 2.3 1.0 1.6 3.5 0.2 Once a Day.................................................................. 42.3 10.1 2.3 1.1 2.1 4.3 0.4 A Few Times Each Week............................................. 27.2 7.8 2.0 0.7 1.3 3.6 Q About Once a

  8. Charge-conjugation symmetric complete impulse approximation for the pion electromagnetic form factor in the covariant spectator theory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Biernat, Elmar P.; Gross, Franz; Peña, M. T.; Stadler, Alfred

    2015-10-26

    The pion form factor is calculated in the framework of the charge-conjugation invariant covariant spectator theory. This formalism is established in Minkowski space, and the calculation is set up in momentum space. In a previous calculation we included only the leading pole coming from the spectator quark (referred to as the relativistic impulse approximation). In this study we also include the contributions from the poles of the quark which interacts with the photon and average over all poles in both the upper and lower half-planes in order to preserve charge conjugation invariance (referred to as the C-symmetric complete impulse approximation).more » We find that for small pion mass these contributions are significant at all values of the four-momentum transfer Q2 but, surprisingly, do not alter the shape obtained from the spectator poles alone.« less

  9. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at ?s = 8 TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2015-08-08

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at ?s = 8 TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q| = 2e to |q| = 6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a DrellYan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  10. Measurements of pion production in eA with the CLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Manly, Steven L.; Lee, Hyupwoo

    2015-05-01

    Preliminary results on semi-inclusive charged pion production in eA collisions at Ebeam=5 GeV/c2 are presented. These data are thought to be useful for tuning the hadronic production models used in extracting results from current and next-generation neutrino oscillation experiments. The data were collected using the CLAS detector, which is a multipurpose, large acceptance, magnetic spectrometer located in Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Distributions (integrated and differential) in W, Q2, pion momentum , and pion angle are shown for data produced using Deuterium, carbon, and iron targets, including radiative corrections. Preliminary comparisons with data simulated using the GENIE generator are made.

  11. Search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}=8$$ s = 8  TeV using the ATLAS detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimoto, G.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnal, V.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Auerbach, B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Bansil, H. S.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Becker, S.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieniek, S. P.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J. -B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Brazzale, S. F.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, K.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Brown, J.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Buda, S. I.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminada, L. M.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Cardarelli, R.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chang, P.; Chapleau, B.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Childers, J. T.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Cleland, W.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Cogan, J. G.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consonni, S. M.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Crispin Ortuzar, M.; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D’Auria, S.; D’Onofrio, M.; Cunha Sargedas De Sousa, M. J. Da; Via, C. Da; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Nooij, L.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Vivie De Regie, J. B.; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. M.; Deliyergiyev, M.; Dell’Acqua, A.; Dell’Asta, L.; Dell’Orso, M.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca, C.; DeMarco, D. A.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demilly, A.; Denisov, S. P.; Derendarz, D.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K.; Deterre, C.; Deviveiros, P. O.; Dewhurst, A.; Dhaliwal, S.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Donato, C.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Micco, B.; Di Nardo, R.; Di Simone, A.; Di Sipio, R.; Di Valentino, D.; Diaconu, C.; Diamond, M.; Dias, F. A.; Diaz, M. A.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietrich, J.; Diglio, S.; Dimitrievska, A.; Dingfelder, J.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Djama, F.; Djobava, T.; Djuvsland, J. I.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobos, D.; Dobre, M.; Doglioni, C.; Dohmae, T.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Donadelli, M.; Donati, S.; Dondero, P.; Donini, J.; Dopke, J.; Doria, A.; Dova, M. T.; Doyle, A. T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. M.; Farthouat, P.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Faucci Giannelli, M.; Favareto, A.; Fayard, L.; Federic, P.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, W.; Feigl, S.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Feng, H.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Fernandez Martinez, P.; Fernandez Perez, S.; Ferrando, J.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferreira de Lima, D. E.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferretto Parodi, A.; Fiascaris, M.; Fiedler, F.; Filipčič, A.; Filipuzzi, M.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finelli, K. D.; Fiolhais, M. C. N.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, A.; Fischer, C.; Fischer, J.; Fisher, W. C.; Fitzgerald, E. A.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fletcher, G. T.; Fletcher, G.; Flick, T.; Floderus, A.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Formica, A.; Forti, A.; Fournier, D.; Fox, H.; Fracchia, S.; Francavilla, P.; Franchini, M.; Francis, D.; Franconi, L.; Franklin, M.; Fraternali, M.; Freeborn, D.; French, S. T.; Friedrich, F.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fulsom, B. G.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gabizon, O.; Gabrielli, A.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadatsch, S.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Galea, C.; Galhardo, B.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallop, B. J.; Gallus, P.; Galster, G.; Gan, K. K.; Gao, J.; Gao, Y.; Gao, Y. S.; Garay Walls, F. 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A.; Oliveira Damazio, D.; Oliver Garcia, E.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Onofre, A.; Onyisi, P. U. E.; Oram, C. J.; Oreglia, M. J.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlando, N.; Oropeza Barrera, C.; Orr, R. S.; Osculati, B.; Ospanov, R.; Otero y Garzon, G.; Otono, H.; Ouchrif, M.; Ouellette, E. A.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Oussoren, K. P.; Ouyang, Q.; Ovcharova, A.; Owen, M.; Owen, R. E.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozturk, N.; Pachal, K.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Pagáčová, M.; Pagan Griso, S.; Paganis, E.; Pahl, C.; Paige, F.; Pais, P.; Pajchel, K.; Palacino, G.; Palestini, S.; Palka, M.; Pallin, D.; Palma, A.; Pan, Y. B.; Panagiotopoulou, E.; Pandini, C. E.; Panduro Vazquez, J. G.; Pani, P.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Paolozzi, L.; Papadopoulou, Th. D.; Papageorgiou, K.; Paramonov, A.; Paredes Hernandez, D.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, K. A.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr.; Pásztor, G.; Pataraia, S.; Patel, N. D.; Pater, J. R.; Pauly, T.; Pearce, J.; Pearson, B.; Pedersen, L. E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Pérez García-Estañ, M. T.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pignotti, D. T.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pinto, B.; Pires, S.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M. -A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Pospisil, S.; Potamianos, K.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Potter, C. T.; Poulard, G.; Poveda, J.; Pozdnyakov, V.; Pralavorio, P.; Pranko, A.; Prasad, S.; Prell, S.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reisin, H.; Relich, M.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rolli, S.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosendahl, P. L.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saimpert, M.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmidt, E.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schroeder, C.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H. -C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Schwoerer, M.; Sciacca, F. G.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Selbach, K. E.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Saadi, D. Shoaleh; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Shushkevich, S.; Sicho, P.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simoniello, R.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soueid, P.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; Spreitzer, T.; Denis, R. D. St.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Stavina, P.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stern, S.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Sugaya, Y.; Suhr, C.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Suzuki, Y.; Svatos, M.; Swedish, S.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tannoury, N.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Therhaag, J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; True, P.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ugland, M.; Uhlenbrock, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Valladolid Gallego, E.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; Van Der Leeuw, R.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives Vaque, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Warsinsky, M.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, L.; Yao, W-M.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2015-08-01

    A search for heavy long-lived multi-charged particles is performed using the ATLAS detector at the LHC. Data collected in 2012 at √s=8 TeV TeV from pp collisions corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1 are examined. Particles producing anomalously high ionisation, consistent with long-lived massive particles with electric charges from |q|=2e to |q|=6e are searched for. No signal candidate events are observed, and 95 % confidence level cross-section upper limits are interpreted as lower mass limits for a Drell–Yan production model. The mass limits range between 660 and 785 GeV.

  12. Longitudinal target-spin asymmetries for deeply virtual Compton scattering

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Seder, E.; Biselli, A.; Pisano, S.; Niccolai, S.; Smith, G. D.; Joo, K.; Adhikari, K.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2015-01-22

    A measurement of the electroproduction of photons off protons in the deeply inelastic regime was performed at Jefferson Lab using a nearly 6-GeV electron beam, a longitudinally polarized proton target and the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer. Target-spin asymmetries for ep → e'p'y events, which arise from the interference of the deeply virtual Compton scattering and the Bethe-Heitler processes, were extracted over the widest kinematics in Q2, xB, t and Φ, for 166 four-dimensional bins. In the framework of Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs), at leading twist the t dependence of these asymmetries provides insight on the spatial distribution of the axialmore » charge of the proton, which appears to be concentrated in its center. In conclusion, these results bring important and necessary constraints for the existing parametrizations of chiral-even GPDs.« less

  13. Electroexcitation of the Δ+(1232) at low momentum transfer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Blomberg, A.; Anez, D.; Sparveris, N.; Sarty, A. J.; Paolone, M.; Gilad, S.; Higinbotham, D.; Ahmed, Z.; Albataineh, H.; Allada, K.; et al

    2016-07-05

    We report on new pmore » $$(e,e^\\prime p)\\pi^\\circ$$ measurements at the $$\\Delta^{+}(1232)$$ resonance at the low momentum transfer region. The mesonic cloud dynamics is predicted to be dominant and rapidly changing in this kinematic region offering a test bed for chiral effective field theory calculations. The new data explore the low $Q^2$ dependence of the resonant quadrupole amplitudes while extending the measurements of the Coulomb quadrupole amplitude to the lowest momentum transfer ever reached. The results disagree with predictions of constituent quark models and are in reasonable agreement with dynamical calculations that include pion cloud effects, chiral effective field theory and lattice calculations. The reported measurements suggest that improvement is required to the theoretical calculations and provide valuable input that will allow their refinements.« less

  14. A=7B (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7B) 1. 10B(3He, 6He)7B Qm = -18.55 A 6He group corresponding to the unbound ground state of 7B has been identified at E(3He) = 50 MeV: M - A (7B) = 27.94 ± 0.10, Γ = 1.4 ± 0.2 MeV. The isobaric quartet mass law would predict M - A = 27.76 ± 0.17 MeV. 7B is unbound with respect to 6Be + p (Q = 2.27), 5Li + 2p (Q = 1.68), 4He + 3p (Q = 3.65). The expected single-particle width is Γ = 0.64 MeV: it is suggested that the two-proton and three-proton decays make

  15. A=7B (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 7B) GENERAL: See also (1974DA1B, 1974IR04, 1975BE31, 1975BE56, 1976IR1B, 1977SP1B). 1. 10B(3He, 6He)7B Qm = -18.55 A 6He group corresponding to the unbound ground state of 7B has been identified at E(3He) = 50 MeV: M - A (7B) = 27.94 ± 0.10, Γ = 1.4 ± 0.2 MeV. The isobaric quartet mass law would predict M - A = 27.76 ± 0.17 MeV. 7B is unbound with respect to 6Be + p (Q = 2.27), 5Li + 2p (Q = 1.68), 4He + 3p (Q = 3.65). The expected single-particle width is

  16. A=8C (1974AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (Not illustrated) 8C has been observed in the 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction at Eα = 156 MeV: M - A = 35.30 ± 0.20 MeV, Γc.m. = 220+80-140 keV [the differential cross section at 2° (lab) is ≈ 20 nb/sr] (R.G.H. Robertson, S. Martin, W.R. Falk, D. Ingham and A. Djaloeis, private communication). 8C is then unstable with respect to 7B + p (Q = 0.1), 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.3), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.8), 4He + 4p (Q = 3.7). See also (1960GO1B, 1966KE16, 1970WA1G).

