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1

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity.

2

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draft Programmaticof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when...

4

Energy Basics: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

5

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in...

6

NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Jump to: navigation, search Logo: NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion Name NREL-Ocean Energy Thermal Conversion AgencyCompany Organization...

7

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DOE-EPA Working Group on Ocean TherUial Energy Conversion,Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversion

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon Ocean Thermal Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Ocean Thermal Incentives...

9

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,Thermal Energy Conversion Conference. Ocean Systems Branch,thermal energy conversion, June 18, 1979. Ocean Systems

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft Programmatic Environ-Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE Assistant Secre-

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Assessment of ocean thermal energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a promising renewable energy technology to generate electricity and has other applications such as production of freshwater, seawater air-conditioning, marine culture and chilled-soil ...

Muralidharan, Shylesh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: An overview  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion, or OTEC is a technology that extracts power from the ocean's natural thermal gradient. This technology is being pursued by researchers from many nations; in the United States, OTEC research is funded by the US Department of Energy's Ocean Energy Technology program. The program's goal is to develop the technology so that industry can make a competent assessment of its potential -- either as an alternative or as a supplement to conventional energy sources. Federally funded research in components and systems will help OTEC to the threshold of commercialization. This publication provides an overview of the OTEC technology. 47 refs., 25 figs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

15

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Thermal Energy Conversion Basics Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:22pm Addthis A process called ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) uses the heat energy stored in the Earth's oceans to generate electricity. OTEC works best when the temperature difference between the warmer, top layer of the ocean and the colder, deep ocean water is about 36°F (20°C). These conditions exist in tropical coastal areas, roughly between the Tropic of Capricorn and the Tropic of Cancer. To bring the cold water to the surface, ocean thermal energy conversion plants require an expensive, large-diameter intake pipe, which is submerged a mile or more into the ocean's depths. Some energy experts believe that if ocean thermal energy conversion can become cost-competitive with conventional power technologies, it could be

16

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionR. E. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion.of sewage effluent in an ocean current. Inst. of Tech. ,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionOpen cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminary1978. 'Open cycle thermal energy converS1on. A preliminary

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cycle ocean thermal difference power plant. M.S. Thesis,ocean thermal energy conversion power plants. M.S. Thesis.comments on the thermal effects of power plants on fish eggs

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large, M.Sc. Candidate University of Hawaii at Manoa Department of Oceanography Hawaii Natural Energy

Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

20

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system including a flash evaporator for vaporizing relatively warm ocean surface water and an axial flow, elastic fluid turbine having a vertical shaft and axis of rotation. The warm ocean water is transmitted to the evaporator through a first prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure circumferentially situated about the axis of rotation. The unflashed warm ocean water exits the evaporator through a second prestressed concrete skirt-conduit structure located circumferentially about and radially within the first skirt-conduit structure. The radially inner surface of the second skirt conduit structure constitutes a cylinder which functions as the turbine's outer casing and obviates the need for a conventional outer housing. The turbine includes a radially enlarged disc element attached to the shaft for supporting at least one axial row of radially directed blades through which the steam is expanded. A prestressed concrete inner casing structure of the turbine has upstream and downstream portions respectively situated upstream and downstream from the disc element. The radially outer surfaces of the inner casing portions and radially outer periphery of the axially interposed disc cooperatively form a downwardly radially inwardly tapered surface. An annular steam flowpath of increasing flow area in the downward axial direction is radially bounded by the inner and outer prestressed concrete casing structures. The inner casing portions each include a transversely situated prestressed concrete circular wall for rotatably supporting the turbine shaft and associated structure. The turbine blades are substantially radially coextensive with the steam flowpath and receive steam from the evaporator through an annular array of prestressed concrete stationary vanes which extend between the inner and outer casings to provide structural support therefor and impart a desired flow direction to the steam.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Western Gulf of Mexico. Energy Research and Developmentfor central Gulf of Mexico. Energy Research and DevelopmentGulf of Mexico, - IV-34 in Proc. Fourth Ocean Thermal Energy

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

List of Ocean Thermal Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Incentives Thermal Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 96 Ocean Thermal Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 96) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active Business Energy Investment Tax Credit (ITC) (Federal) Corporate Tax Credit United States Agricultural Commercial Industrial Utility Anaerobic Digestion Biomass CHP/Cogeneration Fuel Cells Fuel Cells using Renewable Fuels Geothermal Direct Use Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Hydroelectric energy Landfill Gas Microturbines Municipal Solid Waste Ocean Thermal Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Small Wind Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat Tidal Energy Wave Energy Wind energy Yes CCEF - Project 150 Initiative (Connecticut) State Grant Program Connecticut Commercial Solar Thermal Electric

23

COMMERCIAL FISHERY DATA FROM A PROPOSED OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) SITE IN PUERTO RICO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites to identify thethermal energy conversion (OTEC) program; preoperationalOCEAN THERHAL _ENERGY _CONVERSION(OTEC) --:siTE IN PUERTO

Ryan, Constance J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) A New Secure Renewable Energy Source For Defense New Ventures #12;What is OTEC? OTEC B fiOTEC Benefits: Large Renewable Energy Source 3-5 Terawatts Water Temperature Delta 2 A New Clean Renewable 24/7 Energy Source #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion

25

A PRELIMINARY EVALUATION OF IMPINGEMENT AND ENTRAINMENT BY OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PLANTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program PreoperationalOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), U.S. Department ofOregon State University. Conversion Power Plants. Corvallis,

Sullivan, S.M.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9437 GOTEC-02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARYto potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites inThree Proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites:

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

28

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

29

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion LUIS A. VEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

demand due to emerging economies like China, India, and Brazil. Coal and natural gas resources 7296 O. It seems sensible toconsider OTEC as one of the renewable energy technologies of the future. Introduction

30

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC systems and with an investment payback period estimated at 3 to 4 years. #12;OTEC 12 Energy Carriers & Attachments #12;#12;#12;#12;Bottom-Mounted Structures · Fixed Towers · Guyed Towers · TLP not shown · Causeway

31

Environmental programs for ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The environmental research effort in support of the US Department of Energy's Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) program has the goal of providing documented information on the effect of proposed operations on the ocean and the effect of oceanic conditions on the plant. The associated environment program consists of archival studies in potential areas serial oceanographic cruises to sites or regions of interest, studies from various fixed platforms at sites, and compilation of such information for appropriate legal compliance and permit requirements and for use in progressive design of OTEC plants. Site/regions investigated are south of Mobile and west of Tampa, Gulf of Mexico; Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico; St. Croix, Virgin Islands; Kahe Point, Oahu and Keahole Point, Hawaii, Hawaiian Islands; and off the Brazilian south Equatorial Coast. Four classes of environmental concerns identified are: redistribution of oceanic properties (ocean water mixing, impingement/entrainment etc.); chemical pollution (biocides, working fluid leaks, etc.); structural effects (artificial reef, aggregation, nesting/migration, etc.); socio-legal-economic (worker safety, enviromaritime law, etc.).

Wilde, P.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program Management Plan  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Office of the Associate Laboratory Director for Energy and Environmental Technology has established the OTEC Program Management Office to be responsible for the ANL-assigned tasks of the OTEC Program under DOE's Chicago Operations and Regional Office (DOE/CORO). The ANL OTEC Program Management Plan is essentially a management-by-objective plan. The principal objective of the program is to provide lead technical support to CORO in its capacity as manager of the DOE power-system program. The Argonne OTEC Program is divided into three components: the first deals with development of heat exchangers and other components of OTEC power systems, the second with development of biofouling counter-measures and corrosion-resistant materials for these components in seawater service, and the third with environmental and climatic impacts of OTEC power-system operation. The essential points of the Management Plan are summarized, and the OTEC Program is described. The organization of the OTEC Program at ANL is described including the functions, responsibilities, and authorities of the organizational groupings. The system and policies necessary for the support and control functions within the organization are discussed. These functions cross organizational lines, in that they are common to all of the organization groups. Also included are requirements for internal and external reports.

Combs, R E

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Ocean thermal energy conversion plants : experimental and analytical study of mixing and recirculation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) is a method of generating power using the vertical temperature gradient of the tropical ocean as an energy source. Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to determine ...

Jirka, Gerhard H.

34

Seawater pump study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Program. Final report. [For ocean thermal power plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pumping power required to move cold seawater and warm seawater through an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant is a significant portion of the plant power output; therefore, seawater pump performance, sizing, and cost information are very influential inputs into any power plant system design optimizations. The analysis and evaluation of large seawater pumping systems selected specifically for the OTEC application are provided with a view toward judging the impact of pump selection on overall OTEC power plant performance. A self-contained bulb, direct drive, axial flow pump was found to have a distinct advantage in performance and arrangement flexibility. A design of a pump operating at a net total head rise of 3.5 meters and a flow capacity of 100 m/sup 3//s is presented including pump blade geometry (profiles), pump diffuser geometry, and pump/diffuser configuration and performance. Results are presented in terms of the geometric and power requirements of several related pump designs over a range of seawater capacity from 25 m/sup 3//s to 100 m/sup 3//s. Summary analysis and evaluations include pump design weights and cost estimates.

Little, T.E.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

02 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf ofOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico,

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORT FROM 0. S. S. RESEARCHER IN GULF OF MEXICO, JULY 12-23, 1977.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

01 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION ECOLOGICAL DATA REPORTOcean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico,Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were in- itiated in

Quinby-Hunt, M.S.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program. Volume 1. Preoperatinal ocean test platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An environmental impact assessment for the field test of the first preoperational Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion, referred to as OTEC-1, is presented. The conceptual design of OTEC-1 is described, and the existing environments at the four OTEC-1 study sites (Punta Tuna, Keahole Point, offshore New Orleans, and offshore Tampa) are discussed. The environmental impacts considered include organism impingement, organism entrainment, ocean water mixing, metallic ion release, chlorine release, ammonia leakage, oil release, and platform attraction. The development of a risk assessment model for credible accidents at OTEC-1 is discussed. Also, the federal and state legal, safety, and health policies pertinent to OTEC-1 are presented. A glossary is included. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Draft environmental assessment: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plants  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Environmental Assessment (EA) has been prepared, in accordance with the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, for the deployment and operation of a commercial 40-Megawatt (MW) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Pilot Plant (hereafter called the Pilot Plant). A description of the proposed action is presented, and a generic environment typical of the candidate Pilot Plant siting regions is described. An assessment of the potential environmental impacts associated with the proposed action is given, and the risk of credible accidents and mitigating measures to reduce these risks are considered. The Federal and State plans and policies the proposed action will encompass are described. Alternatives to the proposed action are presented. Appendix A presents the navigation and environmental information contained in the US Coast Pilot for each of the candidate sites; Appendix B provides a brief description of the methods and calculations used in the EA. It is concluded that environmental disturbances associated with Pilot Plant activities could potentially cause significant environmental impacts; however, the magnitude of these potential impacts cannot presently be assessed, due to insufficient engineering and environmental information. A site- and design-specific OTEC Pilot Plant Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) is required to resolve the potentially significant environmental effects associated with Pilot Plant deployment and operation. (WHK)

Sullivan, S.M.; Sands, M.D.; Donat, J.R.; Jepsen, P.; Smookler, M.; Villa, J.F.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Programmatic Environmental Analysis--Appendices  

SciTech Connect

The programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization. It is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties. This volume contains these appendices: Appendix A -- Deployment Scenario; Appendix B -- OTEC Regional Characterization; and Appendix C -- Impact and Related Calculations.

Authors, Various

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Gravitational Potential Energy Balance for the Thermal Circulation in a Model Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The gravitational potential energy balance of the thermal circulation in a simple rectangular model basin is diagnosed from numerical experiments based on a mass-conserving oceanic general circulation model. The vertical mixing coefficient is ...

Rui Xin Huang; Xingze Jin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Ocean Energy Technologies  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even...

43

Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating support vessel.

Wittig, J. Michael (West Goshen, PA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Lockheed Testing the Waters for Ocean Thermal Energy System  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The company is working to develop a system to produce electricity using temperature differences in the ocean.

45

Heat exchanger cleaning in support of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) - electronics subsystems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Electronics systems supporting the development of biofouling countermeasures for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) are described. Discussed are the thermistor/thermopile amplifiers, heaters, flowmeters, temperature measurement, control systems for chlorination, flow driven brushes, and recirculating sponge rubber balls. The operation and troubleshooting of each electronic subsystem is documented.

Lott, D.F.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Near and far field models of external fluid mechanics of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The world is facing the challenge of finding new renewable sources of energy - first, in response to fossil fuel reserve depletion, and second, to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) can ...

Rodrguez Buo, Mariana

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Design and cost of near-term OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plants for the production of desalinated water and electric power. [Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There currently is an increasing need for both potable water and power for many islands in the Pacific and Caribbean. The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology fills these needs and is a viable option because of the unlimited supply of ocean thermal energy for the production of both desalinated water and electricity. The OTEC plant design must be flexible to meet the product-mix demands that can be very different from site to site. This paper describes different OTEC plants that can supply various mixes of desalinated water and vapor -- the extremes being either all water and no power or no water and all power. The economics for these plants are also presented. The same flow rates and pipe sizes for both the warm and cold seawater streams are used for different plant designs. The OTEC plant designs are characterized as near-term because no major technical issues need to be resolved or demonstrated. The plant concepts are based on DOE-sponsored experiments dealing with power systems, advanced heat exchanger designs, corrosion and fouling of heat exchange surfaces, and flash evaporation and moisture removal from the vapor using multiple spouts. In addition, the mature multistage flash evaporator technology is incorporated into the plant designs were appropriate. For the supply and discharge warm and cold uncertainties do exist because the required pipe sizes are larger than the maximum currently deployed -- 40-inch high-density polyethylene pipe at Keahole Point in Hawaii. 30 refs., 6 figs., 8 tabs.

Rabas, T.; Panchal, C.; Genens, L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Ocean Energy Technology Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics Ocean Energy Technology Basics August 16, 2013 - 4:18pm Addthis Text Version Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar collectors, oceans contain thermal energy from the sun and produce mechanical energy from tides and waves. Even though the sun affects all ocean activity, the gravitational pull of the moon primarily drives tides, and wind powers ocean waves. Learn more about: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy Ocean Resources Addthis Related Articles Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power A map generated by Georgia Tech's tidal energy resource database shows mean current speed of tidal streams. The East Coast, as shown above, has strong tides that could be tapped to produce energy. | Photo courtesy of Georgia Institute of Technology

49

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Power System Development-I (PSD-I), Phase I, study was to develop conceptual and preliminary designs of closed-cycle ammonia power system modules for the 100-MW(e) OTEC Demonstration Plant, the 400-MW(e) Commercial Size Plant, and Heat Exchanger Test Articles representative of the full-size power system module design. Results are presented.

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

50

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, April-June 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report includes summaries of the following tasks: (1) OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; (2) OTEC methanol; (3) management decision requirements for OTEC construction; (4) hybrid geothermal - OTEC (GEOTEC) power plant performance estimates; and (5) supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

Not Available

1982-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

51

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, January-March 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes work of the following tasks as of March 31, 1982: OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; OTEC methanol; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; potential Navy sites for GEOTEC systems; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance estimates; and supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

Not Available

1982-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

52

Deep water pipe, pump, and mooring study: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion program. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ocean engineering issues affecting the design, construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plants are of key importance. This study addressed the problems associated with the conceptual design of the deep-water pipe, cold-water-pumping, and platform mooring arrangements. These subsystems fall into a natural grouping since the parameters affecting their design are closely related to each other and to the ocean environment. Analysis and evaluations are provided with a view toward judging the impact of the various subsystems on the overall plant concept and to provide an estimate of material and construction cost. Parametric data is provided that describes mooring line configurations, mooring line loads, cold water pipe configurations, and cold water pumping schemes. Selected parameters, issues, and evaluation criteria are used to judge the merits of candidate concepts over a range of OTEC plant size from 100 MWe to 1000 MWe net output power.

Little, T.E.; Marks, J.D.; Wellman, K.H.

1976-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Research on the external fluid mechanics of ocean thermal energy conversion plants : report covering experiments in a current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report describes a set of experiments in a physical model study to explore plume transport and recirculation potential for a range of generic Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) plant designs and ambient conditions. ...

Fry, David J.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

In-situ biofouling of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) evaporator tubes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Puerto Rico Center for Energy and Environmental Research equipped a LCU facility in 1100 m of water near Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico to measure in situ biofouling of simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion evaporator tubes. The system consisted of two 5052 aluminum alloy and two titanium tubes, through which a continuous flow of ocean water was maintained. The tubes were cleaned three times and the fouling resistance was measured, showing only slight differences between the tubes with respect to heat transfer loss resulting from biofouling. In all units, the average fouling rate after cleaning was greater than before cleaning, and only after the first cleaning did the aluminum units show greater fouling rates than did the titanium. The titanium units showed a progressive increase in the fouling rates with each cleaning. The subsequent average fouling rates for all units after eight months were between 4 and 4.6 x 0.000010 sq m-k/W-day.

Sasscer, D.S. (Univ. of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez); Morgan, T. (Argonne National Lab., IL)

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Corrosion and biofouling on the non-heat-exchanger surfaces of an ocean thermal energy conversion power plant: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Of the many foreseeable problems confronting economical ocean thermal energy conversion operation, two major items are the deterioration of the structural and functional components, which prevents efficient operation, and the biofouling of the surfaces, which adds excess weight to the floating ocean platform. The techniques required for effective long-term control of deterioration and corrosion have been investigated actively for many years, and successful solutions for most situations have been developed. For the most part, these solutions can be directly transferred to the ocean thermal energy conversion plant. The majority of problems in these areas are expected to be associated with scale-up and will require some advanced development due to the immensity of the ocean thermal energy conversion platform. Current antifouling control systems are not effective for long-term fouling prevention. Commercially available antifouling coatings are limited to a 3-year service life in temperate waters, and even shorter in tropical waters. However, underwater cleaning techniques and some fouling-control systems presently being used by conventional power plants may find utility on an ocean thermal energy conversion plant. In addition, some recent major advances in long-term antifouling coatings sponsored by the Navy may be applicable to ocean thermal energy conversion. 132 references.

Castelli, V.J. (ed.)

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

GEOTEC (Geothermal-Enhanced Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) engineering concept study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project was to provide a conceptual design for a modular state-of-the-art geothermal-enhanced ocean thermal energy conversion (GEOTEC) plant for implementation at a Navy site on Adak Island, Alaska. This report includes the following appendices: (1) statement of work; (2) geothermal resource assessment; (3) assessment of environmental issues; (4) design optimization program formulations for GEOTEC; (5) calculation of geofluid temperature drop in brine collection system; (6) pressure losses and pumping requirements for seawater pipeline system; (7) geocost comparison of single and dual binary cycle systems; (8) description of seawater pipeline system; and (9) plant system installed cost estimates. (ACR)

Not Available

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Selected legal and institutional issues related to Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), an attractive alternative to traditional energy sources, is still in the early stages of development. To facilitate OTEC commercialization, it is essential that a legal and institutional framework be designed now so as to resolve uncertainties related to OTEC development, primarily involving jurisdictional, regulatory, and environmental issues. The jurisdictional issues raised by OTEC use are dependent upon the site of an OTEC facility and its configuration; i.e., whether the plant is a semipermanent fixture located offshore or a migrating plant ship that provides a source of energy for industry at sea. These issues primarily involve the division of authority between the Federal Government and the individual coastal states. The regulatory issues raised are largely speculative: they involve the adaptation of existing mechanisms to OTEC operation. Finally, the environmental issues raised center around compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) as well as international agreements. 288 references.

Nanda, V. P.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description Related Links List of Ocean Thermal Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleOcean&oldid273467"...

59

Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization- Final Technical Report on Award DE-EE0002664. October 28, 2012  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization (OTEEV) project focuses on assessing the Maximum Practicably Extractable Energy (MPEE) from the world's ocean thermal resources. MPEE is defined as being sustainable and technically feasible, given today's state-of-the-art ocean energy technology. Under this project the OTEEV team developed a comprehensive Geospatial Information System (GIS) dataset and software tool, and used the tool to provide a meaningful assessment of MPEE from the global and domestic U.S. ocean thermal resources. The OTEEV project leverages existing NREL renewable energy GIS technologies and integrates extractable energy estimated from quality-controlled data and projected optimal achievable energy conversion rates. Input data are synthesized from a broad range of existing in-situ measurements and ground-truthed numerical models with temporal and spatial resolutions sufficient to reflect the local resource. Energy production rates are calculated for regions based on conversion rates estimated for current technology, local energy density of the resource, and sustainable resource extraction. Plant spacing and maximum production rates are then estimated based on a default plant size and transmission mechanisms. The resulting data are organized, displayed, and accessed using a multi-layered GIS mapping tool, http://maps.nrel.gov/mhk_atlas with a user-friendly graphical user interface.

Ascari, Matthew B.; Hanson, Howard P.; Rauchenstein, Lynn; Van Zwieten, James; Bharathan, Desikan; Heimiller, Donna; Langle, Nicholas; Scott, George N.; Potemra, James; Nagurny, N. John; Jansen, Eugene

2012-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

60

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Design Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume describes system operation, a complete test program to verify mechanical reliability and thermal performance, fabrication and installation operations, and a cost analysis. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Development of plastic heat exchangers for ocean thermal energy conversion. Final report, August 1976--December 1978  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Materials and processes have been selected and design information obtained for plastic ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) heat exchangers as the result of a program comprising five types of laboratory experiments. Tests to evaluate the chemical resistance of seven commercially available thermoplastics to sea water and several possible working fluids were conducted with emphasis placed on compatibility with ammonia. Environmental rupture tests involving exposure of stressed specimens to sea water or liquid ammonia indicated that the high density polyethylene (HDPE) is the best suited candidate and produced an extrapolated 100,000 hour failure stress of 1060 psi for HDPE. Long term durability tests of extruded HDPE plate-tube panel confirmed that plastic heat transfer surface is mechanically reliable in an OTEC environment. Thermal conductivity measurements of acetylene black filled HDPE indicated that conductivity may be increased by 50% with a 35% by weight filler loading. The permeability coefficient measured for liquid ammonia through HDPE was higher than previous estimates. Test showed that the rate can be significantly reduced by sulfonation of HDPE. A review of biofouling mechanisms revealed that the permeable nature of the plastic heat exchanger surface may be used to control primary biofouling form formation by allowing incorporation of non-toxic organic repellents into the plastic. A preliminary design and fabrication development program suggests that construction of an ammonia condenser test unit is feasible using currently available materials and manufacturing techniques.

Hart, G.K.; Lee, C.O.; Latour, S.R.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the conceptual and preliminary design of closed-cycle, ammonia, ocean thermal energy conversion power plants by Westinghouse Electric Corporation. Preliminary designs for evaporator and condenser test articles (0.13 MWe size) and a 10 MWe modular experiment power system are described. Conceptual designs for 50 MWe power systems, and 100 MWe power plants are also descirbed. Design and cost algorithms were developed, and an optimized power system design at the 50 MWe size was completed. This design was modeled very closely in the test articles and in the 10 MWe Modular Application. Major component and auxiliary system design, materials, biofouling, control response, availability, safety and cost aspects are developed with the greatest emphasis on the 10 MWe Modular Application Power System. It is concluded that all power plant subsystems are state-of-practice and require design verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which verifies the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended and described.

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

63

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the Preliminary Desigh Phase for the Power System Development of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a preliminary design for a Modular Application scaled power system (10MWe) and Heat Exchanger Test Articles, both based on the concept developed in the Conceptual Design Phase. The results of this study were used to improve the baseline design of the 50MWe module for the Commercial Size Power System, which was recommended for the demonstration plant by the conceptual design study. The 50MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since its size convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. Additional optimization studies on the size of the power system plus hull continue to identify 50MWe as the preferred minimum cost configuration. This study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a seawater temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F, and a surface platform/ship reference hull. This volume presents the preliminary design configuration and system optimization. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

64

OceanEnergyMMS.p65  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior Ocean Energy PAGE 1 Teacher Guide .......................................................... 2 Related National Science Standards .......................... 3 Introduction to Ocean Energy .................................. 4 Petroleum & Natural Gas ......................................... 5 Natural Oil and Gas Seeps ........................................ 7 Methane Hydrates .................................................... 8 Solar Energy .............................................................. 9 Wind Energy ........................................................... 10 Wave Energy ........................................................... 11 OTEC: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion .............

65

Energy Basics: Ocean Energy Technologies  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Technologies Photo of low waves in the ocean. A dock is visible in the background. Oceans cover more than 70% of the Earth's surface. As the world's largest solar...

66

Energy Basics: Ocean Resources  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Resources Although the potential for ocean energy technologies is believed to be very large, no comprehensive studies have been conducted to date to determine an accurate resource...

