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  1. Carbon dioxide, hydrographic, and chemical data obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE sections P17S and P16S) during the tunes-2-expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July--August 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-12-31

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}), discrete partial pressure of TCO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}), and total alkalinity (TALK), during the Research Vessel (R/V) Thomas Washington TUNES Leg 2 Expedition in the central South Pacific Ocean. Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Papeete, Tahiti, French Polynesia, on July 16, 1991, and returned to Papeete on August 25, 1991. WOCE Meridional Sections P17S along 135{degrees} W and P16S along 150{degrees} W were completed during the 40-day expedition. A total of 97 hydrographic stations were occupied. Hydrographic and chemical measurements made along WOCE Sections P17S and P16S included pressure, temperature, salinity, and oxygen measured by conductivity, temperature and depth sensor; bottle salinity; oxygen; phosphate; nitrate; nitrite; silicate; CFC-12; CFC- 11; TCO{sub 2}; TALK; and pCO{sub 2} measured at 20{degrees}C. The TCO{sub 2} concentration in 1000 seawater samples was determined with a coulometric analysis system, the pCO{sub 2} in 940 water samples was determined with an equilibrator/gas chromatograph system, while the TALK concentration in 139 samples was determined on shore at the laboratory of C. Goyet of Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with an alkalinity titration system. In addition, 156 coulometric measurements for the Certified Reference Material (Batch {number_sign}6) were made and yielded a mean value of 2303.2 {plus_minus} 1.5 {mu}mol/kg. This mean value agrees within a standard deviation of the 2304.6 {plus_minus} 1.6 {mu}mol/kg (N=9) value determined with the manometer of C. D. Keeling at Scripps Institution of Oceanography (SIO). Replicate samples from 11 Niskin bottles at 4 stations were also collected for later shore-based reference analyses of TCO{sub 2} and TALK by vacuum extraction and manometry in the laboratory of C. D. Keeling of SIO.

  2. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, December 1992-January 1993)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, A.

    1998-12-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Rio de Janeiro on December 27, 1992, and ended after 36 days at sea in Capetown, South Africa, on January 31, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section A10 included pressure, temperature, and salinity [measured by conductivity, temperature, and depth (CTD) sensor], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-1 1 , CFC-12), TCO{sub 2}, TALK, and underway pCO{sub 2}. The TCO{sub 2} was measured by using two Single-Operator Multiparameter Metabolic Analyzers (SOMMAs) for extracting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples that were coupled to a coulometer for detection of the extracted CO{sub 2}. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.9 {micro}mol/kg. Samples collected for TALK were measured by potentiometric titration; precision was {+-}2.0 {micro}mol/kg. Underway pCO{sub 2} was measured by infrared photometry with a precision of {+-} 2.0 {micro}atm. The work aboard the R/V Meteor was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy under contract DE-AC02-76CHOO016, and the Bundesministerium fir Forschung und Technologies through grants 03F0545A and MPG 099/1.

  3. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, March 29 - May 12, 1994)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, A.

    2002-05-09

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and the fugacity of CO{sub 2} (fCO{sub 2}) at hydrographic stations during the R/V Meteor oceanographic cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (Section A8). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Recife, Brazil, on March 29, 1994, and ended after 35 days at sea in Walvis Bay, Namibia, on May 12, 1994. Instructions for accessing the data are provided. TCO{sub 2} was measured using two single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMA) coupled to a coulometer for extracting and detecting CO{sub 2} from seawater samples. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-}1.17 {micro}mol/kg. For the second carbonate system parameter, the fCO{sub 2} was measured in discrete samples by equilibrating a known volume of liquid phase (seawater) with a known volume of a gas phase containing a known mixture of CO{sub 2} in gaseous nitrogen (N{sub 2}). After equilibration, the gas phase CO{sub 2} concentration was determined by flame ionization detection following the catalytic conversion of CO{sub 2} to methane (CH{sub 4}). The precision of these measurements was less than or equal to 1.0%. The R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 data set is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center. The NDP consists of two oceanographic data files, two FORTRAN 90 data retrieval routine files, a readme file, and this printed documentation that describes the contents and format of all files as well as the procedures and methods used to obtain the data.

  4. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Korr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; December 1, 1994-January 19, 1996)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozyr, A.V.

    2003-09-15

    This document describes the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO{sub 2}) and total alkalinity (TALK) at hydrographic stations taken during the R/V Knorr Indian Ocean cruises (Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2) in 1994-1996. The measurements were conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE). The expedition began in Fremantle, Australia, on December 1, 1994, and ended in Mombasa, Kenya, on January 22, 1996. During the nine cruises, 12 WOCE sections were occupied. Total carbon dioxide was extracted from water samples and measured using single-operator multiparameter metabolic analyzers (SOMMAs) coupled to coulometers. The overall precision and accuracy of the analyses was {+-} 1.20 {micro}mol/kg. The second carbonate system parameter, TALK, was determined by potentiometric titration. The precision of the measurements determined from 962 analyses of certified reference material was {+-} 4.2 {micro}mol/kg (REFERENCE). This work was supported by grants from the National Science Foundation, the U. S. Department of Energy, and the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration. The R/V Knorr Indian Ocean data set is available as a numeric data package (NDP) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC). The NDP consists of 18 oceanographic data files, two FORTRAN 77 data retrieval routine files, a readme file, and this printed documentation, which describes the contents and format of all files as well as the procedures and methods used to obtain the data. Instructions for accessing the data are provided.

  5. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) • Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) • Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 – 081103) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) • Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 – 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 – 090397) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 – 012296) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) • Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 – 102192) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 – 111093) • The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 – Jan, 1996) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) • Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Thomas Washington, July-August, 1991 • Total Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Nitrate Measurements in the Southwest Pacific during Austral Autumn, 1990: Results from NOAA/PMEL CGC-90 Cruise • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 15/3 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A9, February March 1991) • Carbon Dioxide Concentrations in Surface Water and the Atmosphere During 1986-1989 NOAA/PMEL Cruises in the Pacific and Indian Oceans • Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 11/5 in the South Atlantic and Northern Weddell Sea Areas (WOCE sections A-12 and A-21) • Surface Water and Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide and Nitrous Oxide Observations by Shipboard Automated Gas Chromatography: Results from Expeditions Between 1977 and 1990 • Indian Ocean Radiocarbon: Data from the INDIGO 1, 2, and 3 Cruises • Carbonate Chemistry of the North Pacific Ocean • Carbonate Chemistry of the Weddell Sea • GEOSECS Atlantic, Pacific, Indian, and Mediterranean Radiocarbon Data •\tTransient Tracers in the Oceans (TTO) - Hydrographic Data and Carbon Dioxide Systems with Revised Carbon Chemistry Data.

  6. Oceanic Trace Gases Numeric Data Packages from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    CDIAC products include numeric data packages, publications, trend data, atlases, models, etc. and can be searched for by subject area, keywords, authors, product numbers, time periods, collection sites, spatial references, etc. Most data sets or packages, many with numerous data files, are free to download from CDIAC's ftp area. CDIAC lists the following numeric data packages under the broad heading of Oceanic Trace Gases: Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16S_2005 ( 01/11/05 - 022405) Determination of Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Parameters during the R/V Nathaniel B. Palmer Cruise in the Southern Indian Ocean (WOCE Section S04I, 050396 - 070496) Inorganic Carbon, Nutrient, and Oxygen Data from the R/V Ronald H. Brown Repeat Hydrography Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean: CLIVAR CO2 Section A16N_2003a (060403 081103) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Maurice Ewing Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A17, 010494 - 032194) Global Ocean Data Analysis Project GLODAP: Results and Data Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruises in the North Atlantic Ocean on WOCE Sections AR24 (1102 120596) and A24, A20, and A22 (053097 090397) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic and Chemical Data Obtained During the Nine R/V Knorr Cruises Comprising the Indian Ocean CO2 Survey (WOCE Sections I8SI9S, I9N, I8NI5E, I3, I5WI4, I7N, I1, I10, and I2; 120 194 012296) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Meteor Cruise 28/1 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A8, 032994 - 051294) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Knorr Cruise 138-3, -4, and -5 in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P6E, P6C, and P6W, 050292 - 073092) Global Distribution of Total Inorganic Carbon and Total Alkalinity below the deepest winter mixed layer depths Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V John V. Vickers Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P13, NOAA CGC92 Cruise, 080492 102192) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Hesperides Cruise in the Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A5, 071492 - 081592) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P10, 100593 111093) The International Intercomparison Exercise of Underway fCO2 Systems during the R/V Meteor Cruise 36/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained during the R/V Meteor Cruise 22/5 in the South Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A10, Dec. 1992-Jan, 1993) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr , Oct. 1992-April 1993) Surface Water and Atmospheric Underway Carbon Data Obtained During the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Indian Ocean Survey Cruises (R/V Knorr, Dec. 1994 Jan, 1996) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Akademik Ioffe Cruise in the South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section S4P, Feb.-April 1992) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-1 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P17C) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas Washington Cruise TUNES-3 in the Equatorial Pacific Ocean (WOCE section P16C) Carbon-14 Measurements in Surface Water CO2 from the Atlantic, Indian and Pacific Oceans, 1965-1994 Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During R/V Meteor Cruise 18/1 in the North Atlantic Ocean (WOCE Section A1E) Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the Central South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Sections P17S and P16S) during the TUNES-2 Expedition of the R/V Th

  7. Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During the R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise in the Pacific Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabine, C.L.; Key, R.M.; Hall, M.; Kozyr, A.

    1999-08-01

    This data documentation discusses the procedures and methods used to measure total carbon dioxide (TCO2), total alkalinity (TALK), and radiocarbon (delta 14C), at hydrographic stations, as well as the underway partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) during the R/V Thomas G. Thompson oceanographic cruise in the Pacific Ocean (Section P10). Conducted as part of the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE), the cruise began in Suva, Fiji, on October 5, 1993, and ended in Yokohama, Japan, on November 10, 1993. Measurements made along WOCE Section P10 included pressure, temperature, salinity [measured by conductivity temperature, and depth sensor (CTD)], bottle salinity, bottle oxygen, phosphate, nitrate, silicate, chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12), TCO2, TALK, delta 14C, and underway pCO2.

  8. PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) Database: A Data Synthesis Resource (NDP-92, ORNL/CDIAC-159)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Suzuki, T.; Ishii, M.; Aoyama, M. R; Christian, J. R.; Enyo, K.; Kawano, T.; Key, R. M.; Kosugi, N.; Kozyr, A.; Miller, L. A.; Murata, A.; Nakano, T.; Ono, T.; Saino, T.; Sasaki, K.; Sasano, D; Takatani, Y.; Wakita, M.; Sabine, C.

    PACIFICA (PACIFic ocean Interior CArbon) was an international collaborative project for synthesis of data on ocean interior carbon and its related parameters in the Pacific Ocean. The North Pacific Marine Science Organization (PICES), Section on Carbon and Climate (S-CC) supported the project. Hydrographic/hydrochemical datasets have been merged from a total of 272 cruises, including those from cruises conducted between the late 1980s and 2000 but not included in GLODAP, as well as CLIVAR/CO2 Repeat Hydrography datasets from the 2000s. Adjustments were calculated to account for analytical offsets in dissolved inorganic carbon, total alkalinity, salinity, oxygen, and nutrients (nitrate and nitrite, phosphate, and silicic acid) for each cruise as a result of the secondary quality control procedure, based on crossover analysis using data from deep layers (Tanhua et al., 2010). A total of 59 adjusted datasets from Line P off the west coast of Canada were also merged. Finally, the authors have produced the adjusted PACIFICA database that consists of datasets from a total of 306 cruises that also includes 34 datasets from WOCE Hydrographic Program cruises in the Pacific Ocean conducted in the 1990s. The PACIFICA database is available free of charge as a numeric data package (NDP-92) from the Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the primary PACIFICA data site at pacifica.pices.jp. The NDP consists of the original cruise data files, adjusted data product, and the documentation.

  9. ARM - Oceans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ListOceans Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Oceans Water vapor in the air eventually condenses and falls as rain, snow, sleet, or hail. Water that falls on land collects in rivers which carry it back to the ocean. The return of water to the ocean may be slowed when water

  10. Section 83

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction Validation and improvement of One of the major obstacles the current climate ... Experiment) and TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere ...

  11. Section 60

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    7 Generation and Maintenance of Cirrus Clouds by Numerically Modeled Thunderstorms H. E. Brooks National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories...

  12. Section 106

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    Figure 1). gress on the North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean (NSAAAO) site. ... accurately represent the current status of the NSAAAO. respectively, to ...

  13. Section 118

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    m D m r e D m . 2.4 r e , D m D m 25 Fm Session Papers 539 Variability of Ice Cloud Microphysical Parameters as Revealed by a Remote Sensing Method S. Y. Matrosov Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado at Boulder and National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency Environment Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado R. A. Kropfli National Oceanic and Atmospheric Agency Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction The vertical distribution

  14. Section 65

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    Investigating Cloud Radiative Forcing in the Tropical West Pacific Using a Single-Column Model J. C. Petch and J. T. Kiehl National Center for Atmospheric Research Boulder, Colorado Introduction The Tropical Western Pacific (TWP) is an important region for world climate (Webster and Lucas 1992) and was the subject of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA-COARE) in 1992/3. This experiment included an intensive observational period (IOP) from

  15. ocean energy technologies

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    ... Tribal Energy Program Intellectual Property Current EC Partnerships How to Partner Small ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers ocean energy technologies HomeTag:ocean ...

  16. Section 105

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    The 8-mm Cloud Profiling Radar for the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed Site: the First 1000 Hours K. Moran, A. Francavilla, D. Hazen, R. Lataitis, B. Martner, D. Merritt, M. J. Post, T. Uttal and D. Welsh National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado K. Widener Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington R. Strauch and L. Zhang Cooperative Institute for Research in the Environmental Sciences Boulder,

  17. Section 41

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    Cloud-Radiative Forcing of the Diurnal Cycle of Intense Convection in the Tropical Pacific W. M. Gray and J. D. Sheaffer Department of Atmospheric Science Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction This U.S. Department of Energy-Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (DOE-ARM) supported research is concerned with better delineating the nature of the diurnal cycle of intense convection over the tropical oceans and a comparative review of these observations with their implications

  18. SECTION H

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    Operations Contract Section H Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 360 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE ...

  19. SECTION E

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    E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. A143 E - i SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE WTP Contract Section E Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. A143 E - ii SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Clause Page E.1 DEAR 952.236-71 INSPECTION (APR 1994) ................................................................................ 1 E.2 INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE

  20. SECTION G

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    G-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 CORRESPONDENCE PROCEDURES ......

  1. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    K-1 SECTION J APPENDIX K CONTRACTOR'S TRANSITION PLAN (RESERVED) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-K-2

  2. SECTION J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    A-1 SECTION J APPENDIX A ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING ON HUMAN RESOURCES (TO BE NEGOTIATED DURING CONTRACT TRANSITION) The personnel appendix required by DEAR Subpart 970.31 entitled...

  3. SECTION J

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    J-F-1 SECTION J APPENDIX F CRITICAL STAFF Subject Matter Expert Subject Matter Canister Transfer Machine Engineering Waste Package Transfer Trolley Engineering Transport and ...

  4. SECTION I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section I, Page i PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS I-1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (NOV 2013) (AS MODIFIED BY DEAR 952.202-1) (REPLACED MODS 020, 029, 0084) ................................................................................................................................ 1 I-2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ................................................................................................. 1 I-3 FAR

  5. SECTION H

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    H Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 499 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION ......

  6. SECTION H

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    H Contract No: DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 491 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 WORKFORCE TRANSITION ......

  7. Section CC

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    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 464 J-11-1 ATTACHMENT J-11 CONTRACT DELIVERABLES TABLE J-11.1 DELIVERABLE LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID Deliverable DOE Contract...

  8. Section 66

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    3 ) (CF 2 Cl 2 ) (CHFCl 2 ) SF 6 CF 4 CCl 4 Session Papers 277 Figure 1. Spectral absorption cross-sections of CF 4 between 1281 and 1284 cm . The experimental -1 conditions...

  9. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    J-1 SECTION J APPENDIX J PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (TO BE NEGOTIATED AFTER CONTRACT AWARD) Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-J-2 Page Blank

  10. Section I

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    in Near-symmetric Collisions of 10A MeV Heavy Ions with Solid Targets V. Horvat, . Smit, R. L. Watson and K. Zaharakis Energy Dependence of Electron Loss Cross Sections for...

  11. Section CC

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    30 J-12-1 ATTACHMENT J-12 GOVERNMENT FURNISHED SERVICES AND INFORMATION TABLE J-12.1 GFS/I LIST FROM SECTION C (SOW) ID GFS/I GFS/I Due Contract Section GF0001 DOE will administer MOUs with other law enforcement agencies or other Federal agencies (e.g., U.S. Department of Defense [Yakima Training Center]). DOE will provide copies of MOUs and/or contracts to the MSC. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0002 DOE will provide Federal Commissions for Hanford Patrol personnel. As required C.2.1.1.1 GF0003 DOE

  12. SECTION C

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    C-1 PART 1 - THE SCHEDULE SECTION C DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATIONS/PERFORMANCE WORK STATEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS C.1 Hanford Occupational Medical Program .................................................................C-3 C.2 Description of Program Performance Requirements ................................................C-6 C.2.1 Firm Fixed Price Scope...................................................................................C-6 C.2.1.1 Medical Monitoring and Qualification Examinations

  13. SECTION B

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FY15 PEMP - May 13, 2015 1 PERFORMANCE EVALUATION AND MEASUREMENT PLAN (PEMP) ANNUAL FEE PLAN (AFP) 1 OCTOBER 2014 THROUGH 30 SEPTEMBER 2015 CONTRACT DE-EM0001971 May 13, 2015 I. INTRODUCTION This Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) contains a standard process for development, administration, and coordination of all phases of the fee determination process consistent with Section B.2 of the subject contract. II. ORGANIZATIONAL STRUCTURE AND DUTIES The following organizational

  14. Section L

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Section L - Attachment F - Past Performance Cover Letter and Questionnaire Date: ________________ Dear _________________: Our firm is submitting a proposal for a Department of Energy (DOE)/National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) Contract for the management and operation of the Nevada National Security Site with an estimated value of approximately $550M per year. Our firm is seeking your assistance. We are asking you to complete the attached questionnaire evaluating our performance on

  15. Section J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    M-1 Section J Appendix M Key Design, Licensing and Site Management M&O Milestone Chart Activity Planned Date Develop and Submit CD-2 (25%-30%) 08/2009 Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Balance of Plant Support Facilities (OCRWM Start of Construction 3/2012) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Initial Handling Facility (IHF) (OCRWM Start of Construction for IHF: 9/2013) TBD Submission of Construction Performance Specifications - Wet Handling

  16. Section Number:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OF APPLICABLE DIRECTIVES Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the following list of directives is applicable to this contract. List A Pursuant to the contract clause entitled, "Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives," the Contractor shall comply with the requirements of applicable Federal, State, and local laws and regulations, unless relief has been granted in writing by the appropriate

  17. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    D-1 SECTION J APPENDIX D KEY PERSONNEL Name Position Doug Cooper General Manager John Donnell Repository Licensing Lead Al Ebner, PE, PhD Repository Design Lead Steve Piccolo Deputy General Manager Steve White Quality & Performance Assurance Lead George Clare Project Management & Integration Lead Mike Hitchler Preclosure Safety Analysis Lead Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-D-2 POSITION DESCRIPTIONS OCRWM SPECIFIED KEY PERSONNEL 1. General Manager: Requires 10 years experience as a

  18. SECTION J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    H-1 SECTION J APPENDIX H CONTRACT GUIDANCE FOR PREPARATION OF DIVERSITY PLAN This Guidance is to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the Diversity elements and where these issues may already be addressed in the contract. To the extent these issues are already addressed in the contract, the Contractor need only cross reference the location. Contractor's Workforce The Department's contracts contain clauses on Equal Employment

  19. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oceanic Properties Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Oceanic Properties There are some other aspects that need to be examined regarding the imbalances in the current carbon cycle. First let's look at the effects of the ocean gaining 2 gigatonnes (1 gigatonne = 1x1012 kilograms)

  20. Ocean Energy Technology Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-08-05

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  1. Publication in Ocean Engineering

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Current EC Partnerships How to Partner Small Business Vouchers Pilot at Sandia National Laboratories Social Twitter Google + Vimeo GovDelivery SlideShare Publication in Ocean ...

  2. Ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, W.H.

    1983-03-17

    A brief explanation of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) concept and an estimate of the amount of energy that can be produced from the ocean resource without introducing environmental concerns are presented. Use of the OTEC system to generate electric power and products which can replace fossil fuels is shown. The OTEC program status and its prospects for the future are discussed.

  3. Section J

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    L-1 Section J Appendix L MEMORANDUM FROM DAVID R. HILL, GENERAL COUNSEL, DATED NOVEMBER 30, 2006, SUBJECT: ONGOING LICENSING SUPPORT NETWORK ("LSN") OBLIGATIONS Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-2 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-3 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-4 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-5 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-6 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-7 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-8 Contract No.: DE-RW0000005 QA:QA J-L-9 Contract No.:

  4. Ocean energy program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth's surface, they collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy cost-effectively and in a way that does not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where industry can accurately assess whether the technology is a viable energy conversion alternative, or supplement, to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the OET Program is concentrating on research that advances the OTEC technology. The program also continues to monitor and study developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts; but it is not actively developing these technologies now. 13 figs.

  5. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  6. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K.; Hoffert, M.I.; Siegenthaler, U.

    1994-02-01

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  7. Ocean energy program summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71{percent} of the earth's surface, this stored energy is realized as waves, currents, and thermal salinity gradients. The purpose of the federal Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness this ocean energy in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable manner. The OET Program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point where the commercial sector can assess whether applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives or supplements to systems. Past studies conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) have identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) as the largest potential contributor to United States energy supplies from the ocean resource. As a result, the OET Program concentrates on research to advance OTEC technology. Current program emphasis has shifted to open-cycle OTEC power system research because the closed-cycle OTEC system is at a more advanced stage of development and has already attracted industrial interest. During FY 1989, the OET Program focused primarily on the technical uncertainties associated with near-shore open-cycle OTEC systems ranging in size from 2 to 15 MW{sub e}. Activities were performed under three major program elements: thermodynamic research and analysis, experimental verification and testing, and materials and structures research. These efforts addressed a variety of technical problems whose resolution is crucial to demonstrating the viability of open-cycle OTEC technology. This publications is one of a series of documents on the Renewable Energy programs sponsored by the US Department of Energy. An overview of all the programs is available, entitled Programs in Renewable Energy.

  8. Ocean Power (4 Activities)

    K-12 Energy Lesson Plans and Activities Web site (EERE)

    Areas of the country that have an available coastline but are limited in other renewable resources can use the oceans to produce energy. We are familiar with the large hydroelectric dams that dot our nation, creating large reservoirs and flooding millions of acres of land. By turning to the restless seas we can find a source of energy that is not affected by clouds and the scarcity of wind. By using ocean power we can increase our need for power without having to deplete our existing non-renewable resources.

  9. Oceans '86 conference record

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-01-01

    These five volumes represent the proceedings of the Oceans '86 Conference Washington, DC, 23-25 September 1986. Volume 1 includes papers on Underwater Photography and Sensing; Marine Recreation; Diving; CTACTS (Charleston Tactical Aircrew Combat Training System); Offshore and Coastal Structures; Underwater Welding, Burning and Cutting; Advances in Ocean Mapping; Ocean Energy; Biofouling and Corrosion; Moorings, Cables and Connections; Marine Minerals; Remote Sensing and Satellites; and Acoustics Analysis. Volume 2 covers Data Base Management; Modeling and Simulation; Ocean Current Simulation; Instrumentation; Artificial Reefs and Fisheries; US Status and Trends; Education and Technology Transfer; Economic Potential and Coastal Zone Management; and Water Quality. Volume 3 includes papers on National and Regional Monitoring Strategies; New Techniques and Strategies for Monitoring; Indicator Parameters/Organisms; Historical Data; Crystal Cube for Coastal and Estuarine Degradation; and the Monitoring Gap. Volume 4 covers the Organotin Symposium - Chemistry; Toxicity Studies; and Environmental Monitoring and Modeling. Volume 5 includes papers on Advances in Oceanography; Applied Oceanography; Unmanned Vehicles and ROV's; Manned Vehicles; and Oceanographic Ships.

  10. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Name: National Oceanic and...

  11. Ocean current resource assessment | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean current resource assessment Ocean current resource assessment Ocean current resource assessment Office presentation icon 45oceanresourcegtrchaas.ppt More Documents & ...

  12. LLNL Ocean General Circulation Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-12-29

    The LLNL OGCM is a numerical ocean modeling tool for use in studying ocean circulation over a wide range of space and time scales, with primary applications to climate change and carbon cycle science.

