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1

Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Intermediate Ethanol Intermediate Ethanol Blends to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Intermediate Ethanol Blends on AddThis.com... Just the Basics Hybrid & Vehicle Systems Energy Storage Advanced Power Electronics & Electrical Machines Advanced Combustion Engines Fuels & Lubricants Fuel Effects on Combustion Lubricants Natural Gas Research Biofuels End-Use Research

2

Intermediate polars in low states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although no intermediate polar (IP) has been observed in recent years to descend into a state of low rate of mass transfer, there are candidate stars that appear to be already in intermediate and low states. V709 Cas is probably an intermediate state IP; NSV 2872 appears to be a low state IP, and will probably resemble the long orbital period IP V1072 Tau if it returns to a high state. The enigmatic V407 Vul, which has had many interpretations as an ultra-short period binary, has many resemblances to the pre-cataclysmic variable V471 Tau, and may therefore be an IP precursor of quite long orbital period, and not yet a fully fledged cataclysmic variable.

Brian Warner

2003-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

3

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Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] ... Thus, many systems administrators do not regularly update non ... works well but it does not protect ...

4

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Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

[an error occurred while processing this directive] These are ... of commercial products within NIST web pages is for information only; it does not imply ...

5

West Texas Intermediate Spot Average ............................  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Crude Oil (dollars per barrel) Crude Oil (dollars per barrel) West Texas Intermediate Spot Average ............................ 102.88 93.42 92.24 87.96 94.34 94.10 105.84 96.30 95.67 95.33 95.67 93.33 94.12 97.64 95.00 Brent Spot Average ........................................................... 118.49 108.42 109.61 110.09 112.49 102.58 110.27 108.29 106.33 105.00 103.00 102.00 111.65 108.41 104.08 Imported Average .............................................................. 108.14 101.18 97.18 97.64 98.71 97.39 103.07 100.03 99.64 99.33 99.69 97.35 101.09 99.85 99.04 Refiner Average Acquisition Cost ...................................... 107.61 101.44 97.38 97.27 101.14 99.45 105.24 100.44 100.15 99.82 100.18 97.83 100.83 101.61 99.50 Liquid Fuels (cents per gallon) Refiner Prices for Resale Gasoline .........................................................................

6

Introduction to naturally occurring radioactive material  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is everywhere; we are exposed to it every day. It is found in our bodies, the food we eat, the places where we live and work, and in products we use. We are also bathed in a sea of natural radiation coming from the sun and deep space. Living systems have adapted to these levels of radiation and radioactivity. But some industrial practices involving natural resources concentrate these radionuclides to a degree that they may pose risk to humans and the environment if they are not controlled. Other activities, such as flying at high altitudes, expose us to elevated levels of NORM. This session will concentrate on diffuse sources of technologically-enhanced (TE) NORM, which are generally large-volume, low-activity waste streams produced by industries such as mineral mining, ore benefication, production of phosphate Fertilizers, water treatment and purification, and oil and gas production. The majority of radionuclides in TENORM are found in the uranium and thorium decay chains. Radium and its subsequent decay products (radon) are the principal radionuclides used in characterizing the redistribution of TENORM in the environment by human activity. We will briefly review other radionuclides occurring in nature (potassium and rubidium) that contribute primarily to background doses. TENORM is found in many waste streams; for example, scrap metal, sludges, slags, fluids, and is being discovered in industries traditionally not thought of as affected by radionuclide contamination. Not only the forms and volumes, but the levels of radioactivity in TENORM vary. Current discussions about the validity of the linear no dose threshold theory are central to the TENORM issue. TENORM is not regulated by the Atomic Energy Act or other Federal regulations. Control and regulation of TENORM is not consistent from industry to industry nor from state to state. Proposed regulations are moving from concentration-based standards to dose-based standards. So when is TENORM a problem? Where is it a problem? That depends on when, where, and whom you talk to! We will start by reviewing background radioactivity, then we will proceed to the geology, mobility, and variability of these radionuclides. We will then review some of the industrial sectors affected by TENORM, followed by a brief discussion on regulatory aspects of the issue.

Egidi, P.

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Definition: Intermediate Balancing Authority | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intermediate Balancing Authority Intermediate Balancing Authority Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Intermediate Balancing Authority A Balancing Authority Area that has connecting facilities in the Scheduling Path between the Sending Balancing Authority Area and Receiving Balancing Authority Area and operating agreements that establish the conditions for the use of such facilities.[1] Related Terms Balancing Authority, Balancing Authority Area, Scheduling Path, Sending Balancing Authority, smart grid References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inli LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ne Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Intermediate_Balancing_Authority&oldid=502634"

8

Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of American, Chinese, and German researchers has exploited this selectivity to identify chemical compounds known as enols as apparently ubiquitous intermediates in flames burning a variety of fuels. This surprising observation will require combustion modelers to revise their models to account for the presence of these compounds.

9

Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of American, Chinese, and German researchers has exploited this selectivity to identify chemical compounds known as enols as apparently ubiquitous intermediates in flames burning a variety of fuels. This surprising observation will require combustion modelers to revise their models to account for the presence of these compounds.

10

Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames Print For those studying flame chemistry and the properties of combustion intermediates by means of molecular beam mass spectrometry, the addition of tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) from a synchrotron to photoionize the beam for mass spectrometry makes for a powerful technique capable of differentiating between isomers with the same molecular weight and composition. With the help of a unique experimental apparatus, an international team of American, Chinese, and German researchers has exploited this selectivity to identify chemical compounds known as enols as apparently ubiquitous intermediates in flames burning a variety of fuels. This surprising observation will require combustion modelers to revise their models to account for the presence of these compounds.

11

Typing a multi-language intermediate code  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Microsoft .NET Framework is a new computing architecture designed to support a variety of distributed applications and web-based services. .NET software components are typically distributed in an object-oriented intermediate language, Microsoft IL, ...

Andrew D. Gordon; Don Syme

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Data requirements for intermediate energy nuclear applications  

SciTech Connect

Several applications that include spallation neutron sources, space radiation effects, biomedical isotope production, accelerator shielding and radiation therapy make use of intermediate energy nuclear data extending to several GeV. The overlapping data needs of these applications are discussed in terms of what projectiles, targets and reactions are of interest. Included is a discussion of what is generally known about these data and what is needed to facilitate their use in intermediate energy applications. 40 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Pearlstein, S.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Is Adjuvant Chemoradiotherapy Overtreatment in Cervical Cancer Patients With Intermediate Risk Factors?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine whether adjuvant chemoradiotherapy (CRT) improves the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors. Methods and Materials: Between January 2000 and June 2006, the medical records of 735 patients who had undergone radical surgery for Stage IB-IIA cervical cancer were reviewed retrospectively. Of the 735 patients, 172 with two or more intermediate risk factors (i.e., lymphovascular space involvement, deep stromal invasion, and tumor size {>=}2 cm) were grouped as follows according to the adjuvant treatment received: 34 patients, no further treatment; 49 patients, RT; and 89 patients, CRT. The significance of the clinical parameters and recurrence-free survival of each group were analyzed. Results: Of the 172 patients with any of the intermediate risk factors, 137 (79.6%) had two or more intermediate risk factors. Of the 172 patients, 12 developed recurrences (6.4%)->(7.0%), with 6 in the pelvis and 6 in distant sites. All 12 recurrences occurred in those who had two or more intermediate risk factors (sensitivity, 100%); however, only six recurrences were detected in patients who met the Gynecologic Oncology Group criteria for the intermediate-risk group (sensitivity, 50%; Z test, p .05). Conclusion: Postoperative adjuvant CRT can improve the outcome of cervical cancer patients with intermediate risk factors, with low increase in toxicity.

Ryu, Sang-Young, E-mail: ryu@kcch.re.k [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang-Il [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Center for Clinical Trials, National Cancer Center, Kyongi (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chul-Koo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kidong; Kim, Beob-Jong; Kim, Moon-Hong; Choi, Seok-Cheol; Lee, Eui-Don; Lee, Kyoung-Hee [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Characterization of a transient +2 sulfur oxidation state intermediate from the oxidation of aqueous sulfide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxidation H{sub 2}S to sulfate involves a net transfer of eight electrons and occurs through the formation of several partially oxidized intermediates with oxidation states ranging from {minus}1 to +5. Known intermediates include elemental sulfur (oxidation state 0), polysulfides (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: 0), sulfite (+4) and thiosulfate (outer sulfur: {minus}1, inner sulfur: +5). A noticeable gap in this series of intermediates is that of a +2 sulfur oxidation state oxoacid/oxoanion species, which was never detected experimentally. Here, we present evidence of the transient existence of +2 oxidation state intermediate in the Ni(II)-catalyzed oxidation of aqueous sulfide. X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) spectroscopy and Fourier-transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy were used to characterize this species; they suggest that it has a sulfoxylate ion (SO{sub 2}{sup 2{minus}}) structure.

Vairavmurthy, M.A.; Zhou, Weiqing

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Explanation of the high temperature obtained in the Intermediate Power Test  

SciTech Connect

It is now generally known by those working on Tory II-A that the average maximum fuel element wall temperature obtained during the Intermediate Power Test was somewhat higher than the 2250 degrees F design value. The purpose of this report is to explain how this occurred.

Barnett, C.

