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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program's activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

2

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2001  

SciTech Connect

This report provides information on the status of groundwater monitoring at the Hanford Site during fiscal year 2001.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

4

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Idaho National Laboratory Site Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This plan describes environmental monitoring as required by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, “Environmental Protection Program,” and additional environmental monitoring currently performed by other organizations in and around the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The objective of DOE Order 450.1 is to implement sound stewardship practices that protect the air, water, land, and other natural and cultural resources that may be impacted by DOE operations. This plan describes the organizations responsible for conducting environmental monitoring across the INL, the rationale for monitoring, the types of media being monitored, where the monitoring is conducted, and where monitoring results can be obtained. This plan presents a summary of the overall environmental monitoring performed in and around the INL without duplicating detailed information in the various monitoring procedures and program plans currently used to conduct monitoring.

Joanne L. Knight

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2006  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater monitoring for FY 2006 on DOE's Hanford Site. Results of groundwater remediation, vadose zone monitoring, and characterization are summarized. DOE monitors groundwater at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act (AEA), the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA), and Washington Administrative Code (WAC).

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Lagrangian Stochastic Modeling in Coastal Oceanography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lagrangian stochastic (LS) modeling is a common technique in atmospheric boundary layer modeling but is relatively new in coastal oceanography. This paper presents some fundamental aspects of LS modeling as they pertain to oceanography. The ...

David Brickman; P. C. Smith

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Water Monitoring Flume Replaced at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Water Monitoring Flume Replaced at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Water Monitoring Flume Replaced at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site Water Monitoring Flume Replaced at the Rocky Flats, Colorado, Site October 22, 2013 - 11:01am Addthis What does this project do? Goal 1. Protect human health and the environment In August of this year the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) Rocky Flats, site took advantage of an existing water diversion structure that was no longer needed, to replace an aging water monitoring flume and avoid future repairs that could interrupt data collection. The flume for Rocky Flats Legacy Management Agreement (RFLMA) Point of Evaluation (POE) monitoring location GS10 in South Walnut Creek was located at the bottom of fairly steep channel banks. The bank on the south side shows localized slumping and sliding toward the creek and GS10. Although

9

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2004  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring for fiscal year 2004 (October 2003 through September 2004)on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in southeast Washington State.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

HYDROGEOLOGIC MONITORING AT TIlE FAULTLESS' SITE,  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

HYDROGEOLOGIC MONITORING AT TIlE FAULTLESS' SITE, -NYE COUNTY, NEVADA By William Thordarsm " . . U. S: GEOLOGl'CAL SURVEY Open-File Report 84-580 ' , ' - ' . " . ':Prepa'i'ed": in...

11

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1994 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiologic and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1994 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1993 and June 1994. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal.

Dresel, P.E.; Thorne, P.D.; Luttrell, S.P. [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site Remote Gas Well Monitoring Technology Applied to Marcellus Shale Site February 10, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - A technology to remotely monitor conditions at energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells to help insure compliance with environmental requirements has been developed through a research partnership funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). NETL-RUA researcher Dr. Michael McCawley hasdeveloped a technology to remotely monitor theenvironment around energy-rich Marcellus Shale gas wells. Photo courtesy of West Virginia University.The technology - which involves three wireless monitoring modules to measure volatile organic compounds, dust, light and sound - is currently being tested at a Marcellus

13

Long-Term Surveillance and Monitoring Program Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monitoring Program Monitoring Program Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites Annual Report for the Period January 1,1998, Through December 31,1998 February 1999 This file contains inspection data for the Shiprock Site only. Long-Term Surveillance and Monitoring Program Annual Site inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites 1998 Annual Report February 1999 Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Albuquerque Operations Office Grand Junction, Colorado Work Performed Under DOE Contract Number DE-AC13-966587335 Task Order Number MAC 99-06 Document Number SO0184 Contents Page 1.0 Introduction .......................................................... SHP-I

14

Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.1 SWCX for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring- .1 SWCX for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring- Revision 0 Sitewide Categorical Exclusion for Site Characterization and Environmental Monitoring Introduction As defined in the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Richland Operations Office L'ltegrated l\1anagement System Procedure, .._1\fEPA Analysis at Hanford, a sitewide categorical exclusion is: An application of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021, Appendices A and B, which may apply to Hanford Site proposed actions (activities) that are "sitewide" in nature and extent, which the cognizant DOE Hanford NCO has determined fit within the scope (i.e., same nature and intent, and of the same or lesser scope) of DOE categorical exclusions described in 10 CFR 1021 Appendices A and B. The cognizant DOE Hanford NCO may issue specific sitewide

15

Analysis of the Monitoring Network at the Salmon, Mississippi, Site  

SciTech Connect

The Salmon site in southern Mississippi was the location of two underground nuclear tests and two methane-oxygen gas explosion tests conducted in the Tatum Salt Dome at a depth of 2,715 feet below ground surface. The U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (a predecessor agency of the U.S. Department of Energy [DOE]) and the U.S. Department of Defense jointly conducted the tests between 1964 and 1970. The testing operations resulted in surface contamination at multiple locations on the site and contamination of shallow aquifers. No radionuclides from the nuclear tests were released to the surface or to groundwater, although radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings were brought to the surface during re-entry drilling. Drilling operations generated the largest single volume of waste materials, including radionuclide-contaminated drill cuttings and drilling fluids. Nonradioactive wastes were also generated as part of the testing operations. Site cleanup and decommissioning began in 1971 and officially ended in 1972. DOE conducted additional site characterization between 1992 and 1999. The historical investigations have provided a reasonable understanding of current surface and shallow subsurface conditions at the site, although some additional investigation is desirable. For example, additional hydrologic data would improve confidence in assigning groundwater gradients and flow directions in the aquifers. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency monitored groundwater at the site as part of its Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program from 1972 through 2007, when DOE's Office of Legacy Management (LM) assumed responsibility for site monitoring. The current monitoring network consists of 28 monitoring wells and 11 surface water locations. Multiple aquifers which underlie the site are monitored. The current analyte list includes metals, radionuclides, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

None

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2000  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2000 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath each of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. RCRA groundwater monitoring continued during fiscal year 2000. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, remediation, and several technical demonstrations were conducted in fiscal year 2000. Soil gas monitoring at the 618-11 burial ground provided a preliminary indication of the location of tritium in the vadose zone and in groundwater. Groundwater modeling efforts focused on 1) identifying and characterizing major uncertainties in the current conceptual model and 2) performing a transient inverse calibration of the existing site-wide model. Specific model applications were conducted in support of the Hanford Site carbon tetrachloride Innovative Treatment Remediation Technology; to support the performance assessment of the Immobilized Low-Activity Waste Disposal Facility; and in development of the System Assessment Capability, which is intended to predict cumulative site-wide effects from all significant Hanford Site contaminants.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project monitoring for calendar year 1993 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that have impacted ground-water quality on the Site. Monitoring of water levels and ground-water chemistry is performed to track the extent of contamination and trends in contaminant concentrations. The 1993 monitoring was also designed to identify emerging ground-water quality problems. The information obtained is used to verify compliance with applicable environmental regulations and to evaluate remedial actions. Data from other monitoring and characterization programs were incorporated to provide an integrated assessment of Site ground-water quality. Additional characterization of the Site`s geologic setting and hydrology was performed to support the interpretation of contaminant distributions. Numerical modeling of sitewide ground-water flow also supported the overall project goals. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate ground-water flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to changes in site disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1992 and June 1993. The greatest declines occurred in the 200-West Area. These declines are part of the continued response to the cessation of discharge to U Pond and other disposal facilities. The low permeability in this area which enhanced mounding of waste-water discharge has also slowed the response to the reduction of disposal. Water levels remained nearly constant in the vicinity of B Pond, as a result of continued disposal to the pond. Water levels measured from wells in the unconfined aquifer north and east of the Columbia River indicate that the primary source of recharge is irrigation practices.

Dresel, P.E.; Luttrell, S.P.; Evans, J.C. [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

SciTech Connect

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program, first quarter 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program. During first quarter 1989 (January--March), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the first quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from first quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Oceanography Department of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/16 3/17 3/18 3/19 3/20 3/21 3/22 Toluene(ppbv) 0 50 100 150 200 250 300 COMEX DOAS PTR-MS PEMEX DOAS the intercomparison of toluene measurements between the PTR-MS and two ground level DOAS light paths, T0-PEMEX and T0-COMEX, where PEMEX is 220 m to the west northwest of the T0 site and COMEX is 1026 m to the northwest

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Improved neutron monitor systems for Savannah River Site separations facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Savannah River Laboratory (SRL), in conjunction with Savannah River Site (SRS) Separations Technology personnel, has developed and implemented a comprehensive program to improve the performance and reliability of neutron detector systems (neutron monitors) in the SRS separations areas. The neutron monitors, which monitor the buildup of fissile material in the mixer-settler banks of the solvent extraction process, are important nuclear safety control devices. A review of the performance history of the neutron monitors reveals that many of the systems exhibit problems arising from several causes, including: low neutron sensitivity, high susceptibility to electromagnetic interferences (due to long cable runs between detectors and their electronics), and high maintenance requirements. To address these problems, the neutron monitor improvement program encompasses both technical and administrative improvements, including: substitution of more sensitive neutron monitors at many locations in the solvent extraction areas, the development of an integrated preamplifier/amplifier package to eliminate long cable runs, and improvements in the neutron monitor functional test procedures to reduce maintenance requirements. The implementation of these improvements, already partially complete, is expected to provide enhanced operation and reliability for the neutron monitors. This paper will present a description of the solvent neutron monitors as well as technical details of the improvement program. 2 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

Griffin, J.C.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Hanford Site groundwater monitoring for fiscal year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring for fiscal year (FY) 1996 on the Hanford Site, Washington. Hanford Site operations from 1943 onward produced large quantities of radiological and chemical waste that affected groundwater quality on the site. Characterization and monitoring of the vadose zone during FY 1996 comprised primarily spectral gamma logging, soil-gas monitoring, and electrical resistivity tomography. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1995 and June 1996. Groundwater chemistry was monitored to track the extent of contamination, to note trends, and to identify emerging groundwater-quality problems. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes were tritium and iodine-129. Smaller plumes of strontium-90, technetium-99, and plutonium also were present at levels above the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington interim drinking water standards. Uranium concentrations greater than the proposed drinking water standard were also observed. Nitrate, fluoride, chromium, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, trichloroethylene, and cis-1,2-dichlomethylene were present in groundwater samples at levels above their U.S. Environmental Protection Agency or State of Washington maximum contaminant levels. The nitrate plume is the most extensive. Three-dimensional, numerical, groundwater models were applied to the Hanford Site to predict contaminant-flow paths and the impact of operational changes on site groundwater conditions. Other models were applied to assess the performance of three separate pump-and-treat systems.

Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.; Borghese, J.V. [eds.] [and others] [eds.; and others

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2002  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2002 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Washington State. This report is written to meet the requirements in CERCLA, RCRA, the Atomic Energy Act of 1954, and Washington State Administrative Code.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2005  

SciTech Connect

This report is one of the major products and deliverables of the Groundwater Remediation and Closure Assessment Projects detailed work plan for FY 2006, and reflects the requirements of The Groundwater Performance Assessment Project Quality Assurance Plan (PNNL-15014). This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2005 on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the west-central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas. Technetium-99 and uranium plumes exceeding standards are present in the 200 Areas. A uranium plume underlies the 300 Area. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 2005: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 8 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination, and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2005, drillers completed 27 new monitoring wells, and decommissioned (filled with grout) 115 unneeded wells. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2005. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath former waste sites.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

26

Nevada Test Site tortoise population monitoring study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Tortoise Population Monitoring Study was initiated to determine and monitor the density of desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) on the Nevada Test Site. Quadrat sampling was conducted following methodology described in the Draft Desert Tortoise Recovery Plan (FWS, 1993). So few tortoises were found that densities could not be calculated. Based on estimates of capture probabilities and densities from other studies, it was determined that 1-km{sup 2} (0.4 mi{sup 2}) plots did not contain enough tortoises for estimating densities with the Recovery Plan methods. It was recommended that additional surveys on the Nevada Test Site using those methods not be conducted. Any future efforts to monitor desert tortoise densities should start by identifying other possible methods, determining their relative power to detect changes, and estimating their cost.

Mueller, J.M.; Zander, K.K.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program, second quarter 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1989 (April--June), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. The flagging criteria are based on detection limits, background levels in SRS groundwater, and drinking water standards. An explanation of flagging criteria for the second quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from second quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

28

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. Fourth quarter, 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Monitoring Section of the Environmental and Health Protection (EHP) Department administers the Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. During fourth quarter 1989 (October--December), EHP conducted routine sampling of monitoring wells and drinking water locations. EHP collected the drinking water samples from Savannah River Site (SRS) drinking water systems supplied by wells. EHP established two sets of flagging criteria in 1986 to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. An explanation of flagging criteria for the fourth quarter is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. All analytical results from fourth quarter 1989 are listed in this report, which is distributed to all waste-site custodians.

Not Available

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 2003  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 2003 (October 2002 through September 2003) on the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. The most extensive contaminant plumes in groundwater are tritium, iodine-129, and nitrate, which all had multiple sources and are very mobile in groundwater. The largest portions of these plumes are migrating from the central Hanford Site to the southeast, toward the Columbia River. Concentrations of tritium, nitrate, and some other contaminants continued to exceed drinking water standards in groundwater discharging to the river in some locations. However, contaminant concentrations in river water remained low and were far below standards. Carbon tetrachloride and associated organic constituents form a relatively large plume beneath the central part of the Hanford Site. Hexavalent chromium is present in smaller plumes beneath the reactor areas along the river and beneath the central part of the site. Strontium-90 exceeds standards beneath all but one of the reactor areas, and technetium-99 and uranium are present in the 200 Areas. Uranium exceeds standards in the 300 Area in the south part of the Hanford Site. Minor contaminant plumes with concentrations greater than standards include carbon-14, cesium-137, cis-1,2-dichloroethene, cyanide, fluoride, plutonium, and trichloroethene. Monitoring for the ''Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act'' is conducted in 11 groundwater operable units. The purpose of this monitoring is to define and track plumes and to monitor the effectiveness of interim remedial actions. Interim groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100-K, 100-D, and 100-H) and strontium-90 (100-N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two interim remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act'' groundwater monitoring continued at 24 waste management areas during fiscal year 2003: 15 under interim or final status detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 7 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. During calendar year 2003, drillers completed seven new RCRA monitoring wells, nine wells for CERCLA, and two wells for research on chromate bioremediation. Vadose zone monitoring, characterization, and remediation continued in fiscal year 2003. Remediation and associated monitoring continued at a soil-vapor extraction system in the 200 West Area, which removes gaseous carbon tetrachloride from the vadose zone. Soil vapor also was sampled to locate carbon tetrachloride sites with the potential to impact groundwater in the future. DOE uses geophysical methods to monitor potential movement of contamination beneath single-shell tank farms. During fiscal year 2003, DOE monitored selected boreholes within each of the 12 single-shell tank farms. In general, the contaminated areas appeared to be stable over time. DOE drilled new boreholes at the T Tank Farm to characterize subsurface contamination near former leak sites. The System Assessment Capability is a set of computer modules simulating movement of contaminants from waste sites through the vadose zone and groundwater. In fiscal year 2003, it was updated with the addition of an atmospheric transport module and with newer versions of models including an updated groundwater flow and transport model.

Hartman, Mary J.; Morasch, Launa F.; Webber, William D.

2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

30

Automated Monitoring System for Waste Disposal Sites and Groundwater  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A proposal submitted to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Science and Technology, Accelerated Site Technology Deployment (ASTD) program to deploy an automated monitoring system for waste disposal sites and groundwater, herein referred to as the ''Automated Monitoring System,'' was funded in fiscal year (FY) 2002. This two-year project included three parts: (1) deployment of cellular telephone modems on existing dataloggers, (2) development of a data management system, and (3) development of Internet accessibility. The proposed concept was initially (in FY 2002) to deploy cellular telephone modems on existing dataloggers and partially develop the data management system at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This initial effort included both Bechtel Nevada (BN) and the Desert Research Institute (DRI). The following year (FY 2003), cellular modems were to be similarly deployed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and the early data management system developed at the NTS was to be brought to those locations for site-specific development and use. Also in FY 2003, additional site-specific development of the complete system was to be conducted at the NTS. To complete the project, certain data, depending on site-specific conditions or restrictions involving distribution of data, were to made available through the Internet via the DRI/Western Region Climate Center (WRCC) WEABASE platform. If the complete project had been implemented, the system schematic would have looked like the figure on the following page.

S. E. Rawlinson

2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program. First quarter, 1990  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) groundwater monitoring program conducted in the first quarter of 1990. It includes the analytical data, field data, well activity data, and the other documentation for this program and provides a record of the program`s activities and rationale and an official document of the analytical results. The groundwater monitoring program includes the following activities: installation, maintenance, and abandonment of monitoring wells, environmental soil borings, development of the sampling and analytical schedule, collection and analyses of groundwater samples, review of the analytical data and other data, maintenance of the databases containing groundwater monitoring data and related data, quality assurance (QA) evaluations of laboratory performance, and reports of results to waste-site facility custodians and to the Environmental Protection Section (EPS) of EPD.

Not Available

1990-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

32

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

F F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE ' i A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1978 Nuclear Radiation Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 October 1979 This work performed under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 for t h e U.S. DEPARTMENT O F ENERGY OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1978 by R. F. Grossman Nuclear Radi a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 This work performed under a Memorandum o f Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539

33

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: First quarter 1993, Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by the Environmental Protection Department`s Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) during the first quarter of 1993. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for this program; provides a record of the program`s activities; and serves as an official document of the analytical results.

Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Integrated environmental monitoring program at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy's Hanford Site, north of Richland, Washington, has a mission of defense production, waste management, environmental restoration, advanced reactor design, and research development. Environmental programs at Hanford are conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and the Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The WHC environmental programs include the compliance and surveillance activities associated with site operations and waste management. The PNL environmental programs address the site-wide and the of-site areas. They include the environmental surveillance and the associated support activities, such as dose calculations, and also the monitoring of environmental conditions to comply with federal and state environmental regulations on wildlife and cultural resources. These are called independent environmental programs'' in that they are conducted completely separate from site operations. The Environmental Surveillance and Oversight Program consists of the following projects: surface environmental surveillance; ground-water surveillance; wildlife resources monitoring; cultural resources; dose overview; radiation standards and calibrations; meteorological and climatological services; emergency preparedness.

Jaquish, R.E.

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

In the past, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site has been performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation Department. Calibration and performance tests on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor were performed but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor because it had never been put into service. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no program in place to test them quarterly. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability (MC&A) Manager at the time decided that the program needed to be strengthened and MC&A took over performance testing of all SNM portal monitoring equipment. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with creating a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, writing procedures, troubleshooting/repairing, validating the process, control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and running the program.

Mike Murphy

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring of Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS)  

SciTech Connect

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. DOE maintains the largest cleanup program in the world, currently spanning over a million acres in 13 states. The inventory of contaminated materials includes 90 million gallons of radioactive waste, 6.4 trillion liters of groundwater, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris. It is not feasible to completely restore many sites to predisposal conditions. Any contamination left in place will require monitoring, engineering controls and/or land use restrictions to protect human health and environment. Research and development efforts to date have focused on improving characterization and remediation. Yet, monitoring will result in the largest life-cycle costs and will be critical to improving performance and protection. Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

Bunn, Amoret L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Wellman, Dawn M. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Deeb, Rula A [ARCADIS/Malcolm Pirnie; Hawley, Elisabeth L [ARCADIS/Malcolm Pirnie; Truex, Michael J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Peterson, Mark J [ORNL; Freshley, Mark D [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Pierce, Eric M [ORNL; Mccord, John [S.M. Stoller Corporation; Young, Michael H [University of Texas, Austin; Gilmore, Tyler J [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Miller, Rick [University of Kansas; Miracle, Ann L [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Kaback, Dawn [AMEC Geomatrix; Eddy-Dilek, Carol [Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL); Rossabi, Joe [Redox Tech, LLC; Lee, M Hope [Idaho National Laboratory (INL); Bush, Richard [U.S. Department of Energy, Grand Junction, Colorado (USA); Beam, Paul [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation; Chamberlain, Grover [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation; Gerdes, Kurt [U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation; Collazo, Yvette [U.S. Department of Energy

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring of Environmental Remediation Sites - (SOMERS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for risk reduction and cleanup of its nuclear weapons complex. DOE maintains the largest cleanup program in the world, currently spanning over a million acres in 13 states. The inventory of contaminated materials includes 90 million gallons of radioactive waste, 6.4 trillion liters of groundwater, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris. It is not feasible to completely restore many sites to predisposal conditions. Any contamination left in place will require monitoring, engineering controls and/or land use restrictions to protect human health and environment. Research and development efforts to date have focused on improving characterization and remediation. Yet, monitoring will result in the largest life-cycle costs and will be critical to improving performance and protection. Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Truex, Michael J.; Peterson, Mark; Freshley, Mark D.; Pierce, Eric M.; McCord, John; Young, Michael H.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Miller, Rick; Miracle, Ann L.; Kaback, Dawn; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Rossabi, Joe; Lee, Hope; Bush, Richard P.; Beam , Paul; Chamberlain, G. M.; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Collazo, Yvette

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year 1999 on the US. Department of Energy's Hanford Site, Washington. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Measurements for site-wide maps were conducted in June in past years and are now measured in March to reflect conditions that are closer to average. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1998 and March 1999. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of carbon-14, strontium-90, technetium-99, and uranium also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Cesium-137 and plutonium exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in US Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for plutonium, strontium-90, tritium, and uranium in small plumes or single wells. Nitrate and carbon tetrachloride are the most extensive chemical contaminants. Chloroform, chromium, cis-1,2dichloroethylene, cyanide, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; however, in most cases, they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during fiscal year 1999: 16 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater; 6 under interim status groundwater quality assessment programs to assess contamination; and 2 under final status corrective-action programs. Another site, the 120-D-1 ponds, was clean closed in fiscal year 1999, and monitoring is no longer required. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued with the goal of reducing the amount of chromium (100 K, D, and H) and strontium-90 (100 N) reaching the Columbia River. The objective of two remediation systems in the 200 West Area is to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetium-99/uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. Subsurface source characterization and vadose zone monitoring, soil-vapor monitoring, sediment sampling and characterization, and vadose zone remediation were conducted in fiscal year 1999. Baseline spectral gamma-ray logging at two single-shell tank farms was completed, and logging of zones at tank farms with the highest count rate was initiated. Spectral gamma-ray logging also occurred at specific retention facilities in the 200 East Area. These facilities are some of the most significant potential sources of remaining vadose zone contamination. Finally, remediation and monitoring of carbon tetradoride in the 200 West Area continued, with an additional 972 kilograms of carbon tetrachloride removed from the vadose zone in fiscal year 1999.

MJ Hartman; LF Morasch; WD Webber

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

39

Site-Wide Integrated Water Monitoring -- Defining and Implementing Sampling Objectives to Support Site Closure  

SciTech Connect

The Underground Test Area (UGTA) activity is responsible for assessing and evaluating the effects of the underground nuclear weapons tests on groundwater at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site (NTS), and implementing a corrective action closure strategy. The UGTA strategy is based on a combination of characterization, modeling studies, monitoring, and institutional controls (i.e., monitored natural attenuation). The closure strategy verifies through appropriate monitoring activities that contaminants of concern do not exceed the SDWA at the regulatory boundary and that adequate institutional controls are established and administered to ensure protection of the public. Other programs conducted at the NNSS supporting the environmental mission include the Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Program (RREMP), Waste Management, and the Infrastructure Program. Given the current programmatic and operational demands for various water-monitoring activities at the same locations, and the ever-increasing resource challenges, cooperative and collaborative approaches to conducting the work are necessary. For this reason, an integrated sampling plan is being developed by the UGTA activity to define sampling and analysis objectives, reduce duplication, eliminate unnecessary activities, and minimize costs. The sampling plan will ensure the right data sets are developed to support closure and efficient transition to long-term monitoring. The plan will include an integrated reporting mechanism for communicating results and integrating process improvements within the UGTA activity as well as between other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Programs.

Bill Wilborn, NNSA /NFO; Kathryn Knapp, NNSA /NFO; Irene Farnham, N-I; Sam Marutzky, N-I

2013-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Savannah River Site`s Groundwater Monitoring Program: Second quarter 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Environmental Protection Department/Environmental Monitoring Section (EPD/EMS) administers the Savannah River Site`s (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. During second quarter 1992, EPD/EMS conducted extensive sampling of monitoring wells. EPD/EMS established two sets of criteria to assist in the management of sample results. The flagging criteria do not define contamination levels; instead, they aid personnel in sample scheduling, interpretation of data, and trend identification. Since 1991, the flagging criteria have been based on the federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) drinking water standards and on method detection limits. A detailed explanation of the current flagging criteria is presented in the Flagging Criteria section of this document. Analytical results from second quarter 1992 are listed in this report.

Rogers, C.D. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)

1992-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Monitor well responses at the Raft River, Idaho, Geothermal Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Effects of geothermal fluid production and injection on overlying ground-water aquifers have been studied at the Raft River Geothermal Site in southcentral Idaho. Data collected from 13 monitor wells indicate a complex fractured and porous media controlled ground-water flow system affected by natural recharge and discharge, irrigation withdrawal, and geothermal withdrawal and injection. The monitor wells are completed in aquifers and aquitards overlying the principal geothermal aquifers. Potentiometric heads and water quality are significantly affected by natural upward geothermal leakage via faults and matrix seepage. No significant change in water quality data has been observed, but potentiometric head changes resulted due to geothermal resource testing and utilization. Long-term hydrographs for the wells exhibit three distinct patterns, with superimposed responses due to geothermal pumping and injection. Well hydrographs typical of the Shallow aquifer exhibit effects of natural recharge and irrigation withdrawals. For selected wells, pressure declines due to injection and pressure buildup associated with pumping are observed. The latter effect is presumably due to the elastic deformation of geologic material overlying the stressed aquifers. A second distinct pattern occurs in two wells believed to be hydraulically connected to the underlying Intermediate aquifer via faults. These wells exhibit marked buildup effects due to injection as well as responses typical of the Shallow aquifer. The third pattern is demonstrated by three monitor wells near the principal production wells. This group of wells exhibits no seasonal potentiometric head fluctuations. Fluctuations which do occur are due to injection and pumpage. The three distinct hydrograph patterns are composites of the potentiometric head responses occurring in the various aquifers underlying the Raft River Site.

Skiba, P.A.; Allman, D.W.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Hanford Site Groundwater Monitoring for Fiscal Year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of groundwater and vadose-zone monitoring and remediation for fiscal year (FY) 1998 on the Word Site, Washington. Soil-vapor extraction in the 200-West Area removed 777 kg of carbon tetrachloride in FY 1998, for a total of 75,490 kg removed since remediation began in 1992. Spectral gamma logging and evaluation of historical gross gamma logs near tank farms and liquid-disposal sites in the 200 Areas provided information on movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. Water-level monitoring was performed to evaluate groundwater-flow directions, to track changes in water levels, and to relate such changes to evolving disposal practices. Water levels over most of the Hanford Site continued to decline between June 1997 and June 1998. The most widespread radiological contaminant plumes in groundwater were tritium and iodine-129. Concentrations of technetium-99, uranium, strontium-90, and carbon-14 also exceeded drinking water standards in smaller plumes. Plutonium and cesium-137 exceeded standards only near the 216-B-5 injection well. Derived concentration guide levels specified in U.S. Department of Energy Order 5400.5 were exceeded for tritium, uranium, strontium-90, and plutonium in small plumes or single wells. One well completed in the basalt-confined aquifer beneath the 200-East Area exceeded the drinking water standard for technetium-99. Nitrate is the most extensive chemical contaminant. Carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, chromium, cis-l, Z-dichloroethylene, fluoride, and trichloroethylene also were present in smaller areas at levels above their maximum contaminant levels. Cyanide concentrations were elevated in one area but were below the maximum contaminant level. Tetrachloroethylene exceeded its maximum contaminant level in several wells in the 300 Area for the first time since the 1980s. Metals such as aluminum, cadmium, iron, manganese, and nickel exceeded their maximum contaminant levels in filtered samples from numerous wells; they are believed to represent natural components of groundwater. Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 groundwater monitoring continued at 25 waste management areas during FY 1998: 17 under detection programs and data indicate that they are not adversely affecting groundwater, 6 under interim-status groundwater-quality-assessment programs to assess possible contamination, and 2 under final-status corrective-action programs. Groundwater remediation in the 100 Areas continued to reduce the amount of strontium-90 (100-N) and chromium (100-K, D, and H) reaching the Columbia River. Two systems in the 200-West Area operated to prevent the spread of carbon tetrachloride and technetide uranium plumes. Groundwater monitoring continued at these sites and at other sites where there is no active remediation. A three-dimensional, numerical groundwater model was applied to simulate radionuclide movement from sources in the 200 Areas following site closure in 2050. Contaminants will continue to move toward the southeast and north (through Gable Gap), but the areas with levels exceeding drinking water standards will diminish.

Hartman, M.J. [and others

1999-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

43

Measurement Sites in Google Earth These files contain measurement site locations for various atmospheric monitoring networks and NARSTO Projects in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measurement Sites in Google Earth These files contain measurement site locations for various atmospheric monitoring networks and NARSTO Projects in Google Earth coverages with links to additional site TN Ozone Study) q MILAGRO Sites q TEXAQS2000 TNRCC CAMS Obtain Google Earth Files The Google Earth

44

Final monitoring plan for site restoration at Murdock, Nebraska.  

SciTech Connect

In early 2005, Argonne National Laboratory conducted an Engineering Evaluation/Cost Analysis (EE/CA; Argonne 2005b) to address carbon tetrachloride contamination identified in groundwater and surface water at Murdock, Nebraska, approximately 22 mi east-northeast of Lincoln (Figure 1.1). The EE/CA study was performed for the Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA), as the technical basis for a proposed removal action for the Murdock site. The EE/CA was conducted in compliance with an Administrative Order on Consent issued for Murdock by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA 1991). Three removal action alternatives were examined through the use of site-specific data and predictive simulations of groundwater flow and contaminant transport performed with calibrated numerical models. The alternatives were evaluated individually and compared against performance criteria established under the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan and the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). On the basis of these evaluations, an alternative employing phytoremediation in conjunction with seasonal groundwater extraction and treatment by spray irrigation was recommended by the CCC/USDA to permanently reduce the carbon tetrachloride contaminant levels in groundwater and surface water at the site. The proposed alternative is being implemented in cooperation with the EPA. Under the direction of the CCC/USDA and the EPA, implementation of the chosen removal action occurred in phases, beginning in April 2005. Installation of all the required remediation systems was completed by the end of August 2005. Specific technical objectives of the removal action are as follows: (1) To eliminate pathways for potential human exposure to carbon tetrachloride concentrations above the regulatory limit of 44.2 {micro}g/L in surface water at the site. (2) To minimize or eliminate any detrimental environmental impacts of carbon tetrachloride discharge to the surface waters of a tributary creek located immediately north of the town. (3) To permanently reduce carbon tetrachloride concentrations in the groundwater and surface water at Murdock and hence restore these resources for potential beneficial use. To evaluate the effectiveness of the selected remedy and its ability to achieve the objectives specified for this site, monitoring is required. This document outlines the proposed scope of a long-term program for monitoring of the removal action at Murdock. In this section the specific remedial objectives of the action are summarized, and a brief overview of the chosen remedy is provided. Section 2 summarizes the results of a baseline sampling event that documented the distribution of carbon tetrachloride contamination in selected media at the Murdock site immediately before cleanup activities began. Section 3 recommends a strategy for subsequent monitoring of the removal action at Murdock, as well as criteria for evaluating the performance of the remedial systems and the progress of the restoration effort.

LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

2006-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

OFF-SITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1977 Monitoring Operations Division Environmental Monitoring and Support Laboratory U.S. ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 July 1978 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 for the U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY O F F - S I T E ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA T E S T S I T E AND OTHER T E S T AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS J a n u a r y through December 1977 by R, F . G r o s s m a n M o n i t o r i n g O p e r a t i o n s D i v i s i o n E n v i r o n m e n t a l M o n i t o r i n g and Support Laboratory U, S . ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Las V e g a s , N e v a d a 89114 J u l y 1978 T h i s w o r k p e r f o r m e d under a M e m o r a n d u m of U n d e r

46

ChangeDetector?: a site-level monitoring tool for the WWW  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a new challenge for Web monitoring tools: to build a system that can monitor entire web sites effectively. Such a system could potentially be used to discover "silent news" hidden within corporate web sites. Examples of silent news ... Keywords: URL monitoring, classification, information extraction, intelligent crawling, machine learning

Vijay Boyapati; Kristie Chevrier; Avi Finkel; Natalie Glance; Tom Pierce; Robert Stockton; Chip Whitmer

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Nevada Test Site 2007 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from three monitoring wells located near the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, for calendar year 2007. The NTS is an approximately 3,561 square kilometer (1,375 square mile) restricted-access federal installation located approximately 105 kilometers (65 miles) northwest of Las Vegas, Nevada (Figure 1). Pilot wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are used to monitor the groundwater at the Area 5 RWMS (Figure 2). In addition to groundwater monitoring results, this report includes information regarding site hydrogeology, well construction, sample collection, and meteorological data measured at the Area 5 RWMS. The disposal of low-level radioactive waste and mixed low-level radioactive waste at the Area 5 RWMS is regulated by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The disposal of mixed low-level radioactive waste is also regulated by the state of Nevada under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulation Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 265, 'Interim Status Standards for Owners and Operators of Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage, and Disposal Facilities' (CFR, 1999). The format of this report was requested by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP) in a letter dated August 12, 1997. The appearance and arrangement of this document have been modified slightly since that date to provide additional information and to facilitate the readability of the document. The objective of this report is to satisfy any Area 5 RWMS reporting agreements between DOE and NDEP.