67

Power system development: Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC). Preliminary design report: appendices, Part 2 (Final)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the electrical system, instrumentation and control, ammonia pump evaluation study, ammonia and nitrogen support subsystems, piping and support design calculations, and plant availability. (WHK)

None

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

68

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Preliminary design report, Appendices, Part 1 (Final)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC demonstration plant. In turn, this demonstration plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an Ocean Thermal Power Plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the demonstration plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibilty studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report contains appendices on the developed computer models, water system dynamic studies, miscellaneous performance analysis, materials and processes, detailed equipment lists, turbine design studies, tube cleaner design, ammonia leak detection, and heat exchanger design supporting data. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

69

Uncertainty analysis routine for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) biofouling measurement device and data reduction procedure. [HTCOEF code  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Biofouling and corrosion of heat exchanger surfaces in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems may be controlling factors in the potential success of the OTEC concept. Very little is known about the nature and behavior of marine fouling films at sites potentially suitable for OTEC power plants. To facilitate the acquisition of needed data, a biofouling measurement device developed by Professor J. G. Fetkovich and his associates at Carnegie-Mellon University (CMU) has been mass produced for use by several organizations in experiments at a variety of ocean sites. The CMU device is designed to detect small changes in thermal resistance associated with the formation of marine microfouling films. An account of the work performed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop a computerized uncertainty analysis for estimating experimental uncertainties of results obtained with the CMU biofouling measurement device and data reduction scheme is presented. The analysis program was written as a subroutine to the CMU data reduction code and provides an alternative to the CMU procedure for estimating experimental errors. The PNL code was used to analyze sample data sets taken at Keahole Point, Hawaii; St. Croix, the Virgin Islands; and at a site in the Gulf of Mexico. The uncertainties of the experimental results were found to vary considerably with the conditions under which the data were taken. For example, uncertainties of fouling factors (where fouling factor is defined as the thermal resistance of the biofouling layer) estimated from data taken on a submerged buoy at Keahole Point, Hawaii were found to be consistently within 0.00006 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu, while corresponding values for data taken on a tugboat in the Gulf of Mexico ranged up to 0.0010 hr-ft/sup 2/-/sup 0/F/Btu. Reasons for these differences are discussed.

Bird, S.P.

1978-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development-I. Phase I. Preliminary design report. Volume 1. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results of a conceptual and preliminary design study of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) closed loop ammonia power system modules performed by Lockheed Missiles and Space Company, Inc. (LMSC) are presented. This design study is the second of 3 tasks in Phase I of the Power System Development-I Project. The Task 2 objectives were to develop: 1) conceptual designs for a 40 to 50-MW(e) closed cycle ammonia commercial plant size power module whose heat exchangers are immersed in seawater and whose ancillary equipments are in a shirt sleeve environment; preliminary designs for a modular application power system sized at 10-MW(e) whose design, construction and material selection is analogous to the 50 MW(e) module, except that titanium tubes are to be used in the heat exchangers; and 3) preliminary designs for heat exchanger test articles (evaporator and condenser) representative of the 50-MW(e) heat exchangers using aluminum alloy, suitable for seawater service, for testing on OTEC-1. The reference ocean platform was specified by DOE as a surface vessel with the heat exchanger immersed in seawater to a design depth of 0 to 20 ft measured from the top of the heat exchanger. For the 50-MW(e) module, the OTEC 400-MW(e) Plant Ship, defined in the Platform Configuration and Integration study, was used as the reference platform. System design, performance, and cost are presented. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

The effect of biofouling in simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) evaporator tubes at a potential site in Puerto Rico  

SciTech Connect

Since 29 January 1980, continuous flow of ocean surface water has been maintained through simulated Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) evaporator tubes in order to determine in situ, long-term effects of microbiofouling on heat exchanger efficiency. The experimental apparatus consists of two aluminum and two titanium modules mounted on a research platform moored at the potential OTEC site off Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico. The fouling resistance (R /SUB f/ ), a relative measure of heat transfer efficiency, is being monitored regularly, and the units have been cleaned four times. Postcleaning fouling rates (dR /SUB f/ /dt) for the aluminum units have not changed significantly but are considerably higher than the initial fouling rates. At first, post-cleaning fouling rates for the titanium units were less than for the aluminum units, but this value has been progressively increasing and now all units are fouling at approximately the same rate. Cleaning with manually operated M.A.N. brushes did not reduce R /SUB f/ to zero. On four occasions, flow velocity through the units has been increased. Results from these experiments suggest that initially the fouling layer is easily dislodged from the tube surface but that, with time, it becomes more firmly attached.

Sasscer, D.S.; Morgan, T.O.; Tosteson, T.R.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Conceptual design of an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion net power-producing experiment (OC-OTEC NPPE)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the conceptual design of an experiment to investigate heat and mass transfer and to assess the viability of open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC). The experiment will be developed in two stages, the Heat- and Mass-Transfer Experimental Apparatus (HMTEA) and the Net Power-Producing Experiment (NPPE). The goal for the HMTEA is to test heat exchangers. The goal for the NPPE is to experimentally verify OC-OTEC's feasibility by installing a turbine and testing the power-generating system. The design effort met the goals of both the HMTEA and the NPPE, and duplication of hardware was minimal. The choices made for the design resource water flow rates are consistent with the availability of cold and warm seawater as a result of the seawater systems upgrade carried out by the US Department of Energy (DOE), the state of Hawaii, and the Pacific International Center for High Technology Research. The choices regarding configuration of the system were made based on projected performance, degree of technical risk, schedule, and cost. The cost for the future phase of the design and the development of the HMTEA/NPPE is consistent with the projected future program funding levels. The HMTEA and NPPE were designed cooperatively by PICHTR, Argonne National Laboratory, and Solar Energy Research Institute under the guidance of DOE. The experiment will be located at the DOE's Seacoast Test Facility at the Natural Energy Laboratory of Hawaii, Kailua-Kona, Hawaii. 71 refs., 41 figs., 34 tabs.

Bharathan, D.; Green, H.J.; Link, H.F.; Parsons, B.K.; Parsons, J.M.; Zangrando, F.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Phase 1: conceptual design. Ocean thermal energy conversion power system development. Volume 2 of 3. Technical details. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Westinghouse has completed the conceptual design of the Power System for the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Demonstration Plant project. This study included the development of a conceptual design for the following three items: first, a full-size power system module for the 100 MWe Demonstration Plant; second, a scaled proof of concept power system; and third, a heat exchanger test article. The study was limited to a closed cycle ammonia power system module, using a water temperature difference of 40/sup 0/F., and a surface platform/ship reference hull. Two power module of 50 MWe each are recommended for the demonstration plant. The 50 MWe module was selected since it has the lowest cost, and since it is of a size which convincingly demonstrates that future economically viable commercial plants, having reliable operation with credible anticipated costs, are possible. A modular, tube bundle approach to heat exchanger design makes large heat exchangers practical and economical. Other power module elements are considered to be within state-of-practice. Technological assessments of all subsystems indicate requirements for verification only, rather than continued research. A complete test program, which will verify the mechanical reliability as well as thermal performance, is recommended.

Not Available

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

74

Green Ocean Wave Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Wave Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Ocean Wave Energy Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.greenoceanwa Region United States LinkedIn...

75

Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources off the Hawaiian Islands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information to assist developers of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems in site selection functions required to determine electricity production with specific OTEC systems can be found in the open be satisfied with desalinated water produced with OTEC systems. This renewable ocean resource is vast enough

76

Study of domestic social and economic impacts of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) commercial development. Volume II. Industry profiles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Econoimc profiles of the industries most affected by the construction, deployment, and operation of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) powerplants are presented. Six industries which will contribute materials and/or components to the construction of OTEC plants have been identified and are profiled here. These industries are: steel industry, concrete industry, titanium metal industry, fabricated structural metals industry, fiber glass-reinforced plastics industry, and electrical transmission cable industry. The economic profiles for these industries detail the industry's history, its financial and economic characteristics, its technological and production traits, resource constraints that might impede its operation, and its relation to OTEC. Some of the historical data collected and described in the profile include output, value of shipments, number of firms, prices, employment, imports and exports, and supply-demand forecasts. For most of the profiled industries, data from 1958 through 1980 were examined. In addition, profiles are included on the sectors of the economy which will actualy construct, deploy, and supply the OTEC platforms.

None

1981-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

77

Ocean thermal energy conversion gas desorption studies. Volume 1. Design of experiments. [Open-cycle power systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Seawater deaeration is a process affecting almost all proposed Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) open-cycle power systems. If the noncondensable dissolved air is not removed from a power system, it will accumulate in thecondenser, reduce the effectiveness of condensation, and result in deterioration of system performance. A gas desorption study is being conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with the goal of mitigating these effects; this study is designed to investigate the vacuum deaeration process for low-temperature OTEC conditions where conventional steam stripping deaeration may not be applicable. The first in a series describing the ORNL studies, this report (1) considers the design of experiments and discusses theories of gas desorption, (2) reviews previous relevant studies, (3) describes the design of a gas desorption test loop, and (4) presents the test plan for achieving program objectives. Results of the first series of verification tests and the uncertainties encountered are also discussed. A packed column was employed in these verification tests and test data generally behaved as in previous similar studies. Results expressed as the height of transfer unit (HTU) can be correlated with the liquid flow rate by HTU = 4.93L/sup 0/ /sup 25/. End effects were appreciable for the vacuum deaeration system, and a correlation of them to applied vacuum pressure was derived.

Golshani, A.; Chen, F.C.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Panchal, C B [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

The Thermal Structure of the Upper Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The salient feature of the oceanic thermal structure is a remarkably shallow thermocline, especially in the Tropics and subtropics. What factors determine its depth? Theories for the deep thermohaline circulation provide an answer that depends on ...

Giulio Boccaletti; Ronald C. Pacanowski; S. George; H. Philander; Alexey V. Fedorov

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part A  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. The document, Volume II - Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part A contains definitions, baseline revisions, test plans, and energy utilization sections.

Not Available

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume II. Part C  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results are presented of an 8-month study to develop alternative non-site-specific OTEC facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC Test Program which may include land and floating test facilities. Volume II--Appendixes is bound in three parts (A, B, and C) which together comprise a compendium of the most significant detailed data developed during the study. Part C describes test facility support, data acquisition and control system design, cost data, energy self-sufficiency, and test facility applications.

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

82

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC). Power system development. Preliminary design report, final  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary design of the 10 MWe OTEC power module and the 200 kWe test articles is given in detail. System operation and performance; power system cost estimates; 10 MWe heat exchangers; 200 kWe heat exchanger articles; biofouling control;ammonia leak detection, and leak repair; rotating machinery; support subsystem; instrumentation and control; electrical subsystem; installation approach; net energy and resource analysis; and operability, maintainability, and safety are discussed. The conceptual design of the 40 MWe electrical power system includes four or five 10 MWe modules as designed for the 10 MWe pilot plant. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

83

The magnesium silicide germanide stannide alloy: A new concept in ocean thermal energy conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In devices hitherto used for the direct conversion of heat into electricity, commonly known as ''thermoelectric energy converters'', the efficiency of conversion is appreciably lower than that of conventional reciprocating or rotary heat engines. This low efficiency is brought about by the physical properties of the materials selected for the manufacture of these devices. The materials that are currently being used for this purpose are either simple elements and alloys thereof, such as silicon and germanium, or intermetallic compounds, either simple or alloys and solid solutions thereof. Of the latter, mention may be made of bismuth telluride, antimony telluride, lead telluride, antimony silver telluride, lead selenide, bismuth selenide, antimony selenide, etc., as well as mixtures and solid solutions of these and other compounds. A search in respect of these materials carried out in the U.S. Patent literature indicates indeed a quite substantial and impressive record.

Nicolaou, M.C.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Ocean Thermal Energy Conservation (OTEC) power system development (PDS) II. Preliminary design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents the results and conclusions of the PDS II, Phase I, preliminary design of a 10 MWe OTEC power system, using enhanced plate type heat exchangers, and of representative 0.2 MWe test articles. It further provides the documentation (specifications, drawings, trade studies, etc.) resulting from the design activities. The data and discussions of the technical concepts are organized to respond to the PDS II, Phase II proposal evaluation criteria. This volume, which specifically addresses the three evaluation categories (heat exchangers, rotating machinery, and power system configuration and performance) is an integral part of the Phase II plans (proposal) which describe the technical approach to delivering test articles to OTEC-1. In addition, there is a section which addresses power system cost and net energy analysis and another which discusses the results of stainless steel feasibility studies. Supporting documentation is contained in two appendix volumes.

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Near-inertial and thermal to atmospheric forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observational and modeling techniques are employed to investigate the thermal and inertial upper ocean response to wind and buoyancy forcing in the North Atlantic Ocean. First, the seasonal kinetic energy variability of ...

Silverthorne, Katherine E

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) test facilities study program. Final report. Volume I  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A comprehensive test program has been envisioned by ERDA to accomplish the OTEC program objectives of developing an industrial and technological base that will lead to the commercial capability to successfully construct and economically operate OTEC plants. This study was performed to develop alternative non-site specific OTEC test facilities/platform requirements for an integrated OTEC test program including both land and floating test facilities. A progression of tests was established in which OTEC power cycle component designs proceed through advanced research and technology, component, and systems test phases. This progression leads to the first OTEC pilot plant and provides support for following developments which potentially reduce the cost of OTEC energy. It also includes provisions for feedback of results from all test phases to enhance modifications to existing designs or development of new concepts. The tests described should be considered as representative of generic types since specifics can be expected to change as the OTEC plant design evolves. Emphasis is placed on defining the test facility which is capable of supporting the spectrum of tests envisioned. All test support facilities and equipment have been identified and included in terms of space, utilities, cost, schedule, and constraints or risks. A highly integrated data acquisition and control system has been included to improve test operations and facility effectiveness through a centralized computer system capable of automatic test control, real-time data analysis, engineering analyses, and selected facility control including safety alarms. Electrical power, hydrogen, and ammonia are shown to be technically feasible as means for transmitting OTEC power to a land-based distribution point. (WHK)

None

1977-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

87

Open Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Open Ocean Energy Ltd Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:http:www.open-ocean-e LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No...

88

Ocean energy contract list, fiscal year 1990  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of the federal Ocean Energy Technology (OET) Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy (waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients) in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable manner. The OET Program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which the commercial sector can assess whether applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives or supplements to systems. The federal OET Program is conducted by DOE and is assigned to the Assistant Secretary for Conservation and Renewable Energy. Past studies conducted by the US Department of Energy (DOE) have identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) as the largest potential contributor to US energy supplies from the ocean resource. As a result, of the OET Program concentrates on research to advance OTEC technology. The FY 1990 contract overview comprises a list of all subcontracts begun, ongoing, or completed during FY 1990 (October 1, 1989, through September 30, 1990). Under each managing laboratory, projects are listed alphabetically by project area and then by subcontractor name.

Not Available

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Ocean Tidal and Wave Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

First published in 2000, the annual Renewable Energy Technical Assessment Guide (TAG-RE) provides a consistent basis for evaluating the economic feasibility of renewable generation technologies. This excerpt from the 2005 TAG-RE addresses ocean tidal and wave energy conversion technologies, which offer promise for converting the significant energy potential available in ocean tidal currents and waves to electricity in the future.

2005-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

90

ocean energy | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Dataset Summary Description This shapefile represents the seasonal winter depth profile to reach water at a temperature of 20ºC. Source NREL Date Released October 28th, 2012 (2 years ago) Date Updated Unknown Keywords depth profile hydrokinetic ocean ocean energy ocean thermal energy conversion OTEC seawater cooling thermal Data application/zip icon OTEC Seawater Cooling 20ºC Depth Profile - Winter Average (zip, 1.1 MiB) Quality Metrics Level of Review Peer Reviewed Comment Temporal and Spatial Coverage Frequency Time Period March 2009 - February 2011 License License Other or unspecified, see optional comment below Comment This GIS data was developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory ("NREL"), which is operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy ("DOE"). The user is granted the right, without any fee or cost, to use, copy, modify, alter, enhance and distribute this data for any purpose whatsoever, provided that this entire notice appears in all copies of the data. Further, the user of this data agrees to credit NREL in any publications or software that incorporate or use the data. Access to and use of the GIS data shall further impose the following obligations on the User. The names DOE/NREL may not be used in any advertising or publicity to endorse or promote any product or commercial entity using or incorporating the GIS data unless specific written authorization is obtained from DOE/NREL. The User also understands that DOE/NREL shall not be obligated to provide updates, support, consulting, training or assistance of any kind whatsoever with regard to the use of the GIS data. THE GIS DATA IS PROVIDED "AS IS" AND ANY EXPRESS OR IMPLIED WARRANTIES, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO, THE IMPLIED WARRANTIES OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE ARE DISCLAIMED. IN NO EVENT SHALL DOE/NREL BE LIABLE FOR ANY SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAMAGES WHATSOEVER, INCLUDING BUT NOT LIMITED TO CLAIMS ASSOCIATED WITH THE LOSS OF DATA OR PROFITS, WHICH MAY RESULT FROM AN ACTION IN CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTIOUS CLAIM THAT ARISES OUT OF OR IN CONNECTION WITH THE ACCESS OR USE OF THE GIS DATA. The User acknowledges that access to the GIS data is subject to U.S. Export laws and regulations and any use or transfer of the GIS data must be authorized under those regulations. The User shall not use, distribute, transfer, or transmit GIS data or any products incorporating the GIS data except in compliance with U.S. export regulations. If requested by DOE/NREL, the User agrees to sign written assurances and other export-related documentation as may be required to comply with U.S. export regulations.

91

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies October 7, 2013 - 9:29am Addthis Photo of water flowing from several openings in a hydropower dam. Hydropower produces 10% of the nation's energy, including power from the Ice Harbor Dam in Burbank, Washington. This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector. Overview Hydropower has been used for centuries to power machinery, but the application most commonly associated with hydropower is electricity production through dams. Ocean energy refers to various forms of renewable energy harnessed from the ocean. There are two primary types of ocean energy: mechanical and thermal.

92

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlined aboveModeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers," Proceed-ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, Lawrence

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using aquifers for thermal energy storage. Problems outlinedmatical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers,"Proceed- ings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,

Tsang, C.-F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Ocean thermal energy conversion ecological data report from OSS Researcher in Gulf of Mexico, (GOTEC-01), July 12-23, 1977  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ecological measurements important for environmental assessment of the effect of an operating Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion plant were initiated in July 1977 at the proposed Gulf of Mexico site off the coasts of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and Florida. The initial cruise of the OSS Researcher, in a joint effort with the Atlantic Oceanic and Meteorological Laboratories (AOML) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) took place from 12 to 23 July 1977. The measurements were taken at 15 oceanographic stations to a maximum depth of 1000 m. Water was analyzed for trace metals, nutrients and chlorophyll a and ATP. Physical data, salinity and dissolved oxygen measurements were supplied by NOAA-AOML. Two bioassays were carried out using indigenous phytoplankton to estimate the effect of deep water on the rates of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ uptake of photic zone algae. The Deep Scattering Layer (DSL) was monitored at the site by a continuously recording 12 kHz depth sounder at the Mobile site. This report presents data collected during the cruise.

Quinby-Hunt, M.S. (comp.)

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Makai Ocean Engineering Inc Address PO Box 1206 Place Kailua Zip 96734-1206 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 1973 Number of employees 28 Phone number 808.259.8871 Website http://www.makai.com Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Deep Water Pipelines This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

96

Ocean thermal energy conversion preliminary data report for the November 1977 GOTEC-02 cruise to the Gulf of Mexico Mobile Site  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the second in a series of preliminary data reports from cruises to potential Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. The data are from the GOTEC-02 cruise to a site at approximately 29/sup 0/N, 88/sup 0/W, the Mobile Site. Twelve oceanographic stations were visited. Due to bad weather, the results are scanty. The reader will note that much of the data is questionable. Current meter results are presented elsewhere (Molinari, Hazelworth and Ortman, 1979). Determinations of the biomass indicators - chlorophyll a, phaeophytins and adenosine triphosphate - and zooplankton, are presented. Results were generally those that might have been predicted from previous studies in the area.

Not Available

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Ocean Energy Institute | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind energy Product Ocean Energy Institute is a think tank established to accelerate offshore wind technology development that hopes to build a 5GW wind project off the coast...

98

Seasonal thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydropower and Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products

100

Intraseasonal Variability of the Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure Observed at 0 and 165E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In response to perturbations in surface wind and energy fluxes associated with the atmospheric MaddenJulian oscillation (MJO), the thermal structure of the upper ocean (surface to 300 m) in the equatorial western Pacific exhibits prominent and ...

Chidong Zhang

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean...

102

On Production and Dissipation of Thermal Variance in the Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An integral relationship is derived expressing the total dissipation of thermal variance by oceanic microstructure in terms of the large-scale forcing at the ocean surface by air/sea heat exchange. The net heat gain by the ocean over warm water ...

Terrence M. Joyce

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

An Operational Global-Scale Ocean Thermal Analysis System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Optimum Thermal Interpolation System (OTIS) is an ocean thermal analysis product developed for real-time operational use at the U.S. Navy's Fleet Numerical Oceanography Center. It functions in an analysis-prediction-analysis data assimilation ...

R. Michael Clancy; Patricia A. Phoebus; Kenneth D. Pollak

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ocean Energy Company LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Company LLC Address 505 Fifth Ave 800 Place Des Moines Zip 50309-2426 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2011 Phone number (515) 246-1500 Region United States...

105

Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Ltd Address 3 Casement Square Place Cobh Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 00353-21-4816779 Website http:www.oceanenergy.ie Region Ireland LinkedIn...

106

Ocean energy conversion systems annual research report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Alternative power cycle concepts to the closed-cycle Rankine are evaluated and those that show potential for delivering power in a cost-effective and environmentally acceptable fashion are explored. Concepts are classified according to the ocean energy resource: thermal, waves, currents, and salinity gradient. Research projects have been funded and reported in each of these areas. The lift of seawater entrained in a vertical steam flow can provide potential energy for a conventional hydraulic turbine conversion system. Quantification of the process and assessment of potential costs must be completed to support concept evaluation. Exploratory development is being completed in thermoelectricity and 2-phase nozzles for other thermal concepts. Wave energy concepts are being evaluated by analysis and model testing with present emphasis on pneumatic turbines and wave focussing. Likewise, several conversion approaches to ocean current energy are being evaluated. The use of salinity resources requires further research in membranes or the development of membraneless processes. Using the thermal resource in a Claude cycle process as a power converter is promising, and a program of R and D and subsystem development has been initiated to provide confirmation of the preliminary conclusion.

Not Available

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton (< 2 um) such as prochlorococccus, nanoplankton (2-20 um), and microplankton (> 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

108

Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Plant Discharges into their Adjacent Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the modeling work by Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc. to simulate the biochemical effects of of the nutrient-enhanced seawater plumes that are discharged by one or several 100 megawatt OTEC plants. The modeling is needed to properly design OTEC plants that can operate sustainably with acceptably low biological impact. In order to quantify the effect of discharge configuration and phytoplankton response, Makai Ocean Engineering implemented a biological and physical model for the waters surrounding O`ahu, Hawai`i, using the EPA-approved Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC). Each EFDC grid cell was approximately 1 square kilometer by 20 meters deep, and used a time step of three hours. The biological model was set up to simulate the biochemical response for three classes of organisms: Picoplankton ( 20 um) e.g., diatoms. The dynamic biological phytoplankton model was calibrated using chemical and biological data collected for the Hawaii Ocean Time Series (HOTS) project. Peer review of the biological modeling was performed. The physical oceanography model uses boundary conditions from a surrounding Hawai'i Regional Ocean Model, (ROM) operated by the University of Hawai`i and the National Atmospheric and Oceanic Administration. The ROM provided tides, basin scale circulation, mesoscale variability, and atmospheric forcing into the edges of the EFDC computational domain. This model is the most accurate and sophisticated Hawai'ian Regional Ocean Model presently available, assimilating real-time oceanographic observations, as well as model calibration based upon temperature, current and salinity data collected during 2010 near the simulated OTEC site. The ROM program manager peer-reviewed Makai's implementation of the ROM output into our EFDC model. The supporting oceanographic data was collected for a Naval Facilities Engineering Command / Makai project. Results: The model was run for a 100 MW OTEC Plant consisting of four separate ducts, discharging a total combined flow rate of 420 m3/s of warm water and 320 m3/s of cold water in a mixed discharge at 70 meters deep. Each duct was assumed to have a discharge port diameter of 10.5m producing a downward discharge velocity of about 2.18 m/s. The natural system, as measured in the HOTS program, has an average concentration of 10-15 mgC/m3. To calibrate the biological model, we first ran the model with no OTEC plant and varied biological parameters until the simulated data was a good match to the HOTS observations. This modeling showed that phytoplankton concentration were patchy and highly dynamic. The patchiness was a good match with the data variability observed within the HOTS data sets. We then ran the model with simulated OTEC intake and discharge flows and associated nutrients. Directly under the OTEC plant, the near-field plume has an average terminal depth of 172 meters, with a volumetric dilution of 13:1. The average terminal plume temperature was 19.8oC. Nitrate concentrations are 1 to 2 umol/kg above ambient. The advecting plume then further dilutes to less than 1 umol/kg above ambient within a few kilometers downstream, while remaining at depth. Because this terminal near-field plume is well below the 1% light limited depths (~120m), no immediate biological utilization of the nutrients occurs. As the nitrate is advected and dispersed downstream, a fraction of the deep ocean nutrients (< 0.5 umol/kg perturbation) mix upward where they are utilized by the ambient phytoplankton population. This occurs approximately twenty-five kilometers downstream from the plant at 110 - 70 meters depth. For pico-phytoplankton, modeling results indicate that this nutrient perturbation causes a phytoplankton perturbation of approximately 1 mgC/m3 (~10% of average ambient concentrations) that covers an area 10x5 km in size at the 70 to 90m depth. Thus, the perturbations are well within the natural variability of the system, generally corresponding to a 10 to 15% increase above the a

PAT GRANDELLI, P.E.; GREG ROCHELEAU; JOHN HAMRICK, Ph.D.; MATT CHURCH, Ph.D.; BRIAN POWELL, Ph.D.