  13. Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Condry. Website: www.oceannavitas.com References: Ocean Navitas&127;UNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU&127; This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Ocean...

  14. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  15. Turbines in the ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, F.G.W.; Charlier, R.H.

    1981-09-01

    It is noted that the relatively high-speed ocean currents flowing northward along the east coast of the U.S. may be able to supply a significant proportion of the future electric power requirements of urban areas. The Gulf Stream core lies only about 20 miles east of Miami here its near-surface water reaches velocities of 4.3 miles per hour. Attention is called to the estimate that the energy available in the current of the Gulf Stream adjacent to Florida is approximately equivalent to that generated by 25 1,000-megawatt power plants. It is also contended that this power could be produced at competitive prices during the 1980s using large turbines moored below the ocean surface near the center of the Stream. Assuming an average ocean-current speed between 4 and 5 knots at the current core, the power density of a hydroturbine could reach 410 watts per square foot, about 100 times that of a wind-driven device of similar scale operating in an airflow of approximately 11 knots.

  16. COLLOQUIUM: Ocean Acoustic Ecology: Great Whales, Ocean Scales...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The dramatic increase in ocean acoustic sensor data offers huge opportunities for ... Keeping pace with big data for current access and analyses needs at appropriate scales ...

  17. ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ocean Currents Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents Objective The objective of this activity is to demonstrate the effect of cooling and heating on currents in the ocean. Materials Each student or group of students will need the following: Large beaker

  18. International Conference on Ocean Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Join the Energy Department in Edinburgh, Scotland from February 23–25th for the International Conference on Ocean Energy (ICOE) conference.

  19. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ascari, Matthew

    2012-10-28

    The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world’s ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today’s state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources.

  20. Section D - G

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING Request for Proposal #DE-RFP 36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging................................................................................................................... 1 D.2 Marking ..................................................................................................................... 1 Section D - Page ii Request for Proposal #DE-RFP 36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING D.1

  1. SECTION L… ATTACHMENT H

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    III-SECTION J APPENDIX K TRANSITION PLAN To be Added at a Later Date

  2. Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oceanic Technology Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Oceanic Technology Inc Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.hioceanictech.com This...

  3. Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Ocean Wave Energy Region: United States Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the...

  4. Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC Place: Saulsbury, Tennessee Zip: 38067 Sector: Ocean Product: Marine energy technology firm developing ocean wave powered generators. Coordinates: 35.052242,...

  5. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Report about the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization project, which focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy from the world's ocean thermal ...

  6. Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ocean Energy Ltd Address: 3 Casement Square Place: Cobh Region: Ireland Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone Number:...

  7. Scott Wilson Oceans | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wilson Oceans Jump to: navigation, search Name: Scott Wilson Oceans Place: Chesterfield, United Kingdom Zip: S30 1JF Sector: Wind energy Product: Specialist in the engineering of...

  8. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; Wichels, Antje; Gerdts, Gunnar; Polymenakou, Paraskevi; Kotoulas, Giorgos; Siam, Rania; Abdallah, Rehab Z.; Sonnenschein, Eva C.; Cariou, Thierry; O’Gara, Fergal; Jackson, Stephen; Orlic, Sandi; Steinke, Michael; Busch, Julia; Duarte, Bernardo; Caçador, Isabel; Canning-Clode, João; Bobrova, Oleksandra; Marteinsson, Viggo; Reynisson, Eyjolfur; Loureiro, Clara Magalhães; Luna, Gian Marco; Quero, Grazia Marina; Löscher, Carolin R.; Kremp, Anke; DeLorenzo, Marie E.; Øvreås, Lise; Tolman, Jennifer; LaRoche, Julie; Penna, Antonella; Frischer, Marc; Davis, Timothy; Katherine, Barker; Meyer, Christopher P.; Ramos, Sandra; Magalhães, Catarina; Jude-Lemeilleur, Florence; Aguirre-Macedo, Ma Leopoldina; Wang, Shiao; Poulton, Nicole; Jones, Scott; Collin, Rachel; Fuhrman, Jed A.; Conan, Pascal; Alonso, Cecilia; Stambler, Noga; Goodwin, Kelly; Yakimov, Michael M.; Baltar, Federico; Bodrossy, Levente; Van De Kamp, Jodie; Frampton, Dion M. F.; Ostrowski, Martin; Van Ruth, Paul; Malthouse, Paul; Claus, Simon; Deneudt, Klaas; Mortelmans, Jonas; Pitois, Sophie; Wallom, David; Salter, Ian; Costa, Rodrigo; Schroeder, Declan C.; Kandil, Mahrous M.; Amaral, Valentina; Biancalana, Florencia; Santana, Rafael; Pedrotti, Maria Luiza; Yoshida, Takashi; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Ingleton, Tim; Munnik, Kate; Rodriguez-Ezpeleta, Naiara; Berteaux-Lecellier, Veronique; Wecker, Patricia; Cancio, Ibon; Vaulot, Daniel; Bienhold, Christina; Ghazal, Hassan; Chaouni, Bouchra; Essayeh, Soumya; Ettamimi, Sara; Zaid, El Houcine; Boukhatem, Noureddine; Bouali, Abderrahim; Chahboune, Rajaa; Barrijal, Said; Timinouni, Mohammed; El Otmani, Fatima; Bennani, Mohamed; Mea, Marianna; Todorova, Nadezhda; Karamfilov, Ventzislav; ten Hoopen, Petra; Cochrane, Guy; L’Haridon, Stephane; Bizsel, Kemal Can; Vezzi, Alessandro; Lauro, Federico M.; Martin, Patrick; Jensen, Rachelle M.; Hinks, Jamie; Gebbels, Susan; Rosselli, Riccardo; De Pascale, Fabio; Schiavon, Riccardo; dos Santos, Antonina; Villar, Emilie; Pesant, Stéphane; Cataletto, Bruno; Malfatti, Francesca; Edirisinghe, Ranjith; Silveira, Jorge A. Herrera; Barbier, Michele; Turk, Valentina; Tinta, Tinkara; Fuller, Wayne J.; Salihoglu, Ilkay; Serakinci, Nedime; Ergoren, Mahmut Cerkez; Bresnan, Eileen; Iriberri, Juan; Nyhus, Paul Anders Fronth; Bente, Edvardsen; Karlsen, Hans Erik; Golyshin, Peter N.; Gasol, Josep M.; Moncheva, Snejana; Dzhembekova, Nina; Johnson, Zackary; Sinigalliano, Christopher David; Gidley, Maribeth Louise; Zingone, Adriana; Danovaro, Roberto; Tsiamis, George; Clark, Melody S.; Costa, Ana Cristina; El Bour, Monia; Martins, Ana M.; Collins, R. Eric; Ducluzeau, Anne-Lise; Martinez, Jonathan; Costello, Mark J.; Amaral-Zettler, Linda A.; Gilbert, Jack A.; Davies, Neil; Field, Dawn; Glöckner, Frank Oliver

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and their embedded functional traits.

  9. 14655 Section H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section H Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 H-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 INCUMBENT EMPLOYEES HIRING PREFERENCES ...

  10. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E SECTION J APPENDIX E PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT(S) [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to contract award. For Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) template, see Section L, Attachment A.]

  11. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to...

  12. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I SECTION J APPENDIX I SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to

  13. Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the ability to produce 10000 TWh per year, which is greater than other types of ocean energy such as tides, marine currents and salinity gradient. OTEC functions best when...

  14. Ocean Renewable Energy Conference X

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10th annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference provides attendees a forum to share new ideas and concepts, opportunity to learn from leading-edge practitioners and policy-makers, information...

  15. MPAS-Ocean Development Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Ringler, Todd D.; Petersen, Mark R.; Jones, Philip W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.

    2012-06-13

    The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

  16. Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ν2006 1 Neutrino Cross Section Measurements with MiniBooNE Outline: - overview - neutrino reaction channels and event totals - CC channels, preliminary results - NC channels, (new) preliminary results - antineutrino running R. Tayloe, Indiana U. ν2006 2 Neutrino Cross Sections - The main goal of MiniBooNE (MB) is a ν µ → ν e search (B. Fleming, next session) - High rates and good particle ID also allow accurate cross section measurements. - Important for MB and other oscillation

  17. Section 106 Archaeology Guidance

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Advisory Council on Historic Preservation's Section 106 guidance is designed to assist federal agencies in making effective management decisions about archaeological resources in completing the requirements of Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (16 U.S.C. 470f) and its implementing regulations (36 CFR Part 800). This guidance highlights the decision-making role of the federal agency in the Section 106 process. It is also designed for use by State and Tribal Historic Preservation Officers, Indian tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, and cultural resource management professionals when assisting federal agencies to meet their responsibilities under Section 106.

  18. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  19. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 J-1 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J -- LIST OF ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Attachment Number Title of Attachment Modification Number...

  20. PART III ? SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX M CONTRACTOR COMMITMENTS, AGREEMENTS, AND UNDERSTANDINGS Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award....

  1. 14655 Section D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING......

  2. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE ... and ... the Financial Institution a financial institution ...

  3. Sectional device handling tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Candee, Clark B. (Monroeville, PA)

    1988-07-12

    Apparatus for remotely handling a device in an irradiated underwater environment includes a plurality of tubular sections interconnected end-to-end to form a handling structure, the bottom section being adapted for connection to the device. A support section is connected to the top tubular section and is adapted to be suspended from an overhead crane. Each section is flanged at its opposite ends. Axially retractable bolts in each bottom flange are threadedly engageable with holes in the top flange of an adjacent section, each bolt being biased to its retracted position and retained in place on the bottom flange. Guide pins on each top flange cooperate with mating holes on adjacent bottom flanges to guide movement of the parts to the proper interconnection orientation. Each section carries two hydraulic line segments provided with quick-connect/disconnect fittings at their opposite ends for connection to the segments of adjacent tubular sections upon interconnection thereof to form control lines which are connectable to the device and to an associated control console.

  4. Section I - Contract Clauses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AC27-10RV15051 Conformed thru Contract Modification No. 106 I-1 PART II - CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I - CONTRACT CLAUSES TABLE OF CONTENTS Section I - Contract Clauses ................................................................................................................... 4 I.1 FAR 52.202-1 Definitions. (JUL 2004) ....................................................................................... 4 I.2 FAR 52.203-3 Gratuities (APR 1984)

  5. 14655 Section D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING......................................................................................................................................1 D.2 MARKING ..........................................................................................................................................1 D-i River Corridor Closure Contract Section D Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I

  6. The Ocean Sampling Day Consortium

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopf, Anna; Bicak, Mesude; Kottmann, Renzo; Schnetzer, Julia; Kostadinov, Ivaylo; Lehmann, Katja; Fernandez-Guerra, Antonio; Jeanthon, Christian; Rahav, Eyal; Ullrich, Matthias; et al

    2015-06-19

    In this study, Ocean Sampling Day was initiated by the EU-funded Micro B3 (Marine Microbial Biodiversity, Bioinformatics, Biotechnology) project to obtain a snapshot of the marine microbial biodiversity and function of the world’s oceans. It is a simultaneous global mega-sequencing campaign aiming to generate the largest standardized microbial data set in a single day. This will be achievable only through the coordinated efforts of an Ocean Sampling Day Consortium, supportive partnerships and networks between sites. This commentary outlines the establishment, function and aims of the Consortium and describes our vision for a sustainable study of marine microbial communities and theirmore » embedded functional traits.« less

  7. Ocean current wave interaction study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayes, J.G.

    1980-09-20

    A numerical model has been developed to incorporate refraction of ocean surface gravity waves by major ocean currents. The model is initialized with directional wave spectra and verified with aircraft synthetic aperture radar X band spectra, laser profilometer spectra, and pitch and roll buoy data. Data collected during the Marineland test experiment are used as surface truth observations for the wave-current study. Evidence of Gulf Stream refraction and trapping of surface waves as well as caustics in the current is shown and modeled assuming a nonuniform Gulf Stream distribution. Frequency and directional resolution of the wave spectral distribution and the current refraction patterns illustrates the need for further study of ocean current-wave interaction in wave refraction studies.

  8. Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Renewable Energy » Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind

  9. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14655 640 PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF ATTACHMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS ATTACHMENT J-1 TABLE OF RIVER...

  10. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, Mod 332 J.6-1 ATTACHMENT J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.6, Mod 332 J.6-2 SMALL...

  11. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    E SECTION J APPENDIX E PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT(S) Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer prior to contract award. For Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) template,...

  12. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, Revision 4 ATTACHMENT J.10 WAGE DETERMINATIONS - SERVICE CONTRACT ACT (SCA) AND DAVIS-BACON ACT J.10-1 Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788...

  13. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12152015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004TU02 6Li(p, ): coincidence yields, deduced S-factors low 1, S-factors from...

  14. 7Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12162015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997GO13 7Li(pol. p, ): total , S-factor for capture to third-excited state 0 -...

  15. HASQARD Section 4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section 4.2.4, Volume 2, Revision 3 requires: "The field custodian shall seal the cap of the individual sample container so that any tampering is easy to detect. Custody...

  16. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lockerby, R.W.

    1981-01-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is reviewed briefly. The two types of OTEC system (open and closed) are described and limitations are pointed out. A bibliography of 148 references on OTEC is given for the time period 1975 to 1980. Entries are arranged alphabetically according to the author's name. (MJJ)

  17. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    J, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX J DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE In accordance with Section I clause DEAR 970.5226-1, Diversity Plan, this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) for each of the diversity elements within the clause. The Contractor shall submit a Diversity Plan to the Contracting Officer for approval within 90 days after the effective date of this

  18. Section 1251 Report Update

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    November 2010 Update to the National Defense Authorization Act of FY2010 Section 1251 Report New START Treaty Framework and Nuclear Force Structure Plans 1. Introduction This paper updates elements of the report that was submitted to Congress on May 13, 2010, pursuant to section 1251 of the National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2010 (Public Law 111-84) ("1251 Report"). 2. National Nuclear Security Administration and modernization of the complex - an overview From FY 2005

  19. Indian National Institute of Ocean Technology | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Ocean Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name: Indian National Institute of Ocean Technology Place: Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India Sector: Ocean Product: Research institute...

  20. MHK Technologies/Ocean Treader floating | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    homepage Ocean Treader floating.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsDevelopment of Ocean...

  1. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Animal, Vegetable or Mineral? Iron is a limiting nutrient in many parts of the oceans, nowhere more so than in the Southern Ocean's photic zone, which receives enough sunlight for...

  2. Ocean Flow Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ocean Flow Energy Place: United Kingdom Zip: NE29 6NL Product: Tidal energy device developer. References: Ocean Flow Energy1 This article...

  3. Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Edit with form History Open Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Open Ocean Energy Ltd Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the...

  4. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, Mod 420 J.6-1 ATTACHMENT J.6 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.6, Mod 420 J.6-2 SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN for United States Department of Energy Plateau Remediation Contract Submitted by: CH2M HILL PLATEAU REMEDIATION COMPANY Prime Contractor FISCAL YEARS 2009-2018 (Base and Option Period) CONTRACT NUMBER DE-AC06-08RL14788 Revision 4 December 30, 2014 Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract

  5. 14655 Section E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 A000 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 FAR 52.246-5 INSPECTION OF SERVICES - COST REIMBURSEMENT (APR 1984) .................1 E.2 FIELD INSPECTION ..........................................................................................................................1 E.3 DOE INSPECTION ............................................................................................................................2 E.4

  6. SECTION I - CONTRACT CLAUSES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I-1 PART II -CONTRACT CLAUSES SECTION I TABLE OF CONTENTS The following Clauses apply to the Scope of the Contract ........................................................ 8 I.1 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004) as modified by DEAR 952.202-1 (MAR 2002) .................................................................................................................................. 8 I.2 FAR 52.203-3 GRATUITIES (APR 1984) ...................................................................... 8

  7. SECTIONS B THROUGH H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Modification 486 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT ................................................................................................ B-1 B.2 ITEM(S) BEING ACQUIRED ....................................................................................... B-1 B.3 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS ........................................................... B-5 B.4 CONTRACT

  8. SECTIONS B THROUGH H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC27-08RV14800 Modification No. 372 B-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT .................................................................................................... 2 B.2 ITEM(S) BEING ACQUIRED ........................................................................................... 2 B.3 OBLIGATION AND AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS ............................................................. 3 B.4

  9. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1973MC12 16O(p, ): threshold - 7.7 X4 10172012 1981DY03 16O(p, p): for production of...

  10. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1B(p, X) (Current as of 12172015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2004RO27, 2004SP03 11B(p, ): deduced , S-factor Ecm 0 - 1 X4 11072012...

  11. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8O(p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008LA06 18O(p, ): deduced S-factor Ecm 0 - 1.5 46 12032012...

  12. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2010LA11 10B(p, ): deduced S(E) E(cm) 0 - 0.15 1 11302011 1993AN06 10B(p, ):...

  13. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1981DY03 20Ne(p, p'): for production of -rays threshold - 23 1.63-MeV -rays...

  14. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12162015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1997ZA06 9Be(p, ), (p, d): S-factor 16 - 390 keV X4 01232013 1973SI27 9Be(p,...

  15. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 19F(p, n): < 30 X4 04262012 2008CO03 19F(p, ): Ecm 200 - 700 keV X4 0514...

  16. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 12172015) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001NE15 13C(p, ): , deduced S(E) ratio < 160 keV X4 09122011 1994KI02 13C(p,...

  17. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    N(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003MU12 14N(p, ): deduced astrophysical S-factors < 600 keV X4 05062013 1990WA10 14N(p, n):...

  18. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 05152012) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1990WA10 15N(p, n): < 30 X4 04262012 1982RE06 15N(p, ): 78 - 810 keV X4...

  19. Global warming and changes in ocean circulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duffy, P.B.; Caldeira, K.C.

    1998-02-01

    This final report provides an overview of the goals and accomplishments of this project. Modeling and observational work has raised the possibility that global warming may cause changes in the circulation of the ocean. If such changes would occur they could have important climatic consequences. The first technical goal of this project was to investigate some of these possible changes in ocean circulation in a quantitative way, using a state-of -the-art numerical model of the ocean. Another goal was to develop our ocean model, a detailed three-dimensional numerical model of the ocean circulation and ocean carbon cycles. A major non-technical goal was to establish LLNL as a center of excellence in modelling the ocean circulation and carbon cycle.

  20. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, Modification 332 J.7-1 ATTACHMENT J.7 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.7, Modification 332 J.7-2 Small Disadvantaged Business (SDB) Participation Program Targets ATTACHMENT J.7 SMALL DISADVANTAGED BUSINESS PARTICIPATION PROGRAM TARGETS (a) OFFEROR - CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company - Prime: AREVA Federal Services, LLC; Fluor Federal Services, Inc. (base period only); East

  1. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, Revision 3, 420 J.8-1 ATTACHMENT J.8 ADVANCE UNDERSTANDING OF COSTS In accordance with the Section H Clause entitled, Advance Understanding of Costs, this attachment sets forth the basis for determining the allowability of costs associated with expenditures that have cost implications under the Contract, that are not identified in other documents requiring the review and approval of the contracting officer. Unless a date is provided within an item of cost identified below, all items within

  2. PART III - SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE PAYMENTS-CLEARED FINANCING ARRANGEMENT Note: (1) The Contractor shall enter into a new banking agreement(s) during the Transition Term of the Contract, utilizing the format contained in this Appendix and include other applicable Contract terms and conditions. (2) Items in brackets [ ] below are provided for clarification and will be removed from the document prior to execution. Agreement entered into this,

  3. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    H DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE To Be Updated during Transition With regard to the Contract Section I Clause entitled "Diversity Plan", this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department for each of the clause's Diversity elements. If the Contractor's current policy or procedure already addresses the following elements, the Contractor need only provide a copy of the policy or procedure to the Contracting Officer and

  4. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Corporation Contract No. DE-AC04-94AL85000 Modification No. 585 Attachment 2 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the

  5. Part III - Section J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M280 Attachment 1 Page 1 of 5 Part III - Section J Appendix G List of Applicable Directives and NNSA Policy Letters In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. DIRECTIVE NUMBER DATE DOE DIRECTIVE TITLE APPH Chapter X Revision 10 09/08/98 Accounting Practices & Procedures Handbook Chapter

  6. 10Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Be(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1970GO04 10Be(p, γ0): σ 0.6 - 6.3 θ = 0°, θ = 90° 06/05/2012 1987ERZY 10Be(p, n): σ 0.9 - 2 X4 05/15/2012 The following references may be related but not included. 1991GOZV Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March 2016

  7. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2, Modification 476 J.2-1 ATTACHMENT J.2 REQUIREMENTS SOURCES AND IMPLEMENTING DOCUMENTS The following lists are provided in accordance with the Section I Clause entitled, DEAR 970.5204-2, Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives. LIST A: APPLICABLE FEDERAL, STATE, AND LOCAL REGULATIONS Table J.2.1 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Document Number Title 10 CFR 63 Disposal of High-Level Radioactive Wastes in a Geologic Repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada 10 CFR 71 Packaging And Transportation Of

  8. 14655 Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, Revision 5 J.10-1 ATTACHMENT J.10 WAGE DETERMINATIONS - SERVICE CONTRACT ACT (SCA) AND DAVIS-BACON ACT Plateau Remediation Contract Section J Contract No. DE-AC06-08RL14788 Attachment J.10, Revision 5 J.10-2 SERVICE CONTRACT ACT WAGE DETERMINATION WD 05-2569 (Rev.-18) was first posted on www.wdol.gov on 07/14/2015 ***************************************************************************** REGISTER OF WAGE DETERMINATIONS UNDER | U.S. DEPARTMENT OF LABOR THE SERVICE CONTRACT ACT | EMPLOYMENT

  9. Cross-Section Measurement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section Measurement of 2 H(n,np)n at 16 MeV in Symmetric Constant Relative Energy Configurations Alexander Hoff Couture A dissertation submitted to the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. Chapel Hill 2011 Approved by: T. B. Clegg, Advisor C. R. Howell, Advisor H. J. Karwowski, Reader J. Lu, Reader J. Engel, Reader c 2011 Alexander Hoff Couture ALL

  10. Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Estimating Three-Dimensional Cloudy Radiative Transfer Effects from Time-Height Cross Sections C. Hannay and R. Pincus National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Diagnostics Center Boulder, Colorado K. F. Evans Program in Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences University of Colorado Boulder, Colorado Introduction Clouds in the atmosphere are finite in extent and variable in every direction and in time. Long data sets from ground-based profilers, such as lidars or cloud radars, could

  11. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaii |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaii National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Honolulu, Hawaii Photo of a Staff Residence at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii The staff residences at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center in Hawaii now have solar water heating systems funded by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). The Center is part of the Department of Commerce's National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (DOC-NOAA). New

  12. Section L, Paragraph L-4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION L ATTACHMENT D CROSS REFERENCE MATRIX Section L Section M Offeror's Proposal Criterion 1: PAST PERFORMANCE L-15 (a) M-3 (a) Criterion 2: SITE ORGANIZATION AND...

  13. Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southern CA Area Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic, Ocean, Renewable Energy Product: OTEC Number of Employees: 28 Year Founded: 1973 Phone Number: 808.259.8871 Website:...

  14. Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Forest

    2011-04-26

    Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  15. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    so than in the Southern Ocean's photic zone, which receives enough sunlight for photosynthesis to occur, but whose biological diversity is limited due to a lack of bioavailable...

  16. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll...

  17. Ocean Electric Power | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Electric Power Place: United Kingdom Sector: Renewable Energy Product: UK-based offshore project developer. The firm is actively engaged in the development of offshore...

  18. Analyzing ocean mixing reveals insight on climate

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Los Alamos National Laboratory Nancy Ambrosiano Communications Office (505) 667-0471 Email "Not only does each particle tell us about the ocean currents, but groups of particles ...

  19. Hawaii Ocean Science and Technology Park

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Tribal Energy Program Intellectual Property Current EC Partnerships How to Partner Small ... SunShot Grand Challenge: Regional Test Centers Hawaii Ocean Science and Technology Park ...

  20. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    At bottom left, the kinds of iron species found in two transects of the Southern Ocean are ... (ACC stands for Antarctic Circumpolar Current.) The map shows chlorophyll ...

  1. Ocean Renewable Power Company | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    LLC was founded in 2004 for the purpose of generating reliable, competitive, emission-free electricity from the energy resources of the oceans. Coordinates: 45.511795,...

