Sample records for ocean test project

  1. EA-1890: Reedsport PB150 Deployment and Ocean Test Project, Oregon

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy has selected Ocean Power Technologies (OPT) for approximately $2.4 million in financial assistance and proposes to authorize the expenditure of federal funding to OPT...

  2. MHK Projects/SurgeWEC Ocean Testing 1 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to: navigation, searchJintang <

  3. Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    generates an upwelling internal wave at 30N with a positive deviation in interface height of size 30m. What long would it take for this internal wave to propagate to 40N? c) At the same time that the wave passesOcean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Project 6: Waves Due: Thursday, March 1 1. A two layer

  4. 2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Deep Sea Drilling Project- and Ocean Drilling Program Services on behalf of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program September 2007 #12;#12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which in February 2007 contained

  5. NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    NAVFAC Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Project Contract Number N62583-09-C-0083 CDRL A014 OTEC Mini-Spar Pilot Plant 9 December 2011 OTEC-2011-001-4 Prepared for: Naval Facilities; distribution is unlimited. #12; Configuration Report and Development Plan Volume 4 Site Specific OTEC

  6. Establishing a Testing Center for Ocean Energy Technologies in...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and scaled devices in both laboratory and open water settings. To facilitate testing wave energy conversion devices, OSU developed and built a mobile ocean testing platform...

  7. Aquantis Ocean Current Turbine Development Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fleming, Alex J.

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Aquantis® Current Plane (“C-Plane”) technology developed by Dehlsen Associates, LLC (DA) and Aquantis, Inc. is an ocean current turbine designed to extract kinetic energy from ocean currents. The technology is capable of achieving competitively priced base-load, continuous, and reliable power generation from a source of renewable energy not before possible in this scale or form.

  8. Ocean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Answers to Project 8: Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, LuAnne

    mkgmkg m = m0292.0= b) How long would it take for this internal wave to propagate to 40N? First weOcean 420 Physical Processes in the Ocean Answers to Project 8: Waves 1. A two layer internal wave is 1028 kg/m3, and the density is 1029 kg/m3 in the lower layer. a) A wind event generates an upwelling

  9. Ocean energy projects may menace marine lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belogay, Eugene A.

    from California to Hawaii or Australia to South Africa. Sea turtles hatched on the beaches of Florida travel the currents of the North Atlantic Gyre to Europe, Africa and South America before heading homeOcean energy projects may menace marine migration lblumenthal@mcclatchydc.com Published Monday, Dec

  10. Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current, and In-Stream Hydrokinetic Power Assessment of Projected Life-Cycle Costs for Wave, Tidal, Ocean Current,...

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Arthur Kill Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of Arthur Kill Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material following current ammonia reduction protocols. Arthur Kill was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were recollected from the Arthur Kill Project areas in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Arthur Kill project areas consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Arthur Kill project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, was used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all Arthur Kill composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. M. bahia did not show statistically significant acute toxicity or a greater than 10% increase in mortality over reference sediment in static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  12. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Hackensack River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the bioassay reevaluation of the Hackensack River Federal Project was to reperform toxicity testing on proposed dredged material with current ammonia reduction protocols. Hackensack River was one of four waterways sampled and evaluated for dredging and disposal in April 1993. Sediment samples were re-collected from the Hackensack River Project area in August 1995. Tests and analyses were conducted according to the manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the {open_quotes}Green Book,{close_quotes} and the regional manual developed by the USACE-NYD and EPA Region II, Guidance for Performing Tests on Dredged Material to be Disposed of in Ocean Waters. The reevaluation of proposed dredged material from the Hackensack River project area consisted of benthic acute toxicity tests. Thirty-three individual sediment core samples were collected from the Hackensack River project area. Three composite sediments, representing each reach of the area proposed for dredging, were used in benthic acute toxicity testing. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed with the amphipod Ampelisca abdita and the mysid Mysidopsis bahia. The amphipod and mysid benthic toxicity test procedures followed EPA guidance for reduction of total ammonia concentrations in test systems prior to test initiation. Statistically significant acute toxicity was found in all three Hackensack River composites in the static renewal tests with A. abdita, but not in the static tests with M. bahia. Statistically significant acute toxicity and a greater than 20% increase in mortality over the reference sediment was found in the static renewal tests with A. abdita. Statistically significant mortality 10% over reference sediment was observed in the M. bahia static tests. 5 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. 1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean 2 equatorial circulation 3 A. Sen Gupta,1 A), 29 Drivers of the projected changes to the Pacific Ocean equatorial 30 circulation, Geophys. Res. Lett., 39, LXXXXX, doi:10.1029/ 31 2012GL051447. 32 1. Introduction 33 [2] The equatorial Pacific Ocean

  14. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MAG-WELL DOWNHOLE MAGNETIC FLUID CONDITIONERS PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field...

  15. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JANUARY 27, 1998 Report No. RMOTC97PT22 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS PETRO-PLUG BENTONITE PLUGGING Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by:...

  16. Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal from Federal Projects in New York and New Jersey and the Military Ocean Terminal (MOTBY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barrows, E.S.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Kohn, N.P.; Gruendell, B.D.; Mayhew, H.L.; Word, J.Q.; Rosman, L.B. [Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory, Sequim, Washington (United States)

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is authorized by Section 103 of the Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act of 1972 (MPRSA), Public Law 92-532, and by the Clean Water Act of 1972 (CWA) and Amendments of 1977 to permit, evaluate, and regulate the disposal of dredged material in ocean waters to minimize adverse environmental effects. Compliance with the regulations of the MPRSA calls for physical and biological testing of sediment proposed for dredging prior to its disposal in ocean waters. The testing required by the MPRSA criteria is conducted under a testing manual developed by the USACE and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal (Testing Manual), commonly referred to as the `Green Book.` Testing protocols in the Green Book include bulk sediment analysis, grain size analysis, elutriate testing, and biological testing. The biological testing includes bioassays for acute toxicity as well as analysis to determine bioaccumulation of certain contaminants by marine organisms. The objective of the USACE-NYD Federal Projects Program was to evaluate sediment proposed for dredging and unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. The results of analytical measurements and bioassays performed on the test sediments were compared with analyses of sediment from the Mud Dump Reference Site to determine whether the test sediments were acutely toxic to marine organisms or resulted in statistically significantly greater bioaccumulation of contaminants in marine organisms, relative to the reference sediment. Testing for the federal project areas was performed according to the requirements.

  17. Uncertainty in the Oceanic Heat and Carbon Uptake and Their Impact on Climate Projections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . These disagreements are, in part, due to differences in the rate of the penetration of heat into the deep ocean. SinceUncertainty in the Oceanic Heat and Carbon Uptake and Their Impact on Climate Projections Andrei P in the rate of heat and carbon uptake by the deep ocean on climate response to increases in greenhouse gas

  18. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Shark River Project area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, L.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Shark River Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Tests and analyses were conducted on the Shark River sediments. The evaluation of proposed dredged material consisted of bulk sediment chemical and physical analysis, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation tests. Individual sediment core samples collected from the Shark River were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One sediment composite was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate, prepared from suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Shark River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs. Benthic acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation tests were performed.

  19. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHEMICAL & MICROBIAL PARAFFIN CONTROL PROJECT DECEMBER 17, 1997 FC9544 96PT12 RMOTC Test Report Paraffin Control Project BDM OklahomaNIPER 220 N. Virginia Bartlesville, OK 4003...

  20. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FC9510 95PT4 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER D-JAX PUMP-OFF CONTROLLER PROJECT TEST RESULTES Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by: MICHAEL R. TYLER RMOTC Field...

  1. An Act to Facilitate Testing and Demonstration of Renewable Ocean Energy Technology (Maine)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This law streamlines and coordinates State permitting and submerged lands leasing requirements for renewable ocean energy demonstration projects, aiding Maine's goal to become an international...

  2. Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System)- TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Renewable Power Co (ORPC) (TRL 7 8 System) - TidGen (TM) Power System Commercialization Project

  3. Project title: Global environmental change: biomineral proxies of ocean chemistry and climate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    #8; FINAL PROJECT REPORT Please remember to provide CMI with electronic copies of any outputs that you have generated. This might include papers, presentations, patents, course material, attendance lists, website addresses, etc. Project... CMI Project Review: Project Name Global Environmental Change: Biomineral Proxies of Ocean Chemistry and Climate Number 003/P Report Period 22 June 2001- 30 April 2004 Project Name Cambridge PI, affiliation Harry Elderfield (Earth...

  4. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Eastchester Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Gardiner, W.W.; Tokos, J.J.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Eastchester project (Federal Project [FP] No. 6) was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area in the Hutchinson River to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Eastchester was one of seven waterways that the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in March 1994. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Eastchester project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water- column and benthic acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Eighteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Eastchester project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Two composite sediment samples, representing the upstream and lower reaches of the area proposed for dredging, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the two Eastchester sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. An additional 1 1 composite samples were created for the USACE-New England Division (USACE-NED) using the same 18 Eastchester core samples but combined into different composites. These composites were analyzed for metals, chlorinated pesticides, PCB congeners, PAHS, and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed along with bioaccumulation tests.

  5. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support - 2014 BTO Peer Review Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support...

  6. Solar Total Energy Project final test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.F.; Abney, L.O.; Towner, M.L. (Georgia Power Co., Shenandoah, GA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP), a cooperative effort between the United States Department of Energy (DOE) and Georgia Power Company (GPC) located at Shenandoah, Georgia, has undergone several design modifications based on experience from previous operations and test programs. The experiences encountered were discussed in detail in the Solar Total Energy Project Summary Report'' completed in 1987 for DOE. Most of the proposed changes discussed in this report were installed and tested in 1987 as part of two 15-day test programs (SNL Contract No. 06-3049). However, several of the suggested changes were not completed before 1988. These plant modifications include a new distributed control system for the balance of plant (BOP), a fiber a optical communications ring for the field control system, and new control configuration reflecting the new operational procedures caused by the plant modifications. These modifications were tested during a non-consecutive day test, and a 60-day field test conducted during the autumn of 1989. These test were partially funded by SNL under Contract No. 42-4859, dated June 22, 1989. Results of these tests and preliminary analysis are presented in this test summary report. 9 refs., 19 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean Disposal from Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gardiner, W.W.; Borde, A.B.; Nieukirk, S.L.; Barrows, E.S.; Gruendell, B.D.; Word, J.Q.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Shoal harbor/Compton Creek Project Area in Belford and Monmouth, New Jersey to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. This was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Shoal Harbor/Compton Creek Project area consisted of bulk chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests and bioaccumulation studies. Eleven core samples were analyzed or grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon. Other sediments were evaluated for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congers, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBs.

  8. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Bronx River Project Area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruendell, B.D.; Gardiner, W.W.; Antrim, L.D.; Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Bronx River project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from the Bronx River project area in Bronx, New York, to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Bronx River was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers-New York District (USAGE-NYD) requested the Battelle Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and to evaluate for dredging and disposal. Sediment samples were submitted for physical and chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic and water-column acute toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Fifteen individual sediment core samples collected from the Bronx River project area were analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample, representing the entire reach of the area proposed for dredging, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4- dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which was prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the Bronx River sediment composite, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  9. GLobal Ocean Data Analysis Project (GLODAP): Data and Analyses

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sabine, C. L.; Key, R. M.; Feely, R. A.; Bullister, J. L.; Millero, F. J.; Wanninkhof, R.; Peng, T. H.; Kozyr, A.

    GLODAP information available through CDIAC includes gridded and bottle data, a live server, an interactive atlas that provides access to data plots, and other tools for viewing and interacting with the data. [from http://cdiac.esd.ornl.gov/oceans/glodap/Glopintrod.htm](Specialized Interface)

  10. Design, construction and testing of an ocean renewable energy storage scaled prototype

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meredith, James D. C. (James Douglas Charles)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept for a new form of pumped storage hydro is being developed within the Precision Engineering Research Group at MIT: the Ocean Renewable Energy Storage (ORES) project. Large, hollow concrete spheres are created, ...

  11. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Westchester Creek project area, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Gardiner, W.W.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B.

    1996-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Westchester Creek project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from this area to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Westchester Creek was one of five waterways that the US Army Corps of Engineers- New York District (USACE-NYD) requested the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) to sample and evaluate for dredging and disposal in May 1995. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Westchester Creek project area consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, benthic acute and water-column toxicity tests, and bioaccumulation studies. Thirteen individual sediment core samples were collected from this area and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). One composite sediment sample representing the Westchester Creek area to be dredged, was analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended- particulate phase (SPP) of the Westchester Creek sediment composite, was analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS.

  12. Ocean Power: Science Projects in Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in ManyDepartment of Order No.ofUseIowaWeatherization11 JulyOcean

  13. Ocean Energy Projects Developing On and Off America's Shores | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterEnergyGlossary ofHomeJC3Minh Le AboutNONorthof Energy Ocean

  14. Testing Components of New Community Isopycnal Ocean Circulation Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bryan, Kirk

    2008-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The ocean and atmosphere are both governed by the same physical laws and models of the two media have many similarities. However, there are critical differences that call for special methods to provide the best simulation. One of the most important difference is that the ocean is nearly opaque to radiation in the visible and infra-red part of the spectrum. For this reason water mass properties in the ocean are conserved along trajectories for long distances and for long periods of time. For this reason isopycnal coordinate models would seem to have a distinct advantage in simulating ocean circulation. In such a model the coordinate surfaces are aligned with the natural paths of near adiabatic, density conserving flow in the main thermocline. The difficulty with this approach is at the upper and lower boundaries of the ocean, which in general do not coincide with density surfaces. For this reason hybrid coordinate models were proposed by Bleck and Boudra (1981) in which Cartesian coordinates were used near the ocean surface and isopycnal coordinates were used in the main thermocline. This feature is now part of the HICOM model (Bleck, 2002).

  15. Oceanic Communities in a Changing Planet - The Tara Oceans Project (GSC8 Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Raes, Jeroen [University of Brussels

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Genomic Standards Consortium was formed in September 2005. It is an international, open-membership working body which promotes standardization in the description of genomes and the exchange and integration of genomic data. The 2009 meeting was an activity of a five-year funding "Research Coordination Network" from the National Science Foundation and was organized held at the DOE Joint Genome Institute with organizational support provided by the JGI and by the University of California - San Diego. Jeroen Raes of the University of Brussels discusses the Tara-Oceans expedition at the Genomic Standards Consortium's 8th meeting at the DOE JGI in Walnut Creek, Calif. on Sept. 9, 2009

  16. Evaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which driftsEvaluation of Arctic sea ice thickness simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004

  17. Evaluation of dredged material proposed for ocean disposal from Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pinza, M.R.; Barrows, E.S.; Borde, A.B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the Red HookIBay Ridge project was to evaluate proposed dredged material from these two areas to determine its suitability for unconfined ocean disposal at the Mud Dump Site. Sediment samples were collected from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas. Tests and analyses were conducted. The evaluation of proposed dredged material from the Red Hook/Bay Ridge project areas consisted of bulk sediment chemical analyses, chemical analyses of dredging site water and elutriate, water-column and benthic acute toxicity tests. Twenty-four individual sediment core samples were collected from these two areas and analyzed for grain size, moisture content, and total organic carbon (TOC). Three composite sediment samples, representing Red Hook Channel and the two Bay Ridge Reaches to be dredged, were analyzed for bulk density, specific gravity, metals, chlorinated pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), and 1,4-dichlorobenzene. Dredging site water and elutriate water, which is prepared from the suspended-particulate phase (SPP) of the three Red Hook Bay Ridge sediment composites, were analyzed for metals, pesticides, and PCBS. Benthic acute toxicity tests were performed. Water-column or SPP toxicity tests were performed. Bioaccumulation tests were also conducted.

  18. Comprehensive Ocean Drilling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography containing citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and International Ocean Discovery Program Last updated: May 2014 #12;Comprehensive Bibliography Comprehensive Ocean Drilling Bibliography

  19. MHK Projects/Ocean Trials Ver 2 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet <|Galway Bay IE < MHK ProjectsTrials

  20. Future projection of mean and variability of the Asian Summer Monsoon and Indian Ocean Climate systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annamalai, H [IPRC, University of Hawaii

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall goal of this project is to assess the ability of the CMIP3/5 models to simulate the Indian-Ocean monsoon systems. The PI along with post-docs investigated research issues ranging from synoptic systems to long-term trends over the Asian monsoon region. The PI applied diagnostic tools such as moist static energy (MSE) to isolate: the moist and radiative processes responsible for extended monsoon breaks over South Asia, precursors in the ENSO-monsoon association, reasons for the drying tendency over South Asia and the possible effect on tropical Indian Ocean climate anomalies influencing certain aspects of ENSO characteristics. By diagnosing various observations and coupled model simulations, we developed working hypothesis and tested them by carrying out sensitivity experiments with both linear and nonlinear models. Possible physical and dynamical reasons for model sensitivities were deduced. On the teleconnection front, the ability of CMIP5 models in representing the monsoon-desert mechanism was examined recently. Further more, we have applied a suite of diagnostics and have performed an in depth analysis on CMIP5 integrations to isolate the possible reasons for the ENSO-monsoon linkage or lack thereof. The PI has collaborated with Dr. K.R. Sperber of PCMDI and other CLIVAR Asian-Australian monsoon panel members in understanding the ability of CMIP3/5 models in capturing monsoon and its spectrum of variability. The objective and process-based diagnostics aided in selecting models that best represent the present-day monsoon and its variability that are then employed for future projections. Two major highlights were an invitation to write a review on present understanding monsoons in a changing climate in Nature Climate Change, and identification of an east-west shift in observed monsoon rainfall (more rainfall over tropical western Pacific and drying tendency over South Asia) in the last six decades and attributing that shift to SST rise over the tropical western Pacific. On the training of post-doctoral scientists: the PI spent considerable amount of time and efforts in introducing the post-docs into climate modeling and designing the numerical experiments. With training provided and knowledge gained, post-docs worked in the project obtained long term positions elsewhere. The PI also enjoyed the experience in managing the works and educating work ethics to the younger generation. Based on the research achievements and publications, the PI gave invited talks in major international monsoon conferences/workshops, and gave lectures in various research organizations in the last six years. Finally, during the project period, the PI attended all the DOE organized PIs meeting and presented the major results. Some of the major implications of the project include: (i) Sustained observational efforts are necessary to monitor the three-dimensional moisture distribution over the Asian monsoon region that would aid in better understanding, modeling and predicting severe monsoons well in advance and (ii) process-based diagnostics lead pathways for model improvements.

  1. Fast flux test facility, transition project plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guttenberg, S.

    1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The FFTF Transition Project Plan, Revision 1, provides changes and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  2. Fast Flux Test Facility project plan. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulvey, R.K.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) Transition Project Plan, Revision 2, provides changes to the major elements and project baseline for the deactivation activities necessary to transition the FFTF to a radiologically and industrially safe shutdown condition.

  3. The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project Andrewto evaluate emerging lithium battery technologies for plug-vehicles. By emerging lithium battery chemistries were meant

  4. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FEBRUARY 19, 1997 FC9532 95EC1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER AJUST A PUMP TEST Rosemond Manufacturing, Inc. (RMI) Prepared for: INDUSTRY PUBLICATION Prepared by:...

  5. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NPOSR), Inc., the Management and Operating Contractor for the DOE Naval Petroleum Oil Shale Reserves in Colorado, Utah and Wyoming. Work was directed by RMOTC Project Manager,...

  6. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OILWELL POWER CONTROLLER JULY 26, 1994 FC9501 94PT1 ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER RMOTC TEST RESULTS OF OILWELL POWER CONTROLLER July 26,1994 MICHAEL R. TYLER FIELD...

  7. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    82601 1994 RMOTC ('107) 261-5000, ext. 5060 RESULTS OF THE V-GER LUBRICATOR SYSTEM TEST AT THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER (RMOTC) Michael Tyler, Marvin Hendricks,...

  8. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER MICROTURBINE PROJECT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    electrical power. 1 MICROTURBINE-GENERATOR SYSTEM: There are several manufacturers of gas microturbine-generators. The system that was tested was a Capstone Turbine Corporation...

  9. Stress Testing Projected Capitalized Farmland Values 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, Bo 1988-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    values in each state as well as regional averages over the 2012-2015 period. These projections reflect alternative assumptions regarding future trends in real net farm income at the state level as well as the rate on 10-year constant maturity U...

  10. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CAVITY PUMPS Cameron Elastomer Technology MARCH 23, 1998 FC956396PT17 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT17 Improved Elastomer Compound for Progressive Cavity Pumps Cameron...

  11. Integrated Performance Testing for Nonproliferation Support Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johns, Russell; Bultz, Garl Alan; Byers, Kenneth R.; Yaegle, William

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this workshop is to provide participants with training in testing techniques and methodologies for assessment of the performance of: Physical Protection system elements; Material Control and Accounting (MC&A) system elements.

  12. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IN-SITU H 2 S BIOREMEDIATION JULY 11, 1994 FC9509 95PT3 Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center 907 North Poplar, Suite 100, Casper, WY 82601 (307) 261-5000, ext. 5060; FAX (307)...

  13. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    LOW COST REFRACTURING JANUARY 23, 1998 FC955096PT14 RMOTC Test Report Number 96PT14 Low Cost Refracturing Rock Creek Enterprises 980 Rock Creek Road Buffalo, Wyoming 82834 (307)...

  14. ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0697DT15 RMOTC Test Report Rotary Steerable Stabilizer Smith Drilling and Completions 16740 Hardy Street P. 0. Box 60068 Houston, Texas, 77205-0068 281-443-3370 Leo Giangiacorno,...

  15. EA-1917: Wave Energy Test Facility Project, Newport, OR

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EA will evaluate the potential environmental impacts of a Wave Energy Test Facility that will be located near Newport, Oregon. The testing facility will be located within Oregon territorial waters, near the Hatfield Marine Science Center and close to onshore roads and marine support services. The site will not only allow testing of new wave energy technologies, but will also be used to help study any potential environmental impacts on sediments, invertebrates and fish. The project is being jointly funded by the State of Oregon and DOE.

  16. TITLE: HVAC TESTING & BALANCING FOR MAJOR AND MINOR PROJECTS OBJECTIVE AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    TITLE: HVAC TESTING & BALANCING FOR MAJOR AND MINOR PROJECTS OBJECTIVE AND PURPOSE: To provide an independent test & balance for the adjustment of all HVAC systems in all major projects and minor projects

  17. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter (WEC) Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dallman, Ann Renee; Neary, Vincent Sinclair

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents met - ocean data and wave energy characteristics at three U.S. wave energy converter (WEC) test and potential deployment sites . Its purpose is to enable the compari son of wave resource characteristics among sites as well as the select io n of test sites that are most suitable for a developer's device and that best meet their testing needs and objectives . It also provides essential inputs for the design of WEC test devices and planning WEC tests, including the planning of deployment and op eration s and maintenance. For each site, this report catalogues wave statistics recommended in the (draft) International Electrotechnical Commission Technical Specification (IEC 62600 - 101 TS) on Wave Energy Characterization, as well as the frequency of oc currence of weather windows and extreme sea states, and statistics on wind and ocean currents. It also provides useful information on test site infrastructure and services .

  18. Project W-314 performance mock-up test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CARRATT, R.T.

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Procedure is to assist construction in the pre-operational fabrication and testing of the pit leak detection system and the low point drain assembly by: (1) Control system testing of the pit leak detection system will be accomplished by actuating control switches and verifying that the control signal is initiated, liquid testing and overall operational requirements stated in HNF-SD-W314-PDS-003, ''Project Development Specification for Pit Leak Detection''. (2) Testing of the low point floor drain assembly by opening and closing the drain to and from the ''retracted'' and ''sealed'' positions. Successful operation of this drain will be to verify that the seal does not leak on the ''sealed'' position, the assembly holds liquid until the leak detector actuates and the assembly will operate from on top of the mock-up cover block.

  19. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eto, Joseph H.; Eto, Joseph H.; Lasseter, Robert; Schenkman, Ben; Klapp, Dave; Linton, Ed; Hurtado, Hector; Roy, Jean; Lewis, Nancy Jo; Stevens, John; Volkommer, Harry

    2008-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed project was to enhance the ease of integrating small energy sources into a microgrid. The project accomplished this objective by developing and demonstrating three advanced techniques, collectively referred to as the CERTS Microgrid concept, that significantly reduce the level of custom field engineering needed to operate microgrids consisting of small generating sources. The techniques comprising the CERTS Microgrid concept are: 1) a method for effecting automatic and seamless transitions between grid-connected and islanded modes of operation; 2) an approach to electrical protection within the microgrid that does not depend on high fault currents; and 3) a method for microgrid control that achieves voltage and frequency stability under islanded conditions without requiring high-speed communications. The techniques were demonstrated at a full-scale test bed built near Columbus, Ohio and operated by American Electric Power. The testing fully confirmed earlier research that had been conducted initially through analytical simulations, then through laboratory emulations, and finally through factory acceptance testing of individual microgrid components. The islanding and resychronization method met all Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers 1547 and power quality requirements. The electrical protections system was able to distinguish between normal and faulted operation. The controls were found to be robust and under all conditions, including difficult motor starts. The results from these test are expected to lead to additional testing of enhancements to the basic techniques at the test bed to improve the business case for microgrid technologies, as well to field demonstrations involving microgrids that involve one or mroe of the CERTS Microgrid concepts.

  20. GICHD Mine Dog Testing Project - Soil Sample Results No.3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PHELAN, JAMES M.; BARNETT, JAMES L.; BENDER, SUSAN FAE ANN; ARCHULETA, LUISA M.

    2003-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the third batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in October 2002.

  1. GICHD mine dog testing project - soil sample results #4.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barnett, James L.; Phelan, James M.; Archuleta, Luisa M.; Wood, Tyson B.; Donovan, Kelly L.; Bender, Susan Fae Ann

    2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mine dog evaluation project initiated by the Geneva International Center for Humanitarian Demining is evaluating the capability and reliability of mine detection dogs. The performance of field-operational mine detection dogs will be measured in test minefields in Afghanistan and Bosnia containing actual, but unfused landmines. Repeated performance testing over two years through various seasonal weather conditions will provide data simulating near real world conditions. Soil samples will be obtained adjacent to the buried targets repeatedly over the course of the test. Chemical analysis results from these soil samples will be used to evaluate correlations between mine dog detection performance and seasonal weather conditions. This report documents the analytical chemical methods and results from the fourth batch of soils received. This batch contained samples from Kharga, Afghanistan collected in April 2003 and Sarajevo, Bosnia collected in May 2003.

  2. Repository-relevant testing applied to the Yucca Mountain Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Veleckis, E.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A repository environment poses a challenge to developing a testing program because of the diverse nature of conditions that may exist at a given time during the life of the repository. A starting point is to identify whether any potential waste-water contact modes are particularly deleterious to the waste form performance, and whether any interactions between materials present in the waste package environment need to be accounted for during modeling the waste form reaction. The Unsaturated Test method in one approach that has been developed by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP) to investigate the above issues, and a description of results that have been obtained during the testing of glass and unirradiated UO{sub 2} are the subject of this report. 10 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Final project report: High energy rotor development, test and evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the auspices of the {open_quotes}Government/Industry Wind Technology Applications Project{close_quotes} [{open_quotes}Letter of Interest{close_quotes} (LOI) Number RC-1-11101], Flo Wind Corp. has successfully developed, tested, and delivered a high-energy rotor upgrade candidate for their 19-meter Vertical Axis Wind Turbine. The project included the demonstration of the innovative extended height-to-diameter ratio concept, the development of a continuous span single-piece composite blade, the demonstration of a continuous blade manufacturing technique, the utilization of the Sandia National Laboratories developed SNLA 2150 natural laminar flow airfoil and the reuse of existing wind turbine and wind power plant infrastructure.

  4. Integrated development and testing plan for the plutonium immobilization project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kan, T.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This integrated plan for the DOE Office of Fissile Materials Disposition (MD) describes the technology development and major project activities necessary to support the deployment of the immobilization approach for disposition of surplus weapons-usable plutonium. The plan describes details of the development and testing (D&T) tasks needed to provide technical data for design and operation of a plutonium immobilization plant based on the ceramic can-in-canister technology (''Immobilization Fissile Material Disposition Program Final Immobilization Form Assessment and Recommendation'', UCRL-ID-128705, October 3, 1997). The plan also presents tasks for characterization and performance testing of the immobilization form to support a repository licensing application and to develop the basis for repository acceptance of the plutonium form. Essential elements of the plant project (design, construction, facility activation, etc.) are described, but not developed in detail, to indicate how the D&T results tie into the overall plant project. Given the importance of repository acceptance, specific activities to be conducted by the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW) to incorporate the plutonium form in the repository licensing application are provided in this document, together with a summary of how immobilization D&T activities provide input to the license activity. The ultimate goal of the Immobilization Project is to develop, construct, and operate facilities that will immobilize from about 18 to 50 tonnes (MT) of U.S. surplus weapons usable plutonium materials in a manner that meets the ''spent fuel'' standard (Fissile Materials Storage and Disposition Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision, ''Storage and Disposition Final PEIS'', issued January 14, 1997, 62 Federal Register 3014) and is acceptable for disposal in a geologic repository. In the can-in-canister technology, this is accomplished by encapsulating the plutonium-containing ceramic forms within large canisters of high level waste (HLW) glass. Deployment of the immobilization capability should occur by 2006 and be completed within 10 years.

  5. DOE-Funded Project Testing Laser CO2 Monitoring at Carbon Storage...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE-Funded Project Testing Laser CO2 Monitoring at Carbon Storage Site DOE-Funded Project Testing Laser CO2 Monitoring at Carbon Storage Site June 3, 2015 - 8:44am Addthis Photo...

  6. Test Plan: Sludge Treatment Project Corrosion Process Chemistry Follow-on Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Poloski, Adam P.