NSTec Environmental Management

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

BRISTOL BAY OCEANOGRAPHY AUGUST-SEPTEMBER, 1938  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Chichagof 7 111 #12;U. S. Coast Guard Tug Redwing IV #12;BRISTOL BAY OCEANOGRAPHY, AUGUST-SEPTEMBER 1938 logs of the U. S. Coast Gucird Tug Redwing present values of temperature, salinity, density, dynamicÂŁird Tug Redwing equipped to make hydrographic casts, measure currents, and obtain bottom samples. Grateful

49

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, May 2010  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety and Security HSS Independent Oversight Abbreviations i Executive Summary iii 1 Introduction 1 2 Positive Attributes 3 3 Program Enhancements 5 4 INL Site Environmental Monitoring Program 7 4.1 Overall Assessment 7 4.2 Crosscutting Concerns and Recommendations 7 4.3 Media-Specific Perspectives and Recommendations 11 4.3.1 Air Monitoring 11 4.3.2 Liquid Effluent Monitoring 12 4.3.3 Soil Monitoring 12 4.3.4 Agricultural Products and Game Animals Monitoring 13

50

Site characterization and monitoring data from Area 5 Pilot Wells, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The Special Projects Section (SPS) of Reynolds Electrical & Engineering Co., Inc. (REECO) is responsible for characterizing the subsurface geology and hydrology of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for the US Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), Environmental Restoration and Waste Management Division, Waste Operations Branch. The three Pilot Wells that comprise the Pilot Well Project are an important part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program designed to determine the suitability of the Area 5 RWMS for disposal of low-level waste (LLW), mixed waste (MW), and transuranic waste (TRU). The primary purpose of the Pilot Well Project is two-fold: first, to characterize important water quality and hydrologic properties of the uppermost aquifer; and second, to characterize the lithologic, stratigraphic, and hydrologic conditions which influence infiltration, redistribution, and percolation, and chemical transport through the thick vadose zone in the vicinity of the Area 5 RWMS. This report describes Pilot Well drilling and coring, geophysical logging, instrumentation and stemming, laboratory testing, and in situ testing and monitoring activities.

NONE

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2010 results. During 2010, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 10 and August 10, 2010; at UE5PW-2 on March 10, August 10, and August 25, 2010; and at UE5PW-3 on March 31, August 10, and August 25, 2010. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, April 26, August 9, and November 9, 2010. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Results from all samples collected in 2010 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nevada Test Site 2008 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada Test Site. These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2008 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities.

NSTec Environmental Management

2009-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

53

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

conducted in the waters of Puerto Rico, the Gulf of Mexico,coast (OTEC-1 site); o Puerto Rico - one site near PuntaHawaii, Gulf of Mexico, and Puerto Rico - a program has been

Wilde, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Flask Air Samples, SIO Network Atmospheric CO2 From Flask Air Samples at 10 Sites in the SIO Air Sampling Network Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Scripps Institution of Oceanography Monitoring Sites Mauna Loa, Hawaii Mauna Loa weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Barrow, Alaska American Samoa South Pole Daily average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples Alert, NWT, Canada Cape Kumukahi Christmas Island Baring Head Kermadec Island La Jolla Pier La Jolla Pier weekly average CO2 concentrations derived from continuous air samples PDF Documentation available as Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide Concentrations at 10 Locations Spanning Latitudes 82°N to 90°S, (NDP-001a) For information on calibration and some additional literature, go to

55

Session: Monitoring wind turbine project sites for avian impacts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This third session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of one presentation followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The focus of the session was on existing wind projects that are monitored for their impacts on birds and bats. The presentation given was titled ''Bird and Bat Fatality Monitoring Methods'' by Wally Erickson, West, Inc. Sections included protocol development and review, methodology, adjusting for scavenging rates, and adjusting for observer detection bias.

Erickson, Wally

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Data Report: Groundwater Monitoring Program Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of the groundwater sampling results from the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS). The data have been collected since 1993 and include calendar year 2011 results. During 2011, groundwater samples were collected and static water levels were measured at the three pilot wells surrounding the Area 5 RWMS. Samples were collected at UE5PW-1 on March 8, August 2, August 24, and October 19, 2011; at UE5PW-2 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011; and at UE5PW-3 on March 8, August 2, August 23, and October 19, 2011. Static water levels were measured at each of the three pilot wells on March 1, June 7, August 1, and October 17, 2011. Groundwater samples were analyzed for the following indicators of contamination: pH, specific conductance, total organic carbon, total organic halides, and tritium. Indicators of general water chemistry (cations and anions) were also measured. Initial total organic carbon and total organic halides results for samples collected in August 2011 were above previous measurements and, in some cases, above the established investigation limits. However, after field sample pumps and tubing were disinfected with Clorox solution, the results returned to normal levels. Final results from samples collected in 2011 were within the limits established by agreement with the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection for each analyte. These data indicate that there has been no measurable impact to the uppermost aquifer from the Area 5 RWMS. There were no significant changes in measured groundwater parameters compared to previous years. The report contains an updated cumulative chronology for the Area 5 RWMS Groundwater Monitoring Program and a brief description of the site hydrogeology.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

57

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SITE CHARACfERlZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SITEWIDE CATEGORICAL EXCLUSION FOR SITE CHARACfERlZATION AND ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE, RICHLAND, WASHINGTON Proposed ActioD: The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) proposes to conduct site characterization and environmental monitoring activities. LocadoD of AcdoD: The proposed action would occur on and near the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site and at other sites in the State of Washington. DeserlpdoD 01 the Proposed AedoD: The proposed action would include a variety of non-intrusive and intrusive characteri2ation and monitoring activities conducted in support of purposes such as environmental surveillance, remediation. research, construction. and sampling.

58

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, fourth quarter 1991  

SciTech Connect

Eleven sewage sludge application sites at the Savannah River Site (SRS) were originally the subject of a research program, begun in 1980, using domestic sewage sludge to reclaim borrow pits and to enhance forest productivity at SRS. Currently, the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites are the only remaining active sludge application sites. During fourth quarter 1991, samples from the four monitoring wells at the F-Area site (FSS series) and three monitoring wells at the H-Area site (HSS series) were analyzed for specific conductance, pH, and certain pesticides, herbicides, toxic metals, water quality indicators, and radionuclides. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency primary drinking water standards (PDWS) and the SRS flagging criteria.

Thompson, C.Y.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Completion of decommissioning: Monitoring for site release and license termination  

SciTech Connect

To request termination of a license upon completion of dismantling or decommissioning activities, documenting any residual radioactivity to show that the levels are environmentally acceptable will be necessary. When the regulators approve the decommissioning plan, they establish what the release criteria for the decommissioned site will be at the time of the site release and license termination. The criteria are numeric guidelines for direct radiation in soils and on surfaces. If the regulatory body finds that the measured on-site values are below the guidelines, the site will be acceptable for unrestricted release (no radiological controls or future use). If areas are found above those values, more decontamination or cleanup of these areas may be required unless the regulatory body grants an exemption.

Boing, L.E.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Site Inspection and Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites November 2012 LMS/S09415 ENERGY Legacy Management U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 Sherwood, Washington, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 L-Bar, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Bluewater, New Mexico, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 Maybell West, Colorado, Disposal Site, 2012 This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy,

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1, Section 1000 Addendum: Revision 3  

SciTech Connect

This document -- the Savannah River Site Environmental Monitoring Plan (SRS EM Plan) -- has been prepared according to guidance contained in the DOE 5400 Series orders, in 10 CFR 834, and in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and environmental Surveillance [DOE, 1991]. The SRS EM Plan`s purpose is to define the criteria, regulations, and guideline requirements with which SRS will comply. These criteria and requirements are applicable to environmental monitoring activities performed in support of the SRS Environmental Monitoring Program (SRS EM Program), WSRC-3Q1-2, Volume 1, Section 1100. They are not applicable to monitoring activities utilized exclusively for process monitoring/control. The environmental monitoring program requirements documented in the SRS EM Plan incorporate all applicable should requirements of DOE/EH-0173T and expand upon them to include nonradiological environmental monitoring program requirements.

Jannik, G.T.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

2010 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Gnome-Coach (Gnome) Site in New Mexico (Figure 1). Groundwater monitoring consisted of collecting hydraulic head data and groundwater samples from the wells on site. Historically, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had conducted these annual activities under the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP). LM took over the sampling and data collection activities in 2008 but continues to use the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, to analyze the water samples. This report summarizes groundwater monitoring and site investigation activities that were conducted at the site during calendar year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

2010 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the 2010 groundwater monitoring results collected by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Legacy Management (LM) at the Gnome-Coach (Gnome) Site in New Mexico. Groundwater monitoring consisted of collecting hydraulic head data and groundwater samples from the wells on site. Historically, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) had conducted these annual activities under the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program (LTHMP). LM took over the sampling and data collection activities in 2008 but continues to use the EPA Radiation and Indoor Environments National Laboratory in Las Vegas, Nevada, to analyze the water samples. This report summarizes groundwater monitoring and site investigation activities that were conducted at the site during calendar year 2010.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Monitoring the Performance of an Alternative Landfill Cover at the Monticello, Utah, Uranium Mill Tailings Disposal Site

65

Environmental monitoring and cooperative resource management at the WIPP site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster session by the Environmental Monitoring Section of the US DOE Waste Isolation Pilot Plant is to demonstrate that the DOE is committed to sound environmental management. This WIPP poster session demonstrates radiological as well as nonradiological environmental monitoring activities conducted routinely at the WIPP. And how data collected prior to the WIPP being operational is used to establish a preoperational baseline for environmental studies in which the samples collected during the operational phase will be compared. Cooperative Resource Management is a relatively new concept for governments agencies. It allows two or more agencies the ability to jointly share in funding a program or project and yet both agencies can benefit from the outcome. These programs are usually a biological type study. The WIPP cooperative agreement between the US BLM, DOE and its contractors is to continue the ongoing documentation of the diversity of the Chihuahuan desert.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

66

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan - 40 CFR 98  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Monitoring Plan is to meet the monitoring plan requirements of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations Part 98.3(g)(5). This GHG Monitoring Plan identifies procedures and methodologies used at the Idaho National Laboratory Site (INL Site) to collect data used for GHG emissions calculations and reporting requirements from stationary combustion and other regulated sources in accordance with 40 CFR 98, Subparts A and other applicable subparts. INL Site Contractors determined subpart applicability through the use of a checklist (Appendix A). Each facility/contractor reviews operations to determine which subparts are applicable and the results are compiled to determine which subparts are applicable to the INL Site. This plan is applicable to the 40 CFR 98-regulated activities managed by the INL Site contractors: Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Cleanup Project (ICP), Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP), and Naval Reactors Facilities (NRF).

Deborah L. Layton; Kimberly Frerichs

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the PNNL Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is in the process of developing a radiological air monitoring program for the PNNL Site that is distinct from that of the nearby Hanford Site. The original DQO (PNNL-19427) considered radiological emissions at the PNNL Site from Physical Sciences Facility (PSF) major emissions units. This first revision considers PNNL Site changes subsequent to the implementation of the original DQO. A team was established to determine how the PNNL Site changes would continue to meet federal regulations and address guidelines developed to monitor air emissions and estimate offsite impacts of radioactive material operations. The result is an updated program to monitor the impact to the public from the PNNL Site. The team used the emission unit operation parameters and local meteorological data as well as information from the PSF Potential-to-Emit documentation and Notices of Construction submitted to the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH). The locations where environmental monitoring stations would most successfully characterize the maximum offsite impacts of PNNL Site emissions from the three PSF buildings with major emission units were determined from these data. Three monitoring station locations were determined during the original revision of this document. This first revision considers expanded Department of Energy operations south of the PNNL Site and relocation of the two offsite, northern monitoring stations to sites near the PNNL Site fenceline. Inclusion of the southern facilities resulted in the proposal for a fourth monitoring station in the southern region. The southern expansion added two minor emission unit facilities and one diffuse emission unit facility. Relocation of the two northern stations was possible due to the use of solar power, rather than the previous limitation of the need for access to AC power, at these more remote locations. Addendum A contains all the changes brought about by the revision 1 considerations. This DQO report also updates the discussion of the Environmental Monitoring Plan for the PNNL Site air samples and how existing Hanford Site monitoring program results could be used. This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006) as well as several other published DQOs.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.; Antonio, Ernest J.

2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

69

PERFORMACE OF MULTI-PROBE CORROSION MONITORING SYSTEMS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

SciTech Connect

Between 2007 and 2009, several different multi-probe corrosion monitoring systems were designed and installed in high-level nuclear waste tanks at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site in WaShington State. The probe systems are being monitored to ensure waste tanks operate in regions that minimize localized corrosion (i.e., pitting) and stress corrosion cracking. The corrosion monitoring systems have been installed in wastes with different chemistry types. An ongoing effort during the same time period has generated non-radioactive simulants that are tested in the laboratory to establish baseline corrosion monitoring system performance and characterize data to allow interpretation of readings from the multiple corrosion monitoring systems. Data collection from these monitoring systems has reached the point where the results allow comparison with the laboratory testing. This paper presents analytical results from the corrosion monitoring system development program.

CAROTHERS KD; BOOMER KD; ANDA VS; DAHL MM; EDGEMON GL

2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

70

Scientific Opportunities for Monitoring at Environmental Remediation Sites (SOMERS): Integrated Systems-Based Approaches to Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through an inter-disciplinary effort, DOE is addressing a need to advance monitoring approaches from sole reliance on cost- and labor-intensive point-source monitoring to integrated systems-based approaches such as flux-based approaches and the use of early indicator parameters. Key objectives include identifying current scientific, technical and implementation opportunities and challenges, prioritizing science and technology strategies to meet current needs within the DOE complex for the most challenging environments, and developing an integrated and risk-informed monitoring framework.

Bunn, Amoret L.; Wellman, Dawn M.; Deeb, Rula A.; Hawley, Elizabeth L.; Truex, Michael J.; Peterson, Mark; Freshley, Mark D.; Pierce, Eric M.; McCord, John; Young, Michael H.; Gilmore, Tyler J.; Miller, Rick; Miracle, Ann L.; Kaback, Dawn; Eddy-Dilek, Carol; Rossabi, Joe; Lee, Michelle H.; Bush, Richard P.; Beam , Paul; Chamberlain, G. M.; Marble, Justin; Whitehurst, Latrincy; Gerdes, Kurt D.; Collazo, Yvette

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

IpNose: Electronic nose for remote bad odour monitoring system in landfill sites Alex Perera*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IpNose: Electronic nose for remote bad odour monitoring system in landfill sites Alex Perera to classify and quantify different gas/odours. Here we suggest the integration of a small form factor computer of bad odours in landfill sites. Preliminary approach to this application using commercial sensors

Gutierrez-Osuna, Ricardo

72

Department of Energy – Office of Science Pacific Northwest Site Office Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE-SC PNNL Site  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Site Office (PNSO) manages the contract for operations at the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE-SC) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) Site in Richland, Washington. Radiological operations at the DOE-SC PNNL Site expanded in 2010 with the completion of facilities at the Physical Sciences Facility. As a result of the expanded radiological work at the site, the Washington State Department of Health (WDOH) has required that offsite environmental surveillance be conducted as part of the PNNL Site Radioactive Air Emissions License. The environmental monitoring and surveillance requirements of various orders, regulations, and guidance documents consider emission levels and subsequent risk of negative human and environmental impacts. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) describes air surveillance activities at the DOE-SC PNNL Site. The determination of offsite environmental surveillance needs evolved out of a Data Quality Objectives process (Barnett et al. 2010) and Implementation Plan (Snyder et al. 2010). The entire EMP is a compilation of several documents, which include the Main Document (this text), Attachment 1: Sampling and Analysis Plan, Attachment 2: Data Management Plan, and Attachment 3: Dose Assessment Guidance.

Snyder, Sandra F.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Poston, Ted M.; Rhoads, Kathleen

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

73

DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: DOE REAL-TIME SEISMIC MONITORING AT ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM SITES Details Activities (6) Areas (6) Regions (0) Abstract: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) at the direction of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Geothermal Technologies EGS Program is installing, operating, and/or interfacing seismic arrays at multiple Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) sites. The overall goal is to gather high resolution seismicity data before, during and after stimulation activities at the EGS projects. This will include both surface and borehole deployments (as necessary in available boreholes) to provide high quality

74

Environmental monitoring and assessment program at potential OTEC sites  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ecologically sound operations of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants can be insured by careful attention to the marine environment during the design phase. This requires quality information from regions of potential OTEC interest, coordinated with required assessment studies to insure legal compliance. Currently, preliminary or actual surveys and laboratory studies are being conducted in the waters of Puerto Rico, the Gulf of Mexico, Hawaii, and Guam for potential moored or seacoast OTEC plants and in the equatorial South Atlantic for proposed plant--ship operations to provide such benchmark and baseline data. These data plus existing archival information can be used to model effects of OTEC operations based on projected design schemes. Four major areas of concerns (1) redistribution of oceanic properties, (2) chemical pollution, (3) structural effects, and (4) socio-legal-economic; and 11 key issues associated with OTEC development and operation have been identified. In general mitigating strategies can be used to alleviate many deleterious environmental effects of operational problems as biostimulation, outgassing, etc. Various assessment research studies on toxicity, biocide releases, etc., are under way or are planned to investigate areas where no clear mitigating strategy is available. Data from the monitoring and assessment programs is being integrated into a series of environmental compliance documents including a comprehensive programmatic environmental impact assessment.

Wilde, P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Hanford Site Rare Plant Monitoring Report for Calendar Year 2012  

SciTech Connect

Two patches of Columbian yellowcress on the Hanford Reach were visited in both 2011 and 2012 to compare ramet counts between years: near Allerd Pumphouse (Rkm 615.4) and near White Bluffs Boat Launch (Rkm 593.3) (Figure 3). In 2012, the population near Allerd Pumphouse had 45 ramets present within a 5x3 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 60 ramets. In 2012, the population near White Bluffs Boat Launch had 105 ramets in a 2x2 m area. At the same population in 2011, there were 100 ramets. This data shows that while annual variability does exist, ramet counts were relatively similar from 2011 to 2012. This is likely due to the similar flow regimes of 2011 and 2012, which both had above average snowpack, high flows, and extended spring flooding seasons. A total of 19.6 miles (31.5 km) of the Hanford shoreline were surveyed in 2012, with ten patches identified and approximately 1,250 ramets counted. It is not known how many individual plants this count represents due to the rhizomatous nature of the species. Two of these sites were identified previously in the WNHP database, and the remaining eight were newly identified locations. Eleven of the ramets had flowers and/or buds in the patches located during 2012, but no fruits were found

Salstrom, D; Easterly, R; Lindsey, Cole T.; Nugent, John J.

2013-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

76

Interim site characterization report and ground-water monitoring program for the Hanford site solid waste landfill  

SciTech Connect

Federal and state regulations governing the operation of landfills require utilization of ground-water monitoring systems to determine whether or not landfill operations impact ground water at the point of compliance (ground water beneath the perimeter of the facility). A detection-level ground-water monitoring system was designed, installed, and initiated at the Hanford Site Solid Waste Landfill (SWL). Chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected at the beginning of the ground-water monitoring program and continue to be detected more than 1 year later. The most probable source of the chlorinated hydrocarbons is washwater discharged to the SWL between 1985 and 1987. This is an interim report and includes data from the characterization work that was performed during well installation in 1987, such as field observations, sediment studies, and geophysical logging results, and data from analyses of ground-water samples collected in 1987 and 1988, such as field parameter measurements and chemical analyses. 38 refs., 27 figs., 8 tabs.

Fruland, R.M.; Hagan, R.A.; Cline, C.S.; Bates, D.J.; Evans, J.C.; Aaberg, R.L.

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

2011 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach Site, New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Gnome-Coach was the site of a 3-kiloton underground nuclear test in 1961. Surface and subsurface contamination resulted from the underground nuclear testing, post-test drilling, and groundwater tracer test performed at the site. The State of New Mexico is currently proceeding with a conditional certificate of completion for the surface. As for the subsurface, monitoring activities that include hydraulic head monitoring and groundwater sampling of the wells onsite are conducted as part of the annual site inspection. These activities were conducted on January 19, 2011. The site roads, monitoring well heads, and the monument at surface ground zero were observed as being in good condition at the time of the site inspection. An evaluation of the hydraulic head data obtained from the site indicates that water levels in wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 appear to respond to the on/off cycling of the dedicated pump in well USGS-1 and that water levels in wells LRL-7 and DD-1 increased during this annual monitoring period. Analytical results obtained from the sampling indicate that concentrations of tritium, strontium-90, and cesium-137 were consistent with concentrations from historical sampling events.

None

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report: Second quarter 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During second quarter 1993, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13,173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During second quarter 1993, no constituents exceeded the final PDWS or any other flagging criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. During first quarter 1993, aluminum and iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criteria in one or more of the KSS and the PSS wells. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 35 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells, except for a single measurement of 1 mg/L in well PSS 1D. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow direction is south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates). The groundwater flow direction at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site could not be determined second quarter 1993.

Not Available

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) Data related to Air, Soil, and Water Monitoring around the Nevada Test Site  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) is a network of 29 monitoring stations located in communities surrounding and downwind of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) that monitor the airborne environment for manmade radioactivity that could result from NTS activities. The network stations, located in Nevada, Utah, and California are comprised of instruments that collect a variety of environmental radiological and meteorological data. The emphasis of the CEMP is to monitor airborne radioactivity and weather conditions, and make the results available to the public. Instrumentation that records these data is connected to a datalogger, and real-time radiation levels or weather conditions can immediately and easily be seen on a display at each station. These data are transmitted via direct or wireless internet connection, landline or cellular phone, or satellite transmission to DRI's Western Regional Climate Center in Reno, Nevada, and are updated as frequently as every 10 minutes on the World Wide Web at http://www.cemp.dri.edu. DOE and DRI also publish the results of the monitoring program and distribute these reports throughout the network community. The reports provide summaries of average values for each station and the entire network, and show deviations from the expected range values. [Copied from the CEMP website (Introduction) at http://www.cemp.dri.edu/cemp/moreinfo.html

80

Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) Ocean Data Tools Technical Guide Map Gallery Regional Planning Feedback Ocean You are here Data.gov » Communities » Ocean » Data Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) Dataset Summary Description PO.DAAC is an element of the Earth Observing System Data Information System (EOSDIS). PO.DAAC's primary responsibility is to provide distribution and archive support for NASA's physical oceanography missions such as TOPEX/Poseidon and SeaWinds on QuikSCAT. However, PO.DAAC additionally collaborates with other institutes to acquire complementary data products and value-added services. Tags {Oceans,"ocean dynamics","Earth observing system",EOS,navigation,"information systems",NASA,JPL,"Jet Propulsion Laboratory"}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

The Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center Global Spectral Ocean Wave Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Spectral Ocean Wave Model (SOWM) has been an operational product at Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center since the mid 1970s; the Global Spectral Ocean Wave Model (GSOWM) was developed to replace it. An operational test of GSOWM, using buoy, ...

R. M. Clancy; J. E. Kaitala; L. F. Zambresky

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

IIth AMS Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Meteorological Society (AMS) held its 11th Conference on Satellite Meteorology and Oceanography at the Monona Terrace Convention Center in Madison, Wisconsin, during 15–18 October 2001. The purpose of the conference, typically held ...

Christopher Velden; Larry Digirolamo; Mary Glackin; Jeffrey Hawkins; Gary Jedlovec; Thomas Lee; Grant Petty; Robert Plante; Anthony Reale; John Zapotocny

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring data report for calendar year 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes the results of the U.S. Department of Energy's Near-Facility Environmental Monitoring program conducted by Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. for Fluor Daniel Hanford, Inc. for 1998 in the 100,200/600, and 300/400 Areas of the Hanford Site, in southcentral Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels are slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

DIEDIKER, L.P.

1999-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

84

A field strategy to monitor radioactivity associated with investigation derived wastes returned from deep drilling sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, Underground Test Area Operable Unit (UGTA) is drilling deep (>1500m) monitoring wells that penetrate both unsaturated (vadose) and saturated zones potentially contaminated by sub-surface nuclear weapons testing at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. Drill site radiological monitoring returns data on drilling effluents to make informed management decisions concerning fluid management. Because of rapid turn-around required for on-site monitoring, a representative sample will be analyzed simultaneously for {alpha}, {beta} and {gamma} emitters by instrumentation deployed on-site. For the purposes of field survey, accurate and precise data is returned, in many cases, with minimal sample treatment. A 30% efficient high purity germanium detector and a discriminating liquid scintillation detector are being evaluated for {gamma} and {alpha}/{beta} monitoring respectively. Implementation of these detector systems complements a successful on-site tritium monitoring program. Residual radioactivity associated with underground nuclear tests include tritium, activation products, fission products and actinides. Pulse shape discrimination (PSD) is used in {alpha}/{beta} liquid scintillation counting and is a function of the time distribution of photon emission. In particular, we hope to measure {sup 241}Am produced from {sup 241}Pu by {beta} decay. Because {sup 241}Pu is depleted in fissile bomb fuels, maximum PSD resolution will be required. The high purity germanium detector employs a multichannel analyzer to count gamma emitting radionuclides; we will designate specific window configurations to selectively monitor diagnostic fission product radionuclides (i.e., {sup 137}Cs).

Rego, J.H.; Smith, D.K.; Friensehner, A.V.

1995-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

85

F- and H-area Sewage Sludge Application Sites: Groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum have been the primary nonpermit constituents exceeding standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. These constituents were not analyzed second quarter 1993. Other constituents also have exceeded standards at this site, but only sporadically, and none of those were analyzed second quarter 1993.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells and occasionally in HSS wells. Tritium and aluminum are the primary nonpermit constituents that exceed standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Review of present groundwater monitoring programs at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater monitoring at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) is conducted to detect the presence of radionuclides produced by underground nuclear testing and to verify the quality and safety of groundwater supplies as required by the State of Nevada and federal regulations, and by U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Orders. Groundwater is monitored at water-supply wells and at other boreholes and wells not specifically designed or located for traditional groundwater monitoring objectives. Different groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS are conducted by several DOE Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) contractors. Presently, these individual groundwater monitoring programs have not been assessed or administered under a comprehensive planning approach. Redundancy exists among the programs in both the sampling locations and the constituents analyzed. Also, sampling for certain radionuclides is conducted more frequently than required. The purpose of this report is to review the existing NTS groundwater monitoring programs and make recommendations for modifying the programs so a coordinated, streamlined, and comprehensive monitoring effort may be achieved by DOE/NV. This review will be accomplished in several steps. These include: summarizing the present knowledge of the hydrogeology of the NTS and the potential radionuclide source areas for groundwater contamination; reviewing the existing groundwater monitoring programs at the NTS; examining the rationale for monitoring and the constituents analyzed; reviewing the analytical methods used to quantify tritium activity; discussing monitoring network design criteria; and synthesizing the information presented and making recommendations based on the synthesis. This scope of work was requested by the DOE/NV Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and satisfies the 1993 (fiscal year) HRMP Groundwater Monitoring Program Review task.

Hershey, R.L.; Gillespie, D.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Hanford Site ground-water monitoring for January through June 1988  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory monitors ground-water quality at the Hanford Site for the US Department of Energy to assess the impact of Site operations on the environment. Work undertaken between January and June 1988 included monitoring ground-water elevations across the Site, and monitoring hazardous chemicals and radionuclides in ground water. Water levels continued to rise in areas receiving increased recharge (e.g., beneath B Pond) and decline in areas where the release of water to disposal facilities has been terminated (e.g., U Pond). The major areas of ground-water contamination defined by monitoring activities are (1) carbon tetrachloride in the 200-West Area; (2) cyanide in and north of the 200-East and 200-West Areas; (3) hexavalent chromium contamination in the 100-B, 100-D, 100-F, 100-H, 100-K, and 200-West Areas; (4) chlorinated hydrocarbons in the vicinity of the Solid Waste Landfill and 300 Area; (5) uranium in the 100-F, 100-H, 200-West, and 300 Areas; and (6) tritium and nitrate across the Site. In addition, several new analytical initiatives were undertaken during this period. These include cyanide speciation in the BY Cribs plume, inductively coupled argon plasma/mass spectrometry (ICP/MS) measurements on a broad selection of samples from the 100, 200, 300, and 600 Areas, and high sensitivity gas chromatography measurements performed at the Solid Waste Landfill-Nonradioactive Dangerous Waste Landfill. 23 figs., 25 tabs.

Evans, J.C.; Bryce, R.W.; Sherwood, D.R.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENCE NAVAL SITE.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

90

AUTOMATED RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING AT A RUSSIAN MINISTRY OF DEFENSE NAVAL SITE.  

SciTech Connect

The Arctic Military Environmental Cooperation (AMEC) Program is a cooperative effort between the military establishments of the Kingdom of Norway, the Russian Federation, and the US. This paper discusses joint activities conducted over the past year among Norwegian, Russian, and US technical experts on a project to develop, demonstrate and implement automated radiological monitoring at Russian Navy facilities engaged in the dismantlement of nuclear-powered strategic ballistic missile launching submarines. Radiological monitoring is needed at these facilities to help protect workers engaged in the dismantlement program and the public living within the footprint of routine and accidental radiation exposure areas. By providing remote stand-alone monitoring, the Russian Navy will achieve added protection due to the defense-in-depth strategy afforded by local (at the site), regional (Kola) and national-level (Moscow) oversight. The system being implemented at the Polyaminsky Russian Naval Shipyard was developed from a working model tested at the Russian Institute for Nuclear Safety, Moscow, Russia. It includes Russian manufactured terrestrial and underwater gamma detectors, smart controllers for graded sampling, radio-modems for offsite transmission of the data, and a data fusion/display system: The data fusion/display system is derived from the Norwegian Picasso AMEC Environmental Monitoring software package. This computer package allows monitoring personnel to review the real-time and historical status of monitoring at specific sites and objects and to establish new monitoring protocols as required, for example, in an off-normal accident situation. Plans are being developed to implement the use of this system at most RF Naval sites handling spent nuclear fuel.

MOSKOWITZ,P.D.; POMERVILLE,J.; GAVRILOV,S.; KISSELEV,V.; DANIYLAN,V.; BELIKOV,A.; EGORKIN,A.; SOKOLOVSKI,Y.; ENDREGARD,M.; KROSSHAVN,M.; SUNDLING,C.V.; YOKSTAD,H.

2001-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

91

A Plan to Develop and Demonstrate Electrochemical Noise Based Corrosion Monitoring Systems in Hanford Site Waste Tanks  

SciTech Connect

This document describes changes that need to be made to the site's authorization basis and technical concerns that need to be resolved before proceduralized use of Electrochemical Noise based corrosion monitoring systems is fully possible at the Hanford Site.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

92

Session: Development and application of guidelines for siting, constructing, operating and monitoring wind turbines  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question and answer period. The two papers were: 'Development and Application of USFWS Guidance for Site Evaluation, Siting, Construction, Operation and Monitoring of Wind Turbines' by Albert Manville and 'Wind Power in Washington State' by Greg Hueckel. The session provided a comparison of wind project guidelines developed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in May 2003 and the Washington State Department of Fish and Wildlife in August 2003. Questions addressed included: is there a need or desire for uniform national or state criteria; can other states learn from Washington State's example, or from the USFWS voluntary guidelines; should there be uniform requirements/guidelines/check-lists for the siting, operation, monitoring, and mitigation to prevent or minimize avian, bat, and other wildlife impacts.

Manville, Albert; Hueckel, Greg

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

1993 Effluent and environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, Pittsburgh Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the radiological and non-radiological environmental monitoring programs for 1993 at the Bettis-Pittsburgh Site are presented. The results obtained from the monitoring programs demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that environmental releases during 1993 were in accordance with applicable Federal and State regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that the current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrated that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the US Environmental Protection Agency and the US Department of Energy.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

94

Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Ecological Monitoring Program 1995 annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring Program (ECMP) was established at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (Site) in September 1992. At that time, EcMP staff developed a Program Plan that was peer-reviewed by scientists from western universities before submittal to DOE RFFO in January 1993. The intent of the program is to measure several quantitative variables at different ecological scales in order to characterize the Rocky Flats ecosystem. This information is necessary to document ecological conditions at the Site in impacted and nonimpacted areas to determine if Site practices have had ecological impacts, either positive or negative. This information can be used by managers interested in future use scenarios and CERCLA activities. Others interested in impact analysis may also find the information useful. In addition, these measurements are entered into a database which will serve as a long-term information repository that will document long-term trends and potential future changes to the Site, both natural and anthropogenic.