2012-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

109

Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy: Reservoirs, Sources,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The coupling of the generation of different energy forms in the dynamics (in either balanced or wave motions are almost nonexistent in the ocean. www.annualreviews.org · Ocean Circulation Kinetic Energy 255 Annu.Rev.Fluid processes? Are the seemingly different dynamical ranges coupled? 2. THE OCEANIC ENERGY BUDGET We begin

Ferrari, Raffaele

110

Preliminary design for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Stationkeeping Subsystem (SKSS). Task IV. Development and testing recommendations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The preliminary designs of Stationkeeping Subsystems (SKSS) for the OTEC Modular Experiment Plant are being prepared for a barge and spar platform. The SKSS selected by NOAA for the barge is a multiple anchor leg mooring with active tensioning (MAL), while that for the spar is a tension anchor leg (TAL) moor. The development and testing program required to provide design data and to validate performance predictions is described. Basic assumptions are made with regard to site characteristics, behavior of the SKSS and platform in the sea state, and characteristics of SKSS components. The test program is intended to provide the data necessary to confirm assumptions or to support design revisions. The testing program for the multiple anchor leg system is considered first, followed by the tension anchor leg program. Development and testing are recommended in the areas of materials, components and procedures which are beyond modest extrapolation of current ocean engineering practice. (WHK)

None

1979-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

111

Ocean tide energy converter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A tide motor energy source includes a tidal piston with a valved chamber. The piston drives a hydraulic ram to generate electrical power through a pressure accumulator and hydraulic motor. The ram can be locked hydraulically to enable the tidal piston to be held fixed at a desired elevation and the valves in the chamber permit it to be filled with water or air. The piston with its chamber filled with air at its low tide position and then released for controlled ascent while submerged acts as a submerged float for driving the ram upwardly while the tide runs in during one phase of its operation. The piston with its chamber filled with water while locked at its highest position as the tide begins to run out, and then released to fall under control, acts as a weight suspended in air after the water level drops below the piston for driving the ram downwardly during the second phase of its operation. The rising and falling motion of the tidal piston is used as the energy source.

Rainey, D.E.

1980-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

112

AWS Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AWS Ocean Energy Ltd AWS Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name AWS Ocean Energy Ltd Place Inverness, Scotland, United Kingdom Zip IV17 1SN Product Inverness-based company established to commercialise the Archimedes Wave Swing. Coordinates 48.55324°, -110.689764° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":48.55324,"lon":-110.689764,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

113

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development (PSD) II. Preliminary design report. Appendix II: supporting data  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The trade studies, calculations, and reports which provide the rationale for design conclusions for the 10 MWe OTEC power system are presented in this volume. These appendices include: (1) system design and optimization model; (2) system off-design performance computer model; (3) seawater system dynamics; (4) system mechanical design studies; (5) electrical design studies; (6) structural design studies; (7) tube cleaner design report and proposed brush test program; (8) heat exchangers: mechanical design; (9) heat exchangers: thermal hydraulic computer model; (10) heat exchangers: manufacturing flow plan; (11) heat exchangers: installation and removal procedures; (12) heat exchangers: stainless steel conceptual design; (13) heat exchangers: cost studies; (14)heat exchangers: materials selection and corrosion; and (15) heat exchangers: quality assurance. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Ocean Energy Program Overview, Fiscal years 1990--1991. Programs in utility technologies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The oceans are the world`s largest solar energy collector and storage system. Covering 71% of the earth`s surface, the oceans collect and store this energy as waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients. The purpose of the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques that harness ocean energy cost effectively and in ways that do not harm the environment. The program seeks to develop ocean energy technology to a point at which industry can accurately assess whether the applications of the technology are viable energy conversion alternatives, or supplements to current power-generating systems. In past studies, DOE identified ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), which uses the temperature difference between warm surface water and cold deep water, as the most promising of the ocean energy technologies. As a result, the Ocean Energy Program has concentrated research that advances OTEC technology. The program also monitored developments in wave energy, ocean current, and salinity gradient concepts. It is not actively developing these technologies now. The mission of the Ocean Energy Program is to develop techniques to harness the vast solar energy stored in the oceans` waves, currents, and thermal and salinity gradients.

Not Available

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

HEATS: Thermal Energy Storage  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: The 15 projects that make up ARPA-Es HEATS program, short for High Energy Advanced Thermal Storage, seek to develop revolutionary, cost-effective ways to store thermal energy. HEATS focuses on 3 specific areas: 1) developing high-temperature solar thermal energy storage capable of cost-effectively delivering electricity around the clock and thermal energy storage for nuclear power plants capable of cost-effectively meeting peak demand, 2) creating synthetic fuel efficiently from sunlight by converting sunlight into heat, and 3) using thermal energy storage to improve the driving range of electric vehicles (EVs) and also enable thermal management of internal combustion engine vehicles.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Thermoelectric Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A novel thermoelectric OTEC concept is proposed and compared with the ammonia closed-cycle designs. The thermoelectric OTEC is a much simpler system which uses no working fluid and therefore requires no pressure vessel, working fluid pumps, or turbogenerator. These components are replaced by power modules which are heat exchangers integrated with thermoelectric generators. The thermoelectric OTEC offers several potential advantages including: simpler and more easily mass-produced components; higher reliability system performance through the use of a high level of redundancy and long-lived, solid-state thermoelectric generators; greater safety for crew and environment by elimination of the pressurized working fluid; and the possibility of lower system costs. These comparisons are discussed and plans for future work are presented.

Jayadev, T.S.; Benson, D.K.; Bohn, M.S.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Practical Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc POEMS | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc POEMS Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc POEMS Jump to: navigation, search Name Practical Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc (POEMS) Place San Diego, California Zip 92138 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product POEMS was formed to involve the public in providing support for the development of ocean energy as a viable component of the renewable energy market. References Practical Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc (POEMS)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Practical Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc (POEMS) is a company located in San Diego, California . References ↑ "Practical Ocean Energy Management Systems Inc (POEMS)" Retrieved from

118

Thermally Driven Circulations in Small Oceanic Basins  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A linear, steady model of the circulation of a small (f plane) oceanic basin driven by heating or cooling at the surface is considered in order to examine the partition of upwelling (heating) or downwelling (cooling) between the basin's interior ...

Joseph Pedlosky

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Thermal Expansion in Ocean and Coupled General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

More than half of the predicted rise in future sea level caused by the enhanced greenhouse effect is currently thought to be due to the thermal expansion of the oceans. Here methods for quantifying this thermal expansion component of sea level ...

D. R. Jackett; T. J. McDougall; M. H. England; A. C. Hirst

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Ocean Energy Technology Overview: Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Introduction to and overview of ocean renewable energy resources and technologies prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy management Program.

Not Available

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Technology Brief provides an update on the current state of cool thermal energy storage systems (TES) for end-use applications. Because of its ability to shape energy use, TES is strategic technology that allows end-users to reduce their energy costs while simultaneously providing benefits for electric utilities through persistent peak demand reduction and peak shifting. In addition to discussing the concepts of thermal energy storage, the Brief discusses the current state of TES technologies and dr...

2008-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

122

Thermal Stability of the World Ocean Thermoclines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the strong variation with temperature of the thermal expansion coefficient of seawater, both horizontal and vertical mixing that perturb the gradients produce changes of volume, usually a decrease, that shift mass relative to the earth'...

N. P. Fofonoff

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Ocean Navitas | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Navitas Navitas Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Navitas Address Nursery House Place United Kingdom Zip DN21 5BQ Sector Ocean Product Ocean Navitas was incorporated in May 2006 by experienced engineers, businessmen and sailing enthusiasts David Hunt, James McCague and Simon Condry. Website http://www.oceannavitas.com Region United Kingdom References Ocean NavitasUNIQ75db538f85b32404-ref-000014E2-QINU LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Ocean Navitas NaREC This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Aegir Dynamo This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

124

Energy Basics: Tidal Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

125

Energy Basics: Wave Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Tidal Energy Wave Energy...

126

ocean energy | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ocean energy ocean energy Home Kch's picture Submitted by Kch(24) Member 9 April, 2013 - 13:30 MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft CBS current energy GMREC LCOE levelized cost of energy marine energy MHK ocean energy The generalized Cost Breakdown Structure (CBS) for marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) projects is a hierarchical structure designed to facilitate the collection and organization of lifecycle costs of any type of MHK project, including wave energy converters and current energy convertners. At a high level, the categories in the CBS will be applicable to all projects; at a detailed level, however, the CBS includes many cost categories that will pertain to one project but not others. It is expected that many of the detailed levels of the CBS will be populated with "NA" or left blank.Upload

127

Ocean Motion International LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Motion International LLC Ocean Motion International LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Motion International LLC Place Saulsbury, Tennessee Zip 38067 Sector Ocean Product Marine energy technology firm developing ocean/ wave powered generators. Coordinates 35.052242°, -89.083299° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.052242,"lon":-89.083299,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

128

STEPA Temperature Profiler for Measuring the Oceanic Thermal Boundary Layer at the OceanAir Interface  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast measuring system has been designed and built to determine the oceanic thermal microstructure at the oceanair interface. The system consists of a profiler sonde, which amends through the uppermost few meters of the ocean with a time of ...

Theodor C. Mammen; Nikolaus von Bosse

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

130

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores January 22, 2013 - 1:14pm Addthis Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Artist rendering of Ocean Power Technologies' proposed wave park off the coast of Oregon. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Verdant testing its tidal energy device in New York's East River. | Photo courtesy of Verdant Power. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean Power Technologies. Ocean Power Technologies wave energy device. | Photo courtesy of Ocean

131

Ocean Renewable Power Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Company Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Power Company LLC Place Portland, Maine Zip 4101 Sector Ocean, Renewable Energy Product Ocean Renewable Power Company, LLC was founded in 2004 for the purpose of generating reliable, competitive, emission-free electricity from the energy resources of the oceans. Coordinates 45.511795°, -122.675629° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":45.511795,"lon":-122.675629,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

132

MHK Technologies/Ocean | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Ocean < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Hydro Green Energy LLC Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Alaska 35 *MHK Projects/Maine 1 Project *MHK Projects/Mississippi 6 *MHK Projects/Mississippi 7 *MHK Projects/New York 1 *MHK Projects/New York 2 Technology Resource Click here Current/Tidal Technology Type Click here Cross Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description Hydro Green Energy's HydroKinetic Turbine Arrays operate differently than a traditional hydropower plant. Like a traditional hydropower station, the electricity that we produce is clean and renewable, however, there are significant differences. Hydro Green Energy's Krouse Turbines are kinetic turbines. This means that the renewable power that is generated comes from the energy in the "motion" of the moving water, i.e. the velocity of the moving water be it river, tidal or ocean current to generate river, tidal energy or ocean energy, respectively.

133

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development utilizing advanced, high-performance heat transfer techniques. Volume 1. Conceptual design report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this project is the development of a preliminary design for a full-sized, closed cycle, ammonia power system module for the 100 MWe OTEC Demonstration Plant. In turn, this Demonstration Plant is to demonstrate, by 1984, the operation and performance of an ocean thermal power plant having sufficiently advanced heat exchanger design to project economic viability for commercial utilization in the late 1980's and beyond. Included in this power system development are the preliminary designs for a proof-of-concept pilot plant and test article heat exchangers which are scaled in such a manner as to support a logically sequential, relatively low-cost development of the full-scale power system module. The conceptual designs are presented for the Demonstration Plant power module, the proof-of-concept pilot plant, and for a pair of test article heat exchangers. Costs associated with the design, development, fabrication, checkout, delivery, installation, and operation are included. The accompanying design and producibility studies on the full-scale power system module project the performance/economics for the commercial plant. This section of the report describes the full-size power system module, and summarizes the design parameters and associated costs for the Demonstration Plant module (prototype) and projects costs for commercial plants in production. The material presented is directed primarily toward the surface platform/ship basic reference hull designated for use during conceptual design; however, other containment vessels were considered during the design effort so that the optimum power system would not be unduly influenced or restricted. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

134

Ocean thermal plantships for production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conventional petroleum, natural gas, and coal are the primary sources of energy that have underpinned modern civilization. Their continued availability in the projected quantities required and the impacts of emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) on the environment are issues at the forefront of world concerns. New primary sources of energy are being sought that would significantly reduce the emissions of GHGs. One such primary source that can help supply energy, water, and fertilizer without GHG emissions is available in the heretofore unexploited thermal gradients of the tropical oceans. The world's oceans are the largest natural collector and reservoir of solar energy. The potential of ocean energy is limitless for producing base-load electric power or ammonia as the hydrogen carrier and fresh water from seawater. However, until now, ocean energy has been virtually untapped. The general perception is that ocean thermal energy is limited to tropical countries. Therefore, the full potential of at-sea production of (1) ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and (2) desalinated water has not been adequately evaluated. Using ocean thermal plantships for the at-sea co-production of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier and desalinated water offer potential energy, environmental, and economic benefits that support the development of the technology. The introduction of a new widespread solution to our projected energy supply requires lead times of a decade or more. Although continuation of the ocean thermal program from the 1970s would likely have put us in a mitigating position in the early 2000s, we still have a window of opportunity to dedicate some of our conventional energy sources to the development of this renewable energy by the time new sources would be critically needed. The primary objective of this project is to evaluate the technical and economic viability of ocean thermal plantships for the production of ammonia as the hydrogen carrier. This objective is achieved by completing project tasks that consist of updating the John Hopkins University/Applied Physics Laboratory (JHU/APL) pilot plantship design and extrapolating it to commercial plantships, evaluating a new energy-efficient ammonia synthesis process, evaluating the co-production of desalinated water on plantships, and developing a conceptual design of a satellite plantships system for commercial-scale ammonia production. In addition, an industrial workshop was organized to present the results and develop future goals for commercialization of ocean thermal plantships by 2015. The following goals, arranged in chronological order, were examined at the workshop: (1) Global displacement of petroleum-fuel-based (diesel, fuel oil, naphtha) power generation for freeing up these fuels for transportation, chemical feedstock, and other high-valued uses; (2) At-sea production of desalinated water for regions of critical water shortages; (3) Displacement of carbon-based feed stocks and energy for production of ammonia fertilizers; (4) Development of hydrogen supply to allow economic processing of heavy crude oils and upgrading oil sands; (5) Development of ammonia-fueled distributed energy to displace natural-gas fueled power generation to free up natural gas for higher-value uses and the mitigation of issues associated with imported liquefied natural gas (LNG); and (6) Use of ammonia as a hydrogen carrier for transportation.

Panchal, C.B.; Pandolfini, P. P.; Kumm, W. H.; Energy Systems; Johns Hopkins Univ.; Arctic Energies, Ltd.

2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

135

NREL: Energy Analysis - Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review Ocean Energy Results - Life Cycle Assessment Review For more information, visit: Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation: Ocean Energy OpenEI: Data, Visualization, and Bibliographies Chart that shows life cycle greenhouse gas emissions for ocean power technologies. For help reading this chart, please contact the webmaster. Estimates of life cycle greenhouse gas emissions of wave and tidal range technologies. Credit: Lewis, A., S. Estefen, J. Huckerby, W. Musial, T. Pontes, J. Torres-Martinez, 2011: Ocean Energy. In IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation [O. Edenhofer, R. Pichs-Madruga, Y. Sokona, K. Seyboth, P. Matschoss, S. Kadner, T. Zwickel, P. Eickemeier, G. Hansen, S. Schlömer, C. von Stechow (eds)], Cambridge University Press. Figure 6.11 Enlarge image

136

Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, January-March 1983  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress is reported on the development of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual and preliminary design activity of industry teams that are designing a shelf-mounted offshore OTEC pilot plant that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway to evaluate and test the Pneumatic Wave-Energy Conversion System (PWECS), an ocean-energy device consisting of a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 March 1983.

Not Available

1983-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ocean Energy Technology: Overview, Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

femp.energy.gov femp.energy.gov Ocean Energy Technology Overview Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Federal Energy Management Program July 2009 DOE/GO-102009-2823 Ocean Energy Technology Overview i Contacts Principal Investigators: Kari Burman Phone: 303-384-7558 E-mail: kari.burman@nrel.gov Andy Walker, PhD PE Phone: 303-384-7531 E-mail: andy.walker@nrel.gov Energy Management and Federal Markets Group National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) MS 301 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, CO 80401 Sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy Federal Energy Management Program Acknowledgements This work was sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP). Research regarding ocean energy resources, status of wave and tidal power technologies, and

138

Approximation of Ocean Heat Storage by OceanAtmosphere Energy Exchange: Implications for Seasonal Cycle Mixed Layer Ocean Formulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The approximation of ocean heat storage by the net surface energy flux and the implications for zonal mean SST simulation using mixed layer ocean formulation are examined. The analysis considers both constant and variable depth mixed layers. ...

Robert G. Gallimore; David D. Houghton

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Wave Wind Energy Ltd OWWE Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.owwe.net Region Norway LinkedIn Connections...

140

Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Engineering and Energy Systems Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Website http:www.ocees.com Region United States LinkedIn...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage material which is stable at atmospheric temperature and pressure and has a melting point higher than 32.degree.F. is prepared by dissolving a specific class of clathrate forming compounds, such as tetra n-propyl or tetra n-butyl ammonium fluoride, in water to form a substantially solid clathrate. The resultant thermal energy storage material is capable of absorbing heat from or releasing heat to a given region as it transforms between solid and liquid states in response to temperature changes in the region above and below its melting point.

Leifer, Leslie (Hancock, MI)

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

Not Available

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Article for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage composition is provided which is in the form of a gel. The composition includes a phase change material and silica particles, where the phase change material may comprise a linear alkyl hydrocarbon, water/urea, or water. The thermal energy storage composition has a high thermal conductivity, high thermal energy storage, and may be used in a variety of applications such as in thermal shipping containers and gel packs.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

2000-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

144

Ocean Resources | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

resource-assessment projects for advanced water power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy Related Terms Pamela Sydelko is the Deputy Associate Laboratory Director...

145

Scott Wilson Oceans | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceans Oceans Jump to: navigation, search Name Scott Wilson Oceans Place Chesterfield, United Kingdom Zip S30 1JF Sector Wind energy Product Specialist in the engineering of onshore and offshore wind farm technology. Coordinates 37.376844°, -77.508252° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":37.376844,"lon":-77.508252,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

146

Tropical Oceanic Response to Extratropical Thermal Forcing in a Coupled Climate Model: A Comparison between the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The tropical oceanic response to the extratropical thermal forcing is quantitatively estimated in a coupled climate model. This work focuses on comparison of the responses between the tropical Atlantic and Pacific. Under the same extratropical ...

Haijun Yang; Lu Wang

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High temperature underground thermal energy storage, inProceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:underground thermal energy storage, in ATES newsletter:

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1978, High temperature underground thermal energy storage,in Proceedings, Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Workshop:High temperature underground thermal energy storage, in ATES

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

B. Quale. Seasonal storage of thermal energy in water in theand J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersSecond Annual Thermal Energy Storage Contractors'

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

MEMS BASED PYROELECTRIC THERMAL ENERGY HARVESTER - Energy ...  

A pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting apparatus for generating an electric current includes a cantilevered layered pyroelectric capacitor extending ...

151

Low-Frequency Variability in the Midlatitude Baroclinic Atmosphere Induced by an Oceanic Thermal Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the flow induced by an eastwest-oriented oceanic thermal front in a highly idealized baroclinic model. Previous work showed that thermal fronts could produce energetic midlatitude jets in an equivalent-barotropic atmosphere ...

Yizhak Feliks; Michael Ghil; Eric Simonnet

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICO MOBILE SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Conversion (OTEC) sites in the Gulf of Mexico. TheENERGY CONVERSION PRELIMINARY DATA REPORT FOR THE NOVEMBER 1977 GOTEC-02 CRUISE TO THE GULF OF MEXICOEnergy Conversion (OTEC) Sites: Puerto Rico, St. Croix and Northern Gulf of Mexico.

Commins, M.L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Ocean Renewable Energy Coalition OREC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Coalition OREC Energy Coalition OREC Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Renewable Energy Coalition (OREC) Place Potomac, Maryland Zip 20859 Sector Ocean Product US trade association founded to promote energy technologies from ocean resources. Coordinates 39.017653°, -77.208337° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.017653,"lon":-77.208337,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

154

Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Finavera Renewables Ocean Energy Ltd Address 595 Burrard Street Suite 3113 Three Bentall Centre PO Box 49071 Place Vancouver Zip V7X 1G4 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 604-288-9051 Website http://www.finavera.com Region Canada LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Coos County Offshore Wave Energy Power Plant Figueira da Foz Portugal Humboldt County Wave Project Makah Bay Offshore Wave Pilot Project South Africa Ucluelet BC Canada This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: AquaBuoy This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it.

155

Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts) < Back Eligibility Construction Industrial Installer/Contractor Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Wind Program Info State Massachusetts Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state's Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan identified certain state waters that are eligible for offshore wind, wave and tidal energy development and other state waters where such development is

156

Dynamical Potential Energy: A New Approach to Ocean Energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The concept of available potential energy is supposed to indicate which part of the potential energy is available to transform into kinetic energy. Yet it is impossible to obtain a unique definition of available potential energy for the real ocean ...

Fabien Roquet

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

MHK Technologies/Ocean Energy Rig | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rig Rig < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Energy Rig.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Energy Rig is a hybrid concept harnessing tidal stream with increased velocity from venturi system wave and wind power The rig also uses solar panels to power computers and warning lights Other unique features include a water ballasting system with automatic self levelling and wave ramps to maximize FreeFlow 69 s new wave power device It is envisaged that the Ocean Energy Rig would be assembled and maintained in dry docks and would be towed out into position before being semi submerged and anchored for operation Power output of the production model would be at least 10MW

158

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the portion of thermal energy that can be converted toof high-performance thermal energy harvesting systems, butreferred to as the thermal energy from low- temperature heat

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Upper Oceanic Energy Response to Tropical Cyclone Passage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The upper oceanic temporal response to tropical cyclone (TC) passage is investigated using a 6-yr daily record of data-driven analyses of two measures of upper ocean energy content based on the U.S. Navys Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation System ...

John A. Knaff; Mark DeMaria; Charles R. Sampson; James E. Peak; James Cummings; Wayne H. Schubert

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Ocean Energy Resource Basics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

resource-assessment projects for advanced water power. Addthis Related Articles Glossary of Energy-Related Terms Frequently Asked Questions Pamela Sydelko is the Deputy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion power system development. Phase I: preliminary design. Final report. [ODSP-3 code; OTEC Steady-State Analysis Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The following appendices are included; Dynamic Simulation Program (ODSP-3); sample results of dynamic simulation; trip report - NH/sub 3/ safety precautions/accident records; trip report - US Coast Guard Headquarters; OTEC power system development, preliminary design test program report; medium turbine generator inspection point program; net energy analysis; bus bar cost of electricity; OTEC technical specifications; and engineer drawings. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

162

MHK Technologies/OceanStar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OceanStar OceanStar < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage OceanStar.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Bourne Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Overtopping Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The OceanStar device captures the underlying pressure wave through a series of small turbine generators The OceanStar relies upon a proprietary energy efficient process to smooth out the pulse characteristics common to wave energy in order to be electrical grid friendly The OceanStars high level of scalability is essential to reach the large surface areas required to reach utility scale ocean power generation Technology Dimensions

163

Ocean Shores, Washington: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Shores, Washington: Energy Resources Ocean Shores, Washington: Energy Resources (Redirected from Ocean Shores, WA) Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 46.9736986°, -124.1562852° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":46.9736986,"lon":-124.1562852,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

164

Riding the Waves: Harnessing Ocean Wave Energy through ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The opportunities for ocean wave power to become a new, reliable and clean source of renewable energy will be discussed, as well as activities of ...