    2007-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    This test plan was prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under contract with Fluor Hanford (FH). The test plan describes the scope and conditions to be used to perform laboratory-scale testing of the Sludge Treatment Project (STP) hydrothermal treatment of K Basin sludge. The STP, managed for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) by FH, was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from the sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) by using high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. The proposed testing builds on the approach and laboratory test findings for both K Basin sludge and simulated sludge garnered during prior testing from September 2006 to March 2007. The outlined testing in this plan is designed to yield further understanding of the nature of the chemical reactions, the effects of compositional and process variations and the effectiveness of various strategies to mitigate the observed high shear strength phenomenon observed during the prior testing. These tests are designed to provide process validation and refinement vs. process development and design input. The expected outcome is to establish a level of understanding of the chemistry such that successful operating strategies and parameters can be implemented within the confines of the existing STP corrosion vessel design. In July 2007, the DOE provided direction to FH regarding significant changes to the scope of the overall STP. As a result of the changes, FH directed PNNL to stop work on most of the planned activities covered in this test plan. Therefore, it is unlikely the testing described here will be performed. However, to preserve the test strategy and details developed to date, the test plan has been published.

  7. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  8. Operational test report -- Project W-320 cathodic protection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bowman, T.J.

    1998-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 173-303-640 specifies that corrosion protection must be designed into tank systems that treat or store dangerous wastes. Project W-320, Waste Retrieval Sluicing System (WRSS), utilizes underground encased waste transfer piping between tanks 241-C-106 and 241-AY-102. Corrosion protection is afforded to the encasements of the WRSS waste transfer piping through the application of earthen ionic currents onto the surface of the piping encasements. Cathodic protection is used in conjunction with the protective coatings that are applied upon the WRSS encasement piping. WRSS installed two new two rectifier systems (46 and 47) and modified one rectifier system (31). WAC 173-303-640 specifies that the proper operation of cathodic protection systems must be confirmed within six months after initial installation. The WRSS cathodic protection systems were energized to begin continuous operation on 5/5/98. Sixteen days after the initial steady-state start-up of the WRSS rectifier systems, the operational testing was accomplished with procedure OTP-320-006 Rev/Mod A-0. This operational test report documents the OTP-320-006 results and documents the results of configuration testing of integrated piping and rectifier systems associated with the W-320 cathodic protection systems.

  9. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM 2011 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT covering citations related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from Geo Drilling Program Publication Services September 2011 #12;OVERVIEW OF THE OCEAN DRILLING CITATION DATABASE

  10. The intermountain power project commissioning - Subsynchronous torsional interaction tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, C.T.; Peterson, K.J. (Dept. of Water and Power, Los Angeles, CA (US)); Pinko, R.J.; Kankam, M.D.; Baker, D.H. (General Electric Co., Schenectady, NY (US))

    1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Subsyncronous torsional vibration as a result of electrochemical interaction between the HVDC controls and a turbine-generator was first discovered during the commissioning of the Square Butte Project in 1977. The level of interaction between the HVDC controls and the turbine-generator depends on several interacting factors: the characteristic torsional frequencies of the turbine-generator, the bandwidth of the HVDC controls and the relative strength of the connecting ac system. For the Intermountain Power Project (IPP), early analysis of these interacting factors indicated that there exist definite potential for subsynchronous oscillation to occur. The calculated torsional frequencies of the IPP units showed that the first mode frequency is 14.0 Hz and is within the typical bandwidth of an HVDC control which is between 10-20 Hz. The HVDC controls, therefore, can influence the torsional stability of the IPP units. Further, the IPP turbine-generators are required to operate isolated on the HVDC rectifier terminal, with no other interconnecting ac network. This ''radial'' mode of operation will result in maximum interaction between the converter station and the IPP units. It became obvious that special measure must be implemented in the design of the IPP HVDC control system to modify its typical characteristics to avoid the occurrence of the subsynchronous oscillation. This paper presents the results of the subsynchronous torsional interaction (SSTI) tests that were performed during the commissioning of the IPP Unit 1 and the HVDC Transmission system.

  11. Draft environmental assessment -- Test Area North pool stabilization project update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to update the ``Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project`` EA (DOE/EA-1050) and finding of no significant impact (FONSI) issued May 6, 1996. This update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of a drying process for the Three Mile Island (TMI) nuclear reactor core debris canisters now stored underwater in a facility on the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). A drying process was analyzed in the predecision versions of the EA released in 1995 but that particular process was determined to be ineffective and dropped form the Ea/FONSI issued May 6, 1996. The origin and nature of the TMI core debris and the proposed drying process are described and analyzed in detail in this EA. As did the 1996 EA, this update analyzes the environmental and health impacts of removing various radioactive materials from underwater storage, dewatering these materials, constructing a new interim dry storage facility, and transporting and placing the materials into the new facility. Also, as did the 1996 EA, this EA analyzes the removal, treatment and disposal of water from the pool, and placement of the facility into a safe, standby condition. The entire action would take place within the boundaries of the INEEL. The materials are currently stored underwater in the Test Area North (TAN) building 607 pool, the new interim dry storage facility would be constructed at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) which is about 25 miles south of TAN.

  12. MHK Projects/Makai Ocean Energy Research Center | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMARECInformationGriffinCABendMakai Ocean

  13. Project B610 process control configuration acceptance test procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silvan, G.R.

    1994-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this test is to verify the Westinghouse configuration of the MICON A/S Distributed Control System for project B610. The following will be verified: proper assignment and operation of all field inputs to and outputs from the MICON Termination panels; proper operation of all display data on the operator`s console; proper operation of all required alarms; and proper operation of all required interlocks. The MICON A/S control system is configured to replace all the control, indication, and alarm panels now located in the Power Control Room. Nine systems are covered by this control configuration, 2736-ZB HVAC, 234-5Z HVAC, Process Vacuum, Dry Air, 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling, Building Accelerometer, Evacuation Siren, Stack CAMs, and Fire. The 2736-ZB HVAC system consists of the ventilation controls for 2736-ZB and 2736-Z as well as alarms for the emergency generators and 232-Z. The 234-5Z HVAC system is the ventilation controls for 235-5Z and 236-Z buildings. Process Vacuum covers the controls for the 26 inch vacuum system. Dry Air covers the controls for the steam and electric air dryers. The 291-Z Closed Loop Cooling system consists of the status indications and alarms for the 291-Z compressor and vacuum pump closed loop cooling system. The rest of closed loop cooling was tested earlier. The Building Accelerometer system consists of the status indications for the two seismic system accelerometers. The Evacuation Siren system includes the controls for the evacuation and take cover sirens. Stack CAMs cover the alarms for the various building ventilation stack continuous air monitors. Finally, the Fire system covers the various fire alarms now located in Room 321-A.

  14. CERTS Microgrid Laboratory Test Bed - PIER Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eto, Joseph H.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    SS as a protection relay and test it similarly. To achieverequire only the Manta 1710 Relay Test Set. The measurementpower supply, a Manta MTS 1710 relay test set, and a Wavetek

  15. Project W-314 Specific Test and Evaluation Plan 241-AN-A Valve Pit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HAMMERS, J.S.

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Specific Test and Evaluation Plan (STEP) is to provide a detailed written plan for the systematic testing of modifications made to the 241-AN-A Valve Pit by the W-314 Project. The STEP develops the outline for test procedures that verify the system's performance to the established Project design criteria. The STEP is a lower tier document based on the W-314 Test and Evaluation Plan (TEP).

  16. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Y. H.; Lawson, M.; Li, Y.; Previsic, M.; Epler, J.; Lou, J.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy established a reference model project to benchmark a set of marine and hydrokinetic technologies including current (tidal, open-ocean, and river) turbines and wave energy converters. The objectives of the project were to first evaluate the status of these technologies and their readiness for commercial applications. Second, to evaluate the potential cost of energy and identify cost-reduction pathways and areas where additional research could be best applied to accelerate technology development to market readiness.

  17. Initial field testing definition of subsurface sealing and backfilling tests in unsaturated tuff; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, J.A. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Case, J.B.; Tyburski, J.R. [I. T. Corp., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains an initial definition of the field tests proposed for the Yucca Mountain Project repository sealing program. The tests are intended to resolve various performance and emplacement concerns. Examples of concerns to be addressed include achieving selected hydrologic and structural requirements for seals, removing portions of the shaft liner, excavating keyways, emplacing cementitious and earthen seals, reducing the impact of fines on the hydraulic conductivity of fractures, efficient grouting of fracture zones, sealing of exploratory boreholes, and controlling the flow of water by using engineered designs. Ten discrete tests are proposed to address these and other concerns. These tests are divided into two groups: Seal component tests and performance confirmation tests. The seal component tests are thorough small-scale in situ tests, the intermediate-scale borehole seal tests, the fracture grouting tests, the surface backfill tests, and the grouted rock mass tests. The seal system tests are the seepage control tests, the backfill tests, the bulkhead test in the Calico Hills unit, the large-scale shaft seal and shaft fill tests, and the remote borehole sealing tests. The tests are proposed to be performed in six discrete areas, including welded and non-welded environments, primarily located outside the potential repository area. The final selection of sealing tests will depend on the nature of the geologic and hydrologic conditions encountered during the development of the Exploratory Studies Facility and detailed numerical analyses. Tests are likely to be performed both before and after License Application.

  18. MHK Projects/Grays Harbor Ocean Energy and Coastal Protection | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet < MHKSound, NYManan Channel Project

  19. MHK Projects/Ocean Energy Galway Bay IE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet <|Galway Bay IE < MHK Projects Jump

  20. MHK Projects/Ocean Navitas NaREC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet <|Galway Bay IE < MHK Projects

  1. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Wilkins, D.W.; Keltch, B.; Saradji, B.; Salamy, S.P.

    1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second volume of the Recovery Efficiency Test Phase I Report of Activities. Volume 1 covered selection, well planning, drilling, coring, logging and completion operations. This volume reports on well testing activities, reclamation activities on the drilling site and access roads, and the results of physical and mechanical properties tests on the oriented core material obtained from a horizontal section of the well. 3 refs., 21 figs., 10 tabs.

  2. MHK Projects/WEST Testing | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHK Projects Jump to:Vicksburg Bend < MHK ProjectsWEC

  3. MHK Projects/Gulf of Mexico Ocean test | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf KilaueaInformationCygnet < MHKSound, NYManan

  4. Acceptance test procedure: RMW Land Disposal Facility Project W-025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roscha, V. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This ATP establishes field testing procedures to demonstrate that the electrical/instrumentation system functions as intended by design for the Radioactive Mixed Waste Land Disposal Facility. Procedures are outlined for the field testing of the following: electrical heat trace system; transducers and meter/controllers; pumps; leachate storage tank; and building power and lighting.

  5. Ocean Engineering Development Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Stephen L.

    Ocean Engineering Hydrofoil Development Team Justin Eickmeier Mirela Dalanaj Jason Gray Matt test bed for future hydrofoil designs. 5) To create future student interest in the Ocean Engineering Efficiency and Acceleration. #12;Design Team Justin Eickmeier Team Leader Major: Ocean Engineering, Junior

  6. CISC 327 -Fall 2014 ! Course Project Assignment #5 -Back End Unit Testing!

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cordy, James R.

    CISC 327 - Fall 2014 ! ! Course Project Assignment #5 - Back End Unit Testing! !Due Wednesday Nov 19! !In this assignment, you will practice (partial) white box testing of the Back Office you cases on your Back End! !! (v) make a table of the failures uncovered by your tests (if any

  7. Ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters (Phase 2 of -42-foot project)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Strand, J.A.; Kohn, N.P.; Squires, A.L. (Battelle Marine Research Lab., Sequim, WA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), San Francisco District, was authorized by the Water Resources Development Act of 1986 to deepen and widen the navigation channels of Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, California, to accommodate modern deep-draft vessels. The recommended plan consists of deepening the harbor channels from the presently authorized water depth of {minus}35 ft mean lower low water (MLLW) to {minus}42 ft MLLW and supplying the harbor with adequate turning basins and berthing areas. Offshore ocean disposal of the dredged sediment is being considered, provided there is no evident of harmful ecological effects. It harmful ecological effects are not evident then the appropriate certifications from state environmental quality agencies and concurrence from the Environmental Protection Agency can be obtained to allow disposal of sediment. To help provide the scientific basis for determining whether Oakland Harbor sediments are suitable for offshore disposal, the Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory (MSL) collected sediment cores from 23 stations in Inner and Outer Oakland Harbor, evaluated these sediment cores geologically, performed chemical analyses for selected contaminants in sediments, conducted a series of solid phase toxicity tests with four sensitive marine invertebrates and assessed the bioaccumulation potential of sediment-associated contaminants in the tissues of Macoma Nasuta. 43 refs., 26 figs., 61 tabs.

  8. Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan Nevada National Security Site, Nevada, Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Irene Farnham

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan (QAPP) provides the overall quality assurance (QA) program requirements and general quality practices to be applied to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) Underground Test Area (UGTA) Sub-Project (hereafter the Sub-Project) activities. The requirements in this QAPP are consistent with DOE Order 414.1C, Quality Assurance (DOE, 2005); U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Guidance for Quality Assurance Project Plans for Modeling (EPA, 2002); and EPA Guidance on the Development, Evaluation, and Application of Environmental Models (EPA, 2009). The QAPP Revision 0 supersedes DOE--341, Underground Test Area Quality Assurance Project Plan, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 4.

  9. Project Impact Assessments: Building America FY14 Field Test Technical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation:in theProject Execution Plan ReviewLongSupport -

  10. The John Deere E diesel Test & Research Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Nathan; Mitchell, William E.

    2008-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Three non-road Tier II emissions compliant diesel engines manufactured by John Deere were placed on a durability test plan of 2000 hours each at full load, rated speed (FLRS). The fuel was a blend of 10% fuel ethanol and 90% low sulfur #2 diesel fuel. Seven operational failures involving twenty seven fuel system components occurred prior to completion of the intended test plan. Regulated emissions measured prior to component failure indicated compliance to Tier II certification goals for the observed test experience. The program plan included operating three non-road Tier II diesel engines for 2000 hours each monitoring the regulated emissions at 500 hour intervals for changes/deterioration. The program was stopped prematurely due to number and frequency of injection system failures. The failures and weaknesses observed involved injector seat and valve wear, control solenoid material incompatibility, injector valve deposits and injector high pressure seal cavitation erosion. Future work should target an E diesel fuel standard that emphasizes minimum water content, stability, lubricity, cetane neutrality and oxidation resistance. Standards for fuel ethanol need to require water content no greater than the base diesel fuel standard. Lubricity bench test standards may need new development for E diesel.

  11. The UC Davis Emerging Lithium Battery Test Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burke, Andy; Miller, Marshall

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    graphite/NiCoMn chemistry. In general, it is possible to design high power batteries (graphite/NiCoMn chemistry. In general, it seems possible to design high power batteries (Batteries tested -manufacturers, technology, and characteristics Manufacturer K2 EIG A123 Technology type Iron phosphate Iron phosphate Iron phosphate Iron Phosphate Graphite/

  12. AN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for themselves. The third home is even more aggressively revamped to target zero net energy use. The first home ... that this is worth looking at and then worth investing in," he said. Putting buildings on energy diets ProjectAN E&E PUBLISHING SERVICE ENERGY EFFICIENCY: Tenn. project to test range of residential upgrades

  13. Status and specifications of a Project X front-end accelerator test facility at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steimel, J.; Webber, R.; Madrak, R.; Wildman, D.; Pasquinelli, R.; Evans-Peoples, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the construction and operational status of an accelerator test facility for Project X. The purpose of this facility is for Project X component development activities that benefit from beam tests and any development activities that require 325 MHz or 650 MHz RF power. It presently includes an H- beam line, a 325 MHz superconducting cavity test facility, a 325 MHz (pulsed) RF power source, and a 650 MHz (CW) RF power source. The paper also discusses some specific Project X components that will be tested in the facility. Fermilab's future involves new facilities to advance the intensity frontier. In the early 2000's, the vision was a pulsed, superconducting, 8 GeV linac capable of injecting directly into the Fermilab Main Injector. Prototyping the front-end of such a machine started in 2005 under a program named the High Intensity Neutrino Source (HINS). While the HINS test facility was being constructed, the concept of a new, more versatile accelerator for the intensity frontier, now called Project X, was forming. This accelerator comprises a 3 GeV CW superconducting linac with an associated experimental program, followed by a pulsed 8 GeV superconducting linac to feed the Main Injector synchrotron. The CW Project X design is now the model for Fermilab's future intensity frontier program. Although CW operation is incompatible with the original HINS front-end design, the installation remains useful for development and testing many Project X components.

  14. Fallon Test Ranges Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOEHazelPennsylvania: EnergyExolisFairway, Kansas: EnergyFallon GeothermalTest

  15. Testing, Manufacturing, and Component Development Projects | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof Energy 2, 2015 - JanuaryTank 48H TreatmentEnergy Test

  16. EA-1965: Florida Atlantic University Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center’s Offshore Marine Hydrokinetic Technology Testing Project, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE), through its Wind and Water Power Technologies Office (WWPTO), is proposing to provide federal funding to Florida Atlantic University’s South-East National Marine Renewable Energy Center (FAU SNMREC) to support the at sea testing of FAU SNMREC’s experimental current generation turbine and the deployment and operation of their Small-Scale Ocean Current Turbine Test Berth, sited on the outer continental shelf (OCS) in waters off the coast of Ft Lauderdale, Florida. SNMREC would demonstrate the test berth site readiness by testing their pilot-scale experimental ocean current turbine unit at that location. The Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) conducted an Environmental Assessment to analyze the impacts associated with leasing OCS lands to FAU SNMREC, per their jurisdictional responsibilities under the Outer Continental Shelf Lands Act. DOE was a cooperating agency in this process and based on the EA, DOE issued a Finding of No Significant Impact.

  17. Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

  18. Mesoscale ocean dynamics modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    mHolm, D.; Alber, M.; Bayly, B.; Camassa, R.; Choi, W.; Cockburn, B.; Jones, D.; Lifschitz, A.; Margolin, L.; Marsden, L.; Nadiga, B.; Poje, A.; Smolarkiewicz, P. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Levermore, D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (United States)

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The ocean is a very complex nonlinear system that exhibits turbulence on essentially all scales, multiple equilibria, and significant intrinsic variability. Modeling the ocean`s dynamics at mesoscales is of fundamental importance for long-time-scale climate predictions. A major goal of this project has been to coordinate, strengthen, and focus the efforts of applied mathematicians, computer scientists, computational physicists and engineers (at LANL and a consortium of Universities) in a joint effort addressing the issues in mesoscale ocean dynamics. The project combines expertise in the core competencies of high performance computing and theory of complex systems in a new way that has great potential for improving ocean models now running on the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5 and on the Cray T3D.

  19. Fuel Retrieval Sub Project (FRS) Stuck Fuel Station Performance Test Data Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2000-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides the test data report for Stuck Fuel Station Performance Testing in support of the Fuel Retrieval Sub-Project. The stuck fuel station was designed to provide a means of cutting open a canister barrel to release fuel elements, etc.

  20. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW's Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  1. Healy Clean Coal Project: Healy coal firing at TRW Cleveland Test Facility. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koyama, T.; Petrill, E.; Sheppard, D.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A test burn of two Alaskan coals was conducted at TRW`s Cleveland test facility in support of the Healy Clean Coal Project, as part of Clean Coal Technology III Program in which a new power plant will be constructed using a TRW Coal Combustion System. This system features ash slagging technology combined with NO{sub x} and SO{sub x} control. The tests, funded by the Alaska Industrial Development and Export Authority (AIDEA) and TRW, were conducted to verify that the candidate Healy station coals could be successfully fired in the TRW coal combustor, to provide data required for scale-up to the utility project size requirements, and to produce sufficient flash-calcined material (FCM) for spray dryer tests to be conducted by Joy/NIRO. The tests demonstrated that both coals are viable candidates for the project, provided the data required for scale-up, and produced the FCM material. This report describes the modifications to the test facility which were required for the test burn, the tests run, and the results of the tests.

  2. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 208 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS EARLY CENOZOIC EXTREME CLIMATES -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  3. December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    December 2001 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 203 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE EQUATORIAL -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University. Acton Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  4. NREL Small Wind Turbine Test Project: Mariah Power's Windspire Wind Turbine Test Chronology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huskey, A.; Forsyth, T.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents a chronology of tests conducted at NREL's National Wind Technology Center on Mariah Power's Windspire 1.2-kW wind turbine and a letter of response from Mariah Power.

  5. Action Memorandum for the Engineering Test Reactor under the Idaho Cleanup Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. B. Culp

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This Action Memorandum documents the selected alternative for decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor at the Idaho National Laboratory under the Idaho Cleanup Project. Since the missions of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex have been completed, an engineering evaluation/cost analysis that evaluated alternatives to accomplish the decommissioning of the Engineering Test Reactor Complex was prepared adn released for public comment. The scope of this Action Memorandum is to encompass the final end state of the Complex and disposal of the Engineering Test Reactor vessol. The selected removal action includes removing and disposing of the vessel at the Idaho CERCLA Disposal Facility and demolishing the reactor building to ground surface.

  6. Ocean General Circulation Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoon, Jin-Ho; Ma, Po-Lun

    2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Definition of Subject The purpose of this text is to provide an introduction to aspects of oceanic general circulation models (OGCMs), an important component of Climate System or Earth System Model (ESM). The role of the ocean in ESMs is described in Chapter XX (EDITOR: PLEASE FIND THE COUPLED CLIMATE or EARTH SYSTEM MODELING CHAPTERS). The emerging need for understanding the Earth’s climate system and especially projecting its future evolution has encouraged scientists to explore the dynamical, physical, and biogeochemical processes in the ocean. Understanding the role of these processes in the climate system is an interesting and challenging scientific subject. For example, a research question how much extra heat or CO2 generated by anthropogenic activities can be stored in the deep ocean is not only scientifically interesting but also important in projecting future climate of the earth. Thus, OGCMs have been developed and applied to investigate the various oceanic processes and their role in the climate system.

  7. AVTA: Chrysler RAM Experimental PHEV Pickup Truck Recovery Act Project Testing Results Phase 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Vehicle Technologies Office's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity carries out testing on a wide range of advanced vehicles and technologies on dynamometers, closed test tracks, and on-the-road. These results provide benchmark data that researchers can use to develop technology models and guide future research and development. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act supported a number of projects that together made up the largest ever deployment of plug-in electric vehicles and charging infrastructure in the U.S. The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Chrysler RAM PHEV, a demonstration vehicle not currently available for sale. The baseline performance testing provides a point of comparison for the other test results. Taken together, these reports give an overall view of how this vehicle functions under extensive testing. This research was conducted by Idaho National Laboratory.

  8. High Burnup Dry Storage Cask Research and Development Project, Final Test Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    EPRI is leading a project team to develop and implement the first five years of a Test Plan to collect data from a SNF dry storage system containing high burnup fuel.12 The Test Plan defined in this document outlines the data to be collected, and the storage system design, procedures, and licensing necessary to implement the Test Plan.13 The main goals of the proposed test are to provide confirmatory data14 for models, future SNF dry storage cask design, and to support license renewals and new licenses for ISFSIs. To provide data that is most relevant to high burnup fuel in dry storage, the design of the test storage system must mimic real conditions that high burnup SNF experiences during all stages of dry storage: loading, cask drying, inert gas backfilling, and transfer to the ISFSI for multi-year storage.15 Along with other optional modeling, SETs, and SSTs, the data collected in this Test Plan can be used to evaluate the integrity of dry storage systems and the high burnup fuel contained therein over many decades. It should be noted that the Test Plan described in this document discusses essential activities that go beyond the first five years of Test Plan implementation.16 The first five years of the Test Plan include activities up through loading the cask, initiating the data collection, and beginning the long-term storage period at the ISFSI. The Test Plan encompasses the overall project that includes activities that may not be completed until 15 or more years from now, including continued data collection, shipment of the Research Project Cask to a Fuel Examination Facility, opening the cask at the Fuel Examination Facility, and examining the high burnup fuel after the initial storage period.

  9. Underground Test Area Project Waste Management Plan (Rev. No. 2, April 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IT Corporation, Las Vegas

    2002-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Operations Office (NNSA/NV) initiated the UGTA Project to characterize the risk posed to human health and the environment as a result of underground nuclear testing activities at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The UGTA Project investigation sites have been grouped into Corrective Action Units (CAUs) in accordance with the most recent version of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order. The primary UGTA objective is to gather data to characterize the groundwater aquifers beneath the NTS and adjacent lands. The investigations proposed under the UGTA program may involve the drilling and sampling of new wells; recompletion, monitoring, and sampling of existing wells; well development and hydrologic/ aquifer testing; geophysical surveys; and subsidence crater recharge evaluation. Those wastes generated as a result of these activities will be managed in accordance with existing federal and state regulations, DOE Orders, and NNSA/NV waste minimization and pollution prevention objectives. This Waste Management Plan provides a general framework for all Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project participants to follow for the characterization, storage/accumulation, treatment, and disposal of wastes generated by UGTA Project activities. The objective of this waste management plan is to provide guidelines to minimize waste generation and to properly manage wastes that are produced. Attachment 1 to this plan is the Fluid Management Plan and details specific strategies for management of fluids produced under UGTA operations.

  10. apollo-soyuz test project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    apollo-soyuz test project First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Blended Wing PRESENTATION...

  11. Phase 2 Reese River Geothermal Project Slim Well 56-4 Drilling and Testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henkle, William R.; Ronne, Joel

    2008-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the drilling and testing of the slim well 56-4 at the Reese River Geothermal Project in Lander County, Nevada. This well was partially funded through a GRED III Cooperative Funding Agreement # DE-FC36-04GO14344, from USDOE.

  12. Shaft Sinking at the Nevada Test Site, U1h Shaft Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B. Briggs; R. Musick

    2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U1h Shaft Project is a design/build subcontract to construct one 6.1 meter (m) (20 feet (ft)) finished diameter shaft to a depth of 321.6 m (1,055 ft.) at the Nevada Test Site. Atkinson Construction was subcontracted by Bechtel Nevada to construct the U1h Shaft for the U.S. Department of Energy. The project consists of furnishing and installing the sinking plant, construction of the 321.6 m (1,055 ft.) of concrete lined shaft, development of a shaft station at a depth of 297.5 m (976 ft.), and construction of a loading pocket at the station. The outfitting of the shaft and installation of a new hoist may be incorporated into the project at a later date. This paper will describe the design phase, the excavation and lining operation, shaft station construction and the contractual challenges encountered on this project.

  13. Fabrication, inspection, and test plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel irradiation project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, G.W.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Materials Disposition Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of MOX fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the ATR to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. In addition, the test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the data base required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues (ORNL/MD/LTR-76). This Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan (FITP) is a level 2 document as defined in the FMDP LWR MOX Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-78).

  14. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  15. Wind-electric icemaking project: Analysis and dynamometer testing. Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holz, R.; Gervorgian, V.; Drouilhet, S.; Muljadi, E.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The wind/hybrid systems group at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory has been researching the most practical and cost-effective methods for producing ice from off-grid wind-electric power systems. The first phase of the project, conducted in 1993--1994, included full-scale dynamometer and field testing of two different electric ice makers directly connected to a permanent magnet alternator. The results of that phase were encouraging and the second phase of the project was launched in which steady-state and dynamic numerical models of these systems were developed and experimentally validated. The third phase of the project was the dynamometer testing of the North Star ice maker, which is powered by a 12-kilowatt Bergey Windpower Company, Inc., alternator. This report describes both the second and third project phases. Also included are detailed economic analyses and a discussion of the future prospects of wind-electric ice-making systems. The main report is contained in Volume 1. Volume 2 consists of the report appendices, which include the actual computer programs used in the analysis and the detailed test results.

  16. Optical properties are an important way to understand how climate change is altering the oceans we rely on. Dr David Antoine leads the BIOCAREX project in improving analysis of optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoine, David

    Optical properties are an important way to understand how climate change is altering the oceans we rely on. Dr David Antoine leads the BIOCAREX project in improving analysis of optical properties. Here, he discusses bio-optics and their application in the Mediterranean Sea As an introduction could you

  17. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2000 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davisson, M L; Eaton, G F; Hakemi, N L; Hudson, G B; Hutcheon, I D; Lau, C A; Kersting, A B; Kenneally, J M; Moran, J E; Phinney, D L; Rose, T P; Smith, D K; Sylwester, E R; Wang, L; Williams, R; Zavarin, M

    2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report highlights the results of FY 2000 technical studies conducted by the Analytical and Nuclear Chemistry Division (ANCD) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrology and Radionuclide Migration Program (HRMP) and Underground Test Area (UGTA) Project. This is the latest in a series of annual reports published by LLNL-ANCD to document recent investigations of radionuclide migration and transport processes at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The HRMP is sponsored by Defense Programs (DP) at the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOENV), and supports DP operations at the NTS through studies of radiochemical and hydrologic processes that are relevant to the DP mission. Other organizations that support the HRMP include Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), the Desert Research Institute (DRI) of the University of Nevada, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPS), and Bechtel Nevada (BN). The UGTA Project is sponsored by the Environmental Management (EM) program at DOENV; its goal is to determine the extent of radionuclide contamination in groundwater resulting from underground nuclear testing at the NTS. The project strategy follows guidelines set forth in a Federal Facilities Agreement and Consent Order between the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Defense, and the State of Nevada. Participating contractors include LLNL (both ANCD and the Energy and Environmental Sciences Directorate), LANL, USGS, DRI, BN, and IT Corporation (with subcontract support from Geotrans Inc.).

  18. 4 -Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Stephen

    4 - Coastal Ocean Processes The Oregon Coastal Ocean: A Sink for Atmospheric CO 2 ? As part of the Coastal Ocean Processes (CoOP)-sponsored Coastal Ocean Advances in Shelf Transport project (COAST) we laboratory, we developed analytical sys- tems that were capable of measuring nutrient con- centrations and CO

  19. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Emergency Firewater Injection System Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  20. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Diesel Bus (E-3) and Switchgear Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  1. Safety Design Strategy for the Advanced Test Reactor Primary Coolant Pump and Motor Replacement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel Duckwitz

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In accordance with the requirements of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 413.3B, “Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets,” safety must be integrated into the design process for new or major modifications to DOE Hazard Category 1, 2, and 3 nuclear facilities. The intended purpose of this requirement involves the handling of hazardous materials, both radiological and chemical, in a way that provides adequate protection to the public, workers, and the environment. Requirements provided in DOE Order 413.3B and DOE Order 420.1B, “Facility Safety,” and the expectations of DOE-STD-1189-2008, “Integration of Safety into the Design Process,” provide for identification of hazards early in the project and use of an integrated team approach to design safety into the facility. This safety design strategy provides the basic safety-in-design principles and concepts that will be used for the Advanced Test Reactor Reliability Sustainment Project. While this project does not introduce new hazards to the ATR, it has the potential for significant impacts to safety-related systems, structures, and components that are credited in the ATR safety basis and are being replaced. Thus the project has been determined to meet the definition of a major modification and is being managed accordingly.