1961-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

16

Observations of the Equatorial Intermediate Current in the Western Pacific Ocean (165°E)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Direct current measurements (0–600 m; re. 600 m) were carried out every six months from January 1984 to June 1986 in the western tropical Pacific Ocean (165°E) from 20°S to 10°N. The Equatorial Intermediate Current (EIC) occurred beneath the ...

Thierry Delcroix; Christian Henin

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: SEAGA Intermediate Level Handbook Agency/Company /Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Sector: Climate Complexity/Ease of Use: Simple Website: www.fao.org/docrep/012/ak213e/ak213e00.pdf‎ Cost: Free Related Tools CDM Sustainable Development Tool Integrated Model to Access the Global Environment Object-Oriented Energy, Climate, and Technology Systems (ObjECTS) Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) ... further results Find Another Tool FIND DEVELOPMENT IMPACTS ASSESSMENT TOOLS The Socio-economic and Gender Analysis (SEAGA) handbook of concepts, tools and guidelines for mainstreaming gender into development planning and policy implementation. Approach SEAGA, for Socio-economic and Gender Analysis, is an approach to

18

Intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry workshop  

SciTech Connect

This report contains the proceedings of the LAMPF Intermediate-Energy Nuclear Chemistry Workshop held in Los Alamos, New Mexico, June 23-27, 1980. The first two days of the Workshop were devoted to invited review talks highlighting current experimental and theoretical research activities in intermediate-energy nuclear chemistry and physics. Working panels representing major topic areas carried out indepth appraisals of present research and formulated recommendations for future research directions. The major topic areas were Pion-Nucleus Reactions, Nucleon-Nucleus Reactions and Nuclei Far from Stability, Mesonic Atoms, Exotic Interactions, New Theoretical Approaches, and New Experimental Techniques and New Nuclear Chemistry Facilities.

Butler, G.W.; Giesler, G.C.; Liu, L.C.; Dropesky, B.J.; Knight, J.D.; Lucero, F.; Orth, C.J.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Intermediate Temperature SOFC Operation Using Lanthanum Gallate Electrolyte  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This presentation discusses intermediate temperature SOFC operation using lanthanum gallate electrolyte.

Elangovan, S.; Balagopal, S. Hartvigsen, J.; Tipmer, M.; Larsen, D.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

20

Intermediate energy nuclear physics with electrons  

SciTech Connect

Inclusive electron scattering has made an enormous contribution to our understanding of hadron and of nuclear structure and to defining the questions which are driving the field in new directions. With intense CW intermediate energy electron beams and with the opportunity to exploit spin observables, central contributions to many of the most crucial questions are anticipated. (AIP)

Moniz, E.J.

1987-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Formal Semantics of the FLINT Intermediate Language  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formal Semantics of the FLINT Intermediate Language (Yale­CS­TR 1171) Christopher League Zhong Shao May 5, 1998 #12; Contents 1 Overview 3 1.1 Formal Semantics of FLINT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.2 Type Checker for FLINT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2 FLINT Abstract Syntax 8

22

Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate Print In the earth's troposphere, which blankets the planet surface where we live and breathe, dust particles, gas molecules, water vapor, and sunlight provide the ingredients for a multitude of chemical reactions that can generate effects ranging from clouds and smog to acid rain and climate change. In 1949, chemist Rudolf Criegee proposed a novel chemical pathway for one such reaction, known as ozonolysis: the destruction of alkenes (a type of hydrocarbon), via reaction with ozone, a key pollutant in the troposphere. Although there has been much indirect evidence supporting Criegee's mechanism, breakthrough research done at the ALS by chemists from Sandia National Laboratories, the University of Manchester, and Bristol University has for the first time directly measured reaction rates for so-called "Criegee intermediates," elusive molecules formed at intermediate stages of ozonolysis. The surprising results may have important implications for subjects ranging from advanced engine design to air quality and climate modeling.

23

MATERIALS SYSTEM FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted on symmetrical cells of the type [gas, electrode/LSGM electrolyte/electrode, gas]. The electrode materials were slurry-coated on both sides of the LSGM electrolyte support. The electrodes selected for this investigation are candidate materials for SOFC electrodes. Cathode materials include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM + doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF + LSGM. Pt metal electrodes were also used for the purpose of comparison. Anode material investigated was the Ni + GDC composite. The study revealed important details pertaining to the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrodes. The information obtained can be used to design electrodes for intermediate temperature SOFCs based on LSGM electrolyte.

Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

2004-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

Accelerated Dynamics Methods for Infrequent Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Laboratory Los Alamos, New Mexico U.S. Department of Energy Theory Focus Session on Hydrogen-8) Francesco Montalenti (U. Milano-Bicocca) Graeme Henkelman (U. Texas at Austin) Timothy C. Germann) Jacques Amar (U. Toledo) DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences Motorola Intel Los Alamos #12;Outline

25

The Uflow Computational Model and Intermediate Format  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report motivates and defines a general-purpose, architecture independent, parallel computational model, which captures the intuitions which underlie the design of the United Functions and Objects programming language. The model has two aspects, which turn out to be a traditional dataflow model and an actor-like model, with a very simple interface between the two. Certain aspects of the model, particularly strictness, maximum parallelism, and lack of suspension are stressed. The implications of introducing stateful objects are carefully spelled out. The model has several purposes, although we largely describe it as it would be used for visualising the execution of programs. The model is embodied in a textual intermediate format, and in a set of UFO data structures. This report also serves as a definition of the intermediate format, and gives a brief overview of the data structures. 1 Introduction This report serves two purposes. Firstly, in sections 1 to 9, the Uflow computational...

John Sargeant; Chris Kirkham; Steve Anderson

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Geostrophic Regimes, Intermediate Solitary Vortices and Jovian Eddies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine the relevance to Jupiter's atmosphere of the solitary vortices favored at scales intermediate to those of the quasi-geostrophic (QG) and planetary-geostrophic motions. Horizontal divergence plays a crucial role in the intermediate-...

Gareth P. Williams; Toshio Yamagata

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Deformation Mechanisms at Intermediate Creep Temperatures in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These cooling rates are also representative of those that can occur in conventional processing of disk components. Constant load. 173. Superalloys 2004.

28

West Texas Intermediate - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Prices. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, November 2000.

29

Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high efficiency energy conversion devices. Present materials set, using yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolyte, limit the cell operating temperatures to 800 C or higher. It has become increasingly evident however that lowering the operating temperature would provide a more expeditious route to commercialization. The advantages of intermediate temperature (600 to 800 C) operation are related to both economic and materials issues. Lower operating temperature allows the use of low cost materials for the balance of plant and limits degradation arising from materials interactions. When the SOFC operating temperature is in the range of 600 to 700 C, it is also possible to partially reform hydrocarbon fuels within the stack providing additional system cost savings by reducing the air preheat heat-exchanger and blower size. The promise of Sr and Mg doped lanthanum gallate (LSGM) electrolyte materials, based on their high ionic conductivity and oxygen transference number at the intermediate temperature is well recognized. The focus of the present project was two-fold: (a) Identify a cell fabrication technique to achieve the benefits of lanthanum gallate material, and (b) Investigate alternative cathode materials that demonstrate low cathode polarization losses at the intermediate temperature. A porous matrix supported, thin film cell configuration was fabricated. The electrode material precursor was infiltrated into the porous matrix and the counter electrode was screen printed. Both anode and cathode infiltration produced high performance cells. Comparison of the two approaches showed that an infiltrated cathode cells may have advantages in high fuel utilization operations. Two new cathode materials were evaluated. Northwestern University investigated LSGM-ceria composite cathode while Caltech evaluated Ba-Sr-Co-Fe (BSCF) based pervoskite cathode. Both cathode materials showed lower polarization losses at temperatures as low as 600 C than conventional manganite or cobaltite cathodes.

S. Elangovan; Scott Barnett; Sossina Haile

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

30

Ligand Intermediates in Metal-Catalyzed Reactions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The longest-running goal of this project has been the synthesis, isolation, and physical chemical characterization of homogeneous transition metal complexes containing ligand types believed to be intermediates in the metal-catalyzed conversion of CO/H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, and similar raw materials to organic fuels, feedstocks, etc. In the current project period, complexes that contain unusual new types of C{sub x}(carbide) and C{sub x}O{sub y} (carbon oxide) ligands have been emphasized. A new program in homogeneous fluorous phase catalysis has been launched as described in the final report.

Gladysz, John A.

1999-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Abstract Abstract unavailable. Author Larry J. Garside Organization Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology Published Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 1973 Report Number Open File Report 94-2 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http://crossref.org Online Internet link for Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada Citation Larry J. Garside (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology). 1973. Radioactive Mineral Occurences in Nevada. Reno, NV: Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology. Report No.: Open File Report 94-2. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Radioactive_Mineral_Occurences_in_Nevada&oldid=690513"

32

Generalized Slow Roll Conditions and the Possibility of Intermediate Scale Inflation in Scalar-Tensor Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Generalized slow roll conditions and parameters are obtained for a general form of scalar-tensor theory (with no external sources), having arbitrary functions describing a nonminimal gravitational coupling F(\\phi), a Kahler-like kinetic function k(\\phi), and a scalar potential V(\\phi). These results are then used to analyze a simple toy model example of chaotic inflation with a single scalar field \\phi and a standard Higgs potential and a simple gravitational coupling function. In this type of model inflation can occur with inflaton field values at an intermediate scale of roughly 10^{11} GeV when the particle physics symmetry breaking scale is approximately 1 TeV, provided that the theory is realized within the Jordan frame. If the theory is realized in the Einstein frame, however, the intermediate scale inflation does not occur.