NONE

1995-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

95

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report: Third quarter 1993  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. Currently, iron, lead, and manganese are the only permit-required analytes that exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Tritium and aluminum are the nonpermit constituents exceeding standards. Other constituents have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Shifting the Paradigm for Long Term Monitoring at Legacy Sites to Improve Performance while Reducing Cost  

SciTech Connect

A major issue facing many government and private industry sites that were previously contaminated with radioactive and chemical wastes is that often the sites cannot be cleaned up enough to permit unrestricted human access. These sites will require long-term management, in some cases indefinitely, leaving site owners with the challenge of protecting human health and environmental quality in a cost effective manner. Long-term monitoring of groundwater contamination is one of the largest projected costs in the life cycle of environmental management at the Savannah River Site (SRS), the larger DOE complex, and many large federal and private sites. Currently, most monitoring strategies are focused on laboratory measurements of contaminants measured in groundwater samples collected from wells. This approach is expensive, and provides limited and lagging information about the effectiveness of cleanup activities and the behavior of the residual contamination. Over the last twenty years, DOE and other federal agencies have made significant investments in the development of various types of sensors and strategies that would allow for remote analysis of contaminants in groundwater, but these approaches do not promise significant reductions in risk or cost. Scientists at SRS have developed a new paradigm to simultaneously improve the performance of long term monitoring systems while lowering the overall cost of monitoring. This alternative approach incorporates traditional point measurements of contaminant concentration with measurements of controlling variables including boundary conditions, master variables, and traditional plume/contaminant variables. Boundary conditions are the overall driving forces that control plume movement and therefore provide leading indication to changes in plume stability. These variables include metrics associated with meteorology, hydrology, hydrogeology, and land use. Master variables are the key variables that control the chemistry of the groundwater system, and include redox variables (ORP, DO, chemicals), pH, specific conductivity, biological community (breakdown/decay products), and temperature. A robust suite of relatively inexpensive tools is commercially available to measure these variables. Traditional plume/contaminant variables are various measures of contaminant concentration including traditional analysis of chemicals in groundwater samples. An innovative long term monitoring strategy has been developed for acidic or caustic groundwater plumes contaminated with metals and/or radionuclides. Not only should the proposed strategy be more effective at early identification of potential risks, this strategy should be significantly more cost effective because measurement of controlling boundary conditions and master variables is relatively simple. These variables also directly reflect the evolution of the plume through time, so that the monitoring strategy can be modified as the plume 'ages'. This transformational long-term monitoring paradigm will generate significant cost savings to DOE, other federal agencies and industry and will provide improved performance and leading indicators of environmental management performance.

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hanford site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1996  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the results of the near-facility environmental monitoring results for 1996 in the 100, 200/600, and 300/400 areas of the Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Surveillance activities included sampling and analyses of ambient air, surface water, groundwater, soil, sediments, and biota. Also, external radiation measurements and radiological surveys were taken at waste disposal sites, radiologically controlled areas, and roads. These activities were conducted to assess and control the effects of nuclear facilities and waste sites on the local environment. The monitoring implements applicable portions of DOE Orders 5400.1 (DOE 1988a), 5400.5 (DOE 1990), and 5820.2A (DOE 1988b); Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247; and Title 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 61, Subpart H (EPA 1989). In addition, diffuse sources were monitored to determine compliance with federal, state, and/or local regulations. In general, although effects from nuclear facilities can still be observed on the Hanford Site and radiation levels were slightly elevated when compared to offsite locations, the differences are less than in previous years.

Perkins, C.J.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

98

2012 Groundwater Monitoring and Inspection Report Gnome-Coach, New Mexico, Site  

SciTech Connect

Gnome-Coach was the site of a 3-kiloton underground nuclear test conducted in 1961. Surface and subsurface contamination resulted from the underground nuclear testing, post-test drilling, and a groundwater tracer test performed at the site. Surface reclamation and remediation began after the underground testing. A Completion Report was prepared, and the State of New Mexico is currently proceeding with a conditional certificate of completion for the surface. Subsurface corrective action activities began in 1972 and have generally consisted of annual sampling and monitoring of wells near the site. In 2008, the annual site inspections were refined to include hydraulic head monitoring and collection of samples from groundwater monitoring wells onsite using the low-flow sampling method. These activities were conducted during this monitoring period on January 18, 2012. Analytical results from this sampling event indicate that concentrations of tritium, strontium-90, and cesium-137 were generally consistent with concentrations from historical sampling events. The exceptions are the decreases in concentrations of strontium-90 in samples from wells USGS-4 and USGS-8, which were more than 2.5 times lower than last year's results. Well USGS-1 provides water for livestock belonging to area ranchers, and a dedicated submersible pump cycles on and off to maintain a constant volume in a nearby water tank. Water levels in wells USGS-4 and USGS-8 respond to the on/off cycling of the water supply pumping from well USGS-1. Well LRL-7 was not sampled in January, and water levels were still increasing when the transducer data were downloaded in September. A seismic reflection survey was also conducted this year. The survey acquired approximately 13.9 miles of seismic reflection data along 7 profiles on and near the site. These activities were conducted from February 23 through March 10, 2012. The site roads, monitoring well heads, and the monument at surface ground zero were in good condition at the time of the site inspection. However, it was reported in September 2012 that the USGS-1 well head had been damaged by a water truck in April 2012.

None

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Summary and results of the comprehensive environmental monitoring program at the INEL's Raft River geothermal site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Raft River Geothermal Program was designed to demonstrate that moderate temperature (approx. 150/sup 0/C) geothermal fluids could be used to generate electricity and provide an alternate energy source for direct-use applications. The environmental program was initiated soon after drilling began. The major elements of the monitoring program were continued during the construction and experimental testing of the 5-MW(e) power plant. The monitoring studies established pre-development baseline conditions of and assessed changes in the physical, biological, and human environment. The Physical Environmental Monitoring Program collected baseline data on geology, subsidence, seismicity, meteorology and air quality. The Biological Environmental Monitoring Program collected baseline data on the flora and fauna of the terrestrial ecosystem, studied raptor disturbances, and surveyed the aquatic communities of the Raft River. The Human Environmental Monitoring Program surveyed historic and archaeological sites, considered the socioeconomic environment, and documented incidences of fluorosis in the Raft River Valley. In addition to the environmental monitoring programs, research on biological direct applications using geothermal water was conducted at Raft River. Areas of research included biomass production of wetland and tree species, aquaculture, agricultural irrigation, and the use of wetlands as a treatment or pretreatment system for geothermal effluents.

Mayes, R.A.; Thurow, T.L.; Cahn, L.S.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

An economic analysis of a monitored retrievable storage site for Tennessee. Final report and appendices  

SciTech Connect

The United States Department of Energy is charged with the task of identifying potential sites for a Monitored Retrievable Storage (MRS) Facility and reporting the results of its analysis to Congress by January 1986. DOE chose three finalist sites from 11 sites DOE analysts evaluated earlier. All three are in Tennessee, including two in Oak Ridge and one in Trousdale/Smith Counties. This paper is a summary of research undertaken on the economic effects of establishing the MRS facility in Tennessee. All three locations were considered in the analysis, but on some occasions attention is focused on the site preferred by DOE. The research was undertaken by the Center for Business and Economic Research (CBER), College of Business Administration, the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, under contract with the Tennessee Department of Economic and Community Development.

Fox, W.F.; Mayo, J.W.; Hansen, L.T.; Quindry, K.E.

1985-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

102

A Strategy and Case Study Example for Designing and Implementing Environmental Long-Term Monitoring at Legacy Management Sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring objectives of site owners, regulators, consultants, and scientists typically share the common elements of (1) cost management, (2) risk management, and (3) information management (Figure 1). Many site owners focus on minimizing monitoring costs while regulators typically focus on risk and regulatory compliance. Scientists and consultants typically provide information management in the form of spreadsheets with extracted information provided in reports to other users. This common piecemeal approach upon individual focus on elements of the monitoring objectives, rather than the common objective of minimizing cost and risk using site information, results in missed opportunities for cost savings, environmental protection, and improved understanding of site performance.

Earl D. Mattson; Roelof J. Versteeg; Mark Ankeny; Gail Heath; Alex Richardson

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Nevada National Security Site 2010 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data were collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, vadose zone, subsidence, and biota. This report summarizes the 2010 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2010a; 2010b; 2011). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Air monitoring data at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs indicate that tritium concentrations are slightly above background levels. All gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below the minimum detectable concentrations, and concentrations of americium and plutonium are only slightly above detection limits. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate that the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by facility operations. The 246.9 millimeters (mm) (9.72 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2010 is 56 percent above the average of 158.7 mm (6.25 in.), and the 190.4 mm (7.50 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2010 is 50 percent above the average of 126.7 mm (4.99 in.). Soil-gas tritium monitoring at borehole GCD-05 continues to show slow subsurface migration consistent with previous results. Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Data from the automated vadose zone monitoring system for the operational waste pit covers show that moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 90 centimeters (cm) (3 feet [ft]) before being removed by evaporation. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 61 cm (2 ft) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2010, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Water drained from both the bare-soil drainage lysimeter and the invader species drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2010 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Nevada National Security Site 2011 Waste Management Monitoring Report, Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2011 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports. Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below derived concentration guides for these radionuclides. During the last 2 weeks of March 2011, gamma spectroscopy results for air particles showed measurable activities of iodine-131 (131I), cesium-134 (134Cs), and cesium-137 (137Cs). These results are attributed to the release of fission products from the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant in Japan. The remaining gamma spectroscopy results for air particulates collected at the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMS were below minimum detectable concentrations. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. The 86.3 millimeters (mm) (3.40 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2011 is 44% below the average of 154.1 mm (6.07 in.), and the 64.8 mm (2.55 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2011 is 47% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 RWMS operational waste covers was not done during 2011 due to construction of the final evapotranspiration cover at these monitoring locations. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 122 centimeters (4 feet) in the vegetated final mono-layer cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS before being removed by evapotranspiration. During 2011, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 feet) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Ten percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2011 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

NSTec Environmental Management

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

105

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT F O R THE NEVADA TEST SITE A N D OTHER TEST AREAS USED F O R UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1979 Nuclear R a d i a t i o n Assessment D i v i s i o n Environmental M o n i t o r i n g Systems Laboratory U. S. Envi ronmental P r o t e c t i o n Agency Las Vegas, Nevada 89114 A p r i l 1980 T h i s work performed under Memorandum o f ' Understanding No. EY-76-A-08-0539 f o r t h e U.S. Department o f Energy This page intentionally left blank OFFSITE ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING REPORT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE AND OTHER TEST AREAS USED FOR UNDERGROUND NUCLEAR DETONATIONS January through December 1979 G. D. P o t t e r , R. F. Grossman, W. A. B l i s s , D. J . Tlom6 Nuclear Radiation Assessment Division Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Envi ronmental P

106

Nevada National Security Site 2012 Waste Management Monitoring Report Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring data are collected at and around the Area 3 and Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Sites (RWMSs) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). These data are associated with radiation exposure, air, groundwater, meteorology, and vadose zone. This report summarizes the 2012 environmental data to provide an overall evaluation of RWMS performance and to support environmental compliance and performance assessment (PA) activities. Some of these data (e.g., radiation exposure, air, and groundwater) are presented in other reports (National Security Technologies, LLC, 2012; 2013a; 2013b). Direct radiation monitoring data indicate exposure levels at the RWMSs are within the range of background levels measured at the NNSS. Slightly elevated exposure levels outside the Area 3 RWMS are attributed to nearby historical aboveground nuclear weapons tests. Air monitoring data show tritium concentrations in water vapor and americium and plutonium concentrations in air particles are only slightly above detection limits and background levels. The measured levels of radionuclides in air particulates and moisture are below Derived Concentration Standards for these radionuclides. Groundwater monitoring data indicate the groundwater in the uppermost aquifer beneath the Area 5 RWMS is not impacted by RWMS operations. Results of groundwater analysis from wells around the Area 5 RWMS were all below established investigation levels. Leachate samples collected from the leachate collection system at the mixed low-level waste cell were below established contaminant regulatory limits. The 133.9 millimeters (mm) (5.27 inches [in.]) of precipitation at the Area 3 RWMS during 2012 is 12% below the average of 153.0 mm (6.02 in.), and the 137.6 mm (5.42 in.) of precipitation at the Area 5 RWMS during 2012 is 11% below the average of 122.4 mm (4.82 in.). Water balance measurements indicate that evapotranspiration from the vegetated weighing lysimeter dries the soil and prevents downward percolation of precipitation more effectively than evaporation from the bare-soil weighing lysimeter. Automated vadose zone monitoring on Area 5 and Area 3 RWMS cell covers show no evidence of precipitation percolating through the cover to the waste. Moisture from precipitation did not percolate below 60 centimeters (cm) (2 feet [ft]) in the vegetated final cover on the U-3ax/bl disposal unit at the Area 3 RWMS, and moisture from precipitation and irrigation did not percolate below 45 cm (1.5 ft) on the 92-Acre Area final cover. Irrigation was applied to this cover for seed germination and plant growth. During 2012, there was no drainage through 2.4 meters (8 ft) of soil from the Area 3 drainage lysimeters that received only natural precipitation. Twenty percent of the applied precipitation and irrigation drained from the bare-soil drainage lysimeter that received 3 times natural precipitation. All 2012 monitoring data indicate that the Area 3 and Area 5 RWMSs are performing within expectations of the model and parameter assumptions for the facility PAs.

Hudson, David B.

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

2001 environmental monitoring report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory, West Mifflin Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2001 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2001 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues is much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life.

NONE

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

2003 Environmental Monitoring Report for the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory Pittsburgh Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2003 results for the Bettis-Pittsburgh radiological and nonradiological environmental monitoring programs are presented. The results demonstrate that the existing procedures ensured that releases to the environment during 2003 were in accordance with applicable Federal, State, County, and local regulations. Evaluation of the environmental data indicates that current operations at the Site continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. A conservative assessment of radiation exposure to the general public as a result of Site operations demonstrates that the dose received by any member of the public was well below the most restrictive dose limits established by the Environmental Protection Agency, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and the U.S. Department of Energy. A risk assessment of potentially exposed populations to chemical residues in the environment at the Site demonstrates that any potential risk posed by these residues in much less than the risks encountered in normal everyday life.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. During fourth quarter 1992, the FSS wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells. Lead concentrations exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards during fourth quarter 1992, an event that is concurrent with a change in sampling procedures. Tritium is the primary nonpermit constituent that exceeds standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Gas exploration and oceanography beyond the shelf break  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gas exploration and oceanography beyond the shelf break Ă?. Thiem1 , J. Berntsen1,2 , G. Alendal2 cause problems for installations needed for exploration of the gas field. Bergen Ocean Model (BOM) has for Computational Science, University of Bergen, Norway 3 Norsk Hydro, Oil & Energy, Research Center, Bergen, Norway

Thiem, Ă?yvind

111

CALIFORNIA SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM Scripps Institution of Oceanography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program Directory 2012 #12;CALIFORNIA SEA GRANT COLLEGE PROGRAM Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive #0231 La Jolla CA 92093-0231 (858) 534-4446 www Administration, by the University of California, the California Natural Resources Agency, the California Ocean

Jaffe, Jules

112

Criteria for temperature monitoring in ferrocyanide waste tanks at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is relevant to the twenty underground waste storage tanks at the Hanford Site that have been identified as potentially containing a significant amount of ferrocyanide compounds. Tanks believed to contain > 1,000 gram moles of ferrocyanide have been classified as Watch List tanks. This report addresses temperature monitoring criteria for the Ferrocyanide Watch List tanks. These criteria must comply with governing regulations to ensure that safe continued storage of the tank wastes is not jeopardized. Temperature monitoring is defined in this report as the routine as the routine continuous measurement of a waste tank temperature with an output that is tied to an actively interrogated information collection system that includes an automated warning of temperature increases beyond the established limits.

Fowler, K.D.; Dukelow, G.T.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hanford Site near-facility environmental monitoring annual report, calendar year 1997  

SciTech Connect

Near-facility environmental monitoring provides a means to measure the impacts of operations, waste management, and remediation activities on the environment adjacent to facilities and ensure compliance with local, state, and federal environmental regulations. Specifically, near-facility environmental monitoring monitors new and existing sites, processes, and facilities for potential impacts and releases; fugitive emissions and diffuse sources associated with contaminated areas, facilities (both active and those undergoing surveillance and maintenance), and environmental restoration activities. External radiation, ambient air particulates, ground and surface water, soil, sediment, and biota (plants and animals) are sampled or monitored. Parameters include, as appropriate, radionuclides; radiation fields; chemical or physical constituents, such as nitrates; pH; and water temperature. All ambient air results were below the US Department of Energy (DOE) Derived Concentration Guides (DCGs). Groundwater concentrations at the two wells at the 107-N Facility were below both the DOE DCG and US Environmental Protection Agency Interim Drinking Water Standards for gamma emitting radionuclides. Soil and vegetation results were generally within historic ranges and mostly below the Accessible Soil Concentration limits (included in HNF-PRO-454, Inactive Waste Sites) with the exception of one soil sampling location at 1 00 N Area. External radiation fields continued an overall downward trend. Surface water disposal unit samples (water, sediment, and aquatic vegetation) showed radionuclide concentrations below their respective DCG and Accessible Soil Concentration limits. The 100 N Area Columbia river shoreline springs results were below DCGs with the exception of one Sr concentration. More than 4,600 ha (11,300 acres) of radiologically controlled areas were surveyed in 1997, approximately the same as in 1996.

Perkins, C.J.

1998-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

114

Monitored plutonium aerosols at a soil cleanup site on Johnston Atoll  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Suspended plutonium in air was monitored for four periods near the operation of a stationary sorting system used to {open_quotes}mine{close_quotes} contaminated soil on Johnston Atoll. The monitoring periods were 14 October-14 November 1992, 20 October-15 November 1993, 16 August-3 November 1994, and 17 February-27 February 1995. Pairs of high volume air samplers were located at each of four locations of the process stream: the {open_quotes}spoils pile{close_quotes} that was the feedstock, the {open_quotes}plant area{close_quotes} near the hot soil gate of the sorter, the {open_quotes}clean pile{close_quotes} conveyer area where sorted clean soil was moved, and the {open_quotes}oversize soil{close_quotes} crushing area. These locations were monitored only during the working hours, while air monitoring was also done at an upwind, {open_quotes}background{close_quotes} area 24-hours per day. The median concentrations of Pu in {open_quotes}workplace{close_quotes} air (combined spoils pile, plant area, and clean pile sites) in 1992 was 397 aCi/m{sup 3} (15 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}), but increased to median values of 23000 aCi/m{sup 3} (852 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in August-November 1994 and 29800 aCi/m{sup 3} (1100 {mu}Bq/m{sup 3}) in February 1995. The highest median value at the worksites (29800 aCi/m{sup 3}) was more than 200 times lower than the regulatory level. The highest observed value was 84200 aCi/m{sup 3} at the spoils pile site, and this was more than 70 times lower than the regulatory level. The conclusion was that, in spite of the dusty environment, and the increased level of specific activity, we did not find that the soil processing posed any significant risk to workers during the observation periods 1992-1995.

Shinn, J.H.; Fry, C.O.; Johnson, J.S.

1996-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

115

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area C at the Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

This document describes the groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area C located in the 200 East Area of the DOE Hanford Site. This plan is required under Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA).

Horton, Duane G.; Narbutovskih, Susan M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Subsidence monitoring and evaluation plan for strategic petroleum reserve storage sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsidence is occurring at all six Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) sites. It results from a combination of cavern closure, Frasch-process sulphur extraction, fluid withdrawal, and from natural causes. Of these, cavern closure resulting from slat creep is the predominant source. A subsidence monitoring program is recommended that includes: (a) continuation of annual releveling; (b) quadrennial determination of horizontal drift; (c) triennial measurement of gravity values to determine elevation change and to validate releveling data; (d) 1/2400 air photos quadrennially; (e) coordination of other subsidence monitoring efforts, especially involving regional subsidence; (f) continuation of cavern creep modeling; (g) engineering evaluation of observed and predicted subsidence effects; (h) information dissemination in the form of an annual review and report. A priority sequence is suggested that considers observed subsidence and operational factors such as oil inventories and risk appraisal. First (highest) priority is assigned to Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Second (intermediate) priority is given to Bayou Choctaw and Bryan Mound. Third, (lowest) priority is assigned to Sulphur Mines and Big Hill. The priority strategy can be used as a management tool in allocating resources and in determining relative attention that is required at the six sites. 32 refs., 1 tab.

Neal, J.T.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Selection of Sampling Pumps Used for Groundwater Monitoring at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variable frequency drive centrifugal submersible pump, Redi-Flo2a made by Grundfosa, was selected for universal application for Hanford Site groundwater monitoring. Specifications for the selected pump and five other pumps were evaluated against current and future Hanford groundwater monitoring performance requirements, and the Redi-Flo2 was selected as the most versatile and applicable for the range of monitoring conditions. The Redi-Flo2 pump distinguished itself from the other pumps considered because of its wide range in output flow rate and its comparatively moderate maintenance and low capital costs. The Redi-Flo2 pump is able to purge a well at a high flow rate and then supply water for sampling at a low flow rate. Groundwater sampling using a low-volume-purging technique (e.g., low flow, minimal purge, no purge, or micropurgea) is planned in the future, eliminating the need for the pump to supply a high-output flow rate. Under those conditions, the Well Wizard bladder pump, manufactured by QED Environmental Systems, Inc., may be the preferred pump because of the lower capital cost.

Schalla, Ronald; Webber, William D.; Smith, Ronald M.

2001-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

118

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Second quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. There were no constituents which exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. There were also no constituents which were above the SRS Flag 2 criteria in any well at the three sites during second quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Low Cost Open-Path Instrument for Monitoring Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide at Sequestration Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Low Cost open-path Instrument for Low Cost open-path Instrument for monItorIng atmospherIC Carbon DIoxIDe at sequestratIon sItes Background Growing concern over the effect on global climate of the buildup of greenhouse gases (GHG), particularly carbon dioxide (CO 2 ), in the atmosphere may lead to the curtailment of CO 2 emissions. One potential course of action by industry to reduce GHG emissions is the subsurface disposal of CO 2 . An important requirement of such disposal is verification that the injected gases remain in place and do not leak to the surface. Perhaps the most direct evidence of a successful sequestration project is the lack of a detectable CO 2 concentration above the background level in the air near the ground. Although measurement of CO 2 concentration can be performed, it is

120

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research objectives of this report are to: implement and maintain the ongoing environmental monitoring program around DOE geopressured-geothermal test wells in Louisiana and Texas; analyze and interpret collected data for evidence of subsidence and induced microearthquakes which may be brought about by geopressured-geothermal well testing and development; continue geological-geophysical studies of the Hulin and Gladys McCall sites incorporating new seismic data; continue review of previously identified and tested geopressured-geothermal prospects in Louisiana to determine if any link exists between such reservoirs and the existence of free gas in commercial or subcommercial quantities; and initiate review of geology, co-location and properties of geopressured brines with medium and heavy oil reservoirs in Louisiana utilizing existing maps, databases, reports, and journal articles. 2 figs.

Not Available

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research objectives of this report are to: implement and maintain the ongoing environmental monitoring program around DOE geopressured-geothermal test well in Louisiana and Texas; analyze and interpret collected data for evidence of subsidence and induced microearthquakes which may be brought about by geopressured-geothermal well testing and development; continue geological-geophysical studies of the Hulin and Gladys McCall sites incorporating new seismic data; continue review of previously identified and tested geopressured-geothermal prospects in Louisiana to determine if any link exists between such reservoirs and the existence of free gas in commercial or subcommercial quantities; and initiate review of geology, co-location and properties of geopressured brines with medium and heavy oil reservoirs in Louisiana utilizing existing maps, databases, reports, and journal articles.

Groat, C.; Stevenson, D.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Third report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a condition of the modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the receiving stream (Mitchell Branch or K-1700 stream). On October 1, 1992, a renewed NPDES permit was issued for the K-25 Site. A biological monitoring plan was submitted for Mitchell Branch, Poplar Creek, Poplar Creek Embayment of the Clinch River and any unnamed tributaries of these streams. The objectives of BMAP are to (1) demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life and (2) document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities, including the Central Neutralization Facility (CNF) and the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) incinerator. The BMAP consists of four tasks: (1) toxicity monitoring; (2) bioaccumulation monitoring; (3) assessment of fish health; and (4) instream monitoring of biological communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document, the third in a series, reports on the results of the Oak Ridge K-25 Site BMAP; it describes studies that were conducted over various periods of time between June 1990 and December 1993, although monitoring conducted outside this time period is included, as appropriate.

Hinzman, R.L. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Ashwood, T.L. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Low Cost Open-Path Instrument for Monitoring Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide at Sequestration Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the past 48 months of the project, we have accomplished all objectives outlined in the proposal. In the first year, we demonstrated the technology for remote sensing on a bench top scale. The core electronics are designed and fabricated. We achieved results that will safely deliver the specifications outlined in the proposal. In the 2nd year, 2 major technical tasks outlined in the Statement of Objectives, i.e. Build a field test ready prototype of a long-range CO2 monitor, and characterize its performance in the short term and demonstrate that the monitor characteristics meet the goals set in the initial proposal, have been accomplished. We also conducted simulation work that defines the different deployment strategies for our sensors at sequestration sites. In the 3rd year, Specifications and Testing protocols have been developed for the CO2 monitor. 1% accuracy had been demonstrated in short period tests ({approx}1 hour). Unattended system operation and stability over a period of a week has been demonstrated with and without EDFA (laser power amplifier). The sensitivity of the instrument to CO2 leaks has been demonstrated. In the 4th no-cost extension year, we further field tested the system and the experience we accumulated give us a clear picture of what else are needed for final field deployment. These results have shown all the objectives of the project have been fulfilled. In July 2008, along with our commercial partner we won the DOE STTR phase I award to commercialize the instrument developed in this project - a testimony to the achievement of this research.

William Goddard

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

124

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1995  

SciTech Connect

During first quarter 1995, samples from monitoring wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) samples were analyzed for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 12,076. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. The only constituent that exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well was lead which was found in wells HSS 3D and PSS 3D. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1995.

Chase, J.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Installation of the Monitoring Site at the Los Alamos Canyon Low-Head Weir  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Cerro Grande fire of 2000 had an enormously adverse impact on and around Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Immediately there were concerns about the potential for enhanced runoff/offsite transport of contaminant-laden sediments because of watershed damage. In response to this concern, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers installed a low-head weir in Los Alamos Canyon near the White Rock ''Y.'' However, the occurrence of fractured basalt at the surface and ponding of runoff behind the weir enhance the possibility of downward migration of contaminants. Therefore, three boreholes were drilled on the south bank of the channel by LANL to provide a means of monitoring the impact of the Cerro Grande fire and of the weir on water quality beneath the canyon. The boreholes and associated instrumentation are referred to as the Los Alamos Weir Site (LAWS). The three boreholes include a vertical hole and two angled holes (one at approximately 45{sup o} and one at approximately 30{sup o}). Since the basalt is highly fractured, the holes would not stay open. Plans called for inserting flexible liners into all holes. However, using liners in such unstable ground was problematic and, in the angled holes, required deployment through scalloped or perforated polyvinyl chloride (PVC) shield. The vertical hole (LAWS-01), drilled to a total depth of 281.5 ft below ground surface (bgs), was completed as a 278-ft deep monitoring well with four screens: one targeting shallow perched water encountered at 80 ft, two in what may correspond to the upper perched zone at regional groundwater characterization well R-9i (1/4 mi. to the west), and one in what may correspond to the lower perched zone at R-9i. A Water FLUTe{trademark} system deployed in the well isolates the screened intervals; associated transducers and sampling ports permit monitoring head and water quality in the screened intervals. The second hole (LAWS-02), drilled at an angle of 43{sup o} from horizontal, is 156 ft long and bottoms at a depth of 106 ft bgs. The shallow perched water seen at LAWS-01 (at 80 ft) was not encountered. A scalloped PVC shield was installed to keep the hole open while permitting flexible liners to contact the borehole wall. It was initially instrumented with a color-reactive liner to locate water-producing fractures. That was later replaced by an absorbent liner to collect water from the vadose zone. The third hole (LAWS-03), drilled at an angle of 34{sup o} from horizontal, initially had a length of 136 ft and bottomed at a depth of 76 ft bgs. However, the PVC shield rotated during installation such that scallops were at the top and rock debris repeatedly fell in, preventing liner insertion. While pulling the scalloped PVC to replace it with a perforated PVC shield that did not require orientation, the scalloped PVC broke and only 85 ft was recovered. The hole was blocked at that position and could not be drilled out with the equipment available. Thus, LAWS-03 was completed at a length of 85 ft and a depth of 40 ft bgs. An absorbent liner was installed at the outset in preparation for the 2002 summer monsoon season. The entire monitoring site is enclosed inside a locked, 8-ft-high chainlink fence for security. The liners used in the angled boreholes carry electrical wire pairs to detect soil-moisture changes. Surface-water data are provided by stream gages above and below the weir site. Depth of ponding behind the weir is provided by a gage installed just behind the structure.

W.J.Stone; D.L.Newell

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During fourth quarter 1992, samples from the three monitoring wells at the K-Area site (KSS series) and the three monitoring wells at the Par Pond site (PSS series) were analyzed for constituents required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 13, 173 and for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. This report describes monitoring results that exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the SRS flagging criteria. During fourth quarter 1992, no constituents analyzed exceeded the PDWS or the SRS Flag 2 criteria at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. In the KSS well series, the field measurement for alkalinity ranged as high as 26 mg/L in well KSS 1D. Alkalinity measurements were zero in the PSS wells. Historical and current water-level elevations at the K-Area and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site indicate that the groundwater flow directions are south to southwest (SRS grid coordinates).

Thompson, C.Y.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

SITE CHARACTERIZATION AND MONITORING DATA FROM THE AREA 5 PILOT WELLS  

SciTech Connect

Three exploratory boreholes were drilled and completed to the uppermost alluvial aquifer in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, in 1992. The boreholes and associated investigations were part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level, mixed, and high-specific-activity waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize the hydrogeology of the thick vadose zone and to help define the water quality and hydraulic properties of the uppermost aquifer. Wells UE5PW-1, UE5PW-2, and UE5PW-3 are located in a triangular array near the southeast, northeast, and northwest corners, respectively, of the approximately 2.6-square-kilometer Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to give reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization, and to help define the nearly horizontal water table. Two of the wells, UE5PW-1 and UE5PW-2, penetrated only unconsolidated alluvial materials. The third well, located closer to the margin of the basin, penetrated both alluvium and underlying ash-flow and bedded tuff units. The watertable was encountered at the elevation of approximately 734 meters. The results of laboratory testing of core and drill cuttings samples indicate that the mineralogical, material, and hydrologic properties of the alluvium are very similar within and between boreholes. Additional tests on the same core and drill cuttings samples indicate that hydrologic conditions within the alluvium are also similar between pilot wells. Both core and drill cuttings samples are dry (less than 10 percent water content by weight) throughout the entire unsaturated section of alluvium, and water content increases slightly with depth in each borehole. Water potential measurements on core samples show a large positive potential gradient (water tends to move upward, rather than downward) to a depth of approximately 30.5 meters in each borehole, and a nearly zero potential gradient throughout the remaining portion of the vadose zone. These hydrologic condition data and hydrologic property data indicate that little net downward liquid flow is occurring (if any) through the thick vadose zone. Conversely, gas flow by diffusion, and possibly by advection, may be an important transport mechanism. Environmental tracer measurements made on water extracted from geologic samples suggest that water vapor in the upper portion of the vadose zone is moving upward in response to evaporative demand of the present arid climate. Preliminary water quality data indicate that the key hazardous and radioactive constituents do not exceed appropriate standards. Monitoring instruments and equipment were installed in each pilot well for making in-situ measurements of key hydrologic and pneumatic parameters and to monitor change in these parameters over time.

BECHTEL NEVADA; U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION NEVADA SITE OFFICE

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Long-term hydrologic monitoring program. Rulison Event Site, Grand Valley, Colorado  

SciTech Connect

The Hydrologic Program Advisory Group reviewed the Long-Term Hydrologic Monitoring Program proposed for the Rulison site at their December 12, 1971, meeting. Samples are collected annually, at about the same dates each year. The hydraulic head, temperature in /sup 0/C, pH, and electrical conductance are recorded at the time of sample collection. Prior to October 1, 1979, each sample was analyzed for gamma emitters and tritium. Gross alpha and beta radioactivity measurements were made on all samples collected. After October 1, 1979, these analyses were discontinued in favor of high-resolution gamma spectrometry using a GeLi detector. For each sample location, samples of raw water and filtered and acidified watar are collected. The raw water samples are analyzed for tritium by the conventional method. Those samples with concentrations that are below the detection level for this method are then analyzed by the enrichment method. Portions of the filtered and acidified samples are analyzed for gamma emitters.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1993 and 1993 summary  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. No constituent exceeded either the final Primary Drinking Water Standards or the SRS Flag 2 criteria during fourth quarter 1993. Iron, lead, and manganese were the only permit- required analytes that exceeded standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites in 1993. Tritium, aluminum, and other constituents not included in the permit have exceeded standards at this site previously, but only sporadically. These constituents were not analyzed fourth quarter 1993.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Internal Technical Report, 1981 Annual Report, An Analysis of the Response of the Raft River Geothermal Site Monitor Wells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A groundwater monitoring program has been established on the Raft River Geothermal Site since 1978. The objective of this program is to document possible impacts that may be caused by geothermal production and injection on the shallow aquifers used for culinary and irrigation purposes. This annual progress report summarizes data from 12 monitor wells during 1981. These data are compared with long-term trends and are correlated with seasonal patterns, irrigation water use and geothermal production and testing. These results provide a basis for predicting long-term impacts of sustained geothermal production and testing. To date, there has been no effect on the water quality of the shallow aquifers.