2012-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

165

Thermal energy storage application areas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of thermal energy storage in the areas of building heating and cooling, recovery of industrial process and waste heat, solar power generation, and off-peak energy storage and load management in electric utilities is reviewed. (TFD)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

An Observational Estimate of Inferred Ocean Energy Divergence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monthly net surface energy fluxes (FS) over the oceans are computed as residuals of the atmospheric energy budget using top-of-atmosphere (TOA) net radiation (RT) and the complete atmospheric energy (AE) budget tendency (?AE/?t) and divergence ( ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Turbine speed control for an ocean wave energy conversion system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work, a hydraulic turbine speed governor is proposed in view of its application in an isolated electric generation system based on an ocean wave energy converter (WEC). The proposed strategy is based on cascade closed-loop control combined with ... Keywords: Pelton turbine, cascade control, feedforward control, ocean wave energy, speed governor

Paula B. Garcia-Rosa; Jos Paulo V. S. Cunha; Fernando Lizarralde

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

The Relationship between Tibet-Tropical Ocean Thermal Contrast and Interannual Variability of Indian Monsoon Rainfall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the northern summer the Tibetan Plateau is a heat source for the atmosphere, and the Equatorial Pacific Ocean Cold Tongue is a heat sink, both contributing to the thermal forcing of large-scale quasi-zonal atmospheric circulation.

Congbin Fu; Joseph O. Fletcher

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Low-Frequency Variability in the Midlatitude Atmosphere Induced by an Oceanic Thermal Front  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the flow induced in a highly idealized atmospheric model by an eastwest-oriented oceanic thermal front. The model has a linear marine boundary layer coupled to a quasigeostrophic, equivalent- barotropic free atmosphere. The ...

Yizhak Feliks; Michael Ghil; Eric Simonnet

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Ocean Wave Energy Company OWECO | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Company OWECO Energy Company OWECO Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Wave Energy Company (OWECO) Place Bristol, Rhode Island Sector Ocean Product Wave energy device developer. The company has patented the OWEC Ocean Wave Energy Converter®., a device consisting of a submerged array, suspended at depths permitting full reciprocation of buoys and respective driveshafts. Coordinates 42.55678°, -88.050449° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.55678,"lon":-88.050449,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

171

Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Energy Company Ocean Energy Company Jump to: navigation, search Name Grays Harbor Ocean Energy Company Place Seattle, Washington Zip 98105 Sector Renewable Energy, Wind energy Product Grays Harbor has started a demonstration project for offshore wind/wave renewable power generation in Washington State and has applied for up to 1GW in permits for wave projects around the US. Coordinates 47.60356°, -122.329439° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.60356,"lon":-122.329439,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

172

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disturbances d~e to carbon dioxide releases and sea-surfacefom installations; however, the carbon dioxide~releases fromwith other man-ind~ced carbon dioxide releases to result in

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

planes, Large quantities of chlorine will be used to controlthe marine environment. Chlorine react ions in sea\\Chlorine also has been reported to

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

The Potential Impact of Ocean Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to the entrainmcnt and impingement that would result with the pumping of large volumes of seawater through an OTEC on bottom-mounted towers or offshore in the form of moored floating plants or free- floating plantships on the order of 100 m. Bottom-mounted plants (on towers) will make use of the space along the vertical extent

175

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and power usages (baseload electricity and production of =approximately 60 GW of baseload electricty could be producedcommunities, and will produce baseload electrical power and

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Estimating the Meridional Energy Transports in the Atmosphere and Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The poleward energy transports in the atmosphereocean system are estimated for the annual mean and the four seasons based on satellite measurements of the net radiation balance at the top of the atmosphere, atmospheric transports of energy at ...

B. C. Carissimo; A. H. Oort; T. H. Vonder Haar

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Estimating Internal Wave Energy Fluxes in the Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Energy flux is a fundamental quantity for understanding internal wave generation, propagation, and dissipation. In this paper, the estimation of internal wave energy fluxes u?p? from ocean observations that may be sparse in either time or depth ...

Jonathan D. Nash; Matthew H. Alford; Eric Kunze

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Title Efficient thermal energy distribution in commercial buildings -- Final Report Publication Type...

179

AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

formerly Oceanergia formerly Oceanergia Jump to: navigation, search Name AWS Ocean Energy formerly Oceanergia Address Redshank House Alness Point Business Park Place Alness Ross shire Zip IV17 0UP Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number 44 (0) 1349 88 44 22 Website http://www.awsocean.com Region United Kingdom LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: AWS II Portugal Pre Commercial Pilot Project This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: Archimedes Wave Swing This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=AWS_Ocean_Energy_formerly_Oceanergia&oldid=678253

180

Lih thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures.

Olszewski, Mitchell (Knoxville, TN); Morris, David G. (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

A fuzzy logic material selection methodology for renewable ocean energy applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis is to develop a renewable ocean energy material selection methodology for use in FAU's Ocean Energy Projects. A detailed and (more)

Welling, Donald Anthony.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SAN DIEGO Recycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to ElectricalRecycling of Wasted Energy : Thermal to Electrical Energyenergy, geothermal energy, wasted heat from a nuclear

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Definition: Thermal energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Thermal energy Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal energy The kinetic energy associated with the random motions of the molecules of a material or object; often used interchangeably with the terms heat and heat energy. Measured in joules, calories, or Btu.[1][2][3] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition Thermal energy is the part of the total potential energy and kinetic energy of an object or sample of matter that results in the system temperature. It is represented by the variable Q, and can be measured in Joules. This quantity may be difficult to determine or even meaningless unless the system has attained its temperature only through warming (heating), and not been subjected to work input or output, or any other

184

Wave Breaking and Ocean Surface Layer Thermal Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of breaking waves on ocean surface temperatures and surface boundary layer deepening is investigated. The modification of the MellorYamada turbulence closure model by Craig and Banner and others to include surface wave breaking ...

George Mellor; Alan Blumberg

2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LABORATORY VI ENERGY AND THERMAL PROCESSES Lab VI - 1 The change of the internal energy of a system temperature by sweating to cool down. Running seems to be the conversion of chemical energy to thermal energy energy into thermal energy, you decide to make some measurements in the laboratory. To make

Minnesota, University of

186

Surface Energy Fluxes of the South Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fluxes of sensible, latent and radiational energy and momentum across the surface of the South Atlantic Ocean have been calculated by substituting ship meteorological observations into bulk aerodynamic and empirical radiation equations. Upper-air ...

Andrew F. Bunker

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TECHNICAL REPORT Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource EPRI Project Manager P. Jacobson 3420 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304-1338 USA PO Box...

188

Mixing and Available Potential Energy in a Boussinesq Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The commonly used definitions for available potential energy and its sources in the oceans are based on the quasigeostrophic approximation, so they are not suitable for the study of basin-scale circulation. Accurate definitions for the available ...

Rui Xin Huang

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

How Much Energy Propagates Vertically in the Equatorial Oceans?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically propagating linear wave calculations using realistic equatorial buoyancy profiles are presented which show the percentage of the downward surface energy flux that reaches the deep equatorial oceans. The percentages vary widely ...

Peter R. Gent; James R. Luyten

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power April 30, 2013 - 12:40pm Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FIND OUT MORE Read about the Energy Department's assessments of wave and tidal energy resources. You've probably seen water at work generating electricity at dams and other hydropower facilities in your region. But an emerging clean energy technology called marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy -- or ocean power -- uses water to generate electricity in a different way, and has yet to get

191

Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Jump to: navigation, search Basic Specifications Facility Name Open Ocean Aquaculture & Wave Energy Site Overseeing Organization University of New Hampshire Hydrodynamics Hydrodynamic Testing Facility Type Offshore Berth Depth(m) 52.0 Cost(per day) Contact POC Special Physical Features The Offshore Mooring System is placed in 52m water depth with a subsurface attachment grid at 20m. The entire mooring system covers 36 acres of bottom. There are four 'bays' into which devices can be attached. Each bay is approximately 130m on a side. There is a database with ~10 years of wave data and other environmental parameters available. Towing Capabilities Towing Capabilities None Wavemaking Capabilities Wavemaking Capabilities Yes

192

Environmental Energy Technologies Division Thermal Field Tests  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Field Tests Joseph H. Klems, LBNL DOE PEER Review San Francisco, CA April 20, 1999 Environmental Energy Technologies Division Current Work l Skylight Thermal Performance *...

193

Stewart Thermal Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Stewart Thermal Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Stewart Thermal Ltd Place United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product Provides specialist advice in the field of biomass energy....

194

THOR Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name THOR Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC Address 3814 West St Place Cincinnati Zip 45227 Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Year founded 2007 Phone number 513-527-4924 Website http://http://www.thorocean.co Region United States LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Technologies: THOR Ocean Current Turbine This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=THOR_Turner_Hunt_Ocean_Renewable_LLC&oldid=678473" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations Companies Organizations

195

Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ice Bear30 Hybrid Air Conditionerthermal energy storage system150uses smart integrated controls, ice storage, and a dedicated compressor for cooling. The system is designed to provide cooling to interior spaces by circulating refrigerant within an additional evaporator coil added to a standard unitary air conditioner. The Ice Bear 30 is a relatively small size (5 ton), intended for use in residential and light commercial applications. This report describes EPRI tests of the Ice Bear 30, which is manu...

2009-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

196

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Coupled withGeneration and Energy Storage," presented at Frontiers ofStudy of Underground Energy Storage Using High-Pressure,

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power Energy Department Releases New Energy 101 Video on Ocean Power April 30, 2013 - 12:40pm Addthis See how marine and hydrokinetic technologies harness the energy of the ocean's waves, tides, and currents and convert it into electricity to power our homes, buildings and cities. Eric Barendsen Energy Technology Program Specialist, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy FIND OUT MORE Read about the Energy Department's assessments of wave and tidal energy resources. You've probably seen water at work generating electricity at dams and other hydropower facilities in your region. But an emerging clean energy technology called marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) energy -- or ocean power -- uses water to generate electricity in a different way, and has yet to get

198

EnOcean Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnOcean Inc EnOcean Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name EnOcean Inc Address 801 Boylston Street Place Boston, Massachusetts Zip 02116 Sector Efficiency Product Wireless sensor for building automation to improve efficiency Website http://www.enocean.com/ Coordinates 42.349048°, -71.082153° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.349048,"lon":-71.082153,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

199

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and J. Schwarz, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage in AquifersA. 1957. Steady State Free Thermal Convection of Liquid in a1958. An Experiment on Free Thermal Convection of Water in

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Thermal and non-thermal energies in solar flares  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The energy of the thermal flare plasma and the kinetic energy of the non-thermal electrons in 14 hard X-ray peaks from 9 medium-sized solar flares have been determined from RHESSI observations. The emissions have been carefully separated in the spectrum. The turnover or cutoff in the low-energy distribution of electrons has been studied by simulation and fitting, yielding a reliable lower limit to the non-thermal energy. It remains the largest contribution to the error budget. Other effects, such as albedo, non-uniform target ionization, hot target, and cross-sections on the spectrum have been studied. The errors of the thermal energy are about equally as large. They are due to the estimate of the flare volume, the assumption of the filling factor, and energy losses. Within a flare, the non-thermal/thermal ratio increases with accumulation time, as expected from loss of thermal energy due to radiative cooling or heat conduction. Our analysis suggests that the thermal and non-thermal energies are of the same magnitude. This surprising result may be interpreted by an efficient conversion of non-thermal energy to hot flare plasma.

Pascal Saint-Hilaire; Arnold O. Benz

2005-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Energy Basics: Thermal Storage Systems for Concentrating Solar...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Energy Basics Renewable Energy Printable Version Share this resource Biomass Geothermal Hydrogen Hydropower Ocean Solar Photovoltaics Concentrating Solar Power Linear...

202

Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Agency/Company /Organization: Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) Partner: International Trade Administration Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, - Biomass Combustion, - Biomass Gasification, - Biomass Pyrolysis, - Biofuels Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Options, Develop Goals Resource Type: Guide/manual User Interface: Website Website: www.biomassthermal.org Cost: Free The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) website is focused on biomass for heating and other thermal energy applications, and includes links to numerous reports from various agencies around the world. Overview The Biomass Thermal Energy Council (BTEC) website is focused on biomass for

203

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in ConcentratedChange Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PHASE CHANGE THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR CONCENTRATING SOLARMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated SolarMaterials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Ocean Power Technologies | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Power Technologies Power Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ocean Power Technologies Name Ocean Power Technologies Address 1590 Reed Road Place Pennington, New Jersey Zip 08534 Year founded 1994 Number of employees 100 Website http://www.oceanpowertechnolog Coordinates 40.297652°, -74.794481° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.297652,"lon":-74.794481,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

206

Annual Cycle of Subsurface Thermal Structure in the Tropical Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subsurface thermal structure in the tropical Atlantic Ocean (30N20S, East of 80W) is studied on the basis of an extensive data bank of subsurface soundings. Calendar monthly maps are presented showing mixed layer depth, base of ...

Stefan Hastenrath; Jacques Merle

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

An Attempt to Estimate the Thermal Resistance of the Upper Ocean to Climatic Change  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An attempt is made to estimate the thermal inertia of the upper ocean, relevant to climatic change. This is done by assuming that the annual variation in sea surface temperature (SST) can, to a first-order approximation, be described by a simple ...

H. M. Van Den Dool; J. D. Horel

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Regional Energy and Water Cycles: Transports from Ocean to Land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flows of energy and water from ocean to land are examined in the context of the land energy and water budgets, for land as a whole and for continents. Most atmospheric reanalyses have large errors of up to 15 W m?2 in the top-of-atmosphere (...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Regional energy and water cycles: Transports from ocean to land  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The flows of energy and water from ocean to land are examined in the context of the land energy and water budgets, for land as a whole and for continents. Most atmospheric reanalyses have large errors of up to 15 W m-2 in the top-of-atmosphere (...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo

210

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene-vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments.

Salyer, Ival O. (Dayton, OH)

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

211

Microwavable thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

Salyer, I.O.

1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

212

Thermal Scout Software - Energy Innovation Portal  

Energy Analysis Thermal ... Technology Marketing Summary. ... The software uses GPS data to automate infrared camera image capture and temperature ana ...

213

Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm Facility Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm Energy Purchaser Bartlett's Ocean View Wind Farm Location Nantucket MA Coordinates 41.259168°, -70.131913° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.259168,"lon":-70.131913,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

214

MHK Technologies/Ocean Current Linear Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Linear Turbine Linear Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Current Linear Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Energy Company LLC Technology Type Click here Seabed mooring system Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Endless cable loop with parachutes spliced to cable which moored in an ocean current pulls the cable through rotors which in turn power conventional electricity generators See US Patent 3 887 817 Additional patent pending Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 30:08.6 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Ocean_Current_Linear_Turbine&oldid=681618"

215

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEAN Countries,"Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling," Seminar25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF COMMERCIAL

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial Building Thermal Energy _Storage in ASEANGas Electric Company, "Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling,"LBL--25393 DE91 ,THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE FOR COOLING OF

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

A Magnetomechanical Thermal Energy Harvester With A Reversible Liquid Interface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Mechanical Model of a Thermal Energy Harvesting Device,M, and Ferrari V. , Thermal energy harvesting throughand G. P. Carman, Thermal energy harvesting device using

He, Hong

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Thermal Transport in Nanomaterials for Energy Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Symposium, Energy Nanomaterials. Presentation Title, Thermal Transport in Nanomaterials for Energy Applications. Author(s), Xinwei Wang. On-Site Speaker ...

219

MHK Technologies/Deep Ocean Water Application Facility DOWAF | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Water Application Facility DOWAF Water Application Facility DOWAF < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Deep Ocean Water Application Facility DOWAF.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Marc M Siah Associates Inc Technology Resource Click here OTEC Technology Type Click here OTEC - Hybrid Cycle Technology Description MOTEC systems utilize the temperature differential between the warm surface and the cold deep seawater The OTEC heat engine converts the thermal energy into usable mechanical energy which in turn is converted to electrical energy There are different types of OTEC system Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 24:54.0 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=MHK_Technologies/Deep_Ocean_Water_Application_Facility_DOWAF&oldid=681561

220

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoporous Thermal-to-Electrical Energy Conversion System (hand, the indirect energy conversion systems tend to beIn a direct energy conversion system, heat can be converted

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ocean Energy Technologies: The State of the Art  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

At present, ocean energy technologies are in various stages of development, ranging from theoretical to commercially available. Estimates made in this study indicate that these technologies are unlikely to be economical sources of power for U.S. utilities in the near term.

1986-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

222

Concurrent studies of enhanced heat transfer and materials for ocean thermal exchangers. Progress report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aluminum alloys 1100, 3003, 5052, and 6063 were examined for their compatibility with the proposed working fluids for Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), anhydrous ammonia, Freon 22 and propane, and mixtures of these with sea water. Such mixtures would occur if leaks develop in evaporator or condenser heat exchangers. These aluminum alloys are compatible with the anhydrous working fluids. In ammonia-sea water solutions only limited general corrosion is found in 0 to 30 percent ammonia, no corrosion in 30 to 90 percent ammonia, and ''self limiting'' pits in 90 to 100 percent ammonia so rapid deterioration of the exchangers would not occur. No corrosion was observed in sea water saturated with Freon 22 or propane. No differences in alloy performance were evident in any of these tests so selection can be made on the basis of compatibility with sea water. A review of the available literature indicates that 5052 shows the best performance in surface sea water followed by 1100, 3003 and then 6063 alloy. In deep sea water only 5052 and 1100 alloys appear suitable although more data is required. In both surface and deep sea waters, alcladding offers the best protection against tube perforation; few instances of penetration into the core alloy have been observed for the alclad alloys examined in this study.

Bonewitz, R.A.

1976-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

223

Ocean Wavemaster Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wavemaster Ltd Wavemaster Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean Wavemaster Ltd Address CAPCIS House 1 Echo Street Place Manchester, United Kingdom Zip M1 2DP Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Product String representation "WaveMaster expl ... water surface." is too long. Phone number 0161 933 4000 Website http://http://www.tnei.co.uk/p Coordinates 53.479605°, -2.248818° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":53.479605,"lon":-2.248818,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

224

Thermal Energy Systems | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Energy Systems Energy Systems Jump to: navigation, search Name Thermal Energy Systems Place London, United Kingdom Sector Biomass Product UK based company that constructs and installs boilers for biomass projects. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

225

MHK Technologies/Ocean Treader floating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Treader floating Treader floating < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Treader floating.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Energy Ltd Project(s) where this technology is utilized *MHK Projects/Development of Ocean Treader Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4: Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Treader is comprised of two sponsons at the fore and aft of the device and a spar buoy in the center. As a wave passes along the device, first the fore sponson lifts and falls, then the spar buoy, and then the aft sponson, respectively. The relative motion between these three floating bodies is harvested by hydraulic cylinders mounted between the tops of the arms and the spar buoy. The cylinders pressurize hydraulic fluid that spins hydraulic motors and an electric generator. The electricity is exported via a cable piggy-backed to the anchor cable. Ocean Treader is designed to passively weather-vane to face the wave direction; and in addition, the device has active onboard adjustment to allow for offset due to the effects of current.

226

Solar energy thermalization and storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passive solar thermalization and thermal energy storage assembly which is visually transparent. The assembly consists of two substantial parallel, transparent wall members mounted in a rectangular support frame to form a liquid-tight chamber. A semitransparent thermalization plate is located in the chamber, substantially paralled to and about equidistant from the transparent wall members to thermalize solar radiation which is stored in a transparent thermal energy storage liquid which fills the chamber. A number of the devices, as modules, can be stacked together to construct a visually transparent, thermal storage wall for passive solar-heated buildings.

McClelland, John F. (Ames, IA)

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Thermal Energy Storage for Cooling of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF THIS DOCUME THERMAL FOR COOLING ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSi- LBL-25393 THERMAL FOR COOLING w ENERGY STORAGE BUILDINGSpeak power periods, thermal storage for cooling has become a

Akbari, H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in Delivering Thermal Comfort Title Guide to Setting Thermal Comfort Criteria and Minimizing Energy Use in...

229

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Harvesting useful electric energy from ambient thermal gradients and/or temperature fluctuations is immensely important. For many years, a number of direct and indirect thermal-to-electrical energy (more)

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy`s Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Baroclinic Adjustment in an AtmosphereOcean Thermally Coupled Model: The Role of the Boundary Layer Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Baroclinic eddy equilibration and the roles of different boundary layer processes in limiting the baroclinic adjustment are studied using an atmosphereocean thermally coupled model. Boundary layer processes not only affect the dynamical ...

Yang Zhang; Peter H. Stone

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Solar Thermal Technologies Available for Licensing - Energy ...  

Solar Thermal Technologies Available for Licensing U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) laboratories and participating research institutions have concentrating solar power ...

233

Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials Thermal Energy Transport in Nanostructured Materials Speaker(s): Ravi Prasher Date: August 25, 2008 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Ashok Gadgil World energy demand is expected to reach ~30 TW by 2050 from the current demand of ~13 TW. This requires substantial technological innovation. Thermal energy transport and conversion play a very significant role in more than 90% of energy technologies. All four modes of thermal energy transport, conduction, convection, radiation, and phase change (e.g. evaporation/boiling) are important in various energy technologies such as vapor compression power plants, refrigeration, internal combustion engines and building heating/cooling. Similarly thermal transport play a critical role in electronics cooling as the performance and reliability of

234

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

SciTech Connect

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Thermal energy storage for cogeneration applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cogeneration is playing an increasingly important role in providing energy efficient power generation and thermal energy for space heating and industrial process heat applications. However, the range of applications for cogeneration could be further increased if the generation of electricity could be coupled from the generation of process heat. Thermal energy storage (TES) can decouple power generation from the production of process heat, allowing the production of dispatchable power while fully utilizing the thermal energy available from the prime mover. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) leads the US Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. The program focuses on developing TES for daily cycling (diurnal storage), annual cycling (seasonal storage), and utility applications (utility thermal energy storage (UTES)). Several of these technologies can be used in a cogeneration facility. This paper discusses TES concepts relevant to cogeneration and describes the current status of these TES systems.

Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Net Metering | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

solar energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, geothermal energy, small hydropower, biogas from anaerobic digestion, or fuel cells using any of these energy sources are...

237

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Key to Large-Scale Cogeneration?" Public Power, v, 35, no.Thermal Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems,"Energy Storage for Cogeneration and Solar Systems, tion from

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel iso-topes, with improvements on two aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. The other, which is unprecedented, is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.33%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 30% smaller.

Ma, X B; Wang, L Z; Chen, Y X; Cao, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion - Energy Explained, Your Guide To ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Landfill Gas and Biogas; Biomass & the Environment See also: Biofuels. Biofuels: Ethanol & Biodiesel. Ethanol; Use of Ethanol; Ethanol & the Environment; Biodiesel;

240

Marin Clean Energy - Feed-In Tariff (California) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Landfill Gas, Municipal Solid Waste, Ocean Thermal, Photovoltaics, Small Hydroelectric, Solar Thermal Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Thermal Monitoring Approaches for Energy Savings Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reviews and summarizes techniques for monitoring thermal energy flows for the purpose of verifying energy savings in industrial and large institutional energy conservation projects. Approaches for monitoring hot and chilled water, steam, steam condensate and boiler feedwater in large facilities are described. Insights gained and lessons learned through the actual in-field installation of thermal monitoring equipment for energy savings verification purposes at over 100 sites at various locations throughout the United States are presented.