  2. 10B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1992MC03 10B(α, α): σ relative to Rutherford scattering 1 - 3.3 X4 05/02/2012 1969GA01 10B(α, p), (α α'): relative σ at θ = 90° for Eγ = 1.0 - 3.5 0.170 MeV, 3.088 MeV, 3.682 MeV, 3.852 MeV, 0.717 MeV 06/18/2012 1973VA25 10B(α, n): laboratory differential σ 1.0 - 5.0 for n0: θ = 0°, θ = 90°, θ = 160° X4 04/04/2011 for n1: θ = 0°, θ = 90° for n23: θ = 0°, θ = 90° 10B(α, n):

  3. 11B Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1991WA02 11B(α, n): thick-target yield of Eα = 411, 605 and 606 keV resonance 350 - 2400 keV 1 X4 04/04/2011 11B(α, n): for 606-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): for 411-keV resonance after subtraction of the 605-keV resonance 1 11B(α, n): S-factor 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thick-target 400 - 500 keV 1 11B(α, n): S-factor for thin-target 1 1966MA04, Errata 11B(α, n): excitation curve < 4.5 for

  4. 11C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013SO11 11C(p, γ): deduced astrophysical reaction rates and S-factors X4 12/14/2015 2003LI51 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor low X4 09/12/2011 2003TA02 11C(p, γ): deduced S-factor 0 - 0.7 X4 09/12/2011 2003KU36 11C(p, p): elastic scattering σ ~ 0.2 - 3.2 θcm = 180° 09/08/2011 Back to (p, X) Main Page Back to (α, X) Main Page Back to Datacomp Home Page Last modified: 02 March

  5. 13C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2006JO11 13C(α, n): deduced S(E) ~ 0 - 1 from (1993BR17), from (1993DR08) X4 08/04/2011 2001HE22 13C(α, n): S(E) 0 - 2 S-factor 11/15/2011 2003KA51 13C(α, n): deduced S-factors, reaction rate Ecm ~ 200 - 800 keV X4 05/01/2012 1993DR08 13C(α, n): excitation function and S(E) ~ 275 - 1075 keV σ, S-factor X4 08/04/2011 2008HE11 13C(α, n): σ, reaction yields and S(E) Ecm = 320 - 700 keV σ, Table

  6. 14N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971CO27 14N(α, γ): thick target yield 0.5 - 1.2 1 08/04/2011 2000GO43 14N(α, γ): resonance yields, deduced astrophysical reaction rates 550 - 1300 keV X4 03/01/2012 1973RO03 14N(α, γ): γ-ray yield 1.0 - 3.2 1 04/30/2012 1980MA26 14N(α, α): σ 1.5, 1.6 X4 03/01/2012 2007CH25 14N(α, γ): deduced resonance parameters 1620 - 1775 keV X4 03/01/2012 1994YE11 14N(α, α): σ(θ)/σ(Rutherford) 2

  7. 18O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2003DA19 18O(α, γ): deduced resonance strengths ~ 470 - 770 keV X4 02/13/2012 1978TR05 18O(α, γ): excitation function for the 1.27 MeV secondary γ-ray transition 0.6 - 2.3 θγ = 0° 02/29/2012 1990VO06 18O(α, γ): resonance γ yields < 0.78 X4 02/13/2012 1973BA10 18O(α, n): σ with target thickness 1 - 5 6 keV, 13 keV 06/06/2011 1956BO61 18O(α, n): neutron yields 1.8 - 5.3 0° - 30° X4

  8. 19F Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2008UG01 19F(α, p): yield curves, σ 792 - 1993 keV X4 09/14/2011 2005UG04 19F(α, p1γ): excitation curve 1238 - 2009 keV 1 11/30/2011 19F(α, p0): excitation curve 1 19F(α, p1): excitation curve 1 1984CS01 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 3.7 X4 09/14/2011 1994CH36 19F(α, α): σ 1.5 - 4.5 X4 09/14/2011 2000WR01 19F(α, n): neutron yields and σ 2.28 - 3.10 X4 09/14/2011 1977VA10 19F(α, n): differential

  9. 6Li Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1985NE05 6Li(α, γ): γ thick target yield resonance X4 02/15/2012 1966FO05 6Li(α, γ): σ 0.9 - 3.0 2 < Eγ < 4 MeV, 4 < Eγ < 7 MeV, thick target capture γ-ray yield, capture γ-ray yield of 2.43 MeV resonance 02/29/2012 1989BA24 6Li(α, γ): σ 1.085, 1.175 X4 02/15/2012 1979SP01 6Li(α, γ): thick target yield curve for 718 keV γ-rays 1140 - 1250 keV 1175 keV resonance 07/19/2011

  10. 9Be Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 01/21/2015) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1994WR01 9Be(α, n): σ, thick target yield, deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.16 - 1.87 S(E) X4 01/24/2012 2011GI05 9Be(α, nγ): σ for n1 0.3 - 7.9 linear scale, log scale 06/18/2012 1968DA05 9Be(α, n): excitation function at θ = 0° 0.34 - 0.68 n0, n1 X4 07/19/2011 1994HA32 9Be(α, n): excitation function 480- 740 keV 1 01/24/2012 1994LE18 9Be(α, α): σ at θ = 170.5° 0.5- 3 X4 01/11/2012 1996KU07

  11. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    value analysis described in this Section M. (b) The instructions set forth in Section L are designed to provide guidance to the Offeror concerning documentation that will be...

  12. PART III-SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C SECTION J APPENDIX C TRANSITION PLAN Plan: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer. Requirements: In accordance with Section F, Deliverables During Transition, the Contractor...

  13. SECTION J, APPENDIX B - PEP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION J APPENDIX B PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PLAN Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084 Intentionally left blank for Internet posting purposes. Section J, Appendix B, Page 1...

  14. SECTION J, APPENDIX B - PEP

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION J APPENDIX B PERFORMANCE EVALUATION PLAN Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084 Intentionally left blank for Internet posting purposes. Section J, Appendix B, Page 1

  15. 12C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2009MA70 12C(α, γ0): σ 0 - 2.27 X4 05/01/2012 2012OU01 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.3 - 3.5 X4 02/12/2015 1997KU18 12C(α, γ): analyzed S-factor Ecm = 0.9 - 3 X4 05/10/2012 1987RE02 12C(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 0.94 - 2.84 X4 05/09/2012 2001HA31 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factors Ecm = 0.95 - 2.78 E1, E2 06/18/2012 2001KU09 12C(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.95 - 2.8 X4 05/09/2012

  16. 14C Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C(p, X) (Incomplete) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1969SI04 14C(p, γ): γ-rays yield for 230 - 690 keV Eγ ≥ 2.8 MeV 08/15/2013 1990GO25 14C(p, γ): σ, deduced S-factor 250 - 740 keV X4 10/28/2014 1968HE12 14C(p, γ): γ-ray yield 0.6 - 2.7 γ0 01/06/2015 1991WA02 14C(p, n): σ 1.0 - 1.55 X4 10/28/2014 1968HA27 14C(p, p): σ at θcm = 1.0 - 2.7 39.2°, 54.7°, 90°, 125.3°, 161.4° 08/15/2013 1971KU01 14C(p, γ0): excitation function at θ = 90° 1.3 - 2.6 1

  17. 15N Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2002WI18 15N(α γ): σ 461 - 2642 keV X4 09/12/2011 1997WI12 15N(α γ): σ 0.65 - 2.65 X4 09/12/2011 1995WI26 15N(α γ): σ 0.67 - 0.69 X4 09/12/2011 1969AI01 15N(α γ): γ-ray excitation curve for 3.0 ≤ Eγ ≤ 7.0 MeV 2.5 - 3.2 1 11/30/2011 1977DI08 15N(α, γ): γ-ray excitation curve near Eα = 3.15 MeV for transitions to 3146 - 3158 keV five low-lying states, 4.65 MeV (13/2+) state

  18. 16O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6O(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1971TO06 16O(α, γ): σ 0.85 - 1.8 X4 09/15/2011 1953CA44 16O(α, α): σ 0.94 - 4.0 X4 09/15/2011 1997KU18 16O(α, γ): analyzed S-factor 1 - 3.25 X4 05/10/2012 1980MA27 16O(α, α): σ 1.305 - 1.330; 2.950 - 3.075 X4 02/14/2012 16O(α, γ): σ 1.37, 2.6, 2.9, 3.036 1987HA24 16O(α, γ): σ Ecm = 1.7 - 2.35 X4 02/14/2012 1990LE06 16O(α, α): σ 1.8 - 5 X4 03/12/2011 1985JA17 16O(α, α): σ 2

  19. 17O Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2013BE11; see also 2012BEZP 17O(α, n), (α, γ): σ, S-factors 0.8 - 2.3 X4 02/12/2015 1973BA10 17O(α, n): neutron yields with target thickness 0.9 - 5.3 ~ 2.5 keV, 6 keV, 13 keV, ~ 35 keV 06/06/2011 1976MC12 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.4 - 2.3 θγ = 50° 04/28/2011 17O(α, n0): yield of neutrons θn = 120° 17O(α, n1): yield of 1.63-MeV γ's 1.825 - 1.885 θγ = 0° 05/03/2011 17O(α,

  20. 3H Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3H(α, X) (Current as of 02/01/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 2001TO07 3H(α, γ): deduced S-factor Ecm = 0.05 - 0.8 X4 01/09/2012 1994BR25 3H(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor Ecm = 50 - 1200 keV X4 01/09/2012 1987SC18 3H(α, γ): σ, deduced S-factor Ecm = 79 - 464 keV X4 01/09/2012 1988SA13 3H(α, α): recoil σ 0.5 - 2.5 X4 01/09/2012 1987BU18 3H(α, γ): σ and S-factor 0.7 - 2 X4 01/09/2012 1968IV01 3H(α, α): elastic scattering σ 3 - 11 Table 9 X4

  1. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1980BE06 3He(pol. p, p): σ 0.3 - 1.0 X4 10/30/2014 1964IM03 3He(p, γ): deduced σ limit for -0.6 < Q < +4.0 MeV 0.5 - 2.6 X4 10/30/2014 1966DR03 3He(p, p): σ 2.38 - 4.46 X4 10/30/2014 1974SO06 3He(p, X): total reaction σ 18 - 48 1 03/07/2011 1976SO01 3He(p, X): total reaction σ 18 - 48 1 X4 03/08/2011 2007SH39 3He(pol. p, π+): differential σ 200, 300, 400 X4 10/30/2014 1985EP01 3He(p,

  2. 3He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    α, X) (Current as of 05/14/2012) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1982KR05 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 107 - 1266 keV X4 01/05/2012 1969NA24 3He(α, γ): σ and S-factor 164 - 245 keV σ, S(E) X4 07/19/2011 1984OS03 3He(α, γ): σ 165 - 1169 keV X4 01/05/2012 1982OS02 3He(α, γ): S-factor 165 - 1170 keV S34(Ecm) X4 07/19/2011 1988HI06 3He(α, γ): σ Ecm = 195 - 686 keV X4 01/05/2012 2007CO17 3He(α, γ): deduced σ and S-factor 220, 250, 400 keV X4 01/05/2012

  3. 4He Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    p, X) (Current as of 03/01/2016) NSR Reaction Ep (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1974KR07 4He(p, p): σ 0.5 - 3 X4 10/23/2014 2004PU02 4He(p, p): σ(θ = 128.7°) 1.2 - 5.2 X4 10/23/2014 1997NU02 4He(p, p): σ 1.4 - 6 X4 10/23/2014 1976BR17 4He(p, p): σ(168.8°)/σ(104.4°) 2.24 - 5.90 X4 10/23/2014 1977DO01 4He(p, p): σ 11 - 14 X4 10/23/2014 1969GA12 4He(p, p): σ 12.04, 14.23, 17.45 X4 10/23/2014 1974SO06 4He(p, X): total reaction σ 18 - 48 1 03/08/2011 1976SO01 4He(p, X),

  4. 20Ne Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    20Ne(α, X) (Current as of 02/08/2016) NSR Reaction Eα (MeV) Cross Section File X4 Dataset Date Added 1983SC17 20Ne(α, γ): deduced S-factor of capture σ 0.55 - 3.2 X4 09/15/2011 1997WI12 20Ne(α, γ): deduced primary transitions yield 1.64 - 2.65 X4 09/15/2011 1999KO34 20Ne(α, γ): γ-ray yield for the transition 1.9 - 2.8 g.s. 01/03/2012 1369 keV g.s. 10917 keV g.s., 1369 keV 11016 keV g.s. 1975KU06 20Ne(α, γ): σ 2.5 - 20 X4 09/15/2011 1968HI02 20Ne(α, γ): σ 3 - 6 X4 09/15/2011

  5. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization project, which focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy from the world's ocean thermal resources. PDF icon Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization More Documents & Publications OTEC resource assessment NELHA Creates the 'Green Energy

  6. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  7. A predictive ocean oil spill model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanderson, J.; Barnette, D.; Papodopoulos, P.; Schaudt, K.; Szabo, D.

    1996-07-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Initially, the project focused on creating an ocean oil spill model and working with the major oil companies to compare their data with the Los Alamos global ocean model. As a result of this initial effort, Los Alamos worked closely with the Eddy Joint Industry Project (EJIP), a consortium oil and gas producing companies in the US. The central theme of the project was to use output produced from LANL`s global ocean model to look in detail at ocean currents in selected geographic areas of the world of interest to consortium members. Once ocean currents are well understood this information could be used to create oil spill models, improve offshore exploration and drilling equipment, and aid in the design of semi-permanent offshore production platforms.

  8. Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    of Energy Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East

  9. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United...

  10. Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources...

  11. Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    County Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Ocean County Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas...

  12. NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Laboratory Sector: Energy Topics: Resource assessment Website: www.nrel.govotec NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Screenshot References: OTEC1 Logo: NREL-Ocean...

  13. MHK Technologies/THOR Ocean Current Turbine | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    THOR Ocean Current Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage THOR Ocean Current Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  14. Ocean Renewable Energy Coalition OREC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Coalition OREC Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ocean Renewable Energy Coalition (OREC) Place: Potomac, Maryland Zip: 20859 Sector: Ocean Product: US trade association...

  15. Ocean County, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Jersey Manahawkin, New Jersey Mantoloking, New Jersey Mystic Island, New Jersey New Egypt, New Jersey North Beach Haven, New Jersey Ocean Acres, New Jersey Ocean Gate, New...

  16. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of ocean currents in the United States and the database created with that data. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline...

  17. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of the United States ocean wave energy resource. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource More Documents...

  18. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline ...

  19. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of ...

  20. OCEANS'13 MTS/IEEE SAN DIEGO, SEPTEMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... They benefit from converting energy into usable power from highly dense energy resources, includ- ing: river, tidal and ocean currents, and ocean waves. In this paper, a simple ...

  1. Session Papers North Slope of Alaska and Adjacent Arctic Ocean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Major pumps for the global ocean currents are located at high latitudes (thermohaline circulation). Results from coupled ocean-atmosphere general circulation models (GCM) suggest ...

  2. Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean Application Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean ...

  3. Ocean Wave Energy Company OWECO | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Company OWECO Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ocean Wave Energy Company (OWECO) Place: Bristol, Rhode Island Sector: Ocean Product: Wave energy device developer. The...

  4. MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Air Piston | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Wave Air Piston.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Wave Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator...

  5. MHK Technologies/Ocean Energy Rig | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the MHK database homepage Ocean Energy Rig.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description The Ocean...

  6. Practical Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc POEMS | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc POEMS Jump to: navigation, search Name: Practical Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc (POEMS) Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92138 Sector:...

  7. Voith Hydro Ocean Current Technologies | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Current Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Name: Voith Hydro Ocean Current Technologies Place: Germany Sector: Hydro Product: Germany-based JV between Voith Hydro and...

  8. Reconstructing Past Ocean Salinity ((delta)18Owater)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guilderson, T P; Pak, D K

    2005-11-23

    Temperature and salinity are two of the key properties of ocean water masses. The distribution of these two independent but related characteristics reflects the interplay of incoming solar radiation (insolation) and the uneven distribution of heat loss and gain by the ocean, with that of precipitation, evaporation, and the freezing and melting of ice. Temperature and salinity to a large extent, determine the density of a parcel of water. Small differences in temperature and salinity can increase or decrease the density of a water parcel, which can lead to convection. Once removed from the surface of the ocean where 'local' changes in temperature and salinity can occur, the water parcel retains its distinct relationship between (potential) temperature and salinity. We can take advantage of this 'conservative' behavior where changes only occur as a result of mixing processes, to track the movement of water in the deep ocean (Figure 1). The distribution of density in the ocean is directly related to horizontal pressure gradients and thus (geostrophic) ocean currents. During the Quaternary when we have had systematic growth and decay of large land based ice sheets, salinity has had to change. A quick scaling argument following that of Broecker and Peng [1982] is: the modern ocean has a mean salinity of 34.7 psu and is on average 3500m deep. During glacial maxima sea level was on the order of {approx}120m lower than present. Simply scaling the loss of freshwater (3-4%) requires an average increase in salinity a similar percentage or to {approx}35.9psu. Because much of the deep ocean is of similar temperature, small changes in salinity have a large impact on density, yielding a potentially different distribution of water masses and control of the density driven (thermohaline) ocean circulation. It is partly for this reason that reconstructions of past salinity are of interest to paleoceanographers.

  9. Neutrino Cross-Section Experiments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology - Chicago David Schmitz, Fermilab Outline Quick Audience Survey Introduction Relevant Energies and Targets Current Cross-Section Experiments Recent...

  10. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-11-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

  11. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print Friday, 21 June 2013 10:08 The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is

  12. Section L, Paragraph L-4

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    D SECTION L ATTACHMENT D CROSS REFERENCE MATRIX Section L Section M Offeror's Proposal Criterion 1: PAST PERFORMANCE L-15 (a) M-3 (a) Criterion 2: SITE ORGANIZATION AND QUALIFICATIONS OF KEY PERSONNEL L-15 (b)(1) M-3 (b)(1) L-15 (b)(2) M-3 (b)(2) Criterion 3: SMALL BUSINESS PARTICIPATION L-15 (c) M-3 (c)

  13. Ocean thermal energy conversion report to congress: fiscal year 1981. public law 96-320

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-02-01

    After a section on the background of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, which deals with the national interest and the nature of the industry, this report discusses OTEC technology, the legal regime, environmental considerations and the international impact and future of OTEC. At the current time no amendments to the ACT are recommended. NOAA is analyzing several areas in which technical amendments would clarify the original intent of the Act. The most significant of these relates to the specific requirements for issuance of OTEC licenses for facilities that are located partly on land and partly in ocean waters.

  14. Ocean energy resources: the impact of OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ditmars, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    The status of OTEC technological development is summarized with emphasis on the potential impacts of OTEC power production on the ocean environment, including implications for impacts to climate. (MHR)

  15. Ocean Energy Institute | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    think tank established to accelerate offshore wind technology development that hopes to build a 5GW wind project off the coast of Maine. References: Ocean Energy Institute1 This...

  16. Green Ocean Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Green Ocean Energy Place: Aberdeen, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip: AB10 1UP Product: Aberdeen, UK-based private developer of wave device....

  17. ocean energy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ocean energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 15 July, 2014 - 07:07 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine...

  18. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    productivity in the ocean-in this case, the growth of phytoplankton, the primary plant food source for bigger marine life-and the larger marine life it supports. At bottom left,...

  19. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Sea Level Rise: The rate of sea level rise is one of the largest unknowns in current climate models and requires our advanced ocean and ice sheet models for accurate future ...

  20. Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The rate of sea level rise is one of the largest unknowns in current climate models and requires our advanced ocean and ice sheet models for accurate future projections. * Rapid ...

  1. MHK Technologies/Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the MHK database homepage Ocean.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydro Green Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK ProjectsAlaska 35 *MHK...

  2. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  3. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  4. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  5. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  6. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  7. Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Iron Availability in the Southern Ocean Print The Southern Ocean, circling the Earth between Antarctica and the southernmost regions of Africa, South America, and Australia, is notorious for its high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll areas, which are rich in nutrients-but poor in essential iron. Sea life is less abundant in these regions because the growth of phytoplankton-the marine plants that form the base of the food chain-is suppressed. A study by scientists from South Africa's Stellenbosch

  8. Ocean floor mounting of wave energy converters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Siegel, Stefan G

    2015-01-20

    A system for mounting a set of wave energy converters in the ocean includes a pole attached to a floor of an ocean and a slider mounted on the pole in a manner that permits the slider to move vertically along the pole and rotate about the pole. The wave energy converters can then be mounted on the slider to allow adjustment of the depth and orientation of the wave energy converters.

  9. Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Resource Basics Ocean Energy Resource Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:34pm Addthis Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource assessment for the United States. To address this problem, the U.S. Department of Energy announced in 2008 that it would fund several resource-assessment projects for advanced water power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related

  10. PART III-SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    C SECTION J APPENDIX C TRANSITION PLAN Plan: [To be inserted by the Contracting Officer.] Requirements: In accordance with Section F, Deliverables During Transition, the Contractor shall submit a Transition Plan for the Contracting Officer's approval 10 days after Contract award. The Transition plan shall describe the process, details, schedule, and cost for providing an orderly transition during the Contract's Transition Term stated in Section F, F-3 Period of Performance. The Transition Plan

  11. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX B AWARD FEE PLAN [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award.]

  12. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    M, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX M CONTRACTOR COMMITMENTS, AGREEMENTS, AND UNDERSTANDINGS [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after contract award.]

  13. SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    0007749 SECTION J, APPENDIX A: STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 1 1.0 OBJECTIVE .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND

  14. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eden, H.F.; Mooers, C.N.K.

    1990-06-01

    The goal of COPS is to couple a program of regular observations to numerical models, through techniques of data assimilation, in order to provide a predictive capability for the US coastal ocean including the Great Lakes, estuaries, and the entire Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). The objectives of the program include: determining the predictability of the coastal ocean and the processes that govern the predictability; developing efficient prediction systems for the coastal ocean based on the assimilation of real-time observations into numerical models; and coupling the predictive systems for the physical behavior of the coastal ocean to predictive systems for biological, chemical, and geological processes to achieve an interdisciplinary capability. COPS will provide the basis for effective monitoring and prediction of coastal ocean conditions by optimizing the use of increased scientific understanding, improved observations, advanced computer models, and computer graphics to make the best possible estimates of sea level, currents, temperatures, salinities, and other properties of entire coastal regions.

  15. SECTION THIRTY SEVEN Consultants Section Thirty Seven Consultants, Inc.

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    SECTION THIRTY SEVEN Consultants Section Thirty Seven Consultants, Inc. A California Corporation 1 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY [OE Docket No. RRTT-IR-001] Rapid Response Team for Transmission AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability, Department of Energy, DoE. ACTION: Request for information. (1) The development timelines for generation and attendant transmission are often not coordinated or run concurrently. Because of the lengthy time to obtain regulatory reviews, permits and

  16. Environmental impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-04-01

    Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising technology for production of energy and usable by-products from solar-generated temperature gradients in the world's oceans. Although considered benign compared to alternative forms of energy generation, deployment of OTEC plants will result in interactions with marine, terrestrial, and atmospheric environments and in socioeconomic interactions with surrounding areas. The Ocean Energy Technology Program of the Department of Energy has funded research to improve the understanding of these interactions. No insurmountable environmental obstacle to OTEC deployment has been uncovered. This document contains a summary of that research for entrepreneurs, utility engineers, and others interested in pursuing OTEC's potential. In addition, it provides a guide to permits, regulations, and licenses applicable to construction of an OTEC plant.

  17. SEASAT altimeter determination of ocean current variability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernstein, R.L.; Born, G.H.; Whritner, R.H.

    1982-04-30

    Radar altimeters of great precision (roughly-equal10 cm), such as the one that flew on the SEASAT satellite, are capable of measuring the small oceanic height variations associated with geostrophic ocean currents. An experiment was concluded in the Kuroshio Current east of Japan, verifying this capability. Air-expendable bathythermographs (AXBT's) were dropped to coincide with the SEASAT subtract during flights on September 25 and October 5 and 13, 1978. Changes in surface dynamic height between flights were inferred from the AXBT data. They agreed generally to within +- 10 cm of height changes observed in the altimeter data.

  18. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SECTION M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS .....................................................................................2 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD ...................................................................................3 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA ..........................................................3 M-4 COST CRITERION

  19. SECTION J - TABLE OF CONTENTS

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Conformed to Mod 0108 DE-NA0000622 Section J Page i PART III - LIST OF DOCUMENTS, EXHIBITS, AND OTHER ATTACHMENTS SECTION J LIST OF APPENDICES TABLE OF CONTENTS Appendix A Statement of Work (Replaced by Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029) Appendix B Performance Evaluation Plan (Replaced by Mods 002, 016, 020, 029, 0084) Appendix C Contractor's Transition Plan Appendix D Sensitive Foreign Nations Control Appendix E Performance Guarantee Agreement(s) Appendix F National Work Breakdown

  20. Pelamis Wave Power Ocean Power Delivery Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Ocean Product: Scotland-based company specialising in the use of ocean power for electricity generation via its Pelamis convertor, which has been demonstrated up to 750kW....

  1. Transition section for acoustic waveguides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karplus, H.H.B.

    1975-10-28

    A means of facilitating the transmission of acoustic waves with minimal reflection between two regions having different specific acoustic impedances is described comprising a region exhibiting a constant product of cross-sectional area and specific acoustic impedance at each cross-sectional plane along the axis of the transition region. A variety of structures that exhibit this feature is disclosed, the preferred embodiment comprising a nested structure of doubly reentrant cones. This structure is useful for monitoring the operation of nuclear reactors in which random acoustic signals are generated in the course of operation.