  17. A=8C (1979AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35096 ± 26 keV, Γc.m. = 230 ± 50 keV: see (1977TR07). See also (1974AJ01, 1974RO17, 1976TR1B, 1978RO01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.13 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.143), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55), 4He + 4p (Q = 3.514). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ≈ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10° (1976RO04). The 12C(α,

  18. A=8C (1984AJ01)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4AJ01) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35095 ± 23 keV (A.H. Wapstra, private communication). Γc.m. = 230 ± 50 keV: see (1979AJ01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.13 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.14), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55), 4He + 4p (Q = 3.51). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ~ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10°. The 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction has been studied

  19. A=8C (2004TI06)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2004TI06) (See the Isobar Diagram for 8C) Mass of 8C: The atomic mass excess of 8C is 35094 ± 23 keV (2003AU03); Γcm = 230 ± 50 keV [Jπ = 0+; T = 2]: see (1979AJ01). 8C is stable with respect to 7B + p (Q = -0.07 MeV) and unstable with respect to 6Be + 2p (Q = 2.14), 5Li + 3p (Q = 1.55) and 4He + 4p (Q = 3.51). At E(3He) = 76 MeV the differential cross section for formation of 8Cg.s. in the 14N(3He, 9Li) reaction is ~ 5 nb/sr at θlab = 10°. The 12C(α, 8He)8C reaction has been studied at

  20. A=9Li (66LA04)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    66LA04) (See Energy Level Diagrams for 9Li) GENERAL: See (GR64C). See also Table 9.1 [Table of Energy Levels] (in PDF or PS). Mass of 9Li: From the Q-value for 7Li(t, p)9Li: Q = -2.397 ± 0.020 MeV, the mass excess of 9Li is 24.965 ± 0.020 MeV (MI64E, MA65A). 1. 9Li(β-)9Be Qm = 13.615 9Li decays to the ground state (25 ± 15 %) and to the 2.43 MeV, neutron-unstable state of 9Be (75 ± 15 %). The β-endpoints are 13.5 ± 0.3 MeV and 11.0 ± 0.4 MeV; log ft = 5.5 ± 0.2 and 4.7 ± 0.2,

  1. D&TX

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    *. ( ARGONNE RATIONAL 1-Ci3ORATORY . 1 D&TX 7. my 19, 1349 70 t. Z. ROse at L, Em &=i*p~~4 DVur;uM hLl%L ?bvs -Lcs . FReti c. c. Fqpr an2 2. E. sulu+rr fis2 S*crep t & fbQ s-e: of the ?atagel DrFAm%un !! 1 0 * the >rt &Fz=z d t& &men of ScieJce & >&7*-z 4-q 2s'; %rZion 0C the ZLLS~~~ of Science a2 31~52-37 fo2 T&imcyyg c.=A+=< he-< - ,,a uas c:cgetes ALL 12, 1SL9. Z 0 sor;~~,-~-lioi! c.jme s 'm&-go& ~WC& c ",& d*cg&A

  2. Analytic calculation of 1-jettiness in DIS at O (αs)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kang, Daekyoung; Lee, Christopher; Stewart, Iain W.

    2014-11-24

    We present an analytic O(αs) calculation of cross sections in deep inelastic scattering (DIS) dependent on an event shape, 1-jettiness, that probes final states with one jet plus initial state radiation. This is the first entirely analytic calculation for a DIS event shape cross section at this order. We present results for the differential and cumulative 1-jettiness cross sections, and express both in terms of structure functions dependent not only on the usual DIS variables x, Q 2 but also on the 1-jettiness τ. Combined with previous results for log resummation, predictions are obtained over the entire range of themore » 1-jettiness distribution.« less

  3. First photometric study of the very short period K-type contact binary 1SWASP J064501.21+342154.9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, N.-P.; Qian, S.-B.; Liao, W.-P.; Zhu, L.-Y.; He, J.-J.; Liu, L.; Zhao, E.-G.; Soonthornthum, B.

    2014-02-01

    The first high precision CCD photometric light curves of 1SWASP J064501.21+342154.9 were obtained in 2013 February along with several new times of minimum light. The multi-color light curves were analyzed using the Wilson-Devinney code. Photometric solutions reveal that the system is a W-type shallow contact binary with a mass ratio of q = 2.110 0.007 and a degree of contact of f = 15.3% 2.1%. A third light contributing about 2% of the total luminosity in the I band was found. It may come from a cool tertiary component. A small spot found on the surface of the binary indicates that the solar-like activities are at a low level at present.

  4. Measurement of the 12C(e,e'p)11B Two-Body Breakup Reaction at High Missing Momentum Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monaghan, P.; Shneor, R.; Subedi, R.; Anderson, B.D.; Aniol, K.; Annand, J.; Arrington, J.; Benaoum, H.; Benmokhtar, F.; Bertin, P.; Bertozzi, W.; Boeglin, W.; Chen, J.P.; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, E.; Ciofi degli-Atti, C.; Cisbani, E.; Cosyn, W.; Craver, B.; de Jager, C.W.; Feuerbach, R.J.; Folts, E.; Frullani, S.; Garibaldi, F.; Gayou, O.; Gilad, S.; Gilman, R.; Glamazdin, O.; Gomez, J.; Hansen, O.; Higinbotham, D.W.; Holmstrom, T.; Ibrahim, H.; Igarashi, R.; Jans, E.; Jiang, X.; Jiang, Y.; Kaufman, L.; Kelleher, A.; Kolarkar, A.; Kuchina, E.; Kumbartzki, G.; LeRose, J.J.; Lindgren, R.; Liyanage, N.; Margaziotis, D.J.; Markowitz, P.; Marrone, S.; Mazouz, M.; Meekins, D.; Michaels, R.; Moffit, B.; Morita, H.; Nanda, S.; Perdrisat, C.F.; Piasetzky, E.; Potokar, M.; Punjabi, V.; Qiang, Y.; Reinhold, J.; Reitz, B.; Ron, G.; Rosner, G.; Ryckebusch, J.; Saha, A.; Sawatzky, B.; Segal, J.; Shahinyan, A.; Sirca, S.; Slifer, K.; Solvignon, P.; Sulkosky, V.; Thompson, N.; Ulmer, P.E.; Urciuoli, G.M.; Voutier, E.; Wang, K.; Watson, J.W.; Weinstein, L.B.; Wojtsekhowski, B.; Wood, S.; Yao, H.; Zheng, X.; Zhu, L.

    2014-08-01

    The five-fold differential cross section for the 12C(e,e'p)11B reaction was determined over a missing momentum range of 200-400 MeV/c, in a kinematics regime with Bjorken x > 1 and Q2 = 2.0 (GeV/c)2. A comparison of the results and theoretical models and previous lower missing momentum data is shown. The theoretical calculations agree well with the data up to a missing momentum value of 325 MeV/c and then diverge for larger missing momenta. The extracted distorted momentum distribution is shown to be consistent with previous data and extends the range of available data up to 400 MeV/c.

  5. Measurement of the EMC effect in the deuteron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Griffioen, Keith A.; Arrington, John R.; Christy, M. Eric; Ent, Rolf; Kalantarians, Narbe; Keppel, Cynthia E.; Kuhn, Sebastian E.; Melnitchouk, Wally; Niculescu, Gabriel; Niculescu, Ioana; et al

    2015-07-01

    We have determined the structure function ratiomore » $$R^d_{\\rm EMC}=F_2^d/(F_2^n+F_2^p)$$ from recently published $F_2^n/F_2^d$ data taken by the BONuS experiment using CLAS at Jefferson Lab. This ratio deviates from unity, with a slope $$dR_{\\rm EMC}^{d}/dx= -0.10\\pm 0.05$$ in the range of Bjorken $x$ from 0.35 to 0.7, for invariant mass $W>1.4$ GeV and $Q^2>1$ GeV$^2$. The observed EMC effect for these kinematics is consistent with conventional nuclear physics models that include off-shell corrections, as well as with empirical analyses that find the EMC effect proportional to the probability of short-range nucleon-nucleon correlations.« less

  6. B → Dℓν form factors at nonzero recoil and |Vcb| from 2+1-flavor lattice QCD

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2015-08-10

    We present the first unquenched lattice-QCD calculation of the hadronic form factors for the exclusive decay B¯→Dℓν¯ at nonzero recoil. We carry out numerical simulations on 14 ensembles of gauge-field configurations generated with 2+1 flavors of asqtad-improved staggered sea quarks. The ensembles encompass a wide range of lattice spacings (approximately 0.045 to 0.12 fm) and ratios of light (up and down) to strange sea-quark masses ranging from 0.05 to 0.4. For the b and c valence quarks we use improved Wilson fermions with the Fermilab interpretation, while for the light valence quarks we use asqtad-improved staggered fermions. We extrapolate ourmore » results to the physical point using rooted staggered heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory. We then parametrize the form factors and extend them to the full kinematic range using model-independent functions based on analyticity and unitarity. We present our final results for f+(q2) and f0(q2), including statistical and systematic errors, as coefficients of a series in the variable z and the covariance matrix between these coefficients. We then fit the lattice form-factor data jointly with the experimentally measured differential decay rate from BABAR to determine the CKM matrix element, |Vcb|=(39.6 ± 1.7QCD+exp ± 0.2QED) × 10–3. As a byproduct of the joint fit we obtain the form factors with improved precision at large recoil. In conclusion, we use them to update our calculation of the ratio R(D) in the Standard Model, which yields R(D)=0.299(11).« less

  7. Systematics of ground-state quadrupole moments of odd-A deformed nuclei determined with muonic M x rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanaka, Y.; Steffen, R.M.; Shera, E.B.; Reuter, W.; Hoehn, M.V.; Zumbro, J.D.

    1984-05-01

    The ground-state quadrupole moments of /sup 151/Eu, /sup 153/Eu, /sup 159/Tb, /sup 163/Dy, /sup 167/Er, /sup 177/Hf, /sup 179/Hf, /sup 191/Ir, and /sup 193/Ir were determined by measuring the quadrupole hyperfine-splitting energies of muonic M x rays. The results are Q = 0.903(10) e b for /sup 151/Eu, Q = 2.412(21) e b for /sup 153/Eu, Q = 1.432(8) e b for /sup 159/Tb, Q = 2.648(21) e b for /sup 163/Dy, Q = 3.565(29) e b for /sup 167/Er, Q = 3.365(29) e b for /sup 177/Hf, Q = 3.793(33) e b for /sup 179/Hf, Q = 0.816(9) e b for /sup 191/Ir, and Q = 0.751(9) e b for /sup 193/Ir. The present quadrupole moments, compared with values obtained from electronic-atom hyperfine measurements, show that the Sternheimer correction factors used in the rare-earth electronic-atom analysis are unreliable. Systematics of deformation parameters ..beta../sub 2/ calculated from the present quadrupole moments for odd-A nuclei, and from B(E2) values of Coulomb excitation measurements for even-A nuclei, also indicate that the largest deformation change so far known exists between /sup 151/Eu and /sup 153/Eu. Except at the onset of nuclear deformation, the deformation parameters of the odd-A nuclei are quite consistent with those of the even-A neighbors.

  8. FOAM FORMATION IN THE SALTSTONE PRODUCTION FACILITY: EVALUATION OF SOURCES AND MITIGATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cozzi, A.

    2011-01-18

    The Saltstone Production Facility receives waste from Tank 50H for treatment. Influents into Tank 50H include the Effluent Treatment Project waste concentrate, H-Canyon low activity waste and General Purpose Evaporator bottoms, Modular Caustic Side Solvent Extraction Unit decontaminated salt solution, and salt solution from the Deliquification, Dissolution and Adjust campaign. Using the Waste Characterization System (WCS), this study tracks the relative amounts of each influent into Tank 50H, as well as the total content of Tank 50H, in an attempt to identify the source of foaming observed in the Saltstone Production Facility hopper. Saltstone has been using antifoam as part of routine processing with the restart of the facility in December 2006. It was determined that the maximum admix usage in the Saltstone Production Facility, both antifoam and set retarder, corresponded with the maximum concentration of H-Canyon low activity waste in Tank 50H. This paper also evaluates archived salt solutions from Waste Acceptance Criteria analysis for propensity to foam and the antifoam dosage required to mitigate foaming. It was determined that Effluent Treatment Project contributed to the expansion factor (foam formation) and General Purpose Evaporator contributed to foaminess (persistence). It was also determined that undissolved solids contribute to foam persistence. It was shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced both the expansion factor and foaminess of salt solutions. The evaluation of foaming in the grout hopper during the transition from water to salt solution indicated that higher water-to-premix ratios tended to produce increased foaming. It was also shown that additions of Dow Corning Q2-1383a antifoam reduced foam formation and persistence.

  9. Phonon-roton modes of liquid 4He beyond the roton in MCM-41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Azuah, Richard T; Omar Diallo, Souleymane; Adams, Mark A.; Kirichek, Oleg; Glyde, Henry R

    2013-01-01

    We present neutron scattering measurements of the phonon-roton (P-R) mode of superfluid 4He confined in 47 A MCM-41 at T = 0.5 K at wave vectors, Q, beyond the roton wave vector (QR = 1.92 A-1). Measurements beyond the roton require access to high wave vectors (up to Q = 4 A-1) with excellent energy resolution and high statistical precision. The present results show for the first time that at T = 0.5 K the P-R mode in MCM-41 extends out to wave-vector Q 3.6 A-1 with the same energy and zero width (within precision) as observed in bulk superfluid 4He. Layer modes in the roton region are also observed. Specifically, the P-R mode energy, !Q, increases with Q for Q > QR and reaches a plateau at a maximum energy !Q = 2 where is the roton energy, = 0.74 0.01 meV in MCM-41. This upper limit means the P-R mode decays to two rotons when its energy exceeds 2 . It also means that the P-R mode does not decay to two layers modes. If the P-R could decay to two layer modes, !Q would plateau at a lower energy, !Q = 2 L where L = 0.60 meV is the energy of the roton like minimum of the layer mode. The observation of the P-R mode with energy up to 2 shows that the P-R mode and the layer modes are independent modes with apparently little interaction between them.