Thurow, T.L.; Large, R.M.; Allman, D.W.; Tullis, J.A.; Skiba, P.A.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Hanford Site Integrated EN Based Corrosion Monitoring System Initial Design Report  

SciTech Connect

Design of integrated corrosion monitoring station. This document meets the requirements of TTP RLO-9-WT-41 Milestone A.3-1.

NORMAN, E.C.

2000-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

132

Monitoring Soil Erosion of a Burn Site in the Central Basin and Range Ecoregion: Final Report on Measurements at the Gleason Fire Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

The increase in wildfires in arid and semi-arid parts of Nevada and elsewhere in the southwestern United States has implications for post-closure management and long-term stewardship for Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) for which the Nevada Field Office of the United States Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration has responsibility. For many CAUs and Corrective Action Sites, where closure-in-place alternatives are now being implemented or considered, there is a chance that these sites could burn over at some time while they still pose a risk to the environment or human health, given the long half lives of some of the radionuclide contaminants. This study was initiated to examine the effects and duration of wildfire on wind and water erodibility on sites analogous to those that exist on the NNSS. The data analyzed herein were gathered at the prescribed Gleason Fire site near Ely, Nevada, a site comparable to the northern portion of the NNSS. Quantification of wind erosion was conducted with a Portable In-Situ Wind ERosion Lab (PI-SWERL) on unburned soils, and on interspace and plant understory soils within the burned area. The PI-SWERL was used to estimate emissions of suspendible particles (particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters less than or equal to 10 micrometers) at different wind speeds. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Based on nearly three years of data, the Gleason Fire site does not appear to have returned to pre burn wind erosion levels. Chemical composition data of suspendible particles are variable and show a trend toward pre-burn levels, but provide little insight into how the composition has been changing over time since the fire. Soil, runoff, and sediment data were collected from the Gleason Fire site to monitor the water erosion potential over the nearly three-year period. Soil hydrophobicity (water repellency) was noted on burned understory soils up to 12 months after the fire, as was the presence of ash on the soil surface. Soil deteriorated from a strong, definable pre-fire structure to a weakly cohesive mass (unstructured soil) immediately after the fire. Surface soil structure was evident 34 months after the fire at both burned and unburned sites, but was rare and weaker at burned sites. The amount of runoff and sediment was highly variable, but runoff occurred more frequently at burned interspace sites compared to burned understory and unburned interspace sites up to 34 months after the burn. No discernible pattern was evident on the amount of sediment transported, but the size of sediment from burned understory sites was almost double that of burned and unburned interspace soils after the fire, and decreased over the monitoring period. Curve numbers, a measure of the runoff potential, did not indicate any obvious runoff response to the fire. However, slight seasonal changes in curve numbers and runoff potential and, therefore, post-fire runoff response may be a function of fire impacts as well as the time of year that precipitation occurs. Site (interspace or understory) differences in soil properties and runoff persisted even after the fire. Vegetation data showed the presence of invasive grasses after the fire. Results from analysis of wind and water coupled with the spatial analysis of vegetation suggest that wind erosion may continue to occur due to the additional exposed soil surface (burned understory sites) until vegetation becomes re-established, and runoff may occur more frequently in interspace sites. The potential for fire-related wind erosion and water erosion may persist beyond three years in this system.

Miller, Julianne [DRI] [DRI; Etyemezian, Vicken [DRI] [DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI] [DRI; Cablk, Mary [DRI] [DRI; Fenstermaker, Lynn [DRI] [DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Legacy Management] [DOE Legacy Management

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Scoping study of SNM detection and indentification for adjunct on-site treaty monitoring. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Following the fall of the Soviet Union, political pressure to negotiate meaningful nuclear arms agreements with Russia and the former soviet republics has increased. Anticipating the monitoring requirements of a future treaty for the decommissioning and disassembly of nuclear warheads presents opportunities to review existing monitoring technologies and to explore new methods to detect and analyze intrinsic radiation. Fully instrumented radiation-detection systems with a range of monitoring capabilities are available, but special-purpose instruments will still need to be developed to match increasing demands for high-confidence, low-intrusion monitoring in a specific scenario. As a guide to present capabilities in monitoring technologies, we have categorized their relevant attributes to detect and identify special nuclear material based on levels of confidence, intrusiveness, vulnerability, and other critical concerns. To add additional flexibility, we review emerging technologies and estimate the development time to bring them to operational status.

Murray, W.S.; Morgado, R.E.; Frankle, C.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Class B monitoring program handbook for southeastern sites with data based on INIT2 software (applicable to heating season)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document provides reference information on eight residences located in the southern part of the US which are being monitored under the Class B Passive Solar Monitoring Program. This handbook provides reference information on the sites and basic test conditions for the 1982-1983 winter heating season using software which is identified as INIT2. The manual is intended for use in data analysis work but is limited to this period of time because of basic differences in the control software and the related instrumentation system. This document is separated into individual sections for each site. The following information is provided for each site: (a) Site summary providing information on the structure, the passive solar features, the auxiliary heating system, and other related data; (b) Floor layouts with the sensor locations, etc.; (c) The One Time Value Log which records the results of field tests and calculations to determine the thermal characteristics, air infiltration rate, and other reference data; (d) The Analog/Digital Channel Log which provides calibration data; (e) The Status Channel Log which defines various event sensors; and (f) Program listings as used during the specified time periods during the heating season. Appendix A provides a summary of photographs which have been provided separately as part of the site documentation.

Gustashaw, D. H.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

The 1993 baseline biological studies and proposed monitoring plan for the Device Assembly Facility at the Nevada Test Site  

SciTech Connect

This report contains baseline data and recommendations for future monitoring of plants and animals near the new Device Assembly Facility (DAF) on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The facility is a large structure designed for safely assembling nuclear weapons. Baseline data was collected in 1993, prior to the scheduled beginning of DAF operations in early 1995. Studies were not performed prior to construction and part of the task of monitoring operational effects will be to distinguish those effects from the extensive disturbance effects resulting from construction. Baseline information on species abundances and distributions was collected on ephemeral and perennial plants, mammals, reptiles, and birds in the desert ecosystems within three kilometers (km) of the DAF. Particular attention was paid to effects of selected disturbances, such as the paved road, sewage pond, and the flood-control dike, associated with the facility. Radiological monitoring of areas surrounding the DAF is not included in this report.

Woodward, B.D.; Hunter, R.B.; Greger, P.D.; Saethre, M.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Best Practice Guidelines for Geologic Storage of Carbon Dioxide: Geologic Storage Options, Site Evaluation, and Monitoring/Mitigatio n  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to set forth a set of "best practices" that support long-term, secure storage of captured carbon dioxide (CO2). For each of a suite of geologic storage options, the report establishes background and basic concepts, defines site selection criteria and procedures, and sets forth monitoring and mitigation options. The initial suite of geologic CO2 storage options to be addressed includes saline aquifers, depleted oil fields, depleted natural gas fields, and deep unmineable coal...

2004-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

Variability of Aerosol Optical Properties at Four North American Surface Monitoring Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aerosol optical properties measured over several years at surface monitoring stations located at Bondville, Illinois (BND); Lamont, Oklahoma (SGP); Sable Island, Nova Scotia (WSA); and Barrow, Alaska (BRW), have been analyzed to determine the ...

David J. Delene; John A. Ogren

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Environmental monitoring at designed geopressured-geothermal well sites, Louisiana and Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document covers the activities of monitoring environmental aspects at designated geothermal wells in Texas and Louisiana during the second quarter of 1990 by the Louisiana Geological Survey, Louisiana State University under contract with US DOE. 1 fig. (FSD)

Not Available

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Feasibility study: Assess the feasibility of siting a monitored retrievable storage facility. Phase 1  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of phase one of this study are: To understand the waste management system and a monitored retrievable storage facility; and to determine whether the applicant has real interest in pursuing the feasibility assessment process. Contents of this report are: Generating electric power; facts about exposure to radiation; handling storage, and transportation techniques; description of a proposed monitored retrievable storage facility; and benefits to be received by host jurisdiction.

King, J.W.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum, iron, lead, and manganese, which were above standards and Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during first quarter 1994, were not analyzed this quarter. Second quarter results are similar to results for fourth quarter 1993.

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Fourth quarter 1992 and 1992 summary  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076 and, as requested, for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permit. During fourth quarter 1992, the FSS wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Historically and currently, no permit-required analytes exceed standards at the F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites except iron, lead, and manganese, which occur in elevated concentrations frequently in FSS wells. Lead concentrations exceeded the final Primary Drinking Water Standards during fourth quarter 1992, an event that is concurrent with a change in sampling procedures. Tritium is the primary nonpermit constituent that exceeds standards at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site. Other constituents also exceed standards at this site but only sporadically.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. First quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three Wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. Lead presently exceeds the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in two wells from the three sites. As in third quarter 1993, aluminum, iron, and lead were reported in excess of the SRS Flag 2 criteria during first quarter 1994. An elevated concentration of manganese was found in one well at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site during first quarter.

1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

On Conservation Equations in Oceanography: How Accurate Are Boussinesq Ocean Models?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Traditionally, the conservation equations in oceanography include the Boussinesq approximation, and the velocity variable is interpreted as the Eulerian mean velocity averaged over turbulent scales. If such a view is adopted, then the ...

Trevor J. McDougall; Richard J. Greatbatch; Youyu Lu

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

The Navy Operational Global and Regional Atmospheric Prediction Systems at the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At the Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center, two computer models, the Navy Operational Global Atmospheric Prediction System, NOGAPS, and the Navy Operational Regional Atmospheric Prediction System, NORAPS, generate a twice-daily suite of ...

Gail Bayler; Howard Lewit

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

The Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center Suite of Oceanographic Models and Products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center (FLENUMOCEANCEN) is the navy's real-time prediction center for global-scale and open-ocean regional-scale oceanographic products, having filled this role for over 25 years. FLENUMOCEANCEN provides operational ...

R. M. Clancy; LCDR W. D. Sadler

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

A Sequential Variational Algorithm for Data Assimilation in Oceanography and Meteorology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study theoretically establishes a sequential variational (SVAR) method for the data assimilation in oceanography and meteorology defined on the model space. Requiring a significantly smaller amount of computer memory, theoretically SVAR ...

Srdjan Dobricic

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

The Application of a Technique for Vector Correlation to Problems in Meteorology and Oceanography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a recent study, Crosby et al. proposed a definition for vector correlation that has not been commonly used in meteorology or oceanography. This definition has both a firm theoretical basis and a rather complete set of desirable statistical ...

L. C. Breaker; W. H. Gemmill; D. S. Crosby

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Second quarter 1992  

SciTech Connect

During second quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) of Savannah River Plant were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. None of these analytes exceeded the US Environmental Protection Agency Primary Drinking Water Standards (PDWS) or the Savannah River Site (SRS) Flag 2 criteria at either sewage sludge site. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Of these constituents, tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. Lead exceeded the PDWS in well FSS 3D. Iron exceeded the Flag 2 criterion in well FSS 4D, and manganese exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Monitoring Environmental Recovery at Terminated Produced Water Discharge Sites in Coastal Louisiana Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the results of a study of terminated produced water discharge sites in the coastal waters of Louisiana. Environmental recovery at the sites is documented by comparing pre-termination and post-termination (six months and one year) data. Produced water, sediments, and sediment interstitial water samples were analyzed for radionuclides, metals, and hydrocarbons. Benthic infauna were identified from samples collected in the vicinity of the discharge and reference sites. Radium isotope activities were determined in fish and crustacean samples. In addition, an environmental risk assessment is made on the basis of the concentrations of metals and hydrocarbons determined in the samples.

Continental Shelf Associates, Inc.

1999-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

The Savannah River Site's Groundwater Monitoring Program - Second Quarter 1998 (April through June 1998)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the Groundwater Monitoring Program conducted by SRS during second quarter 1998. It includes the analytical data, field data, data review, quality control, and other documentation for the program; provides a record of the program's activities; and serves as an official record of the analytical results.

Hutchison, J B

1999-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

152

Summary of the environmental monitoring at the Rock Springs, Wyoming Site No. 9, true in situ oil shale retorting experiment  

SciTech Connect

The environmental effects and needed control technology associated with the potential in-situ retorting of oil shale in the Green River Basin (near Rock Springs, Wyoming) has been studied for over four years. This environmental monitoring program has included previous and existing in-situ oil-shale retorting field experiments and baseline data collection for potential future retorting experiments. The most extensive environmetal monitoring effort is at Rock Springs Site No. 9, a true in-situ oil-shale retorting field experiment which was ignited April 5, 1976. The purpose of this monitoring program was to identify any significant changes in the hydrology, air quality, and soils. Data have been collected during the pre-operational (baseline) and operational phases and continues to be collected during the post-operational phase. This report presents the results of the environmental monitoring conducted in support of the LETC Rock Springs No. 9 field experiment and the entire DOE oil shale program. 18 figures, 8 tables.

Virgona, J.E.; Poulson, R.E.; Spedding, T.J.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

First report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

A modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued to the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site) on September 11, 1986. The Oak Ridge K-25 Site is a former uranium-enrichment production facility, which is currently managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc. for the US Department of Energy. As required in Part III (L) of that permit, a plan for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) was prepared and submitted for approval to the US Environmental Protection Agency and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation [formerly the Tennessee Department of Health and Environment (Loar et al. 1992b)]. The K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. Because it was anticipated that the composition of existing effluent streams entering Mitchell Branch would be altered shortly after the modified permit was issued, sampling of the benthic invertebrate and fish communities (Task 4 of BMAP) was initiated in August and September 1986 respectively.

Smith, J.G. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Kszos, L.A.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R.; Loar, J.M.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report. Third quarter 1994  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the quired by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site (SRS) Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals, also are required by the permits. No constituents exceeded the SCDHEC final Primary Drinking Water Standard in any well from the H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites. Aluminum and iron were above Flag 2 criteria in one or more wells in the three sites during third quarter 1994. These constituents were not analyzed during the previous quarter. Third quarter results are similar to results for first quarter 1994.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Groundwater monitoring program plan and conceptual site model for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center in Iraq.  

SciTech Connect

The Radiation Protection Center of the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is developing a groundwater monitoring program (GMP) for the Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center located near Baghdad, Iraq. The Al-Tuwaitha Nuclear Research Center was established in about 1960 and is currently being cleaned-up and decommissioned by Iraq's Ministry of Science and Technology. This Groundwater Monitoring Program Plan (GMPP) and Conceptual Site Model (CSM) support the Radiation Protection Center by providing:A CSM describing the hydrogeologic regime and contaminant issues,recommendations for future groundwater characterization activities, anddescriptions of the organizational elements of a groundwater monitoring program. The Conceptual Site Model identifies a number of potential sources of groundwater contamination at Al-Tuwaitha. The model also identifies two water-bearing zones (a shallow groundwater zone and a regional aquifer). The depth to the shallow groundwater zone varies from approximately 7 to 10 meters (m) across the facility. The shallow groundwater zone is composed of a layer of silty sand and fine sand that does not extend laterally across the entire facility. An approximately 4-m thick layer of clay underlies the shallow groundwater zone. The depth to the regional aquifer varies from approximately 14 to 17 m across the facility. The regional aquifer is composed of interfingering layers of silty sand, fine-grained sand, and medium-grained sand. Based on the limited analyses described in this report, there is no severe contamination of the groundwater at Al-Tuwaitha with radioactive constituents. However, significant data gaps exist and this plan recommends the installation of additional groundwater monitoring wells and conducting additional types of radiological and chemical analyses.

Copland, John Robin; Cochran, John Russell

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Data Quality Objectives Supporting Radiological Air Emissions Monitoring for the Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document of Data Quality Objectives (DQOs) was prepared based on the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance on Systematic Planning Using the Data Quality Objectives Process, EPA, QA/G4, 2/2006 (EPA 2006), as well as several other published DQOs. The intent of this report is to determine the necessary steps required to ensure that radioactive emissions to the air from the Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) headquartered at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s Sequim Marine Research Operations (Sequim Site) on Washington State’s Olympic Peninsula are managed in accordance with regulatory requirements and best practices. The Sequim Site was transitioned in October 2012 from private operation under Battelle Memorial Institute to an exclusive use contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Pacific Northwest Site Office.

Barnett, J. M.; Meier, Kirsten M.; Snyder, Sandra F.; Antonio, Ernest J.; Fritz, Brad G.; Poston, Theodore M.

2012-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

158

Subsurface Monitor for Dissolved Inorganic Carbon at Geological Sequestration Site Phase 1 SBIR Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Phase I research of this SBIR contract has yielded anticipated results and enable us to develop a practical new instrument to measure the Dissolved Inorganic Carbons (DIC) as well as Supercritical (SC) CO2 in underground brine water at higher sensitivity, lower cost, higher frequency and longer period of time for the Monitoring, Verification & Accounting (MVA) of CO2 sequestration as well as Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR). We show that reduced cost and improved performance are possible; both future and emerging market exist for the proposed new instrument.

Sheng Wu

2012-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

159

Second report on the Oak Ridge K-25 Site Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program for Mitchell Branch  

SciTech Connect

On September 11, 1986, a modified National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System permit was issued for the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant (ORGDP; now referred to as the Oak Ridge K-25 Site), a former uranium-enrichment production facility. As required in Part III of the permit, a Biological Monitoring and Abatement Program (BMAP) was developed for the biological monitoring of Mitchell Branch (K-1700 stream) and submitted for approval to the US EPA and the Tennessee Department of Environment and Conservation. The plan described biomonitoring activities that would be conducted over the duration of the permit. The objectives of the BMAP are to demonstrate that the effluent limitations established for the Oak Ridge K-25 Site protect and maintain the use of Mitchell Branch for growth and propagation of fish and other aquatic life, and to document the effects on stream biota resulting from operation of major new pollution abatement facilities. The BMAP consists of four tasks: ambient toxicity testing; bioaccumulation studies; biological indicator studies; and ecological surveys of stream communities, including benthic macroinvertebrates and fish. This document is the second in a series of reports presenting the results of the studies that were conducted over various periods of time between August 1987 and June 1990.

Smith, J.G. [ed.; Adams, S.M.; Hinzman, R.L.; Kszos, L.A.; Loar, J.M.; Peterson, M.J.; Ryon, M.G.; Southworth, G.R. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Crumby, W.D. [Automated Sciences Group, Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

F- and H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Sites groundwater monitoring report, third quarter 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During third quarter 1992, the four wells at the F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (FSS wells) and the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) were sampled and analyzed for constituents required quarterly by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. The F-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site wells also were analyzed for a number of other constituents not required by the permit. Mercury exceeded the Primary Drinking Water Standard (PDWS) in one analysis from well FSS 2D, and tritium exceeded the PDWS in wells FSS 2D and 3D. The mercury result above PDWS is considered suspect because it was not supported by a reanalysis from the same sample or by historical data. Iron exceeded the SRS Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 3D, lead exceeded its criterion in wells FSS 3D and HSS 3D, and manganese exceeded its Flag 2 criterion in wells FSS 2D and 3D.

Not Available

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Status of the flora and fauna on the Nevada Test Site, 1994: Results of continuing Basic Environmental Monitoring January through December 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the final progress report of a Department of Energy (DOE), Nevada operations Office (NV), program to monitor the ecology of the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The eight-year Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program (BECAMP) included meeting goals of understanding the spatial and temporal changes of plants and animals on the NTS, and determining the effects of DOE operations on those plants and animals. Determination of the changes was addressed through monitoring the most common plant and animal species at undisturbed (baseline) plots located in the major NTS valleys and mesas. One plot in Yucca Flat, the site of most nuclear weapons tests, was monitored annually, while other baseline plots were censused on a three- or four-year cycle. Effects of DOE operations were examined at sites of major disturbances, related to both DOE operations and natural disturbance mechanisms, censused on a three-year cycle. This report concentrates on work completed in 1994.

Hunter, R.B. [comp.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Hydrologic monitoring program, Rifle Oil Shale Facility Site, Colorado. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

A hydrologic monitoring and assessment program is being developed to investigate the hydrologic characteristics of surface and ground waters in the region of the Anvil Points, Colorado, Rifle Oil Shale Facility. The objectives of the program are to: evaluate ground-water contributions to study streams; assess contaminant transport capability of surface and ground waters; determine peak discharge magnitude and frequency relationships for use in designing possible spent oil shale disposal works; and assess the impact of specified hypothetical problems, events, or scenarios. To accomplish these objectives, seven major tasks have been identified: (1) literature review of existing studies dealing with the regional, hydrological, physiographical, geological, and climatological characteristics; (2) ground-water characterization; (3) drainage basin characteristics and channel geometry; (4) streamflow and sediment transport; (5) stream travel times; (6) analysis of spent shale disposal; and (7) support of water quality sample collection.

Ecker, R.M.; Walters, W.H.; Skaggs, R.L.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Status of the flora and fauna on the Nevada Test Site, 1992. Results of continuing basic environmental monitoring, January through December 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents changes in the populations of plants and animals on the Nevada Test Site (NTS) for calendar year 1992. It is part of a Department of Energy (DOE) program (Basic Environmental Compliance and Monitoring Program -- BECAMP) that also includes monitoring DOE compliance with the Endangered Species Act, the Historic Preservation Act, and the American Indian Freedom of Religion Act. Ecological studies were to comply with the National Environmental Policy Act and DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` These studies focused on the following: status of ephemeral plants on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; status of reptile and amphibian populations on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; trends in small mammal populations on the Nevada Test Site, 1992; status of large mammals and birds at Nevada Test Site, 1992; and status of perennial plants on the Nevada Test Site, 1992.

Hunter, R.B. [comp.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Post-Closure Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent site is located in the southeastern portion of the Area 12 Camp at the Nevada Test Site. This site is identified in the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (1996) as Corrective Action Site (CAS) 12-19-01 and is the only CAS assigned to Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 339. Post-closure sampling and inspection of the site were completed on March 27, 2002. Post-closure monitoring activities were scheduled biennially (every two years) in the Post-Closure Monitoring Plan provided in the Closure Report for CAU 339: Area 12 Fleet Operations Steam Cleaning Effluent, Nevada Test Site (U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office [DOEN], 1997). A baseline for the site was established by sampling in 1997. Based on the recommendations from the 1999 post-closure monitoring report (DOE/NV, 1999), samples were collected in 2000, earlier than originally proposed, because the 1999 sample results did not provide the expected decrease in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations at the site. Sampling results from 2000 (DOE/NV, 2000) and 2001 (DOE/NV, 2001) revealed favorable conditions for natural degradation at the CAU 339 site, but because of differing sample methods and heterogeneity of the soil, data results from 2000 and later were not directly correlated with previous results. Post-closure monitoring activities for 2002 consisted of the following: (1) Soil sample collection from three undisturbed plots (Plots A, B, and C, Figure 2). (2) Sample analysis for TPH as oil and bio-characterization parameters (Comparative Enumeration Assay [CEA] and Standard Nutrient Panel [SNP]). (3) Site inspection to evaluate the condition of the fencing and signs. (4) Preparation and submittal of the Post-Closure Monitoring Report.

K. B. Campbell

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Monitoring & Analysis Program of Prison Sites for the Texas Department of Criminal Justice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas Department of Criminal Justice (TDCJ) and the Energy Systems Laboratory (ESL) at Texas A&M University have collaborated to extend the LoanSTAR Monitoring & Analysis Program to Texas' prison facilities. Data loggers are in place in eleven 1,000-bed prison units recording the energy use patterns of the administration, kitchen, laundry, medical, training, and inmate housing units. Specialized software has been developed that will allow TDCJ personnel to customize the data presentation and analysis in-house. A second effort involved the development of a Utility Billing Audit Database program. This database accepts customized entry of the utility bill calculation parameters from the utility company rate schedules and contracts, and provides storage of the parameters for monthly auditing of billed amounts. Storage of all the entered monthly data allows for exporting of the data to satisfy reporting requirements for the Texas State Agency Natural Resources End-Use Database (SANRED) (B. Hunn et a1 1995) and other internal TDCJ reporting needs. Bills for all monthly purchases of electricity, natural gas, water, waste water, and solid waste removal are audited using this software.

Eggebracht, J. A.; Heneghan, T.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Depleted uranium risk assessment for Jefferson Proving Ground using data from environmental monitoring and site characterization. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the third risk assessment completed for the depleted uranium (DU) munitions testing range at Jefferson Proving Ground (JPG), Indiana, for the U.S. Army Test and Evaluation command. Jefferson Proving Ground was closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act and the testing mission was moved to Yuma Proving Ground. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This report integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H.; Hansen, W.R.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

RCRA Groundwater Monitoring Plan for Single-Shell Tank Waste Management Area A-AX at the Hanford Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes the interim status groundwater monitoring plan for Waste Management Area A-AX.

Narbutovskih, Susan M.; Horton, Duane G.

2001-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

168

Physical Oceanography Division Phone: 305/361-4345 4301 Rickenbacker Cswy Fax: 305/361-4412  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- NOAA AOML Loading point of contact: Jim Farrington Office: (757) 441 3062 Cell: (757) 651 3794. Check1 Physical Oceanography Division Phone: 305/361-4345 4301 Rickenbacker Cswy Fax: 305/361-4412 Miami resolution line AX7 that transits from Miami, Florida through the Straits of Gibraltar (Figure 1). Together

169

Kurt M. Schaefer Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. Scripps Institution of Oceanography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Kurt M. Schaefer Inter-American Tropical Tuna Commission. Scripps Institution of Oceanography 8604 of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, near Clipperton Atoll in the eastern Pacific Ocean 98 Abstract.-Spawning of yellowfin tuna, Thunnus albacares, around Clipperton Atoll, in the eastern Pacific Ocean, occurred between

170

Referenced-site environmental document for a Monitored Retrievable Storage facility: backup waste management option for handling 1800 MTU per year  

SciTech Connect

This environmental document includes a discussion of the purpose of a monitored retrievable storage facility, a description of two facility design concepts (sealed storage cask and field drywell), a description of three reference sites (arid, warm-wet, and cold-wet), and a discussion and comparison of the impacts associated with each of the six site/concept combinations. This analysis is based on a 15,000-MTU storage capacity and a throughput rate of up to 1800 MTU per year.

Silviera, D.J.; Aaberg, R.L.; Cushing, C.E.; Marshall, A.; Scott, M.J.; Sewart, G.H.; Strenge, D.L.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

EXPERIENCE MONITORING FOR LOW LEVEL NEUTRON RADIATION AT THE H-CANYON AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy contractors are required to monitor external occupational radiation exposure of an individual likely to receive an effective dose equivalent to the whole body of 0.1 rem (0.001sievert) or more in a year. For a working year of 2000 hours, this translates to a dose rate of 0.05 mrem/hr (0.5 {micro}Sv/hr). This can be a challenging requirement for neutron exposure because traditional surveys with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters are difficult to conduct, particularly at low dose rates. A modified survey method was used at the Savannah River Site to find low dose rates in excess of 0.05 mrem/hr. An unshielded He{sup 3} detector was used to find elevated gross slow neutron counts. Areas with high count rates on the unshielded He{sup 3} detector were further investigated with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters and thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters were placed in the area of interest. An office area was investigated with this method. The data initially suggested that whole body neutron dose rates to office workers could be occurring at levels significantly higher than 0.1 rem (0.001sievert). The final evaluation, however, showed that the office workers were exposed to less than 0.1 rem/yr (0.001sievert/yr) of neutron radiation.

HOGUE, MARK

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

172

Corrosion monitoring in the UF{sub 6} cylinder yards at the Oak Ridge K-25 Site: FY 1994 report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) at the U.S. Department of Energy`s K-25 Site at Oak Ridge, Tennessee, has been stored in large steel cylinders that have undergone significant atmospheric corrosion damage over the last 35 years. A detailed experimental program to characterize the corrosion damage was initiated in 1992. Large amounts of corrosion scale and deep pits are found to cover UF{sub 6} cylinder surfaces. Ultrasonic wall thickness measurements have shown uniform corrosion losses up to 20 mils (0.5 mm) and pits up to 100 mils (2.5 mm) deep. Electrical resistance corrosion probes, TOW sensors, and thermocouples have been attached to cylinder bodies. Atmospheric conditions are monitored using rain gauges, relative humidity sensors, and thermocouples. Long-term (16-year) data are being obtained from mild steel corrosion coupons on test racks as well as attached directly to cylinder surfaces. Corrosion rates have been found to be intimately related to the times-of-wetness, both tending to be higher on cylinder tops due to apparent sheltering effects. Data from the various tests are compared, discrepancies are discussed, and a pattern of cylinder corrosion as a function of cylinder position and location is described.

Rao, M. [Midwest Technical Inc., Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Adamski, R.; Broders, J.; Ellis, A.; Freels, D.; Kelley, D.; Phillips, B. [Oak Ridge K-25 Site, TN (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Coastal Oceanography Applications of Digital Image Data from Marine Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A marine radar attached to a digital image capture system has been adapted for deployment from shore sites. Optimum operating parameters have been identified in relation to the resolution and sampling capabilities of both the radar and the ...

I. S. Robinson; N. P. Ward; C. P. Gommenginger; M. A. Tenorio-Gonzales

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Man–Machine Mix in Operational Product Quality Control and Verification at Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Quality Control (QC) Division of the U.S. Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center (FNOC) is responsible for the quality control of meteorological and oceanographic analyses and forecasts issued to operational users, and for the ...

William M. Clune; Patrick A. Harr; L. Robin Brody

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5)DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Analysis of data collected to date show that: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites, and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Data analysis focusing on relating the aerometric measurements to local and regional scale emissions of sources of primary and secondary fine particles using receptor-based air quality models will follow.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), with a goal of characterizing the ambient fine particulate in this region, including examination of urban/rural variations, correlations between PM{sub 2.5} and gaseous pollutants, and influences of artifacts on PM{sub 2.5} measurements in this region. Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected were all part of existing local and/or state air quality programs. One urban site was located in the Lawrenceville section of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania at an air quality monitoring station operated by the Allegheny County Health Department. A second urban site was collocated at a West Virginia Division of Environmental Protection (WVDEP) monitoring station at the airport in Morgantown, West Virginia. One rural site was collocated with the Pennsylvania Department of Environmental Protection (PADEP) at a former NARSTO-Northeast site near Holbrook, Greene County, Pennsylvania. The other rural site was collocated at a site operated by the Ohio Environmental Protection Agency (OHEPA) and managed by the Ohio State Forestry Division in Gifford State Forest near Athens, Ohio. Previous Semi-Annual Technical Progress Reports presented the following: (1) the median mass and composition of PM{sub 2.5} are similar for both Lawrenceville and Holbrook, suggesting that the sites are impacted more by the regional than by local effects; (2) there was no significant differences in the particulate trending and levels observed at both sites within seasons; (3) sulfate levels predominate at both sites and (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels are consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels being observed in the fall and spring. Analyses of data conducted during the period from April 1, 2003 through September 30, 2003 are presented in this Semi-Annual Technical Progress Report. Report Revision No. 1 includes the additions or removals of text presented in the previous version of this report.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock

2004-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

H-Area, K-Area, and Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Sites Groundwater Monitoring Report. Fourth quarter 1994 and 1994 summary  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater samples from the three wells at the H-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (HSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents as required by South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control Construction Permit 12,076. Samples from the three wells at the K-Area Sewage Sludge Application Site (KSS wells) and the three wells at the Par Pond Sewage Sludge Application Site (PSS wells) are analyzed quarterly for constituents required by SCDHEC Construction Permit 13,173. All samples are also analyzed as requested for other constituents as part of the Savannah River Site Groundwater Monitoring Program. Annual analyses for other constituents, primarily metals. also are required by the permits.