  2. Puget Sound Tidal Energy In-Water Testing and Development Project Final Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craig W. Collar

    2012-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Tidal energy represents potential for the generation of renewable, emission free, environmentally benign, and cost effective energy from tidal flows. A successful tidal energy demonstration project in Puget Sound, Washington may enable significant commercial development resulting in important benefits for the northwest region and the nation. This project promoted the United States Department of Energy�s Wind and Hydropower Technologies Program�s goals of advancing the commercial viability, cost-competitiveness, and market acceptance of marine hydrokinetic systems. The objective of the Puget Sound Tidal Energy Demonstration Project is to conduct in-water testing and evaluation of tidal energy technology as a first step toward potential construction of a commercial-scale tidal energy power plant. The specific goal of the project phase covered by this award was to conduct all activities necessary to complete engineering design and obtain construction approvals for a pilot demonstration plant in the Admiralty Inlet region of the Puget Sound. Public Utility District No. 1 of Snohomish County (The District) accomplished the objectives of this award through four tasks: Detailed Admiralty Inlet Site Studies, Plant Design and Construction Planning, Environmental and Regulatory Activities, and Management and Reporting. Pre-Installation studies completed under this award provided invaluable data used for site selection, environmental evaluation and permitting, plant design, and construction planning. However, these data gathering efforts are not only important to the Admiralty Inlet pilot project. Lessons learned, in particular environmental data gathering methods, can be applied to future tidal energy projects in the United States and other parts of the world. The District collaborated extensively with project stakeholders to complete the tasks for this award. This included Federal, State, and local government agencies, tribal governments, environmental groups, and others. All required permit and license applications were completed and submitted under this award, including a Final License Application for a pilot hydrokinetic license from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The tasks described above have brought the project through all necessary requirements to construct a tidal pilot project in Admiralty Inlet with the exception of final permit and license approvals, and the selection of a general contractor to perform project construction.

  3. EA-1916: Ocean Renewable Power Company Maine, LLC Cobscook Bay Tidal Energy Pilot Project, Cobscook in Washington County, Maine

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Draft Environmental AssessmentThis EA evaluates the environmental impacts of a project that would use the tidal currents of Cobscook Bay to generate electricity via cross-flow Kinetic System turbine generator units (TGU) mounted on the seafloor. The TGUs would capture energy from the flow in both ebb and flood directions.

  4. Transferability of Data Related to the Underground Test Area Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada: Revision 0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture

    2004-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is the collaborative effort of the members of an ad hoc subcommittee of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) Technical Working Group (TWG). The UGTA Project relies on data from a variety of sources; therefore, a process is needed to identify relevant factors for determining whether material-property data collected from other areas can be used to support groundwater flow, radionuclide transport, and other models within a Corrective Action Unit (CAU), and for documenting the data transfer decision and process. This document describes the overall data transfer process. Separate Parameter Descriptions will be prepared that provide information for selected specific parameters as determined by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) UGTA Project Manager. This document and its accompanying appendices do not provide the specific criteria to be used for transfer of data for specific uses. Rather, the criteria will be established by separate parameter-specific and model-specific Data Transfer Protocols. The CAU Data Documentation Packages and data analysis reports will apply the protocols and provide or reference a document with the data transfer evaluations and decisions.

  5. Test Results For a 25-m Prototype Fault Current Limiting HTS Cable for Project Hydra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rey, Christopher M [ORNL] [ORNL; Duckworth, Robert C [ORNL] [ORNL; Demko, Jonathan A [ORNL] [ORNL; Ellis, Alvin R [ORNL] [ORNL; Gouge, Michael J [ORNL] [ORNL; James, David Randy [ORNL] [ORNL; Tuncer, Enis [ORNL] [ORNL

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has tested a 25-m long prototype High Temperature Superconducting (HTS) cable with inherent Fault-Current Limiting (FCL) capability at its recently upgraded HTS cable test facility in Oak Ridge, TN. The HTS-FCL cable and terminations were designed and fabricated by Ultera, which is a joint venture of Southwire and nkt cables with FCL features and HTS wire provided by American Superconductor Corporation. The overall project is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. The ultimate goal of the 25-m HTS-FCL cable test program was to verify the design and ensure the operational integrity for the eventual installation of a ~ 200-m fully functional HTS-FCL cable in the Consolidated Edison electric grid located in downtown New York City. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable consisted of a three-phase (3- ) Triax design with a cold dielectric between the phases. The HTS-FCL cable had an operational voltage of 13.8 kV phase-to-phase and an operating current of 4000 Arms per phase, which is the highest operating current to date of any HTS cable. The 25-m HTS-FCL cable was subjected to a series of cryogenic and electrical tests. Test results from the 25-m HTS-FCL cable are presented and discussed.

  6. November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    November 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 209 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING MANTLE PERIDOTITE ALONG Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA -------------------------------- Dr. D. Jay Miller Leg Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University

  7. Sandia National Laboratories: ocean energy converters

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ocean energy converters DOE-Sponsored Reference Model Project Results Released On January 28, 2014, in Computational Modeling & Simulation, Energy, News, News & Events,...

  8. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

    An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of geographic, economic...

  9. A Study of the Economic Impact of Water Impoundment Through Validity Testing of a Comparitive-Projection Model 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pearson, J. E.; Heideman, K. E.

    1969-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An established economic simulation model for reservoir development was applied to ten reservoir projects throughout Texas. The model as a predictor of economic impact was given a difficult test because of the diversity of ...

  10. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors' designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550[degree]F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100[degree]F lower.

  11. Department of Mechanical Engineering/Material Science and Engineering Spring 2013 Project Name Development of Test Rig to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demirel, Melik C.

    PENNSTATE Department of Mechanical Engineering/Material Science and Engineering Spring 2013 Project Name ­ Development of Test Rig to Analyze Composite Materials for Pump Wear Rings Overview Flowserve up. The hardest part of this project was learning SolidWorks, how to incorporate mechanical design

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 199 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS PALEOGENE EQUATORIAL TRANSECT Dr. Mitchell __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Project Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive

  13. West Valley Demonstration Project vitrification process equipment Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carl, D.E.; Paul, J.; Foran, J.M.; Brooks, R.

    1990-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Vitrification Facility (VF) at the West Valley Demonstration Project was designed to convert stored radioactive waste into a stable glass for disposal in a federal repository. The Functional and Checkout Testing of Systems (FACTS) program was conducted from 1984 to 1989. During this time new equipment and processes were developed, installed, and implemented. Thirty-seven FACTS tests were conducted, and approximately 150,000 kg of glass were made by using nonradioactive materials to simulate the radioactive waste. By contrast, the planned radioactive operation is expected to produce approximately 500,000 kg of glass. The FACTS program demonstrated the effectiveness of equipment and procedures in the vitrification system, and the ability of the VF to produce quality glass on schedule. FACTS testing also provided data to validate the WVNS waste glass qualification method and verify that the product glass would meet federal repository acceptance requirements. The system was built and performed to standards which would have enabled it to be used in radioactive service. As a result, much of the VF tested, such as the civil construction, feed mixing and holding vessels, and the off-gas scrubber, will be converted for radioactive operation. The melter was still in good condition after being at temperature for fifty-eight of the sixty months of FACTS. However, the melter exceeded its recommended design life and will be replaced with a similar melter. Components that were not designed for remote operation and maintenance will be replaced with remote-use items. The FACTS testing was accomplished with no significant worker injury or environmental releases. During the last FACTS run, the VF processes approximated the remote-handling system that will be used in radioactive operations. Following this run the VF was disassembled for conversion to a radioactive process. Functional and checkout testing of new components will be performed prior to radioactive operation.

  14. K Basin Sludge Conditioning Process Testing Project Results from Test 4, ''Acid Digestion of Mixed-Bed Ion Exchange Resin''

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pool, K.H.; Delegard, C.H.; Schmidt, A.J.; Thornton, B.M.; Silvers, K.L.

    1999-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximately 73 m{sup 3} of heterogeneous solid material, ''sludge,'' (upper bound estimate, Packer 1997) have accumulated at the bottom of the K Basins in the 100 K Area of the Hanford Site. This sludge is a mixture of spent fuel element corrosion products, ion exchange materials (organic and inorganic), graphite-based gasket materials, iron and aluminum metal corrosion products, sand, and debris (Makenas et al. 1996, 1997). In addition, small amounts of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) have been found. Ultimately, it is planned to transfer the K Basins sludge to the Hanford double shell tanks (DSTs). The Hanford Spent Nuclear Fuel (HSNF) project has conducted a number of evaluations to examine technology and processing alternatives to pretreat K Basin sludge to meet storage and disposal requirements. From these evaluations, chemical pretreatment has been selected to address criticality issues, reactivity, and the destruction or removal of PCBs before the K Basin sludge can be transferred to the DSTs. Chemical pretreatment, referred to as the K Basin sludge conditioning process, includes nitric acid dissolution of the sludge (with removal of acid insoluble solids), neutrons absorber addition, neutralization, and reprecipitation. Laboratory testing is being conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to provide data necessary to develop the sludge conditioning process.

  15. Hydrothermal Testing of K Basin Sludge and N Reactor Fuel at Sludge Treatment Project Operating Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delegard, Calvin H.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Thornton, Brenda M.

    2007-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sludge Treatment Project (STP), managed for the U. S. DOE by Fluor Hanford (FH), was created to design and operate a process to eliminate uranium metal from K Basin sludge prior to packaging for Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). The STP process uses high temperature liquid water to accelerate the reaction, produce uranium dioxide from the uranium metal, and safely discharge the hydrogen. Under nominal process conditions, the sludge will be heated in pressurized water at 185°C for as long as 72 hours to assure the complete reaction (corrosion) of up to 0.25-inch diameter uranium metal pieces. Under contract to FH, the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) conducted bench-scale testing of the STP hydrothermal process in November and December 2006. Five tests (~50 ml each) were conducted in sealed, un-agitated reaction vessels under the hydrothermal conditions (e.g., 7 to 72 h at 185°C) of the STP corrosion process using radioactive sludge samples collected from the K East Basin and particles/coupons of N Reactor fuel also taken from the K Basins. The tests were designed to evaluate and understand the chemical changes that may be occurring and the effects that any changes would have on sludge rheological properties. The tests were not designed to evaluate engineering aspects of the process. The hydrothermal treatment affected the chemical and physical properties of the sludge. In each test, significant uranium compound phase changes were identified, resulting from dehydration and chemical reduction reactions. Physical properties of the sludge were significantly altered from their initial, as-settled sludge values, including, shear strength, settled density, weight percent water, and gas retention.

  16. Environmental assessment for the Groundwater Characterization Project, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada; Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to conduct a program to characterize groundwater at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), Nye County, Nevada, in accordance with a 1987 DOE memorandum stating that all past, present, and future nuclear test sites would be treated as Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) sites (Memorandum from Bruce Green, Weapons Design and Testing Division, June 6, 1987). DOE has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-0532) to evaluate the environmental consequences associated with the proposed action, referred to as the Groundwater Characterization Project (GCP). This proposed action includes constructing access roads and drill pads, drilling and testing wells, and monitoring these wells for the purpose of characterizing groundwater at the NTS. Long-term monitoring and possible use of these wells in support of CERCLA, as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act, is also proposed. The GCP includes measures to mitigate potential impacts on sensitive biological, cultural and historical resources, and to protect workers and the environment from exposure to any radioactive or mixed waste materials that may be encountered. DOE considers those mitigation measures related to sensitive biological, cultural and historic resources as essential to render the impacts of the proposed action not significant, and DOE has prepared a Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) that explains how such mitigations will be planned and implemented. Based on the analyses presented in the EA, DOE has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). Therefore, preparation of an environmental impact statement is not required and the Department is issuing this FONSI.

  17. MHK Projects/Modeling the Physical and Biochemical Influence...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Project Resource Click here Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Project Nearest Body of Water Pacific Ocean Coordinates 21.9, 158.75 Project Phase Phase 1 Project Details The work...

  18. 2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2009 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  19. 2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2008 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  20. 2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2012 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  1. 2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2007 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  2. 2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2012 OCEAN DRILLING CITATION REPORT Covering Citations Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, and Integrated Ocean Drilling Program from GeoRef Citations Indexed by the American Geological Institute from 1969 through 2011 Produced by Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  3. US-VISIT Independent Verification and Validation Project: Test Bed Establishment Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, N W; Gansemer, J D

    2011-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the computational and data systems available at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use on the US-VISIT Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) project. This system - composed of data, software and hardware - is designed to be as close as a representation of the operational ADIS system as is required to verify and validate US-VISIT methodologies. It is not required to reproduce the computational capabilities of the enterprise-class operational system. During FY10, the test bed was simplified from the FY09 version by reducing the number of database host computers from three to one, significantly reducing the maintenance and overhead while simultaneously increasing system throughput. During the current performance period, a database transfer was performed as a set of Data Pump Export files. The previous RMAN backup from 2007 required the availability of an AIX system which is not required when using data pump. Due to efficiencies in the new system and process, loading of the database refresh was able to be accomplished in a much shorter time frame than was previously required. The FY10 Oracle Test Bed now consists of a single Linux platform hosting two Oracle databases including the 2007 copy as well as the October 2010 refresh.

  4. Conceptual Design Report: Nevada Test Site Mixed Waste Disposal Facility Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NSTec Environmental Management

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Environmental cleanup of contaminated nuclear weapons manufacturing and test sites generates radioactive waste that must be disposed. Site cleanup activities throughout the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex are projected to continue through 2050. Some of this waste is mixed waste (MW), containing both hazardous and radioactive components. In addition, there is a need for MW disposal from other mission activities. The Waste Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Record of Decision designates the Nevada Test Site (NTS) as a regional MW disposal site. The NTS has a facility that is permitted to dispose of onsite- and offsite-generated MW until November 30, 2010. There is not a DOE waste management facility that is currently permitted to dispose of offsite-generated MW after 2010, jeopardizing the DOE environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. A mission needs document (CD-0) has been prepared for a newly permitted MW disposal facility at the NTS that would provide the needed capability to support DOE's environmental cleanup mission and other MW-generating mission-related activities. This report presents a conceptual engineering design for a MW facility that is fully compliant with Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) and DOE O 435.1, 'Radioactive Waste Management'. The facility, which will be located within the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site (RWMS) at the NTS, will provide an approximately 20,000-cubic yard waste disposal capacity. The facility will be licensed by the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection (NDEP).

  5. EA-1792-S1: University of Maine's Deepwater Offshore Floating Wind Turbine Testing and Demonstration Project – Castine Harbor Test Site

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Supplemental EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the University of Maine proposal to use Congressionally directed federal funding, from DOE, to deploy, test and retrieve one 1/8-scale floating wind turbine (20kw) prototype in Castine Harbor, offshore of Castine Maine. This test would be conducted prior to testing at the site 2 miles from Monhegan Island (evaluated under DOE EA-1792).

  6. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for effective application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  7. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahmat Aryaeinejad; Douglas S. Crawford; Mark D. DeHart; George W. Griffith; D. Scott Lucas; Joseph W. Nielsen; David W. Nigg; James R. Parry; Jorge Navarro

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or “Core Modeling Update”) Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF).

  8. West Pearl Queen CO2 sequestration pilot test and modeling project 2006-2008.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engler, Bruce Phillip; Cooper, Scott Patrick; Symons, Neill Phillip; Bartel, Lewis Clark; Byrer, Charles (National Energy Laboratory, Morgantown, WV); Elbring, Gregory Jay; McNemar, Andrea (National Energy Laboratory, Morgantown, WV); Aldridge, David Franklin; Lorenz, John Clay

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The West Pearl Queen is a depleted oil reservoir that has produced approximately 250,000 bbl of oil since 1984. Production had slowed prior to CO{sub 2} injection, but no previous secondary or tertiary recovery methods had been applied. The initial project involved reservoir characterization and field response to injection of CO{sub 2}; the field experiment consisted of injection, soak, and venting. For fifty days (December 20, 2002, to February 11, 2003) 2090 tons of CO{sub 2} were injected into the Shattuck Sandstone Member of the Queen Formation at the West Pearl Queen site. This technical report highlights the test results of the numerous research participants and technical areas from 2006-2008. This work included determination of lateral extents of the permeability units using outcrop observations, core results, and well logs. Pre- and post-injection 3D seismic data were acquired. To aid in interpreting seismic data, we performed numerical simulations of the effects of CO{sub 2} replacement of brine where the reservoir model was based upon correlation lengths established by the permeability studies. These numerical simulations are not intended to replicate field data, but to provide insight of the effects of CO{sub 2}.

  9. Prototypical Rod Consolidation Demonstration Project. Phase 3, Final report: Volume 1, Cold checkout test report, Book 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of Phase 3 of the Prototypical Rod consolidation Demonstration Project (PRCDP) was to procure, fabricate, assemble, and test the Prototypical Rod consolidation System as described in the NUS Phase 2 Final Design Report. This effort required providing the materials, components, and fabricated parts which makes up all of the system equipment. In addition, it included the assembly, installation, and setup of this equipment at the Cold Test Facility. During the Phase 3 effort the system was tested on a component, subsystem, and system level. This volume 1, discusses the PRCDP Phase 3 Test Program that was conducted by the HALLIBURTON NUS Environmental Corporation under contract AC07-86ID12651 with the United States Department of Energy. This document, Volume 1, Book 2 discusses the following topics: Fuel Rod Extraction System Test Results and Analysis Reports and Clamping Table Test Results and Analysis Reports.

  10. Final report: Long Term Test of a Gear-Type Pump for the Am/Cm Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duignan, M.R. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the request of the Immobilization Technology section, the Experimental Thermal Fluids group carried out a test to determine the operational characteristics of a gear-type pump. This pump was under consideration as a replacement for the air-lift melter feed pumping system of the Americium and Curium Project.

  11. Project Management Plan for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Experimental Test Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Connolly, M.J.; Sayer, D.L.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    EG&G Idaho, Inc. and Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) are participating in the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory`s (INEL`s) Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Experimental Test Program (WETP). The purpose of the INEL WET is to provide chemical, physical, and radiochemical data on transuranic (TRU) waste to be stored at WIPP. The waste characterization data collected will be used to support the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA), development of the disposal No-Migration Variance Petition (NMVP), and to support the WIPP disposal decision. The PA is an analysis required by the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Title 40, Part 191 (40 CFR 191), which identifies the processes and events that may affect the disposal system (WIPP) and examines the effects of those processes and events on the performance of WIPP. A NMVP is required for the WIPP by 40 CFR 268 in order to dispose of land disposal restriction (LDR) mixed TRU waste in WIPP. It is anticipated that the detailed Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) waste characterization data of all INEL retrievably-stored TRU waste to be stored in WIPP will be required for the NMVP. Waste characterization requirements for PA and RCRA may not necessarily be identical. Waste characterization requirements for the PA will be defined by Sandia National Laboratories. The requirements for RCRA are defined in 40 CFR 268, WIPP RCRA Part B Application Waste Analysis Plan (WAP), and WIPP Waste Characterization Program Plan (WWCP). This Project Management Plan (PMP) addresses only the characterization of the contact handled (CH) TRU waste at the INEL. This document will address all work in which EG&G Idaho is responsible concerning the INEL WETP. Even though EG&G Idaho has no responsibility for the work that ANL-W is performing, EG&G Idaho will keep a current status and provide a project coordination effort with ANL-W to ensure that the INEL, as a whole, is effectively and efficiently completing the requirements for WETP.

  12. 2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Covering Cita ons Related to the Deep Sea Drilling Project, Ocean Drilling Program, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, and Interna onal Ocean Discovery Program from #12;22014 Ocean Drilling Cita on Report Introduc on At the end of each fiscal year, the Interna onal

  13. Scientific Drilling, Number 1, 2005 Scientific ocean drilling started in the early 1960s with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demouchy, Sylvie

    Scientific Drilling, Number 1, 2005 Scientific ocean drilling started in the early 1960s, or the Moho). This project, known as Mohole, was succeeded by the Deep Sea Drilling Project, the International Phase of Ocean Drilling, the Ocean Drilling Program, and the current Integrated Ocean Drilling Program

  14. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg; Devin A. Steuhm

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance and, to some extent, experiment management are obsolete, inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are becoming increasingly difficult to properly verify and validate (V&V). Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In 2009 the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols, with appropriate V&V, within the next 3-4 years via the ATR Core Modeling and Simulation and V&V Update (or 'Core Modeling Update') Project. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its first full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (SCALE, KENO-6, HELIOS, NEWT, and ATTILA) have been installed at the INL under various permanent sitewide license agreements and corresponding baseline models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational, demonstrating the basic feasibility of these code packages for their intended purpose. Furthermore, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system is being implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications in 2011 and beyond as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation. Finally we note that although full implementation of the new computational models and protocols will extend over a period 3-4 years as noted above, interim applications in the much nearer term have already been demonstrated. In particular, these demonstrations included an analysis that was useful for understanding the cause of some issues in December 2009 that were triggered by a larger than acceptable discrepancy between the measured excess core reactivity and a calculated value that was based on the legacy computational methods. As the Modeling Update project proceeds we anticipate further such interim, informal, applications in parallel with formal qualification of the system under the applicable INL Quality Assurance procedures and standards.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Hydrogeologic Units at the Nevada Test Site Using Geophysical Logs: Examples from the Underground Test Area Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lance Prothro, Sigmund Drellack, Margaret Townsend

    2009-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The diverse and complex geology of the Nevada Test Site region makes for a challenging environment for identifying and characterizing hydrogeologic units penetrated by wells drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Underground Test Area (UGTA) Environmental Restoration Sub-Project. Fortunately, UGTA geoscientists have access to large and robust sets of subsurface geologic data, as well as a large historical knowledge base of subsurface geological analyses acquired mainly during the underground nuclear weapons testing program. Of particular importance to the accurate identification and characterization of hydrogeologic units in UGTA boreholes are the data and interpretation principles associated with geophysical well logs. Although most UGTA participants and stakeholders are probably familiar with drill hole data such as drill core and cuttings, they may be less familiar with the use of geophysical logs; this document is meant to serve as a primer on the use of geophysical logs in the UGTA project. Standard geophysical logging tools used in the UGTA project to identify and characterize hydrogeologic units are described, and basic interpretation principles and techniques are explained. Numerous examples of geophysical log data from a variety of hydrogeologic units encountered in UGTA wells are presented to highlight the use and value of geophysical logs in the accurate hydrogeologic characterization of UGTA wells.

  16. Project W-320 acceptance test report for AY-farm electrical distribution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bevins, R.R.

    1998-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the AY-Farm Electrical Distribution System functions as required by the design criteria. This test is divided into three parts to support the planned construction schedule; Section 8 tests Mini-Power Pane AY102-PPI and the EES; Section 9 tests the SSS support systems; Section 10 tests the SSS and the Multi-Pak Group Control Panel. This test does not include the operation of end-use components (loads) supplied from the distribution system. Tests of the end-use components (loads) will be performed by other W-320 ATPs.

  17. Hydrologic Resources Management Program and Underground Test Area Project FY 2006 Progress Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culham, H W; Eaton, G F; Genetti, V; Hu, Q; Kersting, A B; Lindvall, R E; Moran, J E; Blasiyh Nuno, G A; Powell, B A; Rose, T P; Singleton, M J; Williams, R W; Zavarin, M; Zhao, P

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes FY 2006 technical studies conducted by the Chemical Biology and Nuclear Science Division (CBND) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in support of the Hydrologic Resources Management Program (HRMP) and the Underground Test Area Project (UGTA). These programs are administered by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) through the Defense Programs and Environmental Restoration Divisions, respectively. HRMP-sponsored work is directed toward the responsible management of the natural resources at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), enabling its continued use as a staging area for strategic operations in support of national security. UGTA-funded work emphasizes the development of an integrated set of groundwater flow and contaminant transport models to predict the extent of radionuclide migration from underground nuclear testing areas at the NTS. The report is organized on a topical basis and contains four chapters that highlight technical work products produced by CBND. However, it is important to recognize that most of this work involves collaborative partnerships with the other HRMP and UGTA contract organizations. These groups include the Energy and Environment Directorate at LLNL (LLNL-E&E), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), the Desert Research Institute (DRI), the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Stoller-Navarro Joint Venture (SNJV), and National Security Technologies (NSTec). Chapter 1 is a summary of FY 2006 sampling efforts at near-field 'hot' wells at the NTS, and presents new chemical and isotopic data for groundwater samples from four near-field wells. These include PM-2 and U-20n PS 1DDh (CHESHIRE), UE-7ns (BOURBON), and U-19v PS No.1ds (ALMENDRO). Chapter 2 is a summary of the results of chemical and isotopic measurements of groundwater samples from three UGTA environmental monitoring wells. These wells are: ER-12-4 and U12S located in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and USGS HGH No.2 WW2 located in Yucca Flat. In addition, three springs were sampled White Rock Spring and Captain Jack Spring in Area 12 on Rainier Mesa and Topopah Spring in Area 29. Chapter 3 is a compilation of existing noble gas data that has been reviewed and edited to remove inconsistencies in presentation of total vs. single isotope noble gas values reported in the previous HRMP and UGTA progress reports. Chapter 4 is a summary of the results of batch sorption and desorption experiments performed to determine the distribution coefficients (Kd) of Pu(IV), Np(V), U(VI), Cs and Sr to zeolitized tuff (tuff confining unit, TCU) and carbonate (lower carbonate aquifer, LCA) rocks in synthetic NTS groundwater Chapter 5 is a summary of the results of a series of flow-cell experiments performed to examine Np(V) and Pu(V) sorption to and desorption from goethite. Np and Pu desorption occur at a faster rate and to a greater extent than previously reported. In addition, oxidation changes occurred with the Pu whereby the surface-sorbed Pu(IV) was reoxidized to aqueous Pu(V) during desorption.

  18. Fuel Retrieval Sub (FRS) Project Decapping Station Performance Test Data Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    THIELGES, J.R.

    2000-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is to provide the test data report for Decapping Station Performance Testing. These performance tests were full scale and viewed as a continuation of development testing performed earlier (SNF-2710). A prototype decapping station confinement box was tested, along with some special tools required for the process, providing assurance that the fuel handling equipment will operate as designed, allowing for release of the FRS equipment for installation.

  19. Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) - Aquantis C-Plane Ocean Current Turbine Project Dehlsen (TRL 5 6 System) -...

  20. Advanced Test Reactor Core Modeling Update Project Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David W. Nigg, Principal Investigator; Kevin A. Steuhm, Project Manager

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Legacy computational reactor physics software tools and protocols currently used for support of Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) core fuel management and safety assurance, and to some extent, experiment management, are inconsistent with the state of modern nuclear engineering practice, and are difficult, if not impossible, to properly verify and validate (V&V) according to modern standards. Furthermore, the legacy staff knowledge required for application of these tools and protocols from the 1960s and 1970s is rapidly being lost due to staff turnover and retirements. In late 2009, the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) initiated a focused effort, the ATR Core Modeling Update Project, to address this situation through the introduction of modern high-fidelity computational software and protocols. This aggressive computational and experimental campaign will have a broad strategic impact on the operation of the ATR, both in terms of improved computational efficiency and accuracy for support of ongoing DOE programs as well as in terms of national and international recognition of the ATR National Scientific User Facility (NSUF). The ATR Core Modeling Update Project, targeted for full implementation in phase with the next anticipated ATR Core Internals Changeout (CIC) in the 2014-2015 time frame, began during the last quarter of Fiscal Year 2009, and has just completed its third full year. Key accomplishments so far have encompassed both computational as well as experimental work. A new suite of stochastic and deterministic transport theory based reactor physics codes and their supporting nuclear data libraries (HELIOS, KENO6/SCALE, NEWT/SCALE, ATTILA, and an extended implementation of MCNP5) has been installed at the INL under various licensing arrangements. Corresponding models of the ATR and ATRC are now operational with all five codes, demonstrating the basic feasibility of the new code packages for their intended purpose. Of particular importance, a set of as-run core depletion HELIOS calculations for all ATR cycles since August 2009, Cycle 145A through Cycle 151B, was successfully completed during 2012. This major effort supported a decision late in the year to proceed with the phased incorporation of the HELIOS methodology into the ATR Core Safety Analysis Package (CSAP) preparation process, in parallel with the established PDQ-based methodology, beginning late in Fiscal Year 2012. Acquisition of the advanced SERPENT (VTT-Finland) and MC21 (DOE-NR) Monte Carlo stochastic neutronics simulation codes was also initiated during the year and some initial applications of SERPENT to ATRC experiment analysis were demonstrated. These two new codes will offer significant additional capability, including the possibility of full-3D Monte Carlo fuel management support capabilities for the ATR at some point in the future. Finally, a capability for rigorous sensitivity analysis and uncertainty quantification based on the TSUNAMI system has been implemented and initial computational results have been obtained. This capability will have many applications as a tool for understanding the margins of uncertainty in the new models as well as for validation experiment design and interpretation.

  1. Fabrication, Inspection, and Test Plan for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) High-Power Mixed-Oxide (MOX) Fuel Irradiation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wachs, G. W.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Fissile Disposition Program (FMDP) has announced that reactor irradiation of Mixed-Oxide (MOX) fuel is one of the preferred alternatives for disposal of surplus weapons-usable plutonium (Pu). MOX fuel has been utilized domestically in test reactors and on an experimental basis in a number of Commercial Light Water Reactors (CLWRs). Most of this experience has been with Pu derived from spent low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel, known as reactor grade (RG) Pu. The High-Power MOX fuel test will be irradiated in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) to provide preliminary data to demonstrate that the unique properties of surplus weapons-derived or weapons-grade (WG) plutonium (Pu) do not compromise the applicability of this MOX experience base. The purpose of the high-power experiment, in conjunction with the currently ongoing average-power experiment at the ATR, is to contribute new information concerning the response of WG plutonium under more severe irradiation conditions typical of the peak power locations in commercial reactors. In addition, the high-power test will contribute experience with irradiation of gallium-containing fuel to the database required for resolution of generic CLWR fuel design issues. The distinction between "high-power" and "average-power" relates to the position within the nominal CLWR core. The high-power test project is subject to a number of requirements, as discussed in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light Water Reactor Mixed Oxide Fuel Irradiation High-Power Test Project Plan (ORNL/MD/LTR-125).