  10. Determining the exchange parameters of spin-1 metal-organic molecular magnets in pulsed magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcdonald, Ross D; Singleton, John; Lancaster, Tom; Goddard, Paul; Manson, Jamie

    2011-01-14

    We nave measured the high-field magnetization of a number of Ni-based metal-organic molecular magnets. These materials are self-assembly coordination polymers formed from transition metal ions and organic ligands. The chemistry of the compounds is versatile allowing many structures with different magnetic properties to be formed. These studies follow on from previous measurements of the Cu-based analogues in which we showed it was possible to extract the exchange parameters of low-dimensional magnets using pulsed magnetic fields. In our recent experiments we have investigated the compound (Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2})PF{sub 6}, where pyz = pyrazine, and the Ni-ions are linked in a quasi-two-dimensional (Q2D) square lattice via the pyrazine molecules, with the layers held together by HF{sub 2} ligands. We also investigated Ni(NCS){sub 2}(pyzdo){sub 2}, where pyzdo = pyrazine dioxide. The samples are grown at Eastern Washington University using techniques described elsewhere. Measurements are performed at the pulsed magnetic field laboratory in Los Alamos. The magnetization of powdered samples is determined using a compensated coil magnetometer in a 65 T short pulse magnet. Temperatures as low as 500 mK are achievable using a {sup 3}He cryostat. The main figure shows the magnetization of the spin-1 [Ni(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} compound at 1.43 K. The magnetization rises slowly at first, achieving a rounded saturation whose midpoint is around 19 T. A small anomaly is also seen in the susceptibility at low fields ({approx}3 T), which might be attributed to a spin-flop transition. In contrast, the spin-1/2 [Cu(HF{sub 2})(pyz){sub 2}]PF{sub 6} measured previously has a saturation magnetization of 35.5 T and a strongly concave form of M(B) below this field. This latter compound was shown to be a good example of a Q2D Heisenberg antiferromagnet with the strong exchange coupling (J{sub 2D} = 12.4 K, J{sub {perpendicular}}/J{sub 2D} {approx} 10{sup -2}) directed along

  11. Advanced, Low/Zero Emission Boiler Design and Operation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Babcock Illinois State Geological; Worley Parsons; Parsons Infrastructure /Technology Group

    2007-06-30

    In partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory, B&W and Air Liquide are developing and optimizing the oxy-combustion process for retrofitting existing boilers as well as new plants. The main objectives of the project is to: (1) demonstrate the feasibility of the oxy-combustion technology with flue gas recycle in a 5-million Btu/hr coal-fired pilot boiler, (2) measure its performances in terms of emissions and boiler efficiency while selecting the right oxygen injection and flue gas recycle strategies, and (3) perform technical and economic feasibility studies for application of the technology in demonstration and commercial scale boilers. This document summarizes the work performed during the period of performance of the project (Oct 2002 to June 2007). Detailed technical results are reported in corresponding topical reports that are attached as an appendix to this report. Task 1 (Site Preparation) has been completed in 2003. The experimental pilot-scale O{sub 2}/CO{sub 2} combustion tests of Task 2 (experimental test performance) has been completed in Q2 2004. Process simulation and cost assessment of Task 3 (Techno-Economic Study) has been completed in Q1 2005. The topical report on Task 3 has been finalized and submitted to DOE in Q3 2005. The calculations of Task 4 (Retrofit Recommendation and Preliminary Design of a New Generation Boiler) has been completed in 2004. In Task 6 (engineering study on retrofit applications), the engineering study on 25MW{sub e} unit has been completed in Q2, 2008 along with the corresponding cost assessment. In Task 7 (evaluation of new oxy-fuel power plants concepts), based on the design basis document prepared in 2005, the design and cost estimate of the Air Separation Units, the boiler islands and the CO{sub 2} compression and trains have been completed, for both super and ultra-supercritical case study. Final report of Task-7 is published by DOE in Oct 2007.

  12. Light-front holographic QCD and emerging confinement

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Erlich, Joshua

    2015-05-21

    In this study we explore the remarkable connections between light-front dynamics, its holographic mapping to gravity in a higher-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) space, and conformal quantum mechanics. This approach provides new insights into the origin of a fundamental mass scale and the physics underlying confinement dynamics in QCD in the limit of massless quarks. The result is a relativistic light-front wave equation for arbitrary spin with an effective confinement potential derived from a conformal action and its embedding in AdS space. This equation allows for the computation of essential features of hadron spectra in terms of a single scale. Themore » light-front holographic methods described here give a precise interpretation of holographic variables and quantities in AdS space in terms of light-front variables and quantum numbers. This leads to a relation between the AdS wave functions and the boost-invariant light-front wave functions describing the internal structure of hadronic bound-states in physical spacetime. The pion is massless in the chiral limit and the excitation spectra of relativistic light-quark meson and baryon bound states lie on linear Regge trajectories with identical slopes in the radial and orbital quantum numbers. In the light-front holographic approach described here currents are expressed as an infinite sum of poles, and form factors as a product of poles. At large q2 the form factor incorporates the correct power-law fall-off for hard scattering independent of the specific dynamics and is dictated by the twist. At low q2 the form factor leads to vector dominance. The approach is also extended to include small quark masses. We briefly review in this report other holographic approaches to QCD, in particular top-down and bottom-up models based on chiral symmetry breaking. We also include a discussion of open problems and future applications.« less

  13. Nuclear Properties and Decay Data Chart of Nuclides.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2008-04-04

    Version 00 NUCHART displays nuclear decay data graphically on a PC and, includes a search routine for assigning gamma-ray energies to radionuclides. The numerical data included in NUCHART were taken from the online database "NUDAT" Version of March 1994. The following information is presented: (1) Nuclide information: for each nuclide, abundance, mass excess, (main) decay mode, half-life and uncertainty, branching ratio, decay Q; (2) decay radiation: for each nuclide, tables of radiation energy, intensity andmore » equivalent dose for the 5 most intense decay radiations of beta+, beta-, conversion electrons, gammas, alphas and x-rays, including electron Augers; (3) adopted gammas: for each nuclide, table containing energy, relative intensity, energy level of the main gamma lines and year of publication in Nuclear Data Sheets; (4) search gamma energies: for a specified interval of gamma energies all know gamma lines and their nuclides are displayed; the database contains 132,000 gamma lines; (5) a search mode by specific nuclide is also available. For the latest data and online tools for viewing the data, see NuDat 2.4 on the NNDC and IAEA NDS websites: http://www.nndc.bnl.gov/ and http://www-nds.iaea.org/.« less

  14. Final_report_pub1.pdf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Brien, Nicholas

    2014-08-15

    The paper describes Soitecs project to plan,install,qualify and ramp a high volume CPV module manufactruing facility in Southern California. Soitec’s CPV module factory in San Diego was planned with an annual production capacity of 280MWDC. It was scheduled to be operational by the first quarter of 2013, and was expected to create several hundred direct and indirect jobs in the San Diego region. From ground breaking to facility readiness was completed in six months. This enabled the docking of equipment in the Q3’12 time frame. The first 140 MW of capacity was ready for operation in Q4’12. Production of the CX-M500 modules started in Q4 2012. The line yield and factory capacity were ramped in 2013. The annual production capacity demonstration was successfully completed in Q2 2014. The modules manufactured at the plant were used to supply utility scale demand in the US and also world markets.

  15. Measurement of the neutron F2 structure function via spectator tagging with CLAS

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Baillie, N.; Tkachenko, S.; Zhang, J.; Bosted, P.; Bültmann, S.; Christy, M. E.; Fenker, H.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keppel, C. E.; Kuhn, S. E.; et al

    2012-04-01

    We report on the first measurement of the F2 structure function of the neutron from semi-inclusive scattering of electrons from deuterium, with low-momentum protons detected in the backward hemisphere. Restricting the momentum of the spectator protons to ≈< 100 MeV and their angles to ≈> 100 degrees relative to the momentum transfer allows an interpretation of the process in terms of scattering from nearly on-shell neutrons. The F2n data collected cover the nucleon resonance and deep-inelastic regions over a wide range of x for 0.65 < Q2 < 4.52 GeV2, with uncertainties from nuclear corrections estimated to be less thanmore » a few percent. These measurements provide the first determination of the neutron to proton structure function ratio F2n/F2p at 0.2 ≈< x ≈< 0.8, essentially free of nuclear corrections.« less

  16. Flavour symmetry breaking in the kaon parton distribution amplitude

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    We compute the kaon's valence-quark (twist-two parton) distribution amplitude (PDA) by projecting its Poincar-covariant BetheSalpeter wave-function onto the light-front. At a scale ? = 2 GeV, the PDA is a broad, concave and asymmetric function, whose peak is shifted 1216% away from its position in QCD's conformal limit. These features are a clear expression of SU(3)-flavour-symmetry breaking. They show that the heavier quark in the kaon carries more of the bound-state's momentum than the lighter quark and also that emergent phenomena in QCD modulate the magnitude of flavour-symmetry breaking: it is markedly smaller than one might expect based on themoredifference between light-quark current masses. Our results add to a body of evidence which indicates that at any energy scale accessible with existing or foreseeable facilities, a reliable guide to the interpretation of experiment requires the use of such nonperturbatively broadened PDAs in leading-order, leading-twist formulae for hard exclusive processes instead of the asymptotic PDA associated with QCD's conformal limit. We illustrate this via the ratio of kaon and pion electromagnetic form factors: using our nonperturbative PDAs in the appropriate formulae, FK/F?=1.23 at spacelike-Q2=17 GeV2, which compares satisfactorily with the value of 0.92(5) inferred in e+e- annihilation at s=17 GeV2.less

  17. Electroweak Corrections at the LHC with MCFM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, John M.; Wackeroth, Doreen; Zhou, Jia

    2015-07-10

    Electroweak (EW) corrections at the LHC can be enhanced at high energies due to soft/collinear radiation of W and Z bosons, being dominated by Sudakov-like corrections in the form of $\\alpha_W^l\\log^n(Q^2/M_W^2)$ $(n \\le 2l, \\alpha_W = \\alpha/(4\\pi\\sin\\theta_W^2))$ when the energy scale $Q$ enters the TeV regime. Thus, the inclusion of EW corrections in LHC predictions is important for the search of possible signals of new physics in tails of kinematic distributions. EW corrections should also be taken into account in virtue of their comparable size ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha)$) to that of higher order QCD corrections ($\\mathcal{O}(\\alpha_s^2)$). We calculated the next-to-leading-order (NLO) weak corrections to the neutral-current (NC) Drell-Yan process, top-quark pair production and di-jet producion, and implemented them in the Monte-Carlo program MCFM. This enables a combined study with the corresponding NLO QCD corrections. We provide both the full NLO weak corrections and their weak Sudakov approximation valid at high energies. The latter is often used for a fast evaluation of weak effects, and having the exact result available as well allows to quantify the validity of the Sudakov approximation.

  18. Measurement of Double-Polarization Asymmetries in the Quasielastic He→3(e→,e'd) Process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mihovilovic, M.; Jin, G.; Long, E.; Zhang, Y. -W.; Allada, K.; Anderson, B.; Annand, J. R.M.; Averett, T.; Boeglin, W.; Bradshaw, P.; et al

    2014-12-05

    We present a precise measurement of double-polarization asymmetries in the 3He(e,e'd) reaction. This particular process is a uniquely sensitive probe of hadron dynamics in 3He and the structure of the underlying electromagnetic currents. The measurements have been performed in and around quasi-elastic kinematics at Q2=0.25(GeV/c)2 for missing momenta up to 270MeV/c. The asymmetries are in fair agreement with the state-of-the-art calculations in terms of their functional dependencies on pm and omega, but are systematically offset. Beyond the region of the quasi-elastic peak, the discrepancies become even more pronounced. Thus, our measurements have been able to reveal deficiencies in the mostmore » sophisticated calculations of the three-body nuclear system, and indicate that further refinement in the treatment of their two- and/or three-body dynamics is required.« less

  19. New Precision Limit on the Strange Vector Form Factors of the Proton

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ahmed, Z.; Allada, K.; Aniol, K. A.; Armstrong, D. S.; Arrington, J.; Baturin, P.; Bellini, V.; Benesch, J.; Beminiwattha, R.; Benmokhtar, F.; et al

    2012-03-01

    The parity-violating cross-section asymmetry in the elastic scattering of polarized electrons from unpolarized protons has been measured at a four-momentum transfer squared Q2 = 0.624 GeV2 and beam energy Eb = 3.48 GeV to be APV = -23.80 ± 0.78 (stat) ± 0.36 (syst) parts per million. This result is consistent with zero contribution of strange quarks to the combination of electric and magnetic form factors GEs + 0.517 GMs = 0.003 ± 0.010 (stat) ± 0.004 (syst) ± 0.009 (ff), where the third error is due to the limits of precision on the electromagnetic form factors and radiative corrections.more » With this measurement, the world data on strange contributions to nucleon form factors are seen to be consistent with zero and not more than a few percent of the proton form factors.« less

  20. Delineating parton distributions and the strong coupling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Jimenez-Delgado, P.; Reya, E.