J. R. Morris

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

33

Vehicle Technologies Office: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Effects of Intermediate Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 on Digg

34

Kinetic advantage of controlled intermediate nuclear fusion  

SciTech Connect

The dominated process of controlled fusion is to let nuclei gain enough kinetic energy to overcome Coulomb barrier. As a result, a fusion scheme can consider two factors in its design: to increase kinetic energy of nuclei and to alter the Coulomb barrier. Cold Fusion and Hot fusion are all one-factor schemes while Intermediate Fusion is a twofactors scheme. This made CINF kinetically superior. Cold Fusion reduces deuteron-deuteron distance, addressing Coulomb barrier, and Hot Fusion heat up plasma into extreme high temperature, addressing kinetic energy. Without enough kinetic energy made Cold Fusion skeptical. Extreme high temperature made Hot Fusion very difficult to engineer. Because CIFN addresses both factors, CIFN is a more promising technique to be industrialized.

Guo Xiaoming [Physics and Computer Science Department, Wilfrid Laurier University, Waterloo, Ontario, N2L 3C5 (Canada)

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

35

Benchmark West Texas Intermediate crude assayed  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper gives an assay of West Texas Intermediate, one of the world's market crudes. The price of this crude, known as WTI, is followed by market analysts, investors, traders, and industry managers around the world. WTI price is used as a benchmark for pricing all other US crude oils. The 41[degree] API WTI posted prices is the price paid for the crude at the wellhead in West Texas and is the true benchmark on which other US crudes are priced. The spot price is the negotiated price for short-term trades of the crude. And the New York Mercantile Exchange, or Nymex, price is a futures price for barrels delivered at Cushing.

Rhodes, A.K.

1994-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

36

Intermediate Ethanol Blends Catalyst Durability Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the summer of 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to evaluate the potential impacts of intermediate ethanol blends (also known as mid-level blends) on legacy vehicles and other engines. The purpose of the test program was to develop information important to assessing the viability of using intermediate blends as a contributor to meeting national goals for the use of renewable fuels. Through a wide range of experimental activities, DOE is evaluating the effects of E15 and E20 - gasoline blended with 15% and 20% ethanol - on tailpipe and evaporative emissions, catalyst and engine durability, vehicle driveability, engine operability, and vehicle and engine materials. This report provides the results of the catalyst durability study, a substantial part of the overall test program. Results from additional projects will be reported separately. The principal purpose of the catalyst durability study was to investigate the effects of adding up to 20% ethanol to gasoline on the durability of catalysts and other aspects of the emissions control systems of vehicles. Section 1 provides further information about the purpose and context of the study. Section 2 describes the experimental approach for the test program, including vehicle selection, aging and emissions test cycle, fuel selection, and data handling and analysis. Section 3 summarizes the effects of the ethanol blends on emissions and fuel economy of the test vehicles. Section 4 summarizes notable unscheduled maintenance and testing issues experienced during the program. The appendixes provide additional detail about the statistical models used in the analysis, detailed statistical analyses, and detailed vehicle specifications.

West, Brian H; Sluder, Scott; Knoll, Keith; Orban, John; Feng, Jingyu

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Investigation of Microphysical Processes Occurring in Isolated Convection during NAME  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To address questions regarding microphysical processes occurring in the core North American monsoon region, data from NCAR’s S-band polarimetric Doppler radar (S-Pol) deployed during the North American Monsoon Experiment (NAME) in the summer of ...

Angela K. Rowe; Steven A. Rutledge; Timothy J. Lang

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Intermediate-break LOCA analyses for the AP600 design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A postulated double-ended guillotine break of a direct-vessel-injection line in an AP600 plant has been analyzed. This event is characterized as an intermediate break loss-of-coolant accident (IBLOCA). Most of the insights regarding the response of the AP600 safety systems to the postulated accident are derived from calculations performed with the TRAC-PFl/MOD2 code. However, complementary insights derived from a scaled experiment conducted in the ROSA facility, as well as insights based upon calculations by other codes, are also presented. The key processes occurring in an AP600 during a IBLOCA are primary coolant system depressurization, inventory depletion, inventory replacement via emergency core coolant injection, continuous core cooling, and long-term decay heat rejection to the atmosphere. Based upon the calculated and experimental results, the AP600 will not experience a core heat up and will reach a safe shutdown state using only safety-class equipment. Only the early part of the long-term cooling period initiated by In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank injection was evaluated Thus, the observation that the core is continuously cooled should be verified for the latter phase of the long-term cooling period, the interval when sump injection and containment cooling processes are important.

Boyack, B.E.; Lime, J.F.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Proton-induced fission of heavy nuclei at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The intermediate energy proton-induced fission of 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np is studied. The inelastic interactions of protons and heavy nuclei are described by a CRISP model, in which the reaction proceeds in two steps. The first one corresponds fast cascade, where a series of individual particle-particle collisions occurs within the nucleus. It leaves a highly excited cascade residual nucleus, assumed to be in thermal equilibrium. Subsequently, in the second step the excited nucleus releases its energy by evaporation of neutrons and light charged particles as well. Both the symmetric and asymmetric fission are regarded, and the fission probabilities are obtained from CRISP code calculations, by means of statistical weighting factors. The fission cross sections, the fissility of the fissioning nuclei, and the number of nucleons lost by the target - before and after fission - are calculated and compared to experiments for 660 MeV protons incident on 241Am, 238$U and 237$Np. Some of the model predictions are in full compliance to the experiments. We conclude that our two step model provides a reasonable description of the medium energy proton-induced fission.

A. Deppman; E. Andrade-II; V. Guimaraes; G. S. Karapetyan; A. R. Balabekyan; N. A. Demekhina

2013-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

40

The Crystal Structure of a Meta-stable Intermediate Particle...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of the intermediate form of the virus, but it always quickly morphed into its final armored form, even without DNA present. Finally, working with collaborators from the...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Expanded Intermediate-State Structure of a Bacterial Mechanosensitive...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expanded Intermediate-State Structure of a Bacterial Mechanosensitive Channel Human and other animals rely on the senses of touch and hearing to perceive mechanical stimuli, a...

42

West Texas Intermediate crude oil price and NYMEX 95% confidence ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Texas Intermediate crude oil price and NYMEX 95% confidence intervals January 2007 – October 2009 Short-Term Energy Outlook Note: Confidence intervals for the ...

43

14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics, Fall 2000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presents basic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. Emphasizes applications, including the measurement of productivity, rationing, insurance markets, and ...

Autor, David H.

44

Coal Electrolysis to Produce Hydrogen at Intermediate Temperatures.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??As an alternative technique for hydrogen production, coal electrolysis was evaluated at intermediate temperatures (80 °C-108 °C). First, an electrochemical technique was developed to… (more)

Jin, Xin

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Intermediate Heat ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Creep Behavior of High Temperature Alloys for Intermediate Heat Exchanger in Next Generation Nuclear Plant. Author(s), Xingshuo Wen, ...

46

On properties of certain classical operators occurring in Fourier analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Properties of conjugate functions, Hilbert transforms, and certain maximal operators occurring in Fourier analysis in weighted Lebesgue spaces are established. For functions of several variables in Orlicz spaces the divergence in measure of the Cesaro and the Abel means of the conjugate trigonometric series, and the question of the existence of conjugate functions are investigated.

Zhizhiashvili, L V; Tkebuchava, G E [I. Javakhishvili Tbilisi State University, Tbilisi (Georgia)

2004-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Fact Sheet: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends Fact Sheet: Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends October 7, 2008 - 4:14pm Addthis In August 2007, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiated a test program to assess the potential impacts of higher intermediate ethanol blends on conventional vehicles and other engines that rely on gasoline. The test program focuses specifically on the effects of intermediate blends of E15 and E20-gasoline blended with 15 and 20 percent ethanol, respectively-on emissions, catalyst and engine durability, drivability or operability, and materials associated with these vehicles and engines. This DOE test program includes technical expertise from DOE's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

48

Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed strontium-and-magnesium-doped lanthanum gallate electrolyte, La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSGM). The objective of the study was to identify the materials system for fabrication and evaluation of intermediate temperature (600-800 C) solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The slurry-coated electrode materials had fine porosity to enhance catalytic activity. Cathode materials investigated include La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), LSCF (La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3}), a two-phase particulate composite consisting of LSM-doped-lanthanum gallate (LSGM), and LSCF-LSGM. The anode materials were Ni-Ce{sub 0.85}Gd{sub 0.15}O{sub 2} (Ni-GDC) and Ni-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 2} (Ni-LDC) composites. Experiments conducted with the anode materials investigated the effect of having a barrier layer of GDC or LDC in between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-composite anode to prevent adverse reaction of the Ni with lanthanum in LSGM. For proper interpretation of the beneficial effects of the barrier layer, similar measurements were performed without the barrier layer. The ohmic and the polarization resistances of the system were obtained over time as a function of temperature (600-800 C), firing temperature, thickness, and the composition of the electrodes. The study revealed important details pertaining to the ohmic and the polarization resistances of the electrode as they relate to stability and the charge-transfer reactions that occur in such electrode structures.

Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

2005-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

49

Unified Model for the Heat Transfer Processes that Occur During  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A unified general model for the heat transfer processes that occur within a food product subjected to canning or aseptic thermal treatment, is presented. Two principles are extensively used in the model building process: system segregation and energy balancing. The model is summarized in an algorithm, whose specification is showed for different combinations of processing system type (PST) and product formulation (PF) with a single particle type. A discussion on the practical relevance of proper product identification in the case of aseptic processing, is included. Finally, an illustration is given on the results that can be obtained from the model algorithm application, in a comparative study of different PST-PF combinations.