McBride, J. R.; Bohmer, C. J.; Lippman, R. H.; Zern, M. J.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Hydrogen Energy Stations: Poly-Production of Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy Timothy E. LipmanElectricity, Hydrogen, and Thermal Energy Timothy E. Lipmanof electricity, hydrogen, and thermal energy; 2) a survey of

Lipman, Timothy; Brooks, Cameron

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

MHK Technologies/Ocean Powered Compressed Air Stations | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Powered Compressed Air Stations Powered Compressed Air Stations < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Powered Compressed Air Stations.png Technology Profile Primary Organization Wave Power Plant Inc Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The Ocean Powered Compressed Air Station is a point absorber that uses an air pump to force air to a landbased generator The device only needs 4m water depth and electricity production fluctations through storing energy at a constant air pressure Technology Dimensions Device Testing Date Submitted 13:16.5 << Return to the MHK database homepage Retrieved from

244

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Air Piston | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Piston Piston < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Air Piston.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Green Ocean Wave Energy Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Attenuator Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 4 Proof of Concept Technology Description The OWAP captures power by continually raising or lowering a float which in turn raises or lowers one side of a lever arm about a stationary pivot point This therby raises or lowers a piston which is attached to the opposite side of the lever arm through a cylinder which in turn causes large volumes of air to move This air is funneled through drive turbines to produce power Mooring Configuration Monopile or platfrom

245

Ocean Wave Energy-Driven Desalination Systems for Off-grid Coastal Communities in Developing Countries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Resolute Marine Energy, Inc. (RME) is based in Boston, MA and is developing ocean wave energy converters (WECs) to benefit remote off-grid communities in developing nations. Our two WEC technologies are based on the heaving and surging motion of a buoy ... Keywords: ocean wave energy, renewable energy, desalination, water, coastal communities

Eshwan Ramudu

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Definition: British thermal unit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

thermal unit thermal unit Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png British thermal unit The amount of heat required to raise the temperature of one pound of water one degree Fahrenheit; often used as a unit of measure for the energy content of fuels.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition The British thermal unit (BTU or Btu) is a traditional unit of energy equal to about 1055 joules. It is the amount of energy needed to cool or heat one pound of water by one degree Fahrenheit. In scientific contexts the BTU has largely been replaced by the SI unit of energy, the joule. The unit is most often used as a measure of power (as BTU/h) in the power, steam generation, heating, and air conditioning industries, and also as a measure of agricultural energy production (BTU/kg). It is still used

247

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy storage in Aquifers.In Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Thermally-Activated Technologies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermally-Activated Technologies Thermally-Activated Technologies Thermally-Activated Technologies November 1, 2013 - 11:40am Addthis Thermally-activated technologies include a diverse portfolio of equipment that transforms heat for useful purposes such as heating, cooling, humidity control, thermal storage, and shaft/electrical power. Thermally-activated technologies are essential for combined heat and power (CHP)-integrated systems that maximize energy savings and economic return. Thermally-activated technologies systems also enable customers to reduce seasonal peak electric demand and future electric and gas grids to operate with more level loads. Absorption Chillers Absorption cycles have been used for more than 150 years. Early equipment used a mixture of ammonia and water as an absorption working pair, with

249

Renewable Energy and Energy-Efficient Technologies Grants Program...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Wave Energy, Ocean Thermal, Direct-Use Geothermal Active Incentive No Implementing Sector StateTerritory Energy Category Renewable Energy Incentive Programs, Energy Efficiency...

250

TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems (2013 DOE JGI Genomics of Energy and Environment 8th Annual User Meeting)  

SciTech Connect

Eric Karsenti of EMBL delivers the closing keynote on "TARA OCEANS: A Global Analysis of Oceanic Plankton Ecosystems" at the 8th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 28, 2013 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Karsenti, Eric [EMBL Heidelberg

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Variability of the Thermohaline Circulation in an Ocean General Circulation Model Coupled to an Atmospheric Energy Balance Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability of the oceans thermohaline circulation in an oceanic general circulation model (OGCM) coupled to a two-dimensional atmospheric energy balance model (EBM) is examined. The EBM calculates air temperatures by balancing heat fluxes, ...

David W. Pierce; K-Y. Kim; Tim P. Barnett

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Rhode Island | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

up to 100% of the electricity that a home or other facility uses. Systems that generate electricity using solar energy, wind energy, ocean-thermal energy, geothermal energy,...

253

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Title Model Predictive Control of Thermal Energy Storage in Building Cooling Systems Publication Type...

254

SunShot Initiative: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution for Baseload Power to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Innovative Phase Change Thermal Energy Storage Solution...

255

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peak-demand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Poster: Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity...

256

SunShot Initiative: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power Generation to someone by E-mail Share SunShot Initiative: Innovative Thermal Energy Storage for Baseload Solar Power...

257

Improved Calculation of Thermal Fission Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal fission energy is one of the basic parameters needed in the calculation of antineutrino flux for reactor neutrino experiments. It is useful to improve the precision of the thermal fission energy calculation for current and future reactor neutrino experiments, which are aimed at more precise determination of neutrino oscillation parameters. In this article, we give new values for thermal fission energies of some common thermal reactor fuel isotopes, with improvements on three aspects. One is more recent input data acquired from updated nuclear databases. the second one is a consideration of the production yields of fission fragments from both thermal and fast incident neutrons for each of the four main fuel isotopes. The last one is more carefully calculation of the average energy taken away by antineutrinos in thermal fission with the comparison of antineutrino spectrum from different models. The change in calculated antineutrino flux due to the new values of thermal fission energy is about 0.32%, and the uncertainties of the new values are about 50% smaller.

X. B. Ma; W. L. Zhong; L. Z. Wang; Y. X. Chen; J. Cao

2012-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

258

An Act to Facilitate Testing and Demonstration of Renewable Ocean Energy Technology (Maine)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This law streamlines and coordinates State permitting and submerged lands leasing requirements for renewable ocean energy demonstration projects, aiding Maine's goal to become an international...

259

Ecological analysis of spatial and temporal patterns of pelagic ecosystem components potentially interacting with an OTEC (Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion) plant near Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico: physical characteristics. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This hydrographic study characterizes the Punta Tuna area as a potential site for an OTEC power plant. Seven cruises were conducted at approximately two month intervals. Each cruise included at least 22 hydrocast stations, six done as serial stations in a small area to reveal temporal and small scale variability. The results of the analysis of these data so far indicate a bi-seasonality in the dynamics. Mesoscale eddies and meanders are a common feature of the circulation pattern on Puerto Rico's southern coast. The time series studies have shown their existence of a very energetic internal wave field with relatively large amplitude waves at the diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal frequencies. The results in terms of an OTEC power plant indicate the thermal resource to be at least a 20C thermal gradient in the upper 100 m year round.

Lopez, J.M.; Tilly, L.J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Solar Thermal Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Thermal Incentive Program Thermal Incentive Program Solar Thermal Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Fed. Government Industrial Institutional Local Government Multi-Family Residential Nonprofit Residential Schools State Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate Residential: $4,000 per site/meter Non-residential: $25,000 per site/meter Incentive also capped at 80% of calculated existing thermal load Program Info Funding Source RPS surcharge Start Date 12/10/2010 Expiration Date 12/31/2015 State New York Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount $1.50 per kWh displaced annually, for displacement of up to 80% of calculated existing thermal load Provider New York State Energy Research and Development Authority The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA)

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Solar Thermal Incentive Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Solar Thermal Incentive Program Solar Thermal Incentive Program Solar Thermal Incentive Program < Back Eligibility Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate 50% of the project cost Program Info Funding Source Public Benefits Fund State Connecticut Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Calculated: $70 multiplied by the SRCC "C" rating multiplied by the number of collectors multiplied by the Shading Factor Provider Clean Energy Finance and Investment Authority Note: This program is not currently accepting applications. Check the program web site for information regarding future financing programs. To participate in the residential solar hot water rebate, homeowners must first complete an energy assessment. Then, they must work with CEFIA

262

Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage in Concentrated Solar Thermal Power Plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the replacement of non-renewable energy production. Unlikereplacement of non-renewable energy sources. The thermal

Hardin, Corey Lee

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

EXPERIMENTAL AND THEORETICAL STUDIES OF THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department of Energy, Energy Storage Division through thegeneration and energy storage, Presented at Frontiers ofIn Proceed- ings of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers Work-

Tsang, Chin Fu

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transports as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper reports on energy fluxes across the surface of the ocean as simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models in which ocean surface temperatures and sea-ice boundaries are prescribed. The oceanic meridional energy transport that would be required to balance these surface fluxes is computed, and is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean energy transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions.

Gleckler, P.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Randall, D.A. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Boer, G. [Canadian Climate Centre, Victoria (Canada)

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Turbulent Vertical Kinetic Energy in the Ocean Mixed Layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertical velocities in the ocean boundary layer were measured for two weeks at an open ocean, wintertime site using neutrally buoyant floats. Simultaneous measurements of the surface meteorology and surface waves showed a large variability in ...

Eric A. D'Asaro

2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Solar applications of thermal energy storage. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A technology assessment is presented on solar energy systems which use thermal energy storage. The study includes characterization of the current state-of-the-art of thermal energy storage, an assessment of the energy storage needs of solar energy systems, and the synthesis of this information into preliminary design criteria which would form the basis for detailed designs of thermal energy storage. (MHR)

Lee, C.; Taylor, L.; DeVries, J.; Heibein, S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Case Study on Thermal Energy Storage: Gemasolar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 19.9-MW Gemasolar plant is the first commercial concentrating-solar thermal power plant to use a central receiver tower and a two-tank molten-salt thermal energy storage system. The initial plant operation has demonstrated the feasibility of the technology to operate under commercial conditions at utility scale and verified continuous 24-hour operation. The storage capacity makes the plant output dispatchable and improves the plants capacity factor and profitability. This white paper ...

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

AirIceOcean Momentum Exchange. Part 1:Energy Transfer between Waves and Ice Floes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy exchange between ocean surface waves and ice floes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) involves the scattering and attenuation of wave energy and the excitation of oscillation modes of the ice floes, as open ocean waves propagate into the ...

W. Perrie; Y. Hu

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Outer Banks Ocean Energy Corporation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

28370 Sector Wind energy Product Privately-held company that plans to develop a 200-600MW offshore wind farm in federal lease blocks near North Carolina's barrier islands, known as...

270

Cost-Effective Solar Thermal Energy Storage: Thermal Energy Storage With Supercritical Fluids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: UCLA and JPL are creating cost-effective storage systems for solar thermal energy using new materials and designs. A major drawback to the widespread use of solar thermal energy is its inability to cost-effectively supply electric power at night. State-of-the-art energy storage for solar thermal power plants uses molten salt to help store thermal energy. Molten salt systems can be expensive and complex, which is not attractive from a long-term investment standpoint. UCLA and JPL are developing a supercritical fluid-based thermal energy storage system, which would be much less expensive than molten-salt-based systems. The teams design also uses a smaller, modular, single-tank design that is more reliable and scalable for large-scale storage applications.

None

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy conversion systems ..on thermal energy conversion systems As energy demandsefficient energy conversion in power systems," in Thermal

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Thermal Comfort  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Comfort Thermal Comfort logo. Provides a user-friendly interface for calculating thermal comfort parameters and making thermal comfort predictions using several thermal...

273

A Pointwise Energy Diagnostic Scheme for Multilayer, Nonisopycnic, Primitive Equation Ocean Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Considered is a pointwise energy diagnostic scheme for a multilayer, primitive equation, nonisopycnic ocean model. Both conservative as well as nonconservative energy exchange terms are considered. Moreover, the scheme is worked out for both the ...

Lars Petter Red

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

The Mechanical Energy Input to the Ocean Induced by Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind stress and tidal dissipation are the most important sources of mechanical energy for maintaining the oceanic general circulation. The contribution of mechanical energy due to tropical cyclones can be a vitally important factor in regulating ...

Ling Ling Liu; Wei Wang; Rui Xin Huang

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Aquifer thermal energy (heat and chill) storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

As part of the 1992 Intersociety Conversion Engineering Conference, held in San Diego, California, August 3--7, 1992, the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program coordinated five sessions dealing specifically with aquifer thermal energy storage technologies (ATES). Researchers from Sweden, The Netherlands, Germany, Switzerland, Denmark, Canada, and the United States presented papers on a variety of ATES related topics. With special permission from the Society of Automotive Engineers, host society for the 1992 IECEC, these papers are being republished here as a standalone summary of ATES technology status. Individual papers are indexed separately.

Jenne, E.A. (ed.)

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

LiH thermal energy storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storage device for use in a pulsed power supply to store waste heat produced in a high-power burst operation utilizes lithium hydride as the phase change thermal energy storage material. The device includes an outer container encapsulating the lithium hydride and an inner container supporting a hydrogen sorbing sponge material such as activated carbon. The inner container is in communication with the interior of the outer container to receive hydrogen dissociated from the lithium hydride at elevated temperatures. 5 figures.

Olszewski, M.; Morris, D.G.

1994-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

277

Ocean Gate, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gate, New Jersey: Energy Resources Gate, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.926785°, -74.1337496° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.926785,"lon":-74.1337496,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

278

Ocean Ridge, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ridge, Florida: Energy Resources Ridge, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 26.5270157°, -80.0483747° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":26.5270157,"lon":-80.0483747,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

279

Ocean City, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

City, New Jersey: Energy Resources City, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.2776156°, -74.5746001° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.2776156,"lon":-74.5746001,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

280

Ocean Beach, New York: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Beach, New York: Energy Resources Beach, New York: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 40.6467664°, -73.1570589° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.6467664,"lon":-73.1570589,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Ocean Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Bluff-Brant Rock, Massachusetts: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 42.1080418°, -70.6633175° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.1080418,"lon":-70.6633175,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

282

Ocean Acres, New Jersey: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Acres, New Jersey: Energy Resources Acres, New Jersey: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 39.7434529°, -74.2809757° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.7434529,"lon":-74.2809757,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

283

Phase Diagram Studies on Thermal Energy Storage Materials - tris ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These two thermal energy storage materials (organic crystalline materials) undergo a solid-solid phase transition before melting which will store the thermal ...

284

Aquifer thermal energy storage. International symposium: Proceedings  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Aquifers have been used to store large quantities of thermal energy to supply process cooling, space cooling, space heating, and ventilation air preheating, and can be used with or without heat pumps. Aquifers are used as energy sinks and sources when supply and demand for energy do not coincide. Aquifer thermal energy storage may be used on a short-term or long-term basis; as the sole source of energy or as a partial storage; at a temperature useful for direct application or needing upgrade. The sources of energy used for aquifer storage are ambient air, usually cold winter air; waste or by-product energy; and renewable energy such as solar. The present technical, financial and environmental status of ATES is promising. Numerous projects are operating and under development in several countries. These projects are listed and results from Canada and elsewhere are used to illustrate the present status of ATES. Technical obstacles have been addressed and have largely been overcome. Cold storage in aquifers can be seen as a standard design option in the near future as it presently is in some countries. The cost-effectiveness of aquifer thermal energy storage is based on the capital cost avoidance of conventional chilling equipment and energy savings. ATES is one of many developments in energy efficient building technology and its success depends on relating it to important building market and environmental trends. This paper attempts to provide guidance for the future implementation of ATES. Individual projects have been processed separately for entry onto the Department of Energy databases.

NONE

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Hybrid photovoltaic/thermal solar energy system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Heating and cooling systems that use hybrid solar energy collectors (combination photovoltaic-thermal) have the potential for considerable energy savings, particularly when the system includes a heat pump. Economic evaluations show that photovoltaic systems are potentially most economical, but results depend critically on future collector costs as well as energy prices. Results are based on a specially developed computer program that predicted the total auxiliary energy required for five different solar heating/cooling systems. Performance calculations for a modeled residence and small office building were made using meteorological data from four geographic locations. Annual system costs were also calculated.

Kern, E.C. Jr.; Russell, M.C.

1978-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

NRG Thermal LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal LLC Thermal LLC Jump to: navigation, search Name NRG Thermal LLC Place Minneapolis, Minnesota Zip 55402-2200 Product A subsidiary of NRG Energy that specialises in district energy systems and CHP plants. Coordinates 44.979035°, -93.264929° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.979035,"lon":-93.264929,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

287

Peak Load Shifting by Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical update from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) reviews the technology of storing energy in hot water and explores the potential for implementing this form of thermal energy storagethrough means of smart electric water heatersas a way to shift peak load on the electric grid. The report presents conceptual background, discusses strategies for peak load shifting and demand response, documents a series of laboratory tests conducted on a representative model of smart water heater, and...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Advanced Organic Vapor Cycles for Improving Thermal Conversion Efficiency in Renewable Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reclamation and solar thermal energy," Energy [accepted]. [and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"and M Dennis, "Solar thermal energy systems in Australia,"

Ho, Tony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Seasonal Prediction of Thermal Stress Accumulation for Coral Bleaching in the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mass coral bleaching, associated with anomalously warm ocean temperatures over large regions, poses a serious threat to the future health of the world coral reef systems. Seasonal forecasts from coupled oceanatmosphere models can be a valuable ...

C. M. Spillman; O. Alves; D. A. Hudson

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Phase change thermal energy storage material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal energy storge composition is disclosed. The composition comprises a non-chloride hydrate having a phase change transition temperature in the range of 70.degree.-95.degree. F. and a latent heat of transformation of at least about 35 calories/gram.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

The Role of Thermal Energy Storage in Industrial Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermal Energy Storage for Industrial Applications is a major thrust of the Department of Energy's Thermal Energy Storage Program. Utilizing Thermal Energy Storage (TES) with process or reject heat recovery systems has been shown to be extremely beneficial for several applications. Recent system studies resulting from contracts awarded by the Department of Energy (DOE) have identified four especially; significant industries where TES appears attractive - food processing, paper and pulp, iron and steel, and cement. Potential annual fuel savings with large scale implementation of near term TES systems for these industries is over 9 x 106 bbl of oil. This savings is due to recuperation and storage in the food processing industry, direct fuel substitution in the paper and pulp industry and reduction in electric utility peak fuel use through in-plant production of electricity from utilization of reject heat in the steel and cement industries.

Duscha, R. A.; Masica, W. J.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DISTRIBUTED ENERGY SYSTEMS IN CALIFORNIA'S FUTURE: A PRELIMINARY REPORT, VOLUME I  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Other Solar Technologies HYDROELECTRIC AND PUMPED STORAGEand Solar Thermal Hydroelectric Power Geothermal . Land UseOcean Wind Geothermal Hydroelectric Ocean Energy Fossil

Authors, Various

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Relations between Northward Ocean and Atmosphere Energy Transports in a Coupled Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Third Hadley Centre Coupled OceanAtmosphere General Circulation Model (HadCM3) is used to analyze the relation between northward energy transports in the ocean and atmosphere at centennial time scales. In a transient water-hosing experiment, ...

Michael Vellinga; Peili Wu

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Ocean Heat Transport, Sea Ice, and Multiple Climate States: Insights from Energy Balance Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Several extensions of energy balance models (EBMs) are explored in which (i) sea ice acts to insulate the atmosphere from the ocean and (ii) ocean heat transport is allowed to have some meridional structure controlled by the wind, with minima at ...

Brian E. J. Rose; John Marshall

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Marine pastures: a by-product of large (100 megawatt or larger) floating ocean-thermal power plants. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potential biological productivity of an open-sea mariculture system utilizing the deep-sea water discharged from an ocean-thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant was investigated. In a series of land-based studies, surface water was used to inoculate deep water and the primary production of the resultant blooms was investigated. Each cubic meter of deep water can produce approximately 2.34 g of phytoplankton protein, and that an OTEC plant discharging deep water at a rate of 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ could produce 5.3 x 10/sup 7/ kg of phytoplankton protein per 350-day year. A series of land-based shellfish studies indicated that, when fed at a constant rate of 1.83 x 10/sup -3/ g of protein per second per 70-140 g of whole wet weight, the clam, Tapes japonica, could convert the phytoplankton protein-nitrogen into shellfish meat protein-nitrogen with an efficiency of about 33 per cent. Total potential wet meat weight production from an OTEC plant pumping 4.5 x 10/sup 4/ m/sup 3/ min/sup -1/ is approximately 4.14 x 10/sup 8/ kg for a 350-day year. Various factors affecting the feasibility of open-sea mariculture are discussed. It is recommended that future work concentrate on a technical and economic analysis. (WDM)

Laurence, S.; Roels, O.A.

1976-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

296

LADWP - Feed-in Tariff (FiT) Program (California) | Open Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Electric, Landfill Gas, Ocean Thermal, Photovoltaics, Small Hydroelectric, Solar Thermal Electric, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Wind Active Incentive Yes Implementing...

297

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industrial users. Costs and per kWh increased from to 2.7rf-30, 1978, the average cost per kWh was 6.09i for residential

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

District (Hawaii) Electrical Power Grid--Hawaii . . . . . .Electrical Power Grid--Puerto Rico . . . . Ammonia andocean water to produce electrical power by means of gas or

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cable contractors, tropical cyclones and geology. Dept. ofpressure center. Tropical cyclones are usually accompaniedor plankton. case of 'TROPICAL CYCLONE TUNICATES TURBIDITY

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

distur- bances due to carbon dioxide releases and sea-how- ever, the carbon dioxide releases from large- scalewith other man-induced carbon dioxide releases to result in

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Degradation Processes for Chlorine in Saline Waters .92-101. Fate and effects of chlorine Bogdanov, D.V. , V.A.control alternatives to chlorine for power plant cooling

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and commercialization and a DOE requirement for the SAR. TheDOE Operations (SAR), established the uniform requirement todocument requirements and updating schedule of the SAR (DOE,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposed or existing oil or gas exploration areas, site-useOTEC Liability - Gas and oil exploration and exploitation onor natural gas; however, some oil exploration is beginning,

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Ocean thermal energy. Quarterly report, October-December 1981  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes work on the following tasks: OTEC methanol; approaches for financing OTEC proof-of-concept experimental vessels; investigation of OTEC-ammonia as an alternative fuel; review of electrolyzer development programs and requirements; hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: single-cycle performance; estimates; and hybrid geothermal-OTEC power plants: dual-cycle performance estimates.

Not Available

1981-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

305

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

System Tube-in-She11 Heat Exchanger . . . . . . . . .possible Plate-Type Heat Exchanger Estimated Relationship~res isolation of the heat and exchanger module, purging of

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) power system development. Conceptual design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conceptual design of a power system for application to the OTEC 100-MWe Demonstration Plant is presented. System modeling, design, and performance are described in detail. Materials considerations, module assembly, and cost considerations are discussed. Appendices include: A) systems analysis, B) general arrangements, C) system equipment, D) ammonia system material considerations; E) ammonia cycle, F) auxiliary subsystems, G) DACS availability analysis, H) heat exchanger supporting data, I) rotating machinery, and J) platform influences. (WHK)

Not Available

1978-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

307

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

This programmatic environmental analysis is an initial assessment of OTEC technology considering development, demonstration and commercialization; it is concluded that the OTEC development program should continue because the development, demonstration, and commercialization on a single-plant deployment basis should not present significant environmental impacts. However, several areas within the OTEC program require further investigation in order to assess the potential for environmental impacts from OTEC operation, particularly in large-scale deployments and in defining alternatives to closed-cycle biofouling control: (1) Larger-scale deployments of OTEC clusters or parks require further investigations in order to assess optimal platform siting distances necessary to minimize adverse environmental impacts. (2) The deployment and operation of the preoperational platform (OTEC-1) and future demonstration platforms must be carefully monitored to refine environmental assessment predictions, and to provide design modifications which may mitigate or reduce environmental impacts for larger-scale operations. These platforms will provide a valuable opportunity to fully evaluate the intake and discharge configurations, biofouling control methods, and both short-term and long-term environmental effects associated with platform operations. (3) Successful development of OTEC technology to use the maximal resource capabilities and to minimize environmental effects will require a concerted environmental management program, encompassing many different disciplines and environmental specialties.

Sands, M. D.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by means of gas or steam turbines. temperature The minimalby means of gas or steam turbines. The minimal operationalproblems. present steam turbine hardware by a factor of 11

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in size, and will produce baseload systems primarily land-and intended power use (baseload electricity or at-seathe ultimate use of providing baseload products, ammonia and

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and intended power use (baseload electri- city or at-seaship), and power usages (baseload electricity, ammonia andship con- ~lguratlons. For baseload power production, the

Sands, M.Dale

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fauna associated with offshore platforms 1n the northeasternrisks and safety of offshore drilling platforms. ation andPlatform Effects Attraction - Fish congregate around offshore

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrical Power Grid--Puerto Rico . . . . Ammonia andin the coastal waters of Puerto Rico. Unpublished. HarborAuthority, San Juan, Puerto Rico. Markel, A.L. VA. Personal

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

D. L. 1979. A review of water intake screening options forcapacity of cooling water intake structures for minimizingvessels. a. Warm and Cold Water Intakes Volumes - A single

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power station on northeastern Long Island Sound, USA. Marinepower cycle will entrain and impinge members of the marinesuch as a power plant. A species of marine plankton

Sands, M. D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Definition: Multispectral Thermal Infrared | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Infrared Infrared Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Multispectral Thermal Infrared This wavelength range senses heat energy from the Earth's surface. It can be used to sense surface temperature, including anomalies associated with active geothermal or volcanic systems. Both multispectral and hyperspectral remote sensing observations are available. This range can also be used to map mineralogy associate with common rock-forming silicates.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermal_infrared_spectroscopy ↑ http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/ Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Multispectral_Thermal_Infrared&oldid=601561

316

NREL: TroughNet - Parabolic Trough Thermal Energy Storage Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage Technology One advantage of parabolic trough power plants is their potential for storing solar thermal energy to use during non-solar periods and to dispatch...