    2014-04-29

    In this study, global fits for precision determinations of parton distributions, together with the highly correlated strong coupling αs, are presented up to next-to-next-to- leading order (NNLO) of QCD utilizing most world data (charm and jet production data are used where theoretically possible), except Tevatron gauge boson production data and LHC data which are left for genuine predictions. This is done within the 'dynamical' (valencelike input at Q02 = 0.8 GeV2 ) and 'standard' (input at Q02 = 2 GeV2) approach. The stability and reliability of the results are ensured by including nonperturbative higher-twist terms, nuclear corrections as well asmore » target mass corrections, and by applying various (Q2, W2) cuts on available data. In addition, the Q02 dependence of the results is studied in detail. Predictions are given, in particular for LHC, on gauge and Higgs boson as well as for top-quark pair production. At NNLO the dynamical approach results in αs(MZ2) = 0.1136 ± 0.0004, whereas the somewhat less constrained standard fit gives αs(MZ2) = 0.1162 ± 0.0006.« less

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    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    5,557 4,781 2,466 1,745 349 221 776 33 185 558 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 2,777 2,435 1,311 881 108 135 342 Q 81 252 5,001 to 10,000 1,229 1,101 570 402 88 41 129 Q Q 104 10,001 to 25,000 884 753 377 260 85 30 131 Q 37 88 25,001 to 50,000 332 265 114 103 38 Q 67 Q 17 45 50,001 to 100,000 199 130 52 59 16 Q 69 Q 20 47 100,001 to 200,000 90 65 31 26 7 Q 25 Q 10 15 200,001 to 500,000 38 27 11 11 5 Q 11 Q 4 7 Over 500,000 8 6 2 3 2 Q 2 1 Q 1 Principal building activity

  2. All

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 67,550 30,637 26,115 8,873 1,925 19,543 1,573 5,539 12,431 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 7,077 3,871 2,526 382 298 964 Q 230 713 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,953 4,118 2,932 635 267 947 Q Q 765 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 11,987 6,045 4,149 1,305 488 2,117 Q 621 1,373 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 9,482 4,067 3,656 1,353 Q 2,435 Q 647 1,649 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 9,104 3,712 4,051 1,106 Q 4,814 Q 1,327 3,351 100,001 to 200,000 12,415 8,905 4,306 3,493 1,025 Q 3,510 Q 1,392

  3. Heat

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Release date: April 2015 Revised date: May 2016 Heat pumps Furnaces Indiv- idual space heaters District heat Boilers Pack- aged heating units Other All buildings 87,093 80,078 11,846 8,654 20,766 5,925 22,443 49,188 1,574 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 6,699 868 1,091 1,747 Q 400 3,809 Q 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,590 1,038 1,416 2,025 Q 734 4,622 Q 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 12,744 1,477 2,233 3,115 Q 2,008 8,246 Q 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 10,911 1,642 1,439 3,021 213 2,707

  4. Heat

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 80,078 11,846 8,654 20,766 5,925 22,443 49,188 1,574 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 6,699 868 1,091 1,747 Q 400 3,809 Q 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,590 1,038 1,416 2,025 Q 734 4,622 Q 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 12,744 1,477 2,233 3,115 Q 2,008 8,246 Q 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 10,911 1,642 1,439 3,021 213 2,707 7,237 Q 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 13,114 2,664 1,042 2,763 704 4,938 8,489 541 100,001 to 200,000 12,415 11,941 1,549 683 2,915 1,313 4,258 7,569 Q 200,001 to 500,000

  5. Studies of transverse momentum dependent parton distributions and Bessel weighting

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Aghasyan, M.; Avakian, H.; De Sanctis, E.; Gamberg, L.; Mirazita, M.; Musch, B.; Prokudin, A.; Rossi, P.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a new technique for analysis of transverse momentum dependent parton distribution functions, based on the Bessel weighting formalism. The procedure is applied to studies of the double longitudinal spin asymmetry in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering using a new dedicated Monte Carlo generator which includes quark intrinsic transverse momentum within the generalized parton model. Using a fully differential cross section for the process, the effect of four momentum conservation is analyzed using various input models for transverse momentum distributions and fragmentation functions. We observe a few percent systematic offset of the Bessel-weighted asymmetry obtained from Montemore » Carlo extraction compared to input model calculations, which is due to the limitations imposed by the energy and momentum conservation at the given energy/Q2. We find that the Bessel weighting technique provides a powerful and reliable tool to study the Fourier transform of TMDs with controlled systematics due to experimental acceptances and resolutions with different TMD model inputs.« less

  6. 1,2-Hydroxypyridonates as Contrast Agents for Magnetic ResonanceImaging: TREN-1,2-HOPO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jocher, Christoph J.; Moore, Evan G.; Xu, Jide; Avedano, Stefano; Botta, Mauro; Aime, Silvio; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-05-08

    1,2-Hydroxypyridinones (1,2-HOPO) form very stable lanthanide complexes that may be useful as contrast agents for Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). X-ray diffraction of single crystals established that the solid state structures of the Eu(III) and the previously reported [Inorg. Chem. 2004, 43, 5452] Gd(III) complex are identical. The recently discovered sensitizing properties of 1,2-HOPO chelates for Eu(III) luminescence allow direct measurement of the number if water molecules in the metal complex. Fluorescence measurements of the Eu(III) complex corroborate that in solution two water molecules coordinate the lanthanide (q = 2) as proposed from the analysis of NMRD profiles. In addition, fluorescence measurements have verified the anion binding interactions of lanthanide TREN-1,2-HOPO complexes in solution, studied by relaxivity, revealing only very weak oxalate binding (K{sub A} = 82.7 {+-} 6.5 M{sup -1}). Solution thermodynamic studies of the metal complex and free ligand have been carried out using potentiometry, spectrophotometry and fluorescence spectroscopy. The metal ion selectivity of TREN-1,2-HOPO supports the feasibility of using 1,2-HOPO ligands for selective lanthanide binding [pGd = 19.3 (2); pZn = 15.2 (2), pCa = 8.8 (3)].

  7. Probing the Repulsive Core of the Nucleon-Nucleon Interaction via the 4He(e,e`pN) Triple-Coincidence Reaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Korover, Igor; Muangma, Navaphon; Hen, Or; Shneor, Ran; Sulkosky, Vincent; Kelleher, Aidan; Gilad, Shalev; Higinbotham, Douglas; Piasetzky, Eliazer; Wood, Stephen; et al

    2014-07-01

    We studied simultaneously the 4He(e,e'p), 4He(e,e'pp), and 4He(e,e'pn) reactions at Q2=2 [GeV/c]2 and xB >1, for a (e,e'p) missing-momentum range of 400 to 830 MeV/c. The knocked-out proton was detected in coincidence with a proton or neutron recoiling almost back to back to the missing momentum, leaving the residual A=2 system at low excitation energy. These data were used to identify two-nucleon short-range correlated pairs and to deduce their isospin structure as a function of missing momentum in a region where the nucleon-nucleon force is expected to change from predominantly tensor to repulsive. Neutron-proton pairs dominate the high-momentum tail ofmore » the nucleon momentum distributions, but their abundance is reduced as the nucleon momentum increases beyond ~500 MeV/c. The extracted fraction of proton-proton pairs is small and almost independent of the missing momentum in the range we studied. Our data are compared with ab-initio calculations of two-nucleon momentum distributions in 4He.« less

  8. X-ray crystal structure and properties of Phanta, a weakly fluorescent photochromic GFP-like protein

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Paul, Craig Don; Traore, Daouda A. K.; Olsen, Seth; Devenish, Rodney J.; Close, Devin W.; Bell, Toby D. M.; Bradbury, Andrew; Wilce, Matthew C. J.; Prescott, Mark

    2015-04-29

    Phanta is a reversibly photoswitching chromoprotein (ΦF, 0.003), useful for pcFRET, that was isolated from a mutagenesis screen of the bright green fluorescent eCGP123 (ΦF, 0.8). We have investigated the contribution of substitutions at positions His193, Thr69 and Gln62, individually and in combination, to the optical properties of Phanta. Single amino acid substitutions at position 193 resulted in proteins with very low ΦF, indicating the importance of this position in controlling the fluorescence efficiency of the variant proteins. The substitution Thr69Val in Phanta was important for supressing the formation of a protonated chromophore species observed in some His193 substituted variants,more » whereas the substitution Gln62Met did not significantly contribute to the useful optical properties of Phanta. X-ray crystal structures for Phanta (2.3 Å), eCGP123T69V (2.0 Å) and eCGP123H193Q (2.2 Å) in their non-photoswitched state were determined, revealing the presence of a cis-coplanar chromophore. We conclude that changes in the hydrogen-bonding network supporting the cis-chromophore, and its contacts with the surrounding protein matrix, are responsible for the low fluorescence emission of eCGP123 variants containing a His193 substitution.« less

  9. Minimally nonlocal nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Δ resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M.; Girlanda, L.; Schiavilla, R.; Pérez, R. Navarro; Amaro, J. E.; Arriola, E. Ruiz

    2015-02-26

    In this study, we construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including Δ-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale). The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0–300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$more » and $np$ data in this range, we obtain a Χ2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.« less

  10. A Measurement of the Rate of Muon Capture in Hydrogen Gas andDetermination of the Proton's Induced Pseudoscalar Coupling gP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banks, Thomas Ira

    2007-07-10

    This dissertation describes a measurement of the rate ofnuclear muon capture by the proton, performed by the MuCap Collaborationusing a new technique based on a time projection chamber operating inultraclean, deuterium-depleted hydrogen gas at room temperature and 1 MPapressure. The hydrogen target's low gas density of 1 percent compared toliquid hydrogen is key to avoiding uncertainties that arise from theformation of muonic molecules. The capture rate was obtained from thedifference between the mu- disappearance rate in hydrogen--as determinedfrom data collected in the experiment's first physics run in fall2004--and the world averagefor the mu+ decay rate. After combining theresults of my analysis with the results from another independent analysisof the 2004 data, the muon capture rate from the hyperfine singlet groundstate of the mu-p atom is found to be Lambda_S = 725.0 +- 17.4 1/s, fromwhich the induced pseudoscalar coupling of the nucleon, gP(q2 = -0.88m2mu)= 7.3 +- 1.1, is extracted. This result for gP is consistent withtheoretical predictions that are based on the approximate chiral symmetryof QCD.

  11. A simple correlation to predict the hydrate quadruple point temperature for LPG mixtures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yousif, M.H.

    1997-12-31

    A simple correlation to predict the hydrate upper quadruple point temperature, T{sub Q2B} for liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) mixtures was developed. It was developed for use as a part of a modeling and control system for a LPG pipeline in Russia. For performance reasons, a simple hydrate prediction correlation was required that could be incorporated into the real-time and predictive pipeline simulation models. The operating company required both real time and predictive simulation tools be developed to assist in preventing hydrate blockages while minimizing the use of methanol. In this particular pipeline, LPG fluid moves through the pipeline as a single phase liquid above its bubble point pressure. Because of the very low flow rates, the trace amount of water present in the LPG drops out and creates water pools at low points in the pipeline. The pipeline pressure and seasonal temperatures are conducive for hydrate formation in these pools. Methanol and monoethylene glycol (MEG) are injected in the pipeline to help prevent hydrate formation. The newly developed correlation predicts the hydrate quadruple point temperature using only the composition and the molecular weight of the LPG mixture while retaining an accuracy comparable to the statistical thermodynamic models throughout the range of normal operating conditions.