  2. Final Technical Resource Confirmation Testing at the Raft River Geothermal Project, Cassia County, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glaspey, Douglas J.

    2008-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Incorporates the results of flow tests for geothermal production and injection wells in the Raft River geothermal field in southern Idaho. Interference testing was also accomplished across the wellfield.

  3. Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Chung; Pelfrey, J.R.

    1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four feet thick loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected.

  4. The Rosetta Resources CO2 Storage Project - A WESTCARB Geologic Pilot Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    abandoned gas field located near Rio Vista will be used for the Rosetta pilot tests. STACKED RESERVOIR

  5. The Mobile Test and Demonstration Unit, A Cooperative Project Between EPRI, Utilities and Industry to Demonstrate New Water Treatment Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strasser, J.; Mannapperuma, J.

    THE MOBILE TEST AND DEMONSTRATION UNIT, A COOPERATIVE PROJECT BETWEEN EPRl, UTll.JTIES AND INDUSTRY TO DEMONSTRATE NEW WATER TREATMENT TECHNOLOGIES Jurgen Strasser Consultant to the EPRI Food Office Process & Equipment Technology... agencies are encouraging the reduction of the discharge of high BOD and TSS waste water to the local mlUlicipalities and/or waterways. EPRI collaborated with utilities, the US Dept. of Energy, food processor trade groups, and scientists from the Calif...

  6. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource This project estimates the naturally available and technically recoverable U.S. wave energy resources, using...

  7. Predicting Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Modes with a Climate Modeling Hierarchy -- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michael Ghil, UCLA; Andrew W. Robertson, IRI, Columbia Univ.; Sergey Kravtsov, U. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee; Padhraic Smyth, UC Irvine

    2006-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the project was to determine midlatitude climate predictability associated with tropical-extratropical interactions on interannual-to-interdecadal time scales. Our strategy was to develop and test a hierarchy of climate models, bringing together large GCM-based climate models with simple fluid-dynamical coupled ocean-ice-atmosphere models, through the use of advanced probabilistic network (PN) models. PN models were used to develop a new diagnostic methodology for analyzing coupled ocean-atmosphere interactions in large climate simulations made with the NCAR Parallel Climate Model (PCM), and to make these tools user-friendly and available to other researchers. We focused on interactions between the tropics and extratropics through atmospheric teleconnections (the Hadley cell, Rossby waves and nonlinear circulation regimes) over both the North Atlantic and North Pacific, and the ocean’s thermohaline circulation (THC) in the Atlantic. We tested the hypothesis that variations in the strength of the THC alter sea surface temperatures in the tropical Atlantic, and that the latter influence the atmosphere in high latitudes through an atmospheric teleconnection, feeding back onto the THC. The PN model framework was used to mediate between the understanding gained with simplified primitive equations models and multi-century simulations made with the PCM. The project team is interdisciplinary and built on an existing synergy between atmospheric and ocean scientists at UCLA, computer scientists at UCI, and climate researchers at the IRI.

  8. AVTA: Chrysler RAM Experimental PHEV Pickup Truck Recovery Act Project Testing Results- Phase 2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The following reports describe results of testing done on a 2011 Chrysler RAM PHEV, a demonstration vehicle not currently available for sale.

  9. Mobile Melt-Dilute Technology Development Project FY 2005 Test Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David A. Sell; Donald Fisher

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The adaptation of Melt-Dilute technology to a mobile and deployable platform progressed with the installation of the prototype air-cooled induction furnace and power generator in an ISO cargo container. Process equipment tests were conducted in FY’05 on two fronts: the melt container and its associated hardware and the mobile furnace and generator. Container design was validated through tests at elevated temperature and pressure, under vacuum, and subjected to impact. The Mobile Melt-Dilute (MMD) furnace and power source tests were completed per the plan. The tests provided information necessary to successfully melt and dilute HEU research reactor fuel assemblies.

  10. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY09 Annual Report #12;Discrete core sampling #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), programs

  11. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY10 Annual Report #12;Crane ball #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research program Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), programs that revolutionized our view

  12. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY13 Annual Report #12;Tripping Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) monitored subseafloor environments and explored Earth's history Drilling Project (DSDP) and the Ocean Drilling Program (ODP), which revolutionized our view of Earth

  13. Projecting future changes in distributions of pelagic fish species of Northeast Pacific shelf seas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pauly, Daniel

    characteristics. Using projected ocean condition changes from three different Earth System Models, we simulated

  14. SHRP 2 Project L38 Pilot Testing of Reliability Data and Analytical Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    to address some of the most pressing needs related to the nation's highway system Safety: fielding/22/2014 2 #12;SHRP 2 Project L38 · Series of reliability analysis tools developed in previous research = 19.5 min #12;Reliability ­ CDF Curves 5/22/2014 9 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% 10 20

  15. Engineering testing and technology projects FY 1996 Site Support Program Plan, WBS 6.3.3 and 6.3.8. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, L.C.

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The engineering laboratory services for development, assembly, testing, and evaluation to support the resolution of WHC, Hanford, and DOE complex wide engineering issues for 1996 are presented. Primary customers are: TWRS, spent nuclear fuels, transition projects, liquid effluent program, and other Hanford contractors and programs. Products and services provided include: fabrication and assembly facilities for prototype and test equipment, development testing, proof of principle testing, instrumentation testing, nondestructive examination application development and testing, prototype equipment design and assembly, chemical engineering unit operations testing, engineering test system disposal, and safety issue resolution.

  16. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

  17. The Nevada Test Site Legacy TRU Waste - The WIPP Central Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, J. F.; Lahoud, R. G.; Foster, B. D.; VanMeighem, J.

    2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the Central Characterization Project (CCP) designed by the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) to aid sites, especially those sites with small quantities of transuranic (TRU) waste streams, in disposing of legacy waste at their facility. Because of the high cost of contracting vendors with the characterization capabilities necessary to meet the WIPP Waste Acceptance Criteria, utilizing the CCP is meant to simplify the process for small quantity sites. The paper will describe the process of mobilization of the vendors through CCP, the current production milestones that have been met, and the on-site lessons learned.

  18. Project Impact Assessments Â… Building America FY14 Field Test Technical Support

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of ContaminationHubs+ Report Presentation:in theProject Execution Plan ReviewLong

  19. Structural analysis of closure cap barriers: A pre-test study for the Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gong, Chung

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    According to the EPA-recommended closure cap design a waste site can either be covered with a single layer cap made of 36 inches of compacted soil (clay) or with a multilayer cap consisting of an upper vegetative layer underlain by a drainage layer over a low permeability layer. The Bentonite Mat Demonstration Project (BMDP) is a field demonstration study to determine the construction/installation requirements, permeability, and subsidence performance characteristics of a composite barrier. The composite barrier will consist of on-site sandy-clay blanketed by a bentonite mat and a flexible High Density Polyethylene (HDPE) liner (also called flexible membrane liner). Construction of one control test pad and three bentonite test pads are planned. The control test pad will be used to establish baseline data. Underneath the composite clay cap is a four-foot loose sand layer in which cavities will be created by evacuation of sand. The present work provides a mathematical model for the BMDP. The mathematical model will be used to simulate the mechanical and structural responses of the composite clay cap during the testing processes. Based upon engineering experience and technical references, a set of nominal soil parameters have been selected. Currently, detailed soil test data and cavity configuration data are not available to validate the mathematical model. Since the configuration of the cavities created in the testing process is irregular and unpredictable, two extreme configurations are considered in this mathematical model, viz., the circular cavity and the infinitely long trench in the sand underneath the cap. This approach will provide bounds for the testing results.

  20. Pleasant Bayou geopressured/geothermal testing project, Brazoria County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortego, P.K.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phase II-B production testing of the Pleasant Bayou No. 2 well began September 22, 1982. The test plan was designed to evaluate the capabilities of the geopressured-geothermal reservoir during an extended flow period. Tests were conducted to determine reservoir areal extent; aquifer fluid properties; fluid property change with production; information on reservoir production drive mechanism; long-term scale and corrosion control methods; and disposal well operations. Operatinal aspects of geopressured-geothermal production were also evaluated. The test was discontinued prematurely in May 1983 because of a production tubing failure. Most of the production tubing was recovered from the well and cause of the failure was determined. Plans for recompletion of the well were prepared. However, the well was not recompleted because of funding constraints and/or program rescheduling. In March 1984, the Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV) directed that the site be placed in a standby-secured condition. In August 1984, the site was secured. Routine site maintenance and security was provided during the secured period.

  1. Testing institutional biomass cookstoves in rural Kenyan schools for the Millennium Villages Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modi, Vijay

    Testing institutional biomass cookstoves in rural Kenyan schools for the Millennium Villages Revised 7 July 2010 Accepted 7 July 2010 Available online xxxx Keywords: Biomass Cookstove Institutional fuels such as coal and biomass for their energy needs, burning 2 million ton of biomass each day

  2. Energy Efficiency Pilot Projects in Jaipur: Testing the Energy Conservation Building Code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Mathur, Jyotirmay; Yu, Sha

    2014-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Malaviya National Institute of Technology (MNIT) in Jaipur, India is constructing two new buildings on its campus that allow it to test implementation of the Energy Conservation Building Code (ECBC), which Rajasthan made mandatory in 2011. PNNL has been working with MNIT to document progress on ECBC implementation in these buildings.

  3. HANFORD MEDIUM-LOW CURIE WASTE PRETREATMENT ALTERNATIVES PROJECT FRACTIONAL CRYSTALLIZATION PILOT SCALE TESTING FINAL REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HERTING DL

    2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fractional Crystallization Pilot Plant was designed and constructed to demonstrate that fractional crystallization is a viable way to separate the high-level and low-activity radioactive waste streams from retrieved Hanford single-shell tank saltcake. The focus of this report is to review the design, construction, and testing details of the fractional crystallization pilot plant not previously disseminated.

  4. EERC pilot-scale CFBC evaluation facility Project CFB test results. Topical report, Task 7.30

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mann, M.D.; Hajicek, D.R.; Henderson, A.K.; Moe, T.A.

    1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project CFB was initiated at the University of North Dakota Energy and Environmental Research Center (EERC) in May 1988. Specific goals of the project were to (1) construct a circulating fluidized-bed combustor (CFBC) facility representative of the major boiler vendors` designs with the capability of producing scalable data, (2) develop a database for use in making future evaluations of CFBC technology, and (3) provide a facility for evaluating fuels, free of vendor bias for use in the - energy industry. Five coals were test-burned in the 1-MWth unit: North Dakota and Asian lignites, a Wyoming subbituminous, and Colorado and Pennsylvania bituminous coats. A total of 54 steady-state test periods were conducted, with the key test parameters being the average combustor temperature, excess air, superficial gas velocity, calcium-to-sulfur molar ratio, and the primary air-to-secondary air split. The capture for a coal fired in a CFBC is primarily dependent upon the total alkali-to-sulfur ratio. The required alkali-to ratio for 90% sulfur retention ranged from 1.4 to 4.9, depending upon coal type. While an alkali-to-ratio of 4.9 was required to meet 90% sulfur retention for the Salt Creek coal versus 1.4 for the Asian lignite, the total amount of sorbent addition required is much less for the Salt Creek coal, 4.2 pound sorbent per million Btu coal input, versus 62 pound/million Btu for the Asian lignite. The bituminous coals tested show optimal capture at combustor temperatures of approximately 1550{degree}F, with low-rank coals having optimal sulfur capture approximately 100{degree}F lower.

  5. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  6. System design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truitt, R.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pounds, T.S.; Smith, S.O. [EG and G Energy Measurements, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States)

    1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the hardware subsystems of the data acquisition and control system (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC). The mitigation testing uses a pump immersed in the waste tank, directed at certain angles and operated at different speeds and time durations. The SY-101 tank has experienced recurrent periodic gas releases of hydrogen, nitrous oxide, ammonia, and (recently discovered) methane. The hydrogen gas represents a danger, as some of the releases are in amounts above the lower flammability limit (LFL). These large gas releases must be mitigated. Several instruments have been added to the tank to monitor the gas compositions, the tank level, the tank temperature, and other parameters. A mixer pump has been developed to stir the tank waste to cause the gases to be released at a slow rate. It is the function of the DACS to monitor those instruments and to control the mixer pump in a safe manner. During FY93 and FY94 the mixer pump was installed with associated testing operations support equipment and a mitigation test project plan was implemented. These activities successfully demonstrated the mixer pump`s ability to mitigate the SY-101 tank hydrogen gas hazard.

  7. Hot gas cleanup test facility for gasification and pressurized combustion project. Quarterly report, October--December 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived gas streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: Carbonizer/pressurized circulating fluidized bed gas source; hot gas cleanup units to mate to all gas streams; combustion gas turbine; and fuel cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during this reporting period was continuing the detailed design of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDs) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during this quarter.

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 191 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST PACIFIC SEISMIC OBSERVATORY AND HAMMER DRILL ENGINEERING TESTS Dr. Toshihiko Kanazawa Co-Chief Scientist Earthquake Research Institute Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  9. OECD MCCI project Melt Eruption Test (MET) design report, Rev. 2. April 15, 2003.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program is pursuing separate effect tests to examine the viability of the melt coolability mechanisms identified as part of the MACE program. These mechanisms include bulk cooling, water ingression, volcanic eruptions, and crust breach. At the second PRG meeting held at ANL on 22-23 October 2002, a preliminary design1 for a separate effects test to investigate the melt eruption cooling mechanism was presented for PRG review. At this meeting, NUPEC made several recommendations on the experiment approach aimed at optimizing the chances of achieving a floating crust boundary condition in this test. The principal recommendation was to incorporate a mortar sidewall liner into the test design, since data from the COTELS experiment program indicates that corium does not form a strong mechanical bond with this material. Other recommendations included: (i) reduction of the electrode elevation to well below the melt upper surface elevation (since the crust may bond to these solid surfaces), and (ii) favorably taper the mortar liner to facilitate crust detachment and relocation during the experiment. Finally, as a precursor to implementing these modifications, the PRG recommended the development of a design for a small-scale scoping test intended to verify the ability of the mortar liner to preclude formation of an anchored bridge crust under core-concrete interaction conditions. This revised Melt Eruption Test (MET) plan is intended to satisfy these PRG recommendations. Specifically, the revised plan focuses on providing data on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions, including a floating crust boundary condition. The overall objective of MET is to determine to what extent core debris is rendered coolable by eruptive-type processes that breach the crust that rests upon the melt. The specific objectives of this test are as follows: (1) Evaluate the augmentation in surface heat flux during periods of melt eruption; (2) Evaluate the melt entrainment coefficient from the heat flux and gas flow rate data for input into models that calculate ex-vessel debris coolability; (3) Characterize the morphology and coolability of debris resulting from eruptive processes that transport melt into overlying water; and (4) Discriminate between periods when eruptions take the form of particle ejections into overlying water, leading to a porous particle bed, and single-phase extrusions, which lead to volcano-type structures.

  10. Hybrid energy storage test procedures and high power battery project FY-1995 interim report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, G.L.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Near the end of FY 1994, DOE provided funding and guidance to INEL for two separate but closely related tasks involving high power energy storage technology. One task was intended to develop and refine application-specific test procedures appropriate to high power energy storage devices for potential use in hybrid vehicles, including batteries, ultracapacitors, flywheels, and similar devices. The second task was intended to characterize the high power capabilities of presently available battery technologies, as well as eventually to evaluate the potential high power capabilities of advanced battery technologies such as those being developed by the USABC. Since the evaluation of such technologies is necessarily dependent to some extent on the availability of appropriate test methods, these two tasks have been closely coordinated. This report is intended to summarize the activities and results for both tasks accomplished during FY-1995.

  11. Wind-To-Hydrogen Project: Operational Experience, Performance Testing, and Systems Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, K. W.; Martin, G. D.; Ramsden, T. G.; Kramer, W. E.; Novachek, F. J.

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Wind2H2 system is fully functional and continues to gather performance data. In this report, specifications of the Wind2H2 equipment (electrolyzers, compressor, hydrogen storage tanks, and the hydrogen fueled generator) are summarized. System operational experience and lessons learned are discussed. Valuable operational experience is shared through running, testing, daily operations, and troubleshooting the Wind2H2 system and equipment errors are being logged to help evaluate the reliability of the system.

  12. Experimental Wave Tank Test for Reference Model 3 Floating-Point Absorber Wave Energy Converter Project

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,Energy ConsumersExperimental Test ofExperimental

  13. air station project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Dryer space Mladenoff, David 23 NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory Ocean Climate Stations Project Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary:...

  14. Report for slot cutter proof-of-principle test, Buried Waste Containment System project. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Several million cubic feet of hazardous and radioactive waste was buried in shallow pits and trenches within many US Department of Energy (US DOE) sites. The pits and trenches were constructed similarly to municipal landfills with both stacked and random dump waste forms such as barrels and boxes. Many of the hazardous materials in these waste sites are migrating into groundwater systems through plumes and leaching. On-site containment is one of the options being considered for prevention of waste migration. This report describes the results of a proof-of-principle test conducted to demonstrate technology for containing waste. This proof-of-principle test, conducted at the RAHCO International, Inc., facility in the summer of 1997, evaluated equipment techniques for cutting a horizontal slot beneath an existing waste site. The slot would theoretically be used by complementary equipment designed to place a cement barrier under the waste. The technology evaluated consisted of a slot cutting mechanism, muck handling system, thrust system, and instrumentation. Data were gathered and analyzed to evaluate the performance parameters.

  15. Results of the groundwater restoration project, Hanna Underground Coal Gasification Test Site, Wyoming: Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliver, R.L.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Underground coal gasification (UCG) experiments conducted during the 1970s at the Department of Energy (DOE) site near Hanna, Wyoming, formed six underground cavities in the Hanna No. 1 coal seam, an aquifer of low permeability. When the first Hanna UCG experiment began in March 1973, researchers had little information about what effects the geologic or hydrologic characteristics of the area might have on the UCG process; likewise, the effects of UCG on the environment were unknown. Since the UCG experiments were completed, dilute concentrations of pyrolysis products and leachates have been detected in groundwater monitoring wells in and near some of the six cavities. Three primary UCG indicator constituents have been measured at elevated concentrations: phenols, TDS, and sulfate. The Hanna III cavity water exceeded the DOE target level for TDS and sulfate, and the Hanna I cavity water exceeded the DOE target level for phenols. The indicated phenols contamination, however, was in groundwater sampled from a well which was previously used as a production well during the experiment. Water pumped during the restoration project and a new well located approximately 10 ft from the old production well was sampled and no elevated phenols concentration was detected. Therefore, the restoration performed on the Hanna I cavity water was not necessary. The restoration was performed, however, because these indications were not available until during the restoration. Locally, various other constituents exceed DOE target levels, but concentrations are very near target levels and are well within livestock use limits. 2 refs., 7 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. The Laconia, New Hampshire bottom ash paving project: Volume 3, Physical Performance Testing Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bottom ash is the principal waste stream from the combustion of municipal solid waste (MSW). It is comprised of grate ash (97%), the slag material discharged at the end of the grate system, and grate sifting (3%), the material that melts or falls through the grate structure. This project was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of using municipal solid waste grate ash as an aggregate substitute in the construction of a pavement binder course for a portion of Rt. 3 in Laconia, New Hampshire. The research was conducted over a two year period during 1993 and 1994. This study is the culmination of an earlier two year characterization study between 1990 and 1992 that documented the physical and environmental characteristics of the bottom ash as it was produced at the Concord, N.H. waste-to-energy (@) facility and used in an asphaltic binder course. Together, these two studies provide a complete evaluation of the potential for using grate ash or bottom ash in asphalt binder course or as recycled asphalt pavement (RAP) in base courses in pavements.

  17. Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wage, Kathleen

    Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E. Wage, Matthew A and the Acoustical Society of America. #12;Mode coherence at megameter ranges in the North Pacific Ocean Kathleen E Thermometry of Ocean Climate ATOC and Alternate Source Test AST experiments. Vertical line arrays at Hawaii

  18. Recovery Efficiency Test Project: Phase 1, Activity report. Volume 1: Site selection, drill plan preparation, drilling, logging, and coring operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Overbey, W.K. Jr.; Carden, R.S.; Kirr, J.N.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The recovery Efficiency Test well project addressed a number of technical issues. The primary objective was to determine the increased efficiency gas recovery of a long horizontal wellbore over that of a vertical wellbore and, more specifically, what improvements can be expected from inducing multiple hydraulic fractures from such a wellbore. BDM corporation located, planned, and drilled a long radius turn horizontal well in the Devonian shale Lower Huron section in Wayne County, West Virginia, demonstrating that state-of-the-art technology is capable of drilling such wells. BDM successfully tested drilling, coring, and logging in a horizontal well using air as the circulating medium; conducted reservoir modeling studies to protect flow rates and reserves in advance of drilling operations; observed two phase flow conditions in the wellbore not observed previously; cored a fracture zone which produced gas; observed that fractures in the core and the wellbore were not systematically spaced (varied from 5 to 68 feet in different parts of the wellbore); observed that highest gas show rates reported by the mud logger corresponded to zone with lowest fracture spacing (five feet) or high fracture frequency. Four and one-half inch casting was successfully installed in the borehole and was equipped to isolate the horizontal section into eight (8) zones for future testing and stimulation operations. 6 refs., 48 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Guarantee Testing Results from the Greenidge Mult-Pollutant Control Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel P. Connell; James E. Locke

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CONSOL Energy Inc. Research & Development (CONSOL R&D) performed flue gas sampling at AES Greenidge to verify the performance of the multi-pollutant control system recently installed by Babcock Power Environmental Inc. (BPEI) on the 107-megawatt (MW) Unit 4 (Boiler 6). The multi-pollutant control system includes combustion modifications and a hybrid selective non-catalytic reduction (SNCR)/induct selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system to reduce NO{sub x} emissions, followed by a Turbosorp{reg_sign} circulating fluidized bed dry scrubber system and baghouse to reduce emissions of SO{sub 2}, SO{sub 3}, HCl, HF, and particulate matter. Mercury removal is provided via the co-benefits afforded by the in-duct SCR, dry scrubber, and baghouse and by injection of activated carbon upstream of the scrubber, as required. Testing was conducted through ports located at the inlet and outlet of the SCR reactor to evaluate the performance of the hybrid NO{sub x} control system, as well as through ports located at the air heater outlet and baghouse outlet or stack to determine pollutant removal efficiencies across the Turbosorp{reg_sign} scrubber and baghouse. Data from the unit's stack continuous emission monitor (CEM) were also used for determining attainment of the performance targets for NO{sub x} emissions and SO{sub 2} removal efficiency.

  20. Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility for Gasification and Pressurized Combustion Project. Quarterly report, April--June 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to evaluate hot gas particle control technologies using coal-derived as streams. This will entail the design, construction, installation, and use of a flexible test facility which can operate under realistic gasification and combustion conditions. The major particulate control device issues to be addressed Include the integration of the particulate control devices into coal utilization systems, on-line cleaning, techniques, chemical and thermal degradation of components, fatigue or structural failures, blinding, collection efficiency as a function of particle size, and scale-up of particulate control systems to commercial size. The conceptual design of the facility was extended to include a within scope, phased expansion of the existing, Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility Cooperative Agreement to also address systems integration issues of hot particulate removal in advanced coal-based power generation systems. This expansion included the consideration of the following modules at the test facility in addition to the original Transport Reactor gas source and Hot Gas Cleanup Units: 1 . Carbonizer/Pressurized Circulating, Fluidized Bed Gas Source; 2. Hot Gas Cleanup Units to mate to all gas streams; 3. Combustion Gas Turbine; 4. Fuel Cell and associated gas treatment. This expansion to the Hot Gas Cleanup Test Facility is herein referred to as the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF). The major emphasis during, this reporting period was continuing, the detailed design of the FW portion of the facility towards completion and integrating the balance-of-plant processes and particulate control devices (PCDS) into the structural and process designs. Substantial progress in construction activities was achieved during the quarter. Delivery and construction of the process structural steel is complete and the construction of steel for the coal preparation structure is complete.

  1. Coastal ocean margins program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The marine research program supported by the Office of Energy Research, Ecological Research Division, is focused to provide scientific information on major environmental issues facing development and expansion of most energy technologies and energy policy. These issues include waste disposal, siting/operations, and possible long term effects on global systems. The research is concentrated along the United States coastal margins where marine waters provide abundant food and resources while assimilating discharges from atmospheric, terrestrial, and aquatic sources. The program focuses on the formation and transport of particles within the waters of the continental shelf and the fate of these particles, whether on the shelf, on the slope, or in the open ocean. The program is conducted with multidisciplinary teams of researchers who investigate water mass movements, biological productivity, and naturally forming particles, as well as contaminant transport, to develop a clear understanding of the exchanges of contaminants and other materials that take place between continental shelf and open ocean waters. Seventy-five percent of the projects are funded to university grantees and twenty-five percent to National Laboratories.

  2. Makai Ocean Engineering, Inc.'s Recent OTEC Activities at NELHA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    , and operator of an Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) power plant and heat exchanger test facility at NELHA

  3. GLASS FORMULATION DEVELOPMENT AND TESTING FOR COLD CRUCIBLE INDUCTION MELTER (CCIM) ADVANCED REMEDIATION TECHNOLOGIES DEMONSTRATION PROJECT - 9208

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marra, J; Amanda Billings, A; David Peeler, D; Michael Stone, M; Tommy Edwards, T

    2008-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past few years, Cold Crucible Induction Melter (CCIM) demonstrations have been completed using SRS sludge batches 2, 3 and 4 (SB2, SB3 and SB4) simulant compositions. These campaigns demonstrated the ability of the CCIM to effectively produce quality glasses at high waste loadings. The current Advanced Remediation Technology (ART) Phase II-A Project is aimed at demonstrating the CCIM technology under representative DWPF flowsheet conditions and to demonstrate extended operations of the melter. A glass composition development effort was completed to identify and recommend a frit composition and sludge batch 4 (SB4) simulant waste loading target for subsequent ART-Phase II-A CCIM demonstration testing. Based on the results of the glass formulation testing, it was recommended that the Frit 503-R6 composition (B{sub 2}O{sub 3} = 14 wt %; Li{sub 2}O = 9 wt %; Na{sub 2}O = 3 wt %; and SiO{sub 2} = 74 wt %) be utilized for the demonstration. Furthermore, a waste loading of 46 wt % was recommended. The recommended frit and waste loading would produce a glass with acceptable durability with a liquidus temperature adequately below the 1250 C nominal CCIM operating temperature. This frit composition and waste loading was found to result in a glass that met CCIM processing requirements for viscosity, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity. The recommended frit and waste loading level should also provide a buffer for sludge product compositional variation to support the Phase II-A CCIM demonstration.

  4. An investigation of Bjerknes Compensation in the Southern Ocean in the CCSM4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weijer, Wilbert [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kinstle, Caroline M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project aims to understand the relationship between poleward oceanic and atmospheric heat transport in the Southern Ocean by analyzing output from the community Climate System Model Version 4 (CCSM4). In particular, time series of meridional heat transport in both the atmosphere and the ocean are used to study whether variability in ocean heat transport is balanced by opposing changes in atmospheric heat transport, called Bjerknes Compensation. It is shown that the heat storage term in the Southern Ocean has a significant impact on the oceanic heat budget; as a result, no robust coherences between oceanic and atmospheric heat transports could be found at these southern latitudes.

  5. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stoffelen, Ad

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Jeroen Verspeek Anton Verhoef Ad Stoffelen Version 1.5 2011-03-16 #12;ASCAT NWP Ocean Calibration Contents 1 Introduction ....................................................................................................................3 2 NWP Ocean Calibration

  6. In situ testing to determination field-saturated hydraulic conductivity of UMTRA Project disposal cell covers, liners, and foundation areas. Special study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This special study was conducted to prepare a guidance document for selecting in situ hydraulic conductivity (K) tests, comparing in situ testing methods, and evaluating the results of such tests. This report may be used as a practical decision-making tool by the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project staff to determine which testing method will most efficiently achieve the field-saturated K results needed for long-term planning. A detailed section on near-surface test methods discusses each method which may be applicable to characterization of UMTRA disposal cell covers, liners and foundation materials. These potentially applicable test methods include the sealed double-ring infiltrometer (SDRI), the air-entry permeameter (AEP), the guelph permeameter, the two-stage borehole technique (TSB), the pressure infiltrometer, and the disk permeameter. Analytical solutions for these methods are provided, and limitations of these solutions are discussed, and a description of testing equipment design and installation are provided.

  7. Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, Oregon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mekhiche, Mike [Principal Investigator] [Principal Investigator; Downie, Bruce [Project Manager] [Project Manager

    2013-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean wave power can be a significant source of large?scale, renewable energy for the US electrical grid. The Electrical Power Research Institute (EPRI) conservatively estimated that 20% of all US electricity could be generated by wave energy. Ocean Power Technologies, Inc. (OPT), with funding from private sources and the US Navy, developed the PowerBuoy? to generate renewable energy from the readily available power in ocean waves. OPT's PowerBuoy converts the energy in ocean waves to electricity using the rise and fall of waves to move the buoy up and down (mechanical stroking) which drives an electric generator. This electricity is then conditioned and transmitted ashore as high?voltage power via underwater cable. OPT's wave power generation system includes sophisticated techniques to automatically tune the system for efficient conversion of random wave energy into low cost green electricity, for disconnecting the system in large waves for hardware safety and protection, and for automatically restoring operation when wave conditions normalize. As the first utility scale wave power project in the US, the Wave Power Demonstration Project at Reedsport, OR, will consist of 10 PowerBuoys located 2.5 miles off the coast. This U.S. Department of Energy Grant funding along with funding from PNGC Power, an Oregon?based electric power cooperative, was utilized for the design completion, fabrication, assembly and factory testing of the first PowerBuoy for the Reedsport project. At this time, the design and fabrication of this first PowerBuoy and factory testing of the power take?off subsystem are complete; additionally the power take?off subsystem has been successfully integrated into the spar.