Jose F. Pastrana; Harvey J. Gold; Kenneth R. Swanzel; Pastrana Gold; Jose F. Pastrana; Harvey J. Gold; Kenneth R. Swartzel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Naturally occurring crystalline phases: analogues for radioactive waste forms  

SciTech Connect

Naturally occurring mineral analogues to crystalline phases that are constituents of crystalline radioactive waste forms provide a basis for comparison by which the long-term stability of these phases may be estimated. The crystal structures and the crystal chemistry of the following natural analogues are presented: baddeleyite, hematite, nepheline; pollucite, scheelite;sodalite, spinel, apatite, monazite, uraninite, hollandite-priderite, perovskite, and zirconolite. For each phase in geochemistry, occurrence, alteration and radiation effects are described. A selected bibliography for each phase is included.

Haaker, R.F.; Ewing, R.C.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials in Cargo at US Borders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the U.S. and other countries, large numbers of vehicles pass through border crossings each day. The illicit movement of radioactive sources is a concern that has resulted in the installation of radiation detection and identification instruments at border crossing points. This activity is judged to be necessary because of the possibility of an act of terrorism involving a radioactive source that may include any number of dangerous radionuclides. The problem of detecting, identifying, and interdicting illicit radioactive sources is complicated by the fact that many materials present in cargo are somewhat radioactive. Some cargo contains naturally occurring radioactive material or technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material that may trigger radiation portal monitor alarms. Man-made radioactive sources, especially medical isotopes, are also frequently observed and produce alarms. Such nuisance alarms can be an operational limiting factor for screening of cargo at border crossings. Information about the nature of the radioactive materials in cargo that can interfere with the detection of radionuclides of concern is necessary. This paper provides such information for North American cargo, but the information may also be of use to border control officials in other countries. (PIET-43741-TM-361)

Kouzes, Richard T.; Ely, James H.; Evans, John C.; Hensley, Walter K.; Lepel, Elwood A.; McDonald, Joseph C.; Schweppe, John E.; Siciliano, Edward R.; Strom, Daniel J.; Woodring, Mitchell L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Nonlinear Climate Responses to Changes in Antarctic Intermediate Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global impact of changes in Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) properties is demonstrated using idealized perturbation experiments in a coupled climate model. Properties of AAIW were altered between 10° and 20°S in the Atlantic, Pacific, and ...

Jennifer A. Graham; David P. Stevens; Karen J. Heywood

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Northward Penetration of Antarctic Intermediate Water off Northwest Africa  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this article, historical and climatological datasets are used to investigate the seasonal northward propagation of Antarctic Intermediate Waters (AAIW) along the eastern margin of the North Atlantic subtropical gyre. A cluster analysis for ...

F. Machín; J. L. Pelegrí

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Intermediate SCADA Security Training Course Slides (September 2006)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Presentation for Intermediate SCADA Security, SS-2 SANS SCADA Summit, September 28-29, 2006. The class enabled attendees to develop an understanding of tools and methods that can be used to...

55

14.03 Intermediate Applied Microeconomics, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This class presents microeconomic theory and applications of consumer and producer behavior and welfare analysis at an intermediate level. In addition to standard competitive models, we study deviations due to externalities, ...

Autor, David

56

Multidecadal Warming and Shoaling of Antarctic Intermediate Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) is a dominant Southern Hemisphere water mass that spreads from its formation regions just north of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC) to at least 20°S in all oceans. This study uses an isopycnal climatology ...

Sunke Schmidtko; Gregory C. Johnson

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Intermediate Temperature Planar Na-Metal...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

G. Li, X. Lu, C.A Coyle, J.Y. Kim, J.P. Lemmon, V.L. Sprenkle, Z. Yang, "Novel ternary molten salt electrolytes for intermediate-temperature sodiumnickel chloride batteries,"...

58

Intermediate connector for stacked organic light emitting devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided, having an anode, a cathode, and an intermediate connector disposed between the anode and the cathode. A first organic layer including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the anode and the intermediate connector, and a second including an emissive sublayer is disposed between the intermediate connector and the cathode. The intermediate connector includes a first metal having a work function lower than 4.0 eV and a second metal having a work function lower than 5.0 eV. The work function of the first metal is at least 0.5 eV less than the work function of the second metal. The first metal is in contact with a sublayer of the second organic layer that includes a material well adapted to receive holes from a low work function metal.

D& #x27; Andrade, Brian

2013-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

59

Intermediate Vapor Expansion Distillation and Nested Enrichment Cascade Distillation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Although it is known that incorporating an intermediate reboiler or reflux condenser in a distillation column will improve column efficiency by 15 to 100%, there has been little use of this technique to date." Intermediate vapor compression heat pumping was recently introduced as one practical means of achieving this benefit. Introduced in this paper are two new means having added advantages over compression: intermediate vapor expansion heat pumping, and nested enrichment cascades. In both cases the efficiency advantage is obtained without requiring import of shaft work. With intermediate vapor expansion, the expander is more efficient and less costly than the compressor which achieves comparable improvement in distillation efficiency. With the "nested enrichment" technique, the increased efficiency is obtained without requiring either compressors or expanders.

Erickson, D. C.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

An Intermediate Model of the Tropical Pacific Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intermediate tropical Pacific Ocean model is developed to bridge the gap between anomaly models of El Niño and ocean general circulation models. The model contains essential physics for reproducing both the annual and interannual variations of ...

Bin Wang; Tianming Li; Ping Chang

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Is anyone regulating naturally occurring radioactive material? A state survey  

SciTech Connect

As far as we know, naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) has surrounded humankind since the beginning of time. However, recent data demonstrating that certain activities concentrate NORM have increased concern regarding its proper handling and disposal and precipitated the development of new NORM-related regulations. The regulation of NORM affects the management of government facilities as well as a broad range of industrial processes. Recognizing that NORM regulation at the federal level is extremely limited, Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) conducted a 50-state survey to determine the extent to which states have assumed the responsibility for regulating NORM as well as the NORM standards that are currently being applied at the state level. Though the survey indicates that NORM regulation comprises a broad spectrum of controls from full licensing requirements to virtually no regulation at afl, a trend is emerging toward recognition of the need for increased regulation of potential NORM hazards, particularly in the absence of federal standards.

Gross, E.M.; Barisas, S.G.

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Scrap metal management issues associated with naturally occurring radioactive material  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Certain industrial processes sometimes generate waste by-products that contain naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) at elevated concentrations. Some industries, including the water treatment, geothermal energy, and petroleum industries, generate scrap metal that may be contaminated with NORM wastes. Of these three industries, the petroleum industry probably generates the largest quantity of NORM-contaminated equipment, conservatively estimated at 170,000 tons per year. Equipment may become contaminated when NORM-containing scale or sludge accumulates inside water-handling equipment. The primary radionuclides of concern in these NORM wastes are radium-226 and radium-228. NORM-contaminated equipment generated by the petroleum industry currently is managed several ways. Some equipment is routinely decontaminated for reuse; other equipment becomes scrap metal and may be disposed of by burial at a licensed landfill, encapsulation inside the wellbore of an abandoned well, or shipment overseas for smelting. In view of the increased regulatory activities addressing NORM, the economic burden of managing NORM-contaminated wastes, including radioactive scrap metal, is likely to continue to grow. Efforts to develop a cost-effective strategy for managing radioactive scrap metal should focus on identifying the least expensive disposition options that provide adequate protection of human health and the environment. Specifically, efforts should focus on better characterizing the quantity of radioactive scrap available for recycle or reuse, the radioactivity concentration levels, and the potential risks associated with different disposal options.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Novel ''Controlled Intermediate Nuclear Fusion'' and its Possible Industrial Realization as Predicted by Hadronic Mechanics and Chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this note, we propose, apparently for the first time, a new type of controlled nuclear fusion called "intermediate" because occurring at energies intermediate between those of the ''cold'' and ''hot'' fusions, and propose a specific industrial realization. For this purpose: 1) We show that known limitations of quantum mechanics, quantum chemistry and special relativity cause excessive departures from the conditions occurring for all controlled fusions; 2) We outline the covering hadronic mechanics, hadronic chemistry and isorelativity specifically conceived, constructed and verified during the past two decades for new cleans energies and fuels; 3) We identify seven physical laws predicted by the latter disciplines that have to be verified by all controlled nuclear fusions to occur; 4) We review the industrial research conducted to date in the selection of the most promising engineering realization as well as optimization of said seven laws; and 5) We propose with construction details a specific {\\it hadronic reactor} (patented and international patents pending), consisting of actual equipment specifically intended for the possible industrial production of the clean energy released by representative cases of controlled intermediate fusions for independent scrutiny by interested colleagues.

Ruggero Maria Santilli

2006-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

64

Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds  

SciTech Connect

A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for “stick built” structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tiedowns. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Manufactured Housing Institute. The results of this research can lead to savings in annual losses of life and property by providing validated information to enable the advancement of code requirements and by developing engineering software that can predict and optimize wind resistance.