  12. Pion structure function from leading neutron electroproduction and SU(2) flavor asymmetry

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    McKenney, Joshua R.; Sato, Nobuo; Melnitchouk, Wally; Ji, Chueng-Ryong

    2016-03-07

    In this paper, we examine the efficacy of pion exchange models to simultaneously describe leading neutron electroproduction at HERA and themore » $$\\bar{d}-\\bar{u}$$ flavor asymmetry in the proton. A detailed $$\\chi^2$$ analysis of the ZEUS and H1 cross sections, when combined with constraints on the pion flux from Drell-Yan data, allows regions of applicability of one-pion exchange to be delineated. The analysis disfavors several models of the pion flux used in the literature, and yields an improved extraction of the pion structure function and its uncertainties at parton momentum fractions in the pion of $$4 \\times 10^{-4} \\lesssim x_\\pi \\lesssim 0.05$$ at a scale of $Q^2$=10 GeV$^2$. Also, we provide estimates for leading proton structure functions in upcoming tagged deep-inelastic scattering experiments on the deuteron with forward protons, based on the fit results, at Jefferson Lab.« less

  13. Disruptions, Disruptivity, and Safer Operating Windows in the High-? Spherical Torus NSTX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhardt, S P; Diallo, A; Gates, D; LeBlanc, B P; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Sabbagh, S A; Soukhanovskii, V; Tritz, K

    2012-09-27

    This paper discusses disruption rates, disruption causes, and disruptivity statistics in the high- ?N National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) [M. Ono, et al. Nuclear Fusion 40, 557 (2000)]. While the overall disruption rate is rather high, configurations with high ?N , moderate q*, strong boundary shaping, sufficient rotation, and broad pressure and current profiles are found to have the lowest disruptivity; active n=1 control further reduces the disruptivity. The disruptivity increases rapidly for q*<2.7, which is substantially above the ideal MHD current limit. In quiescent conditions, qmin >1.25 is generally acceptable for avoiding the onset of core rotating n=1 kink/tearing modes; when EPM and ELM disturbances are present, the required qmin for avoiding those modes is raised to ~1.5. The current ramp and early flat-top phase of the discharges are prone to n=1 core rotating modes locking to the wall, leading to a disruption. Small changes to the discharge fueling during this phase can often mitigate the rotation damping associated with these modes and eliminate the disruption. The largest stored energy disruptions are those that occur at high current when a plasma current rampdown is initiated incorrectly.

  14. The algebra of dual -1 Hahn polynomials and the Clebsch-Gordan problem of sl{sub -1}(2)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genest, Vincent X.; Vinet, Luc; Zhedanov, Alexei

    2013-02-15

    The algebra H of the dual -1 Hahn polynomials is derived and shown to arise in the Clebsch-Gordan problem of sl{sub -1}(2). The dual -1 Hahn polynomials are the bispectral polynomials of a discrete argument obtained from the q{yields}-1 limit of the dual q-Hahn polynomials. The Hopf algebra sl{sub -1}(2) has four generators including an involution, it is also a q{yields}-1 limit of the quantum algebra sl{sub q}(2) and furthermore, the dynamical algebra of the parabose oscillator. The algebra H, a two-parameter generalization of u(2) with an involution as additional generator, is first derived from the recurrence relation of the -1 Hahn polynomials. It is then shown that H can be realized in terms of the generators of two added sl{sub -1}(2) algebras, so that the Clebsch-Gordan coefficients of sl{sub -1}(2) are dual -1 Hahn polynomials. An irreducible representation of H involving five-diagonal matrices and connected to the difference equation of the dual -1 Hahn polynomials is constructed.

  15. Minimally non-local nucleon-nucleon potentials with chiral two-pion exchange including Delta resonances

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Piarulli, M; Girlanda, L; Schiavilla, R; Perez, R Navarro; Amaro, J E; Arriola, E Ruiz

    2015-02-01

    We construct a coordinate-space chiral potential, including ?-isobar intermediate states in its two-pion-exchange component up to order Q3 (Q denotes generically the low momentum scale).The contact interactions entering at next-to-leading and next-to-next-to-next-to-leading orders (Q2 and Q4, respectively) are rearranged by Fierz transformations to yield terms at most quadratic in the relative momentum operator of the two nucleons. The low-energy constant multiplying these contact interactions are fitted to the 2013 Granada database, consisting of 2309 pp and 2982 np data (including, respectively, 148 and 218 normalizations) in the laboratory-energy range 0--300 MeV. For the total 5291 $pp$ and $np$ data inmorethis range, we obtain a ?2 /datum of roughly 1.3 for a set of three models characterized by long- and short-range cutoffs, RL and RS respectively, ranging from (RL,RS)=(1.2,0.8) fm down to (0.8,0.6) fm. The long-range (short-range) cutoff regularizes the one- and two-pion exchange (contact) part of the potential.less

  16. Howard Gruenspecht Deputy Administrator Duties

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Release date: April 2015 Revised date: May 2016 Heat pumps Furnaces Indiv- idual space heaters District heat Boilers Pack- aged heating units Other All buildings 87,093 80,078 11,846 8,654 20,766 5,925 22,443 49,188 1,574 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 6,699 868 1,091 1,747 Q 400 3,809 Q 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,590 1,038 1,416 2,025 Q 734 4,622 Q 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 12,744 1,477 2,233 3,115 Q 2,008 8,246 Q 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 10,911 1,642 1,439 3,021 213 2,707

  17. Understanding Light-Induced Degradation of c-Si Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sopori, B.; Basnyat, P.; Devayajanam, S.; Shet, S.; Mehta, V.; Binns, J.; Appel, J.

    2012-06-01

    We discuss results of our investigations toward understanding bulk and surface components of light-induced degradation (LID) in low-Fe c-Si solar cells. The bulk effects, arising from boron-oxygen defects, are determined by comparing degradation of cell parameters and their thermal recovery, with that of the minority-carrier lifetime (964;) in sister wafers. We found that the recovery of 964; in wafers takes a much longer annealing time compared to that of the cell. We also show that cells having SiN:H coating experience a surface degradation (ascribed to surface recombination). The surface LID is seen as an increase in the q/2kT component of the dark saturation current (J02). The surface LID does not recover fully upon annealing and is attributed to degradation of the SiN:H-Si interface. This behavior is also exhibited by mc-Si cells that have very low oxygen content and do not show any bulk degradation.

  18. A method to calculate fission-fragment yields Y(Z,N) versus proton and neutron number in the Brownian shape-motion model

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Moller, Peter; Ichikawa, Takatoshi

    2015-12-23

    In this study, we propose a method to calculate the two-dimensional (2D) fission-fragment yield Y(Z,N) versus both proton and neutron number, with inclusion of odd-even staggering effects in both variables. The approach is to use the Brownian shape-motion on a macroscopic-microscopic potential-energy surface which, for a particular compound system is calculated versus four shape variables: elongation (quadrupole moment Q2), neck d, left nascent fragment spheroidal deformation ϵf1, right nascent fragment deformation ϵf2 and two asymmetry variables, namely proton and neutron numbers in each of the two fragments. The extension of previous models 1) introduces a method to calculate this generalizedmore » potential-energy function and 2) allows the correlated transfer of nucleon pairs in one step, in addition to sequential transfer. In the previous version the potential energy was calculated as a function of Z and N of the compound system and its shape, including the asymmetry of the shape. We outline here how to generalize the model from the “compound-system” model to a model where the emerging fragment proton and neutron numbers also enter, over and above the compound system composition.« less

  19. Evaluation of Foaming and Antifoam Effectiveness During the WTP Oxidative Leaching Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burket, P. R.; Jones, T. M.; White, T. L.; Crawford, C. L.; Calloway, T. B

    2005-10-11

    The River Protection Project-Waste Treatment Plant (RPP-WTP) requested Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to conduct small-scale foaming and antifoam testing using a Hanford waste simulant subjected to air sparging during oxidative leaching. The foaminess of Hanford tank waste solutions was previously demonstrated by SRNL during WTP evaporator foaming studies and in small scale air sparger studies. The commercial antifoam, Dow Corning Q2-3183A was recommended to mitigate the foam in the evaporators and in vessel equipped with pulse jet mixers and air spargers. Currently, WTP is planning to use air spargers in the HLW Lag Storage Vessels (HLP-VSL-00027A/B), the Ultrafiltration Vessels (UFP-VSL-00002A&B), and the HLW Feed Blend Vessel (HLPVSL-00028) to assist the performance of the Pulse Jet Mixers (PJM). The previous air sparger antifoam studies conducted by SRNL researchers did not evaluate the hydrogen generation rate expected from antifoam additions or the effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching or oxidative leaching. The fate of the various antifoam components and breakdown products in the WTP process under prototypic process conditions (temperature & radiation) was also not investigated. The effectiveness of the antifoam during caustic leaching, expected hydrogen generation rate associated with antifoam addition, and the fate of various antifoam components are being conducted under separate SRNL research tasks.

  20. Wide angle x-ray scattering of proteins : effect of beam exposure on protein integrity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischetti, R. F.; Rodi, D. J.; Mirza, A.; Makowski, L.; Illinois Inst. of Tech.

    2003-01-01

    Wide-angle X-ray scattering patterns from proteins in solution contain information relevant to the determination of protein fold. At relevant scattering angles, however, these data are weak, and the degree to which they might be used to categorize the fold of a protein is unknown. Preliminary work has been performed at the BioCAT insertion-device beamline at the Advanced Photon Source which demonstrates that one can collect X-ray scattering data from proteins in solution to spacings of at least 2.2 {angstrom} (q = 2.8 {angstrom}-1). These data are sensitive to protein conformational states, and are in good agreement with the scattering predicted by the program CRYSOL using the known three-dimensional atomic coordinates of the protein. An important issue in the exploitation of this technique as a tool for structural genomics is the extent to which the high intensity of X-rays available at third-generation synchrotron sources chemically or structurally damage proteins. Various data-collection protocols have been investigated demonstrating conditions under which structural degradation of even sensitive proteins can be minimized, making this technique a viable tool for protein fold categorization, the study of protein folding, unfolding, protein-ligand interactions and domain movement.

  1. Electromagnetic Currents and Magnetic Moments in $\\chi$EFT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saori Pastore, Luca Girlanda, Rocco Schiavilla, Michele Viviani, Robert Wiringa

    2009-09-01

    A two-nucleon potential and consistent electromagnetic currents are derived in chiral effective field theory ($\\chi$EFT) at, respectively, $Q^{\\, 2}$ (or N$^2$LO) and $e\\, Q$ (or N$^3$LO), where $Q$ generically denotes the low-momentum scale and $e$ is the electric charge. Dimensional regularization is used to renormalize the pion-loop corrections. A simple expression is derived for the magnetic dipole ($M1$) operator associated with pion loops, consisting of two terms, one of which is determined, uniquely, by the isospin-dependent part of the two-pion-exchange potential. This decomposition is also carried out for the $M1$ operator arising from contact currents, in which the unique term is determined by the contact potential. Finally, the low-energy constants (LEC's) entering the N$^2$LO potential are fixed by fits to the $np$ S- and P-wave phase shifts up to 100 MeV lab energies. Three additional LEC's are needed to completely specify the $M1$ operator at N$^3$L

  2. CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) Physics Database

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The CLAS Physics Data Base contains experimental data obtained by the CLAS Collaboration since 1998. Currently content of the DB is limited by experimental data on measured observables such as cross-sections, polarization asymmetries and structure functions. Information on completely integrated single and multi-differential cross-sections are available for various exclusive reactions off proton, neutron and nuclei, induced by real and virtual photons. The kinematics range covered by data sets are W < 4.0 GeV and Q2 < 5.0 GeV2. The search engine allows data to be selected according to various criteria, for instance: the initial and final states, particular kinematics range, observables of interest, date and author name(s) [Copied from http://clasweb.jlab.org/physicsdb/intro.html] A username and password are required to access and search the entire database. However, the Overview page provides links to detailed data pages for each of the experiments available for public access. There are many experiments with data that the public can freely access.

  3. A 3% Measurement of the Beam Normal Single Spin Asymmetry in Forward Angle Elastic Electron-Proton Scattering using the Qweak Setup

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waidyawansa, Dinayadura Buddhini

    2013-08-01

    The beam normal single spin asymmetry generated in the scattering of transversely polarized electrons from unpolarized nucleons is an observable of the imaginary part of the two-photon exchange process. Moreover, it is a potential source of false asymmetry in parity violating electron scattering experiments. The Q{sub weak} experiment uses parity violating electron scattering to make a direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton. The targeted 4% measurement of the weak charge of the proton probes for parity violating new physics beyond the Standard Model. The beam normal single spin asymmetry at Q{sub weak} kinematics is at least three orders of magnitude larger than 5 ppb precision of the parity violating asymmetry. To better understand this parity conserving background, the Q{sub weak} Collaboration has performed elastic scattering measurements with fully transversely polarized electron beam on the proton and aluminum. This dissertation presents the analysis of the 3% measurement (1.3% statistical and 2.6% systematic) of beam normal single spin asymmetry in electronproton scattering at a Q2 of 0.025 (GeV/c)2. It is the most precise existing measurement of beam normal single spin asymmetry available at the time. A measurement of this precision helps to improve the theoretical models on beam normal single spin asymmetry and thereby our understanding of the doubly virtual Compton scattering process.