  8. Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program U.S. Implementing Organization FY12 Annual Report #12;Handling downhole tool string #12;The Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) is an international marine research in seafloor sediments and rocks. IODP builds upon the earlier successes of the Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP

  9. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Integrated Ocean Drilling Program,Texas A&M University,1000 Discovery Drive,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Integrated Ocean Drilling.E-mail:information@iodp.tamu.edu; Web:www.iodp-usio.org;Telephone:(979) 845-2673. Design of this map was supported by the Ocean Drilling in this publication do not reflect the views of NSF or Texas A&M University. Deep Sea Drilling Project Legs 1­96,Ocean

  10. An unstructured C-grid based method for 3-D global ocean dynamics: Free-surface formulations and tidal test cases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peltier, W. Richard

    and tidal test cases G.R. Stuhne *, W.R. Peltier Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George rights reserved. 1. Introduction In a previous paper (Stuhne and Peltier, 2006, hereafter SP), we

  11. How ocean color can steer Pacific tropical cyclones

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gnanadesikan, Anand

    Because ocean color alters the absorption of sunlight, it can produce changes in sea surface temperatures with further impacts on atmospheric circulation. These changes can project onto fields previously recognized to alter ...

  12. Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TECHNICAL REPORT Mapping and Assessment of the United States Ocean Wave Energy Resource EPRI Project Manager P. Jacobson 3420 Hillview Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94304-1338 USA PO Box...

  13. Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae, and for other species. Keywords: Ocean acidification; Pacific oyster; Larval stages; Hydrated lime; Shellfish No.: 577 Title of Project: Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition

  14. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC) #12;#12;Claude's Off Rio de Janeiro (1933) · Floating Ice Plant: 2.2 MW OC- OTEC to produce 2000

  15. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Mostly about USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion History Mostly about USA 1980's to 1990's and bias towards Vega · Floating Structures (Plantships) · Bottom-Mounted Structures · Model Basin Tests/ At-Sea Tests · 210 kW OC-OTEC: Georges Claude (Open Cycle OTEC) · 1928 Ougree Experiment, France: Factory Water Outflow (33 °C) & Meuse

  16. Global Ocean Circulation Modeling with an Isopycnic Coordinate Model. Final Report for May 1, 1998 - April 30, 2002

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bleck, R.

    2004-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall aim of this project was to continue development of a global version of the Miami Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model (MICOM) with the intent of turning it into a full-fledged oceanic component of an earth system model.

  17. CoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ;VIIRS Operational Ocean Color User: NWS/EMC · Phytoplankton alter the penetration of solar radiationCoastWatch/OceanWatch Proving Ground: VIIRS Ocean Color User Engagement, Quality Assessment Science Seminar #12;Outline Overview of VIIRS Ocean Color Proving Ground (Hughes) VIIRS Ocean Color

  18. PROJECT SUPPORTED DEPARTMENT OF OCEAN DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harinarayana, T.

    GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE (Council of Scientific and Industrial Research) (An ISO 9001:2000 Organization of Scientific and Industrial Research) (An ISO 9001:2000 Organization) Hyderabad- 500 606, India June 2010 #12;A

  19. Nevada Test Site Perspective on Characterization and Loading of Legacy Transuranic Drums Utilizing the Central Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R.G. Lahoud; J. F. Norton; I. L. Siddoway; L. W. Griswold

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nevada Test Site (NTS) has successfully completed a multi-year effort to characterize and ship 1860 legacy transuranic (TRU) waste drums for disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), a permanent TRU disposal site. This has been a cooperative effort among the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), the U.S. Department of Energy, Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO), the NTS Management and Operations (M&O) contractor Bechtel Nevada (BN), and various contractors under the Central Characterization Project (CCP) umbrella. The success is due primarily to the diligence, perseverance, and hard work of each of the contractors, the DOE/CBFO, and NNSA/NSO, along with the support of the U.S. Department of Energy, Headquarters (DOE/HQ). This paper presents, from an NTS perspective, the challenges and successes of utilizing the CCP for obtaining a certified characterization program, sharing responsibilities for characterization, data validation, and loading of TRU waste with BN to achieve disposal at WIPP from a Small Quantity Site (SQS) such as the NTS. The challenges in this effort arose from two general sources. First, the arrangement of DOE/CBFO contractors under the CCP performing work and certifying waste at the NTS within a Hazard Category 2 (HazCat 2) non-reactor nuclear facility operated by BN, presented difficult challenges. The nuclear safety authorization basis, safety liability and responsibility, conduct of operations, allocation and scheduling of resources, and other issues were particularly demanding. The program-level and field coordination needed for the closely interrelated characterization tasks was extensive and required considerable effort by all parties. The second source of challenge was the legacy waste itself. None of the waste was generated at the NTS. The waste was generated at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL), Lynchburg, Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS), and a variety of other sites over 20 years ago, making the development of Acceptable Knowledge a significant and problematic effort. In addition, the characterization requirements, and data quality objectives for shipment and WIPP disposal today, were non-existent when this waste was generated, resulting in real-time adjustments to unexpected conditions.

  20. Arnold Schwarzenegger CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold Schwarzenegger Governor CALIFORNIA OCEAN WAVE ENERGY ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California this report as follows: Previsic, Mirko. 2006. California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment. California Energy Systems Integration · Transportation California Ocean Wave Energy Assessment is the final report

  1. Laboratory Experiments to Stimulate CO(2) Ocean Disposal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Masutani, S.M.

    1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This Technical Progress Report summarizes activities conducted over the period 8/16/96-2/15/97 as part of this project. This investigation responds to the possibility that restrictions on greenhouse gas emissions may be imposed in the future to comply with the Framework Convention on Climate Change. The primary objective of the investigation is to obtain experimental data that can be applied to assess the technical feasibility and environmental impacts of oceanic containment strategies to limit release of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) from coal and other fossil fuel combustion systems into the atmosphere. Critical technical uncertainties of ocean disposal of CO{sub 2} will be addressed by performing experiments that: (1) characterize size spectra and velocities of a dispersed CO{sub 2} phase in the near-field of a discharge jet; and (2) estimate rates of mass transfer from dissolving droplets of liquid CO{sub 2} encased in a thin hydrate shell. Experiments will be conducted in a laboratory facility that can reproduce conditions in the ocean to depths of 600 m (1,969 ft). Between 8/16/96 and 2/15/97, activities focused on modifications to the experimental apparatus and the testing of diagnostics. Following completion of these tasks, experiments will be initiated and will continue through the end of the 36 month period of performance. Major accomplishments of this reporting period were: (1) delivery, set-up, and testing of the PDPA (Phase Doppler Particle Analyzer), which will be the principal diagnostic of the continuous CO{sub 2} jet injection tests; (2) presentation of research papers and posters at the 212th American Chemical Society National Meeting and the Third International Conference on Carbon Dioxide Removal; (3) participation in the 4th Expert Workshop on Ocean Storage of Carbon Dioxide; (4) execution of an Agreement with ABB Management, Ltd. to support and extend the activities of this grant; and (5) initiation of research collaborations with Dr. P.M. Haugen of the University of Bergen, Norway, and Dr. A. Yamasaki of the National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research, Japan.

  2. Prediction of Pseudo relative velocity response spectra at Yucca Mountain for underground nuclear explosions conducted in the Pahute Mesa testing area at the Nevada testing site; Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, J.S.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP), managed by the Office of Geologic Disposal of the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management of the US Department of Energy, is examining the feasibility of siting a repository for commercial, high-level nuclear wastes at Yucca Mountain on and adjacent to the Nevada Test Site (NTS). This work, intended to extend our understanding of the ground motion at Yucca Mountain resulting from testing of nuclear weapons on the NTS, was funded by the Yucca Mountain project and the Military Applications Weapons Test Program. This report summarizes one aspect of the weapons test seismic investigations conducted in FY88. Pseudo relative velocity response spectra (PSRV) have been calculated for a large body of surface ground motions generated by underground nuclear explosions. These spectra have been analyzed and fit using multiple linear regression techniques to develop a credible prediction technique for surface PSRVs. In addition, a technique for estimating downhole PSRVs at specific stations is included. A data summary, data analysis, prediction development, prediction evaluation, software summary and FORTRAN listing of the prediction technique are included in this report.

  3. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 System Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE System Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities associated with the SAPHIRE software product. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  4. OECD MCCI project Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength Tests (SSWICS) SSWICS-1 test data report : thermal hydraulic results. Rev. 0 September 20, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lomperski, S.; Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core/concrete interaction (MCCI) when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. However, due to the integral nature of these tests, several questions regarding the crust freezing behavior could not be adequately resolved. These questions include: (1) To what extent does water ingression into the crust increase the melt quench rate above the conduction-limited rate and how is this affected by melt composition and system pressure and (2) What is the fracture strength of the corium crust when subjected to a thermal-mechanical load and how does it depend upon the melt composition? A series of separate-effects experiments are being conducted to address these issues. The first employs an apparatus designed to measure the quench rate of a pool of corium ({approx}{phi}30 cm; up to 20 cm deep). The main parameter to be varied in these quench tests is the melt composition since it is thought to have a critical influence on the crust cracking behavior which, in turn, alters quench rate. The issue of crust strength will be addressed with a second apparatus designed to mechanically load the crust produced by the quench tests. This apparatus will measure the fracture strength of the crust while under a thermal load created by a heating element beneath the crust. The two apparatuses used to measure the melt quench rate and crust strength are jointly referred to as SSWICS (Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength). This report describes results of the first water ingression test, designated SSWICS-1. The report includes a description of the test apparatus, the instrumentation used, plots of the recorded data, and some rudimentary data reduction to obtain an estimate of the heat flux from the corium to the overlying water pool.

  5. YUCCA Mountain Project - Argonne National Laboratory, Annual Progress Report, FY 1997 for activity WP 1221 unsaturated drip condition testing of spent fuel and unsaturated dissolution tests of glass.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bates, J. K.; Buck, E. C.; Emery, J. W.; Finch, R. J.; Finn, P. A.; Fortner, J.; Hoh, J. C.; Mertz, C.; Neimark, L. A.; Wolf, S. F.; Wronkiewicz, D. J.

    1998-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the work done by the Nuclear Waste Management Section of the Chemical Technology Division of Argonne National Laboratory in the period of October 1996 through September 1997. Studies have been performed to evaluate the behavior of nuclear waste glass and spent fuel samples under the unsaturated conditions (low-volume water contact) that are likely to exist in the Yucca Mountain environment being considered as a potential site for a high-level waste repository. Tests with actinide-doped waste glasses, in progress for over 11 years, indicate that the transuranic element release is dominated by colloids that continuously form and span from the glass surface. The nature of the colloids that form in the glass and spent fuel testing programs is being investigated by dynamic light scattering to determine the size distribution, by autoradiography to determine the chemistry, and by zeta potential to measure the electrical properties of the colloids. Tests with UO{sub 2} have been ongoing for 12 years. They show that the oxidation of UO{sub 2} occurs rapidly, and the resulting paragenetic sequence of secondary phases forming on the sample surface is similar to that observed for uranium found in natural oxidizing environments. The reaction of spent fuel samples in conditions similar to those used with UO{sub 2} have been in progress for over six years, and the results suggest that spent fuel forms many of the same alteration products as UO{sub 2}. With spent fuel, the bulk of the reaction occurs via a through-grain reaction process, although grain boundary attack is sufficient to have reacted all of the grain boundary regions in the samples. New test methods are under development to evaluate the behavior of spent fuel samples with intact cladding: the rate at which alteration and radionuclide release occurs when water penetrates fuel sections and whether the reaction causes the cladding to split. Alteration phases have been formed on fine grains of UO{sub 2} in contact with small volumes of water within a several month period when the radiolysis product H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is added to the groundwater solution. The test setup has been mocked up for operation with spent fuel in the hot-cell.

  6. Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Model Wind over the Central and Southern California Coastal Ocean HSIAO-MING HSU National Center of high-resolution wind in coastal ocean modeling. This paper tests the Coupled Ocean­Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS) at the 9-, 27-, and 81-km grid resolutions in simulating wind off the central

  7. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERMI, A.M.

    2000-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation.

  8. All Eyes on Eastport: Tidal Energy Project Brings Change, Opportunity...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Renewable Power Company will unveil its first commercial-scale tidal turbine before it is deployed underwater to generate power. The pilot project -- supported by...

  9. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and communications, in Ocean Engineering Planning and Designmicropro?ler, Engineering in the Ocean Environment, Ocean ’engineering diagnostic data will be transmitted. 5. GLOBAL OCEAN

  10. Ocean Carbon Cycle Data from the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The U.S. JGOFS program, a component of the U.S Global Change Research Program, grew out of the recommendations of a National Academy of Sciences workshop in 1984. An ambitious goal was set to understand the controls on the concentrations and fluxes of carbon and associated nutrients in the ocean. A new field of ocean biogeochemistry emerged with an emphasis on quality measurements of carbon system parameters and interdisciplinary field studies of the biological, chemical and physical process which control the ocean carbon cycle. U.S. JGOFS, ended in 2005 with the conclusion of the Synthesis and Modeling Project (SMP). Data are available throughout the U.S. JGOFS web site at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/ and from the U.S. JGOFS Data System at http://usjgofs.whoi.edu/jg/dir/jgofs/. Major named segments of the project are: Bermuda Atlantic Time Series (BATS) Study, Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) Study, Equatorial Pacific Process Study, North Atlantic Bloom Experiment (1989), Arabian Sea Process Study, and the Southern Ocean Process Study.

  11. 2.019 Design of Ocean Systems, Fall 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chryssostomidis, Chryssostomos

    This course is the completion of the cycle of designing, implementing and testing an ocean system, including hardware and software implementation, that begins with 2.017J. Design lectures are given in hydrodynamics, power ...

  12. The decadal mean ocean circulation and Sverdrup balance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wunsch, Carl

    Elementary Sverdrup balance is tested in the context of the time-average of a 16-year duration time-varying ocean circulation estimate employing the great majority of global-scale data available between 1992 and 2007. The ...

  13. David Welch is the president of Kintama Research Services Ltd., and chief architect of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    . During the next decade he was responsible for studying the ocean biology of Pacific salmon, and providedDavid Welch is the president of Kintama Research Services Ltd., and chief architect of the Pacific Ocean Shelf Tracking project (POST), which has formed the basis for the global Ocean Tracking Network

  14. Simple ocean carbon cycle models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caldeira, K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Hoffert, M.I. [New York Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Earth System Sciences; Siegenthaler, U. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Physik

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simple ocean carbon cycle models can be used to calculate the rate at which the oceans are likely to absorb CO{sub 2} from the atmosphere. For problems involving steady-state ocean circulation, well calibrated ocean models produce results that are very similar to results obtained using general circulation models. Hence, simple ocean carbon cycle models may be appropriate for use in studies in which the time or expense of running large scale general circulation models would be prohibitive. Simple ocean models have the advantage of being based on a small number of explicit assumptions. The simplicity of these ocean models facilitates the understanding of model results.

  15. Testing, Evaluation, and Qualification of Bio-Oil for Heating Presentation for BETO 2015 Project Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic| DepartmentDepartment ofTankTest Site2009 DOE HydrogenTesting,

  16. 1992 Invited speaker, Coral records of ocean-atmosphere variability, La Parguera, Puerto Rico (NOAA) 1996 Invited speaker, Annual Records of Tropical Systems Workshop, Hawaii (PAGES-CLIVAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    for Best Practices in the Development of Scientific Drilling Projects, Minneapolis on the future of Ocean Scientific Drilling, Vancouver, Canada. 1997 Invited speaker Chair, Conference on Alternate Platforms as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling

  17. DE-EE0000319 Final Technical Report [National Open-ocean Energy Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skemp, Susan

    2013-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Under the authorization provided by Section 634 of the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (P.L. 110-140), in 2009 FAU was awarded U.S. Congressionally Directed Program (CDP) funding through the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to investigate and develop technologies to harness the energy of the Florida Current as a source of clean, renewable, base-load power for Florida and the U.S. A second CDP award in 2010 provided additional funding in order to enhance and extend FAU’s activities. These two CDPs in 2009 and 2010 were combined into a single DOE grant, DE-EE0000319, and are the subject of this report. Subsequently, in July 2010 funding was made available under a separate contract, DE-EE0004200. Under that funding, DOE’s Wind and Water Power Program designated FAU’s state of Florida marine renewable energy (MRE) center as the Southeast National Marine Renewable Energy Center (SNMREC). This report discusses SNMREC activities funded by the DE-EE0000319 grant, but will make reference, as appropriate, to activities that require further investigation under the follow-on grant. The concept of extracting energy from the motions of the oceans has a long history. However, implementation on large scales of the technologies to effect renewable energy recovery from waves, tides, and open-ocean currents is relatively recent. DOE’s establishment of SNMREC recognizes a significant potential for ocean current energy recovery associated with the (relatively) high-speed Florida Current, the reach of the Gulf Stream System flowing through the Straits of Florida, between the Florida Peninsula and the Bahamas Archipelago. The proximity of the very large electrical load center of southeast Florida’s metropolitan area to the resource itself makes this potential all the more attractive. As attractive as this potential energy source is, it is not without its challenges. Although the technology is conceptually simple, its design and implementation in a commercially-viable fashion presents a variety of challenges. Beyond the technology itself (and, especially, the effects on the technology of the harsh oceanic environment), it is important to consider the possible environmental impacts of commercial-scale implementation of oceanic energy extraction. Further, because such implementation represents a completely new undertaking, the human resources required do not exist, so education and training programs are critical to eventual success. This project, establishing a national open-ocean energy laboratory, was designed to address each of these three challenges in a flexible framework allowing for adaptive management as the project proceeded. In particular: ? the technology challenge, including resource assessment, evolved during the project to recognize and address the need for a national testing facility in the ocean for small-scale prototype MRE systems developed by industry; ? the environmental challenge became formalized and expanded during the permitting process for such a testing facility; and ? the human resources/societal challenges, both in terms of the need for education and training and in terms of public acceptance of MRE, stimulated a robust outreach program far beyond that originally envisioned at SNMREC. While all of these activities at SNMREC are ongoing, a number of significant milestones (in addition to the contributions listed in the appendices) were achieved under the auspices of this award. These include: ? Planning and site selection for the first-phase test facility, offshore of Dania Beach, FL, including some equipment for the facility, submission of an Interim Policy Lease Application to the U.S. Department of Interior’s Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and completion of an Environmental Assessment by BOEM and a positive Consistency Determination by the State of Florida; ? Measurements using acoustic profilers of the current structure and variability in the vicinity of the site under a variety of weather conditions, seasons and time durations; ? Design and implementation of instrument

  18. Alternative Fuel Evaluation Program: Alternative Fuel Light Duty Vehicle Project - Data collection responsibilities, techniques, and test procedures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the data gathering and analysis procedures that support the US Department of Energy`s implementation of the Alternative Motor Fuels Act (AMFA) of 1988. Specifically, test procedures, analytical methods, and data protocols are covered. The aim of these collection and analysis efforts, as mandated by AMFA, is to demonstrate the environmental, economic, and performance characteristics of alternative transportation fuels.

  19. Flexible ocean upwelling pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Person, Abraham (Los Alamitos, CA)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In an ocean thermal energy conversion facility, a cold water riser pipe is releasably supported at its upper end by the hull of the floating facility. The pipe is substantially vertical and has its lower end far below the hull above the ocean floor. The pipe is defined essentially entirely of a material which has a modulus of elasticity substantially less than that of steel, e.g., high density polyethylene, so that the pipe is flexible and compliant to rather than resistant to applied bending moments. The position of the lower end of the pipe relative to the hull is stabilized by a weight suspended below the lower end of the pipe on a flexible line. The pipe, apart from the weight, is positively buoyant. If support of the upper end of the pipe is released, the pipe sinks to the ocean floor, but is not damaged as the length of the line between the pipe and the weight is sufficient to allow the buoyant pipe to come to a stop within the line length after the weight contacts the ocean floor, and thereafter to float submerged above the ocean floor while moored to the ocean floor by the weight. The upper end of the pipe, while supported by the hull, communicates to a sump in the hull in which the water level is maintained below the ambient water level. The sump volume is sufficient to keep the pipe full during heaving of the hull, thereby preventing collapse of the pipe.

  20. RMOTC - Library - Test Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Test Reports All non-proprietary project reports that are approved for release are posted here. Many of RMOTC's projects have protection extended through a Cooperative Research and...

  1. Decontamination systems information and research program -- Literature review in support of development of standard test protocols and barrier design models for in situ formed barriers project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy is responsible for approximately 3,000 sites in which contaminants such as carbon tetrachloride, trichlorethylene, perchlorethylene, non-volatile and soluble organic and insoluble organics (PCBs and pesticides) are encountered. In specific areas of these sites radioactive contaminants are stored in underground storage tanks which were originally designed and constructed with a 30-year projected life. Many of these tanks are now 10 years beyond the design life and failures have occurred allowing the basic liquids (ph of 8 to 9) to leak into the unconsolidated soils below. Nearly one half of the storage tanks located at the Hanford Washington Reservation are suspected of leaking and contaminating the soils beneath them. The Hanford site is located in a semi-arid climate region with rainfall of less than 6 inches annually, and studies have indicated that very little of this water finds its way to the groundwater to move the water down gradient toward the Columbia River. This provides the government with time to develop a barrier system to prevent further contamination of the groundwater, and to develop and test remediation systems to stabilize or remove the contaminant materials. In parallel to remediation efforts, confinement and containment technologies are needed to retard or prevent the advancement of contamination plumes through the environment until the implementation of remediation technology efforts are completed. This project examines the various confinement and containment technologies and protocols for testing the materials in relation to their function in-situ.

  2. Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ermi, A.M.

    1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Description of the Proposed Activity/REPORTABLE OCCURRENCE or PIAB: This ECN changes the computer systems design description support document describing the computers system used to control, monitor and archive the processes and outputs associated with the Hydrogen Mitigation Test Pump installed in SY-101. There is no new activity or procedure associated with the updating of this reference document. The updating of this computer system design description maintains an agreed upon documentation program initiated within the test program and carried into operations at time of turnover to maintain configuration control as outlined by design authority practicing guidelines. There are no new credible failure modes associated with the updating of information in a support description document. The failure analysis of each change was reviewed at the time of implementation of the Systems Change Request for all the processes changed. This document simply provides a history of implementation and current system status.

  3. System Design Description for the SY-101 Hydrogen Mitigation Test Project Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS-1)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ERMI, A.M.

    1999-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

    This document describes the hardware and software of the computer subsystems for the Data Acquisition and Control System (DACS) used in mitigation tests conducted on waste tank 241-SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation, The original system was designed and implemented by LANL, supplied to WHC, and turned over to LMHC for operation. In 1999, the hardware and software were upgraded to provide a state-of-the-art, Year-2000 compliant system.

  4. Tribology of improved transformation-toughened ceramics-heat engine test. Final report: DOE/ORNL Ceramic Technology Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lilley, E.; Rossi, G.A.; Pelletier, P.J. [Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States). Advanced Ceramics Div.

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A short term study has been carried out to evaluate the suitability as cam roller followers of three ceria zirconia toughened aluminas and two yttria stabilized tetragonal zirconias (YTZPs) previously enhanced in programs supported by ORNL. Norton Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} (NBD-100) was also included in this study as a reference material, because it was known from work at Northwestern University that Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} to experienced little or no wear in this application, and NBD-100 is currently a successful commercial bearing material. The tribological studies were subcontracted to the Torrington Company. They found that in cam roller follower simulated tests that there was essentially no wear after 1 hour and 5 hours of testing detectable by weighing and concluded that all of these ceramics are, therefore, candidate materials. Because of the minute amounts of wear it was not possible to identify the wear mechanism or to make any correlations with the other physical properties which were evaluated such as MOR, K{sub IC} hardness, density and grain size. Phase transformation during rolling has been of interest in the tribology of zirconia contain materials. The least stable of the ceria zirconia toughened aluminas resulted in as much as 33% monoclinic phase after testing whereas the yttria stabilized (TTZ) contained very little of this transformed phase. The results of this study show that oxide materials can now be considered as candidates for cam roller followers in heat engines.

  5. Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Ocean Thermal Extractable Energy Visualization: Final Technical Report Report about the Ocean Thermal...

  6. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftin Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) technology haveThe Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) 2rogrammatic

  7. WET-NZ Multi-Mode Wave Energy Converter Advancement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopf, Steven

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The overall objective of the project was to verify the ocean wavelength functionality of the WET-NZ through targeted hydrodynamic testing at wave tank scale and controlled open sea deployment of a 1/2 scale (1:2) experimental device. This objective was accomplished through a series of tasks designed to achieve four specific goals: ?Wave Tank Testing to Characterize Hydrodynamic Characteristics; ? Open-Sea Testing of a New 1:2 Scale Experimental Model; ? Synthesis and Analysis to Demonstrate and Confirm TRL5/6 Status; ? Market Impact & Competitor Analysis, Business Plan and Commercialization Strategy.

  8. LLNL underground coal gasification project. Quarterly progress report, July-Sep 1980. [Hoe Creek and Gorgas, Alabama tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olness, D.U. (ed.)

    1980-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory studies of forward gasification through drilled holes in blocks of coal have continued. Such studies give insight into cavity growth mechanisms and particulate production. In addition to obtaining a qualitative comparison of the forward burn characteristics of two coals, we obtained information on the influence of bedding plane/cleat structure orientation on the early-time shape of the burn cavity in the Roland coal. We have improved our model of the coal drying rate during underground coal gasification (UCG) by adding refinements to the model. To aid in analyzing and predicting the performance of UCG tests, we have developed a simple gas-compositional model. When the model was tested against experimental data from the three Hoe Creek experiments, it was able to match very closely the observed gas compositions, energy fractions, and water influxes. This model can be used to make performance predictions consistent with the material and energy balance constraints of the underground system. A postburn coring and wireline-logging study is under way at the Hoe Creek No. 3 site to investigate the overall effect of the directionally-drilled, horizontal linking hole to better estimate the amount of coal gasified and the shape of the combustion front, and to provide additional information on subsurface deformation and thermal effects. The site reclamation work was completed, including the dismantling of all surface equipment and piping and the plugging and sealing of process and diagnostics wells. Final grading of the reclaimed land has been completed, and the area is ready for disk-seeding. Our survey of the UCG literature has continued with a review of the extensive tests at Gorgas, Alabama, carried on by the US Bureau of Mines from 1947 to 1959.

  9. Computer system design description for SY-101 hydrogen mitigation test project data acquisition and control system (DACS-1). Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Truitt, R.W. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides descriptions of components and tasks that are involved in the computer system for the data acquisition and control of the mitigation tests conducted on waste tank SY-101 at the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. The system was designed and implemented by Los alamos National Laboratory and supplied to Westinghouse Hanford Company. The computers (both personal computers and specialized data-taking computers) and the software programs of the system will hereafter collectively be referred to as the DACS (Data Acquisition and Control System).

  10. Testing gravitational-wave searches with numerical relativity waveforms: Results from the first Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Aylott; John G. Baker; William D. Boggs; Michael Boyle; Patrick R. Brady; Duncan A. Brown; Bernd Brügmann; Luisa T. Buchman; Alessandra Buonanno; Laura Cadonati; Jordan Camp; Manuela Campanelli; Joan Centrella; Shourov Chatterji; Nelson Christensen; Tony Chu; Peter Diener; Nils Dorband; Zachariah B. Etienne; Joshua Faber; Stephen Fairhurst; Benjamin Farr; Sebastian Fischetti; Gianluca Guidi; Lisa M. Goggin; Mark Hannam; Frank Herrmann; Ian Hinder; Sascha Husa; Vicky Kalogera; Drew Keppel; Lawrence E. Kidder; Bernard J. Kelly; Badri Krishnan; Pablo Laguna; Carlos O. Lousto; Ilya Mandel; Pedro Marronetti; Richard Matzner; Sean T. McWilliams; Keith D. Matthews; R. Adam Mercer; Satyanarayan R. P. Mohapatra; Abdul H. Mroué; Hiroyuki Nakano; Evan Ochsner; Yi Pan; Larne Pekowsky; Harald P. Pfeiffer; Denis Pollney; Frans Pretorius; Vivien Raymond; Christian Reisswig; Luciano Rezzolla; Oliver Rinne; Craig Robinson; Christian Röver; Lucía Santamaría; Bangalore Sathyaprakash; Mark A. Scheel; Erik Schnetter; Jennifer Seiler; Stuart L. Shapiro; Deirdre Shoemaker; Ulrich Sperhake; Alexander Stroeer; Riccardo Sturani; Wolfgang Tichy; Yuk Tung Liu; Marc van der Sluys; James R. van Meter; Ruslan Vaulin; Alberto Vecchio; John Veitch; Andrea Viceré; John T. Whelan; Yosef Zlochower

    2009-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Numerical INJection Analysis (NINJA) project is a collaborative effort between members of the numerical relativity and gravitational-wave data analysis communities. The purpose of NINJA is to study the sensitivity of existing gravitational-wave search algorithms using numerically generated waveforms and to foster closer collaboration between the numerical relativity and data analysis communities. We describe the results of the first NINJA analysis which focused on gravitational waveforms from binary black hole coalescence. Ten numerical relativity groups contributed numerical data which were used to generate a set of gravitational-wave signals. These signals were injected into a simulated data set, designed to mimic the response of the Initial LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave detectors. Nine groups analysed this data using search and parameter-estimation pipelines. Matched filter algorithms, un-modelled-burst searches and Bayesian parameter-estimation and model-selection algorithms were applied to the data. We report the efficiency of these search methods in detecting the numerical waveforms and measuring their parameters. We describe preliminary comparisons between the different search methods and suggest improvements for future NINJA analyses.