317

Aquifer thermal energy storage: a survey  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The disparity between energy production and demand in many power plants has led to increased research on the long-term, large-scale storage of thermal energy in aquifers. Field experiments have been conducted in Switzerland, France, the United States, Japan, and the People's Republic of China to study various technical aspects of aquifer storage of both hot and cold water. Furthermore, feasibility studies now in progress include technical, economic, and environmental analyses, regional exploration to locate favorable storage sites, and evaluation and design of pilot plants. Several theoretical and modeling studies are also under way. Among the topics being studied using numerical models are fluid and heat flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the efficiency of different injection/withdrawal schemes, buoyancy tilting, numerical dispersion, the use of compensation wells to counter regional flow, steam injection, and storage in narrow glacial deposits of high permeability. Experiments to date illustrate the need for further research and development to ensure successful implementation of an aquifer storage system. Some of the areas identified for further research include shape and location of the hydrodynamic and thermal fronts, choice of appropriate aquifers, thermal dispersion, possibility of land subsidence or uplift, thermal pollution, water chemistry, wellbore plugging and heat exchange efficiency, and control of corrosion.

Tsang, C.F.; Hopkins, D.; Hellstroem, G.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Solar Thermal Energy Storage Device: Hybrid Nanostructures for High-Energy-Density Solar Thermal Fuels  

SciTech Connect

HEATS Project: MIT is developing a thermal energy storage device that captures energy from the sun; this energy can be stored and released at a later time when it is needed most. Within the device, the absorption of sunlight causes the solar thermal fuels photoactive molecules to change shape, which allows energy to be stored within their chemical bonds. A trigger is applied to release the stored energy as heat, where it can be converted into electricity or used directly as heat. The molecules would then revert to their original shape, and can be recharged using sunlight to begin the process anew. MITs technology would be 100% renewable, rechargeable like a battery, and emissions-free. Devices using these solar thermal fuelscalled Hybrisolcan also be used without a grid infrastructure for applications such as de-icing, heating, cooking, and water purification.

None

2012-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

319

MHK Projects/Grays Harbor Ocean Energy and Coastal Protection | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grays Harbor Ocean Energy and Coastal Protection Grays Harbor Ocean Energy and Coastal Protection < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":47.4651,"lon":-124.367,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

320

MHK Projects/Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project Greenwave Rhode Island Ocean Wave Energy Project < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":41.4501,"lon":-71.4495,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Oxide Multilayer Thermal Radiation Energy Reflection EBCs: Effect ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) with thermal radiation energy reflection have been developed recently. The EBCs utilize interaction between...

322

EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay 16: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 19, 2012 EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot

323

Trends of Variables and Energy Fluxes over the Atlantic Ocean from 1948 to 19721  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression coefficients have been computed from monthly. seasonal and annual means of eleven meteorological variables and eight energy fluxes by 10 areas over the North and South Atlantic Oceans from January IMS through December 1972. Many ...

Andrew F. Bunker

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Current-Induced Modulation of the Ocean Wave Spectrum and the Role of Nonlinear Energy Transfer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Numerical simulations were performed to investigate current-induced modulation of the spectral and statistical properties of ocean waves advected by idealized and realistic current fields. In particular, the role of nonlinear energy transfer ...

Hitoshi Tamura; Takuji Waseda; Yasumasa Miyazawa; Kosei Komatsu

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

A Coupled Dynamical OceanEnergy Balance Atmosphere Model for Paleoclimate Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Bern3D coupled three-dimensional dynamical oceanenergy balance atmosphere model is introduced and the atmospheric component is discussed in detail. The model is of reduced complexity, developed to perform extensive sensitivity studies and ...

Stefan P. Ritz; Thomas F. Stocker; Fortunat Joos

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Estimating Meridional Energy Transports by the Atmospheric and Oceanic General Circulations Using Boundary Fluxes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual-mean meridional energy transport in the atmosphereocean system (total transport) is estimated using 4-yr mean net radiative fluxes at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) calculated from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology ...

Y-C. Zhang; W. B. Rossow

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Design, construction and testing of an ocean renewable energy storage scaled prototype  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The concept for a new form of pumped storage hydro is being developed within the Precision Engineering Research Group at MIT: the Ocean Renewable Energy Storage (ORES) project. Large, hollow concrete spheres are created, ...

Meredith, James D. C. (James Douglas Charles)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Net Energy Dissipation Rates in the Tropical Ocean and ENSO Dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How unstable is the tropical oceanatmosphere system? Are two successive El Nio events independent, or are they part of a continual (perhaps weakly damped) cycle sustained by random atmospheric disturbances? How important is energy dissipation ...

Alexey V. Fedorov

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Surface Circulation and Kinetic Energy Distributions in the Southern Hemisphere Oceans from FGGE Drifting Buoys  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Trajectories of approximately 300 satellite-tracked drifting buoys deployed throughout the Southern Hemisphere oceans during the Fiat GARP Global Experiment (FGGE) have been analyzed to infer the mean surface circulation and kinetic energy ...

Steven L. Patterson

1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Annual Cycle of the Energy Budget. Part I: Global Mean and LandOcean Exchanges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mean and annual cycle of energy flowing into the climate system and its storage, release, and transport in the atmosphere, ocean, and land surface are estimated with recent observations. An emphasis is placed on establishing internally ...

John T. Fasullo; Kevin E. Trenberth

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay 1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine Summary This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions. Public Comment Opportunities None available at this time. Documents Available for Download March 19, 2012 EA-1916: Finding of No Significant Impact Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot

332

Major Characteristics of Southern Ocean Cloud Regimes and Their Effects on the Energy Budget  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clouds over the Southern Ocean are often poorly represented by climate models, but they make a significant contribution to the top-of-atmosphere (TOA) radiation balance, particularly in the shortwave portion of the energy spectrum. This study ...

John M. Haynes; Christian Jakob; William B. Rossow; George Tselioudis; Josephine Brown

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Energy Trapping near the Equator in a Numerical Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trapped equatorial standing modes described theoretically by Gent (1979) are reproduced in a single vertical-mode numerical ocean model. integrations are carried out in domains whose longitudinal extents are characteristic of the widths of ...

Peter R. Gent; Albert J. Semtner Jr.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Mixed Boundary Conditions versus Coupling with an EnergyMoisture Balance Model for a Zonally Averaged Ocean Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Wright and Stocker oceanic thermohaline circulation model is coupled to a recently developed zonally averaged energy moisture balance model for the atmosphere. The results obtained with this coupled model are compared with those from an ocean-...

H. Bjornsson; L. A. Mysak; G. A. Schmidt

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Efficient Proactive Thermal Management in Memory Subsystem  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficient Proactive Thermal Management in Memory Subsystem Raid Ayoub rayoub management of memory subsystem is challenging due to performance and thermal constraints. Big energy gains appreciable energy savings in memory sub-system and mini- mize thermal problems. We adopt the consolidation

Simunic, Tajana

336

February 20, 1991 Thermalization of high Energy Particles in a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

revised February 20, 1991 Thermalization of high Energy Particles in a Cold Gas K.T. Waldeer and H to be answered are as to the thermalization time, the temporal evolution of the energy spectra of the gas T . We ask for the thermalization time and the temporal evolution of the energy spectra. We

Waldeer, Thomas

337

MHK Technologies/THOR Ocean Current Turbine | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

THOR Ocean Current Turbine THOR Ocean Current Turbine < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage THOR Ocean Current Turbine.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization THOR Turner Hunt Ocean Renewable LLC Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description The THOR ocean current turbine ROCT is a tethered fully submersible hydrokinetic device with a single horizontal axis rotor that operates at constant speed by varying the depth of operation using a patented power feedback control technology Rotor diameters can reach 60 meters for a 2 0MW class turbine and operations can be conducted as deep as 250 meters Arrays of THOR s ROCTs can be located in outer continental shelf areas 15 to 100 miles offshore in well established ocean currents such as the Gulf Stream or the Kuroshio and deliver electrical power to onshore load centers via submarine transmission line

338

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop, LawrenceF.P. "Thermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer- Second

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No. 10194. Edwards,modeling of thermal energy storage in aquifers, ProceedingsAquifer Thermal Energy Storage Programs (in preparation).

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Enabling Energy-Efficient Approaches to Thermal Comfort Using Room Air Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air MotionEnergy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air Motion No-fan 2Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air Motion

Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Kaam, Soazig; Zhai, Yongchao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aspects of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrencethe Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment."LBL~l0208 SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

THEORETICAL STUDIES IN LONG-TERM THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mathematical Modeling of Thermal Energy Storage in Aquifers.Proceedings of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage Workshop,within the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage program managed

Tsang, C.F.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Review on Sustainable thermal Energy Storage Technologies,D. , 2009, Review on Thermal Energy Storage with PhaseW. , 2002, Survey of Thermal Energy Storage for Parabolic

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Mechanical and Thermal Energy Transport in Biological and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of studies will be presented, including energy transport in carbon ... performance for applications in thermal management and energy harvesting.

345

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing maximizing thermal efficiency and optimizing energy management through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing maximizing thermal efficiency and optimizing energy management through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

How Much Predictive Skill Is Contained in the Thermal Structure of an Oceanic GCM?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The time history of upper-ocean temperatures in the tropical Pacific has been used as a predictor in a statistical prediction scheme to forecast SST anomalies in this region. The temperature variations were taken from the output of an oceanic ...

Mojib Latif; Nicholas E. Graham

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model-predicted distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy in the world's oceans Naoki 9 July 2008; published 30 September 2008. [1] The distribution of wind-induced internal wave energy-scaled kinetic energy are all consistent with the available observations in the regions of significant wind

Miami, University of

349

Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

County Landfill Biomass Facility County Landfill Biomass Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ocean County Landfill Biomass Facility Facility Ocean County Landfill Sector Biomass Facility Type Landfill Gas Location Ocean County, New Jersey Coordinates 39.9652553°, -74.3118212° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":39.9652553,"lon":-74.3118212,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

350

Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Print PDF Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource Dictionary.png Type F: Oceanic-ridge, Basaltic Resource: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Brophy Occurrence Models This classification scheme was developed by Brophy, as reported in Updating the Classification of Geothermal Resources.[1] Type A: Magma-heated, Dry Steam Resource Type B: Andesitic Volcanic Resource Type C: Caldera Resource Type D: Sedimentary-hosted, Volcanic-related Resource Type E: Extensional Tectonic, Fault-Controlled Resource

351

MHK Projects/Ocean Trials Ver 2 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Trials Ver 2 Ocean Trials Ver 2 < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[]}

352

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Thermal Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Thermal Conversion Major Functions: · Solar #12;Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Thermal Conversion Solar energy a surface is heated by a certain flux of incident solar energy is determined by the balance of incident

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

353

Power Technologies Energy Data Book: Fourth Edition, Chapter...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Small Hydro, Tidal Energy, Wave Energy, Ocean Thermal None Purchased by utility at spot- market energy rate Yes Investor- owned utilities only Delaware 25 kW Commercial,...

354

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Name National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Address 1401 Constitution Avenue, NW Room 5128 Washington, DC 20230 Zip 20230 Phone number (301) 713-4000. Website http://www.noaa.gov/index.html Coordinates 38.892111°, -77.031981° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":38.892111,"lon":-77.031981,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

355

Boosting CSP Production with Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Combining concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage shows promise for increasing grid flexibility by providing firm system capacity with a high ramp rate and acceptable part-load operation. When backed by energy storage capability, CSP can supplement photovoltaics by adding generation from solar resources during periods of low solar insolation. The falling cost of solar photovoltaic (PV) - generated electricity has led to a rapid increase in the deployment of PV and projections that PV could play a significant role in the future U.S. electric sector. The solar resource itself is virtually unlimited; however, the actual contribution of PV electricity is limited by several factors related to the current grid. The first is the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal electricity demand patterns. The second is the limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate this highly variable generation resource. At high penetration of solar generation, increased grid flexibility will be needed to fully utilize the variable and uncertain output from PV generation and to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. Energy storage is one way to increase grid flexibility, and many storage options are available or under development. In this article, however, we consider a technology already beginning to be used at scale - thermal energy storage (TES) deployed with concentrating solar power (CSP). PV and CSP are both deployable in areas of high direct normal irradiance such as the U.S. Southwest. The role of these two technologies is dependent on their costs and relative value, including how their value to the grid changes as a function of what percentage of total generation they contribute to the grid, and how they may actually work together to increase overall usefulness of the solar resource. Both PV and CSP use solar energy to generate electricity. A key difference is the ability of CSP to utilize high-efficiency TES, which turns CSP into a partially dispatchable resource. The addition of TES produces additional value by shifting the delivery of solar energy to periods of peak demand, providing firm capacity and ancillary services, and reducing integration challenges. Given the dispatchability of CSP enabled by TES, it is possible that PV and CSP are at least partially complementary. The dispatchability of CSP with TES can enable higher overall penetration of the grid by solar energy by providing solar-generated electricity during periods of cloudy weather or at night, when PV-generated power is unavailable. Such systems also have the potential to improve grid flexibility, thereby enabling greater penetration of PV energy (and other variable generation sources such as wind) than if PV were deployed without CSP.

Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

REGIONAL AND COMMUNITY IMPACTS OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY APPROPRIATE ENERGY TECHNOLOGY PILOT PROGRAM IN THE WESTERN PACIFIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

small grants for alternative energy projects through theirraging small scale alternative energy develop ment. Loco.lalternative ener- gy interest is in ocean thermal energy

Case, Charles W.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

The Basic Effects of AtmosphereOcean Thermal Coupling on Midlatitude Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Starting from the assumption that the atmosphere is the primary source of variability internal to the midlatitude atmosphereocean system on intraseasonal to interannual timescales, the authors construct a simple stochastically forced, one-...

Joseph J. Barsugli; David S. Battisti

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

The Tropical Oceanic Energy Budget from the TRMM Perspective. Part I: Algorithm and Uncertainties  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The earth's weather and climate is driven by the meridional transport of energy required to establish a global balance between incoming energy from the sun and outgoing thermal energy emitted by the atmosphere and surface. Clouds and ...

Tristan S. L'Ecuyer; Graeme L. Stephens

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

MHK Technologies/Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Converter OWEC Converter OWEC < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Ocean Wave Energy Converter OWEC.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Ocean Wave Energy Company Technology Resource Click here Wave Technology Type Click here Point Absorber - Submerged Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 5 6 System Integration and Technology Laboratory Demonstration Technology Description Neutrally suspended and positively buoyant modules are quick connected into open frame networks Submerged portions are stabilized by variable ballast buoyancy chambers and optional damper sheets situated at a relatively calm depth Frame members carry shaft components of linear rotary converters associated with large point absorber buoys Both directions of reciprocal wave motion i e vertical and horizontal motion directly drive components of counter rotating electrical generators Compared to standard generators wherein one is associated with upstroke and another of smaller proportion with downstroke this configuration increases relative speed with fewer parts Electromechanical loads are real time adjustable with respect to wave sensor web resulting in optimal energy conversion from near fully submerged wave following buoys Electrical conductors are series connected and further quick connected with those of other modules via upper frame members Through implementation of rep

360

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar power plants, thermal power plants(fuel, nuclear),reject heat from thermal power plants can only be re-protection is the thermal electric power plant. Electric

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Thermal energy from a biogas engine/generator system  

SciTech Connect

A biogas fueled engine/generator equipped with heat recovery apparatus and thermal storage is described. The thermal energy is used to fuel a liquid fuel plant. Heat recovery is quantified and the static and dynamic performance of the thermal storage is described. At 1260 rpm the engine/generator produces 21 kW of electric power and 2500 kJ/min of thermal energy.

Stahl, T.; Fischer, J.R.; Harris, F.D.

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

State of Solar Thermal Energy Storage Development 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Adding solar thermal energy storage (TES) to concentrating solar thermal power (CSP) plants expands both the amount and timing of power delivered to the grid. Thermal storage associated with CSP plants is typically much more efficient and cost-effective than electrical or mechanical forms of storage. In many cases, the addition of thermal energy storage can lower the levelized electricity production cost and increase the solar plant capacity factor, enabling the availability of solar electricity during p...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

363

An assessment of research and development leadership in ocean energy technologies  

SciTech Connect

Japan is clearly the leader in ocean energy technologies. The United Kingdom also has had many ocean energy research projects, but unlike Japan, most of the British projects have not progressed from the feasibility study stage to the demonstration stage. Federally funded ocean energy research in the US was stopped because it was perceived the technologies could not compete with conventional sources of fuel. Despite the probable small market for ocean energy technologies, the short sighted viewpoint of the US government regarding funding of these technologies may be harmful to US economic competitiveness. The technologies may have important uses in other applications, such as offshore construction and oil and gas drilling. Discontinuing the research and development of these technologies may cause the US to lose knowledge and miss market opportunities. If the US wishes to maintain its knowledge base and a market presence for ocean energy technologies, it may wish to consider entering into a cooperative agreement with Japan and/or the United Kingdom. Cooperative agreements are beneficial not only for technology transfer but also for cost-sharing.

Bruch, V.L.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Standard thermal energy group structure for generation of thermal group constants from ENDF/B data  

SciTech Connect

The final specifications of a standard energy group structure for the generation of thermal group constants from ENDF/B data are presented. The report represents the work of a committee appointed by the Codes and Formats Subcommittee of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group and is a parallel effort to work being done in the epithermal energy range. The thermal energy group structure specified in this report was accepted November 10, 1972, by the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group as the standard for generation of thermal group constants from ENDF/B data. The standard thermal group structure specified in this report is consistent with past design experience and thermal spectrum codes, and incorporates specific features for effects known to be important in nuclear design applications in the thermal energy range. Specific recommendations are made as to methods to be used for generation of thermal group constants. (auth)

Finch, D.R.

1974-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Definition: Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Gradient Holes Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Gradient Holes "A hole logged by a temperature probe to determine the thermal gradient. Usually involves a hole...

366

Solar Thermal Electric | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarThermalElectric&o...

367

Solar Thermal Process Heat | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Jump to: navigation, search TODO: Add description List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSolarThermalPr...

368

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name Nextreme Thermal Solutions Inc Place North Carolina Zip 27709-3981 Product String representation "Manufactures ad...

369

MHK Projects/Development of Ocean Treader | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ocean Treader Ocean Treader < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":5,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"500px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"File:Aquamarine-marker.png","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":57.1497,"lon":-2.09428,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"http:\/\/prod-http-80-800498448.us-east-1.elb.amazonaws.com\/w\/images\/7\/74\/Aquamarine-marker.png","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

370

Commercialization of aquifer thermal energy storage technology  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) conducted this study for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. The purpose of the study was to develop and screen a list of potential entry market applications for aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES). Several initial screening criteria were used to identify promising ATES applications. These include the existence of an energy availability/usage mismatch, the existence of many similar applications or commercial sites, the ability to utilize proven technology, the type of location, market characteristics, the size of and access to capital investment, and the number of decision makers involved. The in-depth analysis identified several additional screening criteria to consider in the selection of an entry market application. This analysis revealed that the best initial applications for ATES are those where reliability is acceptable, and relatively high temperatures are allowable. Although chill storage was the primary focus of this study, applications that are good candidates for heat ATES were also of special interest. 11 refs., 3 tabs.

Hattrup, M.P.; Weijo, R.O.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Peak Load Management of Thermal Loads Using Advanced Thermal Energy Storage Technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Almost 50% of electric energy delivered to residences is converted into some sort of thermal energyhot water, air conditioning, and refrigeration. Storing energy in thermal form is cheaper especially when the medium used to store the energy is an end-use medium for example, hot water. This technical update evaluates two different technologies for storing energyin cold water and in hot water.GreenPeak technology, a storage condensing unit (SCU) from IE Technologies, uses an ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Program. Volume 2. Preoperational ocean test platform  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The supporting data used to prepare an environmental assessment for the OTEC-1 test facility are presented. The candidate sites (Keahole Point, Hawaii; Punta Tuna, Puerto Rico; offshore New Orleans; and offshore Tampa) are characterized and an annotated bibliography is included for each site. Estimates of the water discharge plume and water suction plume geometry are given. A summary of the calculations used to evoluate the water intake and discharge impact field is presented. An annotated list of applicable health and safety regulations are presented, and a general annotated bibliography of OTEC literature is included. (WHK)

Not Available

1979-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Application Level Optimizations for Energy Efficiency and Thermal Stability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

whether application-level software optimization can improve energy efficiency and thermal behavior. We use-life multicore system to explore two issues: (i) software tun- ing to improve scalability and energyApplication Level Optimizations for Energy Efficiency and Thermal Stability Md. Ashfaquzzaman Khan

Coskun, Ayse

374

Advanced Thermal Energy Storage: Novel Tuning of Critical Fluctuations for Advanced Thermal Energy Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HEATS Project: NAVITASMAX is developing a novel thermal energy storage solution. This innovative technology is based on simple and complex supercritical fluids substances where distinct liquid and gas phases do not exist, and tuning the properties of these fluid systems to increase their ability to store more heat. In solar thermal storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAXs system during the day and released at nightwhen the sun is not shiningto drive a turbine and produce electricity. In nuclear storage systems, heat can be stored in NAVITASMAXs system at night and released to produce electricity during daytime peak-demand hours.

None

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

SOLAR THERMAL CONCENTRATOR APPARATUS, SYSTEM, AND METHOD - Energy ...  

SOLAR THERMAL CONCENTRATOR APPARATUS ... The invention was made with the State of California's support under the California Energy Commission contract No. 5005 ...

376

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Modelling Concentrating Solar Power with Thermal Energy Storage for Integration Studies Marissa Hummon 3 rd International Solar Power Integration Workshop October 20-22, 2013...

377

Microwave impregnation of porous materials with thermal energy ...  

The treated construction materials are better able to absorb thermal energy and exhibit increased heat storage capacity. Skip to Content. Skip to Content.

378

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II: Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table A2-12, p. B2-1....

379

Buildings Energy Data Book: 5.5 Thermal Distribution Systems  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

Energy Consumption Characteristics of Commercial Building HVAC Systems, Volume II: Thermal Distribution, Auxiliary Equipment, and Ventilation, Oct. 1999, Table 4-1, p. 4-4; and...

380

Macroencapsulation of Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The use of a latent heat storage system using phase change materials (PCMs) is an effective way of storing thermal energy. Latent heat storage enables (more)

Pendyala, Swetha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Developing Thermal Processes with Energy Efficiency in Mind  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Opportunities to conserve energy not only reduce ecological impact, but can result in significant cost saving, as thermal processing is a critical cost driver in...

382

Carbon Foam Infused with Pentaglycerine for Thermal Energy Storage Applications.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A thermal energy storage device that uses pentaglycerine as a phase change material was developed. This solid-state phase change material was embedded in a carbon (more)

Johnson, Douglas James

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Use of Hybrid Nanoparticles to Enhance Thermal Energy Storage ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Use of Hybrid Nanoparticles to Enhance Thermal Energy Storage Capacity for Concentrated Solar Power. Author(s), Dileep Singh, Sreeram...

384

title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

proceedings title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike journal ECEEE Summer Study textendash June...

385

Rapid Solar-Thermal Conversion of Biomass to Syngas - Energy ...  

Production of synthesis gas or hydrogen by gasification or pyrolysis of biological feedstocks using solar-thermal energy. The invention provides processes that ...

386

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor Fluctuating Low-GradeThermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-Thermally-Chargeable Supercapacitor for Fluctuating Low-

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

MEMS based pyroelectric thermal energy harvester  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pyroelectric thermal energy harvesting apparatus for generating an electric current includes a cantilevered layered pyroelectric capacitor extending between a first surface and a second surface, where the first surface includes a temperature difference from the second surface. The layered pyroelectric capacitor includes a conductive, bimetal top electrode layer, an intermediate pyroelectric dielectric layer and a conductive bottom electrode layer. In addition, a pair of proof masses is affixed at a distal end of the layered pyroelectric capacitor to face the first surface and the second surface, wherein the proof masses oscillate between the first surface and the second surface such that a pyroelectric current is generated in the pyroelectric capacitor due to temperature cycling when the proof masses alternately contact the first surface and the second surface.

Hunter, Scott R; Datskos, Panagiotis G

2013-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

388

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

TECHNICAL REPORT TECHNICAL REPORT Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource EPRI Project Manager P. Jacobson 3420 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304-1338 USA PO Box 10412 Palo Alto, CA 94303-0813 USA 800.313.3774 650.855.2121 askepri@epri.com 1024637 www.epri.com Final Report, December 2011 Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource DISCLAIMER OF WARRANTIES AND LIMITATION OF LIABILITIES THIS DOCUMENT WAS PREPARED BY THE ORGANIZATION(S) NAMED BELOW AS AN ACCOUNT OF WORK SPONSORED OR COSPONSORED BY THE ELECTRIC POWER RESEARCH INSTITUTE, INC. (EPRI).

389

Upper Ocean Thermal Response to Strong Autumnal Forcing of the Northeast Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

CASID free-drifting thermistor chain buoys that utilized Service ARGOS positioning and data collection were deployed in the northeast Pacific Ocean in the vicinity of OWS-P in late autumn in both 1980 and 1981 as part of the Storm Transfer and ...