  4. CaCl 2 -Accelerated Hydration of Tricalcium Silicate: A STXM Study Combined with 29 Si MAS NMR

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Li, Qinfei; Ge, Yong; Geng, Guoqing; Bae, Sungchul; Monteiro, Paulo J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Tmore » he effect of calcium chloride (CaCl 2 ) on tricalcium silicate (C 3 S) hydration was investigated by scanning transmission X-ray microscopy (STXM) with Near Edge X-ray Absorption Fine Structure (NEXAFS) spectra and 29 Si MAS NMR. STXM is demonstrated to be a powerful tool for studying the chemical composition of a cement-based hydration system.he Ca L 3,2 -edge NEXAFS spectra obtained by examining C 3 S hydration in the presence of CaCl 2 showed that this accelerator does not change the coordination of calcium in the calcium silicate hydrate (C-S-H), which is the primary hydration product. O K-edge NEXAFS is also very useful in distinguishing the chemical components in hydrated C 3 S. Based on the Ca L 3,2 -edge spectra and chemical component mapping, we concluded that CaCl 2 prefers to coexist with unhydrated C 3 S instead of C-S-H. In Si K-edge NEXAFS analysis, CaCl 2 increases the degree of silicate polymerization of C-S-H in agreement with the 29 Si CP/MAS NMR results, which show that the presence of CaCl 2 in hydrated C 3 S considerably accelerates the formation of middle groups ( Q 2 ) and branch sites ( Q 3 ) in the silicate chains of C-S-H gel at 1-day hydration.« less

  5. Deeply virtual Compton Scattering cross section measured with CLAS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guegan, Baptistse

    2014-09-01

    The Generalized Parton Distributions (GPDs) provide a new description of nucleon structure in terms of its elementary constituents, the quarks and the gluons. Including and extending the information provided by the form factors and the parton distribution functions, they describe the correlation between the transverse position and the longitudinal momentum fraction of the partons in the nucleon. Deeply Virtual Compton Scattering (DVCS), the electroproduction of a real photon on a single quark in the nucleon eN --> e'N'g, is the exclusive process most directly interpretable in terms of GPDs. A dedicated experiment to study DVCS with the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab has been carried out using a 5.9-GeV polarized electron beam and an unpolarized hydrogen target, allowing us to collect DVCS events in the widest kinematic range ever explored in the valence region : 1.0 < Q2 < 4.6 GeV2, 0.1 < xB < 0.58 and 0.09 < -t < 2.0 GeV2. In this paper, we show preliminary results of unpolarized cross sections and of polarized cross section differences for the DVCS channel.

  6. Deuterium target data for precision neutrino-nucleus cross sections

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meyer, Aaron S.; Betancourt, Minerba; Gran, Richard; Hill, Richard J.

    2016-06-23

    Amplitudes derived from scattering data on elementary targets are basic inputs to neutrino-nucleus cross section predictions. A prominent example is the isovector axial nucleon form factor, FA(q2), which controls charged current signal processes at accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments. Previous extractions of FA from neutrino-deuteron scattering data rely on a dipole shape assumption that introduces an unquantified error. A new analysis of world data for neutrino-deuteron scattering is performed using a model-independent, and systematically improvable, representation of FA. A complete error budget for the nucleon isovector axial radius leads to rA2 = 0.46(22)fm2, with a much larger uncertainty than determined inmore » the original analyses. The quasielastic neutrino-neutron cross section is determined as σ(νμn → μ-p)|Ev=1GeV = 10.1(0.9)×10-39cm2. The propagation of nucleon-level constraints and uncertainties to nuclear cross sections is illustrated using MINERvA data and the GENIE event generator. Furthermore, these techniques can be readily extended to other amplitudes and processes.« less

  7. Chromosome region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. Final progress report, 1 March 1991--28 February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kao, F.T.

    1994-04-01

    The objectives of this grant proposal include (1) development of a chromosome microdissection and PCR-mediated microcloning technology, (2) application of this microtechnology to the construction of region-specific libraries for human genome analysis. During this grant period, the authors have successfully developed this microtechnology and have applied it to the construction of microdissection libraries for the following chromosome regions: a whole chromosome 21 (21E), 2 region-specific libraries for the long arm of chromosome 2, 2q35-q37 (2Q1) and 2q33-q35 (2Q2), and 4 region-specific libraries for the entire short arm of chromosome 2, 2p23-p25 (2P1), 2p21-p23 (2P2), 2p14-p16 (wP3) and 2p11-p13 (2P4). In addition, 20--40 unique sequence microclones have been isolated and characterized for genomic studies. These region-specific libraries and the single-copy microclones from the library have been used as valuable resources for (1) isolating microsatellite probes in linkage analysis to further refine the disease locus; (2) isolating corresponding clones with large inserts, e.g. YAC, BAC, P1, cosmid and phage, to facilitate construction of contigs for high resolution physical mapping; and (3) isolating region-specific cDNA clones for use as candidate genes. These libraries are being deposited in the American Type Culture Collection (ATCC) for general distribution.

  8. Resid-

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    87,093 79,294 14,765 12,538 12,420 4,608 17,041 45,153 1,918 328 Building floorspace (square feet) 1,001 to 5,000 8,041 6,124 2,350 983 1,027 Q Q 2,154 155 Q 5,001 to 10,000 8,900 7,304 2,968 1,193 972 Q Q 3,082 Q N 10,001 to 25,000 14,105 12,357 3,883 1,457 1,855 145 631 6,557 Q Q 25,001 to 50,000 11,917 10,813 2,526 1,866 1,606 Q 1,095 6,466 Q Q 50,001 to 100,000 13,918 13,069 1,395 2,825 1,956 567 2,724 8,705 441 Q 100,001 to 200,000 12,415 12,152 895 1,718 1,652 1,273 3,211 7,447 Q Q 200,001

  9. Measurement of the Target-Normal Single-Spin Asymmetry in Deep-Inelastic Scattering from the Reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Katich, Joseph; Qian, Xin; Zhao, Yuxiang; Allada, Kalyan; Aniol, Konrad; Annand, John; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Bradshaw, Elliott; Bosted, Peter; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Chen, Wei; Chirapatpimol, Khem; Chudakov, Eugene; Cisbani, Evaristo; Cornejo, Juan; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; De Leo, Raffaele; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Ding, Huaibo; Dolph, Peter; Dutta, Chiranjib; Dutta, Dipangkar; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Frullani, Salvatore; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gaskell, David; Gilad, Gilad; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Guo, Lei; Hamilton, David; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, Jijun; Huang, Min; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Iodice, Mauro; Jin, Ge; Jones, Mark; Kelleher, Aidan; Kim, Wooyoung; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; LeRose, John; Li, Xiaomei; Li, Y; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lu, Hai-jiang; Margaziotis, Demetrius; Markowitz, Pete; Marrone, Stefano; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Moffit, Bryan; Munoz Camacho, Carlos; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Oh, Yoomin; Osipenko, Mikhail; Parno, Diana; Peng, Jen-chieh; Phillips, Sarah; Posik, Matthew; Puckett, Andrew; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Ransome, Ronald; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Schulte, Elaine; Shahinyan, Albert; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Sirca, Simon; Stepanyan, Stepan; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tang, Liguang; Tobias, William; Urciuoli, Guido; Vilardi, Ignazio; Wang, Kebin; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Z; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, Xiaohui; Zhang, Yi; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao; Zhu, Lingyan; Zhu, Xiaofeng; Zong, Xing

    2014-07-01

    We report the first measurement of the target single-spin asymmetry in deep-inelastic scattering from the inclusive reaction 3He{uparrow}(e,e')X on a 3He gas target polarized normal to the lepton plane. Assuming time-reversal invariance, this asymmetry is strictly zero in the Born approximation. The experiment, conducted at Jefferson Lab using a 5.89 GeV electron beam, covers a range of 1.7Q2<4.0 GeV2 and 0.162 GeV, which is non-zero at the 2.75sigma level. Theoretical calculations, which assume two-photon exchange with quasi-free quarks, predict a neutron asymmetry of O(10−4) when both photons couple to one quark, and O(10−2) for the photons coupling to different quarks. Our measured asymmetry agrees both in sign and magnitude with the prediction that uses input based on the Sivers transverse momentum distribution obtained from semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering.

  10. Roughness exponent in two-dimensional percolation, Potts model, and clock model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redinz, Jose Arnaldo; Martins, Marcelo Lobato

    2001-06-01

    We present a numerical study of the self-affine profiles obtained from configurations of the q-state Potts (with q=2,3, and 7) and p=10 clock models as well as from the occupation states for site percolation on the square lattice. The first and second order static phase transitions of the Potts model are located by a sharp change in the value of the roughness exponent {alpha} characterizing those profiles. The low temperature phase of the Potts model corresponds to flat ({alpha}{approx_equal}1) profiles, whereas its high temperature phase is associated with rough ({alpha}{approx_equal}0.5) ones. For the p=10 clock model, in addition to the flat (ferromagnetic) and rough (paramagnetic) profiles, an intermediate rough (0.5{lt}{alpha}{lt}1) phase{emdash}associated with a soft spin-wave one{emdash}is observed. Our results for the transition temperatures in the Potts and clock models are in agreement with the static values, showing that this approach is able to detect the phase transitions in these models directly from the spin configurations, without any reference to thermodynamical potentials, order parameters, or response functions. Finally, we show that the roughness exponent {alpha} is insensitive to geometric critical phenomena.

  11. Hydrogen Generation Rate Scoping Study of DOW Corning Antifoam Agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, Charles

    2005-09-27

    The antifoam agent DOW Corning Q2-3183A will be added to waste streams in the Hanford River Protection Program-Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (RPP-WTP) to prevent foaming. It consists mostly of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG). These and other minor constituents of the antifoam have organic constituents that may participate in radiolytic and chemical reactions that produce hydrogen in Hanford waste. It has been recommended by The WTP R&T Department recommended personnel to treat the organic compounds of the antifoam like the in a similar manner as other organic compounds that are native to the Hanford waste with respect to hydrogen production. This testing has investigated the radiolytic and thermal production of hydrogen from antifoam added to simulant waste solutions to determine if the organic components of the antifoam produce hydrogen in the same manner as the native organic species in Hanford waste. Antifoam additions for this testing were in the range of 4 to 10 wt% to ensure adequate hydrogen detection. Test conditions were selected to bound exposures to the antifoam agent in the WTP. These levels are higher than previously recommended values of 350 mg/L for actual applications in WTP tanks containing air spargers and pulse jet mixers. Limited degradation analyses for the organic components of the antifoam were investigated in this study. A more detailed study involving analyses of antifoam degradation and product formation is in progress at SRNL and results from that study will be reported at a later time. The total organic carbon (TOC) content of the Q2-3183A antifoam was measured to be 39.7 {+-} 4.9 wt% TOC. This measurement was performed in triplicate with on three different dilutions of the pure antifoam liquid using a TOC combustion analyzer instrument with catalytic oxidation, followed by CO{sub 2} quantification using an infrared detector. Test results from this study indicate that the WTP HGR correlation

  12. Heavy Truck Engine Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Christopher

    2009-01-08

    The Heavy Duty Truck Engine Program at Cummins embodied three significant development phases. All phases of work strove to demonstrate a high level of diesel engine efficiency in the face of increasingly stringent emission requirements. Concurrently, aftertreatment system development and refinement was pursued in support of these efficiency demonstrations. The program's first phase focused on the demonstration in-vehicle of a high level of heavy duty diesel engine efficiency (45% Brake Thermal Efficiency) at a typical cruise condition while achieving composite emissions results which met the 2004 U.S. EPA legislated standards. With a combination of engine combustion calibration tuning and the development and application of Urea-based SCR and particulate aftertreatment, these demonstrations were successfully performed by Q4 of 2002. The second phase of the program directed efforts towards an in-vehicle demonstration of an engine system capable of meeting 2007 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements while achieving 45% Brake Thermal Efficiency at cruise conditions. Through further combustion optimization, the refinement of Cummins Cooled EGR architecture, the application of a high pressure common rail fuel system and the incorporation of optimized engine parasitics, Cummins Inc. successfully demonstrated these deliverables in Q2 of 2004. The program's final phase set a stretch goal of demonstrating 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency from a heavy duty diesel engine system capable of meeting 2010 U.S. EPA legislated emissions requirements. Cummins chose to pursue this goal through further combustion development and refinement of the Cooled EGR system architecture and also applied a Rankine cycle Waste Heat Recovery technique to convert otherwise wasted thermal energy to useful power. The engine and heat recovery system was demonstrated to achieve 50% Brake Thermal Efficiency while operating at a torque peak condition in second quarter, 2006. The 50% efficient engine

  13. SOUTHEAST REGIONAL CARBON SEQUESTRATION PARTNERSHP (SECARB)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth J. Nemeth

    2005-04-01

    quarters included: (1) Q1-FY05--Assess safety, regulatory and permitting issues; and (2) Q2-FY05--Finalize inventory of major sources/sinks and refine GIS algorithms.