W. D. Richins; T. K. Larson

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

File:Intermediate wind factsheet.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Intermediate wind factsheet.pdf Intermediate wind factsheet.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Metadata File:Intermediate wind factsheet.pdf Size of this preview: 466 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 467 × 600 pixels. Go to page 1 2 Go! next page → next page → Full resolution ‎(1,312 × 1,687 pixels, file size: 480 KB, MIME type: application/pdf, 2 pages) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 14:31, 26 December 2013 Thumbnail for version as of 14:31, 26 December 2013 1,312 × 1,687, 2 pages (480 KB) Rbaranowski (Talk | contribs) Category:Wind for Schools Portal CurriculaCategory:Wind for Schools Middle School Curricula You cannot overwrite this file. Edit this file using an external application (See the setup

66

A Polyhedral Study of Multiechelon Lot Sizing with Intermediate Demands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we study a multiechelon uncapacitated lot-sizing problem in series (m-ULS), where the output of the intermediate echelons has its own external demand and is also an input to the next echelon. We propose a polynomial-time dynamic ... Keywords: extended formulation, facets, fixed-charge networks, lot sizing, multiechelon

Minjiao Zhang; Simge Küçükyavuz; Hande Yaman

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of five different types, NIF possess common structural features, including a conserved alpha-helical central rod domain of NIF in the presence of NF-L (Zackroff et al., 1982; Hisanaga and Hirokawa, 1988; Balin and Lee, 1991

Goldman, Robert D.

68

Tachyon field in intermediate inflation on the brane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new model of intermediate inflation in the framework of brane cosmology in the presence of tachyonic field. We derive the expressions for the model parameters and estimate the observable parameters in the model numerically. We finally conclude that these parameters fit well with the observational data.

Farajollahi, H. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of); School of Physics, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW, 2052 (Australia); Ravanpak, A. [Department of Physics, University of Guilan, Rasht (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

69

More Signatures of the Intermediate Mass Higgs Boson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We examine the potential signatures of the Higgs boson when it decays into a tau-lepton pair. We show that with the proper identification of the tau-jet, this decay mode can lead to the identification of the Higgs boson over most of the intermediate mass range (\\mW $<$ \\mH $<$ 2 \\mW).

Pankaj Agrawal

1998-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

70

Heat exchanger with intermediate evaporating and condensing fluid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shell and tube-type heat exchanger, such as a liquid sodium-operated steam generator for use in nuclear reactors, comprises a shell containing a primary fluid tube bundle, a secondary fluid tube bundle at higher elevation, and an intermediate fluid vaporizing at the surface of the primary fluid tubes and condensing at the surface of the secondary fluid tubes.

Fraas, Arthur P. (Knoxville, TN)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Strong concepts: Intermediate-level knowledge in interaction design research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Design-oriented research practices create opportunities for constructing knowledge that is more abstracted than particular instances, without aspiring to be at the scope of generalized theories. We propose an intermediate design knowledge form that we ... Keywords: Design research, bare-skin connection, seamfulness, social navigation, strong concepts

Kristina Höök; Jonas Löwgren

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

The EXOSAT data on GX 339-4: further evidence for an ``intermediate'' state  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have studied the fast timing and spectral behavior of the black hole candidate (BHC) GX 339-4 using all 1 - 20 keV EXOSAT ME data: the July 1983, March 1984, May 1984 and April 1985 observations. In April 1985 GX 339-4 was in a weak low state (0.03E-9 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}, 2 - 10 keV). The X-ray spectrum was a hard power law with a photon index \\alpha of 1.82 and the power spectrum, though ill-constrained by the data, was consistent with a typical BHC low state spectrum. During the other three pointings the system was brighter (1.5E-9 erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}, 2 - 10 keV), an ultrasoft component was present in the spectrum, and the power law was steeper (\\alpha ~3.5 in 1984; in 1983 it was not well-measured); the power spectrum showed a flat-topped band-limited noise component with a break frequency of ~4.5 Hz and a fractional rms amplitude of ~7%. Comparing flux levels, X-ray spectra and power spectra we conclude that in these observations GX 339-4 was in a state intermediate between the usual BHC low and high states. The system was ~4 times brighter than in its usual low state, 4 times fainter than in its usual high state, and an order of magnitude fainter than in its very high state. We compare these results to those recently obtained on other BHCs, and conclude that this ``intermediate state'' behavior is a common characteristic of BHCs, that occurs at $\\dot M$ levels intermediate between the high and the low state. We argue that this result can be used to resolve the long-standing issue of the dependence of the power spectral break frequency in the low state on mass accretion rate, and strengthens the idea that low-state noise and very-high state noise may have a common origin. We briefly discuss a possible interpretation for the changes in break frequency in the low state and between low state and intermediate state.

Mariano Mendez; Michiel van der Klis

1996-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

73

Roles of Naturally Occurring Bacteria in Controlling Iodine-129 Mobility in Subsurface Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

129I is of major concern because of its biophilic nature, excessive inventory, long half-life (~16 million yrs), and high mobility in the natural environment that depends on its chemical speciation. Iodide (I-) has the highest mobility than iodate (IO3-) and is the predominant species in the terrestrial environment due to prevailing pH and Eh conditions. In order to transform I- to less mobile organo-iodine (OI), strong oxidants are necessary to activate the first electron transfer step from I- to reactive intermediates. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of naturally occurring aerobic bacteria isolated from an 129I contaminated aquifer (F-area of the Savannah River Site, SC) on I- oxidation and OI formation. It was demonstrated that 3 of 136 strains accumulated I- (0.2~2%) in the presence of H2O2, when incubated in the presence of an environmentally relevant concentration of I- (0.1 microM). The accumulation was likely through electrophilic substitution resulting in the iodination of cellular constituents. The results indicated that culturable I--accumulating bacteria are not directly responsible for the high fraction of oxidized iodine species (IO3- and OI, >50% of total I) present in the SRS F-area. Several bacterial strains were found to be capable of stimulating I- oxidation through excretion of oxidants and enzymes. Organic acids in spent liquid medium from 27 of 84 aerobic bacterial cultures enhanced H2O2-dependent I- oxidation 2-10 fold. Organic acids enhanced I- oxidation by (1) lowering the pH of the spent medium and (2) reacting with H2O2 to form peroxy carboxylic acids, which are strong oxidizing agents. In the absence of H2O2, spent medium from 44 of 84 bacteria cultures showed I- oxidizing capacities. One I- oxidizing bacterium was studied to characterize its extracellular I- oxidizing component(s). The I- oxidizing capability from the spent medium was inactive by treatments with heat and H2O2 and absent under anaerobic conditions. Conversely, NADH, NADPH and FMN additions stimulated I- oxidation in the spend medium. These results indicate an oxidase(s) catalyzed I- oxidation. Understanding the bacterial activities involved with I- oxidation and OI formation is expected to help reduce 129I mobility in water-soil systems.

Li, Hsiu-Ping

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Recent advances in modeling fission cross sections over intermediate structures  

SciTech Connect

More accurate fission cross section calculations in presence of underlying intermediate structure are strongly desired. This paper recalls the common approximations used below the fission threshold and quantifies their impact. In particular, an exact expanded R-matrix Monte Carlo calculation of the intermediate structure, deeply mixed with the fluctuations of the class-I and II decay amplitudes, is shown. This paper also insists on the microscopic structure of the level densities as a function of the nucleus deformation and show preliminary neutron induced fission cross section calculations for {sup 239}Pu and {sup 240}Pu using newly calculated combinatorial level densities. Comparisons with recent evaluated and measured fission cross sections are made.

Bouland, Olivier [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Lynn, J. Eric [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Talou, Patrick [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Evolution of emission line activity in intermediate mass young stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical spectra of 45 intermediate mass Herbig Ae/Be stars. Together with the multi-epoch spectroscopic and photometric data compiled for a large sample of these stars and ages estimated for individual stars by using pre-main sequence evolutionary tracks, we have studied the evolution of emission line activity in them. We find that, on average, the H_alpha emission line strength decreases with increasing stellar age in HAeBe stars, indicating that the accretion activity gradually declines during the PMS phase. This would hint at a relatively long-lived (a few Myr) process being responsible for the cessation of accretion in Herbig Ae/Be stars. We also find that the accretion activity in these stars drops substantially by ~ 3 Myr. This is comparable to the timescale in which most intermediate mass stars are thought to lose their inner disks, suggesting that inner disks in intermediate mass stars are dissipated rapidly after the accretion activity has fallen below a certain level. We, further find a relatively tight correlation between strength of the emission line and near-infrared excess due to inner disks in HAeBe stars, indicating that the disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars cannot be entirely passive. We suggest that this correlation can be understood within the frame work of the puffed-up inner rim disk models if the radiation from the accretion shock is also responsible for the disk heating.

P. Manoj; H. C. Bhatt; G. Maheswar; S. Muneer

2006-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

76

Interdecadal Change in Properties of El Niño–Southern Oscillation in an Intermediate Coupled Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The role of subsurface temperature variability in modulating El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) properties is examined using an intermediate coupled model (ICM), consisting of an intermediate dynamic ocean model and a sea surface temperature (...

Rong-Hua Zhang; Antonio J. Busalacchi

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Structural and mechanical properties of intermediate filaments under extreme conditions and disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intermediate filaments are one of the three major components of the cytoskeleton in eukaryotic cells. It was discovered during the recent decades that intermediate filament proteins play key roles to reinforce cells subjected ...

Qin, Zhao, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

An Exchange Window for the Injection of Antarctic Intermediate Water into the South Pacific  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) occupies the intermediate horizon of most of the world oceans. Formed in the Southern Ocean, it is characterized by a relative salinity minimum. With a new, denser in situ National Oceanographic Data Center ...