Chase, J.A.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Monitoring Soil Erosion on a Burned Site in the Mojave-Great Basin Transition Zone: Final Report for the Jacob Fire Site  

SciTech Connect

A historic return interval of 100 years for large fires in the U.S. southwestern deserts is being replaced by one where fires may reoccur as frequently as every 20 to 30 years. The shortened return interval, which translates to an increase in fires, has implications for management of Soil Corrective Action Units (CAUs) and Corrective Action Sites (CASs) for which the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office has responsibility. A series of studies was initiated at uncontaminated analog sites to better understand the possible impacts of erosion and transport by wind and water should contaminated soil sites burn. The first of these studies was undertaken at the Jacob Fire site approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) north of Hiko, Nevada. A lightning-caused fire burned approximately 200 hectares during August 6-8, 2008. The site is representative of a transition between Mojave and Great Basin desert ecoregions on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), where the largest number of Soil CAUs/CASs are located. The area that burned at the Jacob Fire site was primarily a Coleogyne ramosissima (blackbrush) and Ephedra nevadensis (Mormon tea) community, also an abundant shrub assemblage in the similar transition zone on the NNSS. This report summarizes three years of measurements after the fire. Seven measurement campaigns at the Jacob Fire site were completed. Measurements were made on burned ridge (upland) and drainage sites, and on burned and unburned sites beneath and between vegetation. A Portable In-Situ Wind Erosion Lab (PI-SWERL) was used to estimate emissions of suspended particles at different wind speeds. Context for these measurements was provided through a meteorological tower that was installed at the Jacob Fire site to obtain local, relevant environmental parameters. Filter samples, collected from the exhaust of the PI-SWERL during measurements, were analyzed for chemical composition. Runoff and water erosion were quantified through a series of rainfall/runoff simulation tests in which controlled amounts of water were delivered to the soil surface in a specified amount of time. Runoff data were collected from understory and interspace soils on burned ridge and drainage areas. Runoff volume and suspended sediment in the runoff were sampled; the particle size distribution of the sediment was determined by laboratory analysis. Several land surface and soil characteristics associated with runoff were integrated by the calculation of site-specific curve numbers. Several vegetation surveys were conducted to assess post-burn recovery. Data from plots in both burned and unburned areas included species identification, counts, and location. Characterization of fire-affected area included measures at both the landscape scale and at specific sites. Although wind erosion measurements indicate that there are seasonal influences on almost all parameters measured, several trends were observed. PI-SWERL measurements indicated the potential for PM10 windblown dust emissions was higher on areas that were burned compared to areas that were not. Among the burned areas, understory soils in drainage areas were the most emissive, and interspace soils along burned ridges were least emissive. By 34 months after the burn (MAB), at the end of the study, emissions from all burned soil sites were virtually indistinguishable from unburned levels. Like the amount of emissions, the chemical signature of the fire (indicated by the EC-Soil ratio) was elevated immediately after the fire and approached pre-burn levels by 24 MAB. Thus, the potential for wind erosion at the Jacob Fire site, as measured by the amount and type of emissions, increased significantly after the fire and returned to unburned levels by 24 MAB. The effect of fire on the potential for water erosion at the Jacob Fire site was more ambiguous. Runoff and sediment from ridge interspace soils and unburned interspace soils were similar throughout the study period. Seldom, if ever, did runoff and sediment occur in burned drainage area soils. Fo

Miller, Julianne [DRI] DRI; Etyemezian, Vic [DRI] DRI; Cablk, Mary E. [DRI] DRI; Shillito, Rose [DRI] DRI; Shafer, David [DOE Grand Junction, Colorado] DOE Grand Junction, Colorado

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day.

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

180

Monitoring, assessing and evaluating the pollinator species (Hymenoptera: apoidea) found on a native brush site, a revegetated site and an urban garden  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research presents the findings of a pollinator diversity study that took place at three study sites. Although variation in pollinator diversity occurred between the three sites, fewer pollinators than expected were recorded from the La Joya Tract (revegetated site). Numerous genera and species were recorded from the Havana Tract (native site) as well as the Valley Nature Center (urban garden). In contrast, the La Joya Tract had a comparatively depauperate pollinator fauna. The numbers of pollinator genera and species recorded from the three study sites were decreased in comparison to the total number of genera and species recorded from Hidalgo County. Hidalgo County has 35 known genera and 75 species of bees documented to date. About 40% of the genera and 23% of the species recorded from Hidalgo County were recorded from the Havana Tract in this study, while a mere 8.5% of the genera and 4% of the species were reported from the La Joya Tract and 34% of the genera and 16% of the species were reported from the Valley Nature Center. Although the vascular plant species identified from these study sites were diverse, the floral rewards they provided yielded an insight as to what was going on in terms of pollinator diversity. Plants may yield nectar or pollen floral rewards or both in some cases to pollinators. The current study provides evidence that revegetation of land with plants that primarily provide nectar rewards will result in fewer observed bee taxa than from land revegetated with plants that provide a mix of nectar and pollen floral rewards.

Cate, Carrie Ann

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This Final Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 1998 through December 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Advanced Technology Systems, Inc. (ATS), with Desert Research Institute (DRI) and Ohio University as subcontractors, was contracted by the NETL in September 1998 to manage the Upper Ohio River Valley Project (UORVP), which included the establishment and operation of four ambient air monitoring sites located in the Upper Ohio River Valley (UORV). Two urban and two rural monitoring sites were included in the UORVP. The four sites selected for the UOVRP were collocated at existing local and/or state air quality monitoring stations. The goal of the UORVP was to characterize the nature and composition of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases. In the process, the objectives of the UORVP were to examine the ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} as compared with the promulgated PM{sub 2.5} standards, the geographical, seasonal and temporal variations of ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5}, the primary chemical constituents of PM{sub 2.5}, and the correlations between ambient air concentrations of PM{sub 2.5} and its precursor gases, other gaseous pollutants and meteorological parameters. A variety of meteorological and pollutant measurement devices, including several different PM{sub 2.5} samplers that provided either real-time or integrated concentration data, were deployed at the monitoring sites. The frequency of integrated sampling varied throughout the UORVP study period and was as follows: (1) ''Intensive'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which samples were collected on a relatively frequent basis (ranged from 6-hour integrated samples collected round-the-clock to one 24-hour integrated sample collected every third day). (2) ''Background'' sampling periods were defined as periods in which 24-hour integrated samples were collected every third or sixth day. Sampling activities for the UORVP were initiated in February 1999 and concluded in February 2003. This semi-annual Technical Progress Report summarizes the data analyses and interpretations conducted during the period from October 2003 through March 2004. This report was organized in accordance with the Guidelines for Organization of Technical Reports (September 2003).

Robinson P. Khosah; John P. Shimshock; Jerry L. Penland

2004-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

183

Applying the Systems Engineering Process for Establishing Requirements for the Safety and Health Monitoring System of the Waste Solidification Building at the Savannah River Site  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Safety and Health Monitoring (SHM) System technical basis document for the Waste Solidification Building (WSB) was developed by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company design team. The WSB is being designed and built to support the waste disposal needs of the Pit Disassembly and Conversion Facility (PDCF) and the Mixed Oxide Fuel Fabrication Facility (MFFF) at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. The main mission of the WSB is to process the radiological liquid waste streams from the PDCF and the MFFF into a solid waste form. The solid waste form, concrete encased waste, is acceptable for shipment and disposal as transuranic (TRU) waste at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) and as Low Level Waste (LLW) at on-site disposal areas. The SHM System will also handle the job control waste from the PDCF, the MFFF, and the WSB. The SHM System will serve the WSB by monitoring personnel radiation exposure and environmental releases. The WSB design used HPT design support in determining the air monitoring equipment required for the WSB. The Systems Engineering (SE) process was applied to define the functions and requirements necessary to design and operate the SHM System. The SE process is a proven disciplined approach that supports management in clearly defining the mission or problem, managing system functions and requirements, identifying and managing risk, establishing bases for informed decision making, and verifying that products and services meet customer needs. This SE process applied to the SHM System was a major effort encompassing requirements analysis and interface control. Use of the SE process combined with HPT design input resulted in well-defined requirements to support the procurement of a safe-mission essential SHM System.

Simpkins, P.J.

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

184

Comments on Presentation on Industrial Nuclear Explosion Sites in the Russian Federation: Recovery and Institutional Monitoring Problems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. National Academy of Sciences selected 6 U.S. scientists to review papers prepared by Russian specialists in 6 specific areas of radioactive waste management concern. As one of the U.S. specialists selected, Don Bradley attended a meeting in Moscow, Russia where the papers were formally presented. Following the presentation, eah one was critiqued by the U.S. specialist. In Mr. Bradley's case the topic was contamination at Peaceful Nuclear Explosion test sites (PNE's). The formal title of the meeting was: "Cleaning Up Sites Contaminated with Radioactive Materials". Following discussions with the U.S. team, each of the U.S. specialists was charged with writing up a short comment paper for the U.S. Academy of Sciences. This is Mr. Bradley's comments on the presentation by Kasatkin V.V., Kamnev Ye.N. and Ilyichev V.A. (Rosatom, FGUP VNIPIpromtechnologii) .

Bradley, Donald J.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110, for the annual period July 2005 through June 2006. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, cover vegetation, perimeter fence, and UR warning signs was good. Settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VILB.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW009 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2000). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Along the east edge of the cover (repaired previously in August 2003, December 2003, May 2004, October 2004), an area of settling was observed during the December 2005 inspection to again be above the action level, and required repair. This area and two other areas of settling on the cover that were first observed during the December 2005 inspection were repaired in February 2006. The semiannual subsidence surveys were done in September 2005 and March 2006. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.015 m [-0.05 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring on the cover. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the CAU 110 cover is performing as expected. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) data indicated an increase in soil moisture (1 to 3% VMC change) at a depth of 1.8 m (6 ft.) due to the exceptionally heavy precipitation from the January and February 2005 precipitation events. The moisture profile returned to baseline conditions by October 2005. At 2.4 m (8 ft) below the cover surface, TDR data show soil moisture content remained between 10 and 13 percent VMC. Considering the heavy precipitation experience in this and the previous reporting period, a compliance level will be established when the system reaches a steady state and equilibrium has been established.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Environmental monitoring plan - environmental monitoring section. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the environmental monitoring plan for the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. A site characterization is provided along with monitoring and measurement techniques and quality assurance measures.

Wilt, G.C. [ed.; Tate, P.J.; Brigdon, S.L. [and others

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Determination of Depleted Uranium in Environmental Bio-monitor Samples and Soil from Target sites in Western Balkan Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lichen and Moss are widely used to assess the atmospheric pollution by heavy metals and radionuclides. In this paper, we report results of uranium and its isotope ratios using mass spectrometric measurements (followed by chemical separation procedure) for mosses, lichens and soil samples from a depleted uranium (DU) target site in western Balkan region. Samples were collected in 2003 from Han Pijesak (Republika Srpska in Bosnia and Hercegovina). Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) measurements show the presence of high concentration of uranium in some samples. Concentration of uranium in moss samples ranged from 5.2-755.43 Bq/Kg. We have determined {sup 235}U/{sup 238}U isotope ratio using thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) from the samples with high uranium content and the ratios are in the range of 0.002097-0.002380. TIMS measurement confirms presence of DU in some samples. However, we have not noticed any traces of DU in samples containing lesser amount of uranium or from any samples from the living environment of same area.

Sahoo, Sarata K.; Enomoto, Hiroko; Tokonami, Shinji; Ishikawa, Tetsuo [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Ujic, Predrag; Celikovic, Igor; Zunic, Zora S. [Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Vinca, Mike Petrovica Alasa 12-14, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

188

THE APPLICATION OF ELECTROCHEMICAL NOISE BASED CORROSION MONITORING TO NUCLEAR WASTE TANK VAPOR SPACE ENVIRONMENTS AT THE HANFORD SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vapor space corrosion data collected by electrochemical noise (EN) based corrosion probes installed in double shell tanks (DSTs) at the Department of Energy's Hanford Site in Richland, Washington have historically been characterized by surprisingly high levels in current. In late 2003, a program was established to assess the significance of archived Hanford DST vapor space EN data. This program showed that the high vapor space current levels are likely the result of crevice corrosion on the vapor space electrodes. The design of DST vapor space electrodes provides tight metal-to-metal and gaskeito-metal interfaces necessary for this type of localized corrosion to occur. In-tank activities (splashing, etc.), or more likely condensation of water vapor in the vapor space, provide the necessary moisture. Because crevice corrosion appears to be active on the vapor space EN electronics, data collected from these electrodes are not likely to be applicable to the large flat metal surfaces that make up the bulk of the DST domes and upper walls. The data do, however, indicate that conditions in the DST vapor spaces are conducive to accelerated crevice corrosion at creviced areas in the tank vapor space (overlapping joints, riser interfaces, equipment penetrations, etc.) under high humidity conditions.

EDGEMON, G.L.

2005-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

189

COMPARISON OF VENTED AND ABSOLUTE PRESSURE TRANSDUCERS FOR WATER-LEVEL MONITORING IN HANFORD SITE CENTRAL PLATEAU WELLS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated water-level data collected using vented pressure transducers deployed in Hanford Site Central Plateau wells commonly display more variability than manual tape measurements in response to barometric pressure fluctuations. To explain this difference, it was hypothesized that vented pressure transducers installed in some wells are subject to barometric pressure effects that reduce water-level measurement accuracy. Vented pressure transducers use a vent tube, which is open to the atmosphere at land surface, to supply air pressure to the transducer housing for barometric compensation so the transducer measurements will represent only the water pressure. When using vented transducers, the assumption is made that the air pressure between land surface and the well bore is in equilibrium. By comparison, absolute pressure transducers directly measure the air pressure within the wellbore. Barometric compensation is achieved by subtracting the well bore air pressure measurement from the total pressure measured by a second transducer submerged in the water. Thus, no assumption of air pressure equilibrium is needed. In this study, water-level measurements were collected from the same Central Plateau wells using both vented and absolute pressure transducers to evaluate the different methods of barometric compensation. Manual tape measurements were also collected to evaluate the transducers. Measurements collected during this study demonstrated that the vented pressure transducers over-responded to barometric pressure fluctuations due to a pressure disequilibrium between the air within the wellbores and the atmosphere at land surface. The disequilibrium is thought to be caused by the relatively long time required for barometric pressure changes to equilibrate between land surface and the deep vadose zone and may be exacerbated by the restriction of air flow between the well bore and the atmosphere due to the presence of sample pump landing plates and well caps. The disequilibrium is likely limited to wells screened across the water table (i.e., open to the deep vadose zone) where the depth to water is large or a low-permeability layer occurs in the vadose zone. Such wells are a pathway for air movement between the deep vadose zone and land surface and this sustains the pressure disequilibrium between the well bore and the atmosphere for longer time periods. Barometric over-response was not observed with the absolute pressure transducers because barometric compensation was achieved by directly measuring the air pressure within the well. Users of vented pressure transducers should be aware of the over-response issue in certain Hanford Site wells and ascertain if it will affect the use of the data. Pressure disequilibrium between the well and the atmosphere can be identified by substantial air movement through the wellbore. In wells exhibiting pressure disequilibrium, it is recommended that absolute pressure transducers be used rather than vented transducers for applications that require precise automated determinations of well water-level changes in response to barometric pressure fluctuations.

MCDONALD JP

2011-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

190

Results of 1999 Spectral Gamma-Ray and Neutron Moisture Monitoring of Boreholes at Specific Retention Facilities in the 200 East Area, Hanford Site  

SciTech Connect

Twenty-eight wells and boreholes in the 200 East Are% Hanford Site, Washington were monitored in 1999. The monitored facilities were past-practice liquid waste disposal facilities and consisted of six cribs and nineteen ''specific retention'' cribs and trenches. Monitoring consisted of spectral gamma-ray and neutron moisture logging. All data are included in Appendix B. The isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on spectral gamma logs from boreholes monitoring the PUREX specific retention facilities; the isotopes {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, {sup 125}Sb, and {sup 154}Eu were identified on the logs from boreholes at the BC Controlled Area cribs and trenches; and {sup 137}Cs, {sup 60}Co, and {sup 125}Sb were, identified on the logs from boreholes at the BX specific retention trenches. Three boreholes in the BC Controlled Area and one at the BX trenches had previous spectral gamma logs available for comparison with 1999 logs. Two of those logs showed that changes in the subsurface distribution of {sup 137}CS and/or {sup 60}Co had occurred since 1992. Although the changes are not great, they do point to continued movement of contaminants in the vadose zone. The logs obtained in 1999 create a larger baseline for comparison with future logs. Numerous historical gross gamma logs exist from most of the boreholes logged. Qualitative comparison of those logs with the 1999 logs show many substantial changes, most of which reflect the decay of deeper short-lived isotopes, such as {sup 106}Ru and {sup 125}Sb, and the much slower decay of shallower and longer-lived isotopes such as {sup 137}Cs. The radionuclides {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co have moved in two boreholes since 1992. Given the amount of movement and the half-lives of the isotopes, it is expected that they will decay to insignificant amounts before reaching groundwater. However, gamma ray logging cannot detect many of the contaminants of interest such as {sup 99}Tc, NO{sub 3}, or {sup 129}I, all of which can be highly mobile in the vadose zone and, for the radionuclides, have long half-lives.

DG Horton; RR Randall

2000-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

191

Site Environmental Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

30, 2003. However, seven SWMUs could not be remediated to No Further Action (NFA) status. The long- term monitoring of these inactive waste sites has been incorporated into...

192

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rio_Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

RioMonitoring Rio Blanco, Colorado, Site Natural Gas Well Monitoring Results Project Rio Blanco Monitoring Results Fourth Quarter 2010 Separated Water at a Natural Gas Plant,...

193

High Precision Long-Term Monitoring of Radiatively Active and Related Trace Gases at Surface Sites and from Aircraft in the Southern Hemisphere Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Routine high precision measurements of atmospheric CO2, CH4, CO, H2, N2O, and CO2 stable isotopes are conducted by CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, Australia). Of particular relevance to global monitoring of ...

R. J. Francey; L. P. Steele; R. L. Langenfelds; B. C. Pak

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Intensive Evaluation and Monitoring of Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout Production Crooked River and Upper Salmon River Sites, 1993 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook and steelhead adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations in Idaho are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Lockhart, Jerald N.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Intensive Evaluation and Monitoring of Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout Production, Crooked River and Upper Salmon River Sites, 1992 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook salmon Oncorhynchus tshawytscha and steelhead trout 0. mykiss adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production, and develop mitigation accounting based on increases in smolt production. Two locations in Idaho are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Lockhart, Jerald N.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

RCRA Post-Closure Monitoring and Inspection Report for CAU 91: Area 3 U-3fi Waste Unit, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, for the Period October 1999-October 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This annual Neutron Soil Moisture Monitoring report provides an analysis and summary for site inspections, meteorological information, and neutron soil moisture monitoring data obtained at the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit, located in Area 3 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, during the October 1999 to October 2000 period. Inspections of the U-3fi Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Unit are conducted to determine and document the physical condition of the concrete pad, facilities, and any unusual conditions that could impact the proper operation of the waste unit closure. The objective of the neutron-logging program is to monitor the soil moisture conditions along the 128-meter (m) (420-feet [ft]) ER3-3 monitoring well and detect changes that maybe indicative of moisture movement in the regulated interval extending between 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) or to detect changes that maybe indicative of subsidence within the disposal unit itself. Physical inspections of the closure were completed in March and September 2000 and indicated that the site is in good condition with no significant findings noted. The directional survey which is required to be completed every five years was run in the ER3-3 casing to determine if subsidence was occurring in the U-3fi emplacement borehole. Small changes were noted which are attributed to initial settling of the sand pack stemming. No evidence of subsidence within the emplacement borehole was observed. The subsidence survey for the October 1999 to October 2000 monitoring period indicated an increase in elevation of 0.244 centimeters (cm) (0.008 ft) compared to the previous year, July 1999. All changes in subsidence survey data taken to date are so small as to be at the survey instrument resolution level and it is not clear if they represent subsidence or measurement error. There is no clear evidence for any subsidence of the monument. Soil moisture monitoring results indicate dry stable conditions for all quarterly monitoring periods. The Residual Raw Neutron Counts remain below the compliance Action Level of 200 counts within the regulated interval of 73 to 82 m (240 to 270 ft) for the period from October 1999 through October 2000.

D. F. Emer

2001-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 472/540 The goal of this course is to teach students how to apply basic chemical concepts to understand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CHEMICAL OCEANOGRAPHY 472/540 Fall 2007 The goal of this course is to teach students how to apply basic chemical concepts to understand biogeochemical cycles, the distributions of natural and anthropogenic chemical constituents in the ocean, and ocean evolution. The interdisciplinary nature of modern

Rosenthal, Yair

198

Intensive Evaluation and Monitoring of Chinook Salmon and Steelhead Trout Production, Crooked River and Upper Salmon River Sites, 1995 Annual Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this intensive monitoring project is to determine the number of returning chinook salmon and steelhead trout adults necessary to achieve optimal smolt production and develop habitat enhancement mitigation accounting based on increases in wild/natural smolt production. Two locations in Idaho are being intensively studied to meet these objectives. Information from this research will be applied to parr monitoring streams statewide to develop escapement objectives and determine success of habitat enhancement projects. The project to date has developed good information on the relationship between chinook salmon adult escapement and smolt production at low to medium seeding levels. Adult chinook salmon escapements have been too low for us to test carrying capacity. For steelhead trout, they have developed a relationship between parr populations and smolt production at low to high seeding levels, with limited information on carrying capacity.

Kiefer, Russell B.; Lockhart, Jerald N.

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Robustness provided by internet monitoring systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Internet applications such as Wealth Management Banking Programs require a very high degree of robustness. To attain this continuous testing - that is monitoring the systems over a period of time - is suggested. The preparation of an appropriate site-monitoring ... Keywords: continuous testing, internet, internet offering, monitoring systems, requirements, robustness, site monitoring, soft launch, test environment, testing recommendation, transitional state

Barry Dellar

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

PROOF OF CONCEPT TEST OF A UNIQUE GASEOUS PERFLUROCARBON TRACER SYSTEM FOR VERIFICATION AND LONG TERM MONITORING OF CAPS AND COVER SYSTEMS CONDUCTED AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE BENTONITE MAT TEST FACILITY.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Engineered covers have been placed on top of buried/subsurface wastes to minimize water infiltration and therefore, release of hazardous contaminants. In order for the cover to protect the environment it must remain free of holes and breaches throughout its service life. Covers are subject to subsidence, erosion, animal intrusion, plant root infiltration, etc., all of which will affect the overall performance of the cover. The U.S. Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE-EM) Program 2006 Accelerated Cleanup Plan is pushing for rapid closure of many of the DOE facilities. This will require a great number of new cover systems. Some of these new covers are expected to maintain their performance for periods of up to 1000 years. Long-term stewardship will require monitoring/verification of cover performance over the course of the designed lifetime. In addition, many existing covers are approaching the end of their design life and will need validation of current performance (if continued use is desired) or replacement (if degraded). The need for a reliable method of verification and long-term monitoring is readily apparent. Currently, failure is detected through monitoring wells downstream of the waste site. This is too late as the contaminants have already left the disposal area. The proposed approach is the use of gaseous Perfluorocarbon tracers (PFT) to verify and monitor cover performance. It is believed that PFTs will provide a technology that can verify a cover meets all performance objectives upon installation, be capable of predicting changes in cover performance and failure (defined as contaminants leaving the site) before it happens, and be cost-effective in supporting stewardship needs. The PFTs are injected beneath the cover and air samples taken above (either air samples or soil gas samples) at the top of the cover. The location, concentrations, and time of arrival of the tracer(s) provide a direct measure of cover performance. PFT technology can be used as a non-invasive method (if injection ports are emplaced prior to cover emplacement) on new covers or a minimally invasive method on existing covers. PFT verification will be useful at all buried waste sites using a cover system (e.g., treated or untreated chemical waste landfills) including DOE, commercial, and private sector sites. This paper discusses the initial field trial of the PFT cover monitoring system performed at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in FY01. The experiments provided a successful proof-of-principle test of the PFT technology in monitoring caps and covers. An injection and sampling array was installed in the Bentomat test cap at the SRS Caps Test Facility. This system contained 6 feet of sandy soil beneath a 1/2 inch geosynthetic clay liner covered by an HDPE liner which was covered by 2 feet of clayey top soil. PFTs were injected into the sandy soil though a pre-existing system of access pipes below the cap and soil gas samples were taken on top of the cap. Mid-way into the injection period a series of 1 1/2 inch holes were punched into the cap (through the geomembrane) to provide a positive breach in the cap. Data will be presented that shows the initial cap was fairly tight and leak free and that the artificially induced leaks were detectable within two hours of occurrence.

HEISER,J.; SULLIVAN,T.; SERRATO,M.

2002-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Monitor Worldwide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NRC guidance on the need for integration of performance assessment and data collection NUREG-1573 Monitor Scientific Monitoring Monitoring * Two distinct situations - A proposed...

202

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 9: Appendix C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the first quarter of calendar year 1988 (January through March). The data in this volume of Appendix C cover the following wells: 199-N-58; 199-N-59; 199-N-60; 199-N-61; 199-N-67. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Operational Area Monitoring Plan  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' SECTION 11.7B Operational Area Monitoring Plan for the Long -Term H yd rol og ical M o n i to ri ng - Program Off The Nevada Test Site S . C. Black Reynolds Electrical & Engineering, Co. and W. G. Phillips, G. G. Martin, D. J. Chaloud, C. A. Fontana, and 0. G. Easterly Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory U. S. Environmental Protection Agency October 23, 1991 FOREWORD This is one of a series of Operational Area Monitoring Plans that comprise the overall Environmental Monitoring Plan for the DOE Field Office, Nevada (DOEINV) nuclear and non- nuclear testing activities associated with the Nevada Test Site (NTS). These Operational Area Monitoring Plans are prepared by various DOE support contractors, NTS user organizations, and federal or state agencies supporting DOE NTS operations. These plans and the parent

204

Savings Analysis of Utility Bills for Unmonitored Sites, Volume I: Procedures, Results, and Discussion, Texas LoanSTAR Monitoring and Analysis Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Texas LoanSTAR program is an eight year, $98 million revolving loan program, funded by oil overcharge dollars, for energy conservation retrofits in Texas state, local government and school buildings. The program began in 1988. Public sector institutions participating in the program must repay the loans according to estimated energy savings from an energy audit. As part of this program, a statewide energy Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) has been established. The major objectives of the LoanSTAR MAP are to: (1) verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits; (2) reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements; (3) improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program; (4) initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings in Texas.

Wei, G.; Eggebrecht, J.; Saman, N. F.; Claridge, D. E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 5, Appendix B  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W6-2; 299-W7-1; 299-W7-2; 299-W7-3; 299-W7-4. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

none,

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 2, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E27-8; 299-E27-9; 299-E27-10; 299-E28-26; 299-E28-27. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 6, Appendix B (contd)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W7-5; 299-W7-6; 299-W8-1; 299-W9-1; 299-W10-13. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 8, Appendix B (contd)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W18-21; 299-W18-22; 299-W18-23; 299-W18-24. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford site facilities: Progress report for the period January 1 to March 31, 1988: Volume 7, Appendix B (contd)  

SciTech Connect

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wwlls completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix B cover the following wells: 299-W10-14; 299-W15-15; 299-W15-16; 299-W15-17; 299-W15-18. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Ground-water monitoring compliance projects for Hanford Site facilities: Progress report, January 1-March 31, 1988: Volume 3, Appendix A  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This appendix is one of nine volumes, and presents data describing wells completed at the Hanford Site during the fourth quarter of calendar year 1987 (October through December). The data in this volume of Appendix A cover the following wells: 299-E32-2; 299-E32-3; 299-E32-4; 299-E33-28; 299-E33-29. The data are presented in the following order: Well Completion Report/Title III Inspection List, Inspection Plan, As-Built Diagram, Logging Charts, and Drill Logs.

Not Available

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Site Environmental Report, 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, ``General Environmental Protection Program.`` This 1993 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in the Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Site environmental report summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this summary of the Fernald 1992 Site Environmental Report the authors will describe the impact of the Fernald site on man and the environment and provide results from the ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included is a summary of the data obtained from sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. These requirements are set to protect both man and the environment.

Not Available

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

213

COMPARATIVE EVALUATION OF AMBIENT FINE PARTICULATE MATTER (PM2.5) DATA OBTAINED FROM URBAN AND RURAL MONITORING SITES ALONG THE UPPER OHIO RIVER VALLEY  

SciTech Connect

The report discusses the following conclusions: (1) The TEOM equipment performed as well as the sequential filter samplers in accounting for ambient PM{sub 2.5} levels; however, the FRM-obtained data was consistently lower than the averages from the TEOM/DRI-SFS measurements; (2) The trending in the PM{sub 2.5} levels was similar for Lawrenceville and Holbrook, which represent an urban and a rural site sixty-five miles apart. This implies that the PM{sub 2.5} levels appear to be impacted more by regional than by local effects; (3) The absolute median PM{sub 2.5} levels were slightly higher for Lawrenceville than for Holbrook, implying that local urban environmental contributions had a minor but measurable effect on total PM{sub 2.5} mass concentration; (4) PM{sub 2.5} and PM{sub 10} mass concentration levels were consistently higher in summer than in winter, with intermediate levels observed in the spring and fall; (5) Sulfate levels predominated in the speciation data obtained from both the Holbrook and the Lawrenceville sites during winter and summer intensive sampling. Sulfate level measured at Holbrook were higher than those taken at Lawrenceville regardless of the season; (6) Ammonium levels remained relatively constant between seasons and between sites; (7) Nitrate levels measured at Lawrenceville were higher than those measured at Holbrook during winter intensive sampling. Nitrate levels measured during the summer intensive period were found to be very low at both locations; (8) In general, the predominant inorganic fraction of the samples analyzed could be described as being composed of a mixture of ammonium bisulfate and ammonium sulfate with minor amounts of ammonium nitrate; (9) The PM10 fraction had a larger percentage of geological material and a smaller percentage of condensable material (ammonium bisulfate, ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate and total carbon species) than the PM{sub 2.5} fraction for samples collected in winter at Lawrenceville; and (10) Most high PM{sub 2.5} episodes occurred when the predominating wind direction was from the South-West. (11) Plots of ozone vs. NO{sub x} suggest chemical reaction between these molecules since a high concentration of one always results in a low concentration of the other. The analysis of the acquired data has so far addressed three of the four scientific questions originally posed. More data analysis is on-going including the correlation between O{sub 3} and PM{sub 2.5} levels and the correlation of mass data with meteorological observations.

Unknown

2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

214

Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report for Corrective Action Unit 110: Area 3 WMD U-3ax/bl Crater, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, For the Period July 2007-June 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Post-Closure Inspection and Monitoring Report (PCIMR) provides the results of inspections and monitoring for Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 110, Area 3 WMD [Waste Management Division] U-3ax/bl Crater. This PCIMR includes an analysis and summary of the site inspections, repairs and maintenance, meteorological information, and soil moisture monitoring data obtained at CAU 110 for the period July 2007 through June 2008. Site inspections of the cover were performed quarterly to identify any significant changes to the site requiring action. The overall condition of the cover, perimeter fence, and use restriction (UR) warning signs was good. However, settling was observed that exceeded the action level as specified in Section VII.B.7 of the Hazardous Waste Permit Number NEV HW021 (Nevada Division of Environmental Protection, 2005). This permit states that cracks or settling greater than 15 centimeters (6 inches) deep that extend 1.0 meter (m) (3 feet [ft]) or more on the cover will be evaluated and repaired within 60 days of detection. Two areas of settling and cracks were observed on the south and east edges of the cover during the September 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level and required repair. The areas were repaired in October 2007. Additional settling and cracks were observed along the east side of the cover during the December 2007 inspection that exceeded the action level, and the area was repaired in January 2008. Significant animal burrows were also observed during the March 2008 inspection, and small mammal trapping and relocation was performed in April 2008. The semiannual subsidence surveys were performed in September 2007 and March 2008. No significant subsidence was observed in the survey data. Monument 5 shows the greatest amount of subsidence (-0.02 m [-0.08 ft] compared to the baseline survey of 2000). This amount is negligible and near the resolution of the survey instruments; it does not indicate that subsidence is occurring overall on the cover. Soil moisture results obtained to date indicate that the CAU 110 cover is performing well. Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) data show regular changes in the shallow subsurface with significant rain events; however, major changes in volumetric moisture content (VMC) appear to be limited to 1.8 m (6 ft) below ground surface or shallower, depending on the location on the cover. At 2.4 m (8 ft) below the cover surface, TDR data show soil moisture content remained between 9 and 15 percent VMC, depending on the TDR location. The west portion of the cover tends to reflect a lower moisture content and less variability in annual fluctuations in moisture content at this depth. Results of soil moisture monitoring of the cover indicate that VMC at the compliance level (at 2.4 m [8 ft] below the cover surface) is approaching a steady state. If the moisture content at this level remains consistent with recent years, then a recommendation may be made for establishing compliance levels for future monitoring.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Site environmental report for 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, Sandia National Laboratories (SNL)/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the environment at the SNL/California site perimeter. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) performs off-site environmental monitoring for both sites. These monitoring efforts ensure that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of SNL/California`s Environmental Monitoring Program, an environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally produced food-stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. Each year, the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program are published in this report, the Site Environmental Report. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions. Chapter 3, {open_quotes}Compliance Summary,{close_quotes} reviews the site`s various environmental protection activities and compliance status, with applicable environmental regulations. The effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance results for 1996 show that SNL/California operations had no harmful effects on the environment or the public. 37 figs., 12 tabs.