  2. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    United States Coastline | Department of Energy Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of seven years of numerical model simulations of ocean currents in the United States and the database created with that data. PDF icon energy_production_ocean_currents_us.pdf More Documents & Publications Assessment of Energy Production

  3. Current practices and new technology in ocean engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuinness, T.; Shih, H.H.

    1986-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on wave power and marine engineering. Topics considered at the conference included remote sensing, ocean current measurement, air and spaceborne instrumentation, marine dynamics, real-time measurements, telemetry systems, seafloor measurement, computer-based data acquisition, materials and devices for underwater work systems, ocean system design analysis and reliability, ocean structure fatigue life prediction, underwater life support systems, sensor design, ocean thermal energy conversion, and wave energy converters.

  4. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    United States Coastline | Department of Energy Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline Report summarizing the results of seven years of numerical model simulations of ocean currents in the United States and the database created with that data. PDF icon Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline More Documents & Publications

  5. Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Resources | Department of Energy On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources Memorandum of Understanding On Weather-Dependent and Oceanic Renewable Energy Resources between the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. PDF icon MOU_DOE_Commerce.pdf More Documents

  6. Section H: Special Contract Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS Request for Proposal # DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 No Third Party Beneficiaries.............................................................................................1 H.2 Workforce Transition ........................................................................................................1 H.3 Employee Compensation: Pay and

  7. SECTION M_Evaluation Factors

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    TABLE OF CONTENTS M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS......................................................................176 M-2 BASIS FOR CONTRACT AWARD...................................................................177 M-3 TECHNICAL AND MANAGEMENT CRITERIA..........................................177 M-4 COST CRITERION.............................................................................................179 Section M, Page 176 M-1 EVALUATION OF PROPOSALS (a) This acquisition will be

  8. SECTION J, APPENDIX A - SOW

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Mod 002; Modified Mod 016; Replaced Mod 029; Modified Mod 0049) Honeywell FM&T, LLC Contract No. DE-NA0000622 SECTION J APPENDIX A STATEMENT OF WORK 09/19/12 TABLE OF CONTENTS CHAPTER I. OBJECTIVES, SCOPE, AND REQUIREMENTS ......................................................................... 1 1.0 OBJECTIVE .................................................................................................................................................. 1 2.0 BACKGROUND

  9. Ocean thermal energy conversion: report to congress - fiscal year 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-31

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) activities related to ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) during fiscal year 1982 are described. The agency focus has been in the areas of providing ocean engineering and technical assistance to the Department of Energy (DOE), in streamlining the administration of the Federal OTEC licensing system, and in environmental assistance.

  10. Transverse section radionuclide scanning system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuhl, David E.; Edwards, Roy Q.

    1976-01-01

    This invention provides a transverse section radionuclide scanning system for high-sensitivity quantification of brain radioactivity in cross-section picture format in order to permit accurate assessment of regional brain function localized in three-dimensions. High sensitivity crucially depends on overcoming the heretofore known raster type scanning, which requires back and forth detector movement involving dead-time or partial enclosure of the scan field. Accordingly, this invention provides a detector array having no back and forth movement by interlaced detectors that enclose the scan field and rotate as an integral unit around one axis of rotation in a slip ring that continuously transmits the detector data by means of laser emitting diodes, with the advantages that increased amounts of data can be continuously collected, processed and displayed with increased sensitivity according to a suitable computer program.

  11. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer.

  12. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

    1980-01-01

    An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

  13. Mission Support Contract Section J

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC06-09RL14728 Modification 298 1 ATTACHMENT J-4-d Mission Support Contract FY 2013 Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan The Performance Evaluation and Measurement Plan (PEMP) details the administration of performance incentives and allocation of total available fee as defined in Section B, Supplies or Services and Prices/Costs. 1. PERFORMANCE INCENTIVES This PEMP contains both objective and subjective performance incentives in order to maximize the efficacy of the

  14. PART III … SECTION J

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 Section J Appendix F List of Applicable Laws, Regulations, and DOE Directives In addition to the list of applicable directives referenced below, the Contractor shall also comply with supplementary directives (e.g., manuals), which are invoked by a Contractor Requirements Document (CRD) attached to a directive referenced below. This List excludes directives that have been granted an exemption from the CRD in whole or in part. For those Directives whereby

  15. Clean Air Act, Section 309

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CLEAN AIR ACT § 309* §7609. Policy review (a) The Administrator shall review and comment in writing on the environmental impact of any matter relating to duties and responsibilities granted pursuant to this chapter or other provisions of the authority of Administrator, contained in any (1) legislation proposed by any Federal department or agency, (2) newly authorized Federal projects for construction and any major Federal agency action (other than a project for construction) to which section

  16. Ocean thermal energy conversion: a review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuen, P.C.

    1981-10-01

    The OTEC principle is discussed along with general system and cycle types, specific OTEC designs, OTEC applications, and the ocean thermal resource. The historic development of OTEC is briefly reviewed, and the status of French, Japanese, EUROCEAN, and US programs is assessed. US efforts are detailed and DOE's strategy outlined with OTEC-1 and Mini-OTEC information. Power system components of the more technically advanced closed-cycle OTEC concept are discussed. These include: heat exchangers, corrosion and biofouling countermeasures, working fluids, ammonia power systems, and on-platform seawater systems. Several open-cycle features are also discussed. A critical review is presented of the ocean engineering aspects of OTEC power systems. Major subsystems such as platform, cold water pipe, mooring system, dynamic positioning system, power transmission cable system are assessed for their relationships with the ocean environment and with each other. Nine available studies of OTEC costs are reviewed. Tentative comparisons are made between OTEC and traditional fuel costs, and OTEC products and markets are considered. Possible environmental and social effects of OTEC development are discussed. International, national, and local laws regulating OTEC plants and OTEC energy products are reviewed. Tax incentives, attitudes of the utilities, and additional legislative needs are considered. (LEW)

  17. Ocean Energy Program Overview, Fiscal years 1990--1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The oceans are the world's largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth's surface, the oceans collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy cost effectively and in ways that do not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which industry can accurately assess whether the applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives, or supplements to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the Ocean Energy Program has concentrated research that advances OTEC technology. The program also monitored developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts. It is not actively developing these technologies now. The mission of the Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques to harness the vast solar energy stored in the oceans' waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients.

  18. Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

  19. Turbine airfoil having outboard and inboard sections

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mazzola, Stefan; Marra, John J

    2015-03-17

    A turbine airfoil usable in a turbine engine and formed from at least an outboard section and an inboard section such that an inner end of the outboard section is attached to an outer end of the inboard section. The outboard section may be configured to provide a tip having adequate thickness and may extend radially inward from the tip with a generally constant cross-sectional area. The inboard section may be configured with a tapered cross-sectional area to support the outboard section.

  20. Deep Ocean Heat Uptake and the Influence of Sea Ice in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cecilia M. Bitz

    2011-11-22

    Climate sensitivity defines the equilibrium response to climate forcing, but ocean heat uptake is equally important at controlling the transient, response. Heat stored beneath the mixed layer is not in close thermal contact with the atmosphere, and therefore warming below the mixed layer sequesters heat that would otherwise be available to warm the surface, slowing the rate of surface warming. In this study, we investigate mechanisms that control heat uptake, primarily in the Southern Ocean, where roughly 40% of the global heat uptake occurs.

  1. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B.

    1996-08-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  2. Part IV: Section D - Packaging and Marking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page ii PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging 1 D.2 Marking...

  3. OpenEI Community - Section 7

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Geothermal Regulatory Roadmap Wed, 05 Sep...

  4. Section 999 Program Library | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Offshore Drilling Section 999 Program Library Section 999 Program Library Cost-Shared Program Publications October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 October 2, 2013 URTAC ...

  5. Vermont Section 401 Water Quality Certification Application ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Abstract Application required for Section 401 water quality certification under the Clean Water Act. Form Type ApplicationNotice Form Topic Section 401 Water Quality...

  6. Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    impact on tropical cyclones (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Dynamic Potential Intensity: An improved representation of the ocean's impact on tropical cyclones To incorporate the effects of tropical cyclone (TC)-induced upper ocean mixing and sea surface temperature (SST) cooling on TC intensification, a vertical average of temperature down to a

  7. Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean Application

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean Application Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean Application Authors: Candy, J V Publication Date: 2011-07-12 OSTI Identifier: 1117989 Report Number(s): LLNL-CONF-491045 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: OCEANS'11, Kona, HI, United States, Sep 19 - Sep 22, 2011

  8. Adaptive Wavenumber Estimation for Mode Tracking in a Shallow Ocean

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Environment (Conference) | SciTech Connect Adaptive Wavenumber Estimation for Mode Tracking in a Shallow Ocean Environment Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Adaptive Wavenumber Estimation for Mode Tracking in a Shallow Ocean Environment Authors: Candy, J V Publication Date: 2012-06-28 OSTI Identifier: 1059076 Report Number(s): LLNL-CONF-563556 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: IEEE OCEANS '12, Hampton Roads, VA,

  9. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited OCEAN THERMAL EXTRACTABLE ENERGY VISUALIZATION Award # DE-EE0002664 October 28, 2012 Final Technical Report Prepared by Lockheed Martin Mission Systems & Sensors (MS2) DE-EE0002664 Ocean Thermal Energy Resource Assessment Final Draft i 10/28/2012 Project Title: Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization Recipient: Lockheed Martin Corporation Award #: DE-0002664 Working Partners Project Lead: Matthew Ascari - Lockheed Martin

  10. Decoding Ancient Ocean Acidification Signals from Plankton Shells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Decoding Ancient Ocean Acidification Signals from Plankton Shells Decoding Ancient Ocean Acidification Signals from Plankton Shells Print Wednesday, 04 March 2015 16:42 Ancient plankton shells can record the physical and chemical state of the ocean in which they grew. Foraminifera, a type of zooplankton, do this by trapping trace chemical impurities in their calcium carbonate shells. Decoding these impurity records can reveal changes in global climate, atmospheric CO2, and the acidity of the

  11. Ocean energy program summary: Volume 1, Overview: Fiscal year 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-02-01

    Past studies conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) have identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) as the largest potential contributor to US energy supplies from the ocean resource. As a result, the OET Program concentrates on research to advance OTEC technology. The program also continues to monitor and study developments in wave energy, ocean current and salinity gradient concepts, but it is not actively developing these technologies at the present time. 8 figs.

  12. Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-01

    Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

  13. Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable (TRL 4 System) - THOR's Power Method...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    More Documents & Publications CX-004722: Categorical Exclusion Determination Vortex Hydro Energy (TRL 5 6 System) - Advanced Integration of Power Take-Off in VIVACE Ocean...

  14. Sandia Energy - High-Fidelity Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrostructural Analysis of Ocean Renewable Power Company's (ORPC's) TidGen Turbine Home Renewable Energy Energy Water Power Partnership News News & Events Computational...

  15. MHK Technologies/Ocean Current Linear Turbine | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Current Linear Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Current Linear Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary...

  16. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator Southeastern Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee PDF icon 3-24-15KennethL...

  17. MHK Projects/Development of Ocean Treader | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wave Treader fixed *MHK TechnologiesOcean Treader floating Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  18. Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Overseeing Organization University of New...

  19. List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydrogen Landfill Gas Methanol Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Renewable Fuels Small Hydroelectric...

  20. Ocean Energy Technology Overview: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-07-01

    Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

  1. Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The warming biases from the dynamic heat transport by ocean currents however stay throughout all seasons once they are developed, which are eventually balanced by enhanced energy ...

  2. Decoding Ancient Ocean Acidification Signals from Plankton Shells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Understanding how these processes occurred in the past guides predictions of future ocean and atmospheric conditions, providing context for current global climate change. While ...

  3. Ocean energy technologies: The state of the art: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carmichael, A.D.; Adams, E.E.; Glucksman, M.A.

    1986-11-01

    A state-of-the-art study of ocean energy technologies has been conducted to evaluate their potential use for the generation of electrical power. The more developed technologies are tidal energy, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), and wave energy. In addition there has been a demonstration of a small ocean current turbine, and proposals have been made for salinity gradient devices and ocean wind turbines. Energy costs were estimated for representative base case systems for tidal, OTEC, and wave energy projects. The tidal energy scheme was predicted to have the lowest energy costs.

  4. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Elliot E. Mainzer, Administrator, Bonneville...

  5. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Turner, Administrator Southwest Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources PDF icon 3-24-15ChristopherTurner ...

  6. MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":...

  7. MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Description The O H E...

  8. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Act of 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    A legislative proposal to develop ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) facilities for power generation was the subject of hearings held on April 10 and May 1, 1980. Following the test of S. 2492 are the statements of 20 witnesses and additional materials submitted for consideration. The need for a large-scale demonstration of OTEC and the need for a Federal regulatory, siting, and financial-assistance framework are the major commercialization issues. S. 2492 provides one-stop licensing by treating the facilities as vessels and making them eligible for loan guarantees. The bill complements S. 1430, which deals with the demonstration program. OTEC development in Hawaii has progressed to a second pilot project. (DCK)

  9. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant achievements in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power in this decade with subsequent large-scale commercialization to follow by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, Interstate Electronics has prepared an OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment (EA) that considers tne development, demonstration, and commercialization of OTEC power systems. The EA considers several tecnnological designs (open cycle and closed cycle), plant configurations (land-based, moored, and plantship), and power usages (baseload electricity and production of ammonia and aluminum). Potencial environmental impacts, health and safety issues, and a status update of international, federal, and state plans and policies, as they may influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  10. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Perspective and status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, A.; Hillis, D.L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of the thermal gradient between the warm surface waters and the deep cold waters of tropical oceans was first proposed by J. A. d'Arsonval in 1881 and tried unsuccessfully be George Claude in 1930. Interest in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) and other renewable energy sources revived in the 1970s as a result of oil embargoes. At that time, the emphasis was on large floating plants miles from shore producing 250--400 MW for maintained grids. When the problems of such plants became better understood and the price of oil reversed its upward trend, the emphasis shifted to smaller (10 MW) shore-based plants on tropical islands. Such plants would be especially attractive if they produce fresh water as a by-product. During the past 15 years, major progress has been made in converting OTEC unknowns into knowns. Mini-OTEC proved the closed-cycle concept. Cost-effective heat-exchanger concepts were identified. An effective biofouling control technique was discovered. Aluminum was determined to be promising for OTEC heat exchangers. Heat-transfer augmentation techniques were identified, which promised a reduction on heat-exchanger size and cost. Fresh water was produced by an OTEC open-cycle flash evaporator, using the heat energy in the seawater itself. The current R D emphasis is on the design and construction of a test facility to demonstrate the technical feasibility of the open-cycle process. The 10 MW shore-based, closed-cycle plant can be built with today's technology; with the incorporation of a flash evaporator, it will produce fresh water as well as electrical power -- both valuable commodities on many tropical islands. The open-cycle process has unknowns that require solution before the technical feasibility can be demonstrated. The economic viability of either cycle depends on reducing the capital costs of OTEC plants and on future trends in the costs of conventional energy sources. 7 refs.

  11. Effects of Ocean Ecosystem on Marine Aerosol-Cloud Interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meskhidze, Nicholas; Nenes, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    Using smore » atellite data for the surface ocean, aerosol optical depth (AOD), and cloud microphysical parameters, we show that statistically significant positive correlations exist between ocean ecosystem productivity, the abundance of submicron aerosols, and cloud microphysical properties over different parts of the remote oceans. The correlation coefficient for remotely sensed surface chlorophyll a concentration ([Chl- a ]) and liquid cloud effective radii over productive areas of the oceans varies between − 0.2 and − 0.6 . Special attention is given to identifying (and addressing) problems from correlation analysis used in the previous studies that can lead to erroneous conclusions. A new approach (using the difference between retrieved AOD and predicted sea salt aerosol optical depth, AOD diff ) is developed to explore causal links between ocean physical and biological systems and the abundance of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) in the remote marine atmosphere. We have found that over multiple time periods, 550 nm AOD diff (sensitive to accumulation mode aerosol, which is the prime contributor to CCN) correlates well with [Chl- a ] over the productive waters of the Southern Ocean. Since [Chl- a ] can be used as a proxy of ocean biological productivity, our analysis demonstrates the role of ocean ecology in contributing CCN, thus shaping the microphysical properties of low-level marine clouds.« less

  12. Contribution of oceanic gas hydrate dissociation to the formation of Arctic Ocean methane plumes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reagan, M.; Moridis, G.; Elliott, S.; Maltrud, M.

    2011-06-01

    Vast quantities of methane are trapped in oceanic hydrate deposits, and there is concern that a rise in the ocean temperature will induce dissociation of these hydrate accumulations, potentially releasing large amounts of carbon into the atmosphere. Because methane is a powerful greenhouse gas, such a release could have dramatic climatic consequences. The recent discovery of active methane gas venting along the landward limit of the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ) on the shallow continental slope (150 m - 400 m) west of Svalbard suggests that this process may already have begun, but the source of the methane has not yet been determined. This study performs 2-D simulations of hydrate dissociation in conditions representative of the Arctic Ocean margin to assess whether such hydrates could contribute to the observed gas release. The results show that shallow, low-saturation hydrate deposits, if subjected to recently observed or future predicted temperature changes at the seafloor, can release quantities of methane at the magnitudes similar to what has been observed, and that the releases will be localized near the landward limit of the GHSZ. Both gradual and rapid warming is simulated, along with a parametric sensitivity analysis, and localized gas release is observed for most of the cases. These results resemble the recently published observations and strongly suggest that hydrate dissociation and methane release as a result of climate change may be a real phenomenon, that it could occur on decadal timescales, and that it already may be occurring.

  13. The Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems program: Understanding and managing our coastal ocean. Volume 2: Overview and invited papers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-05-15

    This document is a compilation of summaries of papers presented at the Coastal Ocean Prediction Systems workshop. Topics include; marine forecasting, regulatory agencies and regulations, research and application models, research and operational observing, oceanic and atmospheric data assimilation, and coastal physical processes.

  14. Spontaneous Potential (book section) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Reference LibraryAdd to library Book Section: Spontaneous Potential (book section) Author NA Published NA, The date "NA" was not understood.The date "NA" was not understood....

  15. Section 12 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  16. Section 7 | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contributor 4 September, 2012 - 21:36 Idaho Meeting 2 endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 The second Idaho GRR meeting was held today...

  17. Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS Request for Proposal DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service Being ...

  18. Regulatory Review Comment Section | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Radiation Protection of the Public and the Environment » Regulatory Review Comment Section Regulatory Review Comment Section DOE Comments on Radiation Protection (Atomic Energy Act) DOE Comments on Radioactive Waste

  19. OpenEI Community - Section 12

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    http:en.openei.orgcommunityblogidaho-meeting-2comments endangered species Fauna Fish and Wildlife Flora FWS Section 12 Section 7 Wed, 05 Sep 2012 04:36:43 +0000 Kyoung 488...

  20. Part V: Section H: Special Contract Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M801 Section H - Page 2 of 50 PART I SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 No Third Party Beneficiaries...

  1. Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device File 12aquantisawpdaalexfleming.pptx ...

  2. Section 1705 Loan Program | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 1705 Loan Program Section 1705 Loan Program About the Section 1705 Loan Program The Section 1705 Loan Program authorizes loan guarantees for U.S.-based projects that commenced construction no later than September 30, 2011 and involve certain renewable energy systems, electric power transmission systems, and leading edge biofuels. To become more familiar with the program, please review Title XVII and the Final Rule and read each solicitation carefully for specific requirements that were

  3. Section 1703 Loan Program | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 1703 Loan Program Section 1703 Loan Program About the Section 1703 Loan Program Section 1703 of Title XVII of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 authorizes the U.S. Department of Energy to support innovative clean energy technologies that are typically unable to obtain conventional private financing due to high technology risks. In addition, the technologies must avoid, reduce, or sequester air pollutants or anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases. Technologies we will consider include:

  4. SNL RML recommended dosimetry cross section compendium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffin, P.J.; Kelly, J.G.; Luera, T.F.; VanDenburg, J.

    1993-11-01

    A compendium of dosimetry cross sections is presented for use in the characterization of fission reactor spectrum and fluence. The contents of this cross section library are based upon the ENDF/B-VI and IRDF-90 cross section libraries and are recommended as a replacement for the DOSCROS84 multigroup library that is widely used by the dosimetry community. Documentation is provided on the rationale for the choice of the cross sections selected for inclusion in this library and on the uncertainty and variation in cross sections presented by state-of-the-art evaluations.

  5. Part IV: Section D - Packaging and Marking

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page ii PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 Packaging 1 D.2 Marking 1 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section D - Page 1 of 1 PART I SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING D.1 Packaging Preservation, packaging, and packing for shipment or mailing of all work delivered hereunder shall be in accordance with good commercial practice and adequate to insure acceptance by common carrier and

  6. Part IV: Section E - Inspection and Acceptance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section E - Page ii PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS E.1 FAR 52.246-9 Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) 1 E.2 Acceptance 1 E.3 Certification 1 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section E - Page 1 of 1 PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 FAR 52.246-9 Inspection of Research and Development (Short Form) (Apr 1984) The Government has the right to inspect and

  7. Broadband Particle Filtering in a Noisy Littoral Ocean (Conference) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Broadband Particle Filtering in a Noisy Littoral Ocean Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Broadband Particle Filtering in a Noisy Littoral Ocean Authors: Candy, J V Publication Date: 2015-02-12 OSTI Identifier: 1184166 Report Number(s): LLNL-CONF-667626 DOE Contract Number: DE-AC52-07NA27344 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: OCEANS'15, Genova, Italy, May 18 - May 21, 2015 Research Org: Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL),

  8. Oceanic Communities in a Changing Planet - The Tara Oceans Project (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Raes, Jeroen [University of Brussels

    2011-04-28

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Jeroen Raes of the University of Brussels discusses the Tara-Oceans expedition at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  9. Adaptive Particle Filtering for Mode Tracking: A Shallow Ocean...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    LLNL-CONF-491045 DOE Contract Number: W-7405-ENG-48 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: Presented at: OCEANS'11, Kona, HI, United States, Sep 19 - Sep 22, 2011...

  10. MHK Projects/Makai Ocean Energy Research Center | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Details Makai Ocean Engineering has designed, owns, and operates a closed-cycle OTEC system in Kailua-Kona Hawaii. True deep cold seawater is drawn from a depth of about...

  11. Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Region: Norway Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: www.owwe.net This company is listed...

  12. Changes in Dimethyl Sulfide Oceanic Distribution due to Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cameron-Smith, P; Elliott, S; Maltrud, M; Erickson, D; Wingenter, O

    2011-02-16

    Dimethyl sulfide (DMS) is one of the major precursors for aerosols and cloud condensation nuclei in the marine boundary layer over much of the remote ocean. Here they report on coupled climate simulations with a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemical model for DMS distribution and fluxes using present-day and future atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentrations. They find changes in zonal averaged DMS flux to the atmosphere of over 150% in the Southern Ocean. This is due to concurrent sea ice changes and ocean ecosystem composition shifts caused by changes in temperature, mixing, nutrient, and light regimes. The largest changes occur in a region already sensitive to climate change, so any resultant local CLAW/Gaia feedback of DMS on clouds, and thus radiative forcing, will be particularly important. A comparison of these results to prior studies shows that increasing model complexity is associted with reduced DMS emissions at the equator and increased emissions at high latitudes.

  13. Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex

    2015-09-16

    The Aquantis 2.5 MW Ocean Current Generation Device technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) is a derivation of wind power generating technology (a means of harnessing a slow moving fluid) adapted to the ocean environment. The Aquantis Project provides an opportunity for accelerated technological development and early commercialization, since it involves the joining of two mature disciplines: ocean engineering and wind turbine design. The Aquantis Current Plane (C-Plane) technology is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from a current flow. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced, continuous, base-load, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  14. Lab researchers develop models to analyze mixing in the ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    scales of less than 100 km and timescales on the order of a month. Mesoscale ocean eddies are currents which flow in a roughly circular motion around the center of the eddy. ...

  15. Visualization and analysis of eddies in a global ocean simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Sean J; Hecht, Matthew W; Petersen, Mark; Strelitz, Richard; Maltrud, Mathew E; Ahrens, James P; Hlawitschka, Mario; Hamann, Bernd

    2010-10-15

    Eddies at a scale of approximately one hundred kilometers have been shown to be surprisingly important to understanding large-scale transport of heat and nutrients in the ocean. Due to difficulties in observing the ocean directly, the behavior of eddies below the surface is not very well understood. To fill this gap, we employ a high-resolution simulation of the ocean developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Using large-scale parallel visualization and analysis tools, we produce three-dimensional images of ocean eddies, and also generate a census of eddy distribution and shape averaged over multiple simulation time steps, resulting in a world map of eddy characteristics. As expected from observational studies, our census reveals a higher concentration of eddies at the mid-latitudes than the equator. Our analysis further shows that mid-latitude eddies are thicker, within a range of 1000-2000m, while equatorial eddies are less than 100m thick.