Daniele Iudicone; Keith B. Rodgers; Richard Schopp; Gurvan Madec

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Prices - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

West Texas Intermediate Crude Oil Prices. Sources: History: EIA; Projections: Short-Term Energy Outlook, September 2000.

80

Cognitive processing differences between frequent and infrequent Internet users  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Internet is rapidly transforming a range of human activities; socio-cognitive theory assumes that engagement in transformed activities, over time, transforms human cognition. Four hundred and six college students completed four modified cognitive ... Keywords: Cognition, Internet use

G. M. Johnson

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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81

Improved field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes by an Ag micro-particle intermediation layer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An efficient way to improve field emission characteristic of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) through an Ag micro-particle intermediation layer is presented. In this way, the intermediation layer is deposited on an indium tin oxide glass substrate by electrochemical ... Keywords: Ag micro-particle intermediation layer, Carbon nanotubes, Field emission

Wenhui Lu; Hang Song; Yixin Jin; Haifeng Zhao; Zhiming Li; Hong Jiang; Guoqing Miao

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Digital intermediate frequency QAM modulator using parallel processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The digital Intermediate Frequency (IF) modulator applies to various modulation types and offers a simple and low cost method to implement a high-speed digital IF modulator using field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs). The architecture eliminates multipliers and sequential processing by storing the pre-computed modulated cosine and sine carriers in ROM look-up-tables (LUTs). The high-speed input data stream is parallel processed using the corresponding LUTs, which reduces the main processing speed, allowing the use of low cost FPGAs.

Pao, Hsueh-Yuan (Livermore, CA); Tran, Binh-Nien (San Ramon, CA)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Observational Tests Of Intermediate Mass Star Yields Using Planetary Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a project designed to study abundances in a sample of planetary nebulae representing a broad range in progenitor mass and metallicity. We collect abundances of C, N, and O determined for the entire sample and compare them with theoretical predictions of planetary nebula abundances from a grid of intermediate-mass star models. We find very good agreement between observations and theory, lending strong support to our current understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars with progenitor masses below 8 solar masses. This agreement between observation and theory also supports the validity of published stellar yields of C and N in the study of the abundance evolution of these two elements.

K. B. Kwitter; R. B. C. Henry

2001-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

84

Observational Tests Of Intermediate Mass Star Yields Using Planetary Nebulae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper summarizes a project designed to study abundances in a sample of planetary nebulae representing a broad range in progenitor mass and metallicity. We collect abundances of C, N, and O determined for the entire sample and compare them with theoretical predictions of planetary nebula abundances from a grid of intermediate-mass star models. We find very good agreement between observations and theory, lending strong support to our current understanding of nucleosynthesis in stars with progenitor masses below 8 solar masses. This agreement between observation and theory also supports the validity of published stellar yields of C and N in the study of the abundance evolution of these two elements.

Kwitter, K B

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Ectrodactyly and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletion 7q  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on an individual with severe mental retardation, seizures, microcephaly, unusual face, scoliosis, and cleft feet and cleft right hand. The chromosomal study showed a proximal interstitial deletion 7q (q11.23q22). From our review of the literature, 11 patients have been reported with ectrodactyly (split hand/split foot malformation) and proximal/intermediate interstitial deletions or rearrangements of 7q. The critical segment for ectrodactyly seems to be located between 7q21.2 and 7q22.1. This malformation is present in 41% of the patients whose deletion involves the critical segment. 37 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

McElveen, C.; Carvajal, M.V.; Moscatello, D. [Louisiana State Univ. Medical Center, New Orleans, LA (United States)] [and others

1995-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

86

Electron capture in ion-molecule collisions at intermediate energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Recent progress of theoretical charge transfer study in ion-molecule collisions at the intermediate energy is reviewed. Concept of close and distant collisions obtained from extensive ion-atom collision studies is identified so that it can be utilized to model two distinct collision processes. For a close collision, explicit representation of the whole collision complex is necessary to describe collision dynamics correctly, while a model potential approach for molecule is appropriate for a distant collision. It is shown that these two distinct models are indeed capable of reproducing experimental charge transfer cross sections. Some remarks for further theoretical study of ion-molecule collisions are also given. 21 refs., 8 figs.

Kumura, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Gain-offunction mutations reveal expanded intermediate states and a sequential action of two gates in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

abstract The tension-driven gating transition in the large mechanosensitive channel MscL proceeds through detectable states of intermediate conductance. Gain-of-function (GOF) mutants with polar or charged substitutions in the main hydrophobic gate display altered patterns of subconducting states, providing valuable information about gating intermediates. Here we present thermodynamic analysis of several GOF mutants to clarify the nature and position of low-conducting conformations in the transition pathway. Unlike wild-type (WT) MscL, which predominantly occupies the closed and fully open states with very brief substates, the mild V23T GOF mutant frequently visits a multitude of short-lived subconducting states. Severe mutants V23D and G22N open in sequence: closed (C) ? low-conducting substate (S) ? open (O), with the first subtransition occurring at lower tensions. Analyses of equilibrium state occupancies as functions of membrane tension show that the C?S subtransition in WT MscL is associated with only a minor conductance increment, but the largest in-plane expansion and free energy change. The GOF substitutions strongly affect the first subtransition by reducing area (?A) and energy (?E) changes between C and S states commensurably with the severity of mutation. GOF mutants also exhibited a considerably larger ?E associated with the second (S?O) subtransition, but a ?A similar to WT. The area changes indicate that closed conformations of GOF mutants are physically preexpanded. The tension dependencies of rate constants for channel closure (k off) predict different positions of rate-limiting barriers on the energy-area profiles

Andriy Anishkin; Chien-sung Chiang; Sergei Sukharev

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Elastic Hadron Scattering on Li Isotopes at Intermediate Energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The elastic scattering of hadrons (protons, charged pions, and positively charged kaons) on {sup 6,7,8}Li nuclei is analyzed on the basis of Glauber-Sitenko diffraction theory. A few nuclear-wave-function versions found within two- and three-particle potential cluster models are used in the calculations. It is shown that the application of these wave functions in diffraction theory makes it possible to describe adequately the experimental differential cross sections and analyzing powers in hadron scattering at intermediate energies. In this study, particular attention is given to a comparison of the scattering of different particles on the same target nucleus, as well as to a comparison of scattering of particles of the same sort on different target nuclei.

Zhusupov, M.A.; Imambekov, O. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, Kazakh State University, ul. Timiryazeva 46, Almaty, 480121 (Kazakhstan); Ibraeva, E.T. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty, 480082 (Kazakhstan)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

the LIGO Scientific Collaboration; the Virgo Collaboration; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; R. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; K. Agatsuma; P. Ajith; B. Allen; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. A. Arain; M. C. Araya; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; J. C. B. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; D. Beck; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; A. Belletoile; I. Belopolski; M. Benacquista; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; R. Biswas; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; R. Bondarescu; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; S. Braccini; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; J. Cannizzo; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; S. Caudill; M. Cavaglia; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; O. Chaibi; T. Chalermsongsak; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; S. Chelkowski; W. Chen; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; S. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. Clark; J. H. Clayton; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; J. Colas; A. Colla; M. Colombini; A. Conte; R. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. M. Cruise; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; R. M. Cutler; K. Dahl; S. L. Danilishin; R. Dannenberg; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; E. J. Daw; R. Day; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; D. DeBra; G. Debreczeni; W. Del Pozzo; M. del Prete; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; M. Di Paolo Emilio; A. Di Virgilio; M. Diaz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; M. Drago; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edgar; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; G. Endroczi; R. Engel; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Y. Fan; B. F. Farr; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; F. Feroz; I. Ferrante; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; M. Flanigan; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gaspar; G. Gemme; R. Geng; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. A. Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; L. M. Goggin; G. Gonzalez; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; N. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Greverie; R. Grosso; H. Grote; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; R. Gupta; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; T. Ha; J. M. Hallam; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. -F. Hayau; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; V. Herrera; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; D. J. Hosken; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; B. Hughey; S. Husa; S. H. Huttner; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. I. Jones; G. Jones; R. Jones; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; Z. Keresztes; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov; B. Kim; C. Kim; H. Kim; K. Kim; N. Kim; Y. -M. Kim; P. J. King; D. L. Kinzel; J. S. Kissel; S. Klimenko; K. Kokeyama; V. Kondrashov; S. Koranda; W. Z. Korth; I. Kowalska

2012-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

90

Kaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The article reviews the physics related to kaon and antikaon production in heavy ion reactions at intermediate energies. Chiral dynamics predicts substantial modifications of the kaon properties in a dense nuclear environment. The status of the theoretical predictions as well as experimental evidences for medium effects such as repulsive/attractive mass shifts for $K^+/K^-$ are reviewed. In the vicinity of the thresholds, and even more pronounced below threshold, the production of strangeness is a highly collective process. Starting from elementary reaction channels the phenomenology of $K^+$ and $K^-$ production, i.e. freeze-out densities, time scales etc. as derived from experiment and theoretical transport calculations is presented. Below threshold kaon production shows a high sensitivity on the nuclear compression reached in heavy ion reactions. This allows to put constraints on the nuclear equation-of-state which are finally discussed.