Holland, R.C.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Assessment of the Idaho National Laboratory Hot Fuel Examination Facility Stack Monitoring Site for Compliance with ANSI/HPS N13.1 1999  

SciTech Connect

This document reports on a series of tests to determine whether the location of the air sampling probe in the Hot Fuels Examination Facility (HFEF) heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) exhaust duct meets the applicable regulatory criteria regarding the placement of an air sampling probe. Federal regulations require that a sampling probe be located in the exhaust stack according to the criteria of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999, Sampling and Monitoring Releases of Airborne Radioactive Substances from the Stacks and Ducts of Nuclear Facilities. These criteria address the capability of the sampling probe to extract a sample that is representative of the effluent stream. The tests conducted by PNNL during July 2010 on the HFEF system are described in this report. The sampling probe location is approximately 20 feet from the base of the stack. The stack base is in the second floor of the HFEF, and has a building ventilation stream (limited potential radioactive effluent) as well as a process stream (potential radioactive effluent, but HEPA-filtered) that feeds into it. The tests conducted on the duct indicate that the process stream is insufficiently mixed with the building ventilation stream. As a result, the air sampling probe location does not meet the criteria of the N13.1-1999 standard. The series of tests consists of various measurements taken over a grid of points in the duct cross section at the proposed sampling-probe location. The results of the test series on the HFEF exhaust duct as it relates to the criteria from ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 are desribed in this report. Based on these tests, the location of the air sampling probe does not meet the requirements of the ANSI/HPS N13.1-1999 standard, and modifications must be made to either the HVAC system or the air sampling probe for compliance. The recommended approaches are discussed and vary from sampling probe modifications to modifying the junction of the two air exhaust streams.

Glissmeyer, John A.; Flaherty, Julia E.

2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

217

Meteorological Monitoring Program  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this technical report is to provide a comprehensive, detailed overview of the meteorological monitoring program at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. The principle function of the program is to provide current, accurate meteorological data as input for calculating the transport and diffusion of any unplanned release of an atmospheric pollutant. The report is recommended for meteorologists, technicians, or any personnel who require an in-depth understanding of the meteorological monitoring program.

Hancock, H.A. Jr. [ed.; Parker, M.J.; Addis, R.P.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field DOE Study Monitors Carbon Dioxide Storage in Norway's Offshore Sleipner Gas Field May 21, 2009 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, D.C. -- In a newly awarded project, researchers funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) are partnering with European scientists to track injected carbon dioxide (CO2) in the world's first and longest running carbon storage operation located at the Sleipner gas field in the North Sea. The researchers--from the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, and the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO) in New York--will conduct surveys on the seafloor to monitor injected CO2 in the 1 kilometer-deep reservoir, where more than

219

Oak Ridge Reservation annual site environmental report for 1995  

SciTech Connect

This report presents the details of the environmental monitoring and management program for the Oak Ridge Reservation. Topics discussed include: site background, climate, and operations; environmental compliance strategies; effluent monitoring; environmental management program including environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning, technology development, and public involvement; effluent monitoring of airborne discharges, liquid discharges, toxicity control and monitoring, biological monitoring and abatement; environmental surveillance which encompasses meteorological monitoring, ambient air monitoring, surface water monitoring, soils monitoring, sediment monitoring, and contamination of food stuffs monitoring; radiation doses; chemical exposures; ground water monitoring; and quality assurance.

Koncinski, W.S. [ed.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site, ER-B-98-02 Audit of Environmental Monitoring and Health Physics Laboratories at the Savannah River Site,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

.. ' \ MONTICELLO NPL SITES FFA QUARTERLY REPORT: October 1 -December 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Dayvault JR 7CJ7 This report summarizes current project status and activities implemented during October tiU'ough December 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities for the Monticello MIII Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection repmis, site meteorological data, and monitoring summary for tlw ex situ ground water treatment system. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 · * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities (see attached repmis). .

222

Independent Oversight Assessment of Environmental Monitoring...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment of Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site May 2010 Office of Independent Oversight Office of Health, Safety and Security Office of Health, Safety...

223

AQUIFER STORAGE SITE EVALUATION AND MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mackay,MinJin,PeterOlden,GillianPickup,JimSomerville, Mehran Sohrabi, Adrian Todd 3 #12;Marathon is the fourth largest US based integrated oil and gas company and has interests in exploration, production, integrated gas and downstream operations. European shore and onshore CO2 storage as an alternative to the use of offshore oil & gas fields. Schlumberger

224

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan. Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy manages the Nevada Test Site in a manner that meets evolving DOE Missions and responds to the concerns of affected and interested individuals and agencies. This Routine Radiological Monitoring Plan addressess complicance with DOE Orders 5400.1 and 5400.5 and other drivers requiring routine effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance on the Nevada Test Site. This monitoring plan, prepared in 1998, addresses the activities conducted onsite NTS under the Final Environmental Impact Statement and Record of Decision. This radiological monitoring plan, prepared on behalf of the Nevada Test Site Landlord, brings together sitewide environmental surveillance; site-specific effluent monitoring; and operational monitoring conducted by various missions, programs, and projects on the NTS. The plan provides an approach to identifying and conducting routine radiological monitoring at the NTS, based on integrated technical, scientific, and regulatory complicance data needs.

Bechtel Nevada

1999-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

226

FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders (''surveillance monitoring''); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

Hartman, Mary J; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jon W; Newcomer, Darrell R; Thornton, Edward C

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

227

FY 2002 Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project and contains: well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders ("surveillance monitoring"); other, established monitoring plans by reference; and a master well/ constituent/frequency matrix for the entire Hanford Site.

Hartman, Mary J.; Dresel, P Evan; Lindberg, Jonathan W.; Newcomer, Darrell R.; Thornton, Edward C.

2001-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Pantex Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pantex Site Pantex Site The primary mission of the Pantex Plant is the assembly, disassembly, testing, and evaluation of nuclear wespons in support of the NNSA stockpile...

229

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

April 1 - June 30, 2008 April 1 - June 30, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during April through June 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. 1.0 MMTS Activities/Status Repository and Pond 4 * Monthly and quarterly inspection of the repository identified no abnormalities. * Shrub seedlings planted last fall had a poor survival rate. * New damage to shrubs and vole infestation is not evident. * Monthly inspection of Pond 4 identified no abnormalities.

230

MONTICELLO NPL SITES  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

January 1 - March 31, 2008 January 1 - March 31, 2008 DOE Site Manager: Jalena Maestas This report summarizes current project status, activities implemented during January through March 2008, and provides a schedule of planned near term activities, for the Monticello Mill Tailings Site (MMTS) and the Monticello Vicinity Properties (MVP) NPL sites. This report also includes repository and Pond 4 leachate collection data, quarterly site inspection results, and site meteorological monitoring data. The first semi-annual FFA meeting of 2008 was held at UDEQ in Salt Lake City, Utah, March 26 and 27, 2008. Minutes and action items resulting from that meeting will be prepared under separate cover pending review and concurrence by EPA and UDEQ. Draft minutes and action items are scheduled for submittal by May 1, 2008.

231

INSTITUTION OF OCEANOGRAPHY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S 30 AM Bridgeport, Pen 1070 6 0 0 S 12 AM Jordan 1490 30 0 0 S 10 AM Buchanan, Pen 1290 0 0 0 S 15 AM L 3 McClosky, Mis 2738 1964 14 0 0 37 OL 17 ABD 1958,REV 1964,ABD 1985 *Energy, Williamson, 9S, 2E

Constable, Steve

232

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rulison Monitoring  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rulison Monitoring Rulison Monitoring Rulison, Colorado, Site Natural Gas Well Monitoring Results Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Second Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Fourth Quarter 2012 and First Quarter 2013 Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison Third Quarter 2012. Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (2nd quarter 2012) Monitoring Results for Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (1st quarter 2012) Monitoring Results Natural Gas Wells Near Project Rulison (4th quarter 2011) Project Rulison Monitoring Results for Water Vapor in Gas at the Holmes Mesa Compressor Station, Garfield County, Colorado (3rd quarter

233

1994 Site environmental report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE)-owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. The Site Environmental Report (SER) is prepared annually in accordance with DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program. This 1994 SER provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA). For some readers, the highlights provided in this Executive Summary may provide sufficient information. Many readers, however, may wish to read more detailed descriptions of the information than those which are presented here. All information presented in this summary is discussed more fully in the main body of this report.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

1987 environmental monitoring report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of Brookhaven National Laboratory's (BNL) environmental monitoring program is to determine whether: facility operations, waste treatment, and control systems functioned as designed to contain environmental pollutants; and the applicable environmental standards and effluents control requirements were met. This annual report for calendar year 1987 follows the recommendations given by the Department of Energy (DOE) but has been broadened to meet site-specific environmental monitoring needs. This program includes the sampling and analysis for radioactivity, water quality indices, metals, and organic compounds. 32 refs., 17 figs., 70 tabs.

Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R. (eds.)

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Reflred - Monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... power bumps due to weather conditions affecting the electrical supply), so use with caution. Be careful when mixing monitor and time data in the ...

236

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954; the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976; the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The U.S. Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/ frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories: plume and trend tracking, treatment/ storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

MJ Hartman; PE Dresel; JW Lindberg; DR Newcomer; EC Thornton

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

237

Integrated Monitoring Plan for the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project  

SciTech Connect

Groundwater is monitored at the Hanford Site to fulfill a variety of state and federal regulations, including the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980; and Washington Administrative Code. Separate monitoring plans are prepared for various requirements, but sampling is coordinated and data are shared among users to avoid duplication of effort. The US Department of Energy manages these activities through the Hanford Groundwater Monitoring Project. This document is an integrated monitoring plan for the groundwater project. It documents well and constituent lists for monitoring required by the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 and its implementing orders; includes other, established monitoring plans by reference; and appends a master well/constituent/frequency matrix for the entire site. The objectives of monitoring fall into three general categories plume and trend tracking, treatment/storage/disposal unit monitoring, and remediation performance monitoring. Criteria for selecting Atomic Energy Act of 1954 monitoring networks include locations of wells in relation to known plumes or contaminant sources, well depth and construction, historical data, proximity to the Columbia River, water supplies, or other areas of special interest, and well use for other programs. Constituent lists were chosen based on known plumes and waste histories, historical groundwater data, and, in some cases, statistical modeling. Sampling frequencies were based on regulatory requirements, variability of historical data, and proximity to key areas. For sitewide plumes, most wells are sampled every 3 years. Wells monitoring specific waste sites or in areas of high variability will be sampled more frequently.

Newcomer, D.R.; Thornton, E.C.; Hartman, M.J.; Dresel, P.E.

1999-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

238

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2012 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office (NNSA/NFO, formerly Nevada Site Office), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2012. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2012, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hall, Derek B.; Anderson, David C.; Greger, Paul D.; Ostler, W. Kent; Hansen, Dennis J.

2013-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2011 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC, during calendar year 2011. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex. During 2011, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D. J., Anderson, D. C., Hall, D. B., Greger, P. D., Ostler, W. K.

2012-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

240

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2008 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2008. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

Dennis J. Hansen, David C. Anderson, Derek B. Hall, Paul D. Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2009-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2010 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NNSS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), during calendar year 2010. Program activities included (a) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem monitoring, (d) sensitive plant species monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat restoration monitoring, and (g) monitoring of the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). During 2010, all applicable laws, regulations, and permit requirements were met, enabling EMAC to achieve its intended goals and objectives.

Hansen, D.J.; Anderson, D.C.; Hall, D.B.; Greger, P.D.; Ostler, W.K.

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Multizone infiltration monitoring system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multizone infiltration monitoring system (MIMS) using a single tracer gas has been developed. MIMS measures zonal infiltration and exfiltration as well as interzonal air movement rates. The system has been used at the 4-zone test house at the SERI interim field site, and this paper presents preliminary results. The present system can determine zonal infiltration rates, and the results show significant differences in infiltration rates for the various zones.

Wortman, D.N.; Burch, J.; Judkoff, R.

1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Weld Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Monitoring of Laser Beam Welding Using Infrared Weld Emissions P. G. Sanders, J. S. Keske, G. Kornecki, and K. H. Leong Technology Development Division Argonne National Laboratory Argonne, IL 60439 USA The submitted manuscript has been authorized by a contractor of the U. S. Government under contract No. W-31-109-ENG-38. Accordingly, the U. S. Government retains a non-exclusive, royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for U. S. Government purposes. Abstract A non-obtrusive, pre-aligned, solid-state device has been developed to monitor the primary infrared emissions during laser welding. The weld monitor output is a 100-1000 mV signal that depends on the beam power and weld characteristics. The DC level of this signal is related to weld

244

Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Completed Batch Jobs Completed Parallel Jobs Usage Reports Hopper Benchmark Monitoring Edison Benchmark Monitoring Carver Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Monitoring: Retired Systems...

245

Site environmental report for 2002.  

SciTech Connect

Sandia National Laboratories, California (SNL/CA) is a government-owned/contractor-operated laboratory. Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, operates the laboratory for the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration. The DOE, Sandia Site Office oversees operations at the site, using Sandia Corporation as a management and operating contractor. This Site Environmental Report for 2002 was prepared in accordance with DOE Order 231.1. The report provides a summary of environmental monitoring information and compliance activities that occurred at SNL/CA during calendar year 2002. General site and environmental program information is also included.

Larsen, Barbara L.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2008 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2009a). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Savannah River Site (SRS) conducts effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance to ensure the safety of the public and the well-being of the environment. DOE Order 5400,1, ``General Environmental Protection Program,`` requires the submission of an environmental report that documents the impact of facility operations on the environment and on public health. SRS has had an extensive environmental surveillance program in place since 1951 (before site startup). At that time, data generated by the on-site surveillance program were reported in site documents. Beginning in 1959, data from off-site environmental monitoring activities were presented in reports issued for public dissemination. Separate reporting of SRS`s on- and off-site environmental monitoring activities continued until 1985, when data from both surveillance programs were merged into a single public document. The Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1993 is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 1993. For complete program descriptions, consult the ``SRS Environmental Monitoring Plan`` (WSRC-3Ql-2-1000). It documents the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, the frequency of monitoring and analysis, the specific analytical and sampling procedures, and the quality assurance requirements.

Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R. [eds.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

PDSF Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDSF Monitoring PDSF Monitoring The plot below is a measure of the read and write rates a single user would experience via the PDSF batch system. Jobs are submitted sequentially every hour to the debug queue. If a jobs doesn't finish in 8 minutes, it is killed and a -1 rate is written out. The read rates are calculated by copying a directory containing 2 files totaling 274 MB from the eliza directories to the $TMPDIR on the node running the job. The write rates are calculated by untarring a tarball on the eliza directories. The write rates are typically around a factor of two slower than the read rates, because the data still has to travel to the compute node and then back to the eliza for writing. The I/O rates are taken from the ganglia monitoring and serve as a measure of the amount of

249

Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Carbon Storage Monitoring, Verification and Accounting Research Reliable and cost-effective monitoring, verification and accounting (MVA) techniques are an important part of making geologic sequestration a safe, effective, and acceptable method for greenhouse gas control. MVA of geologic storage sites is expected to serve several purposes, including addressing safety and environmental concerns; inventory verification; project and national accounting of greenhouse gas emissions reductions at geologic storage sites; and evaluating potential regional, national, and international greenhouse gas reduction goals. The goal of our program area is to develop and demonstrate a broad portfolio of technologies, applications, and accounting requirements that

250

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 2003 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 2003.

Bechtel Nevada

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Hanford Site 1998 Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1998 Hanford Site activities; present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, and groundwater protection and monitoring information; and discuss the activities to ensure quality.

RL Dirkes; RW Hanf; TM Poston

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Hanford Site environmental report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, to describe environmental management performance, to demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations, and to highlight major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet requirements and guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to: (1) describe the Hanford Site and its mission; (2) summarize the status of compliance with environmental regulations; (3) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; (4) discuss the estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1999 Hanford Site activities; (5) present the effluent monitoring, environmental surveillance, groundwater protection and monitoring information; and (6) discuss the activities to ensure quality.

TM Poston; RW Hanf; RL Dirkes

2000-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

253

Monitor 1979  

SciTech Connect

The status, improvements, and accomplishments of the Monitor remote-handling system previously reported are updated. It also outlines the goals for the future to improve the efficiency and speed of remote-maintenance operations at the Clinton P. Anderson Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF).

Grisham, D.L.; Ekberg, E.L.; Lambert, J.E.; Meyer, R.E.; Stroik, P.J.; Wickham, M.D.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

255

Monitoring well  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005, Attachment A - Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This appendix to the ''Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2005'', dated October 2006 (DOE/NV/11718--1214; DOE/NV/25946--007) expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction. Included are subsections that summarize the site?s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This appendix complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy A. Wills

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

-460 -460 Environmental Groundwater Monitoring Report Third Quarter, 1997 October 1997 Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Environmental Restoration U.S. Department of Energy Nevada Operations Office This report has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. 1 - I : ~vailablk to DOE and DOE contractors from the. Office of Scientific - and Technical .Information, P.O. Box 62, Oak Ridge, TN 3783 1 ; prices available from (423) 576-840 1. Available to the public from the National Technical Information Service, U.S. Department of Commerce, 5285 Port Royal Rd., Springfield, VA 22 16 1, telephone (703) 487-4650. RULISON SITE GROUNDWATER MONITORING REPORT THIRD QUARTER, 1997 DOE Nevada Operations Office Las Vegas, Nevada

258

Medical Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Sites Name: Jenielle Location: NA Country: NA Date: NA Question: I started itching Aug. 1999. Diagnosed with ITP Oct.1999. I am in remission With a platelet count in...

259

Hanford Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites

Around the Site Current HMS Observations Daily HMS Extremes in Met Data Met and Climate Data Summary Products Contacts Hours Current NWS Forecast for the Tri-Cities NWS...

260

Summary of the Hanford Site Environmental Report for Calendar Year 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This small booklet provides highlights of the environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site during 2005. It is a summary of the information contained in the larger report: Hanford Site Environmental Monitoring for Calendar Year 2005.

Hanf, Robert W.; Morasch, Launa F.; Poston, Ted M.; Dirkes, Roger L.

2006-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

ECOLOGICAL MONITORING AND COMPLIANCE PROGRAM CALENDAR YEAR 2005 REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program (EMAC), funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program’s activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada (BN) during the Calendar Year 2005. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive and protected/regulated species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC).

BECHTEL NEVADA ECOLOGICAL SERVICES

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, Philippe (Augusta, GA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system is described for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream. 1 fig.

Chastagner, P.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

264

Tritium monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a system for continuously monitoring the concentration of tritium in an aqueous stream. The system pumps a sample of the stream to magnesium-filled combustion tube which reduces the sample to extract hydrogen gas. The hydrogen gas is then sent to an isotope separation device where it is separated into two groups of isotopes: a first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium, and a second group of isotopes having substantially no deuterium and tritium. The first group of isotopes containing concentrations of deuterium and tritium is then passed through a tritium detector that produces an output proportional to the concentration of tritium detected. Preferably, the detection system also includes the necessary automation and data collection equipment and instrumentation for continuously monitoring an aqueous stream.

Chastagner, P.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

265

Return on Investment of Structural Health Monitoring Systems for ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Return on Investment of Structural Health Monitoring Systems for Wind Turbine Blades. Author(s), Davion M Hill. On-Site Speaker (Planned) ...

266

Microsoft Word - Tualatin_River_Pipeline_Crossing_Site_LURR_19940060...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Memorandum Julie Goodrich - TERR-3 Project Manager Proposed Action: Tualatin River Pipeline Crossing Site - Monitoring Well Redevelopment Categorical Exclusion Applied (from...

267

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1996 Site Environmental Report Vol. I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sampling of Airborne Radionuclides Ambient Air MonitoringRadiation Airborne Radionuclides Berkeley Lab Site4- 1. Most Significant Radionuclides Used at L B N L During

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central FacilityInstruments Central FacilityInstruments SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Central Facility [ Single installation ] ACSM Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Aerosols Browse Data [ Single installation ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] AOS Aerosol Observing System Aerosols Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BRS Broadband Radiometer Station Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BSRN Baseline Solar Radiation Network

269

ARM - Site Instruments  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PlainsInstruments PlainsInstruments SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts Instruments : Southern Great Plains [ Single installation ] ACSM Aerosol Chemical Speciation Monitor Aerosols Browse Data [ Installed at 5 facilities ] AERI Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] AOS Aerosol Observing System Aerosols Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BRS Broadband Radiometer Station Radiometric Browse Plots Browse Data [ Single installation ] BSRN Baseline Solar Radiation Network

270

Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This appendix expands on the general description of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report 2007 (U.S. Department of Energy [DOE], 2008). Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting. The cultural resources of the NTS are also presented. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NTS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NTS. The NTS environment contributes to several key features of the site which afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NTS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NTS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy Wills

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam, steam condensate and boiler feedwater in large facilities are described. Insights gained and lessons learned through the actual in-field installation of thermal monitoring equipment for energy savings verification purposes at over 100 sites at various locations throughout the United States are presented.

McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Home » Site Map Home » Site Map Site Map Home About Overview NERSC Mission Contact us Staff Center Leadership Sudip Dosanjh Select Publications Jeff Broughton Katie Antypas John Shalf Francesca Verdier Center Administration James Craw Norma Early Jeff Grounds Betsy MacGowan Zaida McCunney Lynn Rippe Suzanne Stevenson David Tooker Center Communications Jon Bashor Linda Vu Margie Wylie Kathy Kincade Advanced Technologies Group Nicholas Wright Brian Austin Research Projects Matthew Cordery Christopher Daley Analytics Group Peter Nugent David Camp Hank Childs Harinarayan Krishnan Burlen Loring Joerg Meyer Prabhat Oliver Ruebel Daniela Ushizima Gunther Weber Yushu Yao Computational Systems Group Jay Srinivasan James Botts Scott Burrow Tina Butler Nick Cardo Tina Declerck Ilya Malinov David Paul Larry Pezzaglia Iwona Sakrejda

273

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 458.1, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment. Specifically, environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring is also a major component of compliance demonstration for permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality; (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work; and (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. LLNL prepares the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that environmental monitoring work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 458.1, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies.

Gallegos, G M; Bertoldo, N A; Blake, R G; Campbell, C G; Grayson, A R; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Rosene, C A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K R; Jones, H E

2012-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

274

SRNL - Natural Attenuation Monitor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Natural Attenuation Monitor covers Natural Attenuation Monitor Published by the US DOE Monitored Natural Attenuation and Enhanced Attenuation for Chlorinated Solvents Technology...

275

Isotopic Studies of Contaminant Transport at the Hanford Site, WA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MR-0132. Westinghouse Hanford Company, Richland WA. Bretz,in recharge at the Hanford Site. Northwest Science. 66:237-M.J. , ed. 2000. Hanford Site groundwater Monitoring

Christensen, J.N.; Conrad, M.E.; DePaolo, D.J.; Dresel, P.E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Hanford Site Environmental Report 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Site Environmental Report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations. The report also highlights major environmental programs and efforts. The report is written to meet reporting requirements and Guidelines of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) an to meet the needs of the public. This summary has been written with a minimum of technical terminology. Individual sections of the report are designed to (a) describe the Hanford Site and its mission, (b) summarize the status in 1993 of compliance with environmental regulations, (c) describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site, (d) discuss estimated radionuclide exposure to the public from 1993 Hanford activities, (e) present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, (f) discuss activities to ensure quality. More detailed information can be found in the body of the report, the appendixes, and the cited references.

Dirkes, R.L.; Hanf, R.W.; Woodruff, R.K. [eds.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Indoor Sampler Siting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Indoor Sampler Siting Indoor Sampler Siting Title Indoor Sampler Siting Publication Type Conference Proceedings Year of Publication 2009 Authors Sohn, Michael D., and David M. Lorenzetti Conference Name 11th International Conference on Air Distribution in Rooms Conference Location Busan, Korea Abstract Contaminant releases in or near a building can lead to significant human exposures unless prompt response is taken. U.S. Federal and local agencies are implementing programs to place air-monitoring samplers in buildings to quickly detect biological agents. We describe a probabilistic algorithm for siting samplers in order to detect accidental or intentional releases of biological material. The algorithm maximizes the probability of detecting a release from among a suite of realistic scenarios. The scenarios may differ in any unknown, for example the release size or location, weather, mode of building operation, etc. The algorithm also can optimize sampler placement in the face of modeling uncertainties, for example the airflow leakage characteristics of the building, and the detection capabilities of the samplers. In anillustrative example, we apply the algorithm to a hypothetical 24-room commercial building, finding optimal networks for a variety of assumed sampler types and performance characteristics. We also discuss extensions of this work for detecting ambient pollutants in buildings, and for understanding building-wide airflow, pollutant dispersion, and exposures

278

ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring System (REMS) Monitoring System (REMS) ORISE maintains large database of radition exposure records for the U.S. Department of Energy ORISE staff monitoring radiation data for DOE Rule 10 CFR 835 establishes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational protection rule and requires assessment and recording of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or contamination. The Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) database is the radiation exposure data repository for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors and members of the public. REMS maintains dose records for all monitored individuals dating back to 1969. Aggregated, site-specific data are available on the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System website for all years since 1986. Currently,

279

Colonie Interim Storage Site annual site environmental report for calendar year 1989, Colonie, New York  

SciTech Connect

IN 1984, Congress assigned the cleanup of the National Lead (NL) Industries site in Colonie, New York, to the Department of Energy (DOE) as part of a decontamination research and development project under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act. DOE then included the site in the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), an existing DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain for the early years of the nation's atomic energy program. DOE instituted an environmental monitoring program at the site in 1984. Results are presented annually in reports such as this. Under FUSRAP, the first environmental monitoring report for this site presented data for calendar year 1984. This report presents the findings of the environmental monitoring program conducted during calendar year 1989. 16 refs., 17 figs., 14 tabs.

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

Site C  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' u. s. A r my Corps or Engineers Kurfal.. Ilisfr ifl om« 1776 N1 . ~lI rll Sfred , lIu fflll" , New v ur k. 14207 Site C loseout Report for th e Ashland I (Includlng Seaway Arca D), Ashland 2 and Rattlesnake Creek FUS RAP Sites To nawanda . New Yor k F ina l - Octo ber 2006 Formerl y Ut ilized Sites Remedi al Actiun Program Dt:CLAlUlfiO lO OF RF ~ I'O""" A <:n o .. ('oMnLflOI'O '" 1 S-~1 1 A "n· nvnn: S Ill: C'lO'iU 'U l RtrUlIT f OR A SlIu x u l (I "ICLU I ING S t:A" ·,H A RU D j, AS H I .A ~O 2 A."n RAnU:M'AKf eRU" ~ rn~ I!d'on at A.hland 1 (Ind udonl Seaway Area DJ. Ashland 2 and kan~snak c Creek is Wi,...... 1c in acwr.hnu willi ~ Rcconl or Oecisim (ROD) . igned 00> April 20. 1998 and l'.1pbIWlOII <;If

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1999  

SciTech Connect

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the three KAPL Sites [Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York; Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York; S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut] during calendar year 1999 resulted in no significant release of hazardous substances or radioactivity to the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations.

None

2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

SAVANNAH RIVER SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is an overview of effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance activities conducted on and in the vicinity of SRS from January 1 through December 31, 2012 - including the Site?s performance against applicable standards and requirements. Details are provided on major programs such as the Environmental Management System (EMS) and permit compliance.

Griffith, M.; Jannik, T.; Cauthen, K.; Bryant, T.; Coward, L.; Eddy, T.; Vangelas, K.; O& #x27; Quinn, S.; Meyer, A.

2013-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

283

Timber Mountain Precipitation Monitoring Station  

SciTech Connect

A precipitation monitoring station was placed on the west flank of Timber Mountain during the year 2010. It is located in an isolated highland area near the western border of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), south of Pahute Mesa. The cost of the equipment, permitting, and installation was provided by the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) project. Data collection, analysis, and maintenance of the station during fiscal year 2011 was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office Environmental Restoration, Soils Activity. The station is located near the western headwaters of Forty Mile Wash on the Nevada Test and Training Range (NTTR). Overland flows from precipitation events that occur in the Timber Mountain high elevation area cross several of the contaminated Soils project CAU (Corrective Action Unit) sites located in the Forty Mile Wash watershed. Rain-on-snow events in the early winter and spring around Timber Mountain have contributed to several significant flow events in Forty Mile Wash. The data from the new precipitation gauge at Timber Mountain will provide important information for determining runoff response to precipitation events in this area of the NNSS. Timber Mountain is also a groundwater recharge area, and estimation of recharge from precipitation was important for the EMSI project in determining groundwater flowpaths and designing effective groundwater monitoring for Yucca Mountain. Recharge estimation additionally provides benefit to the Underground Test Area Sub-project analysis of groundwater flow direction and velocity from nuclear test areas on Pahute Mesa. Additionally, this site provides data that has been used during wild fire events and provided a singular monitoring location of the extreme precipitation events during December 2010 (see data section for more details). This letter report provides a summary of the site location, equipment, and data collected in fiscal year 2011.

Lyles Brad,McCurdy Greg,Chapman Jenny,Miller Julianne

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 Performance Analysis - Environmental Monitoring, Surveillance, and Control Programs Within the U.S. Department of Energy, October 2002 This report documents the results of a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight and Performance Assurance (OA) analysis of DOE environmental monitoring, surveillance, and control activities. The analysis is based primarily on DOE Headquarters independent oversight evaluations of environmental monitoring and surveillance activities that were conducted at 14 different sites across the DOE complex during fiscal years 1999 through 2002. Independent oversight evaluations determined that all sites had established

285

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01 Edgemont Mill Site - SD 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Edgemont Mill Site (SD.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site Documents Related to Edgemont Mill Site 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title II Disposal Sites-Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site. LMS/S09415. November 2012 U.S. Department of Energy 2008 UMTRCA Title II Sites Annual Report November 2008 Edgemont, South Dakota FACT SHEET Office of Legacy Management Edgemont, South Dakota, Disposal Site This fact sheet provides information about the Uranium Mill

286

1999 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Throughout the scientific community, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is renowned for its leading-edge research in physics, medicine, chemistry, biology, materials, and the environment. BNL is committed to supporting its world-class scientific research with an internationally recognized environmental protection program. The 1999 Site Environmental Report (SER) summarizes the status of the Laboratory's environmental programs and performance, including the steady progress towards cleaning up the site and fully integrating environmental stewardship into all facets of the Laboratory's mission. BNL is located on 5,265 acres of pine barrens in Suffolk County in the center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated above a sole source aquifer at the headwaters of the Peconic River; therefore, protecting ground and surface water quality is a special concern. Approximately 3,600 acres of the site are undeveloped and serve as habitat for a wide variety of animals and plants, including one New York State endangered species, the tiger salamander, and two New York State threatened species, the banded sunfish and the stiff goldenrod. Monitoring, preserving, and restoring these ecological resources is a high priority for the Laboratory.

ENGEL-COX,J.; ZIMMERMAN,E.; LEE,R.; WILLIAMS,J.; GREEN,T.; PAQUETTE,D.; HOODA,B.; SCARPITTA,S.; GENZER,P.; ET AL

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report for 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Rats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1992. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population.

Cirrincione, D.A.; Erdmann, N.L. [eds.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal Year 1999 Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ecological and Compliance program, funded through the U. S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to NTS biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during fiscal year 1999. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites (2) desert tortoise compliance (3) ecosystem mapping (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring and (5) biological monitoring at the HAZMAT Spill Center.

Cathy A. Wills

1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Physical oceanographic data from the OTEC Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico Site, September 1979-June 1980  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The first results of an oceanographic measurement program being conducted off the southeast corner of Puerto Rico are presented. The study site is a proposed OTEC site and is located about 20 km off Punta Tuna. The objectives of the measurement program are to document the physical oceanography of the site as related to the engineering and environmental factors involved in OTEC design and operation. Oceanographic measurements include: (1) a subsurface mooring instrumented with five current, temperature, and pressure recorders; and (2) quarterly hydrographic cruises to measure salinity, temperature, and depth profiles on a grid of 33 stations in the vicinity of the mooring site. The first cruise, conducted between 16 and 21 June 1980, included the initial mooring deployment and a CTD (conductivity, temperature, and depth) and XBT (expendable bathythermograph) survey. The CTD/XBT measurements are presented. Also included are results of in situ current, temperature, and pressure measurements made during two previous programs. In September 1979, Coastal Marine Research (CMR) deployed a mooring at approximately the same site as the present mooring. Results from three of these instruments are included. The Naval Underwater Systems Center deployed a mooring at this site in February 1979 and partial results from one instrument on this mooring are also presented. (WHK)

Frye, D.; Davison, A.; Leavitt, K.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large-Scale Forcing, Surface Fluxes, and Convective Inhibition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Diurnal Cycle of Convection at the ARM SGP Site: Role of Large-Scale Forcing, Surface Fluxes, and Convective Inhibition G. J. Zhang Center for Atmospheric Sciences Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Introduction Atmospheric convection undergoes strong diurnal variation over both land and oceans (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Dai 2001; Nesbitt and Zipser 2003). Because of the nature of the diurnal variation of solar radiation, the phasing of convection with solar radiation has a significant impact on the atmospheric radiation budget and cloud radiative forcing. A number of studies have investigated the possible mechanisms of the diurnal variation of convection (Gray and Jacobson 1977; Randall et al. 1991; Dai et al. 1999; Dai 2001). Yet, in regional and global climate models, the diurnal variation of

291

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Rifle Mill Site - CO 0-11  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Rifle Mill Site - CO 0-11 Rifle Mill Site - CO 0-11 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Rifle Mill Site (CO.0-11 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Rifle, Colorado, New Processing Site Rifle, Colorado, Old Processing Site Documents Related to Rifle Mill Site 2009 Verification Monitoring Report for the Old and New Rifle, Colorado, Processing Sites; LMS/RFO/RFN/S05775; September 2009. This report evaluates and interprets groundwater monitoring data collected at the Old and New Rifle Sites and assesses the progress of meeting the compliance strategy for groundwater cleanup. 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill

292

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Uravan Mill Site - CO 02  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Uravan Mill Site - CO 02 Uravan Mill Site - CO 02 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Uravan Mill Site (CO.02 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site Documents Related to Uravan Mill Site Data Validation Package for the July and October 2008 Water Sampling at the Naturita Processing and Disposal Sites Data Validation Report for the July 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Naturita, Colorado, Processing Site; LMS/NAP/S00709; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Naturita, Colorado,

293

2005 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

2006-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

294

2006 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; RATEL,K.