  16. About Cost Breakdown Structure for Ocean Current Device Created...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ocean Current Device Created by Mirko Previsic Company RE Vision Consulting, LLC Contact mirko@re-vision.net Date 41114 CommentsNotes 1. This spreadsheet provides the background ...

  17. MHK Technologies/Ocean Powered Compressed Air Stations | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Description The Ocean Powered Compressed Air Station is a point absorber that uses an air pump to force air to a landbased generator The device only needs 4m water depth and...

  18. ARM - Field Campaign - Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govCampaignsSurface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) Campaign Links SHEBA Website ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note...

  19. MHK Technologies/OceanStar | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy efficient process to smooth out the pulse characteristics common to wave energy in order to be electrical grid friendly The OceanStars high level of scalability is...

  20. Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ocean Energy Ltd Address: 595 Burrard Street Suite 3113 Three Bentall Centre PO Box 49071 Place: Vancouver Zip: V7X 1G4 Region: Canada Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic...

  1. Expandable mixing section gravel and cobble eductor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, Arthur L. (Kenyon, MN); Krawza, Kenneth I. (Lakeville, MN)

    1997-01-01

    In a hydraulically powered pump for excavating and transporting slurries in hich it is immersed, the improvement of a gravel and cobble eductor including an expandable mixing section, comprising: a primary flow conduit that terminates in a nozzle that creates a water jet internal to a tubular mixing section of the pump when water pressure is applied from a primary supply flow; a tubular mixing section having a center line in alignment with the nozzle that creates a water jet; a mixing section/exit diffuser column that envelopes the flexible liner; and a secondary inlet conduit that forms an opening at a bas portion of the column and adjacent to the nozzle and water jet to receive water saturated gravel as a secondary flow that mixes with the primary flow inside of the mixing section to form a combined total flow that exits the mixing section and decelerates in the exit diffuser.

  2. Cross Sections for Electron Collisions with Methane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Mi-Young Yoon, Jung-Sik; Cho, Hyuck; Itikawa, Yukikazu; Karwasz, Grzegorz P.; Kokoouline, Viatcheslav; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Tennyson, Jonathan

    2015-06-15

    Cross section data are compiled from the literature for electron collisions with methane (CH{sub 4}) molecules. Cross sections are collected and reviewed for total scattering, elastic scattering, momentum transfer, excitations of rotational and vibrational states, dissociation, ionization, and dissociative attachment. The data derived from swarm experiments are also considered. For each of these processes, the recommended values of the cross sections are presented. The literature has been surveyed through early 2014.

  3. Coastal ocean current response to storm winds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gordon, R.L.

    1982-03-20

    Design of offshore structures requires knowledge of the appropriate current profile to be used in conjunction with the design wave. Accurate determination of the current profile will depend on reliable current models. Vertical transfer of momentum in storm-driven current models is commonly treated either by using eddy viscosity or by assuming 'slab-like' mixed layer flow. These two fundamentally different approaches predict different current speeds and profiles during severe storms. The existing data base is inadequate to determine which approach is better, but most existing data sets are subject to one or more of four limitations that can lead one improperly to interpret the data as supporting the existence of current velocity shear in otherwise uniform mixed layers. One-dimensional slab models are found to compare favorably with observed wind-driven currents at the Ocean Test Structure in the Gulf of Mexico (deployed in 20 m deep water). By using some reasonably simple assumptions, these slab models are able to replicate many of the significantly features of the wide range of different responses. The character of the response appears to depend on an interaction of stratification and topography. Barotropic responses are characteristic of typical coastal responses; current oriented longshore and are in phase with the wind. Baroclinic responses are dominantly inertial as might be expected in the deep sea, but with an additional near-bottom cross-shore counter flow. The structure of one observed barotropic response is compared to detail to predictions of both slab and eddy viscosity models and found consistent with a slab model and inconsistent with eddy viscosity models. Shear observed during this event was not significantly different from zero, but was significantly below estimated shear predictions of four eddy viscosity models given the peak 0.4 N/m/sup 2/ wind stress.

  4. ARM - Lesson Plans: Temperature of the Pacific Ocean

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Temperature of the Pacific Ocean Outreach Home Room News Publications Traditional Knowledge Kiosks Barrow, Alaska Tropical Western Pacific Site Tours Contacts Students Study Hall About ARM Global Warming FAQ Just for Fun Meet our Friends Cool Sites Teachers Teachers' Toolbox Lesson Plans Lesson Plans: Temperature of the Pacific Ocean Objective The objective of this activity is to demonstrate how the earth's temperature has varied gradually in the past. Materials Each student or group of students

  5. Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources Committee | Department of Energy - House Natural Resources Committee Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee Testimony of Kenneth E. Legg, Administrator Southeastern Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans - House Natural Resources Committee PDF icon 3-24-15_Kenneth_Legg FT HNR.pdf More Documents & Publications Before The Subcommittee on Water and Power - House Energy and Natural Resources

  6. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Explanatory Material Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart Explanatory Material Abstract This...

  7. RPM Sections - RPM-2 RPM-2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    clock History Browse Pages Blog Labels Attachments Index Recent updates RSS feed builder Home RPM Sections Asset Management Information Technology (Assets) Lifecycle Management...

  8. Part IV: Section F - Deliveries or Performance

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M933 Section F - Page ii PART I SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE TABLE OF CONTENT F.1 Term of Contract 1 F.2 Principal Place of Performance 1 F.3 FAR 52.242-15 Stop-Work Order (Aug 1989) (Alternate 1) (Apr 1984) 1 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M933 Section F - Page 1 of 2 PART I SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE F.1 Term of Contract (a) This contract shall be effective as specified in Block No. 28, Award Date, of SF 33, and shall

  9. Part IV: Section G - Contract Administration Data

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section G - Page ii PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS G.1 Contracting Officer's Representative(s) 1 G.2 Contract Administration 1 G.3 Modification Authority 1 G.4 Monthly Cost Reports 1 G.5 Indirect Charges 2 DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section G - Page 1 of 2 PART I SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA G.1 Contracting Officer's Representative(s) Contracting Officer's Representative(s)

  10. Cal. PRC Section 21065 - Environmental Quality Definitions |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: Cal. PRC Section 21065 - Environmental Quality DefinitionsLegal Abstract Contains...

  11. Montana Watershed Protection Section Contacts Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    contact information for the Watershed Protection Section of the Water Quality Planning Bureau. Author Montana Water Quality Planning Bureau Published State of Montana, Date Not...

  12. Radioactivity in the ocean: laws and biological effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunsaker, C.T.

    1985-01-01

    This paper summarizes the literature on US laws and international agreements, experimental and monitoring data, and ongoing studies to provide background information for environmental assessment and regulatory compliance activities for ocean dumping of low-level radioactive waste. The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act is the major US legislation governing ocean disposal of radioactive waste. The major international agreement on ocean dumping is the Convention on the Prevention of Marine Pollution by Dumping of Wastes and other Matter. The United States ended its ocean dumping of radioactive wastes in 1970, but other countries have continued ocean dumping under international supervision in the northeast Atlantic. Monitoring of former US disposal sites has neither revealed significant effects on marine biota nor indicated a hazard to human health. Also, no effects on marine organisms have been found that could be attributed to routine discharges into the Irish Sea from the Windscale reprocessing plant. We must improve our ability to predict the oceanic carrying capacity and the fate and effects of ionizing radiation in the marine environment.

  13. MiniBooNE Cross Sections

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sections Group e-mail: BOONE-CROSSSECTIONS(AT)fnal.gov convenors: Alessandro Curioni (alessandro.curioni(AT)yale.edu) and Sam Zeller (gzeller(AT)fnal.gov) Cross Sections at MiniBooNE, Meetings, Reference Articles, Conferences, Useful Links Last updated on 07/19/07

  14. Part V: Section H - Special Contract Requirements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M962 Section H - Page 2 of 52 PART I SECTION H SPECIAL CONTRACT REQUIREMENTS TABLE OF CONTENTS H.1 No Third Party Beneficiaries ............................................................................................. 4 H.2 Reserved ............................................................................................................................ 4 H.3 Employee Compensation: Pay and Benefits

  15. Section M: Evaluations Factors for Award

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    V SECTION M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD Request for Proposal # DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART V SECTION M EVALUATION FACTORS FOR AWARD TABLE OF CONTENTS M.1 Evaluation of Proposals ..........................................................................................1 M.2 Evaluation Criteria..................................................................................................1 M.3 Basis For Award

  16. TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karsenti, Eric [EMBL Heidelberg

    2013-03-01

    Eric Karsenti of EMBL delivers the closing keynote on "TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

  17. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-03-01

    Prediction of the substantial biologically mediated carbon flows in a rapidly changing and acidifying ocean requires model simulations informed by observations of key carbon cycle processes on the appropriate space and time scales. From 2000 to 2004, the National Oceanographic Partnership Program (NOPP) supported the development of the first low-cost fully-autonomous ocean profiling Carbon Explorers that demonstrated that year-round real-time observations of particulate organic carbon (POC) concentration and sedimentation could be achieved in the world's ocean. NOPP also initiated the development of a sensor for particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) suitable for operational deployment across all oceanographic platforms. As a result, PIC profile characterization that once required shipboard sample collection and shipboard or shore based laboratory analysis, is now possible to full ocean depth in real time using a 0.2W sensor operating at 24 Hz. NOPP developments further spawned US DOE support to develop the Carbon Flux Explorer, a free-vehicle capable of following hourly variations of particulate inorganic and organic carbon sedimentation from near surface to kilometer depths for seasons to years and capable of relaying contemporaneous observations via satellite. We have demonstrated the feasibility of real time - low cost carbon observations which are of fundamental value to carbon prediction and when further developed, will lead to a fully enhanced global carbon observatory capable of real time assessment of the ocean carbon sink, a needed constraint for assessment of carbon management policies on a global scale.

  18. Critical Infrastructure for Ocean Research and Societal Needs in 2030

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    National Research Council

    2011-04-22

    The United States has jurisdiction over 3.4 million square miles of ocean—an expanse greater than the land area of all fifty states combined. This vast marine area offers researchers opportunities to investigate the ocean’s role in an integrated Earth system, but also presents challenges to society, including damaging tsunamis and hurricanes, industrial accidents, and outbreaks of waterborne diseases. The 2010 Gulf of Mexico Deepwater Horizon oil spill and 2011 Japanese earthquake and tsunami are vivid reminders that a broad range of infrastructure is needed to advance our still-incomplete understanding of the ocean. The National Research Council (NRC)’s Ocean Studies Board was asked by the National Science and Technology Council’s Subcommittee on Ocean Science and Technology, comprised of 25 U.S. government agencies, to examine infrastructure needs for ocean research in the year 2030. This request reflects concern, among a myriad of marine issues, over the present state of aging and obsolete infrastructure, insufficient capacity, growing technological gaps, and declining national leadership in marine technological development; issues brought to the nation’s attention in 2004 by the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy. A 15-member committee of experts identified four themes that encompass 32 future ocean research questions–enabling stewardship of the environment, protecting life and property, promoting economic vitality, and increasing fundamental scientific understanding. Many of the questions in the report (e.g., sea level rise, sustainable fisheries, the global water cycle) reflect challenging, multidisciplinary science questions that are clearly relevant today, and are likely to take decades of effort to solve. As such, U.S. ocean research will require a growing suite of ocean infrastructure for a range of activities, such as high quality, sustained time series observations or autonomous monitoring at a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. Consequently, a coordinated national plan for making future strategic investments becomes an imperative to address societal needs. Such a plan should be based upon known priorities and should be reviewed every 5-10 years to optimize the federal investment. The committee examined the past 20 years of technological advances and ocean infrastructure investments (such as the rise in use of self-propelled, uncrewed, underwater autonomous vehicles), assessed infrastructure that would be required to address future ocean research questions, and characterized ocean infrastructure trends for 2030. One conclusion was that ships will continue to be essential, especially because they provide a platform for enabling other infrastructure – autonomous and remotely operated vehicles; samplers and sensors; moorings and cabled systems; and perhaps most importantly, the human assets of scientists, technical staff, and students. A comprehensive, long-term research fleet plan should be implemented in order to retain access to the sea. The current report also calls for continuing U.S. capability to access fully and partially ice-covered seas; supporting innovation, particularly the development of biogeochemical sensors; enhancing computing and modeling capacity and capability; establishing broadly accessible data management facilities; and increasing interdisciplinary education and promoting a technically-skilled workforce. The committee also provided a framework for prioritizing future investment in ocean infrastructure. They recommend that development, maintenance, or replacement of ocean research infrastructure assets should be prioritized in terms of societal benefit, with particular consideration given to usefulness for addressing important science questions; affordability, efficiency, and longevity; and ability to contribute to other missions or applications. These criteria are the foundation for prioritizing ocean research infrastructure investments by estimating the economic costs and benefits of each potential infrastructure investment, and funding those investments that collectively produce the largest expected net benefit over time. While this type of process is clearly subject to budget constraints, it could quantify the often informal evaluation of linkages between infrastructure, ocean research, the value of information produced, societal objectives, and economic benefits. Addressing the numerous complex science questions facing the entire ocean research enterprise in 2030–from government to academia, industry to nonprofits, local to global scale–represents a major challenge, requiring collaboration across the breadth of the ocean sciences community and nearly seamless coordination between ocean-related federal agencies.

  19. MODELING AND FISSION CROSS SECTIONS FOR AMERICIUM.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ROCHMAN, D.; HERMAN, M.; OBLOZINSKY, P.

    2005-05-01

    This is the final report of the work performed under the LANL contract on the modeling and fission cross section for americium isotopes (May 2004-June 2005). The purpose of the contract was to provide fission cross sections for americium isotopes with the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE 2.19. The following work was performed: (1) Fission calculations capability suitable for americium was implemented to the EMPIRE-2.19 code. (2) Calculations of neutron-induced fission cross sections for {sup 239}Am to {sup 244g}Am were performed with EMPIRE-2.19 for energies up to 20 MeV. For the neutron-induced reaction of {sup 240}Am, fission cross sections were predicted and uncertainties were assessed. (3) Set of fission barrier heights for each americium isotopes was chosen so that the new calculations fit the experimental data and follow the systematics found in the literature.

  20. Section 54: Scope of Compliance Assessments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    transport pathway is through the anhydrite marker beds, as assumed in previous CRAs and the CCA (Appendix IGP-2014, Section IGP-2.2.1 ). The DOE's approach to compliance...

  1. Microsoft Word - SECTION D.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Occupational Medical Services at Hanford D-1 PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION D PACKAGING AND MARKING TABLE OF CONTENTS D.1 PACKAGING ..................................................................................................................................... D-2 D.2 MARKING ......................................................................................................................................... D-2 D.3 SECURITY REQUIREMENTS

  2. SECTION L ? ATTACHMENT A - PERFORMANCE GUARANTEE AGREEMENT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Guarantor affirms that the Government shall not be Request for Proposal No. DE-SOL-0008418 Section L, Attachment A, Page 2 required to first commence any action or obtain...

  3. DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemp, Susan

    2013-12-29

    Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAU’s activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program designated FAU’s state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOE’s establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Florida’s metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially-viable fashion presents a variety of challenges. Beyond the technology itself (and, especially, the effects on the technology of the harsh oceanic environment), it is important to consider the possible environmental impacts of commercial-scale implementation of oceanic energy extraction. Further, because such implementation represents a completely new undertaking, the human resources required do not exist, so education and training programs are critical to eventual success. This project, establishing a national open-ocean energy laboratory, was designed to address each of these three challenges in a flexible framework allowing for adaptive management as the project proceeded. In particular:  the technology challenge, including resource assessment, evolved during the project to recognize and address the need for a national testing facility in the ocean for small-scale prototype MRE systems developed by industry;  the environmental challenge became formalized and expanded during the permitting process for such a testing facility; and  the human resources/societal challenges, both in terms of the need for education and training and in terms of public acceptance of MRE, stimulated a robust outreach program far beyond that originally envisioned at SNMREC. While all of these activities at SNMREC are ongoing, a number of significant milestones (in addition to the contributions listed in the appendices) were achieved under the auspices of this award. These include:  Planning and site selection for the first-phase test facility, offshore of Dania Beach, FL, including some equipment for the facility, submission of an Interim Policy Lease Application to the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and completion of an Environmental Assessment by BOEM and a positive Consistency Determination by the State of Florida;  Measurements using acoustic profilers of the current structure and variability in the vicinity of the site under a variety of weather conditions, seasons and time durations;  Design and implementation of instrumentation for the first phase of the offshore testing facility, the wet- and top-side data acquisition systems, and shore-based analysis systems;  Implementation of a laboratory-scale dynamometer system to test generators of up to 25 kW capacity using real-world (simulated) forcing;  Completion of 24 months of (airborne) marine vertebrate surveys and associated analysis of sea turtle offshore activity, marine mammal vocalization research, and ocean current turbine hydrodynamic noise characterization;  Development of a secondary-school (nominally grade 10) curriculum about hydrokinetic MRE, “Energy from the Oceans: The New Renewable”, and training of over 200 high-school teachers in its use and in how to educate their colleagues in application of the material in the classroom;  Presentations to over 50 interested civic groups in the region on various aspects of MRE in SE Florida  A series of public lectures to over 600 residents of south Florida to provide broader education on MRE.  Development of an interactive kiosk for installation in local science museums. These, and other accomplishments detailed in this report contribute to a comprehensive ongoing program at the SNMREC to support the affordable, responsible, and achievable commercialization of MRE. Many of the tasks of this award are continued or will be verified with follow-on funding DE-EE0004200, and its goal: the installation of the world’s first offshore ocean current turbine testing and validation capability.

  4. Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Program I. Purpose In the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005; Public Law 109-58) Congress established a new program to support the expansion of hydropower energy development at existing dams and impoundments through an incentive payment procedure. Under section 242 of EPAct 2005, the Secretary of Energy is directed to provide incentive payments to the owner or authorized operator of qualified hydroelectric facilities for electric energy generated and sold

  5. Section 999 Program Library | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Offshore Drilling » Section 999 Program Library Section 999 Program Library Cost-Shared Program Publications October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 September 10, 2013 Draft 2014 Annual Plan More Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC) Activities and Products January 27, 2014 UDAC 2014 Report November 27, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 16, 2013 November 20, 2013 UDAC Meeting - December 9, 2013 More Unconventional Resources Technology Advisory

  6. Microsoft Word - Section F (Mod 616).docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F Contract No. DE-AC06-05RL14655 616 F-i PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS F.1 PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE AND DELIVERY DATES ................................................................ 1 F.2 PRINCIPAL PLACE OF PERFORMANCE ...................................................................................... 1 F.3 FAR 52.242-15 STOP-WORK ORDER (AUG 1989) -- ALTERNATE I (APR 1984) ...................... 1 River Corridor Closure Contract Section F Contract

  7. Section 999: Annual Plans | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 999: Annual Plans Section 999: Annual Plans October 2, 2013 UDAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 8, 2013 UDAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Ultra-Deepwater Advisory Committee (UDAC), previously scheduled for October 8, 2013, is postponed until further notice due to a lapse in Federal funding. October 2, 2013 URTAC Meeting - October 2013 Federal Register Notice for October 10, 2013 URTAC Meeting The 24th Meeting of the Unconventional Resources Technology

  8. Some ocean engineering considerations in the design of OTEC plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McGuiness, T.

    1982-08-01

    An alternate energy resource using the temperature differences between warm surface waters and cool bottom waters of the world's oceans, Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) utilizes the solar energy potential of nearequatorial water masses and can be applied to generate electrical energy as a baseload augmentation of landside power plants or to process energy-intensive products at sea. Designs of OTEC plants include concepts of floating barge or shipshape structures with large (up to 100-foot diameter, 3,000 feet in length) pipes used to intake cool bottom waters and platforms located in 300-foot water depths similar to oil drilling rigs, also with a pipe to ingest cool waters, but in this case the pipe is laid on continental shelf areas in 25/sup 0/-30/sup 0/ slopes attaining a length of several miles. The ocean engineering design considerations, problem areas, and proposed solutions to data regarding various OTEC plant concepts are the topic of this presentation.

  9. Metagenome of a Versatile Chemolithoautotroph from Expanding Oceanic Dead Zones

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, David A.; Zaikova, Elena; Howes, Charles L.; Song, Young; Wright, Jody; Tringe, Susannah G.; Tortell, Philippe D.; Hallam, Steven J.

    2009-07-15

    Oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), also known as oceanic"dead zones", are widespread oceanographic features currently expanding due to global warming and coastal eutrophication. Although inhospitable to metazoan life, OMZs support a thriving but cryptic microbiota whose combined metabolic activity is intimately connected to nutrient and trace gas cycling within the global ocean. Here we report time-resolved metagenomic analyses of a ubiquitous and abundant but uncultivated OMZ microbe (SUP05) closely related to chemoautotrophic gill symbionts of deep-sea clams and mussels. The SUP05 metagenome harbors a versatile repertoire of genes mediating autotrophic carbon assimilation, sulfur-oxidation and nitrate respiration responsive to a wide range of water column redox states. Thus, SUP05 plays integral roles in shaping nutrient and energy flow within oxygen-deficient oceanic waters via carbon sequestration, sulfide detoxification and biological nitrogen loss with important implications for marine productivity and atmospheric greenhouse control.

  10. Ocean FUSRAP: feasibility of ocean disposal of materials from the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Progam (FUSRAP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kupferman, S.L.; Anderson, D.R.; Brush, L.H.; Gomez, L.S.; Laul, J.C.; Shephard, L.E.

    1982-01-01

    The Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) of the Department of Energy is designed to identify and evaluate the radiological conditions at sites formerly used by the Corps of Engineers Manhattan Engineer District and the US Atomic Energy Commission. Where required, remedial action will be instituted to remove potential restrictions on the use of the sites due to residual low-level radioactive contamination. A total of 31 sites that may require remedial action has been identified. The purpose of the Ocean FUSRAP Program, which began in March 1981, is to assess the technical, environmental, and institutional feasibility of disposing, in the ocean and on the ocean floor, of FUSRAP soil and rubble which contains traces of natural radioactive materials. The initial focus has been on the Middlesex, New Jersey, Sampling Plant site and surrounding properties, which contain on the order of 100,000 metric tons of material. The Belgian Congo uranium ore and other uranium ores used by the United States were handled at the sampling plant site. In studying the feasibility of ocean disposal of FUSRAP material from Middlesex, New Jersey, we have begun to examine institutional requirements to be met, the composition of the source material with regard to its inventory of toxic chemical and radiochemical components and the impact of the source material in the marine environment. To date we have found nothing that would preclude safe and inexpensive disposal of this material in the ocean.

  11. The annual cycle in the tropical Pacific Ocean based on assimilated ocean data from 1983 to 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, T.M.; Chelliah, M.

    1995-06-01

    An analysis of the tropical Pacific Ocean from January 1983 to December 1992 is used to describe the annual cycle, with the main focus on subsurface temperature variations. Some analysis of ocean-current variations are also considered. Monthly mean fields are generated by assimilation of surface and subsurface temperature observations from ships and buoys. Comparisons with observations show that the analysis reasonably describes large-scale ocean thermal variations. Ocean currents are not assimilated and do not compare as well with observations. However, the ocean-current variations in the analysis are qualitatively similar to the known variations given by others. The authors use harmonic analysis to separate the mean annual cycle and estimate its contribution to total variance. The analysis shows that in most regions the annual cycle of subsurface thermal variations is larger than surface variations and that these variations are associated with changes in the depth of the thermocline. The annual cycle accounts for most of the total surface variance poleward of about 10{degrees} latitude but accounts for much less surface and subsurface total variance near the equator. Large subsurface annual cycles occur near 10{degrees}N associated with shifts of the intertropical convergence zone and along the equator associated with the annual cycle of equatorial wind stress. The hemispherically asymmetric depths of the 20{degrees}C isotherms indicate that the large Southern Hemisphere warm pool, which extends to near the equator, may play an important role in thermal variations on the equator. 51 refs., 18 figs., 1 tab.

  12. High-Order/Low-Order methods for ocean modeling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Newman, Christopher; Womeldorff, Geoff; Chacón, Luis; Knoll, Dana A.

    2015-06-01

    We examine a High Order/Low Order (HOLO) approach for a z-level ocean model and show that the traditional semi-implicit and split-explicit methods, as well as a recent preconditioning strategy, can easily be cast in the framework of HOLO methods. The HOLO formulation admits an implicit-explicit method that is algorithmically scalable and second-order accurate, allowing timesteps much larger than the barotropic time scale. We demonstrate how HOLO approaches, in particular the implicit-explicit method, can provide a solid route for ocean simulation to heterogeneous computing and exascale environments.