Christian Fuchs

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

91

Search for Gravitational Waves from Intermediate Mass Binary Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the results of a weakly modeled burst search for gravitational waves from mergers of non-spinning intermediate mass black holes (IMBH) in the total mass range 100--450 solar masses and with the component mass ratios between 1:1 and 4:1. The search was conducted on data collected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors between November of 2005 and October of 2007. No plausible signals were observed by the search which constrains the astrophysical rates of the IMBH mergers as a function of the component masses. In the most efficiently detected bin centered on 88+88 solar masses, for non-spinning sources, the rate density upper limit is 0.13 per Mpc^3 per Myr at the 90% confidence level.

Abadie, J; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M; Accadia, T; Acernese, F; Adams, C; Adhikari, R; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Ceron, E Amador; Amariutei, D; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Arain, M A; Araya, M C; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Atkinson, D; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Aylott, B E; Babak, S; Baker, P; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S; Baragoya, J C B; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barton, M A; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Bastarrika, M; Basti, A; Batch, J; Bauchrowitz, J; Bauer, Th S; Bebronne, M; Beck, D; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Beker, M G; Bell, A S; Belletoile, A; Belopolski, I; Benacquista, M; Berliner, J M; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Beveridge, N; Beyersdorf, P T; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Biswas, R; Bitossi, M; Bizouard, M A; Black, E; Blackburn, J K; Blackburn, L; Blair, D; Bland, B; Blom, M; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Bogan, C; Bondarescu, R; Bondu, F; Bonelli, L; Bonnand, R; Bork, R; Born, M; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bosi, L; Bouhou, B; Braccini, S; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Breyer, J; Briant, T; Bridges, D O; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Britzger, M; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Burguet-Castell, J; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Campsie, P; Cannizzo, J; Cannon, K; Canuel, B; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Carbognani, F; Carbone, L; Caride, S; Caudill, S; Cavaglia, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C; Cesarini, E; Chaibi, O; Chalermsongsak, T; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chelkowski, S; Chen, W; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H; Chow, J; Christensen, N; Chua, S S Y; Chung, C T Y; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clark, D E; Clark, J; Clayton, J H; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P -F; Colacino, C N; Colas, J; Colla, A; Colombini, M; Conte, A; Conte, R; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cordier, M; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M; Coulon, J -P; Couvares, P; Coward, D M; Cowart, M; Coyne, D C; Creighton, J D E; Creighton, T D; Cruise, A M; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Cutler, R M; Dahl, K; Danilishin, S L; Dannenberg, R; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Dattilo, V; Daudert, B; Daveloza, H; Davier, M; Daw, E J; Day, R; Dayanga, T; De Rosa, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Del Pozzo, W; del Prete, M; Dent, T; Dergachev, V; DeRosa, R; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Di Fiore, L; Di Lieto, A; Di Palma, I; Emilio, M Di Paolo; Di Virgilio, A; Diaz, M; Dietz, A; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Dumas, J -C; Eberle, T; Edgar, M; Edwards, M; Effler, A; Ehrens, P; Endroczi, G; Engel, R; Etzel, T; Evans, K; Evans, M; Evans, T; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fairhurst, S; Fan, Y; Farr, B F; Fazi, D; Fehrmann, H; Feldbaum, D; Feroz, F; Ferrante, I; Fidecaro, F; Finn, L S; Fiori, I; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Flanigan, M; Foley, S; Forsi, E; Forte, L A; Fotopoulos, N; Fournier, J -D; Franc, J; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frede, M; Frei, M; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Fricke, T T; Friedrich, D; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fujimoto, M -K; Fulda, P J; Fyffe, M; Gair, J; Galimberti, M; Gammaitoni, L; Garcia, J; Garufi, F; Gaspar, M E; Gemme, G; Geng, R; Genin, E; Gennai, A; Gergely, L A; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giampanis, S; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gil, S; Gill, C; Gleason, J; Goetz, E; Goggin, L M; Gonzalez, G; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossler, S; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Gray, N; Greenhalgh, R J S; Gretarsson, A M; Greverie, C; Grosso, R; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Gupta, R; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Ha, T; Hallam, J M; Hammer, D; Hammond, G; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hanson, J; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Harstad, E D; Hartman, M T; Haughian, K; Hayama, K; Hayau, J -F; Heefner, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hendry, M A; Heng, I S; Heptonstall, A W; Herrera, V; Hewitson, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Holt, K; Holtrop, M; Hong, T; Hooper, S; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Howell, E J; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Inta, R; Isogai, T; Ivanov, A; Izumi, K; Jacobson, M; James, E; Jang, Y J; Jaranowski, P; Jesse, E; Johnson, W W; Jones, D I; Jones, G; Jones, R; Ju, L; Kalmus, P; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Kasturi, R; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, H; Kawabe, K; Kawamura, S; Kawazoe, F; Kelley, D; Kells, W; Keppel, D G; Keresztes, Z; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khazanov, E A; Kim, B; Kim, C; Kim, H; Kim, K; Kim, N; Kim, Y -M; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Klimenko, S; Kokeyama, K; Kondrashov, V; Koranda, S; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D; Kranz, O; Kringel, V; Krishnamurthy, S; Krishnan, B; Krolak, A; Kuehn, G; Kumar, R; Kwee, P; Lam, P K; Landry, M; Lantz, B; Lastzka, N; Lawrie, C; Lazzarini, A; Leaci, P; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Leong, J R; Leonor, I; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Li, J

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Intermediate-Size Inducer Pump design report. [LMFBR  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the mechanical, structural, and hydrodynamic design of the Intermediate-Size Inducer Pump (ISIP). The design was performed under Atomics International's DOE Base Technology Program by the Atomics International and Rocketdyne Divisions of Rockwell International. The pump was designed to utilize the FFTF prototype pump frame as a test vehicle to test the inducer, impeller, and diffuser plus necessary adapter hardware under simulated Large Scale Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor service conditions. The report describes the design requirements including the purpose and objectives, and discusses those design efforts and considerations made to meet the requirements. Included in the report are appendices showing calculative methods and results. Also included are overall assembly and layout drawings plus some details used as illustrations for discussion of the design results and the results of water tests performed on a model of the inducer.

Boardman, T.J.

1979-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

93

Photodissociation dynamics and spectroscopy of free radical combustion intermediates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The photodissociation spectroscopy and dynamics of free radicals is studied by the technique of fast beam photofragment translational spectroscopy. Photodetachment of internally cold, mass-selected negative ions produces a clean source of radicals, which are subsequently dissociated and detected. The photofragment yield as a function of photon energy is obtained, mapping out the dissociative and predissociative electronic states of the radical. In addition, the photodissociation dynamics, product branching ratios, and bond energies are probed at fixed photon energies by measuring the translational energy, P(E{sub T}), and angular distribution of the recoiling fragments using a time- and position-sensitive detector. Ab initio calculations are combined with dynamical and statistical models to interpret the observed data. The photodissociation of three prototypical hydrocarbon combustion intermediates forms the core of this work.

Osborn, D.L.

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biologically produced succinic acid: A new route to chemical intermediates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) Alternative Feedstocks (AF) program is forging new links between the agricultural community and the chemicals industry through support of research and development (R & D) that uses `green` feedstocks to produce chemicals. The program promotes cost-effective industrial use of renewable biomass as feedstocks to manufacture high-volume chemical building blocks. Industrial commercialization of such processes would stimulate the agricultural sector by increasing the demand of agricultural and forestry commodities. New alternatives for American industry may lie in the nation`s forests and fields. The national laboratory consortium has undertaken a joint R&D project with the Michigan Biotechnology Institute to demonstrate the feasibility of producing a chemical intermediate, succinic acid, and various derivatives, from renewable agricultural resources.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Investigation of transverse collective flow of intermediate mass fragments  

SciTech Connect

The transverse flow of intermediate mass fragments (IMFs) has been investigated for the 35 MeV/u {sup 70}Zn+{sup 70}Zn, {sup 64}Zn+{sup 64}Zn, and {sup 64}Ni+{sup 64}Ni systems. A transition from the IMF transverse flow strongly depending on the mass of the system, in the most violent collisions, to a dependence on the charge of the system, for the peripheral reactions, is shown. This transition was shown to be sensitive to the density dependence of the symmetry energy using the antisymmetrized molecular-dynamics model. The results present an observable, the IMF transverse flow, that can be used to probe the nuclear equation of state. Comparison with the simulation demonstrated a preference for a stiff density dependence of the symmetry energy.

Kohley, Z.; May, L. W.; Wuenschel, S.; Soisson, S. N.; Stein, B. C.; Yennello, S. J. [Chemistry Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Bonasera, A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, I-95123 Catania (Italy); Hagel, K.; Tripathi, R.; Wada, R.; Shetty, D. V.; Galanopoulos, S.; Smith, W. B. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Souliotis, G. A. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Athens GR-15771 (Greece); Mehlman, M. [Cyclotron Institute, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); Physics and Astronomy Department, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

96

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, further measurements of the oxygen deficient double perovskite PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} are reported. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. Preliminary measurements in symmetric cells have shown low ASR values at 600 C. Here we describe the first complete cell measurements on Ni/CGO/CGO/PBCO/CGO cells.

Allan J. Jacobson

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

97

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode--electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. In this report, the oxygen exchange kinetics of a P2 composition are described in detail. The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) have been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

Allan J. Jacobson

2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

98

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USE...