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

2009 Site Environmental Report  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and compliance, restoration, and surveillance monitoring program performance. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The report is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD of the full report.

Ratel, K.M.; Brookhaven National Laboratory

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental monitoring plan for Calendar Year 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As required by DOE Order 5400.1, each U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) site, facility, or activity that uses, generates, releases, or manages significant quantities of hazardous materials shall provide a written Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) covering effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance. DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance, provides specific guidance regarding environmental monitoring activities.

Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.; Lee, R. [and others

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Site environmental report for 1992  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is committed to conducting its operations in an environmentally safe and sound manner. It is mandatory that activities at SNL/California comply with all applicable environmental statutes, regulations, and standards. Moreover, SNL/California continuously strives to reduce risks to employees, the public, and the environment to the lowest levels reasonably possible. To help verify effective protection of public safety and preservation of the environment, SNL/California maintains an extensive, ongoing environmental monitoring program. This program, conducted in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, monitors all significant airborne and liquid effluents and the general environment in the area. This monitoring effort ensures that emission controls are effective in preventing contamination of the environment. As part of the Environmental Monitoring Program, an ambient environmental surveillance system measures the possible presence of radioactive and hazardous materials in ambient air, surface water, groundwater, sewage, soil, vegetation, and locally-produced food stuffs. The program also includes an extensive environmental dosimetry program, which measures external radiation levels around the Livermore site and nearby vicinity. This executive summary focuses on impacts to the environment and estimated radiation doses to the public from site emissions.

Gordon, K.W. [ed.; Brekke, D.D. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

298

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- SiteA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Illinois Illinois Site A/Plot M Decommissioned Reactor Site This Site All Sites All LM Quick Search Key Documents and Links All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon Key Documents Fact Sheet 2013 Inspection and Annual Site Status Report for the Site A/Plot M, Cook County, Illinois Decontamination and Decommissioning Program Site Annual Monitoring Report Environmental Monitoring Program at Site A and Plot M, Palos Forest Preserve, Cook County, Illinois Long-Term Surveillance and Maintenance Plan for Site A/Plot M, Illinois,Decommissioned Reactor Please be green. Do not print these documents unless absolutely necessary. Request a paper copy of any document by submitting a Document Request. All Site Documents All documents are Adobe Acrobat files. pdf_icon

299

Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control - Nuclear Engineering  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Capabilities > Nuclear Systems Technologies > Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Capabilities Nuclear Systems Technologies Nuclear Criticality Safety Research Reactor Analysis Decontamination and Decommissioning Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Overview Process Monitoring & Signal Validation Diagnostic & Advisory Systems Advanced (AI-based) Nonlinear Controllers for Industrial Processes Artificial intelligence Other Capabilities Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Bookmark and Share Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control Systems/Process Monitoring, Diagnostics and Control. Click on image to view larger image. The goal of the Nuclear Engineering Division's research on advanced

300

Operating Experience Review of Tritium-in-Water Monitors  

SciTech Connect

Monitoring tritium facility and fusion experiment effluent streams is an environmental safety requirement. This paper presents data on the operating experience of a solid scintillant monitor for tritium in effluent water. Operating experiences were used to calculate an average monitor failure rate of 4E-05/hour for failure to function. Maintenance experiences were examined to find the active repair time for this type of monitor, which varied from 22 minutes for filter replacement to 11 days of downtime while waiting for spare parts to arrive on site. These data support planning for monitor use; the number of monitors needed, allocating technician time for maintenance, inventories of spare parts, and other issues.

S. A. Bruyere; L. C. Cadwallader

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

1992 Fernald Site Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fernald site is a Department of Energy (DOE) owned facility that produced high-quality uranium metals for military defense for nearly 40 years. DOE suspended production at the Fernald site in 1989 and formally ended production in 1991. Although production activities have ceased, the site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. This report covers the reporting period from January 1, 1992, through December 31, 1992, with the exception of Chapter Three, which provides information from the first quarter of 1993 as well as calendar year 1992 information. This 1992 report provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Use included in this report are summary data of the sampling conducted to determine if the site complies with DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA (OEPA) requirements. Finally, this report provides general information on the major waste management and environmental restoration activities during 1992.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site has changed from producing nuclear weapons materials for national defense to managing the waste it has generated, restoring the environment, and enhancing industrial development in and around the site. But no matter what the site`s mission is, it will continue to maintain its comprehensive environmental monitoring and surveillance program. In 1994, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 30,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, foodstuffs, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.W.; Mamatey, A.; Spitzer, D.

1994-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

303

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program 2007 Report  

SciTech Connect

In accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, 'Environmental Protection Program', the Office of the Assistant Manager for Environmental Management of the DOE, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) requires ecological monitoring and biological compliance support for activities and programs conducted at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), Ecological Services has implemented the Ecological Monitoring and Compliance (EMAC) Program to provide this support. EMAC is designed to ensure compliance with applicable laws and regulations, delineate and define NTS ecosystems, and provide ecological information that can be used to predict and evaluate the potential impacts of proposed projects and programs on those ecosystems. This report summarizes the EMAC activities conducted by NSTec during calendar year 2007. Monitoring tasks during 2007 included eight program areas: (a) biological surveys, (b) desert tortoise compliance, (c) ecosystem mapping and data management, (d) sensitive plant monitoring, (e) sensitive and protected/regulated animal monitoring, (f) habitat monitoring, (g) habitat restoration monitoring, and (h) biological monitoring at the Nonproliferation Test and Evaluation Complex (NPTEC). The following sections of this report describe work performed under these eight areas.

Dennis Hansen, David Anderson, Derek Hall, Paul Greger, W. Kent Ostler

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Division Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Carbon Dioxide Reduction Catalysts Our research program is directed toward developing and understanding metal complexes that catalyze reactions relevant to renewable energy, particularly those that reduce carbon dioxide to fuels or fuel precursors. Carbon dioxide reduction catalysts are important targets because they could enable "recycling" of hydrocarbon fuels, thus lowering their carbon footprint. Our research addresses two key challenges in this area. First, we aim to improve the lifetimes, activity, and selectivity of homogeneous catalysts by incorporating them into porous heterogeneous frameworks derived from structurally persistent organic polymers. These frameworks allow isolation of the catalytic centers, which inhibits reaction pathways that lead to catalyst decomposition, and enable the spatially controlled deployment of ancillary functional groups that bind and concentrate substrate near the active site and/or assist with its activation. Second, we are developing homogeneous dual-catalyst systems and assemblies that couple CO2 reduction catalysis to a parallel catalytic reaction that provides the reducing equivalents. We are especially interested in proton-coupled electron-transfer reactions involving activation of H2 and of organic dehydrogenation substrates, wherein the proton pathway also participates in the conversion of CO2 to CO. In both of these research thrusts we are studying catalysts that may be activated under thermal, electrochemical, or photochemical conditions.

305

INSTRUMENTATION FOR ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING R. D. McLaughlin, M. S. Hunt, D. L.

McLaughlin, R.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

2012 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

2010 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advance Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site’s Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (#LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

mike lewis

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Solar Decathlon 2005, Instrumentation and Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review Decathlon 2005: The Event in Review Web Site Resources: Instrumentation and Monitoring 1 Solar Decathlon 2005, Instrumentation and Monitoring The Solar Decathlon organizers installed sensors and monitoring equipment in each house during assembly and removed the equipment during disassembly. (Some of the equipment was installed on prior visits to the teams' sites on their campuses during construction.) The locations of sensors and monitoring equipment were planned in advance through negotiations between the organizers and each team. Installation had to be completed on the Mall at least two days before the start of the objectively measured contests (October 10, 2005). Most of the teams, despite their very best intentions, were finishing construction of their houses during assembly on the Mall, which made

309

2003 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

SciTech Connect

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a multi-program national laboratory, prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform outside regulators, the public, and Laboratory employees of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review, and to summarize BNL's on-site environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), state, and local regulations; and environmental, restoration, and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. This report is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.ser.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview, and is distributed with a CD version of the full-length SER. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

ENVIRONMENT AND WASTE MANAGMENT SERVICES DIVISION; ET AL.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

1999 Annual Site Environmental Report --  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Tonopah Test Range (TTR) in Nevada is a government-owned, contractor-operated facility. Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is run by Sandia Corporation, a subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) oversees the operations of TTR through its Kirtland Area Office (KAO), which reports to the Albuquerque Operations Office (AL). Sandia Corporation conducts operations at TTR in support of DOE's Weapons Ordnance Program and has operated the site since 1957. Westinghouse Government Services subcontracts to SNL in administering most of the environmental programs at the site. This annual report summarizes data and the compliance status of the environmental protection and monitoring program at TTR through December 31, 1999. The compliance status of environmental regulations applicable at the site include state and federal regulations governing air emissions, wastewater effluent, waste management, and Environmental Restoration (ER) cleanup activities. Terrestrial surveillance for radiological and nonradiological contaminants is also conducted, as required by DOE, to determine contaminant levels at offsite, perimeter, and onsite locations. Sandia Corporation is responsible only for those environmental program activities related to SNL's operations. The DOE Nevada Operations office (NVOO) retains responsibility for the cleanup and management of ER sites at TTR. Environmental monitoring and surveillance programs are required by DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program (DOE 1990), and DOE Order 231.1, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting (DOE 1996a).

Dianne Duncan; William Forston; Rebecca Sanchez

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and Site closure activities at the S1C Site (also known as the KAPL Windsor Site) continue to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations. The environmental monitoring program for the S1C Site continues to be reduced in scope from previous years due to the completion of Site dismantlement activities during 1999 and a return to green field conditions during 2000.

NONE

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

312

Tillman Creek Mitigation Site As-Build Report.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This as-built report describes site conditions at the Tillman Creek mitigation site in South Cle Elum, Washington. This mitigation site was constructed in 2006-2007 to compensate for wetland impacts from the Yakama Nation hatchery. This as-built report provides information on the construction sequence, as-built survey, and establishment of baseline monitoring stations.

Gresham, Doug [Otak, Inc.

2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

Environmental Monitoring Plan, Revision 5  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of environmental monitoring is to promote the early identification of, and response to, potential adverse environmental impacts associated with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) operations. Environmental monitoring supports the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS), International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 14001 Environmental Management Systems standard, and U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1A, Environmental Protection Program. Specifically, in conformance with DOE Order 450.1A, Attachment 1, paragraph 1(b)(5), environmental monitoring enables LLNL to detect, characterize, and respond to releases from LLNL activities; assess impacts; estimate dispersal patterns in the environment; characterize the pathways of exposure to members of the public; characterize the exposures and doses to individuals and to the population; and to evaluate the potential impacts to the biota in the vicinity of LLNL. Environmental monitoring also serves to demonstrate compliance with permits and other regulatory requirements. The Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) addresses the sample collection and analytical work supporting environmental monitoring to ensure the following: (1) A consistent system for collecting, assessing, and documenting environmental data of known and documented quality. (2) A validated and consistent approach for sampling and analysis of samples to ensure laboratory data meets program-specific needs and requirements within the framework of a performance-based approach for analytical laboratory work. (3) An integrated sampling approach to avoid duplicative data collection. Until its cancellation in January 2003, DOE Order 5400.1 required the preparation of an environmental monitoring plan. Neither DOE Order 450.1A nor the ISO 14001 standard are as prescriptive as DOE Order 5400.1, in that neither expressly requires an EMP. However, LLNL continues to prepare the EMP because it provides an organizational framework for ensuring that this work, which is integral to the implementation of LLNL's Environmental Management System, is conducted appropriately. Furthermore, the Environmental Monitoring Plan helps LLNL ensure compliance with DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment, and DOE Order 231.1 Change 2, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting, which require the publication of an annual report that characterizes the site's environmental management performance. To summarize, the general regulatory drivers for this environmental monitoring plan are ISO 14001, DOE Order 450.1A, DOE Order 5400.5, and DOE Order 231.1. The environmental monitoring addressed by this plan includes preoperational characterization and assessment, effluent and surveillance monitoring, and permit and regulatory compliance monitoring. Additional environmental monitoring is conducted at LLNL as part of compliance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA, also known as Superfund). LLNL coordinates its ground water surveillance monitoring program with the CERCLA monitoring program to gain sampling efficiencies. (See LLNL [1992] and LLNL [2008] for information about LLNL's CERCLA activities).

Gallegos, G M; Blake, R G; Bertoldo, N A; Campbell, C G; Coty, J; Folks, K; Grayson, A R; Jones, H E; Nelson, J C; Revelli, M A; Wegrecki, T; Williams, R A; Wilson, K

2010-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

314

CERCLA - Site Selector  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(LEHR) Fernald Preserve Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov...

315

ORNL DAAC Site Map  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site Map ORNL DAAC Site Map About Us About ORNL DAAC Who We Are User Working Group Biogeochemical Dynamics Data Citation Policy News Newsletters Workshops Site Map Products...

316

Savannah River Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

River Site Savannah River Site Savannah River Site (SRS) has mission responsibilities in nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship by ensuring the safe and reliable management of...

317

CERCLA - Site Selector  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Monticello Site Mound Site - Miamisburg Closure Project Rocky Flats Site Weldon Spring Search the Administrative Record The White House USA.gov E-Gov Information Quality FOIA...

318

Modern Performance Monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today's diverse and decentralized computer world demands new thinking about performance monitoring and analysis.

Mark Purdy

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory Environmental Monitoring Report, Calendar Year 2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL at the Knolls and Kesselring Sites are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as environmental monitoring of air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of the Knolls and Kesselring Sites and at off-site background locations.

None

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

320

SSA Young Aspen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Site (SSA-YA) The pole-tower at the YA site Closer look at the pole-tower at the YA site Solar panels powering the site, mounted on a folding ladder The young aspen canopy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Chapter 3: Building Siting  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

: Building Siting : Building Siting Site Issues at LANL Site Inventory and Analysis Site Design Transportation and Parking LANL | Chapter 3 Site Issues at LANL Definitions and related documents Building Siting Laboratory site-wide issues include transportation and travel distances for building occupants, impacts on wildlife corridors and hydrology, and energy supply and distribution limitations. Decisions made during site selec- tion and planning impact the surrounding natural habitat, architectural design integration, building energy con- sumption, occupant comfort, and occupant productivity. Significant opportunities for creating greener facilities arise during the site selection and site planning stages of design. Because LANL development zones are pre- determined, identify the various factors affecting devel-

322

Ecological Monitoring and Compliance Program Fiscal/Calendar Year 2004 Report  

SciTech Connect

The Ecological Monitoring and Compliance program, funded through the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office, monitors the ecosystem of the Nevada Test Site and ensures compliance with laws and regulations pertaining to Nevada Test Site biota. This report summarizes the program's activities conducted by Bechtel Nevada during the Fiscal Year 2004 and the additional months of October, November, and December 2004, reflecting a change in the monitoring period to a calendar year rather than a fiscal year as reported in the past. This change in the monitoring period was made to better accommodate information required for the Nevada Test Site Environmental Report, which reports on a calendar year rather than a fiscal year. Program activities included: (1) biological surveys at proposed construction sites, (2) desert tortoise compliance, (3) ecosystem mapping and data management, (4) sensitive species and unique habitat monitoring, (5) habitat restoration monitoring, and (6) biological monitoring at the Hazardous Materials Spill Center.

Bechtel Nevada

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Indiana Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Indiana Web Sites Other Links : Indiana Electricity Profile: Indiana Energy Profile: Indiana Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

324

Florida Web Sites  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Florida Web Sites Other Links : Florida Electricity Profile: Florida Energy Profile: Florida Restructuring: Last Updated: April 2007 . Sites: Links ...

325

MIDC: Web Site Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MIDC Web Site Search Enter words or phrases: Search Clear Help Also see the site directory. NREL MIDC...

326

Design of a particulate-monitoring network for the Y-12 plant  

SciTech Connect

An Air Quality Monitoring Network Design (AQMND) with multiple objectives is being developed for the Y-12 Plant production facilities. The objectives are: Y-12 facility surveillance; monitoring the transport of Y-12 generated airborne effluents towards either the Oak Ridge National Laboratory or the developed region of the City of Oak Ridge; and monitoring population exposure in residential areas close to the Y-12 Plant. A two step design process was carried out, using the Air Quality Monitor Network Design Model (AQMND) previously used for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory network. In the first step of the design we used existing air quality monitor locations, subjectively designated locations, and grid intersections as a set of potential monitor sites. The priority sites from the first step (modified to account for terrain and accessibility), and subjectively designated sites, were used as the potential monitor sites for the second step of the process which produced the final design recommendations for the monitor network.

Hougland, E.S.; Oakes, T.W.; Underwood, J.N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - December 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2012 Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - December 2012 December 2012 Nevada National Security Site Operational Awareness Visit [HIAR NNSS-2012-12-03] The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to perform an operational awareness site visit to observe Subcritical Experiment (SCE) activities at the U1a Complex, discuss ongoing activities at the National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC), and monitor the status of other ongoing site activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - December 2012 More Documents & Publications Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - August 2012

328

Fernald Environmental Management Project 1995 site environmental report  

SciTech Connect

The Fernald site continues to examine the air and liquid pathways as possible routes through which pollutants from past operations and current remedial activities may leave the site. This 1995 Site Environmental Report provides the general public as well as scientists and engineers with the results from the site`s ongoing Environmental Monitoring Program. Also included in this report is information concerning the site`s progress toward achieving full compliance with requirements set forth by DOE, US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), and Ohio EPA.

NONE

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory environmental monitoring report, calendar year 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) Sites are summarized and assessed in this report. Operations at the Knolls Site, Niskayuna, New York and the Kesselring Site, West Milton, New York and site closure activities at the S1C Site, Windsor, Connecticut, continued to have no adverse effect on human health and the quality of the environment during calendar year 2000. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each Site and at off-site background locations. Monitoring programs at the S1C Site were reduced in scope during calendar year 2000 due to completion of site dismantlement activities during 1999.

None

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Carbon Sequestration Monitoring Activities  

SciTech Connect

In its 'Carbon Sequestration Technology Roadmap and Program Plan 2007' the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)'s Office of Fossil Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) identified as a major objective extended field tests to fully characterize potential carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage sites and to demonstrate the long-term storage of sequestered carbon (p. 5). Among the challenges in this area are 'improved understanding of CO{sub 2} flow and trapping within the reservoir and the development and deployment of technologies such as simulation models and monitoring systems' (p. 20). The University of Wyoming (UW), following consultations with the NETL, the Wyoming State Geological Survey, and the Governor's office, identified potential for geologic sequestration of impure carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) in deep reservoirs of the Moxa Arch. The Moxa Arch is a 120-mile long north-south trending anticline plunging beneath the Wyoming Thrust Belt on the north and bounded on the south by the Uinta Mountains. Several oil and gas fields along the Moxa Arch contain accumulations of natural CO{sub 2}. The largest of these is the La Barge Platform, which encompasses approximately 800 square miles. Several formations may be suitable for storage of impure CO{sub 2} gas, foremost among them the Madison Limestone, Bighorn Dolomite, and Nugget Sandstone. This project responded to the challenges described above by preparing a geological site characterization study on the Moxa Arch. The project included four priority research areas: (A) geological characterization of geologic structure of the Arch, the fault, and fracture patterns of the target formations and caprocks, (B) experimental characterization of carbon dioxide-brine-rock reactions that may occur, (C) optimization of geophysical and numerical models necessary for measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV), and (D) a preliminary performance assessment. Research work to accomplish these goals was coordinated by one administrative task under the direction of Dr. Carol Frost, Professor of Geology and Geophysics (Task 1.0), and one task devoted to designing and creating an interdisciplinary, project-specific carbon cyberinfrastructure to support collaborative carbon dioxide sequestration research among University of Wyoming scientists and their collaborators, performed by Jeff Hammerlinck, Director of the Wyoming Geographic Information Science Center at the University of Wyoming (Task 1.5). The results of these tasks are presented in the Introduction and in Chapter 1, respectively.

Carol Frost

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

331

Clean Slate 1 revegetation and monitoring plan  

SciTech Connect

This document is a reclamation plan for short-term and long-term stabilization of land disturbed by activities associated with interim cleanup of radionuclide-contaminated surface soil at the Clean Slate 1 site (located on the Tonopah Test Range). This document has been prepared to provide general reclamation practices and procedures that will be followed during restoration of the cleanup site. Reclamation demonstration plots were established near the Double Tracks cleanup site in the fall of 1994 to evaluate the performance of several native plant species and to evaluate different irrigation strategies. Results of that study, and the results from numerous other studies conducted at other sites (Area 11 and Area 19 of the Nevada Test Site), have been summarized and incorporated into this final reclamation plan for the cleanup of the Clean Slate 1 site. The plan also contains procedures for monitoring both short-term and long-term reclamation.

NONE

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08 Slick Rock Mill Site - CO 08 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Slick Rock Mill Site (CO.08) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Site Documents Related to Slick Rock Mill Site 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Slick Rock, Colorado, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Verification Monitoring Report for the Slick Rock, Colorado, Processing Sites, 2007 Update June 2008 Office of Legacy Management DOE M/1577 2008 - -L Work Performed Under DOE Contract No. for the U.S.

333

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problems; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) explains the rationale and design criteria for the environmental monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of EMPs is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2008-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

334

SITE ELECTRICAL POWER SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Site Electrical Power System receives and distributes utility power to all North Portal site users. The major North Portal users are the Protected Area including the subsurface facility and Balance of Plant areas. The system is remotely monitored and controlled from the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System. The system monitors power quality and provides the capability to transfer between Off-Site Utility and standby power (including dedicated safeguards and security power). Standby power is only distributed to selected loads for personnel safety and essential operations. Security power is only distributed to essential security operations. The standby safeguards and security power is independent from all other site power. The system also provides surface lighting, grounding grid, and lightning protection for the North Portal. The system distributes power during construction, operation, caretaker, and closure phases of the repository. The system consists of substation equipment (disconnect switches, breakers, transformers and grounding equipment) and power distribution cabling from substation to the north portal switch gear building. Additionally, the system includes subsurface facility substation (located on surface), switch-gear, standby diesel generators, underground duct banks, power cables and conduits, switch-gear building and associated distribution equipment for power distribution. Each area substation distributes power to the electrical loads and includes the site grounding, site lighting and lightning protection equipment. The site electrical power system distributes power of sufficient quantity and quality to meet users demands. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the North Portal surface systems requiring electrical power. The system interfaces with the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System which will supply power to the underground facilities from the North Portal. Power required for the South Portal and development side activities of the subsurface facility will be provided at the South Portal by the Subsurface Electrical Distribution System. The Site Electrical Power System interfaces with the Off-Site Utility System for the receipt of power. The System interfaces with the Surface Operations Monitoring and Control System for monitoring and control. The System interfaces with MGR Site Layout System for the physical location of equipment and power distribution.

E.P. McCann

1999-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

335

Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released Annual Environmental Monitoring Report Released September 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contacts Darwin J. Morgan morgan@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 Kelly K. Snyder snyderk@nv.doe.gov 702-295-3521 The National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) has released the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. The report summarizes the results of air and groundwater monitoring during calendar year 2010 on and off of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), formerly the Nevada Test Site. It also reports the estimated radiological dose to the public from releases of radioactive material from the NNSS and summarizes the overall environmental compliance and management performance

336

2005 River Corridor Cleanup Contractor Revegetation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This report contains a compilation of the results of vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2005 for the Environmental Restoration Contractor's revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

A. L. Johnson

2005-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

337

ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM AT POTENTIAL OTEC SITES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

assessment Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) programthe 6th Annual Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,of projected Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plants

Wilde, P.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Measurement of carbon for carbon sequestration and site monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 2 to 6 degree C increase in global temperature by 2050 has been predicted due to the production of greenhouse gases that is directly linked to human activities. This has encouraged an increase in the international efforts on ways to reduce anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases particularly carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) as evidence for the link between atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change has been established. Suggestion that soils and vegetation could be managed to increase their uptake and storage of CO{sub 2}, and thus become 'land carbon sinks' is an incentive for scientists to undertake the ability to measure and quantify the carbon in soils and vegetation to establish base-line quantities present at this time. The verification of the permanence of these carbon sinks has raised some concern regarding the accuracy of their long-term existence. Out of the total percentage of carbon that is potentially sequestered in the terrestrial land mass, only 25% of that is sequestered above ground and almost 75% is hypothesized to be sequestered underground. Soil is composed of solids, liquids, and gases which is similar to a three-phase system. The gross chemical composition of soil organic carbon (SOC) consists of 65% humic substances that are amorphous, dark-colored, complex, polyelectrolyte-like materials that range in molecular weight from a few hundred to several thousand Daltons. The very complex structure of humic and fulvic acid makes it difficult to obtain a spectral signature for all soils in general. The humic acids of different soils have been observed to have polymeric structure, appearing as rings, chains and clusters as seen in electron microscope observations. The humification processes of the soils will decide the sizes of their macromolecules that range from 60-500 angstroms. The percentage of the humus that occurs in the light brown soils is much lower than the humus present in dark brown soils. The humus of forest soils is characterized by a high content of fulvic acids while the humus of peat and grassland soils is high in humic acids. Similarly it is well known that the amount of carbon present in forest soils is lower than the amount present in grassland soils.

Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Measurement of Carbon for Carbon Sequestration and Site Monitoring,  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is basically an emission spectroscopy technique where atoms and ions are primarily formed in their excited states as a result of interaction between a tightly focused laser beam and the material sample. The interaction between matter and high-density photons generates a plasma plume, which evolves with time and may eventually acquire thermodynamic equilibrium. One of the important features of this technique is that it does not require any sample preparation, unlike conventional spectroscopic analytical techniques. Samples in the form of solids, liquids, gels, gases, plasmas and biological materials (like teeth, leaf or blood) can be studied with almost equal ease. LIBS has rapidly developed into a major analytical technology with the capability of detecting all chemical elements in a sample, of real- time response, and of close-contact or stand-off analysis of targets. The present book has been written by active specialists in this field, it includes the basic principles, the latest developments in instrumentation and the applications of LIBS . It will be useful to analytical chemists and spectroscopists as an important source of information and also to graduate students and researchers engaged in the fields of combustion, environmental science, and planetary and space exploration.

Martin, Madhavi Z [ORNL; Wullschleger, Stan D [ORNL; Garten Jr, Charles T [ORNL; Palumbo, Anthony Vito [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Conceptual design of a geothermal site development forecasting system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A site development forecasting system has been designed in response to the need to monitor and forecast the development of specific geothermal resource sites for electrical power generation and direct heat applications. The system is comprised of customized software, a site development status data base, and a set of complex geothermal project development schedules. The system would use site-specific development status information obtained from the Geothermal Progress Monitor and other data derived from economic and market penetration studies to produce reports on the rates of geothermal energy development, federal agency manpower requirements to ensure these developments, and capital expenditures and technical/laborer manpower required to achieve these developments.

Neham, E.A.; Entingh, D.J.

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Corrosion monitoring apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosion monitoring device in an aqueous system which includes a formed crevice and monitoring the corrosion of the surfaces forming the crevice by the use of an a-c electrical signal.

Isaacs, Hugh S. (Shoreham, NY); Weeks, John R. (Stony Brook, NY)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Portal radiation monitor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A portal radiation monitor combines 0.1% FAR with high sensitivity to special nuclear material. The monitor utilizes pulse shape discrimination, dynamic compression of the photomultiplier output and scintillators sized to maintain efficiency over the entire portal area.

Kruse, Lyle W. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Solar Powered Radioactive Air Monitoring Stations  

SciTech Connect

Environmental monitoring of ambient air for radioactive material is required as stipulated in the PNNL Site radioactive air license. Sampling ambient air at identified preferred locations could not be initially accomplished because utilities were not readily available. Therefore, solar powered environmental monitoring systems were considered as a possible option. PNNL purchased two 24-V DC solar powered environmental monitoring systems which consisted of solar panels, battery banks, and sampling units. During an approximate four month performance evaluation period, the solar stations operated satisfactorily at an on-site test location. They were subsequently relocated to their preferred locations in June 2012 where they continue to function adequately under the conditions found in Richland, Washington.

Barnett, J. M.; Bisping, Lynn E.; Gervais, Todd L.

2013-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

Strategic Petroleum Reserve annual environmental monitoring report, 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress made in the monitoring and inspection program for the Strategic Petroleum Reserve during 1983 is reported. The following sites were monitored: Bayou Choctau, Bryan Mound, St. James Terminal, Sulfur Mines, Weeks Island and West Hackberry. Discussion is presented under the headings: air quality monitoring; oil spills and NPDES compliance; and water quality monitoring. The discussion on water quality monitoring is by far the most extensive. Surface waters from the sites previously mentioned were sampled and monitored for general water quality (except for St. James Terminal where there is a lack of potentially impacted surface waters). The following parameters were measured: pH value; salinity; total suspended particulates; temperature; dissolved oxygen; biochemical oxygen demand; oil and grease; and general observations. 12 references, 6 figures. (DMC)

Not Available

1984-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Savannah River Site Environmental Report for 1998  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is focused primarily on support of the national defense, nonproliferation, and environmental cleanup. SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program.

Arnett, M.

1999-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

346

Site Environmental Report for 2008, Volume 1  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report for 2008 is an integrated report on the environmental programs at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and satisfies the requirements of DOE order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. Volume II contains individual data results from surveillance and monitoring activities

Lackner, Regina; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea; Xu, Suying

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

347

OFF-SITE S  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

S S e T B ~ I L L ~ C E ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L R E S E A R C H CENTER from July through December 197C / t i o n a l Environmental Research Centeq U. S. ~ ~ I R O N M E L S T P ~ TR~ECTIQN AGENCY e Unders tancling No. 23 (26-1)-539 for the U. S o ATOMIC ENERGY COlQ4ISSION OFF-SITE SURVEILLANCE ACTIVITIES OF THE NATIONAL E N V I R O N M E N T A L RESEARCH CENTER from July through December 197C by Monitoring Operations Laboratory National Environmental Research Center U. S. ENVIRONMENTAL P R O T E C T I O N AGENCY Las Vegas , Nevada Published February 1974 This work performed under a Memorandum of Understanding No. AT (26-1)-539 for the U . S. A T O M I C ENERGY C O M M I S S I O N ABSTRACT During t h e period J u l y through December 1970, s i x announced underground n u c l e a r tests were conducted a t t h e Nevada T

348

2004 SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The SER is written to inform the public, regulators, Laboratory employees, and other stakeholders of BNL's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. The report summarizes BNL's environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. The SER is intended to be a technical document. It is available in print and as a downloadable file on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/esd/SER.htm. A summary of the SER is also prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a CD version of the full report. The summary supports BNL's educational and community outreach program.

BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY; SER TEAM; ENVIRONMENTAL INFORMATION MANAGEMENT SERVICES GROUP; ENVIROMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION FIELD SAMPLING TEAM; (MANY OTHER CONTRIBUTORS)

2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

349

2007 Site Environmental Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the-length report.

Ratel,K.

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

2002 WIPP Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

DOE Order 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE | facility to prepare an environmental management plan (EMP). This document is | prepared for WIPP in accordance with the guidance contained in DOE Order 5400.1; DOE Order 5400.5, Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment; applicable sections of Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance (DOE/EH-0173T; DOE, 1991); and the Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 834, ''Radiation Protection of the Public and Environment'' (draft). Many sections of DOE Order 5400.1 have been replaced by DOE Order 231.1, which is the driver for the annual Site Environmental Report (SER) and the guidance source for preparing many environmental program documents. The WIPP Project is operated by Westinghouse TRU Solutions (WTS) for the DOE. This plan defines the extent and scope of WIPP's effluent and environmental | monitoring programs during the facility's operational life and also discusses WIPP's quality assurance/quality control (QA/QC) program as it relates to environmental monitoring. In addition, this plan provides a comprehensive description of environmental activities at WIPP including: A summary of environmental programs, including the status of environmental monitoring activities A description of the WIPP Project and its mission A description of the local environment, including demographics An overview of the methodology used to assess radiological consequences to the public, including brief discussions of potential exposure pathways, routine and accidental releases, and their consequences Responses to the requirements described in the Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance.

Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

351

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1989  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to meet three of the primary objectives of the Savannah River Site (SRS) environmental monitoring program. These objectives are to assess actual or potential exposures to populations form the presence of radioactive and nonradioactive materials from normal operations or nonroutine occurrences; to demonstrate compliance with applicable authorized limits and legal requirements; and to communicate results of the monitoring program to the public. This 1989 report contains descriptions of radiological and nonradiological monitoring programs, it provides data obtained from these programs, and it describes various environmental research activities ongoing at the site. Also included are summaries of environmental management and compliance activities, a summary of National Environmental Policy Act activities, and a listing of environmental permits issued by regulatory agencies.