  13. Proceedings of the ocean energy information dissemination workshop, December 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, D.

    1980-04-01

    The workshop was held to discuss the status of marketing ocean energy information and to develop an understanding of information needs and how to satisfy them. Presentations were made by the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) staff and media consultants about the effective use of audio-visual and print products, the mass media, and audience needs. Industry and government representatives reported on current efforts in each of their communication programs and outlined future plans. Four target audiences (DOE contractors, researchers, influencers, and general public) were discussed with respect to developing priorities for projects to enhance the commercialization of ocean energy technology.

  14. American Bar Association Section on Environment | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bar Association Section on Environment Jump to: navigation, search Name: American Bar Association Section on Environment Place: Chicago, Illinois Zip: 60610 Product: The Section of...

  15. NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments NDAA Section 3116 Waste Determinations with Related Disposal Performance Assessments Section...

  16. Precise neutron inelastic cross section measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Negret, Alexandru [Horia Hulubei National Institute for Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest-Magurele (Romania)

    2012-11-20

    The design of a new generation of nuclear reactors requires the development of a very precise neutron cross section database. Ongoing experiments performed at dedicated facilities aim to the measurement of such cross sections with an unprecedented uncertainty of the order of 5% or even smaller. We give an overview of such a facility: the Gamma Array for Inelastic Neutron Scattering (GAINS) installed at the GELINA neutron source of IRMM, Belgium. Some of the most challenging difficulties of the experimental approach are emphasized and recent results are shown.

  17. Covariance Evaluation Methodology for Neutron Cross Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herman,M.; Arcilla, R.; Mattoon, C.M.; Mughabghab, S.F.; Oblozinsky, P.; Pigni, M.; Pritychenko, b.; Songzoni, A.A.

    2008-09-01

    We present the NNDC-BNL methodology for estimating neutron cross section covariances in thermal, resolved resonance, unresolved resonance and fast neutron regions. The three key elements of the methodology are Atlas of Neutron Resonances, nuclear reaction code EMPIRE, and the Bayesian code implementing Kalman filter concept. The covariance data processing, visualization and distribution capabilities are integral components of the NNDC methodology. We illustrate its application on examples including relatively detailed evaluation of covariances for two individual nuclei and massive production of simple covariance estimates for 307 materials. Certain peculiarities regarding evaluation of covariances for resolved resonances and the consistency between resonance parameter uncertainties and thermal cross section uncertainties are also discussed.

  18. LLNL Section I Clauses/Prescriptions

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AC52-06NA27344 LLNL Section I, Page 56 Part II - Contract Clauses Section I I-1 CONTRACT CLAUSES Unless conditionally "Noted", all contract clauses are hereby incorporated by full text. The references cited herein are from the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) (48 CFR Chapter 1) and the Department of Energy Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) (48 CFR Chapter 9). Note: The titles and page locations of the clauses are as follows: CLAUSE TITLE PAGE I001 FAR 52.202-1 DEFINITIONS (JUL 2004)

  19. SECTION J, APPENDIX L - DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    L, Page 1 SECTION J APPENDIX L [Note: The Diversity Plan shall be submitted to the Contracting Officer in accordance with DEAR 970.5226-1] DIVERSITY PLAN GUIDANCE 12/1/10 In accordance with the Contract's Section I Clause entitled "DEAR 970.5226-1, Diversity Plan," this Appendix provides guidance to assist the Contractor in understanding the information being sought by the Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration (DOE/NNSA) for each of the clause's Diversity

  20. Quantitative evaluation of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC): executive briefing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gritton, E.C.; Pei, R.Y.; Hess, R.W.

    1980-08-01

    Documentation is provided of a briefing summarizing the results of an independent quantitative evaluation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) for central station applications. The study concentrated on a central station power plant located in the Gulf of Mexico and delivering power to the mainland United States. The evaluation of OTEC is based on three important issues: resource availability, technical feasibility, and cost.

  1. GLobal Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP): Data and Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sabine, C. L.; Key, R. M.; Feely, R. A.; Bullister, J. L.; Millero, F. J.; Wanninkhof, R.; Peng, T. H.; Kozyr, A.

    GLODAP information available through CDIAC includes gridded and bottle data, a live server, an interactive atlas that provides access to data plots, and other tools for viewing and interacting with the data. [from http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/oceans/glodap/Glopintrod.htm](Specialized Interface)

  2. Deployment, release and recovery of ocean riser pipes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham; Wetmore, Sherman B.; McNary, James F.

    1980-11-18

    An ocean thermal energy conversion facility includes a long pipe assembly which is supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. Cold water flows to the facility from deep in the ocean. The pipe assembly comprises an elongate pipe construction and a weight connected to the lower end of the construction by a line of selected length. A floatation collar is connected to the construction at its upper end to cause the construction to have positive buoyancy and a center of buoyancy closer to the upper end of the construction than its center of mass. The weight renders the entire pipe assembly negatively buoyant. In the event that support of the pipe assembly should be lost, as by release of the assembly from the facility hull in an emergency, the assembly sinks to the ocean floor where it is moored by the weight. The pipe construction floats submerged above the ocean floor in a substantially vertical attitude which facilitates recovery of the assembly.

  3. Ocean Barrier Layers Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  4. Testing (Validating?) Cross Sections with ICSBEP Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kahler, Albert C. III

    2012-06-28

    We discuss how to use critical benchmarks from the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments to determine the applicability of specific cross sections to the end-user's problem of interest. Particular attention is paid to making sure the selected suite of benchmarks includes the user's range of applicability (ROA).

  5. Section C: Description, Specifications and Work Statements

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    C DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/ STATEMENT OF WORK Request for Proposal #DE-RP36-07GO97036 PART I SECTION C DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/ STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE OF CONTENTS C.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................1 C.2 Purpose ...................................................................................................................2 C.3

  6. Navy's Section 2922a Legislation Success Stories

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation—given at the Fall 2011 Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) meeting—features U.S. Department of Navy success stories in relation to Section 2922a legislation, which involves contracts for energy or fuel for military installations.

  7. IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Knowledge on Oscillation Knowledge on Oscillation Measurements Measurements M. Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and U. of Valencia) IDS-NF, RAL, Jan 16-17 2008 M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 2 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 3 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA Beta

  8. MHK Technologies/Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17 | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17 < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Turbo Ocean Power Generator MadaTech 17.jpg Technology...

  9. Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - ...

  10. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, ...

  11. Enabling Technologies for Ceramic Hot Section Components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venkat Vedula; Tania Bhatia

    2009-04-30

    Silicon-based ceramics are attractive materials for use in gas turbine engine hot sections due to their high temperature mechanical and physical properties as well as lower density than metals. The advantages of utilizing ceramic hot section components include weight reduction, and improved efficiency as well as enhanced power output and lower emissions as a result of reducing or eliminating cooling. Potential gas turbine ceramic components for industrial, commercial and/or military high temperature turbine applications include combustor liners, vanes, rotors, and shrouds. These components require materials that can withstand high temperatures and pressures for long duration under steam-rich environments. For Navy applications, ceramic hot section components have the potential to increase the operation range. The amount of weight reduced by utilizing a lighter gas turbine can be used to increase fuel storage capacity while a more efficient gas turbine consumes less fuel. Both improvements enable a longer operation range for Navy ships and aircraft. Ceramic hot section components will also be beneficial to the Navy's Growth Joint Strike Fighter (JSF) and VAATE (Versatile Affordable Advanced Turbine Engines) initiatives in terms of reduced weight, cooling air savings, and capability/cost index (CCI). For DOE applications, ceramic hot section components provide an avenue to achieve low emissions while improving efficiency. Combustors made of ceramic material can withstand higher wall temperatures and require less cooling air. Ability of the ceramics to withstand high temperatures enables novel combustor designs that have reduced NO{sub x}, smoke and CO levels. In the turbine section, ceramic vanes and blades do not require sophisticated cooling schemes currently used for metal components. The saved cooling air could be used to further improve efficiency and power output. The objectives of this contract were to develop technologies critical for ceramic hot section components for gas turbine engines. Significant technical progress has been made towards maturation of the EBC and CMC technologies for incorporation into gas turbine engine hot-section. Promising EBC candidates for longer life and/or higher temperature applications relative to current state of the art BSAS-based EBCs have been identified. These next generation coating systems have been scaled-up from coupons to components and are currently being field tested in Solar Centaur 50S engine. CMC combustor liners were designed, fabricated and tested in a FT8 sector rig to demonstrate the benefits of a high temperature material system. Pretest predictions made through the use of perfectly stirred reactor models showed a 2-3x benefit in CO emissions for CMC versus metallic liners. The sector-rig test validated the pretest predictions with >2x benefit in CO at the same NOx levels at various load conditions. The CMC liners also survived several trip shut downs thereby validating the CMC design methodology. Significant technical progress has been made towards incorporation of ceramic matrix composites (CMC) and environmental barrier coatings (EBC) technologies into gas turbine engine hot-section. The second phase of the program focused on the demonstration of a reverse flow annular CMC combustor. This has included overcoming the challenges of design and fabrication of CMCs into 'complex' shapes; developing processing to apply EBCs to 'engine hardware'; testing of an advanced combustor enabled by CMCs in a PW206 rig; and the validation of performance benefits against a metal baseline. The rig test validated many of the pretest predictions with a 40-50% reduction in pattern factor compared to the baseline and reductions in NOx levels at maximum power conditions. The next steps are to develop an understanding of the life limiting mechanisms in EBC and CMC materials, developing a design system for EBC coated CMCs and durability testing in an engine environment.

  12. ARM - Field Campaign - Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (GOAMAZON) Amazon (GOAMAZON) Campaign Links GOAMAZON Website ARM Manacapuru Deployment Page ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Related Campaigns Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon - Hi-Vol Filter Sampling 2015.03.13, de Mello Dias Machado, AMF Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: LIDAR Comparison 2014.10.05, Barbosa, AMF Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean Amazon: Oxidation Flow Reactor 2 2014.08.15, Palm, AMF Observations and Modeling of the Green Ocean

  13. Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Lakes | Department of Energy 47: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability of ocean and coastal economies, preserve our maritime heritage, support sustainable uses and access, provide for adaptive

  14. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    RIVER PLUMES (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC RIVER PLUMES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC RIVER PLUMES Oceanic river plumes represent some of the most productive environments on Earth. As major conduits for freshwater and nutrients into the coastal ocean, their impact on water column ecosystems extend for up

  15. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December » Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern climate Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. December 19, 2013 Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric

  16. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RIVER PLUMES (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Technical Report: FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC RIVER PLUMES Citation Details In-Document Search Title: FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT-THE ECOLOGY AND GENOMICS OF CO2 FIXATIION IN OCEANIC RIVER PLUMES Oceanic river plumes represent some of the most productive environments on Earth. As major conduits for freshwater and nutrients into the coastal ocean, their impact on water column ecosystems extend for up

  17. Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern climate Effect of ocean temperature on southwestern U.S. climate analyzed Researchers concluded that only part of the recent temperature rise in the Southwest could be attributed to greenhouse gases. December 19, 2013 Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Environmental Visualization Laboratory depicts sea surface temperatures around Greenland from October 2010. Image from National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's

  18. Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Lakes | Department of Energy Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes Executive Order 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability of ocean and coastal economies, preserve our maritime heritage, support sustainable uses and access,

  19. Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project File 13_aquantismhk_da_alexfleming.pptx More Documents & Publications Aquantis 2.5MW Ocean Current Generation Device 2014 Water Power Program Peer Review Compiled Presentations: Marine and Hydrokinetic Technologies CX-005670: Categorical Exclusion

  20. Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System May 27, 2010 - 11:46am Addthis Paul Lester Paul Lester Digital Content Specialist, Office of Public Affairs A floating platform, simple turbine and tropical oceans could be the key to producing 30 percent or more of the total energy the world consumes today, according to Lockheed Martin. The technology in play: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Lockheed Martin

  1. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This report describes the analysis and results of a rigorous assessment of the United States ocean wave energy resource. PDF icon Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource More Documents & Publications Assessment and Mapping of the Riverine Hydrokinetic Resource in the Continental United States

  2. focused ion beam cross-sectioning

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    focused ion beam cross-sectioning - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs

  3. Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-01-15

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (excluding Section 404) and those regulations that implement the statutes and appear to be most relevant to US Department of Energy (DOE) activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, EH-231 (202/586-2609).

  4. Quality Quantification of Evaluated Cross Section Covariances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varet, S.; Dossantos-Uzarralde, P.

    2015-01-15

    Presently, several methods are used to estimate the covariance matrix of evaluated nuclear cross sections. Because the resulting covariance matrices can be different according to the method used and according to the assumptions of the method, we propose a general and objective approach to quantify the quality of the covariance estimation for evaluated cross sections. The first step consists in defining an objective criterion. The second step is computation of the criterion. In this paper the Kullback-Leibler distance is proposed for the quality quantification of a covariance matrix estimation and its inverse. It is based on the distance to the true covariance matrix. A method based on the bootstrap is presented for the estimation of this criterion, which can be applied with most methods for covariance matrix estimation and without the knowledge of the true covariance matrix. The full approach is illustrated on the {sup 85}Rb nucleus evaluations and the results are then used for a discussion on scoring and Monte Carlo approaches for covariance matrix estimation of the cross section evaluations.

  5. Major developments in section 404-permitting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, M.; Orr, S.

    2009-06-15

    Mountain coal mining in the Central Appalachians faces increased challenge under the Clean Water Act (CWA). These challenges have included the US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) increased involvement in permitting under Section 404 of the CWA; active opposition by environmental groups to Section 404 permits; and proposed federal legislation to reduce the availability of these permits. These recent challenges culminated in a June 11, 2009, Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between the PEA, the Department of Interior (DoI) and the Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) that will limit the use of general permits for mountaintop coal mining and increase the scrutiny applied to individual permits, while also providing a coordinated approach for reviewing the backlog of pending permit application. By entering into the MoU, the federal agencies aim to reduce the environmental impacts of mountaintop coal mining while increasing certainty and transparency for permit applications. Challenges to Section 404 permitting for mountaintop coal mining are dynamic and new developments occur almost daily. This article provides a snapshot of the current climate.

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sands, M.Dale

    1980-08-01

    Significant acccrmplishments in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology have increased the probability of producing OTEC-derived power within this decade with subsequent large scale commercialization following by the turn of the century. Under U.S. Department of Energy funding, the Oceanic Engineering Operations of Interstate Electronics Corporation has prepared several OTEC Environmental Assessments over the past years, in particular, the OTEC Programmatic Environmental Assessment. The Programmatic EA considers several technological designs (open- and closed-cycle), plant configuratlons (land-based, moored, and plant-ship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia and aluminum production). Potential environmental impacts, health and safetv issues and a status update of the institutional issues as they influence OTEC deployments, are included.

  7. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  8. Interpretation of Synthetic Aperture Radar measurements of ocean currents

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufenach, C.L.; Shuchman, R.A.; Lyzenga, D.R.

    1983-02-28

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) experiments hae been performed over the last few years to measure ocean currents inferred from shifts in the Doppler spectral peak. Interpretations of aircraft SAR measurements, when compared with limited surface values, tend to underestimate the currents by about 25%. A theory is developed that modifies the classical Doppler expression showing that the radar measurements are dependent on the radar processor (system) bandwidth and the received signal bandwidth. Measured bandwidths give a correction that increases the inferred current values by about 25%, bringing the measurements into good agreement. This new correction lends credence to the theory and increases the potential for application of SAR systems to future ocean current measurements. SAR measurements should include the determination of processor and signal bandwidths such that this correction can be applied.

  9. Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huesemann, Michael H.

    2008-07-29

    In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

  10. Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01

    Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

  11. Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, January-March 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1983-03-30

    Progress is reported on the development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual and preliminary design activity of industry teams that are designing a shelf-mounted offshore OTEC pilot plant that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway to evaluate and test the Pneumatic Wave-Energy Conversion System (PWECS), an ocean-energy device consisting of a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1983.

  12. Clean Water Act (Section 404) and Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-03-01

    This Reference Book contains a current copy of the Clean Water Act (Section 404) and the Rivers and Harbors Act (Sections 9 and 10) and those regulations that implement those sections of the statutes and appear to be most relevant to DOE activities. The document is provided to DOE and contractor staff for informational purposes only and should not be interpreted as legal guidance. Updates that include important new requirements will be provided periodically. Questions concerning this Reference Book may be directed to Mark Petts, IH-231 (FTS 896-2609 or Commercial 202/586-2609).

  13. Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PowerBuoy Project | Department of Energy Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility-Scale PowerBuoy Project Office presentation icon 04_pb50_ocean_power_technologies_inc_hart.ppt More Documents & Publications Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Ocean Power

  14. Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haas, Kevin A.

    2013-10-03

    Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States.

  15. Research and development on ocean thermal energy conversion in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uehara, H.

    1982-08-01

    The study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) in Japan has been conducted under the leadership of a team of the ''Sunshine Project'', a national new energy development project promoted by the Ministry of International Trade and Industries (MITI) since 1974. At present, two experimental OTEC power plants -Nauru's OTEC plant and Imari's OTEC plant are operating. In this paper, the review of research and development activity of these two OTEC plants in Japan is made.

  16. Technical Sessions B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B. E. Manner National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Wave Propagation Laboratory 130ulder, CO 80303 The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) pirog ram goals are ambitious, and its schedule is demanding. Many of the instruments, proposed for operations at the first Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site as early alS 1992 represent emerging technology and exist only as :special research prototypes. Therefore, an important preparatory step for ARM was an intensive field project in

  17. Ocean Carbon and Repeat Hydrographic CLIVAR Program Data

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Effective management and archival of data is a fundamental requirement for successful scientific research endeavors, and future oceanographic research depends on the availability and clarity of existing data. Two data offices in the US deal with reference-quality global ocean CTD, water sample, and underway data, one (CDIAC) specializing in discrete CO2 and underway surface data, and the other (WHPO/CCHDO) specializing in CTD, hydrographic, and tracer data.

  18. Vertical dispersion of inertial waves in the upper ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rubenstein, D.M.

    1983-05-20

    A linear model of the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves is developed. A porosity distribution near the bottom of the computational domain minimizes bottom reflections and simulates an ocean of the infinite depth. The model is used to show that the vertical dispersion of near-inertial waves in the upper ocean may, under certain conditions, contribute significanlty to the observed rapid decay of inertial oscillations in the surface layer. The kinetic energy of inertial oscillations at mid-latitudes decays with an e folding time scale of 10 days or less, when the parameter lambda(km)/N(cph)d(m) is less than or of the order of unity, where lambda is the wavelength of the wind-generated near-inertial waves, N is the Vaeisaelae frequency in the upper pycnocline, and d is the surface layer thickness. At the top of the pycnocline the model predicts a velocity maximum, which develops as energy propagates downward, out of the surface layer. However, when the upper pycnocline is sufficiently peaked, a resonant frequency interference effect is predicted. This effect modulates the dissipation of surface layer inertial oscillations, and their magnitude after a storm need not decay monotonically. We also make qualitative comparisons with deep-ocean current meter observations taken during the Mixed Layer Experiment (MILE) and with shallow water (105 m) observations taken in the Baltic Sea.

  19. Self-cleaning inlet screen to an ocean riser pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wetmore, S.B.; Person, A.

    1980-06-17

    A long, vertically disposed ocean water upwelling pipe, such as a cold water riser in an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, is fitted at its lower inlet end with a self-cleaning inlet screen. The screen includes a right conical frustum of loose metal netting connected at its larger upper end to the lower end of the pipe. A heavy, negatively buoyant closure is connected across the lower end of the frustum. A weight is suspended below the closure on a line which passes loosely through the closure into the interior of the screen. The line tends to stay stationary as the lower end of the pipe moves, as in response to ocean current vortex shedding and other causes, thus causing the closure to rattle on the line and to shake the netting. The included half-angle of the frustum is approximately 20 so that, on shaking of the netting, marine life accumulated on the netting becomes loose and falls free of the netting. 6 claims.

  20. Federal Ocean Energy Technology: Program summary for fiscal year 1986

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-10-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is looking for cost-effective ways to harness ocean energy to help power tomorrow's world. Federally sponsored researchers are studying methods to transform the solar heat stored in the ocean's surface waters into electricity as well as new ways to convert wave energy into mechanical energy or electricity. This report provides a summary of research completed during FY 1986. Four major research areas are addressed in the work covered by this report: Thermodynamic Research and Analysis addresses the process and system analyses which provide the underlying understanding of physical effects which constitute the energy conversion processes, Experimental Verification and Testing provides confirmation of the analytical projections and empirical relationships, Materials and Structural Research addresses special materials compatibility issues related to operation in the sea. Much of its focus is on concepts for the system CWP which is a major technology cost driver, and Oceanographic, Environmental, and Geotechnical Research addresss those unique design requirements imposed by construction in steep slope coastal areas.

  1. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

  2. CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

  3. Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabine, Christopher; Hankin, S.; Koyuk, H; Bakker, D C E; Pfeil, B; Olsen, A; Metzl, N; Fassbender, A; Manke, A; Malczyk, J; Akl, J; Alin, S R; Bellerby, R G J; Borges, A; Boutin, J; Cai, W-J; Chavez, F P; Chen, A; Cosa, C; Feely, R A; Gonzalez-Davila, M; Goyet, C; Hardman-Mountford, N; Heinze, C; Hoppema, M; Hunt, C W; Hydes, D; Ishii, M; Johannessen, T; Key, R M; Kortzinger, A; Landschutzer, P; Lauvset, S K; Lefevre, N; Lourantou, A; Mintrop, L; Miyazaki, C; Murata, A; Nakadate, A; Nakano, Y; Nakaoka, S; Nojiri, Y; et al.

    2013-01-01

    A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

  4. SECTION IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IV. ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR SCIENCE Cross Sections for Cu K-Vacancy Production in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, J.M. Blackadar and V. Horvat Enhancement of the Cu Kα x-ray Diagram Lines in Fast Heavy Ion Collisions R.L. Watson, V. Horvat and J.M. Blackadar K-shell Ionization by Secondary Electrons V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Target-atom Inner-shell Vacancy Distributions Created in Collisions with Heavy Ion Projectiles V. Horvat, R.L. Watson and J.M. Blackadar Systematics of

  5. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2015-00110 Revision 1 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 722 kgal Vault 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells 2A and 2B SDU 5, Cells 5A and 5B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  6. Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 SRR-ESH-2016-00025 Revision 0 Post Date: February 29, 2016 Page 1 of 6 Z-Area Saltstone Disposal Facility Permit General Condition B.5.a-h Information and Consent Order of Dismissal, Section III.7 Permit Condition Requirement Estimated Value Updated Value Comments B.5 a) Cumulative process volume of salt waste disposed to date Not Applicable 10, 744 kgal SDU 4, Cells B, D, E, F, H, J, K, L SDU 2, Cells A and B SDU 5, Cells A and B b) Process volume of saltstone grout disposed and

  7. Cross Sections for Nuclei A = 3 - 20

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross Sections with Proton and Alpha Induced Reactions for Nuclei A = 3 - 20 I. Introduction: We have scanned the NSR from 1910-present for various articles with proton and alpha induced reactions. We have used the program Plot Digitizer 2.5.0 to extract the excitation functions from figures in the articles. In some cases the uncertainties are provided in the figures, we have noted this in comments, but we have made no attempt to extract the uncertainties. In cases where the data are given in

  8. Microsoft Word - Section 5 September 2007.doc

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Project Schedules and Milestones September 2007 Site Management Plan Page 5-1 5.0 Project Schedules and Milestones (FY 2008-2010) 5.1 Establishing Project Schedules and Milestones As stated in Section 1.1.2, the SMP establishes the overall plan for remedial actions at the MMTS and milestones against which progress can be measured. The SMP also documents the overall plan for remedial actions at the MVP Site, which was deleted from the NPL on February 28, 2000. The SMP was first prepared in 1995

  9. Ocean Energy Program Overview, Fiscal years 1990--1991. Programs in utility technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-05-01

    The oceans are the world`s largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth`s surface, the oceans collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy cost effectively and in ways that do not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which industry can accurately assess whether the applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives, or supplements to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the Ocean Energy Program has concentrated research that advances OTEC technology. The program also monitored developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts. It is not actively developing these technologies now. The mission of the Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques to harness the vast solar energy stored in the oceans` waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients.