  14. HerMES: Spectral energy distributions of submillimeter galaxies at z > 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, J.-S.; Rigopoulou, D.; Magdis, G.; Rowan-Robinson, M.; Clements, D. L.; Dai, Y.; Fazio, G. G.; Bock, J. J.; Burgarella, D.; Chapman, S.; Cooray, A.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Oliver, S.; Smith, A. J.; Wang, L.; Page, M.; Symeonidis, M.; Riechers, D.; Roseboom, I.; and others

    2014-03-20

    We present a study of the infrared properties for a sample of seven spectroscopically confirmed submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) at z > 4.0. By combining ground-based near-infrared, Spitzer IRAC and MIPS, Herschel SPIRE, and ground-based submillimeter/millimeter photometry, we construct their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) and a composite model to fit the SEDs. The model includes a stellar emission component at λ{sub rest} < 3.5 μm, a hot dust component peaking at λ{sub rest} ∼ 5 μm, and cold dust component which becomes significant for λ{sub rest} > 50 μm. Six objects in the sample are detected at 250 and 350 μm. The dust temperatures for the sources in this sample are in the range of 40-80 K, and their L {sub FIR} ∼ 10{sup 13} L {sub ☉} qualifies them as hyper-luminous infrared galaxies. The mean FIR-radio index for this sample is around (q) = 2.2 indicating no radio excess in their radio emission. Most sources in the sample have 24 μm detections corresponding to a rest-frame 4.5 μm luminosity of Log{sub 10}(L {sub 4.5}/L {sub ☉}) = 11 ∼ 11.5. Their L {sub 4.5}/L {sub FIR} ratios are very similar to those of starburst-dominated SMGs at z ∼ 2. The L {sub CO} – L {sub FIR} relation for this sample is consistent with that determined for local ULIRGs and SMGs at z ∼ 2. We conclude that SMGs at z > 4 are hotter and more luminous in the FIR but otherwise very similar to those at z ∼ 2. None of these sources show any sign of the strong QSO phase being triggered.

  15. The black hole binary V4641 Sagitarii: Activity in quiescence and improved mass determinations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacDonald, Rachel K. D.; Bailyn, Charles D.; Buxton, Michelle; Cantrell, Andrew G.; Chatterjee, Ritaban; Kennedy-Shaffer, Ross; Orosz, Jerome A.; Markwardt, Craig B.; Swank, Jean H.

    2014-03-20

    We examine ?10 yr of photometric data and find that the black hole X-ray binary V4641 Sgr has two optical states, passive and active, during X-ray quiescence. The passive state is dominated by ellipsoidal variations and is stable in the shape and variability of the light curve. The active state is brighter and more variable. Emission during the active state varies over the course of the orbital period and is redder than the companion star. These optical/infrared states last for weeks or months. V4641 Sgr spends approximately 85% of X-ray quiescence in the passive state and 15% in the active. We analyze passive colors and spectroscopy of V4641 Sgr and show that they are consistent with a reddened B9III star (with E(B V) = 0.37 0.19) with little or no contribution from the accretion disk. We use X-ray observations with an updated ephemeris to place an upper limit on the duration of an X-ray eclipse of <8.3 in phase (?1.6 hr). High-resolution spectroscopy yields a greatly improved measurement of the rotational velocity of the companion star of V {sub rot}sin i = 100.9 0.8 km s{sup 1}. We fit ellipsoidal models to the passive state data and find an inclination angle of i = 72.3 4.1, a mass ratio of Q = 2.2 0.2, and component masses for the system of M {sub BH} = 6.4 0.6 M {sub ?} and M {sub 2} = 2.9 0.4 M {sub ?}. Using these values we calculate an updated distance to V4641 Sgr of 6.2 0.7 kpc.

  16. Verification of the ideal magnetohydrodynamic response at rational surfaces in the VMEC code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazerson, Samuel A.; Loizu, Joaquim; Hirshman, Steven; Hudson, Stuart R.

    2016-01-01

    The VMEC nonlinear ideal MHD equilibrium code [S. P. Hirshman and J. C. Whitson, Phys. Fluids 26, 3553 (1983)] is compared against analytic linear ideal MHD theory in a screw-pinch-like configuration. The focus of such analysis is to verify the ideal MHD response at magnetic surfaces which possess magnetic transform (ι) which is resonant with spectral values of the perturbed boundary harmonics. A large aspect ratio circular cross section zero-beta equilibrium is considered. This equilibrium possess a rational surface with safety factor q = 2 at a normalized flux value of 0.5. A small resonant boundary perturbation is introduced, exciting a response at the resonant rational surface. The code is found to capture the plasma response as predicted by a newly developed analytic theory that ensures the existence of nested flux surfaces by allowing for a jump in rotational transform (ι=1/qι=1/q). The VMEC code satisfactorily reproduces these theoretical results without the necessity of an explicit transform discontinuity (ΔιΔι) at the rational surface. It is found that the response across the rational surfaces depends upon both radial grid resolution and local shear (dι/dΦdι/dΦ, where ι is the rotational transform and ΦΦ the enclosed toroidal flux). Calculations of an implicit ΔιΔι suggest that it does not arise due to numerical artifacts (attributed to radial finite differences in VMEC) or existence conditions for flux surfaces as predicted by linear theory (minimum values of ΔιΔι). Scans of the rotational transform profile indicate that for experimentally relevant levels of transform shear the response becomes increasing localised. Careful examination of a large experimental tokamak equilibrium, with applied resonant fields, indicates that this shielding response is present, suggesting the phenomena is not limited to this verification exercise.

  17. MOA 2010-BLG-477Lb: CONSTRAINING THE MASS OF A MICROLENSING PLANET FROM MICROLENSING PARALLAX, ORBITAL MOTION, AND DETECTION OF BLENDED LIGHT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bachelet, E.; Fouque, P.; Shin, I.-G.; Han, C.; Gould, A.; Dong, Subo; Marshall, J.; Skowron, J.; Menzies, J. W.; Beaulieu, J.-P.; Marquette, J.-B.; Bennett, D. P.; Bond, I. A.; Heyrovsky, D.; Street, R. A.; Sumi, T.; Udalski, A.; Abe, L.; Agabi, K.; Albrow, M. D.; Collaboration: PLANET Collaboration; FUN muCollaboration; MOA Collaboration; OGLE Collaboration; RoboNet Collaboration; MiNDSTEp Consortium; and others

    2012-07-20

    Microlensing detections of cool planets are important for the construction of an unbiased sample to estimate the frequency of planets beyond the snow line, which is where giant planets are thought to form according to the core accretion theory of planet formation. In this paper, we report the discovery of a giant planet detected from the analysis of the light curve of a high-magnification microlensing event MOA 2010-BLG-477. The measured planet-star mass ratio is q = (2.181 {+-} 0.004) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} and the projected separation is s = 1.1228 {+-} 0.0006 in units of the Einstein radius. The angular Einstein radius is unusually large {theta}{sub E} = 1.38 {+-} 0.11 mas. Combining this measurement with constraints on the 'microlens parallax' and the lens flux, we can only limit the host mass to the range 0.13 < M/M{sub Sun} < 1.0. In this particular case, the strong degeneracy between microlensing parallax and planet orbital motion prevents us from measuring more accurate host and planet masses. However, we find that adding Bayesian priors from two effects (Galactic model and Keplerian orbit) each independently favors the upper end of this mass range, yielding star and planet masses of M{sub *} = 0.67{sup +0.33}{sub -0.13} M{sub Sun} and m{sub p} = 1.5{sup +0.8}{sub -0.3} M{sub JUP} at a distance of D = 2.3 {+-} 0.6 kpc, and with a semi-major axis of a = 2{sup +3}{sub -1} AU. Finally, we show that the lens mass can be determined from future high-resolution near-IR adaptive optics observations independently from two effects, photometric and astrometric.

  18. Semi-inclusive charged-pion electroproduction off protons and deuterons: Cross sections, ratios, and access to the quark-parton model at low energies

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Asaturyan, R.; Ent, R.; Mkrtchyan, H.; Navasardyan, T.; Tadevosyan, V.; Adams, G. S.; Ahmidouch, A.; Angelescu, T.; Arrington, J.; Asaturyan, A.; et al

    2012-01-01

    A large set of cross sections for semi-inclusive electroproduction of charged pions (π±) from both proton and deuteron targets was measured. The data are in the deep-inelastic scattering region with invariant mass squared W2 > 4 GeV2 and range in four-momentum transfer squared 2 < Q2 < 4 (GeV/c)2, and cover a range in the Bjorken scaling variable 0.2 < x < 0.6. The fractional energy of the pions spans a range 0.3 < z < 1, with small transverse momenta with respect to the virtual-photon direction, Pt2 < 0.2 (GeV/c)2. The invariant mass that goes undetected, Mx or W',more » is in the nucleon resonance region, W' < 2 GeV. The new data conclusively show the onset of quark-hadron duality in this process, and the relation of this phenomenon to the high-energy factorization ansatz of electron-quark scattering and subsequent quark → pion production mechanisms. The x, z and Pt2 dependences of several ratios (the ratios of favored-unfavored fragmentation functions, charged pion ratios, deuteron-hydrogen and aluminum-deuteron ratios for π+ and π-) have been studied. The ratios are found to be in good agreement with expectations based upon a high-energy quark-parton model description. We find the azimuthal dependences to be small, as compared to exclusive pion electroproduction, and consistent with theoretical expectations based on tree-level factorization in terms of transverse-momentum-dependent parton distribution and fragmentation functions. In the context of a simple model, the initial transverse momenta of d quarks are found to be slightly smaller than for u quarks, while the transverse momentum width of the favored fragmentation function is about the same as for the unfavored one, and both fragmentation widths are larger than the quark widths.« less

  19. Precise determination of the deuteron spin structure at low to moderate Q2 with CLAS and extraction of the neutron contribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guler, N.; Fersch, R. G.; Kuhn, S. E.; Bosted, P.; Griffioen, K. A.; Keith, C.; Minehart, R.; Prok, Y.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; Avakian, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Batourine, V.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Biselli, A.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Bltmann, S.; Burkert, V. D.; Carman, D. S.; Celentano, A.; Chandavar, S.; Charles, G.; Colaneri, L.; Cole, P. L.; Contalbrigo, M.; Crabb, D.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Dashyan, N.; Deur, A.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; El Fassi, L.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Filippi, A.; Fleming, J. A.; Forest, T. A.; Garillon, B.; Garon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Goetz, J. T.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Harrison, N.; Hattawy, M.; Hicks, K.; Ho, D.; Holtrop, M.; Hughes, S. M.; Hyde, C. E.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jo, H. S.; Joo, K.; Joosten, S.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Kim, A.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; MacGregor, I. J. D.; McKinnon, B.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Montgomery, R. A.; Movsisyan, A.; Munoz Camacho, C.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Net, L. A.; Niculescu, I.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Park, K.; Pasyuk, E.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Ripani, M.; Rizzo, A.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Roy, P.; Sabati, F.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seder, E.; Simonyan, A.; Skorodumina, Iu.; Sokhan, D.; Sparveris, N.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Sytnik, V.; Tian, Ye; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Voutier, E.; Walford, N. K.; Wei, X.; Weinstein, L. B.; Wood, M. H.; Zachariou, N.; Zana, L.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, Z. W.; Zonta, I.