  11. High sensitivity double beta decay study of 116-Cd and 100-Mo with the BOREXINO Counting Test Facility (CAMEO project)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Bellini; B. Caccianiga; M. Chen; F. A. Danevich; M. G. Giammarchi; V. V. Kobychev; B. N. Kropivyansky; E. Meroni; L. Miramonti; A. S. Nikolayko; L. Oberauer; O. A. Ponkratenko; V. I. Tretyak; S. Yu. Zdesenko; Yu. G. Zdesenko

    2000-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The unique features (super-low background and large sensitive volume) of the CTF and BOREXINO set ups are used in the CAMEO project for a high sensitivity study of 100-Mo and 116-Cd neutrinoless double beta decay. Pilot measurements with 116-Cd and Monte Carlo simulations show that the sensitivity of the CAMEO experiment (in terms of the half-life limit for neutrinoless double beta decay) is (3-5) 10^24 yr with a 1 kg source of 100-Mo (116-Cd, 82-Se, and 150-Nd) and about 10^26 yr with 65 kg of enriched 116-CdWO_4 crystals placed in the liquid scintillator of the CTF. The last value corresponds to a limit on the neutrino mass of less than 0.06 eV. Similarly with 1000 kg of 116-CdWO_4 crystals located in the BOREXINO apparatus the neutrino mass limit can be pushed down to m_nu<0.02 eV.

  12. Mode of opening of an oceanic pull-apart: The 20N Basin along the Owen Fracture Zone (NW Indian Ocean)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    boundary, known as the Owen Fracture Zone (OFZ). Using nearby oceanic drilling (Deep Sea Drilling Project in salt tectonics, suggesting that subsidence was accommodated by one or several décollement layers

  13. DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for the program is provided by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche&M University, as an account of work performed under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managedDEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT DATA FILE DOCUMENTS Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical

  14. Tier 1 ecological evaluation of proposed discharge of dredged material from Oakland Harbor into ocean waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shreffler, D.K.; Thorn, R.M.; Walls, B.E.; Word, J.Q. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Water Resources Development Act of 1986 (Public Law 99--662) authorized the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) -- San Francisco District, to accommodate larger, deeper draft vessels in Oakland inner and Outer Harbors by deepening and widening the existing navigation channel, and providing turning basins and maneuvering areas in Oakland inner Harbor. The suitability of the resulting dredged material for disposal into ocean waters was subject to the procedures of the 1991 Testing Manual, Evaluation of Dredged Material Proposed for Ocean Disposal, known as the ``Green Book``. The Green Book provides a tiered approach for testing the suitability of dredged materials through chemical, physical, and biological evaluations. The first level of investigation, or Tier 1 evaluation, is used to determine whether a decision on LPC compliance can be made on the basis of readily available information. The Tier 1 report primarily summarizes existing information on sediment contamination and toxicity potential, identifies contaminants of concern, and determines the need for further testing. To assist the USACE in determining the suitability of dredged material from Oakland inner and Outer Harbors for ocean disposal, Battelle/Marine Sciences Laboratory prepared this Tier 1 report based upon information and data provided by USACE. Because this Tier 1 report originated well after an LPC determination was made to require testing of project sediments in Tier 3, the primary purpose of this report was to identify contaminants of concern (if any) in that particular dredged material. In addition, this Tier 1 report summarizes available information on chemical, physical, and biological characterization of the sediments in Oakland inner and Outer Harbors.

  15. acoustic testing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sets in the field cricket genus Robillard, Tony 3 EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF THE BLIND OCEAN ACOUSTIC TOMOGRAPHY CONCEPT Engineering Websites Summary: EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF THE...

  16. Massachusetts Ocean Management Plan (Massachusetts)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Massachusetts Ocean Act of 2008 required the state’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs to develop a comprehensive ocean management plan for the state by the end of 2009. That plan...

  17. A Project to Design and Build the Magnets for a New Test Beamline, the ATF2, at KEK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spencer, Cherrill M.; /slac; Sugahara, Ryuhei; Masuzawa, Mika; /KEK, Tsukuba; Bolzon, Benoit; Jeremie, Andrea; /Annecy, LAPP

    2011-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to achieve the high luminosity required at the proposed International Linear Collider (ILC), it is critical to focus the beams to nanometer size with the ILC Beam Delivery System, and to maintain the beams collisions with a nanometer-scale stability. To establish the technologies associated with this ultra-high precision beam handling, a special beamline has been designed and built as an extension of the existing extraction beamline of the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK, Japan. The ATF provides an adequate ultra-low emittance electron beam that is comparable to the ILC requirements; the ATF2 mimics the ILC final focus system to create a tightly focused, stable beam. There are 37 magnets in the ATF2, 29 quadrupoles, 5 sextupoles and 3 bends. These magnets had to be acquired in a short time and at minimum cost, which led to various acquisition strategies; but nevertheless they had to meet strict requirements on integrated strength, physical dimensions, compatibility with existing magnet movers and beam position monitors, mechanical stability and field stability and quality. This paper will describe how 2 styles of quadrupoles, 2 styles of sextupoles, one dipole style and their supports were designed, fabricated, refurbished or modified, measured and aligned by a small team of engineers from 3 continents.

  18. Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus

  19. Ninth Annual Ocean Renewable Energy Conference

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The future of clean, renewable ocean wave energy will be discussed in depth at the 2014 Ocean Renewable Energy Conference.

  20. NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY Project Information Project Title: Casing...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Casing Drilling Test Date: 5-17-201 1 DOE Code: 6730-020-72000 Contractor Code: 8067-806 Project Lead: Marl< Duletsky Project Overview 1, Brief project description nclude The...

  1. 6, 51375162, 2006 Oceanic ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W. Fairall et al. Title Page Abstract Discussions Water-side turbulence enhancement of ozone deposition to the ocean C. W. Fairall1 , D. Helmig2 , L. Fairall (chris.fairall@noaa.gov) 5137 #12;ACPD 6, 5137­5162, 2006 Oceanic ozone deposition velocity C. W

  2. composition of putative oceans on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treiman, Allan H.

    point · Warm/hot ocean · Water-saturated atmosphere · Consumption of liquid water · hydration: continents and oceans Hot oceanic water Quartz Hydrated, oxidized rock Partially altered rock Unaltered rock · CO2, ~0.3-0.9 (volume fraction) · H2O, ~0.01-0.6 · N2, ~0.02-0.15 · High temperature corresponds

  3. Evolving research directions in Surface OceanLower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evolving research directions in Surface Ocean­Lower Atmosphere (SOLAS) science Cliff S. Law­Lower Atmosphere Study (SOLAS) coordinates multi-disciplinary ocean­ atmosphere research projects that quantify and characterise this exchange. This article details five new SOLAS research strategies ­ upwellings and associated

  4. Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice-Ocean Model) in Lake Erie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing Great Lakes Ice Model (GLIM) using CIOM (Coupled Ice- Ocean Model) in Lake Erie Primary of the ice-ocean models, assistance with development of project reports and scientific presentations will first start the implementation of the CIOM in Lake Erie, assemble satellite observations of ice cover

  5. Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory Mr. Peter Phibbs for maintenance can quickly make a system uneconomic. Peter Phibbs was project manager for the $75M construction ocean observatory, and went into operation fifteen months ago. The infrastructure demonstrates not only

  6. OCEAN CARBON SEQUESTRATION: A CASE STUDY IN PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL PERCEPTIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN CARBON SEQUESTRATION: A CASE STUDY IN PUBLIC AND INSTITUTIONAL PERCEPTIONS M. A. de and institutional perceptions for future carbon sequestration projects. INTRODUCTION The United States Department scrutiny. DOE, NEDO and NRC agreed to an initial field experiment on ocean carbon sequestration via direct

  7. Long-range propagation of ocean waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, William R.

    hours. Friday, February 22, 2013 #12;OceanPowerTechnologies A 103 foot long, 260ton buoy being tested #12;Wave Power? PelamisWavePower With T=10sec and a = 1 meter, the energy flux is 40kW/meter. An average 40kW/meter of wave power is typical of good sites. Energy Flux = cg × Energy Density = g2 Ta2 8

  8. BOEM Issues First Renewable Energy Lease for MHK Technology Testing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to harness energy from ocean currents. Each floating test berth will consist of a buoy anchored to the sea floor to measure ocean conditions and will allow for the deployment...

  9. EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Hawaii Ocean Observing System (HiOOS) Employment Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UHM EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Hawaii Ocean Observing System (HiOOS) Employment Opportunities FIELD TECHNICIAN OPPORTUNITY: employment with possible development of a senior thesis project in GESCarlo, edecarlo@soest.hawaii.edu JOB REFERENCE NUMBER ON STUDENT EMPLOYMENT WEBSITE: none Student

  10. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    transports from ocean to land and global energy ?ows inof Earth energy imbal- ance, ocean warming, and thermostericthe ther- mal energy of the ocean, it remains a challenging

  11. Showcase Guidelines for Student Projects Engineering East -The Cube and 1st

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    · Geomatics Engineering Design I and II ­ SUR 4670 and SUR 4672 · Ocean Systems Control and Design ­ EOC 4804 · Ocean Engineering Systems Design Project ­ EOC 4804L 2. Teams that have won awards but have projects tooShowcase Guidelines for Student Projects Engineering East - The Cube and 1st Floor Hallway 1

  12. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project : Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grond Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.A.; McKinstry, C.A.; Simmons, C.S.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Colville Confederated Tribes have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC's Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the first year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on the distribution (numbers) and behavior of kokanee and rainbow trout was based on 51, 683 fish targets detected during the study period (June 30 through August 1, 2001). Study findings include the following: (1) Analysis of the count data indicated that significantly more fish were present when the lights were on compared to off. This was true for both the 24-hr tests as well as the 1-hr tests. Powerplant discharge, distance from lights, and date were significant factors in the analysis. (2) Behavioral results indicated that fish within 14 m of the lights were trying to avoid the lights by swimming across the lighted region or upstream. Fish were also swimming faster and straighter when the lights were on compared to off. (3) The behavioral results were most pronounced for medium- and large-sized fish at night. Medium-sized fish, based on acoustic target strength, were similar to the size of kokanee and rainbow trout released upstream of Grand Coulee Dam. Based on this study and general review of strobe lights, the researchers recommend several modifications and enhancements to the follow-on study in 2002. The recommendations include: (1) modifying the study design to include only the 24-hr on/off treatments, and controlling the discharge at the third powerplant, so it can be included as a design variable; and (2) providing additional data by beginning the study earlier (mid-May) to better capture the kokanee population, deploying an additional splitbeam transducer to sample the region close to the lights, and increasing the number of lights to provide better definition of the lit and unlit region.

  13. Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter Test Sites: A...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data Characterization of U.S. Wave Energy Converter Test Sites: A Catalogue of Met-Ocean Data...

  14. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2002-2003 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, R.; McKinstry, C.; Simmons, C. (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation concluded that entrainment at Grand Coulee Dam ranged from 211,685 to 576,676 fish annually. Further analysis revealed that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the second year of the study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The 2002 study period extended from May 18 through July 30. The objective of the study was to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout. The prototype system consisted of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, were aimed to illuminate a specific region directly upstream of the barge. Three light level treatments were used: 6 of 6 lights on, 3 of 6 lights on, and all lights off. These three treatment conditions were applied for an entire 24-hr day and were randomly assigned within a 3-day block throughout the study period. A seven-transducer splitbeam hydroacoustic system was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. Two of the seven transducers were mounted to the frame containing the strobe lights and were oriented horizontally. The remaining five transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on individual floating frames upstream of the barge, with the transducers looking vertically downward.

  15. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean: National Science Foundation _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling

  16. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Oceans . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean associated with thethe western equatorial Pacific Ocean. J. Geophys. Res. , 96,

  17. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential. Texas Pacific Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310, Wasson (San Andres) Field, Yoakum County, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.; McCoy, R.L.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Glascock, M.R.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The coring, logging and testing of Bennett Ranch Unit well No. 310 was a cooperative effort between Texas Pacific, owner of the well, and Gruy Federal, Inc. The requirements of the contract, which are summarized in Enclosure 1, Appendix A, include drilling and coring activities. The pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs in selected wells are intended to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report presents detailed information on the first such project. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood. The engineering of tests and analysis of such experimental data requires original thinking, but the reliability of the results is higher than data derived from conventional tests.

  18. The Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor decontamination and decommissioning project and the Tokamak Physics Experiment at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory. Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    If the US is to meet the energy needs of the future, it is essential that new technologies emerge to compensate for dwindling supplies of fossil fuels and the eventual depletion of fissionable uranium used in present-day nuclear reactors. Fusion energy has the potential to become a major source of energy for the future. Power from fusion energy would provide a substantially reduced environmental impact as compared with other forms of energy generation. Since fusion utilizes no fossil fuels, there would be no release of chemical combustion products to the atmosphere. Additionally, there are no fission products formed to present handling and disposal problems, and runaway fuel reactions are impossible due to the small amounts of deuterium and tritium present. The purpose of the TPX Project is to support the development of the physics and technology to extend tokamak operation into the continuously operating (steady-state) regime, and to demonstrate advances in fundamental tokamak performance. The purpose of TFTR D&D is to ensure compliance with DOE Order 5820.2A ``Radioactive Waste Management`` and to remove environmental and health hazards posed by the TFTR in a non-operational mode. There are two proposed actions evaluated in this environmental assessment (EA). The actions are related because one must take place before the other can proceed. The proposed actions assessed in this EA are: the decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) of the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR); to be followed by the construction and operation of the Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX). Both of these proposed actions would take place primarily within the TFTR Test Cell Complex at the Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL). The TFTR is located on ``D-site`` at the James Forrestal Campus of Princeton University in Plainsboro Township, Middlesex County, New Jersey, and is operated by PPPL under contract with the United States Department of Energy (DOE).

  19. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. ______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  20. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  1. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean _______________________________ David L. Divins Director, Ocean Drilling Programs Consortium for Ocean Leadership, Inc. Washington, D

  2. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Assessment. 1978. Renewable ocean energy sources, Part I.on aquaculture and ocean energy systems for the county of310, the Ocean the Ocean Energy Thermal Energy Conversion

  3. MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ................................................................................. 24 #12;v ASMFC Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission BOEM Bureau of Ocean Energy Management BMPMID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research #12;MID-ATLANTIC REGIONAL OCEAN RESEARCH PLAN SEPTEMBER 2012 Sea Grant Mid-Atlantic Ocean Research

  4. AVTA: Transit Vehicle Specifications and Test Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    All Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity transit projects follow a rigorous data collection and analysis protocol. Refer to "General Evaluation Plan: Fleet Test and Evaluation Projects" for...

  5. Ocean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands-on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    -on opportunities for research in ocean renewable energy, remotely operated vehicles, ocean mapping, ocean acousticsOcean Engineering at UNH THE OCEAN ENGINEERING program at UNH provides students with hands, and coastal processes. The Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Laboratory is equipped with state

  6. ARM - Oceanic Properties

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDCnarrowbandheat fluxChinaNews : AMFAlaskaNews from theOceanic

  7. Ocean | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale ElectricOcean Flow

  8. FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Joint Oceanographic Institutions,Inc.,1200 New York Avenue,NW,Suite 400,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION on scientific ocean drilling,please contact Joint Oceanographic:www.joiscience.org; Phone:(202)232-3900. Design of this map was supported by the Ocean Drilling Program under° 20° 20° Deep Sea Drilling Project THE DEEP SEA DRILLING PROJECT (DSDP; 1968-1983) pioneered

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 190 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    164 Japan __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling under the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) European Science Foundation Consortium for the Ocean

  10. Pelagic Polychaetes of the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dales, K Phillips

    1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean CLAPARtDE,E. 1868. LesPolyc'haetes of the Pacific Ocean KINBERG, J. G. H. 1866.Polyc'kaetes of the Pacific Ocean TREADWELL, A. L. 1906.

  11. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    near-inertial energy in an eddying ocean channel model. Geo-maximum integrated kinetic energy when the ocean was forcedto the the transfer of energy in the ocean from large scales

  12. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedSands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)

  13. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftof ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. Depart~June 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  14. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Draftr:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands, M.D. (editor) Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC)r:he comnercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionJune 1-11, 1980 OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION PROGRAMMATIC

  16. Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project; Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at the Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay, 2003-2004 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simmons, M.; McKinstry, C.; Cook, C.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1995, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes) have managed the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project as part of the Northwest Power Planning Council (NWPPC) Fish and Wildlife Program. Project objectives have focused on understanding natural production of kokanee (a land-locked sockeye salmon) and other fish stocks in the area above Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams on the Columbia River. A 42-month investigation from 1996 to 1999 determined that from 211,685 to 576,676 fish were entrained annually at Grand Coulee Dam. Analysis of the entrainment data found that 85% of the total entrainment occurred at the dam's third powerplant. These numbers represent a significant loss to the tribal fisheries upstream of the dam. In response to a suggestion by the NWPPC Independent Scientific Review Panel, the scope of work for the Chief Joseph Kokanee Enhancement Project was expanded to include a multiyear pilot test of a strobe light system to help mitigate fish entrainment. This report details the work conducted during the third year of the strobe light study by researchers of the Colville Confederated Tribes in collaboration with the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. The objective of the study is to determine the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee and rainbow trout under field conditions. The prototype system consists of six strobe lights affixed to an aluminum frame suspended 15 m vertically underwater from a barge secured in the center of the entrance to the third powerplant forebay. The lights, controlled by a computer, illuminate a region directly upstream of the barge. The 2003 study period extended from June 16 through August 1. Three light treatments were used: all six lights on for 24 hours, all lights off for 24 hours, and three of six lights cycled on and off every hour for 24 hours. These three treatment conditions were assigned randomly within a 3-day block throughout the study period. Hydroacoustic technology was used to evaluate the effectiveness of the strobe lights in eliciting a negative phototactic response in fish. The hydroacoustic system in 2003 comprised seven splitbeam transducers arrayed in front of the strobe lights, two multibeam transducers behind the lights, and a mobile splitbeam system. The seven splitbeam transducers were deployed so they tracked fish entering and within the region illuminated by the strobe lights. These transducers were spaced approximately 4 m apart on an aluminum frame floating upstream of the barge and looked vertically downward. The multibeam transducers monitored the distribution of fish directly behind and to both sides of the lights, while the mobile splitbeam system looked at the distribution of fish within the third powerplant forebay. To augment the hydroacoustic data, additional studies were conducted. The hydrodynamic characteristics of the third powerplant forebay were measured, and acoustically tagged juvenile kokanee were released upstream of the strobe lights and tracked within the forebay and downstream of the dam. Analysis of the effect of strobe lights on kokanee and rainbow trout focused on the number of fish detected in each of the areas covered by one of the downlooking transducers, the timing of fish arrivals after the status of the strobe lights changed, fish swimming effort (detected velocity minus flow velocity), and fish swimming direction. Water velocity measurements were used to determine fish swimming effort. The tracking of tagged kokanee provided data on fish movements into and out of the third powerplant forebay, including entrainment.

  17. HOW TO COOK OCEAN PERCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , is an excellent food fish with firm fle h. When cooked, the meat is white and flaky, with a delicate flavor. Ocean to the consumer until 1935. At that time, the indlu;try began experimenting with filleting and freezing ocean pel

  18. January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    January 2003 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 210 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING THE NEWFOUNDLAND HALF OF THE NEWFOUNDLAND­IBERIA TRANSECT: THE FIRST CONJUGATE MARGIN DRILLING IN A NON-VOLCANIC RIFT Brian E. Tucholke Co Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery

  19. The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boynton, Walter R.

    The Plastic Ocean Michael Gonsior Bonnie Monteleone, William Cooper, Jennifer O'Keefe, Pamela Seaton, and Maureen Conte #12;#12;#12;Plastic does not biodegrade it photo-degrades breaking down is the plastic cheese wrap? Unfortunately, marine creatures mistake plastics in the ocean for food #12

  20. February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2002 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 204 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING GAS HYDRATES ON HYDRATE, Italy, The Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland) Institut National des Sciences de l States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University

  1. California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California Small Hydropower and Ocean Wave Energy Resources IN SUPPORT OF THE 2005 INTEGRATED....................................................................................................................... 9 Ocean Wave Energy............................................................................................................. 20 Wave Energy Conversion Technology

  2. Small Wind Independent Testing (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This fact sheet describes the Small Wind Independent Testing at the NWTC and the Regional Test Centers project.

  3. Project Year Project Title

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Jeffrey J.

    Project Year 2011-2012 Project Title Using M-Health and GIS Technology in the Field to Improve-specialized, but practically useless skill. Solution One goal of this summer's Applied Geographic Information Systems in Public lessons about observational epidemiology. Technologies Used Geographic Info System (GIS), Blackboard

  4. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS ­ UAV ­ Ocean optics, Biological ­ Laser penetration New opportunity · Insitu Sensors ­ (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  5. Independent Verification and Validation Of SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan Project Number: N6423 U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Norris

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Independent Verification and Validation (IV&V) role in the evaluation of the SAPHIRE 8 Software Acceptance Test Plan is to assess the approach to be taken for intended testing activities. The plan typically identifies the items to be tested, the requirements being tested, the testing to be performed, test schedules, personnel requirements, reporting requirements, evaluation criteria, and any risks requiring contingency planning. The IV&V team began this endeavor after the software engineering and software development of SAPHIRE had already been in production.

  6. Peter C. Chu Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    , such as using the wind tunnel, we present a new efficient and low cost method to determine the drag, liftPeter C. Chu Chenwu Fan Naval Ocean Analysis and Prediction Laboratory, Naval Postgraduate School, and no fin and no-tail section) conducted at the SRI test site. The cost of this method is much lower than

  7. Project Fact Sheet Project Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    & Figures: Budget: £51,074,000 Funding Source: Capital Plan Construction Project Programme: Start on SiteProject Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The concept of the new scheme is to redevelop Gardens project http://www.imperial.ac.uk/princesgardens/ Construction Project Team: Project Facts

  8. Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFex)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coale, Kenneth H.

    2005-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX) was an experiment decades in the planning. It's implementation was among the most complex ship operations that SIO has been involved in. The SOFeX field expedition was successful in creating and tracking two experimentally enriched areas of the Southern Ocean, one characterized by low silicic acid, one characterized by high silicic acid. Both experimental sites were replete with abundant nitrate. About 100 scientists were involved overall. The major findings of this study were significant in several ways: (1) The productivity of the southern ocean is limited by iron availability. (2) Carbon uptake and flux is therefore controlled by iron availability (3) In spite of low silicic acid, iron promotes non-silicious phytoplankton growth and the uptake of carbon dioxide. (4) The transport of fixed carbon from the surface layers proceeds with a C:N ratio that would indicate differential remineralization of nitrogen at shallow depths. (5) These finding have major implications for modeling of carbon export based on nitrate utilization. (6) The general results of the experiment indicate that, beyond other southern ocean enrichment experiments, iron inputs have a much wider impact of productivity and carbon cycling than previously demonstrated. Scientific presentations: Coale, K., Johnson, K, Buesseler, K., 2002. The SOFeX Group. Eos. Trans. AGU 83(47) OS11A-0199. Coale, K., Johnson, K. Buesseler, K., 2002. SOFeX: Southern Ocean Iron Experiments. Overview and Experimental Design. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47) OS22D-01. Buesseler, K.,et al. 2002. Does Iron Fertilization Enhance Carbon Sequestration? Particle flux results from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-09. Johnson, K. et al. 2002. Open Ocean Iron Fertilization Experiments From IronEx-I through SOFeX: What We Know and What We Still Need to Understand. Eos. Trans. AGU 83 (47), OS22D-12. Coale, K. H., 2003. Carbon and Nutrient Cycling During the Southern Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments. Seattle, WA. Geological Society of America. Coale, K., 2003. Open Ocean Iron Enrichment Experiments: What they have told us, what they have not. American Society for Limnology and Oceanography and The Oceanography Society, Honolulu, February 2004. Coale, K., 2004. Recent Research from the Southern Ocean Iron Experiment (SOFeX), in Taking the Heat: What is the impact of ocean fertilization on climate and ocean ecology? Science of earth and sky. AAAS, February 12-16, Seattle, WA

  9. Test plan for glass melter system technologies for vitrification of high-sodium content low-level radioactive liquid waste, Project No. RDD-43288

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higley, B.A.

    1995-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides a test plan for the conduct of combustion fired cyclone vitrification testing by a vendor in support of the Hanford Tank Waste Remediation System, Low-Level Waste Vitrification Program. The vendor providing this test plan and conducting the work detailed within it is the Babcock & Wilcox Company Alliance Research Center in Alliance, Ohio. This vendor is one of seven selected for glass melter testing.

  10. Development and Testing of Simulation (Game) to Illustrate Basic Principles of Integrated Project Delivery and Target Value Design: A First Run Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munankami, Manish 1972-

    2012-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ..................................................................... 57 x Page Figure 38 BIM presentations at big room meeting, COOK?S Children Hospital ... 69 Figure 39 Example of schedule ............................................................................... 69 Figure 40 Target Cost and achieved... (Macomber, 2009). TVD was researched and created by the Lean Project Consulting, Inc. Company formed by Greg Howell and Glenn Ballard and later joined by others. The term was first used for the Sutter Health Project (Macomber, 2009). Like TVD...

  11. The Effects Of High Pressure-High Temperature On Some Physical Properties Of Ocean Sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Roger

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of laboratory experiments was conducted with four ocean sediments, two biogenic oozes and two clays. Permeability and thermal conductivity were directly measured as a function of porosity and the testing program ...

  12. n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liley, David

    n CAPABILITY STATEMENT Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology Overview The Centre for Ocean Engineering, Science and Technology (COEST) is dedicated to the ocean, the most fascinating and the most challenging environment for human endeavour. COEST brings together the disciplines of ocean

  13. 4, 709732, 2007 Ice-shelf ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    OSD 4, 709­732, 2007 Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf M. R. Price Title Page published in Ocean Science Discussions are under open-access review for the journal Ocean Science Ice-shelf ­ ocean interactions at Fimbul Ice Shelf, Antarctica from oxygen isotope ratio measurements M. R. Price 1

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 165 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CARIBBEAN OCEAN HISTORY AND THE CRETACEOUS Scientist, Leg 165 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College of any portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 104 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORWEGIAN SEA Olav Eldholm Co-Chief Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Pni±ip o Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 110 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LESSER ANTILLES FOREARC J. Casey Moore Staff Science Representative, Leg 110 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Direct* Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean

  17. INSTRUCTIONS INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM (IODP) MANUSCRIPT AND PHOTOGRAPH COPYRIGHT, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station, Texas 77845, USA A signed copyright of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program or any other publications of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program. Author

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 109 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 109 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 Philip D. Rabinowitz Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Louis E

  19. Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Heat Content Changes in the Pacific Ocean The Acoustic Thermometry of Ocean Cli- mate (ATOC assimilating ocean observations and changes expected from surface heat fluxes as measured by the daily National are a result of advection of heat by ocean currents. We calculate that the most likely cause of the discrepancy

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and lithosphere evolution, earthquake source mechanisms, oceanic crustal structure, tsunami warning and monitoring

  1. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

  2. Ocean Studies Board annual report 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Activities of the Ocean Studies Board fall into three broad categories: promoting the health of ocean sciences in the United States, encouraging the protection and wise use of the ocean and its resources, and applying ocean science to improve national security.

  3. Project Funding

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Federal energy projects require funding to generate results. Carefully matching available funding options with specific project needs can make the difference between a stalled, unfunded project and a successful project generating energy and cost savings.

  4. Dept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) Only Indian and Pacific Ocean GlobalEEZ100km from shorelineAtlantic OceanIndo-Pacific #12;OTEC MODELINGDept. of Ocean and Resources Engineering School of Ocean and Earth Science and Technology of deep layers, Increase in THC strength 1) Global 2) EEZ 3)100km from Shoreline 4) Only Atlantic Ocean 5

  5. Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal waters in the upper ocean, the vertical distribution of solar radiation (ESR) in the shortwave domain plays (2005), Penetration of solar radiation in the upper ocean: A numerical model for oceanic and coastal

  6. Mercury in the Anthropocene Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lamborg, Carl

    The toxic metal mercury is present only at trace levels in the ocean, but it accumulates in fish at concentrations high enough to pose a threat to human and environmental health. Human activity has dramatically altered the ...

  7. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  8. MOWII Webinar: OCGen Prototype Testing: Evaluating Buoyancy Pod/Tension Leg Platforms for Tidal Energy Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Ocean Renewable Power Company (ORPC) will present the results of the company's design, permitting, and testing of a mooring system for ocean energy devices in partnership with the U.S. Department...

  9. CARINA (Carbon dioxide in the Atlantic Ocean) Data from CDIAC

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The idea for CARINA developed at a workshop (CO2 in the northern North Atlantic) that was held at the HANSE-Wissenschaftskolleg (HANSE Institute for Advanced Study) in Delmenhorst, Germany from June 9 to 11, 1999. While the main scientific focus is the North Atlantic, some data from the South Atlantic have been included in the project, along with data from the Arctic Ocean. Data sets go back to 1972, and more than 100 are currently available. The data are also being used in conjunction with other projects and research groups, such as the Atlantic Ocean Carbon Synthesis Group. See the inventory of data at http://store.pangaea.de/Projects/CARBOOCEAN/carina/data_inventory.htm See a detailed table of information on the cruises at http://cdiac.ornl.gov/oceans/CARINA/Carina_table.html and also provides access to data files. The CARBOOCEAN data portal provides a specialized interface for CARINA data, a reference list for historic carbon data, and password protected access to the "Data Underway Warehouse.".