  10. Actinide Targets for Neutron Cross Section Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Baker; Christopher A. McGrath

    2006-10-01

    The Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI) and the Generation IV Reactor Initiative have demonstrated a lack of detailed neutron cross-sections for certain "minor" actinides, those other than the most common (235U, 238U, and 239Pu). For some closed-fuel-cycle reactor designs more than 50% of reactivity will, at some point, be derived from "minor" actinides that currently have poorly known or in some cases not measured (n,?) and (n,f) cross sections. A program of measurements under AFCI has begun to correct this. One of the initial hurdles has been to produce well-characterized, highly isotopically enriched, and chemically pure actinide targets on thin backings. Using a combination of resurrected techniques and new developments, we have made a series of targets including highly enriched 239Pu, 240Pu, and 242Pu. Thus far, we have electrodeposited these actinide targets. In the future, we plan to study reductive distillation to achieve homogeneous, adherent targets on thin metal foils and polymer backings. As we move forward, separated isotopes become scarcer, and safety concerns become greater. The chemical purification and electodeposition techniques will be described.

  11. Part III: Section C - Description, Specification, Statement of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION C DESCRIPTIONSPECIFICATION STATEMENT OF WORK DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section C - Page ii PART I SECTION C DESCRIPTIONSPECIFICATION STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE ...

  12. Recommendations: Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    8 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan PDF icon UDAC Recommendations on Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications UDAC Meeting - October 15, 2008 UDAC Meeting - July 2007 UDAC Meeting - February 2011

  13. Recommendations: Draft 2011 Section 999 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    1 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2011 Section 999 Annual Plan PDF icon UDAC Recommendations on Draft 2011 Section 999 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications Recommendations: Draft 2012 Annual Plan UDAC Next Steps UDAC Meeting - February 2011

  14. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, Bhushan L. (Scottsdale, AZ); Wolf, Abraham (Sun City West, AZ)

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample prior to introduction of a molding medium in the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  15. Apparatus for sectioning demountable semiconductor samples

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sopori, B.L.; Wolf, A.

    1984-01-01

    Apparatus for use during polishing and sectioning operations of a ribbon sample is described. The sample holder includes a cylinder having an axially extending sample cavity terminated in a first funnel-shaped opening and a second slot-like opening. A spring-loaded pressure plunger is located adjacent the second opening of the sample cavity for frictional engagement of the sample cavity. A heat softenable molding medium is inserted in the funnel-shaped opening, to surround the sample. After polishing, the heater is energized to allow draining of the molding medium from the sample cavity. During manual polishing, the second end of the sample holder is inserted in a support ring which provides mechanical support as well as alignment of the sample holder during polishing. A gauge block for measuring the protrusion of a sample beyond the second wall of the holder is also disclosed.

  16. Advisory Council on Historic Preservation - Section 106 Regulations...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- RegulationRegulation: Advisory Council on Historic Preservation - Section 106 RegulationsLegal Abstract Section 106 requires...

  17. Category:Hydropower Regulatory Roadmap Sections | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Login | Sign Up Search Category Edit History Category:Hydropower Regulatory Roadmap Sections Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Toolkit Add.png Add a Section Pages in...

  18. 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2014, Congress ...

  19. Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program Final Guidance for EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program This document contains the Final ...

  20. 2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM 2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM In 2015, Congress ...

  1. Idaho Section 319 Grant Application | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Form: Idaho Section 319 Grant Application Abstract This page provides access to an online form Section 319 Project Application for grants for watershed and aquifer...

  2. EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 6217 Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA Coastal Zone Act Reauthorization Amendments (CZARA) Section 6217 Webpage...

  3. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents Key Documents Briefing Package for Section 180(c) Implementation - July 2005 PDF icon Executive Summary...

  4. EPA Section 401 Water Quality Certification Manual | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 401 Water Quality Certification Manual Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Reference: EPA Section 401 Water Quality Certification Manual...

  5. Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hazardous Waste Section Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii DOH Hazardous Waste Section Webpage Abstract This webpage...

  6. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, H.J. ); Guenther, P.R. )

    1990-09-01

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Heat transfer research for ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreith, F.; Bharathan, D.

    1988-02-01

    In this lecture an overview of the heat and mass-transfer phenomena of importance in ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is presented with particular emphasis on open-cycle OTEC systems. Also included is a short historical review of OTEC developments in the past century and a comparison of open and closed-cycle thermodynamics. Finally, results of system analyses, showing the effect of plant size on cost and the near-term potential of using OTEC for combined power production and desalination systems, are briefly discussed.

  8. Heat transfer research for ocean thermal energy conversion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreith, F.; Bharathan, D.

    1987-03-01

    In this lecture an overview of the heat- and mass-transfer phenomena of importance in ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is presented with particular emphasis on open-cycle OTEC systems. Also included is a short historical review of OTEC developments in the past century and a comparison of open- and closed-cycle thermodynamics. Finally, results of system analyses, showing the effect of plant size on cost and the near-term potential of using OTEC for combined power production and desalination systems are briefly discussed.

  9. Microsoft Word - WTP Contract Section G - Conformed Thru 353.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    G Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Modification No. 353 G - i SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA WTP Contract Section G Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Modification No. 353 G - ii SECTION G CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION DATA TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Clause Page G.1 CORRESPONDENCE PROCEDURES ........................................................................................... 1 G.2 CONTRACT ADMINISTRATION

  10. SECTION L -ATTACHMENT B - LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    H SECTION J APPENDIX H KEY PERSONNEL [Note: To be inserted by the Contracting Officer after

  11. Recommendations: Draft 2007 Section 999 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    7 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2007 Section 999 Annual Plan PDF icon UDAC - Recommendations on Draft 2007 Section 999 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications Recommendations: Draft 2012 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2008 Section 999 Annual Plan UDAC Meeting - July 2007

  12. Recommendations: Draft 2009 Section 999 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    09 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2009 Section 999 Annual Plan PDF icon UDAC Recommendations on Draft 2009 Section 999 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications Recommendations: Draft 2010 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2012 Annual Plan Recommendations: 2009

  13. Recommendations: Draft 2010 Section 999 Annual Plan | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    10 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2010 Section 999 Annual Plan PDF icon UDAC - Recommendations on Draft 2010 Section 999 Annual Plan More Documents & Publications Recommendations: Draft 2009 Section 999 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2012 Annual Plan Recommendations: Draft 2013

  14. Comments to Section 934 Rulemaking | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to Section 934 Rulemaking Comments to Section 934 Rulemaking ConverDyn's comments on section 934 rulemaking PDF icon Comments to Section 934 Rulemaking More Documents & Publications NOPR ConverDyn Memo to DOE re conference call minutes Public Comment re Convention on Supplementary Compensation for Nuclear Damage Contingent Cost Allocation

  15. Cleaning of the ocean floor near offshore platforms in the Gulf coast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fang, C.S.; Smith, S.A. Jr.

    1986-03-01

    For decades in offshore drilling, the drill cuttings were separated from the circulating drilling fluid by the shale shaker and hydrocyclone, and discharged to the ocean. The drilling fluid itself was discharged to the ocean intermittently to maintain its required properties during the drilling process. These discharges contain many environmentally undesirable chemicals, such as hydrocarbons chemical additives and heavy metals. As a result, the ocean floor near some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico are covered by contaminated sediment. Ocean current is not as effective in washing out the discarded ocean muds as previously believed. An attempt was made to clean some of the offshore platforms in the Gulf of Mexico. The quantity and characteristics of the drilling discharges are estimated the technology used to clean the ocean floor near platforms is described, and advanced treatments for hydrocarbon removal, chemical oxidation and activated carbon adsorption, are discussed. 8 references.

  16. Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    prediction (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate prediction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Improved atmosphere-ocean coupled modeling in the tropics for climate prediction We investigated the initial development of the double ITCZ in the Community Climate System Model (CCSM Version 3) in the central Pacific. Starting from a resting initial condition of the ocean in January, the model developed a warm bias of

  17. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power | Department of Energy Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Office presentation icon 16_life_revision_previsic_update.ppt More Documents & Publications 2014 Water Power Program

  18. Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power April 30, 2013 - 12:40pm Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FIND OUT MORE Read about the Energy Department's assessments of wave and

  19. Mapping the Potential of U.S. Ocean Energy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Potential of U.S. Ocean Energy Mapping the Potential of U.S. Ocean Energy November 6, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis In September 2013, EERE completed a series of resource assessments showing the technically recoverable potential energy available in the nation's waves, tidal and river currents, and ocean thermal gradients. These resource assessments are pivotal to understanding water power's potential and making these resources available to contribute to the United States' total annual electricity

  20. The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Resources | Department of Energy The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources The Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources Testimony of Christopher M. Turner, Administrator Southwest Power Administration Before the Subcommittee on Water, Power, and Oceans House Committee on Natural Resources PDF icon 3-24-15_Christopher_Turner FT HNR.pdf More Documents & Publications Before the House Natural Resources Subcommittee

  1. METAL MEDIA FILTERS, AG-1 SECTION FI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adamson, D.

    2012-05-23

    One application of metal media filters is in various nuclear air cleaning processes including applications for protecting workers, the public and the environment from hazardous and radioactive particles. To support this application the development of the ASME AG-1 FI Standard on Metal Media has been under way for more than ten years. Development of the proposed section has required resolving several difficult issues associated with operating conditions (media velocity, pressure drop, etc.), qualification testing, and quality acceptance testing. Performance characteristics of metal media are dramatically different than the glass fiber media with respect to parameters like differential pressures, operating temperatures, media strength, etc. These differences make existing data for a glass fiber media inadequate for qualifying a metal media filter for AG-1. In the past much work has been conducted on metal media filters at facilities such as Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) to qualify the media as High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) Filters. Particle retention testing has been conducted at Oak Ridge Filter Test Facility and at Air Techniques International (ATI) to prove that the metal media meets or exceeds the 99.97% particle retention required for a HEPA Filter. Even with his testing, data was lacking to complete an AG-1 FI Standard on metal media. With funding secured by Mississippi State University (MSU) from National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), a research test stand is being designed and fabricated at MSU's Institute for Clean Energy Technology (ICET) Facility to obtain qualification data on metal media. This in turn will support required data needed for the FI Standard. The paper will discuss in detail how the test stand at MSU will obtain the necessary data to complete the FI Standard.

  2. Averaging cross section data so we can fit it

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, D.

    2014-10-23

    The 56Fe cross section we are interested in have a lot of fluctuations. We would like to fit the average of the cross section with cross sections calculated within EMPIRE. EMPIRE is a Hauser-Feshbach theory based nuclear reaction code, requires cross sections to be smoothed using a Lorentzian profile. The plan is to fit EMPIRE to these cross sections in the fast region (say above 500 keV).

  3. The Fidelity of Ocean Models With Explicit Eddies (Chapter 17)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McClean, J; Jayne, S; Maltrud, M; Ivanova, D

    2007-08-01

    Current practices within the oceanographic community have been reviewed with regard to the use of metrics to assess the realism of the upper-ocean circulation, ventilation processes diagnosed by time-evolving mixed layer depth and mode water formation, and eddy heat fluxes in large-scale fine resolution ocean model simulations. We have striven to understand the fidelity of these simulations in the context of their potential use in future fine-resolution coupled climate system studies. A variety of methodologies are used to assess the veracity of the numerical simulations. Sea surface height variability and the location of western boundary current paths from altimetry have been used routinely as basic indicators of fine-resolution model performance. Drifters and floats have also been used to provide pseudo-Eulerian measures of the mean and variability of surface and sub-surface flows, while statistical comparisons of observed and simulated means have been carried out using James tests. Probability density functions have been used to assess the Gaussian nature of the observed and simulated flows. Length and time scales have been calculated in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks from altimetry and drifters, respectively. Concise measures of multiple model performance have been obtained from Taylor diagrams. The time-evolution of the mixed layer depth at monitoring stations has been compared with simulated time series. Finally, eddy heat fluxes are compared to climatological inferences.

  4. Millennial-scale ocean acidification and late Quaternary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riding, Dr Robert E; Liang, Liyuan; Braga, Dr Juan Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Ocean acidification by atmospheric carbon dioxide has increased almost continuously since the last glacial maximum (LGM), 21 000 years ago. It is expected to impair tropical reef development, but effects on reefs at the present day and in the recent past have proved difficult to evaluate. We present evidence that acidification has already significantly reduced the formation of calcified bacterial crusts in tropical reefs. Unlike major reef builders such as coralline algae and corals that more closely control their calcification, bacterial calcification is very sensitive to ambient changes in carbonate chemistry. Bacterial crusts in reef cavities have declined in thickness over the past 14 000 years with largest reduction occurring 12 000 10 000 years ago. We interpret this as an early effect of deglacial ocean acidification on reef calcification and infer that similar crusts were likely to have been thicker when seawater carbonate saturation was increased during earlier glacial intervals, and thinner during interglacials. These changes in crust thickness could have substantially affected reef development over glacial cycles, as rigid crusts significantly strengthen framework and their reduction would have increased the susceptibility of reefs to biological and physical erosion. Bacterial crust decline reveals previously unrecognized millennial-scale acidification effects on tropical reefs. This directs attention to the role of crusts in reef formation and the ability of bioinduced calcification to reflect changes in seawater chemistry. It also provides a long-term context for assessing anticipated anthropogenic effects.

  5. Technological challenges associated with the sequestration of CO{sub 2} in the ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nihous, G.C.

    1998-07-01

    The specific technological challenges associated with the delivery of CO{sub 2} into the deep ocean are qualitatively discussed. Since the projected effectiveness of CO{sub 2} oceanic sequestration so far requires ocean depths of kilometer(s) and large flow rates, the necessary pipelines bear some similarities with the cold seawater conduits of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). A unique perspective is thus provided by examining the history of OTEC seawater systems. Design criteria specific to CO{sub 2} delivery pipelines are also mentioned, as well as their impact on future design work.

  6. Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 5 6 System) - PB500, 500 kW Utility...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ...powertechnologiesinchart.ppt More Documents & Publications Advanced, High Power, Next Scale, Wave Energy Conversion Device Ocean Power Technologies (TRL 7 8 System) - Reedsport ...

  7. MHK Projects/Ocean Navitas NaREC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Number of Devices Deployed 1 Main Overseeing Organization Ocean Navitas Project Licensing Environmental Monitoring and Mitigation Efforts See Tethys << Return to the MHK database...

  8. MHK Projects/Gulf of Mexico Ocean test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Gulf of Mexico Ocean test < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... "minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"R...

  9. Developing El Niño The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 Developing El Niño The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) recently announced the development of El Niño conditions in the tropical Pacific Ocean near the South American coastline. Scientists detected a 4ºF increase in the sea-surface temperatures during February. Conrad C. Lautenbacher, NOAA administrator and Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere, indicated that this warming is a sign that the Pacific Ocean is heading toward an El Niño condition.

  10. MHK ISDB/Instruments/TRDI Ocean Observer ADCP | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TRDI Ocean Observer ADCP < MHK ISDB Jump to: navigation, search MHK Instrumentation & Sensor Database Menu Home Search Add Instrument Add Sensor Add Company Community FAQ Help...

  11. EO 13547: Stewardship of the Ocean, Our Coasts, and the Great Lakes

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This order establishes a national policy to ensure the protection, maintenance, and restoration of the health of ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes ecosystems and resources, enhance the sustainability...

  12. EERE Success Story-Establishing a Testing Center for Ocean Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    NNMREC offers a full range of capabilities to support wave and tidal energy development for the United States. Ocean energy, generated from waves, tides, and currents, can be ...

  13. EERE Success Story-Mapping the Potential of U.S. Ocean Energy...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    a series of resource assessments showing the technically recoverable potential energy available in the nation's waves, tidal and river currents, and ocean thermal gradients. ...

  14. An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay-davis, Xylar

    2011-01-24

    This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

  15. Renewable energy from the ocean - a guide to OTEC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avery, W.H.; Wu, C.

    1994-01-01

    An enormous renewable energy resource exists in the tropical oceans. The authors of this book state that this resource could be exploited to produce a large fraction of the world's energy needs in the form of methanol or ammonia and that any associated deleterious environmental effects would be minimal. Careful analyses of potential problems, detailed designs of OTEC plant ships, and consideration of costs occupy most of the book. Part of it is devoted to some limited practical experience. With the knowledge set forth a 40-MWe seagoing pilot plant could be constructed. Cost would be about $200 million in 1990 dollars. Construction could be relatively rapid, since most of the components would be commercially available. The authors provide extensive evidence that with experience costs of OTEC would be substantially reduced and that ultimately production of methanol and ammonia by OTEC could be made cost-competitive.

  16. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wittig, J. Michael

    1980-01-01

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

  17. Part II: Section B: Supplies, Services and Costs

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M801 Section B - ii PART I SECTION B SUPPLIES AND SERVICES AND PRICECOSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS B.1 Service...

  18. California Fish and Game Code Section 86 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Fish and Game Code Section 86 Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- StatuteStatute: California Fish and Game Code Section...

  19. Category:Regulatory Roadmap Sections | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Roadmap Sections Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png Looking for the RAPIDRoadmap? Click here for a user-friendly list of Regulatory Roadmap pages. Add.png Add a Section...

  20. EPA EPCRA Section 304 Website | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 304 Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: EPA EPCRA Section 304 Website Abstract This website explains Emergency Planning...

  1. Clean Water Act Section 303(d) Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Clean Water Act Section 303(d) Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an overview of Section...

  2. Idaho Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Idaho Clean Water Act Section 401 Certification...

  3. _PART I - THE SCHEDULE SECTION B-H

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    to Mod 0108 dated 7/30/15 DE-NA0000622 Section B - H, Page i PART I - THE SCHEDULE TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION B ............................................................................................................................................................ 1 SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS .............................................................................................. 1 B-1 SERVICES BEING ACQUIRED

  4. Alaska Request for SHPO Section 106 Review | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Alaska Request for SHPO Section 106 Review Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Form: Alaska Request for SHPO Section 106 Review Form Type...

  5. Experiments on Antiprotons: Antiproton-Nucleon Cross Sections

    DOE R&D Accomplishments [OSTI]

    Chamberlain, Owen; Keller, Donald V.; Mermond, Ronald; Segre, Emilio; Steiner, Herbert M.; Ypsilantis, Tom

    1957-07-22

    In this paper experiments are reported on annihilation and scattering of antiprotons in H{sub 2}O , D{sub 2}O, and O{sub 2}. From the data measured it is possible to obtain an antiproton-proton and an antiproton-deuteron cross section at 457 Mev (lab). Further analysis gives the p-p and p-n cross sections as 104 mb for the p-p reaction cross section and 113 mb for the p-n reaction cross section. The respective annihilation cross sections are 89 and 74 mb. The Glauber correction necessary in order to pass from the p-d to the p-n cross section by subtraction of the p-p cross section is unfortunately large and somewhat uncertain. The data are compared with the p-p and p-n cross sections and with other results on p-p collisions.

  6. Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land Rights-of-Way Study Draft Report to Congress: Energy Policy Act of 2005, Section 1813, Indian Land ...

  7. Clean Air Act, Section 309 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Air Act, Section 309 Clean Air Act, Section 309 The Administrator shall review and comment in writing on the environmental impact of any matter relating to duties and ...

  8. Hawaii DOH Solid Waste Section Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solid Waste Section Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Hawaii DOH Solid Waste Section Webpage Abstract This webpage provides an...

  9. Drake passage and central american seaway controls on the distribution of the oceanic carbon reservoir

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fyke, Jeremy G.; D'Orgeville, Marc; Weaver, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    A coupled carbon/climate model is used to explore the impact of Drake Passage opening and Central American Seaway closure on the distribution of carbon in the global oceans. We find that gateway evolution likely played an important role in setting the modern day distribution of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), which is currently characterized by relatively low concentrations in the Atlantic ocean, and high concentrations in the Southern, Indian, and Pacific oceans. In agreement with previous studies, we find a closed Drake Passage in the presence of an open Central American Seaway results in suppressed Atlantic meridional overturning and enhancedmore » southern hemispheric deep convection. Opening of the Drake Passage triggers Antarctic Circumpolar Current flow and a weak Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Subsequent Central American Seaway closure reinforces the AMOC while also stagnating equatorial Pacific subsurface waters. These gateway-derived oceanographic changes are reflected in large shifts to the global distribution of DIC. An initially closed Drake Passage results in high DIC concentrations in the Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and lower DIC concentrations in the Pacific/Indian/Southern oceans. Opening Drake Passage reverses this gradient by lowering mid-depth Atlantic and Arctic DIC concentrations and raising deep Pacific/Indian/Southern Ocean DIC concentrations. Central American Seaway closure further reinforces this trend through additional Atlantic mid-depth DIC decreases, as well as Pacific mid-depth DIC concentration increases, with the net effect being a transition to a modern distribution of oceanic DIC.« less

  10. Drake passage and central american seaway controls on the distribution of the oceanic carbon reservoir

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fyke, Jeremy G.; D'Orgeville, Marc; Weaver, Andrew J.

    2015-05-01

    A coupled carbon/climate model is used to explore the impact of Drake Passage opening and Central American Seaway closure on the distribution of carbon in the global oceans. We find that gateway evolution likely played an important role in setting the modern day distribution of oceanic dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), which is currently characterized by relatively low concentrations in the Atlantic ocean, and high concentrations in the Southern, Indian, and Pacific oceans. In agreement with previous studies, we find a closed Drake Passage in the presence of an open Central American Seaway results in suppressed Atlantic meridional overturning and enhanced southern hemispheric deep convection. Opening of the Drake Passage triggers Antarctic Circumpolar Current flow and a weak Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC). Subsequent Central American Seaway closure reinforces the AMOC while also stagnating equatorial Pacific subsurface waters. These gateway-derived oceanographic changes are reflected in large shifts to the global distribution of DIC. An initially closed Drake Passage results in high DIC concentrations in the Atlantic and Arctic oceans, and lower DIC concentrations in the Pacific/Indian/Southern oceans. Opening Drake Passage reverses this gradient by lowering mid-depth Atlantic and Arctic DIC concentrations and raising deep Pacific/Indian/Southern Ocean DIC concentrations. Central American Seaway closure further reinforces this trend through additional Atlantic mid-depth DIC decreases, as well as Pacific mid-depth DIC concentration increases, with the net effect being a transition to a modern distribution of oceanic DIC.

  11. SECTION L -ATTACHMENT B - LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    B, Page 1 SECTION L ATTACHMENT B LISTING OF KEY PERSONNEL TITLE NAME Note: Addremove extra rows if needed...

  12. Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Federal Requirements » Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act Section 508 of the Rehabilitation Act All Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) websites, applications, and other digital media are expected to comply with Section 508 requirements. New and redesigned sites should be compliant when submitted to the Web Governance Team for approval to send live. Section 508 requires all federal agencies to make their electronic and information technologies accessible to people with

  13. USDA Section 502 Direct Loan Application Packaging Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is providing Section 502 direct loan application packaging training.