    2015-11-02

    In this study, we present the final results for the deuteron spin structure functions obtained from the full data set collected with Jefferson Lab's CLAS in 2000-2001. Polarized electrons with energies of 1.6, 2.5, 4.2 and 5.8 GeV were scattered from deuteron (15ND3) targets, dynamically polarized along the beam direction, and detected with CLAS. From the measured double spin asymmetry, the virtual photon absorption asymmetry Ad1 and the polarized structure function gd1 were extracted over a wide kinematic range (0.05 GeV2 < Q2 < 5 GeV2 and 0.9 GeV < W < 3 GeV). We use an unfolding procedure and a parametrization of the corresponding proton results to extract from these data the polarized structure functions An1 and g1n of the (bound) neutron, which are so far unknown in the resonance region, W < 2 GeV. We compare our final results, including several moments of the deuteron and neutron spin structure functions, with various theoretical models and expectations as well as parametrizations of the world data. The unprecedented precision and dense kinematic coverage of these data can aid in future extractions of polarized parton distributions, tests of perturbative QCD predictions for the quark polarization at large x, a better understanding of quark-hadron duality, and more precise values for higher-twist matrix elements in the framework of the Operator Product Expansion.

  20. A Measurement of the Weak Charge of the Proton through Parity Violating Electron Scattering using the Qweak Apparatus: A 21% Result

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beminiwattha, Rakitha

    2013-08-01

    After a decade of preparations, the Qweak experiment at Jefferson Lab is making the first direct measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q^p_W. This quantity is suppressed in the Standard Model making a good candidate for search for new physics beyond the SM at the TeV scale. Operationally, we measure a small (about -0.200 ppm) parity-violating asymmetry in elastic electron-proton scattering in integrating mode while flipping the helicity of the electrons 1000 times per second. Commissioning took place Fall 2010, and we finished taking data in early summer 2012. This dissertation is based on the data taken on an initial two weeks period (Wien0). It will provide an overview of the Qweak apparatus, description of the data acquisition and analysis software systems, and final analysis and results from the Wien0 data set. The result is a 16% measurement of the parity violating electron-proton scattering asymmetry, A = -0.2788 +/- 0.0348 (stat.) +/- 0.0290 (syst.) ppm at Q^2 = 0.0250 +/- 0.0006 (GeV)^2. From this a 21% measurement of the weak charge of the proton, Q_w^p(msr)= +0.0952 +/- 0.0155 (stat.) +/- 0.0131 (syst.) +/- 0.0015 (theory) is extracted. From this a 2% measurement of the weak mixing angle, sin^2theta_W(msr)= +0.2328 +/- 0.0039 (stat.) +/- 0.0033 (syst.) +/- 0.0004 (theory) and improved constraints on isoscalar/isovector effective coupling constants of the weak neutral hadronic currents are extracted. These results deviate from the Standard Model by one standard deviation. The Wien0 results are a proof of principle of the Qweak data analysis and a highlight of the road ahead for obtaining full results.

  1. Integrated Biomass Gasification with Catalytic Partial Oxidation for Selective Tar Conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Lingzhi; Wei, Wei; Manke, Jeff; Vazquez, Arturo; Thompson, Jeff; Thompson, Mark

    2011-05-28

    requirement for commercial deployment of biomass-based power/heat co-generation and biofuels production. There are several commonly used syngas clean-up technologies: (1) Syngas cooling and water scrubbing has been commercially proven but efficiency is low and it is only effective at small scales. This route is accompanied with troublesome wastewater treatment. (2) The tar filtration method requires frequent filter replacement and solid residue treatment, leading to high operation and capital costs. (3) Thermal destruction typically operates at temperatures higher than 1000oC. It has slow kinetics and potential soot formation issues. The system is expensive and materials are not reliable at high temperatures. (4) In-bed cracking catalysts show rapid deactivation, with durability to be demonstrated. (5) External catalytic cracking or steam reforming has low thermal efficiency and is faced with problematic catalyst coking. Under this program, catalytic partial oxidation (CPO) is being evaluated for syngas tar clean-up in biomass gasification. The CPO reaction is exothermic, implying that no external heat is needed and the system is of high thermal efficiency. CPO is capable of processing large gas volume, indicating a very compact catalyst bed and a low reactor cost. Instead of traditional physical removal of tar, the CPO concept converts tar into useful light gases (eg. CO, H2, CH4). This eliminates waste treatment and disposal requirements. All those advantages make the CPO catalytic tar conversion system a viable solution for biomass gasification downstream gas clean-up. This program was conducted from October 1 2008 to February 28 2011 and divided into five major tasks. - Task A: Perform conceptual design and conduct preliminary system and economic analysis (Q1 2009 ~ Q2 2009) - Task B: Biomass gasification tests, product characterization, and CPO tar conversion catalyst preparation. This task will be conducted after completing process design and system economics analysis

  2. White noise of Nb-based microwave superconducting quantum interference device multiplexers with NbN coplanar resonators for readout of transition edge sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohjiro, Satoshi; Hirayama, Fuminori; Yamamori, Hirotake; Nagasawa, Shuichi; Fukuda, Daiji; Hidaka, Mutsuo

    2014-06-14

    White noise of dissipationless microwave radio frequency superconducting quantum interference device (RF-SQUID) multiplexers has been experimentally studied to evaluate their readout performance for transition edge sensor (TES) photon counters ranging from near infrared to gamma ray. The characterization has been carried out at 4?K, first to avoid the low-frequency fluctuations present at around 0.1?K, and second, for a feasibility study of readout operation at 4?K for extended applications. To increase the resonant Q at 4?K and maintain low noise SQUID operation, multiplexer chips consisting of niobium nitride (NbN)-based coplanar-waveguide resonators and niobium (Nb)-based RF-SQUIDs have been developed. This hybrid multiplexer exhibited 1??10{sup 4}???Q???2??10{sup 4} and the square root of spectral density of current noise referred to the SQUID input ?S{sub I}?=?31?pA/?Hz. The former and the latter are factor-of-five and seven improvements from our previous results on Nb-based resonators, respectively. Two-directional readout on the complex plane of the transmission component of scattering matrix S{sub 21} enables us to distinguish the flux noise from noise originating from other sources, such as the cryogenic high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) amplifier. Systematic noise measurements with various microwave readout powers P{sub MR} make it possible to distinguish the contribution of noise sources within the system as follows: (1) The achieved ?S{sub I} is dominated by the Nyquist noise from a resistor at 4?K in parallel to the SQUID input coil which is present to prevent microwave leakage to the TES. (2) The next dominant source is either the HEMT-amplifier noise (for small values of P{sub MR}) or the quantization noise due to the resolution of 300-K electronics (for large values of P{sub MR}). By a decrease of these noise levels to a degree that is achievable by current technology, we predict that the microwave RF-SQUID multiplexer can exhibit ?S{sub I

  3. Measurment and Interpretation of Seismic Attenuation for Hydrocarbon Exploration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Batzle; Luca Duranti; James Rector; Steve Pride

    2007-12-31

    This research project is the combined effort of several leading research groups. Advanced theoretical work is being conducted at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Here, the fundamental controls on loss mechanisms are being examined, primarily by use of numerical models of heterogeneous porous media. At the University of California, Berkeley, forward modeling is combined with direct measurement of attenuation. This forward modeling provides an estimate of the influence of 1/Q on the observed seismic signature. Direct measures of losses in Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSPs) indicate mechanisms to separate scattering versus intrinsic losses. At the Colorado School of Mines, low frequency attenuation measurements are combined with geologic models of deep water sands. ChevronTexaco is our corporate cosponsor and research partner. This corporation is providing field data over the Genesis Field, Gulf of Mexico. In addition, ChevronTexaco has rebuilt and improved their low frequency measurement system. Soft samples representative of the Genesis Field can now be measured for velocities and attenuations under reservoir conditions. Throughout this project we have: Assessed the contribution of mechanical compaction on time-lapse monitoring; Developed and tested finite difference code to model dispersion and attenuation; Heterogeneous porous materials were modeled and 1/Q calculated vs. frequency; 'Self-affine' heterogeneous materials with differing Hurst exponent modeled; Laboratory confirmation was made of meso-scale fluid motion influence on 1/Q; Confirmed theory and magnitude of layer-based scattering attenuation at Genesis and at a shallow site in California; Scattering Q's of between 40 and 80 were obtained; Measured very low intrinsic Q's (2-20) in a partially saturated vadose zone VSP; First field study to separate scattering and intrinsic attenuation in real data set; Revitalized low frequency device at ChevronTexaco's Richmond lab completed; First complete

  4. Integrated simulations of saturated neoclassical tearing modes in DIII-D, Joint European Torus, and ITER plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Halpern, Federico D.; Bateman, Glenn; Kritz, Arnold H.

    2006-06-15

    A revised version of the ISLAND module [C. N. Nguyen et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 3604 (2004)] is used in the BALDUR code [C. E. Singer et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 49, 275 (1988)] to carry out integrated modeling simulations of DIII-D [J. Luxon, Nucl. Fusion 42, 614 (2002)], Joint European Torus (JET) [P. H. Rebut et al., Nucl. Fusion 25, 1011 (1985)], and ITER [R. Aymar et al., Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 44, 519 (2002)] tokamak discharges in order to investigate the adverse effects of multiple saturated magnetic islands driven by neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs). Simulations are carried out with a predictive model for the temperature and density pedestal at the edge of the high confinement mode (H-mode) plasma and with core transport described using the Multi-Mode model. The ISLAND module, which is used to compute magnetic island widths, includes the effects of an arbitrary aspect ratio and plasma cross sectional shape, the effect of the neoclassical bootstrap current, and the effect of the distortion in the shape of each magnetic island caused by the radial variation of the perturbed magnetic field. Radial transport is enhanced across the width of each magnetic island within the BALDUR integrated modeling simulations in order to produce a self-consistent local flattening of the plasma profiles. It is found that the main consequence of the NTM magnetic islands is a decrease in the central plasma temperature and total energy. For the DIII-D and JET discharges, it is found that inclusion of the NTMs typically results in a decrease in total energy of the order of 15%. In simulations of ITER, it is found that the saturated magnetic island widths normalized by the plasma minor radius, for the lowest order individual tearing modes, are approximately 24% for the 2/1 mode and 12% for the 3/2 mode. As a result, the ratio of ITER fusion power to heating power (fusion Q) is reduced from Q=10.6 in simulations with no NTM islands to Q=2.6 in simulations with fully saturated

  5. The pMSSM10 after LHC run 1

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de Vries, K. J.; Bagnaschi, E. A.; Buchmueller, O.; Cavanaugh, R.; Citron, M.; De Roeck, A.; Dolan, M. J.; Ellis, J. R.; Flächer, H.; Heinemeyer, S.; et al

    2015-09-01

    We present a frequentist analysis of the parameter space of the pMSSM10, in which the following ten soft SUSY-breaking parameters are specified independently at the mean scalar top mass scale MSUSY ≡ √mmore » $$\\tilde{t}$$1m$$\\tilde{t}$$2 : the gaugino masses M1,2,3 , the first-and second-generation squark masses m$$\\tilde{q}$$1 = m$$\\tilde{q}$$2 , the third-generation squark mass m$$\\tilde{q}$$3, a common slepton mass m$$\\tilde{ℓ}$$ and a common trilinear mixing parameter A , as well as the Higgs mixing parameter μ , the pseudoscalar Higgs mass MA and tanβ , the ratio of the two Higgs vacuum expectation values. We use the MultiNest sampling algorithm with ∼ 1.2 ×109 points to sample the pMSSM10 parameter space. A dedicated study shows that the sensitivities to strongly interacting sparticle masses of ATLAS and CMS searches for jets, leptons + E-slashT signals depend only weakly on many of the other pMSSM10 parameters. With the aid of the Atom and Scorpion codes, we also implement the LHC searches for electroweakly interacting sparticles and light stops, so as to confront the pMSSM10 parameter space with all relevant SUSY searches. In addition, our analysis includes Higgs mass and rate measurements using the HiggsSignals code, SUSY Higgs exclusion bounds, the measurements of BR(Bs→μ+μ-) by LHCb and CMS, other B -physics observables, electroweak precision observables, the cold dark matter density and the XENON100 and LUX searches for spin-independent dark matter scattering, assuming that the cold dark matter is mainly provided by the lightest neutralino χ-tilde10 . We show that the pMSSM10 is able to provide a supersymmetric interpretation of (g-2)μ , unlike the CMSSM, NUHM1 and NUHM2. As a result, we find (omitting Higgs rates) that the minimum χ2=20.5 with 18 degrees of freedom (d.o.f.) in the pMSSM10, corresponding to a χ2 probability of 30.8 %, to be compared with χ2/d.o.f.=32.8/24(31.1/23)(30.3/22) in the CMSSM (NUHM1) (NUHM2). We