W. G. Large; J. C. McWilliams; P. P. Niiler

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

thermal storage can be interfaced with a variety of high temperature heat generating systems, e.g. nuclear

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Transient Climate Response in a Two-Layer Energy-Balance Model. Part II: Representation of the Efficacy of Deep-Ocean Heat Uptake and Validation for CMIP5 AOGCMs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this second part of a series of two articles analyzing the global thermal properties of atmosphereocean coupled general circulation models (AOGCMs) within the framework of a two-layer energy-balance model (EBM), the role of the efficacy of ...

O. Geoffroy; D. Saint-Martin; G. Bellon; A. Voldoire; D. J. L. Olivi; S. Tytca

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

SEASONAL THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS-MATHEMATICAL MODELING STUDIES IN 1979  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage." Lawrence BerkeleyP, Andersen, "'rhermal Energy Storage in a Confined Aquifer~University Thermal Energy Storage Experiment." Lawrence

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Thermal Ion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Ion Dispersion Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Geochemical Data Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion: Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples

394

Potential energy savings from aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pacific Northwest Laboratory researchers developed an aggregate-level model to estimate the short- and long-term potential energy savings from using aquifer thermal storage (ATES) in the United States. The objectives of this effort were to (1) develop a basis from which to recommend whether heat or chill ATES should receive future research focus and (2) determine which market sector (residential, commercial, or industrial) offers the largest potential energy savings from ATES. Information was collected on the proportion of US land area suitable for ATES applications. The economic feasibility of ATES applications was then evaluated. The potential energy savings from ATES applications was calculated. Characteristic energy use in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors was examined, as was the relationship between waste heat production and consumption by industrial end-users. These analyses provided the basis for two main conclusions: heat ATES applications offer higher potential for energy savings than do chill ATES applications; and the industrial sector can achieve the highest potential energy savings for the large consumption markets. Based on these findings, it is recommended that future ATES research and development efforts be directed toward heat ATES applications in the industrial sector. 11 refs., 6 figs., 9 tabs.

Anderson, M.R.; Weijo, R.O.

1988-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Economics of compressed air energy storage employing thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The approach taken in this study is to adopt system design and capital cost estimates from three independent CAES studies (eight total designs) and, by supplying a common set of fuel/energy costs and economic assumptions in conjunction with a common methodology, to arrive at a series of levelized energy costs over the system's lifetime. In addition, some analyses are provided to gauge the sensitivity of these levelized energy costs to fuel and compression energy costs and to system capacity factors. The systems chosen for comparison are of four generic types: conventional CAES, hybrid CAES, adiabatic CAES, and an advanced-design gas turbine (GT). In conventional CAES systems the heat of compression generated during the storage operation is rejected to the environment, and later, during the energy-generation phase, turbine fuel must be burned to reheat the compressed air. In the hybrid systems some of the heat of compression is stored and reapplied later during the generation phase, thereby reducing turbine fuel requirements. The adiabatic systems store adequate thermal energy to eliminate the need for turbine fuel entirely. The gas turbine is included within the report for comparison purposes; it is an advanced-design turbine, one that is expected to be available by 1985.

Schulte, S.C.; Reilly, R.W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Economics of compressed air energy storage employing thermal energy storage  

SciTech Connect

The approach taken in this study is to adopt system design and capital cost estimates from three independent CAES studies (eight total designs) and, by supplying a common set of fuel/energy costs and economic assumptions in conjunction with a common methodology, to arrive at a series of levelized energy costs over the system's lifetime. In addition, some analyses are provided to gauge the sensitivity of these levelized energy costs to fuel and compression energy costs and to system capacity factors. The systems chosen for comparison are of four generic types: conventional CAES, hybrid CAES, adiabatic CAES, and an advanced-design gas turbine (GT). In conventional CAES systems the heat of compression generated during the storage operation is rejected to the environment, and later, during the energy-generation phase, turbine fuel must be burned to reheat the compressed air. In the hybrid systems some of the heat of compression is stored and reapplied later during the generation phase, thereby reducing turbine fuel requirements. The adiabatic systems store adequate thermal energy to eliminate the need for turbine fuel entirely. The gas turbine is included within the report for comparison purposes; it is an advanced-design turbine, one that is expected to be available by 1985.

Schulte, S.C.; Reilly, R.W.

1979-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

The Vertical Partition of Oceanic Horizontal Kinetic Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To produce an interpretation of the surface kinetic energy as measured by altimeters, a survey is made of the vertical structure of kinetic energy profiles in a large number of globally distributed long current meter records. Although the data ...

Carl Wunsch

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Mesoscale Eddy Energy Locality in an Idealized Ocean Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates the energy budget of mesoscale eddies in wind-driven two-layer quasigeostrophic simulations. Intuitively, eddy energy can be generated, dissipated, and fluxed from place to place; regions where the budget balances ...

Ian Grooms; Louis-Philippe Nadeau; K. Shafer Smith

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Flexible ocean upwelling pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Meridional Energy Transport in the Coupled AtmosphereOcean System: Compensation and Partitioning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The variability and compensation of the meridional energy transport in the atmosphere and ocean are examined with the state-of-the-art GFDL Climate Model, version 2.1 (CM2.1), and the GFDL Intermediate Complexity Coupled Model (ICCM). On decadal ...

Riccardo Farneti; Geoffrey K. Vallis

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Simulation of Present-Day and Twenty-First-Century Energy Budgets of the Southern Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy budget of the modern-day Southern Hemisphere is poorly simulated in both state-of-the-art reanalyses and coupled global climate models. The ocean-dominated Southern Hemisphere has low surface reflectivity and therefore its albedo is ...

Kevin E. Trenberth; John T. Fasullo

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Assessment of Energy Production Potential from Ocean Currents along the United States Coastline  

SciTech Connect

Increasing energy consumption and depleting reserves of fossil fuels have resulted in growing interest in alternative renewable energy from the ocean. Ocean currents are an alternative source of clean energy due to their inherent reliability, persistence and sustainability. General ocean circulations exist in the form of large rotating ocean gyres, and feature extremely rapid current flow in the western boundaries due to the Coriolis Effect. The Gulf Stream system is formed by the western boundary current of the North Atlantic Ocean that flows along the east coastline of the United States, and therefore is of particular interest as a potential energy resource for the United States. This project created a national database of ocean current energy resources to help advance awareness and market penetration in ocean current energy resource assessment. The database, consisting of joint velocity magnitude and direction probability histograms, was created from data created by seven years of numerical model simulations. The accuracy of the database was evaluated by ORNL?s independent validation effort documented in a separate report. Estimates of the total theoretical power resource contained in the ocean currents were calculated utilizing two separate approaches. Firstly, the theoretical energy balance in the Gulf Stream system was examined using the two-dimensional ocean circulation equations based on the assumptions of the Stommel model for subtropical gyres with the quasi-geostrophic balance between pressure gradient, Coriolis force, wind stress and friction driving the circulation. Parameters including water depth, natural dissipation rate and wind stress are calibrated in the model so that the model can reproduce reasonable flow properties including volume flux and energy flux. To represent flow dissipation due to turbines additional turbine drag coefficient is formulated and included in the model. Secondly, to determine the reasonableness of the total power estimates from the Stommel model and to help determine the size and capacity of arrays necessary to extract the maximum theoretical power, further estimates of the available power based on the distribution of the kinetic power density in the undisturbed flow was completed. This used estimates of the device spacing and scaling to sum up the total power that the devices would produce. The analysis has shown that considering extraction over a region comprised of the Florida Current portion of the Gulf Stream system, the average power dissipated ranges between 4-6 GW with a mean around 5.1 GW. This corresponds to an average of approximately 45 TWh/yr. However, if the extraction area comprises the entire portion of the Gulf Stream within 200 miles of the US coastline from Florida to North Carolina, the average power dissipated becomes 18.6 GW or 163 TWh/yr. A web based GIS interface, http://www.oceancurrentpower.gatech.edu/, was developed for dissemination of the data. The website includes GIS layers of monthly and yearly mean ocean current velocity and power density for ocean currents along the entire coastline of the United States, as well as joint and marginal probability histograms for current velocities at a horizontal resolution of 4-7 km with 10-25 bins over depth. Various tools are provided for viewing, identifying, filtering and downloading the data.

Haas, Kevin

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

403

Method and apparatus for thermal energy storage. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for storing energy by converting thermal energy to potential chemically bound energy in which a first metal hydride is heated to dissociation temperature, liberating hydrogen gas which is compressed and reacted with a second metal to form a second metal hydride while releasing thermal energy. Cooling the first metal while warming the second metal hydride to dissociation temperature will reverse the flow of hydrogen gas back to the first metal, releasing additional thermal energy. The method and apparatus are particularly useful for the storage and conversion of thermal energy from solar heat sources and for the utilization of this energy for space heating purposes, such as for homes or offices.

Gruen, D.M.

1975-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

404

The Impact of Rapid Wind Variability upon AirSea Thermal Coupling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic effect of extratropical atmosphereocean thermal coupling is to enhance the variance of both anomalous sea surface temperatures (SSTs) and air temperatures (AIRT) due to a decreased energy flux between the atmosphere and ocean, called ...

Philip Sura; Matthew Newman

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Feasibility studies of aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Determining the feasibility of using aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) for a particular heating or cooling application is an interdisciplinary effort, requiring (at a minimum) expertise in engineering and hydrology. The feasibility study should proceed in two distinct stages. The first stage, which is limited in scope and detail, is intended to show if an ATES system is technically and economically suited to the application. Focus of this preliminary investigation is on revealing the existence of factors that might weigh heavily against the use of ATES methods, and, in the absence of such factors, on choosing a suitable scale for the ATES plant and well field. The results of the preliminary investigation are used to determine if more detailed investigation--including field studies--are justified, and to facilitate comparing the advantages of ATES to those of other means of providing heating or cooling. The second stage of the feasibility study focuses on detailed aquifer characterization, refinement of engineering design and cost estimates, and economic and environmental risk analysis. The results of this investigation, if favorable, will be used to justify the expense of constructing the ATES system.

Hall, S H

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Composite materials for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention discloses composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These phase change materials do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions, such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

Benson, David K. (Golden, CO); Burrows, Richard W. (Conifer, CO); Shinton, Yvonne D. (Northglenn, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Composite materials for thermal energy storage  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

1985-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

408

Thermal Waters of Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Waters of Nevada Thermal Waters of Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Thermal Waters of Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Authors Larry J. Garside and John H. Schilling Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1979 Report Number Bulletin 91 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Thermal Waters of Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside,John H. Schilling (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1979. Thermal Waters of Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Bulletin 91. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Thermal_Waters_of_Nevada&oldid=690515" Categories: References Geothermal References

409

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Resource This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed...

410

Thermal Management Using Carbon Nanotubes - Energy Innovation ...  

Patent 7,763,353: Fabrication of high thermal conductivity arrays of carbon nanotubes and their composites Methods and apparatus are described for ...

411

Definition: Thermal Overload Monitoring | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Overload Monitoring Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Overload Monitoring Technology including sensors, information processors and communications that can detect...

412

Definition: Thermal Rating | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rating Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Rating The maximum amount of electrical current that a transmission line or electrical facility can conduct over a...

413

PCM energy storage during defective thermal cycling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Incomplete thermal cycling affects storage capacities of phase change materials (PCMs). Existing PCM measuring methods are presented with their drawbacks. A new device named the (more)

Koekenbier, S.F.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heat. flow, dispersion, land subsidence or uplift, the ofpossibility of land subsidence or upliftu thermal pollution,flow, land uplift or subsidence 1 water chemistry and

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solar Thermal Technologies - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Thermal Technology Marketing Summaries Here you'll find marketing summaries of concentrating solar power and solar heating technologies available for licensing ...

416

Solar Thermal Success Stories - Energy Innovation Portal  

Solar Thermal Success Stories These success stories highlight some of the effective licensing and partnership activity between laboratories and industry in the area ...

417

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Thermal Conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainable Energy Science and Engineering Center Solar Thermal Conversion Major Functions: · Solar Center Collection The temperature to which a surface is heated by a certain flux of incident solar energy - 1914 Between 1880 and 1910, there were 48 articles on solar energy as a world energy source

Krothapalli, Anjaneyulu

418

Impact of improved building thermal efficiency on residential energy demand  

SciTech Connect

The impact of improved building shell thermal efficiency on residential energy demand is explored in a theoretical framework. The important economic literature on estimating the price elasticity of residential energy demand is reviewed. The specification of the residential energy demand model is presented. The data used are described. The empirical estimation of the residential energy demand model is described. (MHR)

Adams, R.C.; Rockwood, A.D.

1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption Energy Conversion and Thermal Efficiency Sales Tax Exemption < Back Eligibility Commercial Industrial Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Bioenergy Biofuels Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Wind Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate None Program Info State Ohio Program Type Sales Tax Incentive Rebate Amount 100% exemption Provider Ohio Department of Taxation Ohio may provide a sales and use tax exemption for certain tangible personal property used in energy conversion, solid waste energy conversion, or thermal efficiency improvement facilities designed, constructed, or installed after December 31, 1974. Qualifying energy conversion facilities are those that are used for the

420

List of Solar Thermal Electric Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Electric Incentives Electric Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 548 Solar Thermal Electric Incentives. CSV (rows 1-500) CSV (rows 501-548) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Net Metering (Arizona) Net Metering Arizona Commercial Industrial Residential Nonprofit Schools Local Government State Government Fed. Government Agricultural Institutional Solar Thermal Electric Photovoltaics Wind energy Biomass No Advanced Energy Fund (Ohio) Public Benefits Fund Ohio Commercial Industrial Institutional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, Solar Thermal Power Plants, The European PhysicalThermal Energy Storage for Parabolic Trough Power Plants,fuel based power plants, and most nuclear and solar thermal

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant MHK Technologies/The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant < MHK Technologies Jump to: navigation, search << Return to the MHK database homepage The Ocean Hydro Electricity Generator Plant.jpg Technology Profile Primary Organization Free Flow 69 Technology Resource Click here Current Technology Type Click here Axial Flow Turbine Technology Readiness Level Click here TRL 1 3 Discovery Concept Def Early Stage Dev Design Engineering Technology Description The O H E G plant is a revolutionary concept using tidal energy designed by FreeFlow 69 The plant uses tidal energy to create electricity 24 hours a day making this a unique project 24 hour power is produced by using both the kinetic energy in tidal flow and the potential energy created by tidal height changes The O H E G plant is completely independent of the wind farm however it does make an ideal foundation for offshore wind turbines combining both tidal energy and wind energy The O H E G plant is not detrimental to the surrounding environment or ecosystem and due to its offshore location it will not be visually offensive

423

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accumulation of Solar Energy in an Aquifer. Geliotekhnika.Aquifer Heating in Solar-Energy Accumulation, Gelioteknhika.presented at Int. Solar Energy Soc. (American Sec. ) "Solar

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Aquifer thermal energy storage costs with a seasonal heat source.  

SciTech Connect

The cost of energy supplied by an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system from a seasonal heat source was investigated. This investigation considers only the storage of energy from a seasonal heat source. Cost estimates are based upon the assumption that all of the energy is stored in the aquifer before delivery to the end user. Costs were estimated for point demand, residential development, and multidistrict city ATES systems using the computer code AQUASTOR which was developed specifically for the economic analysis of ATES systems. In this analysis the cost effect of varying a wide range of technical and economic parameters was examined. Those parameters exhibiting a substantial influence on ATES costs were: cost of purchased thermal energy; cost of capital; source temperature; system size; transmission distance; and aquifer efficiency. ATES-delivered energy costs are compared with the costs of hot water heated by using electric power or fuel-oils. ATES costs are shown as a function of purchased thermal energy. Both the potentially low delivered energy costs available from an ATES system and its strong cost dependence on the cost of purchased thermal energy are shown. Cost components for point demand and multi-district city ATES systems are shown. Capital and thermal energy costs dominate. Capital costs, as a percentage of total costs, increase for the multi-district city due to the addition of a large distribution system. The proportion of total cost attributable to thermal energy would change dramatically if the cost of purchased thermal energy were varied. It is concluded that ATES-delivered energy can be cost competitive with conventional energy sources under a number of economic and technical conditions. This investigation reports the cost of ATES under a wide range of assumptions concerning parameters important to ATES economics. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.; Brown, D.R.; Huber, H.D.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Simulation and prediction of thermal energy demand  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the development and exploitation of two mathematical models based on statistical methods and artificial neural networks for analyzing and predicting the thermal power of buildings connected to a substation supplied by a district heating ... Keywords: district heating systems, neural networks, prediction, regression analysis, thermal request

Florina Ungureanu; Daniela Popescu; Catalin Ungureanu

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Thermal Gradient Holes | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thermal Gradient Holes Thermal Gradient Holes Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Thermal Gradient Holes Details Activities (50) Areas (39) Regions (4) NEPA(29) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Drilling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Exploration Drilling Parent Exploration Technique: Exploration Drilling Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Field wide fluid flow characteristics if an array of wells are drilled Thermal: Mapping and projecting thermal anomalies Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 5.00500 centUSD 0.005 kUSD 5.0e-6 MUSD 5.0e-9 TUSD / foot Median Estimate (USD): 16.501,650 centUSD 0.0165 kUSD 1.65e-5 MUSD 1.65e-8 TUSD / foot High-End Estimate (USD): 50.005,000 centUSD

427

Spectral Energy Fluxes in Geostrophic Turbulence: Implications for Ocean Energetics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy pathways in geostrophic turbulence are explored using a two-layer, flat-bottom, f-plane, quasigeostrophic model forced by an imposed, horizontally homogenous, baroclinically unstable mean flow and damped by bottom Ekman friction. A ...

Robert B. Scott; Brian K. Arbic

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Thermal Energy Storage at a Federal Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Utility partnership upgrades energy system to help meet the General Services Administration's (GSA) energy-saving goals

Not Available

2000-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Tunable Thermal Link - Energy Innovation Portal  

Building Energy Efficiency Advanced Materials Tunable ... Solar energy collection; Heat pumps and internal combustion engines; Hybrid biological/inorganic systems;

430

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Title Thermal Energy Storage for Electricity Peakdemand Mitigation: A Solution in Developing and Developed World Alike Publication Type Conference Proceedings Refereed Designation Refereed LBNL Report Number LBNL-6308E Year of Publication 2013 Authors DeForest, Nicholas, Gonçalo Mendes, Michael Stadler, Wei Feng, Judy Lai, and Chris Marnay Conference Name ECEEE 2013 Summer Study 3-8 June 2013, Belambra Les Criques, France Date Published 06/2013 Conference Location Belambra Les Criques, France Keywords electricity, energy storage, Energy System Planning & Grid Integration, peakdemand mitigation, thermal Abstract In much of the developed world, air-conditioning in buildings is the dominant driver of summer peak electricity

431

Ammonia as an Alternative Energy Storage Medium for Hydrogen Fuel Cells: Scientific and Technical Review for Near-Term Stationary Power Demonstration Projects, Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) systems, where plantto conversion efficiencies and system energy balances;to conversion efficiencies and system energy balances;

Lipman, Tim; Shah, Nihar

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE. A NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF AUBURN UNIVERSITY FIELD EXPERIMENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

C.F. , 1980, "Aquifer Thermal Energy - Parameter Study" (infrom the Auburn University Thermal Energy Storage , LBL No.studies in aquifer thermal energy , Presented at the ~~~~~~~

Tsang, Chin Fu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Enabling Energy-Efficient Approaches to Thermal Comfort Using Room Air Motion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uc/item/4488d1b8 Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Airuc/item/4488d1b8 Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Airuc/item/4488d1b8 Energy Efficiency, Thermal Comfort with Air

Pasut, Wilmer; Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Kaam, Soazig; Zhai, Yongchao

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hybrid Dynamic Energy and Thermal Management in Heterogeneous Embedded Multiprocessor SoCs Shervin propose a joint thermal and energy management technique specifically designed for heterogeneous MPSo technique simultaneously reduces the thermal hot spots, temperature gradients, and energy consumption

Simunic, Tajana

435

MULTIPLE WELL VARIABLE RATE WELL TEST ANALYSIS OF DATA FROM THE AUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRAM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBL-9459. experimental Thermal energy storage in confinedAUBURN UNIVERSITY THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE PROGRM1 Christineseries of aquifer thermal energy storage field experiments.

Doughty, Christine

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Projected Impact of Climate Change on the Energy Budget of the Arctic Ocean by a Global Climate Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The annual energy budget of the Arctic Ocean is characterized by a net heat loss at the airsea interface that is balanced by oceanic heat transport into the Arctic. Two 150-yr simulations (19502099) of a global climate model are used to examine ...

James R. Miller; Gary L. Russell

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

A Two-Level Model of a Thermally Forced Ocean Basin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some simple solutions (mostly analytic) are presented for the large-scale baroclinic response to thermal forcing on a mid-latitude beta-plane. Surface heat flux is parameterized as (TATT)/tau;, with atmospheric temperature TA prescribed as a ...

M. K. Davey

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

On Haney-Type Surface Thermal Boundary Conditions for Ocean Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Haney-type surface thermal boundary conditions linearly connect net downward surface heat flux Q to airsea temperature difference (gradient-type condition) ?T1 or to climate/synoptic sea temperature difference (restoring-type condition) ?T2 by a ...

Peter C. Chu; Yuchun Chen; Shihua Lu

1998-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

A Model of Sea Level Rise Caused by Ocean Thermal Expansion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Warming of the atmosphere as a result of an increased concentration of greenhouse gases is expected to lead to a significant rise is global sea level. We present estimates of the component of this sea level rise caused by thermal expansion of the ...

John A. Church; J. Stuart Godfrey; David R. Jackett; Trevor J. McDougall

1991-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

ThermalSoul | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ThermalSoul ThermalSoul Jump to: navigation, search Name ThermalSoul Place Austin, Texas Zip 78746 Sector Solar Product Austin, Texas-based parabolic trough-based solar thermal electrical generation systems maker. Coordinates 30.267605°, -97.742984° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":30.267605,"lon":-97.742984,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

2007 Survey of Energy Resources World Energy Council 2007 Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion COUNTRY NOTES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in 1929-1930. Although the plant never produced net electrical power (i.e. output minus own use was delayed. Following testing, it was planned to relocate the plant to the Lakshadweep Islands for power. Indonesia A study was carried out in the Netherlands for a 100 kW (net power) land-based OTEC plant

442

Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, July-September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This quarterly report summarizes work on the following tasks as of September 30, 1982: (1) OTEC pilot plant conceptual design review; (2) OTEC methanol; (3) financial and legal considerations in OTEC implementation; (4) GEOTEC resource exploration at Adak, Alaska, and Lualualei, Hawaii; (5) preliminary GEOTEC plant cost estimates; and (6) supervision of testing of pneumatic wave energy conversion system.

Not Available

1982-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

443

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energies III Photovoltaics, Solar & Geo-Thermal 21st August - 2nd September 2011 2011 will provide students with a solid foundation in renewable energies (especially photovoltaics of renewable energies. Accommodation is arranged in fully-equipped cosy holiday flats with fellow students

444

Micro/Nano-Scale Phase Change Systems for Thermal Management and Solar Energy Conversion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

R. a. , 2012, Molecular Solar Thermal (MOST) Energy Storageand Nocera D. G. , 2010, Solar Energy Supply and Storage20] Kalogirou S. a. , 2004, Solar Thermal Collectors and

Coso, Dusan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future Thermal Energy Storage (TES): Past, Present and Future Speaker(s): Klaus Schiess Date: June 10, 2011 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Sila Kiliccote Thermal Energy Storage (TES) is a technology that stores "cooling" energy in a thermal storage mass. In the eighties and early nineties the utilities in California incentivised this technology to shift electrical on-peak power to off-peak. Thereafter, for various reasons TES became the most neglected permanent load shifting opportunity. It is only now with the challenges that the renewables provide that TES may have a come- back because it is basically the best and most economical AC battery available with a round trip efficiency of 100% or even better. This presentation gives some background to this development and shows the interdependence of

446

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Use and Indoor Thermal Environment of Residential Buildings in China Speaker(s): Hiroshi Yoshino Date: December 16, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The first part of this...

447

Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NREL-TP-6A2-45833 February 2010 The Value of Concentrating Solar Power and Thermal Energy Storage Ramteen Sioshansi The Ohio State University Columbus, Ohio Paul Denholm National...

448

Thermal Energy Grid Concept M. Olszewski OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

38 longer term resource base, such as nuclear or coal, to supply this thermal energy. If nuclear fuels are used to supply a significant portion of the low to moderate temperature...

449

Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Variations in eastern Indian Ocean upper-ocean thermal properties are assessed for the period 19702004, with a particular focus on asymmetric features related to opposite phases of Indian Ocean dipole events, using high-resolution ocean model ...