  14. DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting - For Grant

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and Loan Recipients | Department of Energy DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting - For Grant and Loan Recipients DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting - For Grant and Loan Recipients Instructions for Quarterly reporting through FederalReporting.gov PDF icon DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting - For Grant and Loan Recipients More Documents & Publications DOE Supplemental Instructions for OMB Section 1512 Reporting -

  15. Microsoft Word - Section B -Conformed thru 355.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. 355 B - i SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS WTP Contract Section B Contract No. DE-AC27-01RV14136 Conformed Thru Modification No. 355 B - ii SECTION B SUPPLIES OR SERVICES AND PRICES/COSTS TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Clause Page B.1 TYPE OF CONTRACT - ITEMS BEING ACQUIRED ..................................................................... 1 B.2 ITEMS BEING ACQUIRED

  16. Interagency ADR Workplace Section Education Programs | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Services » Conflict Prevention and Resolution » Interagency ADR Workplace Section Education Programs Interagency ADR Workplace Section Education Programs The Secretary of Energy expresses support of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) and the DOE annual celebration of Conflict Resolution Day held on the third Thursday of October. The Interagency Alternative Dispute Resolution Working Group (IADRWG) Workplace Conflict Management Section ("Workplace Section") provides guidance on

  17. Department of Energy (DOE) and Section 508 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy (DOE) and Section 508 Department of Energy (DOE) and Section 508 flag-973746_960_720.jpg In 1998, the Congress amended the Rehabilitation Act to require that all Federal agencies make electronic and information technology accessible to people with disabilities. Under Section 508 (29 U.S.C. 794d), agenices must: incorporate Section 508 requirements into policy and practice manage administrative complaints respond to reporting requirements For additional information: Acquiring

  18. EPAct Section 242 Comments and DOE Responses | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EPAct Section 242 Comments and DOE Responses EPAct Section 242 Comments and DOE Responses On July 2, 2014 in the Federal Register, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) published and requested comment on draft guidance for implementing Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct 2005). See 79 FR 37733 (July 2, 2014). In many instances, there were common themes among the commenters. This document consolidates and summarizes the comments and responds to the comments. PDF icon EPAct Section

  19. Section 3161 Rehiring Preference for Eligible Separated Employees |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Section 3161 Rehiring Preference for Eligible Separated Employees Section 3161 Rehiring Preference for Eligible Separated Employees PDF icon Attachment 4 - Section 3161 Rehiring Preference for Eligible Separated Employees More Documents & Publications Involuntary Separation Plan Template General Workforce Restructuring Plan Template Workforce Restructuring Policy

  20. Part III: Section C - Description, Specification, Statement of Work

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SECTION C DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/ STATEMENT OF WORK DE-AC36-08GO28308 Modification M901 Section C - Page ii PART I SECTION C DESCRIPTION/SPECIFICATION/ STATEMENT OF WORK TABLE OF CONTENTS C.1 Introduction ............................................................................................................ 1 C.2 Purpose ................................................................................................................... 2 C.3 Background

  1. Registration Overview for OMB Section 1512 Reporting for DOE Prime

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Recipients | Department of Energy Registration Overview for OMB Section 1512 Reporting for DOE Prime Recipients Registration Overview for OMB Section 1512 Reporting for DOE Prime Recipients Instructions for reporting through FederalReporting.gov PDF icon Registration Overview for OMB Section 1512 Reporting for DOE Prime Recipients More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Instructions for Grant and Loan Recipients Slide 1

  2. Section 2.2 (Roles and Responsibilities) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Section 2.2 (Roles and Responsibilities) Section 2.2 (Roles and Responsibilities) Describes responsibilities of program managers, office directors, and the peer review leader, as well as corporate responsibilities, for conducting peer reviews. PDF icon Section 2.2 of EERE Peer Review Guide More Documents & Publications SOP for Peer Reviews EERE Peer Review Guide EERE Peer Review Guide - August 2004

  3. Final Technical Report: DOE-Biological Ocean Margins Program. Microbial Ecology of Denitrifying Bacteria in the Coastal Ocean.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Kerkhof

    2013-01-01

    The focus of our research was to provide a comprehensive study of the bacterioplankton populations off the coast of New Jersey near the Rutgers University marine field station using terminal restriction fragment polymorphism analysis (TRFLP) coupled to 16S rRNA genes for large data set studies. Our three revised objectives to this study became: (1) to describe bacterioplankton population dynamics in the Mid Atlantic Bight using TRFLP analysis of 16S rRNA genes. (2) to determine whether spatial and temporal factors are driving bacterioplankton community dynamics in the MAB using monthly samping along our transect line over a 2-year period. (3) to identify dominant members of a coastal bacterioplankton population by clonal library analysis of 16S rDNA genes and sequencing of PCR product corresponding to specific TRFLP peaks in the data set. Although open ocean time-series sites have been areas of microbial research for years, relatively little was known about the population dynamics of bacterioplankton communities in the coastal ocean on kilometer spatial and seasonal temporal scales. To gain a better understanding of microbial community variability, monthly samples of bacterial biomass were collected in 1995-1996 along a 34-km transect near the Long-Term Ecosystem Observatory (LEO-15) off the New Jersey coast. Surface and bottom sampling was performed at seven stations along a transect line with depths ranging from 1 to 35m (n=178). The data revealed distinct temporal patterns among the bacterioplankton communities in the Mid-Atlantic Bight rather than grouping by sample location or depth (figure 2-next page). Principal components analysis models supported the temporal patterns. In addition, partial least squares regression modeling could not discern a significant correlation from traditional oceanographic physical and phytoplankton nutrient parameters on overall bacterial community variability patterns at LEO-15. These results suggest factors not traditionally measured during oceanographic studies are structuring coastal microbial communities.

  4. Experimental Cross Section Data Selection by a SAMMY Parameterization:

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    9Be({alpha}, n) Cross Section Evaluation up to 4 MeV (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Experimental Cross Section Data Selection by a SAMMY Parameterization: 9Be({alpha}, n) Cross Section Evaluation up to 4 MeV Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experimental Cross Section Data Selection by a SAMMY Parameterization: 9Be({alpha}, n) Cross Section Evaluation up to 4 MeV This paper reports an evaluation work on the resolved resonance parameters of the {alpha} + 9Be reaction from 0 to 4

  5. SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination SRS FTF Section 3116 Basis for Determination Basis for Section 3116 Determination for Closure of F-Tank Farm at the Savannah River Site. In accordance with NDAA Section 3116, certain waste from reprocessing of spent nuclear fuel is not high-level waste if the Secretary of Energy, in consultation with the NRC, determines that the criteria in NDAA Section 3116(a) are met. This FTF 3116 Basis Document shows that those criteria are satisfied, to support a

  6. Global Ocean Circulation Modeling with an Isopycnic Coordinate Model. Final Report for May 1, 1998 - April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleck, R.

    2004-05-19

    The overall aim of this project was to continue development of a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) with the intent of turning it into a full-fledged oceanic component of an earth system model.

  7. Biogenic opal germanium/silicon ratios used to monitor upwelling intensity in Newport Lagoon section, Monterey Formation, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murnane, R.J.

    1986-04-01

    Empirical evidence and modeling of geochemical cycles of silicon (Si) and germanium (Ge) suggest that opal Ge/Si ratios record water Ge/Si ratios although some fractionation of germanium from silicon occurs during biogenic opal formation. Modeling results also suggest that opal Ge/Si ratios could record changes in upwelling intensity. In today's oceans, areas of high productivity associated with upwelling show relatively elevated surface-water nutrient concentrations, whereas areas of low productivity with restricted upwelling exhibit low surface-water nutrient concentrations. Fractionation of germanium from silicon during biogenic opal formation would cause the surface ocean's Ge/Si ratio to increase as surface-water nutrient concentrations are lowered. Diatomites from the Newport Lagoon section of the Monterey Formation were analyzed to test the hypothesis that biogenic opal Ge/Si ratios could be used to trace upwelling intensity. Diatom assemblages of the Monterey Formation vary with upwelling intensity over a time scale of millions of years. Samples collected from the middle and late Miocene have high ratios (up to 8 x 10/sup -7/) when diatom assemblages indicate relatively weak upwelling, and low ratios (less than 6 x 10/sup -7/) when diatom assemblages indicate relatively strong upwelling. These ratios agree with modeling predictions. Opal Ge/Si ratios may also record upwelling fluctuations on much shorter times scales. Adjacent, centimeter-scale, lighter and darker layers record past variations in biogenic and terrigenous inputs to ocean-bottom sediments. Opal Ge/Si ratios may indicate whether the darker layers result from a relative decrease in surface-water productivity in response to a reduction in upwelling intensity, or only from a relative increase in terrigenous detrital inputs.

  8. Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters

  9. Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System)- TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project

  10. High Biomass Low Export Regimes in the Southern Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lam, Phoebe J.; Bishop, James K.B.

    2006-01-27

    This paper investigates ballasting and remineralization controls of carbon sedimentation in the twilight zone (100-1000 m) of the Southern Ocean. Size-fractionated (<1 {micro}m, 1-51 {micro}m, >51 {micro}m) suspended particulate matter was collected by large volume in-situ filtration from the upper 1000 m in the Subantarctic (55 S, 172 W) and Antarctic (66 S, 172 W) zones of the Southern Ocean during the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) in January-February 2002. Particles were analyzed for major chemical constituents (POC, P, biogenic Si, CaCO3), and digital and SEM image analyses of particles were used to aid in the interpretation of the chemical profiles. Twilight zone waters at 66 S in the Antarctic had a steeper decrease in POC with depth than at 55 S in the Subantarctic, with lower POC concentrations in all size fractions at 66 S than at 55 S, despite up to an order of magnitude higher POC in surface waters at 66 S. The decay length scale of >51 {micro}m POC was significantly shorter in the upper twilight zone at 66 S ({delta}{sub e}=26 m) compared to 55 S ({delta}{sub e}=81 m). Particles in the carbonate-producing 55 S did not have higher excess densities than particles from the diatom-dominated 66 S, indicating that there was no direct ballast effect that accounted for deeper POC penetration at 55 S. An indirect ballast effect due to differences in particle packaging and porosities cannot be ruled out, however, as aggregate porosities were high ({approx}97%) and variable. Image analyses point to the importance of particle loss rates from zooplankton grazing and remineralization as determining factors for the difference in twilight zone POC concentrations at 55 S and 66 S, with stronger and more focused shallow remineralization at 66 S. At 66 S, an abundance of large (several mm long) fecal pellets from the surface to 150 m, and almost total removal of large aggregates by 200 m, reflected the actions of a single or few zooplankton species capable of grazing diatoms in the euphotic zone, coupled with a more diverse particle feeding zooplankton community immediately below. Surface waters with high biomass levels and high proportion of biomass in the large size fraction were associated with low particle loading at depth, with all indications implying conditions of low export. The 66 S region exhibits this 'High Biomass, Low Export' (HBLE) condition, with very high >51 {micro}m POC concentrations at the surface ({approx}2.1 {micro}M POC), but low concentrations below 200 m (<0.07 {micro}M POC). The 66 S region remained HBLE after iron fertilization. Iron addition at 55 S caused a ten fold increase in >51 {micro}m biomass concentrations in the euphotic zone, bringing surface POC concentrations to levels found at 66 S ({approx}3.8 {micro}M), and a concurrent decrease in POC concentrations below 200 m. The 55 S region, which began with moderate levels of biomass and stronger particle export, transitioned to being HBLE after iron fertilization. We propose that iron addition to already HBLE waters will not cause mass sedimentation events. The stability of an iron-induced HBLE condition is unknown. Better understanding of biological pump processes in non-HBLE Subantarctic waters is needed.

  11. Preliminary Geospatial Analysis of Arctic Ocean Hydrocarbon Resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, Philip E.; Wurstner, Signe K.; Sullivan, E. C.; Schaef, Herbert T.; Bradley, Donald J.

    2008-10-01

    Ice coverage of the Arctic Ocean is predicted to become thinner and to cover less area with time. The combination of more ice-free waters for exploration and navigation, along with increasing demand for hydrocarbons and improvements in technologies for the discovery and exploitation of new hydrocarbon resources have focused attention on the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Basin and its margins. The purpose of this document is to 1) summarize results of a review of published hydrocarbon resources in the Arctic, including both conventional oil and gas and methane hydrates and 2) develop a set of digital maps of the hydrocarbon potential of the Arctic Ocean. These maps can be combined with predictions of ice-free areas to enable estimates of the likely regions and sequence of hydrocarbon production development in the Arctic. In this report, conventional oil and gas resources are explicitly linked with potential gas hydrate resources. This has not been attempted previously and is particularly powerful as the likelihood of gas production from marine gas hydrates increases. Available or planned infrastructure, such as pipelines, combined with the geospatial distribution of hydrocarbons is a very strong determinant of the temporal-spatial development of Arctic hydrocarbon resources. Significant unknowns decrease the certainty of predictions for development of hydrocarbon resources. These include: 1) Areas in the Russian Arctic that are poorly mapped, 2) Disputed ownership: primarily the Lomonosov Ridge, 3) Lack of detailed information on gas hydrate distribution, and 4) Technical risk associated with the ability to extract methane gas from gas hydrates. Logistics may control areas of exploration more than hydrocarbon potential. Accessibility, established ownership, and leasing of exploration blocks may trump quality of source rock, reservoir, and size of target. With this in mind, the main areas that are likely to be explored first are the Bering Strait and Chukchi Sea, in spite of the fact that these areas do not have highest potential for future hydrocarbon reserves. Opportunities for improving the mapping and assessment of Arctic hydrocarbon resources include: 1) Refining hydrocarbon potential on a basin-by-basin basis, 2) Developing more realistic and detailed distribution of gas hydrate, and 3) Assessing the likely future scenarios for development of infrastructure and their interaction with hydrocarbon potential. It would also be useful to develop a more sophisticated approach to merging conventional and gas hydrate resource potential that considers the technical uncertainty associated with exploitation of gas hydrate resources. Taken together, additional work in these areas could significantly improve our understanding of the exploitation of Arctic hydrocarbons as ice-free areas increase in the future.

  12. Apparatus and methods for installing, removing and adjusting an inner turbine shell section relative to an outer turbine shell section

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leach, David (Niskayuna, NY); Bergendahl, Peter Allen (Scotia, NY); Waldo, Stuart Forrest (Salem, NC); Smith, Robert Leroy (Milford, OH); Phelps, Robert Kim (Milford, OH)

    2001-01-01

    A turbine includes upper and lower inner shell sections mounting the nozzles and shrouds and which inner shell is supported by pins secured to a surrounding outer shell. To disassemble the turbine for access to the inner shell sections and rotor, an alignment fixture is secured to the lower outer shell section and has pins engaging the inner shell section. To disassemble the turbine, the inner shell weight is transferred to the lower outer shell section via the alignment fixture and cradle pins. Roller assemblies are inserted through access openings vacated by support pins to permit rotation of the lower inner shell section out of and into the lower outer shell section during disassembly and assembly. The alignment fixture includes adjusting rods for adjusting the inner shell axially, vertically, laterally and about a lateral axis. A roller over-cage is provided to rotate the inner shell and a dummy shell to facilitate assembly and disassembly in the field.

  13. 40-MW(e) OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plant at Kahe Point, Oahu, Hawaii: a case study of potential biological impacts. Technical memo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, J.T.

    1987-02-01

    Construction and operation of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) facility will affect marine, terrestrial, and atmospheric environments. The nature and degree of OTEC environmental impacts have been subjects of numerous studies and reports. The proposed 40-MWe OTEC plant at Kahe Point, Oahu, Hawaii has been the focus of much of the work. The first section provides a summary of pertinent design features of the proposed plant, including standard operating parameters. Next, salient elements of the biological oceanography in the region of the proposed development are summarized. The following sections discuss expected impacts of construction and operation of the plant, and finally, significant aspects of modeling studies conducted in support of the Kahe OTEC plant development are presented.

  14. NSF final project report planning and implementation of the U.S. Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (U.S. JGOFS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livingston, Hugh D.

    1996-07-01

    Conducted planning and implementation of ocean carbon dioxide hydrographic surveys ocean process studies, time-series studies of Bermuda and Hawaii, and sponsored scientific workshops for those activities.

  15. Ocean thermal energy conversion: Historical highlights, status, and forecast

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dugger, G.L.; Avery, W.H.; Francis, E.J.; Richards, D.

    1983-07-01

    In 1881, d'Arsonval conceived the closed-Rankine-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) system in which a working fluid is vaporized by heat exchange with cold water drawn from a 700-1200 m depth. In 1930, Claude demonstrated an open-cycle process in Cuba. Surface water was flash-vaporized at 3 kPa to drive a turbine directly (no secondary working fluid) and then was condensed by direct contact with water drawn from a 700-m depth through a 1.6m-diam, 1.75-km-long cold-water pipe (CWP). From a delta T of 14/sup 0/C his undersized turbine generated 22 kW. In 1956 a French team designed a 3.5-MW (net) open-cycle plant for installation off Abidjan on the Ivory Coast of Africa and demonstrated the necessary CWP deployment. The at-sea demonstrations by Mini-OTEC and OTEC-1 and other recent advances in OTEC technology summarized herein represent great progress. All of the types of plants proposed for the DOE's PON program may be worthy of development; certainly work on a grazing plant is needed. Our estimates indicate that the U.S. goals established by Public Law 96-310 leading to 10 GW of OTEC power and energy product equivalents by 1999 are achievable, provided that adequate federal financial incentives are retained to assure the building of the first few plants.

  16. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Authors, Various

    1980-01-01

    The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

  17. Waterborne noise due to ocean thermal energy conversion plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janota, C.P.; Thompson, D.E.

    1983-07-01

    Public law reflects a United States national commitment to the rapid development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) as an alternate energy source. OTEC plants extract the stored solar energy from the world's tropical seas and in so doing pose a potential for altering the character of the ambient noise there. The sources of noise from an OTEC plant are analyzed in the context of four configurations, two of which were built and tested, and two which are concepts for future full-scale moored facilities. The analysis indicates that the noise resulting from the interaction of turbulence with the seawater pumps is expected to dominate in the frequency range 10 Hz to 1 kHz. Measured radiated noise data from the OTEC-I research plant, located near the island of Hawaii, are compared with the analysis. The measured data diverge from the predicted levels at frequencies above about 60 Hz because of dominant non-OTEC noise sources on this platform. However, at low frequency, the measured broadband noise is comparable to that predicted.

  18. Production of desalinated water using ocean thermal energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) desalination plant that consists of a multistage flash evaporator (MSF), a closed-cycle OTEC power plant, and an appropriate seawater system depending if the desalination plant is land based or floating. OTEC desalination plants of this type are preferred because the production of desalinated water far exceeds that obtained from other OTEC plant types employing the same size seawater system. The focus of the paper is on the multistage flash evaporator. The similarities and differences between conventional MSF and OTEC multistage flash evaporators (OTEC-MSF) are first described. Then the details of the OTEC-MSF evaporator design are discussed and preliminary correlations are recommended for the three major elements: the flash chamber, the moisture removal device, and the condenser. Recent advances such as enhanced condenser tubes, condensers of the compact type, and corrugated-plate moisture separators are introduced into the design. Comparisons of the water production capability, evaporator shell volume, and material cost are then presented for state-of-the-art and the new design concepts. 20 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. The oceanic cycle and global atmospheric budget of carbonyl sulfide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, P.S.

    1994-12-31

    A significant portion of stratospheric air chemistry is influenced by the existence of carbonyl sulfide (COS). This ubiquitous sulfur gas represents a major source of sulfur to the stratosphere where it is converted to sulfuric acid aerosol particles. Stratospheric aerosols are climatically important because they scatter incoming solar radiation back to space and are able to increase the catalytic destruction of ozone through gas phase reactions on particle surfaces. COS is primarily formed at the surface of the earth, in both marine and terrestrial environments, and is strongly linked to natural biological processes. However, many gaps in the understanding of the global COS cycle still exist, which has led to a global atmospheric budget that is out of balance by a factor of two or more, and a lack of understanding of how human activity has affected the cycling of this gas. The goal of this study was to focus on COS in the marine environment by investigating production/destruction mechanisms and recalculating the ocean-atmosphere flux.

  20. Cyclone-cyclone Interactions through the Ocean Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Taraphdar, Sourav; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Foltz, Gregory R.; Knaff, John A.

    2014-10-16

    The intense SST (Sea Surface Temperature) cooling caused by hurricane-induced mixing is restored at timescales on the order of weeks(1) and thus may persist long enough to influence a later hurricane passing over it. Though many studies have evaluated the effects of SST cool-ing induced by a hurricane on its own intensification(2, 3), none has looked at its effect on later storms. Using an analysis of observations and numerical model simulations, we demonstrate that hurricanes may influence the intensity of later hurricanes that pass over their linger-ing wakes. On average, when hurricanes encounter cold wakes, they experience SSTs that are ~0.4oC lower than when they do not encounter wakes and consequently decay(intensify) at a rate that is nearly three times faster(slower). In the region of warm SSTs (* 26.5oC) where the most intense and damaging hurricanes tend to occur, the percentage of hurricanes that encounter lingering cold wakes increases with hurricane frequency and was found to be as high as 40%. Furthermore, we estimate that the cumulative power dissipated(4) by the most energetic hurricanes has been reduced by as much as ~7% in a season through this effect. As the debate on changes in Atlantic hurricane activity associated with global warming(5) continues, the negative feedback between hurricane frequency and intensity resulting from hurricane-hurricane interactions through the ocean pathway deserves attention.

  1. Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

    1981-02-01

    This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

  2. 1996 Central New Mexico Section [American Chemical Society] annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cournoyer, M.E.

    1997-02-07

    The main goal of the Central New Mexico Section this year was to increase attendance at the local meetings. Throughout the course of the year attendance at the meeting more than doubled. This was brought on by several factors: having the meeting spread throughout the section (Albuquerque, Santa Fe, Las Vegas, Socorro, Los Alamos); supplementing the ACS National Tour speakers with interesting local sections speakers; and making full use of the newly formed Public Relations Committee. Activities during 1996 are summarized.

  3. Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposal at the Savannah River Site | Department of Energy Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site Notice of Availability of Section 3116 Determination for Salt Waste Disposal at the Savannah River Site The Department of Energy (DOE) announces the availability of a section 3116 determination for the disposal of separated, solidified, low-activity salt waste at the Savannah River Site (SRS) near Aiken, South Carolina. PDF icon

  4. ORISE Contract, PART I - SCHEDULE, Section E Inspection and Acceptance

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 52.246-5 INSPECTION OF SERVICES - COST-REIMBURSEMENT (APR 1984) ......................................................................................................................... 3 E.2 ACCEPTANCE (MAY 1997) .......................................................................................... 4 Section E - Page 1 of 4 DE-AC05-06OR23100 Blank Page Section E - Page 2 of 4 DE-AC05-06OR23100 PART I - SCHEDULE SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 52.246-5

  5. Section 129 of the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Continuing Appropriations Act | Department of Energy Section 129 of the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act Section 129 of the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act PDF icon Section 129 of the Consolidated Security, Disaster Assistance, and Continuing Appropriations Act More Documents & Publications ENERGY POLICY ACT OF 2005 NATIONAL DEFENSE AUTHORIZATION ACT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2000 Energy Policy Act of 20

  6. Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    structures (Conference) | SciTech Connect modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures More accurate fission cross section calculations in presence of underlying intermediate structure are strongly desired. This paper recalls the common approximations used below the fission threshold and quantifies their impact. In particular, an exact expanded R-matrix

  7. Section 3116 Waste Determinationfor Salt Disposal at the Savannah River

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Site, signed by Secretary of Energy, Samuel W. Bodman | Department of Energy Section 3116 Waste Determinationfor Salt Disposal at the Savannah River Site, signed by Secretary of Energy, Samuel W. Bodman Section 3116 Waste Determinationfor Salt Disposal at the Savannah River Site, signed by Secretary of Energy, Samuel W. Bodman PDF icon Section 3116 Waste Determinationfor Salt Disposal at the Savannah River Site, signed by Secretary of Energy, Samuel W. Bodman More Documents &

  8. EPAct 2005 Section 1817 Public Comments | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Section 1817 Public Comments EPAct 2005 Section 1817 Public Comments Following are all comments received by the U.S. Department of Energy on the February 2007 draft of the Study, "The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and Rate-Related Issued That May Impede Their Expansion." All comments are provided in their original, unedited format. PDF icon EPAct 2005 Section 1817 Public Comments More Documents & Publications The Potential Benefits of Distributed Generation and the

  9. Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Conference) | SciTech Connect Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Theory in evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross sections. The authors discuss the possibilities and limitations of the use of theory as a tool in the evaluation of actinide fission and capture cross-sections. They consider especially the target {sup 235}U as an example. They emphasize the roles of intermediate structure in the fission

  10. Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Frequently Asked Questions | Department of Energy Section 1222 of the Energy Policy Act 2005 » Proposed Project: Plains & Eastern Clean Line » Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Frequently Asked Questions Section 1222 Program - Proposed Plains & Eastern Clean Line Project Frequently Asked Questions Note: DOE intends to update these FAQs as more information about the proposed project and the review process becomes available. FAQs 1. What is the

  11. SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 SUMMARY OF REGULATIONS IMPLEMENTING FEDERAL POWER ACT SECTION 216 The Energy Policy Act of 2005 added section 216(h) to the Federal Power Act providing for the Department of Energy to act as the lead agency for coordinating all applicable Federal authorizations and related environmental reviews required under Federal law in order to site an electric transmission facility. The Act authorized DOE to issue

  12. Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Process: A Handbook (2011) | Department of Energy Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (2011) Consultation with Native Hawaiian Organizations in the Section 106 Review Process: A Handbook (2011) The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) requires that, in carrying out the requirements of Section 106, "Protection of Historic Properties," each federal agency must consult with any Native Hawaiian organization that attaches

  13. 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program | Department of Energy 3 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program 2013 Electrical Production: EPAct 2005 Section 242 Hydroelectric Incentive Program In 2014, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to 1.8

  14. 2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    PROGRAM | Department of Energy ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM 2014 ELECTRICAL PRODUCTION: EPACT 2005 SECTION 242 HYDROELECTRIC INCENTIVE PROGRAM In 2015, Congress appropriated funds for Hydroelectric Production Incentives under Section 242 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005. Qualified hydroelectric facilities-existing powered or non-powered dams and conduits that added a new turbine or other hydroelectric generating device-may receive up to 1.8

  15. Example USFS Preliminary Section 4(e) Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    4(e) Report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Personal Communication: Example USFS Preliminary Section 4(e) Report Abstract This letter...

  16. EPA's Clean Water Act Section 319 Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and text of Section 319 of the Clean Water Act (33 U.S.C. 1329). Author United States Environmental Protection Agency Published United States Environmental Protection Agency,...

  17. The Environmental Protection Agency: Clean Water Act Section...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Environmental Protection Agency: Clean Water Act Section 319 Website Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: The Environmental Protection...

  18. ACHP - Relationship of Section 106 to Other Laws | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act and other laws. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, Date...

  19. ACHP - Section 106 Regulations Flowchart | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act. Author Advisory Council on Historic Preservation Published Advisory Council on Historic Preservation, 2001...

  20. RAPID/Roadmap/Geo/Sections | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon RAPIDRoadmapGeoSections < RAPID | Roadmap | Geo Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png...