  10. Test Automation Test Automation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousavi, Mohammad

    Test Automation Test Automation Mohammad Mousavi Eindhoven University of Technology, The Netherlands Software Testing 2013 Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Outline Test Automation Mousavi: Test Automation #12;Test Automation Why? Challenges of Manual Testing Test-case design: Choosing inputs

  11. Software_Design_Document,Testing,Deployment_and_Configuration_Management,and_Use_Manual_of_the_UUIS--a_Team_2_COMP5541-W10_Project_Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmad, Omer Shahid; Jason,; Chen,; Ilham, Najah; Lu, Jianhai; Sun, Yiwei; Wang, Tong; Zhu, Yongxin

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Software Design Document has three part: 1. Overview of System Architecture;2. System Architecture;3. Database Layer and two Appendix I: Deployment and Configuration; II: Test cases

  12. M.Sc. Thesis Project at Ericsson AB for two students Comparison of model-based testing tools based on modelling of LTE functionality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parrow, Joachim

    , Object Oriented programming using Java, Constraint programming, Test methodology, and Software than January 22, to Olga Grinchtein olga.grinchtein@ericsson.com #12;

  13. Open ocean DMS air/sea fluxes over the eastern South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marandino, C. A; De Bruyn, W. J; Miller, S. D; Saltzman, E. S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the North Pacific Ocean, J. Geophys. Res. - Atmos. ,air/sea fluxes over S. Pacific Ocean References Asher, W.in the equa- torial Pacific Ocean ( 1982 to 1996): Evidence

  14. Laboratory Investigations in Support of Dioxide-Limestone Sequestration in the Ocean

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dan Golomb; Eugene Barry; David Ryan; Stephen Pennell; Carl Lawton; Peter Swett; Devinder Arora; John Hannon; Michael Woods; Huishan Duan; Tom Lawlor

    2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Research under this Project has proven that liquid carbon dioxide can be emulsified in water by using very fine particles as emulsion stabilizers. Hydrophilic particles stabilize a CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O (C/W) emulsion; hydrophobic particles stabilize a H{sub 2}O-in-CO{sub 2} (W/C) emulsion. The C/W emulsion consists of tiny CO{sub 2} droplets coated with hydrophilic particles dispersed in water. The W/C emulsion consists of tiny H{sub 2}O droplets coated with hydrophobic particles dispersed in liquid carbon dioxide. The coated droplets are called globules. The emulsions could be used for deep ocean sequestration of CO{sub 2}. Liquid CO{sub 2} is sparsely soluble in water, and is less dense than seawater. If neat, liquid CO{sub 2} were injected in the deep ocean, it is likely that the dispersed CO{sub 2} droplets would buoy upward and flash into vapor before the droplets dissolve in seawater. The resulting vapor bubbles would re-emerge into the atmosphere. On the other hand, the emulsion is denser than seawater, hence the emulsion plume would sink toward greater depth from the injection point. For ocean sequestration a C/W emulsion appears to be most practical using limestone (CaCO{sub 3}) particles of a few to ten ?m diameter as stabilizing agents. A mix of one volume of liquid CO{sub 2} with two volumes of H{sub 2}O, plus 0.5 weight of pulverized limestone per weight of liquid CO{sub 2} forms a stable emulsion with density 1087 kg m{sup -3}. Ambient seawater at 500 m depth has a density of approximately 1026 kg m{sup -3}, so the emulsion plume would sink by gravity while entraining ambient seawater till density equilibrium is reached. Limestone is abundant world-wide, and is relatively cheap. Furthermore, upon disintegration of the emulsion the CaCO{sub 3} particles would partially buffer the carbonic acid that forms when CO{sub 2} dissolves in seawater, alleviating some of the concerns of discharging CO{sub 2} in the deep ocean. Laboratory experiments showed that the CaCO{sub 3} emulsion is slightly alkaline, not acidic. We tested the release of the CO{sub 2}-in-H{sub 2}O emulsion stabilized by pulverized limestone in the DOE National Energy Technology Laboratory High Pressure Water Tunnel Facility (HPWTF). Digital photographs showed the sinking globules in the HPWTF, confirming the concept of releasing the emulsion in the deep ocean. We modeled the release of an emulsion from the CO{sub 2} output of a 1000 MW coal-fired power plant at 500 m depth. The emulsion would typically sink several hundred meters before density equilibration with ambient seawater. The CO{sub 2} globules would rain out from the equilibrated plume toward the ocean bottom where they would disintegrate due to wave action and bottom friction. Conceptual release systems are described both for an open ocean release and a sloping seabed release of the emulsion.

  15. New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project, Acushnet River Estuary engineering feasibility study of dredging and dredged-material disposal alternatives. Report 3. Characterization and elutriate testing of Acushnet River Estuary sediment. Technical report, August 1985-March 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Averett, D.E.

    1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several of the alternatives being considered for the New Bedford Harbor Superfund Project involve dredging of contaminated sediment from the Acushnet River Estuary and placement of the contaminated dredged material in confined disposal areas. Evaluation of these alternatives requires testing sediment from the site to determine chemical and physical characteristics, settling properties, contaminant releases for various migration pathways, and treatment requirements for disposal area effluent. The purpose of this report is to describe the estuary composite sediment sample and the hot-spot-sediment sample tested at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station as part of the US Army Corps of Engineers' Acushnet River Estuary Engineering Feasibility Study of Dredging and Dredged Material Disposal Alternatives. Bulk sediment chemistry, physical characteristics, and elutriate testing for the sediments are included.

  16. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling

  17. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization Consortium for Ocean. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Division Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental of the Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. ,of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference. Sponsored by the

  19. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Presented at the 7th Ocean Energy Conference, Washington,Power Applications, Division of Ocean Energy Systems, UnitedM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft

  20. Dynamics of a Submesoscale Surface Ocean Density Front

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramczyk, Marshall

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    dominant portion of the ocean energy [Capet et al. , 2008a].are important for the ocean energy budget and biogeochemicalrelevance for the ocean energy budget and nutrient

  1. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1 environmental Seventh Ocean Energy Michel, H. B. , and M.of the Seventh Ocean Energy Conference, Washington, DC.1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)

  2. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byand M.D. Sands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.

  3. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  4. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotCommercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,

  5. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALM.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion DraftDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  6. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants byof the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  7. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of ocean thermal energy conversion technology. U.S. DOE.Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. A preliminaryCompany. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission analysis

  8. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion: Potential Environmental Impacts and Fisheries Christina M Comfort Institute #12;Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) · Renewable energy ­ ocean thermal gradient · Large

  9. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants byfield of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  10. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plants bySands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilotof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  11. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,development of ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) plant-impact assessment ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  12. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC) plants bySands. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot plantof the Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Biofouling,

  13. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)field of ocean thermal energy conversion discharges. I~. L.II of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  14. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) pilot

  15. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: AN OVERALL ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M.Dale

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M.D. (editor). 1980. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Draft1980 :. i l OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION: ENVIRONMENTALDevelopment Plan. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion. U.S. DOE

  16. OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PROGRAMMATIC ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sands, M. D.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the commercialization of ocean thermal energy conversionE. Hathaway. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion. AElectric Company. Ocean thermal energy conversion mission

  17. DRAFT. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion ( OTEC)the intermediate field of ocean thermal energy conversionII of the Sixth Ocean Thermal Energy conversion Conference.

  18. ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT OCEAN THERMAL ENERGY CONVERSION (OTEC) PILOT PLANTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sullivan, S.M.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1979. Commercial ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)of the Fifth Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Conference,and M.D. Sands. 1980. Ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC)

  19. Acceptance Test Procedure for Project 251W, WBS 3, Substation A-8, Building 251-W, Bus {number_sign}2 switchgear replacement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanBaalen, R.A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document records the steps taken and results of the acceptance testing of the new 13.8kV switchgear installed at 251W. This gear is under the administrative control of Electrical Utilities.

  20. Work plan for monitor well installation water and sediment sample collection aquifer testing and topographic surveying at the Riverton, Wyoming, UMTRA Project Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Investigations conducted during preparation of the site observational work plan (SOWP) at the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project site support a proposed natural flushing ground water compliance strategy, with institutional controls. However, additional site-specific data are needed to reduce uncertainties in order to confirm the applicability and feasibility of this proposed compliance strategy option. This proposed strategy will be analyzed in the site-specific environmental assessment. The purpose of this work plan is to summarize the data collection objectives to fill those data needs, describe the data collection activities that will be undertaken to meet those objectives, and elaborate on the data quality objectives which define the procedures that will be followed to ensure that the quality of these data meet UMTRA Project needs.

  1. Project Title:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Repair flowline 61-66-SX-3 DOE Code: Project Lead: Wes Riesland NEPA COMPLIANCE SURVEY 291 Project Information Date: 31 12010 Contractor Code: Project Overview In order to...

  2. Ocean Barrier Layers’ Effect on Tropical Cyclone Intensification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balaguru, Karthik; Chang, P.; Saravanan, R.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Xu, Zhao; Li, M.; Hsieh, J.

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improving a tropical cyclone's forecast and mitigating its destructive potential requires knowledge of various environmental factors that influence the cyclone's path and intensity. Herein, using a combination of observations and model simulations, we systematically demonstrate that tropical cyclone intensification is significantly affected by salinity-induced barrier layers, which are 'quasi-permanent' features in the upper tropical oceans. When tropical cyclones pass over regions with barrier layers, the increased stratification and stability within the layer reduce storm-induced vertical mixing and sea surface temperature cooling. This causes an increase in enthalpy flux from the ocean to the atmosphere and, consequently, an intensification of tropical cyclones. On average, the tropical cyclone intensification rate is nearly 50% higher over regions with barrier layers, compared to regions without. Our finding, which underscores the importance of observing not only the upper-ocean thermal structure but also the salinity structure in deep tropical barrier layer regions, may be a key to more skillful predictions of tropical cyclone intensities through improved ocean state estimates and simulations of barrier layer processes. As the hydrological cycle responds to global warming, any associated changes in the barrier layer distribution must be considered in projecting future tropical cyclone activity.

  3. Title: Analytic Evolutions in the Digital Ocean Until recently, the collection of data regarding the activity of learners typically required

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of tests. The high cost of data collection and manipulation led to a relative paucity of data we referTitle: Analytic Evolutions in the Digital Ocean Abstract: Until recently, the collection of data performance data. This leads to a potential wealth of informative data we call the digital ocean. The two eras

  4. EIS-0140: Ocean State Power Project, Tennessee Gas Pipeline Company

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission prepared this statement to evaluate potential impacts of construction and operation of a new natural gas-fired, combined-cycle power plant which would be located on a 40.6-acre parcel in the town of Burrillville, Rhode Island, as well as construction of a 10-mile pipeline to transport process and cooling water to the plant from the Blackstone River and a 7.5-mile pipeline to deliver No. 2 fuel oil to the site for emergency use when natural gas may not be available. The Economic Regulatory Administration adopted the EIS on 7/15/1988.

  5. Global warming projections : sensitivity to deep ocean mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei P.; Stone, Peter H.

    The climatological impact of increases in greenhouse gas concentrations in the atmosphere, despite being a subject of intensive study in recent years, is still very uncertain. One major uncertainty affecting possible climate ...

  6. MHK Projects/Development of Ocean Treader | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant Jump to:LandownersLuther, Oklahoma: EnergyMAREC Jump34.3719°,Convent,TribesTreader

  7. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 207 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    3E3 Canada -------------------------------- Dr. Jack Bauldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations the international Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Foundation (United States) Natural Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute

  8. Mechanistic models of oceanic nitrogen fixation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monteiro, Fanny

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic nitrogen fixation and biogeochemical interactions between the nitrogen, phosphorus and iron cycles have important implications for the control of primary production and carbon storage in the ocean. The biological ...

  9. Dynamics of global ocean heat transport variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jayne, Steven Robert

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A state-of-the-art, high-resolution ocean general circulation model is used to estimate the time-dependent global ocean heat transport and investigate its dynamics. The north-south heat transport is the prime manifestation ...

  10. Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) gridded data products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sabine, Christopher [NOAA Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory; Hankin, S. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koyuk, H [Joint Institute for the Study of the Atmosphere and Ocean, University of Washington; Bakker, D C E [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Pfeil, B [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen; Uni Research AS, Bergen, Norway; Olsen, A [Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research, UNIFOB AS, Bergen, Norway; Metzl, N [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Kozyr, Alexander [ORNL; Fassbender, A [School of Oceanography, University of Washington, Seattle, WA; Manke, A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Malczyk, J [Jetz Laboratory, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University; Akl, J [CSIRO Wealth from Oceans Flagship, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Alin, S R [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Bellerby, R G J [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Borges, A [University of Liege, Chemical Oceanography Unit, Institut de Physique, Liege, Belgium; Boutin, J [Universite Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Brown, P J [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Cai, W-J [Department of Marine Sciences, University of Georgia; Chavez, F P [Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute, Moss Landing, CA; Chen, A [Institute of Marine Geology and Chemistry, National Sun Yat-sen University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan; Cosa, C [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Feely, R A [Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory, National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; Gonzalez-Davila, M [Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Facultad de Ciencias del Mar, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria,; Goyet, C [Institut de Modélisation et d'Analyse en Géo-Environnement et Santé, Université de Perpignan; Hardman-Mountford, N [CSIRO, Marine and Atmospheric Research, Wembley, Western Australia, Australia; Heinze, C [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Hoppema, M [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven, Germany; Hunt, C W [Ocean Process Analysis Lab, University of New Hampshire, Durham, New Hampshire; Hydes, D [National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, UK; Ishii, M [Japan Meteorological Agency, Meteorological Research Institute, Tsukuba, Japan; Johannessen, T [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Key, R M [Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, New Jersey; Kortzinger, A [GEOMAR, Helmholtz Centre for Ocean Research, Kiel, Germany; Landschutzer, P [School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia, Norwich, UK; Lauvset, S K [Geophysical Institute, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Lefevre, N [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Lenton, A [Centre for Australian Weather and Climate Research, Hobart, Tasmania, Australia; Lourantou, A [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Merlivat, L [Université Pierre et Marie Curie, LOCEAN/IPSL, Paris, France; Midorikawa, T [Nagasaki Marine Observatory, Nagasaki, Japan; Mintrop, L [MARIANDA, Kiel, Germany; Miyazaki, C [Faculty of Environmental Earth Science, Hokkaido University, Hokkaido, Japan; Murata, A [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakadate, A [Marine Division, Global Environment and Marine Department, Japan Meteorological Agency, Tokyo, Japan; Nakano, Y [Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology, Yokosuka, Japan; Nakaoka, S [National Institute for Environmental Studies (NIES), Tsukuba, Japan; Nojiri, Y [National Institute for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan; et al.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well documented, publicly available, global data set for surface ocean carbon dioxide (CO2) parameters has been called for by international groups for nearly two decades. The Surface Ocean CO2 Atlas (SOCAT) project was initiated by the international marine carbon science community in 2007 with the aim of providing a comprehensive, publicly available, regularly updated, global data set of marine surface CO2, which had been subject to quality control (QC). SOCAT version 1.5 was made public in September 2011 and holds 6.3 million quality controlled surface CO2 data from the global oceans and coastal seas, spanning four decades (1968 2007). The SOCAT gridded data is the second data product to come from the SOCAT project. Recognizing that some groups may have trouble working with millions of measurements, the SOCAT gridded product was generated to provide a robust regularly spaced fCO2 product with minimal spatial and temporal interpolation which should be easier to work with for many applications. Gridded SOCAT is rich with information that has not been fully explored yet, but also contains biases and limitations that the user needs to recognize and address.

  11. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Test Bed and Data Infrastructure Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Van Dam, Kerstin Kleese [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shipman, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The collaborative Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project started in July 2011 with the goal of accelerating the development of climate model components (i.e., atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, and land surface) and enhancing their predictive capabilities while incorporating uncertainty quantification (UQ). This effort required accessing and converting observational data sets into specialized model testing and verification data sets and building a model development test bed, where model components and sub-models can be rapidly evaluated. CSSEF’s prototype test bed demonstrated, how an integrated testbed could eliminate tedious activities associated with model development and evaluation, by providing the capability to constantly compare model output—where scientists store, acquire, reformat, regrid, and analyze data sets one-by-one—to observational measurements in a controlled test bed.

  12. Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Ocean and Sea Ice SAF ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Technical Report SAF/OSI/CDOP2 #12;SAF/OSI/CDOP2/KNMI/TEC/RP/199 ASCAT-B NWP Ocean Calibration and Validation Summary On September 17 launched. For the ASCAT-B scatterometer, corrections are derived with the use of the NWP ocean calibration

  13. AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AANNUALNNUAL RREPORTEPORT Integrated Ocean Drilling ProgramIntegrated Ocean Drilling Program U ANNUAL REPORT #12;#12;Integrated Ocean Drilling Program United States Implementing Organization JOI T his Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP)-U.S. Implementing Organization (USIO) Fiscal Year 2006

  14. Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C. UMMENHOFER*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ummenhofer, Caroline C.

    Pacific Ocean Contribution to the Asymmetry in Eastern Indian Ocean Variability CAROLINE C is restricted to the Indian or Pacific Ocean only, support the interpretation of forcing mechanisms for large Indian Ocean atmospheric forcing versus remote influences from Pacific wind forcing: low events develop

  15. A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haine, Thomas W. N.

    of the oceanic31 carbon pool. It influences light penetration with consequences for primary productivity1 A Biochemical Ocean State Estimate in the Southern1 Ocean Gas Exchange Experiment2 S. Dwivedi1 , T. W. N. Haine2 and C. E. Del Castillo3 3 1 Department of Atmospheric and Ocean Sciences, University

  16. Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 19971998

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yuqing

    Oceanic processes associated with anomalous events in the Indian Ocean with relevance to 1997 Abstract. An anomalous climatic event occurred in the Indian Ocean (IO) region during 1997­1998, which 1997, warm SSTAs appeared in the western IO, and they peaked in February 1998. An ocean general

  17. Ocean and Resources Engineering is the application of ocean science and engineering to the challenging conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    engineering, mixing and transport, water quality, ocean thermal energy conversion, hydrogen. GENO PAWLAK

  18. A review of global ocean temperature observations: Implications for ocean heat content estimates and climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    oceans; their extensive total volume and large thermal capacity require a larger injection of energy

  19. Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Career Opportunity in Ocean Energy POSITION TITLE: Director of Renewable Ocean Energy Research: The Coastal Studies Institute (CSI) is seeking a dynamic individual to lead its Renewable Ocean Energy Program for a multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary renewable ocean energy research program. The position

  20. Ocean Sci., 3, 337344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1/3 of the total tidal energy dissipation, in the ocean basins through "internal" waves breaking, eOcean Sci., 3, 337­344, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/337/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Unpredictability of internal M2 H. van Haren Netherlands

  1. Ocean Sci., 3, 461482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ocean Sci., 3, 461­482, 2007 www.ocean-sci.net/3/461/2007/ © Author(s) 2007. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License. Ocean Science Effects of mesoscale eddies on global ocean Environment Laboratories, International Atomic Energy Agency, Monaco *now at: Institute of Biogeochemistry

  2. Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milano-Bicocca, Università

    challenges in ocean management Theme 5 ­ Energy Area ENERGY.10.1 Call "The ocean of tomorrow" ­ Joining1 Call title: "The ocean of tomorrow" · Call identifier: FP7-OCEAN-2010 · Date of publication: 30, and Biotechnology (KBBE) - EUR 6 million from Theme 5 ­ Energy - EUR 10.5 million from Theme 6 ­ Environment

  3. The effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Battisti, David

    a severely reduced (&50 %) meridi- onal energy transport relative to the deep ocean runs. As a resultThe effect of ocean mixed layer depth on climate in slab ocean aquaplanet experiments Aaron Donohoe online: 28 June 2013 Ã? Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2013 Abstract The effect of ocean mixed layer

  4. Development and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations for Hurricane Forecast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    forecasts for individual storms and improved seasonal forecast of the ocean thermal energy availableDevelopment and Demonstration of a Relocatable Ocean OSSE System: Optimizing Ocean Observations in the Gulf of Mexico is being extended to provide NOAA the ability to evaluate new ocean observing systems

  5. Test plan for in situ bioremediation demonstration of the Savannah River Integrated Demonstration Project DOE/OTD TTP No.: SR 0566-01. Revision 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is designed to demonstrate in situ bioremediation of groundwater and sediment contaminated with chlorinated solvents. Indigenous microorganisms will be simulated to degrade trichloroethylene (TCE), tetrachloroethylene (PCE) and their daughter products in situ by addition of nutrients to the contaminated zone. in situ biodegradation is a highly attractive technology for remediation because contaminants are destroyed, not simply moved to another location or immobilized, thus decreasing costs, risks, and time, while increasing efficiency and public and regulatory acceptability. Bioremediation has been found to be among the least costly technologies in applications where it will work.

  6. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 205 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FLUID FLOW AND SUBDUCTION FLUXES ACROSS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  7. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 202 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SOUTHEAST PACIFIC PALEOCEANOGRAPHIC TRANSECTS __________________ Dr. Jack Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Manager and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College

  8. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 195 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS MARIANA CONVERGENT MARGIN/ WEST PHILIPPINE SEA Baldauf Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery and Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 185 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS IZU-MARIANA MARGIN Dr. Terry Plank Co France Dr. Carlota Escutia Staff Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS SHAKEDOWN AND SEA TRIALS CRUISE Philip D. Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station

  11. SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SHIPBOARD SCIENTISTS1 HANDBOOK OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY TECHNICAL NOTE 3 portion requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A & M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery

  12. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 100 REPORT NORTHEASTERN GULF OF MEXICO Philip D Rabinowitz Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843 William J. Merrell Co-Chief Scientist, Leg 100 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77843

  13. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 200 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DRILLING AT THE H2O LONG-TERM SEAFLOOR Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  14. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 159 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS THE COTE D'IVOIRE - GHANA TRANSFORM MARGIN, Leg 159 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station requires the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park

  15. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 140 PRELIMINARY REPORT HOLE 504B Dr. Henry Dick Dr. Jörg Erzinger Co Giessen Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Laura Stokking Staff Scientist, Leg 140 Ocean Drilling Program Copies of this publication may be obtained from the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 196 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LOGGING WHILE DRILLING AND ADVANCED CORKS Deputy Director of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive Scientist Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station TX 77845-9547 USA

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 105 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS LABRADOR SEA - BAFFIN BAY Dr. Michael A. Bradford Clement Staff Science Representative, Leg 105 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469" Philip Director Ocean Drilling Program Robert B. Kidd Manager of Science

  18. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 108 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS NORTHWEST AFRICA Dr. William Ruddiman Co Federal Republic of Germany Dr. Jack G. Baldauf Staff Scientist, Leg 108 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, Texas 77843-3469 Philip W Rabin Direct Ocean Drilling Program

  19. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 118 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS FRACTURE ZONE DRILLING ON THE SOUTHWEST INDIAN Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, MA 02543 Andrew C. Adamson Staff Scientist, Leg 118 Ocean Drilling Program the written consent of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000

  20. Ocean Optics Environmental Optics, Nanoscience Division

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strathclyde, University of

    suspended solids swept up from the floor of the Gulf of Mexico The right picture shows a phytoplankton bloom and changes observed. This can be used to monitor pollution in our oceans and methods taken when levels become such as ocean pollution, currents and warming, and to see how the oceans are affecting the health of our planet

  1. Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jochum, Markus

    Ocean viscosity and climate M. Jochum,1 G. Danabasoglu,1 M. Holland,1 Y.-O. Kwon,1 and W. G. Large1] The impacts of parameterized lateral ocean viscosity on climate are explored using three 120-year integrations of a fully coupled climate model. Reducing viscosity leads to a generally improved ocean circulation

  2. Oceanic Origins of Southwest Tropical Atlantic Biases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Zhao

    2013-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Oceanic General Circulation Model POP Parallel Ocean Program ROMS Regional Ocean Modeling System SEC South Equatorial Current SECC South Equatorial Counter Current SETA Southeast Tropical Atlantic SEUC South Equatorial UnderCurrent SLP Sea Level... SST bias ................................................................................... 5 1.3.2 SST bias in SETA ...................................................................................... 8 1.4 Objectives and Approach...

  3. Menghua Wang NOAA STAR Ocean Color Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .g., BOUSSOLE, Chesapeake Bay, etc., will be added) Regional ocean color EDR monitoring Hawaii South PacificLw551, and nLw671. #12;VIIRS ocean color EDR regional time- series monitoring at South Pacific Gyre (SPG) #12;Online interactive plot of SPG time-series #12;Global deep-water (>1000 m) ocean color EDR

  4. Software Design Document, Testing, and Deployment and Configuration Management of the UUIS - a Team 1 COMP5541-W10 Project Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sankaran, Abirami; Attar, Maab; Parham, Mohammad; Zayikina, Olena; Rifai, Omar Jandali; Lepin, Pavel; Hassan, Rana

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The document presents a detailed description of the designs for the implementation of the Unified University Inventory System for the Imaginary University of Arctica. The document, through numerous diagrams and UI samples, gives the structure of the system and the functions of its modules. It also gives test cases and reports that support the system's architecture and design.

  5. 2006-2007 Special Projects Kissel: Video Education and Marketing for Soil Testing as a Best Management Practice in the Southern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to labs. Scientifically, increased soil testing by non- agricultural audiences will improve University of certain nutrients (phosphorus is one example), which could be compared between urban and agricultural Rate of Mature Wastewater Drainfield Systems with Varying Interface Architecture On June 27-28, 2006

  6. Strobe Light Testing and Kokanee Population Monitoring : Dworshak Dam Impacts Assessment and Fisheries Investigation Project, 97-99 : annual Progress Report for 1998.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiolie, Melo A.; Harryman, Bill; Ament, William J.

    1999-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the response of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka to strobe lights. Testing was conducted on wild, free-ranging fish in their natural environment (i.e., the pelagic region of two large Idaho lakes). Split-beam hydroacoustics were used to record the distance kokanee moved away from the lights as well as the density of kokanee in the area near the lights. In control tests, where the strobe lights were lowered into the lake but kept turned off, kokanee remained within a few meters of the lights. Once the lights began flashing, kokanee quickly moved away from the light source. Kokanee were found to move an average of 30 to 136 m away from the lights in waters with Secchi transparencies from 2.8 to 17.5 m (p=0.00 to p=0.04). Kokanee densities near the lights were significantly lower (p=0.00 to p=0.07) when the lights were turned on than in control samples with no lights flashing. Flash rates of 300, 360, and 450 flashes/min elicited strong avoidance responses from the fish. Kokanee remained at least 24 m away from the lights during our longest test that lasted for 5 h 50 min. Kokanee appeared to be responding to flashes that were well less than 0.00016 lux above background lighting.

  7. Project Controls

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Project controls are systems used to plan, schedule, budget, and measure the performance of a project/program. The cost estimation package is one of the documents that is used to establish the baseline for project controls. This chapter gives a brief description of project controls and the role the cost estimation package plays.

  8. CLEAR LAKE BASIN 2000 PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LAKE COUNTY SANITATION DISTRICT

    2003-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The following is a final report for the Clear Lake Basin 2000 project. All of the major project construction work was complete and this phase generally included final details and testing. Most of the work was electrical. Erosion control activities were underway to prepare for the rainy season. System testing including pump stations, electrical and computer control systems was conducted. Most of the project focus from November onward was completing punch list items.

  9. Strobe Light Testing and Kokanee Population Monitoring : Dworshak Dam Impacts Assessment and Fisheries Investigation Project, 87-99 : Annual Progress Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maiolie, Melo A.; Harryman, Bill; Ament, Willaim J.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We tested the response of kokanee Oncorhynchus nerka to strobe lights. Testing was conducted on wild, free-ranging fish in their natural environment (i.e., the pelagic region of two large Idaho lakes). Split-beam hydroacoustics were used to record the distance kokanee moved away from the lights, as well as the density of kokanee in the area near the lights. In control tests, where strobe lights were lowered into the lake but kept turned off, kokanee remained within a few meters of the lights. Once the lights began flashing, kokanee quickly moved away from the light source. Kokanee moved 20 to 40 m away from the lights in waters with Secchi transparencies from 3 to 5 m. Kokanee densities near the lights were significantly lower (p=0.07 to p=0.00) when the lights were turned on than in control samples with no lights flashing. Flash rates of 300, 360, and 450 flashes/min elicited strong avoidance responses from the fish. Kokanee remained at least 24 m from the lights during our longest test that lasted for 5 h 50 min. We also continued annual monitoring of the kokanee population in Dworshak Reservoir. Spawner counts in four tributary streams that were used as an index of the adult population reached a record low of 144 spawners. No age-1 or age-2 kokanee were caught in 15 trawl hauls used to make population estimates. The population estimate of fry was 65,000 fish, {+-} 76% (90% C.I.). Flooding during the spring of 1996 was responsible for the low kokanee population.

  10. Project Fact Sheet Project Update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Project Fact Sheet Project Update: Project Brief: The works cover the refurbishment of floors 4, 5, with `wet' labs for molecular biology, materials characterisation, cell culture and flow studies, and `dry operating theatre. The Bionanotechnology Centre is one of the projects funded from the UK Government's £20

  11. Project Fact Sheet Project Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .union.ic.ac.uk/marketing/building Construction Project Team: Project Facts & Figures: Budget: £1,400,000 Funding Source: Capital PlanProject Fact Sheet Project Brief: In the first phase of the Union Building re that it adapts to meet the needs of a changing student body. The re-development plans are grounded in a full

  12. Project Fact Sheet Project Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facts & Figures: Budget: £3,500,000 Funding Source: SRIF III Construction Project Programme: StartProject Fact Sheet Project Brief: This project refurbished half of the 5th and 7th floors of work includes: · Building fabric replacement and revised space planning · New mechanical and electrical

  13. Establishment of Small Wind Turbine Regional Test Centers (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, K.

    2011-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation offers an overview of the Regional Test Centers project for Small Wind Turbine testing and certification.

  14. Normalized mechanical properties of resedimented Gulf of Mexico clay from Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition Leg 308

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzei, David P. C. (David Peter Clark)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition Leg 308, many Whole Core Samples were recovered from the Ursa Basin in the Gulf of Mexico. Post-cruise geotechnical testing found these samples to be highly disturbed ...

  15. MECH 491 Mechanical Engineering Design I -Project Description Project Topic: A corrosion fatigue experiment setup design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Muradoglu, Metin

    Topic: A deformation setup design for testing of small scale metallic materials Project DescriptionProject 1 MECH 491 ­ Mechanical Engineering Design I - Project Description Project Topic: A corrosion fatigue experiment setup design Project Description: It is required for the students to design

  16. Verification survey report of the south waste tank farm training/test tower and hazardous waste storage lockers at the West Valley demonstration project, West Valley, New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weaver, Phyllis C.