Cummins, C.L.; Martin, D.K.; Todd, J.L.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Near-facility environmental monitoring quality assurance project plan  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the preoperational and near facility environmental monitoring performed by Waste Management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations and supersedes WHC-EP-0538-2. This plan applies to all sampling and monitoring activities performed by waste management Federal Services, Inc., Northwest Operations in implementing facility environmental monitoring at the Hanford Site.

McKinney, S.M.

1997-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Routine Radiological Environmental Monitoring Plan, Volume 2 Appendices  

SciTech Connect

Supporting material for the plan includes: QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS AIR; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR WATER ON AND OFF THE NEVADA TEST SITE; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR NTS BIOTA; QUALITY ASSURANCE, ANALYSIS, AND SAMPLING PLAN FOR DIRECT RADIATION MONITORING; DATA QUALITY OBJECTIVES PROCESS; VADOSE ZONE MONITORING PLAN CHECKLIST.

Bechtel Nevada

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

354

REAL TIME MONITORING OF INFRASTRUCTURE USING TDR TECHNOLOGY: CASE HISTORIES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Remote system installed to monitor subsidence along a highway over an active coal mine. #12;Figure 5 abandoned coal mine. In spite of periodic visual monitoring, a 5 m diameter hole, 3 m deep suddenly opened experiencing active subsidence over an abandoned coal mine (O'Connor and Murphy, 1997). #12;At this site

355

Miniaturized Redox Potential Probe for In Situ Environmental Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

43026 The need for accurate, robust in situ microscale monitoring of oxidation-reduction potentials (ORP-contained microelectrodes that can be used in the environment, such as at Superfund sites, to monitor ORP in contaminated for ORP measurements. The electrochemical performance of these ORP electrodes was fully characterized

Papautsky, Ian

356

Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report: 1993 Highlights  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rocky Flats Plant Site Environmental Report provides summary information on the plant`s environmental monitoring programs and the results recorded during 1993. The report contains a compliance summary, results of environmental monitoring and other related programs, a review of environmental remediation activities, information on external gamma radiation dose monitoring, and radiation dose estimates for the surrounding population. This section provides an overview of these topics and summarizes more comprehensive discussions found in the main text of this annual report.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

357

Building Energy Monitoring System: Making Energy Manageable  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Monitoring System: Making Energy Manageable Building Energy Monitoring System: Making Energy Manageable Speaker(s): Bob Hunter Date: July 21, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Peng Xu For any line-item expense to be managed, it must first be manageable. In most organizations, this means bringing that expense into the budget/forecast/variance cycle at the department and individual level. While energy costs are the second fastest growing for most organizations, they have simply received a pass on individual accountability. TrendPoint provides a patented system for monitoring energy at the department and user-level. By monitoring each circuit, we assign a circuit to a user, each user to a group and each group to a site. Energy budgets can then be created and assigned to departments, allowing energy costs become a part of

358

Monitored Retrievable Storage Background | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monitored Retrievable Storage Background Monitored Retrievable Storage Background Monitored Retrievable Storage Background `The U.S. Government is seeking a site for a monitored retrievable storage facility (MRS). Employing proven technologies used in this country and abroad, the MRS will be an Integral part of the Federal system for safe and permanent disposal of the nation's high-level radioactive wastes. The MRS will accept shipments of spent fuel from commercial nuclear power plants, temporarily store the spent fuel above ground, and stage shipments of it to a geologic repository for permanent disposal. The law authorizing the MRS provides an opportunity for a State or an Indian Tribe to volunteer to host the MRS. The law establishes the Office of the Nuclear Waste Negotiator, who Is 10 seek a State or an Indian Tribe

359

Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - August 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August August 2012 Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - August 2012 August 2012 Operational Awareness Oversight of the Nevada National Security Site [HIAR NNSS-2012-08-16] The purpose of this Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) activity was to perform an operational awareness site visit to observe Subcritical Experiment (SCE) activities at the U1a Complex, discuss ongoing activities at the Device Assembly Facility (DAF) and the National Criticality Experiment Research Center (NCERC), and monitor the status of other ongoing site activities at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) operated by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec). Independent Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - August 2012 More Documents & Publications

360

Monticello Mill site Federal Facility Agreement, December 22, 1988 Summary  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Monticello Monticello Agreement Name Monticello (Utah) Site: Monticello Vicinity Properties NPL Site and Monticello Millsite Federal Facility Agreement Pursuant to CERCLA Section 120, December 22, 1988 State Utah Agreement Type Federal Facility Agreement Legal Driver(s) CERCLA Scope Summary Establish a procedural framework and schedule for developing, implementing, and monitoring appropriate response actions at the Site Parties DOE; US EPA; State of Utah Department of Environmental Health Date 12/22/1988 SCOPE * Identify Interim Remedial Action (IRA) alternatives, if any, which are appropriate at the Site prior to the implementation of final remedial actions for the Site. * Evaluate all past investigative and response actions taken at the Site and documented

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Documentation of Uncertainties and Biases Associated with Surface Temperature Measurement Sites for Climate Change Assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to determine whether poorly sited long-term surface temperature monitoring sites have been adjusted in order to provide spatially representative independent data for use in regional and global surface temperature ...

Roger Pielke Sr.; John Nielsen-Gammon; Christopher Davey; Jim Angel; Odie Bliss; Nolan Doesken; Ming Cai; Souleymane Fall; Dev Niyogi; Kevin Gallo; Robert Hale; Kenneth G. Hubbard; Xiaomao Lin; Hong Li; Sethu Raman

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

363

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

364

Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Environmental Monitoring Plan  

SciTech Connect

U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 450.1, Environmental Protection Program, requires each DOE site to conduct environmental monitoring. Environmental monitoring at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) is conducted in order to: (a) Verify and support compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental laws, regulations, permits, and orders; (b) Establish baselines and characterize trends in the physical, chemical, and biological condition of effluent and environmental media; (c) Identify potential environmental problems and evaluate the need for remedial actions or measures to mitigate the problem; (d) Detect, characterize, and report unplanned releases; (e) Evaluate the effectiveness of effluent treatment and control, and pollution abatement programs; and (f) Determine compliance with commitments made in environmental impact statements, environmental assessments, safety analysis reports, or other official DOE documents. This Environmental Monitoring Plan (EMP) has been written to contain the rationale and design criteria for the monitoring program, extent and frequency of monitoring and measurements, procedures for laboratory analyses, quality assurance (QA) requirements, program implementation procedures, and direction for the preparation and disposition of reports. Changes to the environmental monitoring program may be necessary to allow the use of advanced technology and new data collection techniques. This EMP will document any proposed changes in the environmental monitoring program. Guidance for preparation of Environmental Monitoring Plans is contained in DOE/EH-0173T, Environmental Regulatory Guide for Radiological Effluent Monitoring and Environmental Surveillance. The plan will be effective when it is approved by the appropriate Head of Field Organization or their designee. The plan discusses major environmental monitoring and hydrology activities at the WIPP and describes the programs established to ensure that WIPP operations do not have detrimental effects on the environment. This EMP is to be reviewed annually and updated every three years unless otherwise requested by the DOE or contractor.

Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services; Washington TRU Solutions LLC

2004-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

365

Environmental Monitoring Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to fulfill the requirements of Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5400.1 and DOE Environmental Regulatory Guide DOE/EH 0173T. This Plan documents the background, organizational structure, and methods used for effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance at Sandia National Laboratories/California. The design, rationale, and historical results of the environmental monitoring system are discussed in detail. Throughout the Plan, recommendations for improvements to the monitoring system are made. This revision to the Environmental Monitoring Plan was written to document the changes made to the Monitoring Program during 1992. Some of the data (most notably the statistical analyses of past monitoring data) has not been changed.

Holland, R.C. [Science Applications International Corp., San Diego, CA (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- SiteA  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Illinois Illinois Site A/Plot M, Illinois, Decommissioned Reactor Site A D&D Program Site sitea_map As part of the DOE Defense Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Program, the Office of Legacy Management manages the Site A/Plot M Decommissioned Reactor Site and ensures compliance with applicable federal, state, and local environmental protection laws and regulations, executive orders, and internal DOE policies. The site transferred to the Office of Legacy Management in 2003 and requires routine inspection and maintenance, records-related activities, and stakeholder support. For more information about the Site A/Plot M site, view the fact sheet. Site Documents and Links Contact Us Inspection/Sampling Schedule Site A/Plot M Decommissioned Reactor Mapping and Monitoring (GEMS)

367

Independent Oversight Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May 2010 Independent Oversight Assessment , Idaho National Laboratory Site - May 2010 May 2010 Environmental Monitoring at the Idaho National Laboratory Site The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Independent Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), performed an assessment of environmental monitoring and surveillance at the DOE Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site during March through April 2010. The assessment was performed at the request of the DOE Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID). HSS reports directly to the Secretary of Energy, and this INL sitewide environmental monitoring program assessment was performed by Independent Oversight's Office of Environment, Safety and Health Evaluations with

368

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 Attachment A: Site Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2012 (National Security Technologies, LLC [NSTec], 2013). Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Wills, Cathy A

2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

369

Particle Physics Education Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Particle Physics Education Sites quick reference Education and Information - National Laboratory Education Programs - Women and Minorities in Physics - Other Physics Sites -...

370

Land Validation web site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

web site A web site is now available for the Land Validation project. It was created with the purpose of facilitating communication among MODIS Land Validation Principal...

371

Site Lead TQP Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

of specific site safety functions. C. Must have the ability to provide an overall systematic assessment of site safety performance and to characterize the major issues and...

372

Geothermal: Site Map  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

GEOTHERMAL TECHNOLOGIES LEGACY COLLECTION - Site Map Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log On HomeBasic Search About Publications...

373

Hanford Site Development Plan  

SciTech Connect

The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (USA)); Yancey, E.F. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (USA))

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Plug & Play Sensors Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Documents. Plug & Play Sensors Sites. ... Plug & Play Sensors Sites. By selecting some of the links below, you will be leaving NIST webspace. ...

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

375

Career Site FAQs | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Careers Working at ORNL Diversity Postdocs Internships and Postgrad Opportunities Fellowships Career Site FAQs Events and Conferences Careers Home | ORNL | Careers | Career Site...

376

Comprehensive air monitoring plan: general monitoring report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recommendations are provided for general monitoring of hydrogen sulfide (H/sub 2/S) in ambient air in parts of Colusa, Lake, Mendocino, Napa, and Sonoma counties potentially impacted by emissions from geothermal development projects in the Geysers-Calistoga Known Geothermal Resource Area. Recommendations for types, placement, performance guidelines, and criteria and procedure for triggering establishment and termination of CAMP monitoring equipment were determined after examination of four factors: population location; emission sources; meteorological considerations; and data needs of permitting agencies and applicants. Three alternate financial plans were developed. Locations and equipment for immediate installation are recommended for: two air quality stations in communities where the State ambient air quality standard for H/sub 2/S has been exceeded; three air quality trend stations to monitor progress in reduction of H/sub 2/S emissions; two meteorological observation stations to monitor synoptic wind flow over the area; and one acoustic radar and one rawinsonde station to monitor air inversions which limit the depth of the mixing layer.

Not Available

1980-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

377

Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services,...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 Audit Report Hanford Site Contractors' Use of Site Services, WR-B-99-03 To operate the Hanford Site (Site),...

378

Retrieval Group Sites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Information Retrieval Tools and Systems: ... currently unavailable. Other sites with extensive information retrieval (IR) links: ...

379

Quality Assurance Program Plan for radionuclide airborne emissions monitoring  

SciTech Connect

This Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) describes the quality assurance requirements and responsibilities for radioactive airborne emissions measurements activities from regulated stacks are controlled at the Hanford Site. Detailed monitoring requirements apply to stacks exceeding 1% of the standard of 10 mrem annual effective dose equivalent to the maximally exposed individual from operations of the Hanford Site.

Vance, L.M.

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Mound Site  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Site Fairfield Site Falls City Site Fernald Preserve Gasbuggy Site General Atomics Geothermal Gnome-Coach Site Grand Junction Sites Granite City Site Green River Site Gunnison...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Continuous Emissions Monitoring Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the 2002 update of this manual, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has been extremely active in its efforts to expand continuous emissions monitoring (CEM) requirements through a variety of regulatory instruments. Additional monitoring requirements have resulted from EPA's Clean Air Interstate Rule and Cross-State Air Pollution Rule. EPA attempted to impose mercury (Hg) monitoring requirements in its now-vacated Clean Air Mercury Rule. Most recently, EPA has proposed mercury, particulate mat...

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

382

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010, Attachment A: Site Description  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2010. Included are subsections that summarize the site’s geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site’s environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

C. Wills, ed.

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

383

Evaluation of a multiport groundwater monitoring system  

SciTech Connect

In 1988 and 1989, Pacific Northwest Laboratory installed a multiport groundwater monitoring system in two wells on the Hanford Site: one near the 216-B-3 Pond in the center of the Hanford Site and one just north of the 300 Area near the Columbia River. The system was installed to provide the US Department of Energy with needed three-dimensional data on the vertical distribution of contaminants and hydraulic heads on the Hanford Site. This study evaluates the ability of the multiport system to obtain hydrogeologic data at multiple points vertically in a single borehole, and addresses the representativeness of the data. Data collected from the two wells indicate that the multiport system is well suited for groundwater monitoring networks requiring three-dimensional characterization of the hydrogeologic system. A network of these systems could provide valuable information on the hydrogeologic environment. However, the advantages of the multiport system diminish when the system is applied to long-term monitoring networks (30+ years) and to deeper wells (<300 ft). For shallow wells, the multiport system provides data in a cost-effective manner that would not be reasonably obtainable with the conventional methods currently in use at the Hanford Site. 17 refs., 28 figs., 6 tabs.

Gilmore, T.J.; Hall, S.H.; Olsen, K.B.; Spane, F.A. Jr.

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for the  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for the Amchitka, Alaska, Site DOE Releases Biological Monitoring and Sampling Results Report for the Amchitka, Alaska, Site October 28, 2013 - 3:39pm Addthis Contractor, Judy Miller, S.M. Stoller Corporation Public Affairs, (970) 248-6363 jmiller@lm.doe.gov GRAND JUNCTION, Colo. - The U.S. Department of Energy today announced the availability of the Amchitka Island, Alaska, Biological Monitoring Report 2011 Sampling Results for the Amchitka, Alaska, site. The report provides the results of terrestrial and marine sampling in the areas surrounding Amchitka and Adak Islands in 2011 to determine whether local subsistence- and commercial-catch seafood is safe to eat. "The results confirmed earlier investigations indicating that seafood

385

Hanford Site environmental report for calendar year 1989  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report is a summary of the environmental status of the Hanford Site in 1989. It includes descriptions of the Site and its mission, the status of compliance with environmental regulations, planning and activities to accomplish compliance, environmental protection and restoration activities, and environmental monitoring. 97 refs., 67 figs., 14 tabs.

Jaquish, R.E.; Bryce, R.W. (eds.)

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Edison Benchmark Monitoring  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Edison Benchmark Monitoring Benchmark Results Select Benchmark CAM GAMESS GTC IMPACT-T MAESTRO MILC PARATEC Submit Last edited: 2013-06-25 22:45:11...

387

Savannah River site environmental report for 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mission at the Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from the production of nuclear weapons materials for national defense to the management of site-generated waste, restoration of the surrounding environment, and the development of industry in and around the site. However, SRS-through its prime operating contractor, Westinghouse Savannah River Company (WSRC)-continues to maintain a comprehensive environmental monitoring program. In 1996, effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance were conducted within a 31,000-square-mile area in and around SRS that includes neighboring cities, towns, and counties in Georgia and South Carolina and extends up to 100 miles from the site. Though the environmental monitoring program was streamlined in 1996-to improve its cost-effectiveness without compromising data quality or reducing its overall ability to produce critical information-thousands of samples of air, surface water, groundwater, food products, drinking water, wildlife, rainwater, soil, sediment, and vegetation were collected and analyzed for radioactive and nonradioactive contaminants.

Arnett, M.; Mamatey, A. [eds.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

388

Savannah River Site environmental report for 1991  

SciTech Connect

This report describes environmental activities conducted on and in the vicinity of the Savannah River Site (SRS) in Aiken, S.C., from Jan. 1 to Dec. 31, 1991, with an update on compliance activities through April 1, 1992. The report is a single volume with a separate summary pamphlet highlighting the major findings for 1991. The report is divided into an executive summary and 14 chapters containing information on environmental compliance issues, environmental monitoring methods and programs, and environmental research activities for 1991, as well as historical data from previous years. Analytical results, figures, charts, and data tables relevant to the environmental monitoring program for 1991 at SRS are included.

Arnett, M.W.; Karapatakis, L.K.; Mamatey, A.R.; Todd, J.L.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Site Environmental Report for 2007 Volume I  

SciTech Connect

The Site Environmental Report is an integrated report on Berkeley Lab's environmental programs to satisfy the requirements of DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety, and Health Reporting. It summarizes Berkeley Lab's environmental management performance, presents environmental monitoring results, and describes significant programs for calendar year 2007. Volume I is organized into an executive summary followed by six chapters that contain an overview of the Laboratory, a discussion of the Laboratory's environmental management system, the status of environmental programs, and summarized results from surveillance and monitoring activities.

Lackner, Regina E.; Baskin, David; Fox, Robert; Jelinski, John; Pauer, Ron; Thorson, Patrick; Wahl, Linnea

2008-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

(Stanford Linear Accelerator Center) annual environmental monitoring report, January--December 1989  

SciTech Connect

This progress report discusses environmental monitoring activities at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center for 1989. Topics include climate, site geology, site water usage, land use, demography, unusual events or releases, radioactive and nonradioactive releases, compliance summary, environmental nonradiological program information, environmental radiological program information, groundwater protection monitoring ad quality assurance. 5 figs., 7 tabs. (KJD)

Not Available

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory 1995 site environmental report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1995 Site Environmental Report summarizes environmental activities at the Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for the 1995 calendar year. The report strives to present environmental data in a manner that characterizes the performance and compliance status of the environmental management programs. The report also discusses significant highlights and plans of these programs. Topics discussed include: environmental monitoring, environmental compliance programs, air quality, water quality, ground water protection, sanitary sewer monitoring, soil and sediment quality, vegetation and foodstuffs monitoring, and special studies which include preoperational monitoring of building 85 and 1995 sampling results, radiological dose assessment, and quality assessment.

Balgobin, D.; Javandel, I.; Lackner, G.; Smith, C.; Thorson, P.; Tran, H.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Gunnison Mill Site - CO 0-06  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Gunnison Mill Site - CO 0-06 Gunnison Mill Site - CO 0-06 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Gunnison Mill Site (CO.0-06 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site Documents Related to Gunnison Mill Site Verification Montioring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, Processing Site, September 2007. 2011 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site. LMS/S08056. January 2012 U.S. Department of Energy 2009 UMTRCA Title I Annual Report January 2010 Gunnison, Colorado Page 8-1 8.0 Gunnison, Colorado, Disposal Site

393

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 Green River Mill Site - UT 0-01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: Green River Mill Site (UT.0-01 ) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials Handled: Radiological Survey(s): Site Status: Also see Green River, Utah, Disposal Site Documents Related to Green River Mill Site Data Validation Package for the June 2009 Groundwater and Surface Water Sampling at the Green River, Utah, Disposal Site; LMS/GRN/S0609; October 2009 2012 Annual Site Inspection and Monitoring Report for Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act Title I Disposal Sites-Green River, Utah, Disposal Site. LMS/S09461. February 2013 Historic Fact Sheet: Green River Disposal Site Uranium ore was

394

Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory annual environmental monitoring report, calendar year 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the effluent and environmental monitoring programs at the three Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) sites are summarized and assessed in this report. The effluent and environmental monitoring programs conducted by KAPL are designed to determine the effectiveness of treatment and control methods, to provide measurement of the concentrations in effluents for comparison with applicable standards, and to assess resultant concentrations in the environment. The monitoring programs include analyses of samples of liquid and gaseous effluents for chemical constituents and radioactivity as well as monitoring of environmental air, water, sediment, and fish. Radiation measurements are also made around the perimeter of each site and at off-site background locations.

NONE

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

395

Hanford Site Environmental Report for calendar year 1992  

SciTech Connect

This report is prepared annually to summarize environmental data and information, describe environmental management performance, and demonstrate the status of compliance with environmental regulations at the Hanford Site. The following sections: describe the Hanford Site and its mission; summarize the status in 1992 of compliance with environmental regulations; describe the environmental programs at the Hanford Site; discuss public dose estimates from 1992 Hanford activities; present information on effluent monitoring and environmental surveillance, including ground-water protection and monitoring, and discuss activities to ensure quality.

Woodruff, R.K.; Hanf, R.W.; Lundgren, R.E. [eds.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractor’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

397

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

398

2011 Radiological Monitoring Results Associated with the Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste Pond  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes radiological monitoring performed of the Idaho National Laboratory Site's Advanced Test Reactor Complex Cold Waste wastewater prior to discharge into the Cold Waste Pond and of specific groundwater monitoring wells associated with the Industrial Wastewater Reuse Permit (LA-000161-01, Modification B). All radiological monitoring is performed to fulfill Department of Energy requirements under the Atomic Energy Act.

Mike Lewis

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation's role has evolved over Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and Environmental Monitoring on the Oak Ridge." The results sum- marized in this report are based on the data col- lected prior to and through 2000. The 2000

Pennycook, Steve

400

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation's role has evolved over the years, and it continues Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and Environmental Monitoring on the Oak Ridge Reservation: 2001 of Energy (DOE) Order 231.1, "Environment, Safety and Health Reporting," for an annual summary of environ

Pennycook, Steve

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "oceanography monitoring sites" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Site and Operations Overview 1-1 1. Site and Operations Overview  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

undertaking that produced the materials for the first atomic bombs. The reservation's role has evolved over Ridge Reservation Annual Site Environmental Report and Environmental Monitoring on the Oak Ridge Protection Program." The results summa- rized in this report are based on the data collected prior

Pennycook, Steve

402

2005 Site environmental reportv Each year, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.4 years. Initiatives to reduce, recycle, and reuse 2.8 million pounds of industrial, sanitary, hazardous monitoring. Radiological Dose Assessment Program BNL routinely assesses its operations to ensure that any to a hypothetical Maximally Exposed In- dividual (MEI) at the BNL site boundary. For dose assessment purposes

Homes, Christopher C.

403

2007 Site environmental reportv Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to reduce, recycle, and reuse 14.6 million pounds of industrial, sanitary, hazard- ous, and radiological, and maps relating to all groundwater monitoring performed in 2007. Radiological Dose Assessment Program BNL (MEI) at the BNL site boundary. For dose assessment purposes, the pathways include direct radiation

Homes, Christopher C.

404

DOE/EPA site demonstration  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Health and Safety Plan applies to the technology demonstration of the Retech, Inc., centrifugal furnace under the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund Innovative Evaluation (SITE) Program. Retech will conduct a series of furnace tests at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Component Development and Integration Facility (CDIF) in Butte, Montana. MSE, operating contractor of the CDIF, will evaluate the furnace technology and determine the feasibility of further testing based on these demonstrations. This plan applies to the field demonstration at DOE's CDIF. This plan is designed to cover most work assignment activities under the Retech furnace evaluation to ensure safe and healthful conditions. Specific guidance is necessary for workers at the CDIF for the entire demonstration, addressing each of the known or expected safety hazards and contaminants. The layout of the exclusion zone and decontamination areas at the CDIF has been incorporated into this plan. This plan has been prepared in accordance with applicable federal regulations, but should the regulations be changed or if other situations require, the plan will be modified by the SITE Program Health and Safety Manager. The following items are covered in the plan: organization and responsibilities for the demonstration; hazard evaluation of the technology, test waste, and test site; contamination control zones; standard operating procedures (SOP) for the demonstration; protective and emergency equipment; exposure monitoring during test operations; medical surveillance; applicable safety and health regulations; and, references. 6 refs., 2 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan: Site planning  

SciTech Connect

This plan revises the Hanford Site Strategic Facilities Plan submitted by Westinghouse Hanford Company in 1988. It separates the Hanford Site facilities into two categories: ''strategically required'' facilities and ''marginal'' facilities. It provides a comparison of future facility requirements against existing capacities and proposed projects to eliminate or consolidate marginal facilities (i.e., those facilities that are not fully utilized or are no longer required to accomplish programmatic missions). The objective is to enhance the operating efficiency of the Hanford Site by maximizing facility use and minimizing unnecessary facility operating and maintenance costs. 11 refs.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Simple beam profile monitor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B. [ASD Inc. Garden Bay, BC (Canada); Best Theratronics Ltd Ottawa Ontario (Canada); PharmaSpect Ltd., Burnaby BC (Canada)

2012-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

407

Offsite environmental monitoring report: Radiation monitoring around United States nuclear test areas, calendar year 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the Offsite Radiation Safety Program conducted during 1991 by the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA`s) Environmental Monitoring Systems Laboratory-Las Vegas. This laboratory operates an environmental radiation monitoring program in the region surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS) and at former test sites in Alaska, Colorado, Mississippi, Nevada, and New Mexico. The surveillance program is designed to measure levels and trends of radioactivity, if present, in the environment surrounding testing areas to ascertain whether current radiation levels and associated doses to the general public are in compliance with existing radiation protection standards. The surveillance program additionally has the responsibility to take action to protect the health and well being of the public in the event of any accidental release of radioactive contaminants. Offsite levels of radiation and radioactivity are assessed by sampling milk, water, and air; by deploying thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) and using pressurized ion chambers (PICs); and by biological monitoring of animals, food crops, and humans. Personnel with mobile monitoring equipment are placed in areas downwind from the test site prior to each nuclear weapons test to implement protective actions, provide immediate radiation monitoring, and obtain environmental samples rapidly after any occurrence of radioactivity release. Comparison of the measurements and sample analysis results with background levels and with appropriate standards and regulations indicated that there was no radioactivity detected offsite by the various EPA monitoring networks and no exposure above natural background to the population living in the vicinity of the NTS that could be attributed to current NTS activities. Annual and long-term trends were evaluated in the Noble Gas, Tritium, Milk Surveillance, Biomonitoring, TLD, PIC networks, and the Long-Term Hydrological Monitoring Program.

Chaloud, D.J.; Dicey, B.B.; Mullen, A.A.; Neale, A.C.; Sparks, A.R.; Fontana, C.A.; Carroll, L.D.; Phillips, W.G.; Smith, D.D.; Thome, D.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Monitoring Jobs on Hopper  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Jobs Monitoring Edison Batch Jobs The batch system provides the command to monotor your jobs. We are listing the commands commonly used to submit and monitor the jobs. For more informaiton please refer to the man pages of these commands. Job Commands Command Description qsub batch_script Submits batch script to the queue. The output of qsub will be a jobid qdel jobid Deletes a job from the queue qhold jobid Puts a job on hold in the queue. qrls jobid Releases a job from hold. qalter [options] jobid Change attributes of submitted job. (See below.) qmove new_queue jobid Move job to new queue. Remember, the new queue must be one of the submission queues (premium, regular, or low) qstat -a Lists jobs in submission order (more useful than qstat without options) Also takes -u and -f [jobid]> options

409

PROTECTIVE CLOTHING MONITORING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

An automatic conveyor-type laundry monitoring system, whlch monitors laboratory coats and coveralls for both alpha and beta-gamma contamination, was developed and installed at the Hanford Laundry Facility to improve monitoring efficiency and control. The instrument employs eight alpha and seven beta-gamma scintillation large-area detectors, a garment conveyor, solid state circuitry, and appropriate signaling devices. Oarments are manually placed on hangers which are then placed onto an automatic loading mechanism. Each garment is conveyed past detectors where it is monitored for beta-gamma and alpha contamination. Contaminated garments are rejected and dropped into a special contniner if spot contamination exceeds 1000 disintegrations per minute (dis/min) of alpha or 5000 dis/min of mixed fission products. The garments which are not rejected pass through for folding and distribution. The system, which requires only one attendant, can effectively monitor 500 garments per standard shift. System operation was fully successful for ten months. (auth)

Rankin, M.O.; Spear, W.G.

1963-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Colonie Interim Storage Site: Annual site environmental report, Colonie, New York, Calendar year 1986: Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP)  

SciTech Connect

During 1986, the environmental monitoring program continued at the Colonie Interim Storage Site (CISS), a US Department of Energy (DOE) facility located in Colonie, New York. The CISS is part of the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP), a DOE program to decontaminate or otherwise control sites where residual radioactive materials remain from the early years of the nation's atomic energy program or from commercial operations causing conditions that Congress has mandated DOE to remedy. As part of the decontamination research and development project authorized by Congress under the 1984 Energy and Water Appropriations Act, remedial action is being conducted at the site and at vicinity properties by Bechtel National Inc. (BNI), Project Management Contractor for FUSRAP. The environmental monitoring program is also carried out by BNI. The monitoring program at the CISS measures external gamma radiation levels as well as uranium and radium-226 concentrations in surface water, groundwater, and sediment. To verify that the site is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard and to assess the potential effect of the site on public health, the radiation dose was calculated for the maximally exposed individual. Based on the conservative scenario described in the report, the maximally exposed individual would receive an annual external exposure approximately equivalent to 5% of the DOE radiation protection standard of 100 mrem/y. Results of 1986 monitoring show that the CISS is in compliance with the DOE radiation protection standard. 14 refs., 9 figs., 9 tabs.

1987-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

REMOTE RADIOLOGICAL MONITORING  

SciTech Connect

A gamma-radiation telemetering system was utilized to measure fall-out levels at the Ncvada Test Site. Two methods of signal transmission were used: directcoupled field lines for on-site installations and commercial telephone lines for areas out to 330 miles. Graphic and tabular data cover on-site and off- site residual gamma-radiation dose rate measurements taken as a function of time after selected events. (auth)

Sigoloff, S.C.; Borella, H.M.

1958-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Site Manager Kansas City Site Office  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Kansas City Site Office (KCSO) Workforce Diversity FY 2010 NNSA Service Center EEO and Diversity Program Office PO Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185 (505) 845-5517 TTY (800)...

413

Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011 Attachment A: Site Description  

SciTech Connect

This attachment expands on the general description of the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) presented in the Introduction to the Nevada National Security Site Environmental Report 2011. Included are subsections that summarize the site's geological, hydrological, climatological, and ecological setting and the cultural resources of the NNSS. The subsections are meant to aid the reader in understanding the complex physical and biological environment of the NNSS. An adequate knowledge of the site's environment is necessary to assess the environmental impacts of new projects, design and implement environmental monitoring activities for current site operations, and assess the impacts of site operations on the public residing in the vicinity of the NNSS. The NNSS environment contributes to several key features of the site that afford protection to the inhabitants of adjacent areas from potential exposure to radioactivity or other contaminants resulting from NNSS operations. These key features include the general remote location of the NNSS, restricted access, extended wind transport times, the great depths to slow-moving groundwater, little or no surface water, and low population density. This attachment complements the annual summary of monitoring program activities and dose assessments presented in the main body of this report.

Cathy Wills, ed.

2012-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

414

A Sea Floor Gravity Survey of the Sleipner Field to Monitor CO2 Migration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Carbon dioxide gas (CO{sub 2}) is a byproduct of many wells that produce natural gas. Frequently the CO{sub 2} separated from the valuable fossil fuel gas is released into the atmosphere. This adds to the growing problem of the climatic consequences of greenhouse gas contamination. In the Sleipner North Sea natural gas production facility, the separated CO{sub 2} is injected into an underground saline aquifer to be forever sequestered. Monitoring the fate of such sequestered material is important - and difficult. Local change in Earth's gravity field over the injected gas is one way to detect the CO{sub 2} and track its migration within the reservoir over time. The density of the injected gas is less than that of the brine that becomes displaced from the pore space of the formation, leading to slight but detectable decrease in gravity observed on the seafloor above the reservoir. Using equipment developed at Scripps Institution of Oceanography, we have been monitoring gravity over the Sleipner CO{sub 2} sequestration reservoir since 2002. We surveyed the field in 2009 in a project jointly funded by a consortium of European oil and gas companies and the US Department of Energy. The value of gravity at some 30 benchmarks on the seafloor, emplaced at the beginning of the monitoring project, was observed in a week-long survey with a remotely operated vehicle. Three gravity meters were deployed on the benchmarks multiple times in a campaign-style survey, and the measured gravity values compared to those collected in earlier surveys. A clear signature in the map of gravity differences is well correlated with repeated seismic surveys.

Mark Zumberge

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Redesigned Web Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Redesigned Web Sites In an ongoing effort to improve services to our customers, the ORNL DAAC is pleased to announce that it has released a major revision to its Web site. The new...

416

Web Site Metadata  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

International World Wide Web Conference, pages 1123–1124,Erik Wilde. Site Metadata on the Web. In Proceedings of theUCB ISchool Report 2009-028 Web Site Metadata [4] David R.

Wilde, Erik; Roy, Anuradha

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

SSA Fen Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

View an aerial photo-map of the SSA-Fen site. A general view of the Fen The flux tower at the Fen The huts at the Fen Pink flamingos, fen hens at the SSA-Fen site. Aerial...