Caroline C. Ummenhofer; Franziska U. Schwarzkopf; Gary Meyers; Erik Behrens; Arne Biastoch; Claus W. Bning

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Quantum Energy Teleportation between Spin Particles in Thermal Equilibrium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Quantum energy teleportation is the transfer of energy between two physically separated, but quantum correlated, sites, accomplished without an external energy carrier, using a three-step LOCC (local operations and classical communication) protocol. We apply this LOCC teleportation protocol to a Heisenberg spin particle pair initially in a quantum thermal state, making temperature an explicit parameter. The thermal states of the spin pair are quantum correlated (entangled or otherwise) at all temperatures. We find that energy teleportation is possible at any temperature, even at temperatures above the threshold where the particles' entanglement vanishes. This shows for thermal spin states that entanglement is not fundamentally necessary for energy teleportation; quantum correlation other than entanglement can suffice. This is a new instance in which quantum dissonance (quantum correlation without entanglement) is seen to act as a quantum resource. We compare energy teleportation to particle B with direct loca...

Frey, Michael

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management (Fact Sheet), Thermal Test Facility (TTF), NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Maximizing Thermal Efficiency and Optimizing Energy Management Scientists at this living laboratory develop optimal solutions for managing energy flows within buildings and transportation systems. The built environment is stressing the utility grid to a greater degree than ever before. Growing demand for electric vehicles, space conditioning, and plug loads presents a critical opportunity for more effective energy management and development of efficiency technologies. Researchers at the Thermal Test Facility (TTF) on the campus of the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in Golden, Colorado, are addressing this opportunity. Through analysis of efficient heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) strategies, automated home energy management (AHEM), and energy storage systems,

452

An Act to Implement the Recommendations of the Governor's Ocean Energy Task  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

An Act to Implement the Recommendations of the Governor's An Act to Implement the Recommendations of the Governor&#039;s Ocean Energy Task Force (Maine) An Act to Implement the Recommendations of the Governor's Ocean Energy Task Force (Maine) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Savings Category Water Buying & Making Electricity Program Info State Maine Program Type Siting and Permitting Provider Department of Environmental Protection This law was enacted to overcome economic, technical and regulatory

453

Assimilation of Subsurface Thermal Data into a Simple Ocean Model for the Initialization of an Intermediate Tropical Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adjoint variational assimilation technique is used to assimilate observations of both the oceanic state and wind stress data into an intermediate coupled ENSO prediction model. This method of initialization is contrasted with the more usual ...

Richard Kleeman; Andrew M. Moore; Neville R. Smith

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

List of Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Process Heat Incentives Process Heat Incentives Jump to: navigation, search The following contains the list of 204 Solar Thermal Process Heat Incentives. CSV (rows 1 - 204) Incentive Incentive Type Place Applicable Sector Eligible Technologies Active 30% Business Tax Credit for Solar (Vermont) Corporate Tax Credit Vermont Commercial Industrial Photovoltaics Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Electric Solar Thermal Process Heat Solar Water Heat No APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) Utility Rebate Program Arizona Commercial Residential Anaerobic Digestion Biomass Daylighting Geothermal Electric Ground Source Heat Pumps Landfill Gas Other Distributed Generation Technologies Photovoltaics Small Hydroelectric Solar Pool Heating Solar Space Heat Solar Thermal Process Heat

455

Phase-change thermal energy storage: Final subcontract report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The research and development described in this document was conducted within the US Department of Energy's Solar Thermal Technology Program. The goal of this program is to advance the engineering and scientific understanding of solar thermal technology and to establish the technology base from which private industry can develop solar thermal power production options for introduction into the competitive energy market. Solar thermal technology concentrates the solar flux using tracking mirrors or lenses onto a receiver where the solar energy is absorbed as heat and converted into electricity or incorporated into products as process heat. The two primary solar thermal technologies, central receivers and distributed receivers, employ various point and line-focus optics to concentrate sunlight. Current central receiver systems use fields of heliostats (two-axes tracking mirrors) to focus the sun's radiant energy onto a single, tower-mounted receiver. Point focus concentrators up to 17 meters in diameter track the sun in two axes and use parabolic dish mirrors or Fresnel lenses to focus radiant energy onto a receiver. Troughs and bowls are line-focus tracking reflectors that concentrate sunlight onto receiver tubes along their focal lines. Concentrating collector modules can be used alone or in a multimodule system. The concentrated radiant energy absorbed by the solar thermal receiver is transported to the conversion process by a circulating working fluid. Receiver temperatures range from 100{degree}C in low-temperature troughs to over 1500{degree}C in dish and central receiver systems. 12 refs., 119 figs., 4 tabs.

Not Available

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Definition: Thermal Ion Dispersion | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Dispersion Dispersion Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Thermal Ion Dispersion Thermal Ion Dispersion (TID) is a method used by the precious-metals industry to determine the movement of hot, mineral-bearing waters through rocks, gravels, and soils. The survey involves collection of soil samples and analyses of ions by an enzyme leach process done by commercial laboratories. The method utilizes the property of elements to be dissolved, transported, or deposited depending on the temperature of the thermal waters.{{#tag:ref|[[Final Technical Report}}[1][2][3][4] Also Known As enzyme leach References ↑ Geothermal Resource Evaluation And Definitioni (Gred) Program-Phases I ↑ Ii ↑ And Iii For The Animas Valley ↑ Nm Geothermal Resource]] {{#set:Reference URI={{#explode:{{#replace:[[Final Technical Report|[|}}|

457

Amulaire Thermal Technology | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Amulaire Thermal Technology Amulaire Thermal Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Amulaire Thermal Technology Address 11555 Sorrento Valley Road Place San Diego, California Zip 92121 Sector Efficiency Product Makes heat-dissipation products used in liquid cooling systems Website http://www.amulaire.com/ Coordinates 32.912393°, -117.231201° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":32.912393,"lon":-117.231201,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

458

Assessment of Methods to Manipulate Thermal Emission and Evaluate the Quality of Thermal Radiation for Direct Energy Conversion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??ABSTRACT Control of spectral thermal emission from surfaces may be desirable in some energy related applications, such as nano-scale antenna energy conversion and thermophotovoltaic conversion. (more)

Wijewardane, Samantha

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Portfolio Manager Technical Reference: Thermal Conversion Factors | ENERGY  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Thermal Conversion Factors Thermal Conversion Factors Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In This Section Campaigns Commercial building design Communications resources Energy management guidance Financial resources Portfolio Manager Products and purchasing Recognition Research and reports Service and product provider (SPP) resources Success stories Target Finder

460

Legal and regulatory issues affecting aquifer thermal energy storage  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document updates and expands the report with a similar title issued in October 1980. This document examines a number of legal and regulatory issues that potentially can affect implementation of the aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) concept. This concept involves the storage of thermal energy in an underground aquifer until a later date when it can be effectively utilized. Either heat energy or chill can be stored. Potential end uses of the energy include district space heating and cooling, industrial process applications, and use in agriculture or aquaculture. Issues are examined in four categories: regulatory requirements, property rights, potential liability, and issues related to heat or chill delivery.

Hendrickson, P.L.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Property:ThermalInfo | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Property Property Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Property:ThermalInfo Jump to: navigation, search Property Name ThermalInfo Property Type Text Subproperties This property has the following 93 subproperties: A Acoustic Logs Active Seismic Methods Active Sensors Aeromagnetic Survey Airborne Electromagnetic Survey Analytical Modeling C Caliper Log Cation Geothermometers Cement Bond Log Conceptual Model Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics Cross-Dipole Acoustic Log Cuttings Analysis D Data Acquisition-Manipulation Data Collection and Mapping Data Techniques Data and Modeling Techniques Density Log Direct-Current Resistivity Survey Drilling Methods E Earth Tidal Analysis Electric Micro Imager Log Electromagnetic Sounding Methods Elemental Analysis with Fluid Inclusion

462

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade Unique Solar Thermal Laboratory Gets an Upgrade September 10, 2010 - 2:54pm Addthis This “power tower” is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories This "power tower" is part of the National Solar Thermal Test Facility in Albuquerque, which is getting upgrades through Recovery Act funding. | Photo Courtesy of Sandia National Laboratories Lorelei Laird Writer, Energy Empowers The National Solar Thermal Test Facility at Sandia National Laboratories is unique - and in demand. The Facility has been instrumental in NASA tests, national defense programs and concentrated solar technology development.

463

Upper-Ocean Thermal Structure and the Western North Pacific Category 5 Typhoons. Part II: Dependence on Translation Speed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using new in situ ocean subsurface observations from the Argo floats, best-track typhoon data from the U.S. Joint Typhoon Warning Center, an ocean mixed layer model, and other supporting datasets, this work systematically explores the ...

I-I. Lin; Iam-Fei Pun; Chun-Chieh Wu

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Ocean Viruses: Tiny entities with Global Impacts ( JGI Seventh Annual User Meeting 2012: Genomics of Energy and Environment)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Matt Sullivan from the University of Arizona on "Ocean Viruses: Tiny Entities with Global Impacts" at the 7th Annual Genomics of Energy & Environment Meeting on March 22, 2012 in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Sullivan, Matthew B [University of Arizona

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

465

Evolution of the Lorenz Energy Cycle in the Intertropical Convergence Zone in the South American Sector of the Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The intertropical convergence zone (ITCZ) in the South American sector of the Atlantic Ocean is identified using outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) data in order to investigate the evolution of the Lorenz energy cycle in the region dominated by ...

Ligia A. Da Silva; Prakki Satyamurty

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Heat and Energy Balances in the Upper Ocean at 50N, 140W during November 1980 (STREX)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Subsurface temperature data and surface meteorological data are analyzed from thermistor chain moorings deployed near 50N, 140W during the Storm Transfer and Response Experiment (STREX). The upper-ocean heat and potential energy (PE) contents ...

S. D. Paduan; R. A. DeSzoeke

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Energy Transports by Ocean and Atmosphere Based on an Entropy Extremum Principle. Part 1: Zonal Averaged Transports  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Required global energy transports determined from Nimbus-7 satellite net radiation measurements have been separated into atmospheric and oceanic components by applying a maximum entropy production principle to the atmospheric system. Strong ...

Byung-Ju Sohn; Eric A. Smith

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Aquifer thermal energy storage reference manual: seasonal thermal energy storage program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the reference manual of the Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage (STES) Program, and is the primary document for the transfer of technical information of the STES Program. It has been issued in preliminary form and will be updated periodically to include more technical data and results of research. As the program progresses and new technical data become available, sections of the manual will be revised to incorporate these data. This primary document contains summaries of: the TRW, incorporated demonstration project at Behtel, Alaska, Dames and Moore demonstration project at Stony Brook, New York, and the University of Minnesota demonstration project at Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota; the technical support programs including legal/institutional assessment; economic assessment; environmental assessment; field test facilities; a compendia of existing information; numerical simulation; and non-aquifer STES concepts. (LCL)

Prater, L.S.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Page not found | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Download CX-002278: Categorical Exclusion Determination The Potential Impacts of Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Intakes on Aquatic Organisms at an OTEC Site under...

470

Pulse thermal energy transport/storage system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A pulse-thermal pump having a novel fluid flow wherein heat admitted to a closed system raises the pressure in a closed evaporator chamber while another interconnected evaporator chamber remains open. This creates a large pressure differential, and at a predetermined pressure the closed evaporator is opened and the opened evaporator is closed. This difference in pressure initiates fluid flow in the system.

Weislogel, Mark M. (23133 Switzer Rd., Brookpark, OH 44142)

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

471

Designing a Thermal Energy Storage Program for Electric Utilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electric utilities are looking at thermal energy storage technology as a viable demand side management (DSM) option. In order for this DSM measure to be effective, it must be incorporated into a workable, well-structured utility program. This paper describes a methodology to design a successful thermal energy storage program for electric utilities. The design process is addressed beginning with the market research phase. The research includes information obtained from utilities having successful thermal storage programs. In addition, information is gathered from interviews with local architects and engineers, air conditioning contractors and potential thermal energy storage customers. From this information a marketing plan is developed that addresses the target market, market penetration, promotional methods, incentive types and levels, internal and external training requirements and optimal organizational structure. The marketing plan also includes various rate structures, program procedures and evaluation techniques. In addition to the marketing plan, several case histories are addressed.

Niehus, T. L.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

The use of thermal energy storage for energy system based on cogeneration plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Usage of thermal energy storage together with cogeneration technology provides an attractive solution by allowing the production of electricity in the periods, when heat load is low and later consumption of heat, when load is high. The purpose of the ... Keywords: CHP, cogeneration, energy efficiency, energy system, thermal storage

Anna Volkova; Andres Siirde

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

10 to 15 percent of national energy consumption is feU to be22.5 quads) of national energy consumption there must beenergy conservation- at least 10 percent of national consumption -

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

MEMS-Based Pyroelectric Thermal Energy Scavenger  

... high efficiency heat energy converter, ... costs of concentrated photovoltaic solar cells Electrical power generation from ... and residential ...

475

Thermal conductor for high-energy electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thermal conductor for use with an electrochemical energy storage device is disclosed. The thermal conductor is attached to one or both of the anode and cathode contacts of an electrochemical cell. A resilient portion of the conductor varies in height or position to maintain contact between the conductor and an adjacent wall structure of a containment vessel in response to relative movement between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor conducts current into and out of the electrochemical cell and conducts thermal energy between the electrochemical cell and thermally conductive and electrically resistive material disposed between the conductor and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may be fabricated to include a resilient portion having one of a substantially C-shaped, double C-shaped, Z-shaped, V-shaped, O-shaped, S-shaped, or finger-shaped cross-section. An elastomeric spring element may be configured so as to be captured by the resilient conductor for purposes of enhancing the functionality of the thermal conductor. The spring element may include a protrusion that provides electrical insulation between the spring conductor and a spring conductor of an adjacently disposed electrochemical cell in the presence of relative movement between the cells and the wall structure. The thermal conductor may also be fabricated from a sheet of electrically conductive material and affixed to the contacts of a number of electrochemical cells.

Hoffman, Joseph A. (Minneapolis, MN); Domroese, Michael K. (South St. Paul, MN); Lindeman, David D. (Hudson, WI); Radewald, Vern E. (Austin, TX); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Trice, Jennifer L. (Eagan, MN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the overall efficiency. The heat source can be solar thermalefficiency of the vehicles can be considerably enhanced [105]. Other examples of LGH include solar thermal

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Parallel Integrated Thermal Management - Energy Innovation Portal  

Many current cooling systems for hybrid electric vehicles ... Energy Innovation Portal ... either through direct heat transfer or through integration with a heat ...

478

AQUIFER THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE-A SURVEY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy storage for cogeneration and solar systems, inTwin City district cogeneration system, in Proceedings,proposed system, based on cogeneration of power and heat by

Tsang, Chin Fu

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of switching field and thermal energy barrier distributions in a FePt nanoparticle system X dependence of the thermal stability factor, the width of the thermal energy barrier distribution- ropy energy distribution and the interaction and the thermal energy barrier distribution determined

Laughlin, David E.

480

National Thermal Power Corporation NTPC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NTPC NTPC Jump to: navigation, search Name National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) Place New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India Zip 110003 Sector Biomass, Hydro, Solar, Wind energy Product Delhi-based, state owned largest thermal power generating company of India. The firm has also ventured into consultancy, power trading, ash utilisation and coal mining. The firm is also developing various wind, solar, small hydro and biomass project. References National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC)[1] LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC) is a company located in New Delhi, Delhi (NCT), India . References ↑ "National Thermal Power Corporation (NTPC)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ocean thermal energy" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program Gulf Power - Solar Thermal Water Heating Program < Back Eligibility Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Solar Water Heating Maximum Rebate $1,000 Program Info State Florida Program Type Utility Rebate Program Provider Energy Efficiency '''''This program reopened on October 3, 2011 for 2012 applications. Funding is limited and must be reserved through online application before the installation of qualifying solar water heating systems. See Gulf Power's [http://www.gulfpower.com/renewable/solarThermal.asp Solar Water Heating] web site for more information.''''' Gulf Power offers a Solar Thermal Water Heating rebate to customers who install water heaters. This program started after the original pilot

482

Recycling of wasted energy : thermal to electrical energy conversion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mahkamov, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Vol. 11(S. Wongwises, Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews, Vol.E. Barbier, Renewable Sustainable Energy Review, Vol. 6, pp.

Lim, Hyuck

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

On the Loss of Wind-Induced Near-Inertial Energy to Turbulent Mixing in the Upper Ocean XIAOMING received 27 March 2009, in final form 23 June 2009) ABSTRACT Wind-induced near-inertial energy has been find that nearly 70% of the wind-induced near-inertial energy at the sea surface is lost to turbulent

Miami, University of

484

Estimates of wind energy input to the Ekman layer in the Southern Ocean from surface drifter data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Estimates of wind energy input to the Ekman layer in the Southern Ocean from surface drifter data the contribution from the anticyclonic frequencies dominate the wind energy input. The latitudinal and seasonal variations of the wind energy input to the Ekman layer are closely related to the variations of the wind

Gille, Sarah T.

485

THERMAL ENERGY STORAGE IN AQUIFERS WORKSHOP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

government in their regulation of natural gas prices. ThatRegulation of energy sup- ply activites, chiefly electric and natural gasregulation requ1red householders to give up burn- ing coal in favor of natural gas

Authors, Various

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Thermal energy harvesting from temperature fluctuations.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The development of portable equipments, wireless sensors networks and self-powered devices in a general manner generates a strong demand for micro-energy harvesting devices. One of (more)

Zhu, Hongying

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Accelerating Ocean Energy to the Marketplace Environmental Research at the U.S. Department of Energy National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (US DOE) has mobilized its National Laboratories to address the broad range of environmental effects of ocean and river energy development. The National Laboratories are using a risk-based approach to set priorities among environmental effects, and to direct research activities. Case studies will be constructed to determine the most significant environmental effects of ocean energy harvest for tidal systems in temperate estuaries, for wave energy installations in temperate coastal areas, wave installations in sub-tropical waters, and riverine energy installations in large rivers. In addition, the National Laboratories are investigating the effects of energy removal from waves, tides and river currents using numerical modeling studies. Laboratory and field research is also underway to understand the effects of electromagnetic fields (EMF), acoustic noise, toxicity from anti-biofouling coatings, effects on benthic habitats, and physical interactions with tidal and wave devices on marine and freshwater organisms and ecosystems. Outreach and interactions with stakeholders allow the National Laboratories to understand and mitigate for use conflicts and to provide useful information for marine spatial planning at the national and regional level.

Copping, Andrea E.; Cada, G. F.; Roberts, Jesse; Bevelhimer, Mark

2010-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

488

Probing Chemical Reactions: Evidence for Exploration of an Excited Potential Energy Surface at Thermal Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Thermal Energies Author(s): Michael D. Barnes, Philip R. Brooks, R. F. Curl, Bruce R. Johnson SourceProbing Chemical Reactions: Evidence for Exploration of an Excited Potential Energy Surface

Brooks, Philip R.

489

Construction of a Demand Side Plant with Thermal Energy Storage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Utility managements have two primary responsibilities. They must supply reliable electric service to meet the needs of their customers at the most efficient price possible while at the same time generating the maximum rate of return possible for their shareholders. Regulator hostility towards the addition of generating capacity has made it difficult for utilities to simultaneously satisfy both the needs of their ratepayers and the needs of their shareholders. Recent advances in thermal energy storage may solve the utilities' paradox. Residential thermal energy storage promises to provide the ratepayers significantly lower electricity rates and greater comfort levels. Utilities benefit from improved load factors, peak capacity additions at low cost, improved shareholder value (ie. a better return on assets), improved reliability, and a means of satisfying growing demand without the regulatory and litigious nightmares associated with current supply side solutions. This paper discusses thermal energy storage and its potential impact on the electric utilities and introduces the demand side plant concept.

Michel, M.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Chemical energy storage system for SEGS solar thermal power plant  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In October 1988, a symposium was held in Helendale, California, to discuss thermal energy storage (TES) concepts applicable to medium-temperature (200 to 400{degrees}C) solar thermal electric power plants, in general, and the solar electric generating system (SEGS) plants developed by Luz International, in particular. Chemical reaction energy storage based on the reversible reaction between metal oxides and metal hydroxides was identified as a leading candidate for meeting Luz International's cost and performance requirements. The principal objectives of this study were to identify the design conditions, requirements, and potential feasibility for a chemical energy storage system applied to a SEGS solar thermal power plant. The remaining sections of this report begin by providing an overview of the chemical reaction energy storage concept and a SEGS solar thermal power plant. Subsequent sections describe the initial screening of alternative evaporation energy sources and the more detailed evaluation of design alternatives considered for the preferred evaporation energy source. The final sections summarize the results, conclusions, and recommendations. 7 refs., 8 figs., 13 tabs.

Brown, D.R.; LaMarche, J.L.; Spanner, G.E.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Descriptive analysis of aquifer thermal energy storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The technical and economic feasibility of large-scale aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) was examined. A key to ATESs attractiveness is its simplicity of design and construction. The storage device consists of two ordinary water wells drilled into an aquifer, connected at the surface by piping and a heat exchanger. During the storage cycle water is pumped out of the aquifer, through the heat exchanger to absorb thermal energy, and then back down into the aquifer through the second well. The thermal storage remains in the aquifer storage bubble until required for use, when it is recovered by reversing the storage operation. For many applications the installation can probably be designed and constructed using existing site-specific information and modern well-drilling techniques. The potential for cost-effective implementation of ATES was investigated in the Twin Cities District Heating-Cogeneration Study in Minnesota. In the study, ATES demonstrated a net energy saving of 32% over the nonstorage scenario, with an annual energy cost saving of $31 million. Discounting these savings over the life of the project, the authors found that the break-even capital cost for ATES construction was $76/kW thermal, far above the estimated ATES development cost of $23 to 50/kW thermal. It appears tht ATES can be highly cost effective as well as achieve substantial fuel savings. ATES would be environmentally beneficial and could be used in many parts of the USA. The existing body of information on ATES indicates that it is a cost-effective, fuel-conserving technique for providing thermal energy for residential, commercial, and industrial users. The negative aspects are minor and highly site-specific, and do not seem to pose a threat to widespread commercialization. With a suitable institutional framework, ATES promises to supply a substantial portion of the nation's future energy needs. (LCL)

Reilly, R.W.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Southside Thermal Services Ltd | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ltd Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name Southside Thermal Services Ltd Place London, Greater London, United Kingdom Zip SW7 2AZ Product String representation "Southside Therm ... perial College." is too long. Coordinates 51.506325°, -0.127144° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":51.506325,"lon":-0.127144,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

493

Thermal energy storage technical progress report, April 1992--March 1993  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is supporting development of thermal energy storage (TES) as a means of efficiently coupling energy supplies to variable heating or cooling demands. Uses of TES include electrical demand-side management in buildings and industry, extending the utilization of renewable energy resources such as solar, and recovery of waste heat from periodic industrial processes. Technical progress to develop TES for specific diurnal and industrial applications under the Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s TES program from April 1992 to March 1993 is reported and covers research in the areas of low temperature sorption, thermal energy storage water heater, latent heat storage wallboard and latent/sensible heat regenerator technology development.

Olszewski, M.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Thermal Sciences The thermal sciences area involves the study of energy conversion and transmission, power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, power generation, the flow of liquids and gases, and the transfer of thermal energy (heat) by means, Thermodynamics, a sophomore spring course. This is followed by ME 608, Fluid Dynamics in the fall of the junior - Analytical Fluid Dynamics ME 709 - Computational Fluids Dynamics ME 712 - Waves in Fluids #12;

Chini, Gregory P.

495

Thermal Energy Storage/Heat Recovery and Energy Conservation in Food Processing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Modern food processing operations often require that the temperature of the processed foodstuff be raised or lowered. These operations result in energy consumption by refrigeration or heating systems, and a portion of this energy can be recovered from waste heat streams for reuse in the processing operations. This paper addresses the recovery of waste heat and the storage of thermal energy as a means of energy conservation in food processing. An energy conservation project in a poultry processing plant sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and conducted by Georgia Tech is used as an illustrative example of potential applications of heat recovery and thermal energy storage.

Combes, R. S.; Boykin, W. B.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

450 450 Varnish cache server Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource Dataset Summary Description This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using a 51-month Wavewatch III hindcast database developed especially for this study by National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration's (NOAA's) National Centers for Environmental Prediction. For total resource estimation, wave power density in terms of kilowatts per meter is aggregated across a unit diameter circle. This approach is fully consistent with accepted global practice and includes the resource made available by the lateral transfer of wave energy along wave crests, which enables densities within a few kilometers of a linear array, even for fixed terminator devices.

497

Energy Balance Models Incorporating Transport of Thermal and Latent Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Standard latitudinally resolved energy balance models describe conservation of energy on a sphere subject to solar heating, cooling by infrared radiation and diffusive redistribution of energy according to a Fourier type heat flow with flux ...

Brian P. Flannery

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Semi-transparent solar energy thermal storage device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A visually transmitting solar energy absorbing thermal storage module includes a thermal storage liquid containment chamber defined by an interior solar absorber panel, a