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A team from ORAU's Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program performed verification survey activities on the South Test Tower and four Hazardous Waste Storage Lockers. Scan data collected by ORAU determined that both the alpha and alpha-plus-beta activity was representative of radiological background conditions. The count rate distribution showed no outliers that would be indicative of alpha or alpha-plus-beta count rates in excess of background. It is the opinion of ORAU that independent verification data collected support the site?s conclusions that the South Tower and Lockers sufficiently meet the site criteria for release to recycle and reuse.

  17. FESD Preliminary Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huybers, Peter

    (University of Michigan), Jerry McManus (Columbia Univer- sity), Suzanne Carbotte (Columbia University), JoergFESD Preliminary Proposal, Type I VOICE: Volcano, Ocean, Ice, and Carbon Experiments Project Manager: Charles Langmuir (Harvard University) PIs: Peter Huybers (Harvard University), David Lund

  18. Ice-ocean boundary conditions for coupled models Gavin A. Schmidt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bitz, Cecilia

    that must be simulated in any comprehensive earth system model incorporating ocean, atmosphere, sea ice different groups (a central fo- cus in the ongoing PRogramme for Integrated earth System Modelling (PRISM) and Earth System Modeling Framework (ESMF) projects). This paper addresses developments in coupling at sea

  19. LIMB demonstration project extension

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the DOE limestone injection multistage burner (LIMB) Demonstration Project Extension is to extend the data base on LIMB technology and to expand DOE's list of Clean Coal Technologies by demonstrating the Coolside process as part of the project. The main objectives of this project are: to demonstrate the general applicability of LIMB technology by testing 3 coals and 4 sorbents (total of 12 coal/sorbent combinations) at the Ohio Edison Edgewater plant; and to demonstrate that Coolside is a viable technology for improving precipitator performance and reducing sulfur dioxide emissions while acceptable operability is maintained. Progress is reported. 3 figs.

  20. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.

    2000-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of {approx}11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide (U{sub 3}O{sub 8})], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  1. Prototype Tests for the Recovery and Conversion of UF6 Chemisorbed in NaF Traps for the Molten Salt Reactor Remediation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Del Cul, G.D.; Icenhour, A.S.; Simmons, D.W.

    2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The remediation of the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) site includes the removal of about 37 kg of uranium. Of that inventory, about 23 kg have already been removed from the piping system and chemisorbed in 25 NaF traps. This material is being stored in Building 3019. The planned recovery of -11 kg of uranium from the fuel salt will generate another 15 to 19 NaF traps. The remaining 2 to 3 kg of uranium are present in activated charcoal beds, which are also scheduled to be removed from the reactor site. Since all of these materials (NaF traps and the uranium-laden charcoal) are not suitable for long-term storage, they will be converted to a chemical form [uranium oxide], which is suitable for long-term storage. This document describes the process that will be used to recover and convert the uranium in the NaF traps into a stable oxide for long-term storage. Included are a description of the process, equipment, test results, and lessons learned. The process was developed for remote operation in a hot cell. Lessons learned from the prototype testing were incorporated into the process design.

  2. Proposal for a Full-Scale Prototype Single-Phase Liquid Argon Time Projection Chamber and Detector Beam Test at CERN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kutter, T

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) will use a large liquid argon (LAr) detector to measure the CP violating phase, determine the neutrino mass hier- archy and perform precision tests of the three-flavor paradigm in long-baseline neutrino oscillations. The detector will consist of four modules each with a fiducial mass of 10 kt of LAr and due to its unprecedented size will allow sensitive searches for proton decay and the detection and measurement of electron neutrinos from core collapse supernovae [1]. The first 10 kt module will use single-phase LAr detection technique and be itself modular in design. The successful manufacturing, installation and operation of several full-scale detector components in a suitable configuration represents a critical engineering milestone prior to the construction and operation of the first full 10 kt DUNE detector module at the SURF underground site. A charged particle beam test of a prototype detector will provide critical calibration measurements as well as inva...

  3. Solar Dish Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert F. Boehm

    2004-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    (Original wording, now somewhat outdated.) The Nevada Solar Dish Project is designed to deploy at least 1 MW of dish-based, field validation power generation systems in a mini-power plant near Las Vegas, Nevada, as a transitional precursor to the full commercialization of the technology. This will occur over a period of about three years, from 2001 through 2004. The statement of work defines activities that the University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV) will provide by establishing a test site for two dish/Stirling systems on the UNLV campus and providing operation, test and training, and education in support of the project.

  4. "What Controls the Structure and Stability of the Ocean Meridional Overturning Circulation: Implications for Abrupt Climate Change?"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fedorov, Alexey [Yale University] [Yale University

    2013-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The central goal of this research project is to understand the properties of the ocean meridional overturning circulation (MOC) – a topic critical for understanding climate variability and stability on a variety of timescales (from decadal to centennial and longer). Specifically, we have explored various factors that control the MOC stability and decadal variability in the Atlantic and the ocean thermal structure in general, including the possibility abrupt climate change. We have also continued efforts on improving the performance of coupled ocean-atmosphere GCMs.

  5. Impact of the Southern ocean winds on sea-ice - ocean interaction and its associated global ocean circulation in a warming world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheon, Woo Geunn

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation discusses a linkage between the Southern Ocean (SO) winds and the global ocean circulation in the framework of a coarse-resolution global ocean general circulation model coupled to a sea-ice model. In addition to reexamination...

  6. Carbon dioxide release from ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, H.J. (Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA)); Guenther, P.R. (Scripps Institution of Oceanography, La Jolla, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the results of recent measurements of CO{sub 2} release from an open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC) experiment. Based on these data, the rate of short-term CO{sub 2} release from future open-cycle OTEC plants is projected to be 15 to 25 times smaller than that from fossil-fueled electric power plants. OTEC system that incorporate subsurface mixed discharge are expected to result in no long-term release. OTEC plants can significantly reduce CO{sub 2} emissions when substituted for fossil-fueled power generation. 12 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. OCEANS'13 MTS/IEEE SAN DIEGO, SEPTEMBER

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project TapsDOERecoveryNuclearLife UsersOCEANS'13

  8. Energy Department Announces Five Research Projects to Improve...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    an experimental model to test four dewatering strategies. The project team leader is West Virginia University, Morgantown, W.V. Partners in this project are: Luscar Ltd.,...

  9. Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Organization...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Project Management (APM) Organization Chart Office of Acquisition and Project Management (APM) Organization Chart test APM Org Chart v15.pdf More Documents & Publications MA-60 Org...

  10. National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance National Geothermal Data System Architecture Design, Testing and Maintenance Project objective: To create the National...

  11. Microsoft Word - STWA Test Report - FINAL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3292012 - G. Hughes & J. BUELT ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS STWA, INC. VISCOSITY REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared by:...

  12. Multi-decadal projections of surface and interior pathways of the Fukushima Cesium-137 radioactive plume

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    England, Matthew

    contaminated with radionuclides, including Cesium-137, were released into the Pacific Ocean. With a halfMulti-decadal projections of surface and interior pathways of the Fukushima Cesium-137 radioactive of the leaked Cs-137 in the North Pacific Ocean. The simulations suggest that the contaminated plume would have

  13. Annual Report for FY2001 PFRP Project: Evaluation of Remote Sensing Technologies for Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hawai'i at Manoa, University of

    JIMAR/PFRP Annual Report for FY2001 PFRP Project: Evaluation of Remote Sensing Technologies've evaluated applications of Topex/Poseidon satellite altimetry, and SeaWiFS satellite ocean color for the identification of ocean features critical to pelagic fishes. We've found both these sensors can identify fronts

  14. On the World-wide Circulation of the Deeper Waters of the World Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reid, Joseph L

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    circulation of the Pacific Ocean: Flow patterns, tracers,in preparing the figures. Fig. 1 Pacific Ocean winds Fig.2 Pacific Ocean circulation Fig. 4 Pacific Ocean potential

  15. VOCALS: The VAMOS Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Wood, Robert [VOCALS-REx PI, University of Washington; Bretherton, Christopher [GEWEX/GCSS Representative, University of Washington; Huebert, Barry [SOLAS Representative, University of Hawaii; Mechoso, Roberto C. [VOCALS Science Working Group Chair, UCLA; Weller, Robert [Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution

    VOCALS (VAMOS* Ocean-Cloud-Atmosphere-Land Study) is an international CLIVAR program the major goal of which is to develop and promote scientific activities leading to improved understanding of the Southeast Pacific (SEP) coupled ocean-atmosphere-land system on diurnal to inter-annual timescales. The principal program objectives are: 1) the improved understanding and regional/global model representation of aerosol indirect effects over the SEP; 2) the elimination of systematic errors in the region of coupled atmospheric-ocean general circulation models, and improved model simulations and predictions of the coupled climate in the SEP and global impacts of the system variability. VOCALS is organized into two tightly coordinated components: 1) a Regional Experiment (VOCALSREx), and 2) a Modeling Program (VOCALS-Mod). Extended observations (e.g. IMET buoy, satellites, EPIC/PACS cruises) will provide important additional contextual datasets that help to link the field and the modeling components. The coordination through VOCALS of observational and modeling efforts (Fig. 3) will accelerate the rate at which field data can be used to improve simulations and predictions of the tropical climate variability [Copied from the Vocals Program Summary of June 2007, available as a link from the VOCALS web at http://www.eol.ucar.edu/projects/vocals/]. The CLIVAR sponsored program to under which VOCALS falls is VAMOS, which stands for Variability of the American Monsoon Systems.

  16. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

  17. Horizontal stirring in the global ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hernández-Carrasco, I; Hernández-García, E; Turiel, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal mixing and the distribution of coherent structures in the global ocean are analyzed using Finite-Size Lyapunov Exponents (FSLE), computed for the surface velocity field derived from the Ocean general circulation model For the Earth Simulator (OFES). FSLEs measure horizontal stirring and dispersion; additionally, the transport barriers which organize the oceanic flow can roughly be identified with the ridges of the FSLE field. We have performed a detailed statistical study, particularizing for the behaviour of the two hemispheres and different ocean basins. The computed Probability Distributions Functions (PDFs) of FSLE are broad and asymmetric. Horizontal mixing is generally more active in the northern hemisphere than in the southern one. Nevertheless the Southern Ocean is the most active ocean, and the Pacific the less active one. A striking result is that the main currents can be classified in two 'activity classes': Western Boundary Currents, which have broad PDFs with large FSLE values, and Eas...

  18. Evaluation of a low-cost and accurate ocean temperature logger on subsurface mooring systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tian, Chuan; Deng, Zhiqun; Lu, Jun; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhao, Wei; Xu, Ming

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Monitoring seawater temperature is important to understanding evolving ocean processes. To monitor internal waves or ocean mixing, a large number of temperature loggers are typically mounted on subsurface mooring systems to obtain high-resolution temperature data at different water depths. In this study, we redesigned and evaluated a compact, low-cost, self-contained, high-resolution and high-accuracy ocean temperature logger, TC-1121. The newly designed TC-1121 loggers are smaller, more robust, and their sampling intervals can be automatically changed by indicated events. They have been widely used in many mooring systems to study internal wave and ocean mixing. The logger’s fundamental design, noise analysis, calibration, drift test, and a long-term sea trial are discussed in this paper.

  19. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  20. RMOTC TEST REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    896PT15 RMOTC TEST REPORT Bull Dog Auger Bull Dog Tool, Inc 243 W. County Road P.O. Box 5961 Hobbs, New Mexico 88241-5961 Leo Gianfiacomo, Project Manager Rocky Mountain Oilfield...

  1. Ocean energy systems. Quarterly report, October-December 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research progress is reported on developing Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) systems that will provide synthetic fuels (e.g., methanol), energy-intensive products such as ammonia (for fertilizers and chemicals), and aluminum. The work also includes assessment and design concepts for hybrid plants, such as geothermal-OTEC (GEOTEC) plants. Another effort that began in the spring of 1982 is a technical advisory role to DOE with respect to their management of the conceptual design activity of the two industry teams that are designing offshore OTEC pilot plants that could deliver power to Oahu, Hawaii. In addition, a program is underway in which tests of a different kind of ocean-energy device, a turbine that is air-driven as a result of wave action in a chamber, are being planned. This Quarterly Report summarizes the work on the various tasks as of 31 December 1982.

  2. Ocean Sci., 10, 281322, 2014 www.ocean-sci.net/10/281/2014/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashkenazy, Yossi "Yosef"

    28020, Spain 15Department of Solar Energy & Environmental Physics, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes of Environmental Physics, Ocean Physics and Modeling Group, Athens, Greece 12GEOMAR Helmholz Center for Ocean

  3. Laboratory test results on the thermal resistance of polyisocyanurate foamboard insulation blown with CFC-11 substitutes: A cooperative industry/government project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElroy, D.L.; Graves, R.S.; Yarbrough, D.W.; Weaver, F.J.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbon gases (CFC-11 and CFC-12) are used as blowing agents for foam insulations for building and appliance applications. The thermal resistance per unit thickness of these insulations is greater than that of other commercially available insulations. Mandated reductions in the production of these chemicals may lead to less efficient substitutes and increase US energy consumption by one quad or more. This report describes laboratory thermal and aging tests on a set of industry-produced, experimental polyisocyanurate (PIR) laminate boardstock to evaluate the viability of hydrochlorofluorocarbons (HCFSs) as alternative blowing agents to chlorofluorcarbon-11 (CFC-11). The PIR boards were blown with five gases: CFC-11, HCFC- 123, HCFC-141b, and 50/50 and 65/35 blends of HCFC-123/HCFC-141b. These HCFC gases have a lower ozone depletion potential than CFC-11 or CFC-12. Apparent thermal conductivity (k) was determined from 0 to 50{degrees}C. Results on the laminate boards provide an independent laboratory check on the increase in k observed for field exposure in the Roof Thermal Research Apparatus (RTRA). The measured laboratory increase in k was between 8 and 11% after a 240-d field exposure in the RTRA. Results are reported on a thin-specimen, aging procedure to establish the long-term thermal resistance of gas-filled foams. These thin specimens were planed from the industry-produced boardstock foams and aged at 75 and 150{degrees}F for up to 300 d. The resulting k-values were correlated with an exponential dependency on (diffusion coefficient {times} time){sup {1/2}}/thickness and provided diffusion coefficients for air components into, and blowing agent out of, the foam. This aging procedure was used to predict the five-year thermal resistivity of the foams. The thin-specimen aging procedure is supported with calculations by a computer model for aging of foams. 43 refs., 33 figs., 25 tabs.

  4. A Joint Theory and Experimental Project in the Synthesis and Testing of Porous COFs for On-Board Vehicular Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M. [University of California - Los Angeles] [University of California - Los Angeles; Goddard, William A. [California Institute of Technology] [California Institute of Technology

    2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional storage of large amounts of hydrogen in its molecular form is difficult and expensive because it requires employing either extremely high pressure gas or very low temperature liquid. Because of the importance of hydrogen as a fuel, the DOE has set system targets for hydrogen storage of gravimetric (5.5 wt%) and volumetric (40 g/L) densities to be achieved by 2015. From our continuous efforts on hydrogen storage, it is believed that metalation of highly porous solids with high-valence metals is promising and provides a rational direction to realize high volumetric hydrogen density near room temperature. This grant was focused on the study of high surface area covalent organic frameworks (COFs) with these specific objectives (1) to introduce potential metal binding sites through the COF synthesis and (2) to implement metalation experiments and evaluate their respective hydrogen adsorption properties. To maximize our efforts, simulation calculations were also performed (prior to experiments) for the prediction of binding enthalpy of hydrogen for molecular building units containing transition metals and promising COF structures to increase volumetric hydrogen uptake at room temperature. In this effort, first molecular building units with optimal binding energy for hydrogen storage (20 kJ/mol) were designed by quantum mechanical (QM) methods. Employing these results, it was revealed that one of metalated COFs takes up 60 g/L (total) of H2 at 100 bar and 298 K. To realize proposed COF structures, chemistry of COF synthesis has been developed; for instance, new air stable COFs were synthesized via hydrazone (COF-41 to 43) and imine condensation (COF-301, 320, 340, and 366) and some of them were tested the effect on metalation. Finally, a new triazine COF with high volumetric hydrogen uptake capacity was presented as a proposed future direction.

  5. Technical and philosophical aspects of ocean disposal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zapatka, Marchi Charisse

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ting Permissible Concentrations Alternatives to Ocean Oisposal. Deep-well injection. Incineration Land-based storage Land disposal. Rocycling. Advanced treatment Trends 55 56 58 58 61 61 62 65 66 71 83 87 90 91 TABLE OF CONTENTS... of Ocean Disposal. (August 1976) Plarchi Charisse Zapatka, B. S. , Texas ASM University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Roy W. Harm, Jr. The ocean disposal of waste materials is a controversial subject. People d1sagree as to whether this method...

  6. Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction to the Ocean Drilling Program JOIDES RESOLUTION OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM TECHNICAL NOTE 11 1989 #12;TEXAS A&M UNIVERSITY #12;INTRODUCTION TO THE OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Technical Note No. 11 Anne Gilbert Graham Ocean Drilling Program Texas A

  7. Short Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribes, Aurélien

    ), the tropical cyclone heat potential, showing the thermal energy available in the ocean to enhance or decreaseShort Communication Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite L., and Soulat, F. 2008. Three ocean state indices implemented in the Mercator-Ocean operational suite. ­ ICES

  8. OceanObs 1999 G GRIFFITHS et al. OceanObs 99

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    , telecoms, defence, science, monitoring Hugin, Odyssey, OE X, R-One Robot, Martin, LDUUV, Autosub #12;Ocean

  9. Strong wind forcing of the ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zedler, Sarah E.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    M . , and Yang, E. , 2007: Mesoscale eddies drive increasedIV The interaction of mesoscale and steady wind driven 1.ocean in presence of mesoscale eddies. Geophysical Research

  10. Ocean Viral Metagenomics (2010 JGI User Meeting)

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Rohwer, Forest

    2011-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Forest Rohwer from San Diego State University talks about "Ocean Viral Metagenomics" on March 25, 2010 at the 5th Annual DOE JGI User Meeting

  11. Hydropower and Ocean Energy Resources and Technologies

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This page provides a brief overview of hydropower and ocean energy resources and technologies supplemented by specific information to apply these technologies within the Federal sector.

  12. Manhattan Project Signature Facilities | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Trinity test. July 15, 1945. New Manhattan Project Interactive Website The Department of Energy, in the mid-1990s, developed a list of eight Manhattan Project properties that were...

  13. Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change -New Regulations: Implications for Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Research on Ocean Resources, Marine Geo-Engineering and Climate Change - New Regulations: Implications for Ocean Engineers Dr. Philomène Verlaan Visiting Colleague, Department of Oceanography & Senior Framework for Scientific Research Involving Ocean Fertilization", a definition of marine geo-engineering

  14. Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Grace C.

    Comparisons of optical properties of the coastal ocean derived from satellite ocean color Laboratory, Ocean Optics Section, Code 7333, Stennis Space Center, MS 39529 gould@nrlssc.navy.mil Abstract: Satellite-derived optical properties are compared to in situ mooring and ship-based measurements

  15. Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

  16. DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tandon, Amit

    DETECTING AND TRACKING OF MESOSCALE OCEANIC FEATURES IN THE MIAMI ISOPYCNIC CIRCULATION OCEAN MODEL developed to automatically detect, locate and track mesoscale eddies spatially and temporally. Using an invaluable tool to assess mesoscale oceanic features. Key Words ­ Scientific Visualization, Eddy Detection

  17. Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meyers, Steven D.

    Author's personal copy A novel ocean color index to detect oating algae in the global oceans December 2008 Received in revised form 15 May 2009 Accepted 23 May 2009 Keywords: Floating Algae Index (FAI Remote sensing Ocean color Climate data record Various types of oating algae have been reported in open

  18. 2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006 Ocean Drilling Citation Report Overview of the Ocean Drilling Citation Database The Ocean Drilling Citation Database, which contained almost 22,000 citation records related to the Deep Sea Drilling Institute (AGI). The database has been on line since August 2002. Beginning in 2006, citation records

  19. Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu Ocean Thermal Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Thermal Resource and Site Selection Criteria (January 2011) luisvega@hawaii.edu 1 Ocean Thermal Resources The vast size of the ocean thermal resource and the baseload capability of OTEC systems of Hawaii throughout the year and at all times of the day. This is an indigenous renewable energy resource

  20. Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sigman, Daniel M.

    Effect of global ocean temperature change on deep ocean ventilation A. M. de Boer,1,2 D. M. Sigman suggest that the ocean's deep ventilation is stronger in warm climates than in cold climates. Here we use that a dynamically cold ocean is globally less ventilated than a dynamically warm ocean. With dynamic cooling

  1. ARM - Lesson Plans: Ocean Currents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625govInstrumentstdmadap Documentation TDMADAP : XDC documentationBarrow, Alaska OutreachMaking CloudsMovingOcean

  2. Ocean Thermal | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRoseConcerns Jumpsource HistoryFractures belowOasisEnergyTheJump to:Ocean

  3. Magnesium Projects

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    cyberinfrastructure projects and will be augmented by original research in Computer Science and Software Engineering towards the creation of large, distributed, autonomic and...

  4. Project Construction

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Integrating renewable energy into Federal new construction or major renovations requires effective structuring of the construction team and project schedule. This overview discusses key construction team considerations for renewable energy as well as timing and expectations for the construction phase. The project construction phase begins after a project is completely designed and the construction documents (100%) have been issued. Construction team skills and experience with renewable energy technologies are crucial during construction, as is how the integration of renewable energy affects the project construction schedule.

  5. Oceanic alkyl nitrates as a natural source of tropospheric ozone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neu, Jessica L; Lawler, Michael J; Prather, Michael J; Saltzman, Eric S

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    over the equatorial Pacific Ocean during Saga 3, J. Geophys.the troposphere over the Pacific Ocean during PEM- Tropics Ain the tropical Pacific Ocean, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 32,

  6. Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab, Durham, NH Directions & Parking Jere Chase Ocean Engineering Lab of the University of New Hampshire. Parking is available at the Jere A. Chase Ocean Engineering Building. Directions

  7. Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Guide to Graduate Study and Research in Ocean and Resources Engineering University of Hawaii REQUIREMENTS ............................................... 16 Ocean and Resources Engineering Page 3 #12;Page 4 Ocean and Resources Engineering BACKGROUND Hawaii's unique location, climate and marine

  8. ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    ORE 601 Ocean and Resources Engineering Laboratory Designation Core course Catalog Description This course aims to provide ocean and resources engineering students with the fundamentals necessary Program Outcome 2: Basic science, mathematics, & engineering Program Outcome 3: Ocean engineering core

  9. Effects of variable wind stress on ocean heat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, Kelly

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ocean heat content change (ocean heat uptake) has an important role in variability of the Earth's heat balance. The understanding of which methods and physical processes control ocean heat uptake needs improvement in order ...

  10. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2004), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 1.2003), A coupled ocean?ecosystem model of the Ross Sea: 2.global upper ocean ecosystem?biogeochemistry models against

  11. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs of work for Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) activities and deliverables for the current fiscal

  12. Biological and physical regulation of the oceanic fixed nitrogen reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Thomas Smith

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 in the subtropical North Pacific Ocean. Nature 412: 635-38in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean. Marine Chemistry 16:and N 2 fixation in the Pacific Ocean. Global Biogeochemical

  13. Ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the tropical Indo- Pacific region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drushka, Kyla

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    vertically, carrying energy into the ocean interior with aas a beam of energy into the ocean interior, observations ofKelvin wave energy from the Indian Ocean bypasses the gap in

  14. Milliwatt Generator Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Latimer, T.W.; Rinehart, G.H.

    1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers progress on the Milliwatt Generator Project from April 1986 through March 1988. Activities included fuel processing and characterization, production of heat sources, fabrication of pressure-burst test units, compatibility studies, impact testing, and examination of surveillance units. The major task of the Los Alamos Milliwatt Generator Project is to fabricate MC2893A heat sources (4.0 W) for MC2730A radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGS) and MC3599 heat sources (4.5 W) for MC3500 RTGs. The MWG Project interfaces with the following contractors: Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque (designer); E.I. du Pont de Nemours and Co. (Inc.), Savannah River Plant (fuel); Monsanto Research Corporation, Mound Facility (metal hardware); and General Electric Company, Neutron Devices Department (RTGs). In addition to MWG fabrication activities, Los Alamos is involved in (1) fabrication of pressure-burst test units, (2) compatibility testing and evaluation, (3) examination of surveillance units, and (4) impact testing and subsequent examination of compatibility and surveillance units.

  15. atms software project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    % of the total cost of a software project, prompting authors to call it the "legacy crisis". In this project, weTitle of Project: Analysis and Test Generation of Evolving...

  16. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 136 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Operations ODP/TAI Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU May 1991 #12;This informal report Ocean Drilling Program, which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc., under contract Environment Research Council (United Kingdom) Ocean Research Institute of the University of Tokyo (Japan) Any

  17. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 ENGINEERING PROSPECTUS WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Manager of Engineering and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Louis E. Garrison Deputy Director ODP

  18. Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 22092223 Technical Note

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohseni, Kamran

    Ocean Engineering 33 (2006) 2209­2223 Technical Note Pulsatile vortex generators for low-speed maneuvering of small underwater vehicles Kamran Mohseni� Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, science writer). #12;1. Introduction Oceans hold the key to the origin and continuity of life on the Earth

  19. Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legal Implications of CO2 Ocean Storage Jason Heinrich Working Paper Laboratory for Energy the deployment of CO2 storage technologies used in the marine environment. This paper will address some of the legal issues involved in ocean storage of carbon dioxide from a US perspective. The following paragraphs

  20. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 179 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS HAMMER DRILLING and NERO Dr. Jack Casey Chief.S.A. Tom Pettigrew Chief Engineer, Leg 179 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Drilling Program Texas A&M University Research Park 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, Texas 77845

  1. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 132 PRELIMINARY REPORT ENGINEERING II: WESTERN AND CENTRAL PACIFIC Mr. Michael A. Storms Supervisor of Development Engineering Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University and Drilling Operations ODP/TAMU Timothy J.G. Francis Deputy Director ODP/TAMU September 1990 #12;This informal

  2. ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purkis, Sam

    ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper An ESF Programme September 2003 #12;The, maintains the ship over a specific location while drilling into water depths up to 27,000 feet. A seven Amsterdam, The Netherlands #12;1 ESF Consortium for Ocean Drilling (ECOD) White Paper Foreword 3

  3. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 192 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS BASEMENT DRILLING OF THE ONTONG JAVA PLATEAU of Science Operations Ocean Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX Drilling Program Texas A&M University 1000 Discovery Drive College Station, TX 77845-9547 U.S.A. May 2000

  4. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 120 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS CENTRAL KERGUELEN PLATEAU Dr. Roland Schlich Drilling Program Texas A&M University College Station, TX 77841 Philip D.VRabinowitz Director ^^~-- ODP of the Director, Ocean Drilling Program, Texas A&M University Research Park, 1000 Discovery Drive, College Station

  5. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 106 PRELIMINARY REPORT BARE ROCK DRILLING IN THE MID-ATLANTIC RIDGE RIFT 106 Ocean Drilling Program Texas A & M University College Station, TX 77843-3469 ±nuwiLZ" ector ODP Drilling Program, Texas A & M University, College Station, Texas 77843-3469. In some cases, orders

  6. LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM ENGINEERING PRELIMINARY REPORT NO. 3 EAST PACIFIC RISE 1992 #12;OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 142 PRELIMINARY REPORT East Pacific Rise Dr. Rodey Batiza Co 96822 Mr. Michael A. Storms Operations Superintendent/ Assistant Manager of Engineering and Drilling

  7. Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ocean Conditions, Salmon, and Climate Change John Ferguson1 NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries're finding - adult forecasts and climate change) #12;1. Past (for context) · The coastal pelagic ecosystem/survival #12;NE Pacific Ocean fisheries productivity, 200 BC to 2000 AD (by Finney et al. 2002 Nature) Main

  8. Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Ocean Climate Change: Comparison of Acoustic Tomography, Satellite Altimetry, and Modeling The ATOC to thermal expansion. Interpreting climate change signals from fluctuations in sea level is therefore in the advective heat flux. Changes in oceanic heat storage are a major expected element of future climate shifts

  9. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 180 PRELIMINARY REPORT ACTIVE CONTINENTAL EXTENSION IN THE WESTERN WOODLARK BASIN, PAPUA NEW GUINEA Dr. Philippe Huchon CNRS, Laboratoire de Géologie �cole Normale Supérieure and Technology University of Hawaii at Manoa 2525 Correa Road Honolulu, HI 96822-2285 U.S.A. Dr. Adam Klaus Ocean

  10. OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    under the international Ocean Drilling Program which is managed by Joint Oceanographic Institutions, Inc by the following agencies: Department of Energy, Mines and Resources (Canada) Deutsche ForschungsgemeinschaftOCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM LEG 111 SCIENTIFIC PROSPECTUS DSDP HOLE 504B REVISITED Keir Becker

  11. Microsoft Word - STWA Test Report - May 2012 Test - REV2012.05...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5022012 - G. Hughes & W. Riesland ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER PROJECT TEST RESULTS STWA, INC. VISCOSITY REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY Prepared for: Industry Publication Prepared...

  12. Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Assistant Professor, Ocean Engineering The Department of Ocean Engineering at the University of Rhode Island (URI) invites applications for a tenure-track faculty position in ocean energy systems

  13. Wind-driven changes in Southern Ocean residual circulation, ocean carbon reservoirs and atmospheric CO[subscript 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lauderdale, Jonathan M.

    The effect of idealized wind-driven circulation changes in the Southern Ocean on atmospheric CO[subscript 2] and the ocean carbon inventory is investigated using a suite of coarse-resolution, global coupled ocean circulation ...

  14. Autonomous observations of the ocean biological carbon pump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, James K.B.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency of biological pump in the global ocean. JournalOcean Biological Carbon Pump Carbon Flux Explorerocean’s “biological carbon pump” (Broecker and Peng, 1982;

  15. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization JOI Alliance Joint _______________________________ Steven R. Bohlen President, Joint Oceanographic Institutions Executive Director, Ocean Drilling Programs

  16. INTEGRATED OCEAN DRILLING PROGRAM United States Implementing Organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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    E-Print Network [OSTI]

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    Energy Savers [EERE]

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    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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