99

Assessment of next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made an assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using models developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop. Two IHX designs namely, shell and straight tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in an earlier assessment. Helical coil heat exchangers were analyzed in the current report and the results were compared with the performance features of designs from industry. In addition, a comparative analysis is presented between the shell and straight tube, helical, and printed circuit heat exchangers from the standpoint of heat exchanger volume, primary and secondary sides pressure drop, and number of tubes. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses were performed for the helical heat exchanger design and the results were compared with earlier-developed results on shell and straight tube and printed circuit heat exchangers.

Majumdar, S.; Moisseytsev, A.; Natesan, K.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2008-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

100

Guidance Concerning Enforcement of EISA 2007 Standards Candelabra Base and Intermediate Base Lamps  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA 2007) imposed energy conservation standards for candelabra and intermediate base lamps, and those provisions became effective with the statute.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Incorporating stochastic influences in assembly models: application to intermediate filament polymerisation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The focus of this thesis is the inclusion of stochasticity into mathematical models of assembly with particular interest to the in vitro polymerisation of intermediate… (more)

Craig, Morgan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Intermediate left-right gauge symmetry, unification of couplings and fermion masses in SUSY $SO(10)\\times S_4$  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

If left-right gauge theory occurs as an intermediate symmetry in a GUT then, apart from other advantages, it is possible to obtain the see-saw scale necessary to understand small neutrino masses with Majorana coupling of order unity. Barring threshold or non-renormalizable gravitational effects, or assumed presence of additional light scalar particles of unprescribed origin, all other attempts to achieve manifest one-loop gauge coupling unification in SUSY SO(10) with left-right intermediate symmetry have not been successful so far. Attributing this failure to lack of flavor symmetry in the GUT, we show how the spontaneous symmetry breaking of $SO(10)\\times S_4$ leads to such intermediate scale extending over a wide range, $M_R \\simeq 5\\times 10^{9}$ GeV to $10^{15}$ GeV. All the charged fermion masses are fitted at the see-saw scale, $M_N\\simeq M_R \\simeq 4 \\times 10^{13}$ GeV which is obtained with Majorana coupling $f_0 \\simeq 1$. Using a constrained parametrization in which CP-violation originates only from quark sector, besides other predictions made in the neutrino sector, the reactor mixing angle is found to be $\\theta_{13} \\simeq 3^{\\circ} - 5^{\\circ}$ which is in the range accessible to ongoing and planned experiments. The leptonic Dirac phase turns out to be $\\delta \\sim 2.9- 3.1$ radians with Jarlskog invariant $J \\sim 2.95 \\times 10^{-5} - 10^{-3}$.

M. K. Parida

2008-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

103

Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an ``intermediate evaluation`` of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Barron, W.F. [Hong Kong Univ. (Hong Kong); Kamel, A.M. [Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt); Santiago, H.T. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States)

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Intermediate evaluation of USAID/Cairo energy policy planning project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three years ago, a team from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge Associated Universities, supplemented by an expert from the US Department of Energy and a senior Egyptian energy professional, carried out what was termed an intermediate evaluation'' of a major energy policy project in Egypt. Supported by USAID/Cairo, the project had concentrated on developing and strengthening an Organization for Energy Planning (OEP) within the Government of India, and it was actually scheduled to end less than a year after this evaluation. The evaluation was submitted to USAID/Cairo and circulated elsewhere in the US Agency for International Development and the Government of Egypt as an internal report. Over the next several years, the USAID energy planning project ended and the functions performed by OEP were merged with planning capabilities in the electric power sector. Now that the major issues addressed by the evaluation report have been resolved, we are making it available to a broader audience as a contribution to the general literature on development project evaluation and institution-building.

Wilbanks, T.J.; Wright, S.B. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Barron, W.F. (Hong Kong Univ. (Hong Kong)); Kamel, A.M. (Ain Shams Univ., Cairo (Egypt)); Santiago, H.T. (USDOE, Washington, DC (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Nuclear photoabsorption and Compton scattering at intermediate energy  

SciTech Connect

Intermediate energy nuclear photoabsorption and Compton scattering within the ..delta..-hole approach are studied. The same ..delta..-nucleus dynamics used to describe a variety of pion-induced reactions are employed. A dynamical model for the photon-nucleon amplitude is constructed, including both resonant-channel and nonresonant backgrounds in addition to ..delta..-excitation. Medium corrections to the full amplitude are included for nuclear scattering. A doorway state expansion allows one to discuss quantiatively the role of various contributions to the ..delta..-hole Hamiltonian, thereby clarifying the level of sensitivity to the structure of the ..delta.. spreading potential. The reactive content of the total cross section is discussed. The results are compared with available photoabsorption data for /sup 4/He, /sup 12/C, and /sup 16/O. We present results for the ..delta.. contribution to the electron scattering transverse response function, for coherent ..pi../sup 0/ photoproduction, and for nuclear elastic Compton scattering. The photoabsorption strength is spread over a larger energy range by the ..delta.. dynamics, in agreement with the data, but is centered at too high at energy. The helicity flip Compton cross section is especially sensitive to the ..delta..-nucleus interaction, such as the spin-orbit potential strength.

Koch, J.H.; Moniz, E.J.; Ohtsuka, N.

1984-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

106

Compact intermediate heat transport system for sodium cooled reactor  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes a combination with a sodium cooled reactor having an intermediate heat exchanger for extracting heat in a nonradioactive secondary sodium loop from the sodium rector. It comprises: first and second upstanding closed cylindrical vessels, one of the cylindrical vessels being exterior of the other of the cylindrical vessels; the other of the cylindrical vessels being interior, smaller, and concentric of the larger cylindrical vessel so as to define between the inside of the larger vessel and the outside of the smaller vessel an interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater inlet plenums at the bottom of the larger vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; at least one feedwater outlet plenums at the top of the larger and outer vessel communicated to the interstitial annular volume; tubes communicated to the feedwater inlet plenum at the bottom of the vessels and to the steam outlet plenum at the top of the vessel; a first conduit; a large submersible electromagnetic pump; and a jet pump having an inlet, a venturi, and a diffusing outlet.

Boardman, C.E.; Maurer, J.P.

1990-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

Advanced Intermediate-Temperature Na-S Battery  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study, we reported an intermediate-temperature (~150°C) sodium-sulfur (Na-S) battery. With a reduced operating temperature, this novel battery can potentially reduce the cost and safety issues associated with the conventional high-temperature (300~350°C) Na-S battery. A dense ?"-Al2O3 solid membrane and tetraglyme were utilized as the electrolyte separator and catholyte solvent in this battery. Solubility tests indicated that cathode mixture of Na2S4 and S exhibited extremely high solubility in tetraglyme (e.g., > 4.1 M for Na2S4 + 4 S). CV scans of Na2S4 in tetraglyme revealed two pairs of redox couples with peaks at around 2.22 and 1.75 V, corresponding to the redox reactions of polysulfide species. The discharge/charge profiles of the Na-S battery showed a slope region and a plateau, indicating multiple steps and cell reactions. In-situ Raman measurements during battery operation suggested that polysulfide species were formed in the sequence of Na2S5 + S ? Na2S5 + Na2S4? Na2S4 + Na2S2 during discharge and in a reverse order during charge. This battery showed dramatic improvement in rate capacity and cycling stability over room-temperature Na-S batteries, which makes it attractive for renewable energy integration and other grid related applications.

Lu, Xiaochuan; Kirby, Brent W.; Xu, Wu; Li, Guosheng; Kim, Jin Yong; Lemmon, John P.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Yang, Zhenguo (Gary)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Production of Intermediate-Mass and Heavy Nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Nucleosynthesis is the science related to all astrophysical processes which are responsible for the abundances of the elements and their isotopes in the universe. The astrophysical sites are the big bang and stellar objects. The working of nucleosynthesis processes is presented in a survey of events which act as abundance sources. For intermediate-mass and heavy elements, these are stellar evolution, type Ia and core collapse supernovae as well as hypernovae. We discuss successes and failures of existing processes and possible solutions via new (hitherto unknown) processes. Finally an analysis of their role is given in the puzzle to explain the evolution of the elemental and isotopic compositions found in galaxies, and especially the mixture found in the solar system. Different timescales due to the progenitor mass dependence of the endpoints of stellar evolution (type II supernova explosions - SNe II vs. planetary nebulae) or single vs. binary stellar systems (the latter being responsible for novae, type Ia supernovae -- SNe Ia, or X-ray bursts) are the keys to understand galactic evolution. At very early times, the role of explosion energies of events, polluting pristine matter with a composition originating only from the big bang, might also play a role. We also speculate on the role of very massive stars not undergoing SN II explosions but rather causing 'hypernovae' after the formation of a central black hole via core collapse.

Hix, William Raphael [ORNL; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl W. [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Fr?hlich, Dr. Carla [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Hirschi, Raphael [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Liebendoerfer, Matthias [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Dillmann, Iris [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Mocelj, Darko [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Rauscher, Thomas [Universitat Basel, Switzerland; Martinez-Pinedo, Gabriel [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Langanke, Karlheinz [Gesellschaft fur Schwerionenforschung (GSI), Germany; Farouq, Khalil [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Kratz, Karl-Ludwig [ORNL; Pfeiffer, Bernard [Johannes Gutenberg-Universitaet Mainz, Mainz, Germany; Panov, Igor V. [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Nadyozhin, Dimitri K [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Blinnikov, Sergei I [Alikhanov Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia; Bravo, Eduardo [Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya, Barcelona, Spain; H?flich, Peter [Florida State University, Tallahassee; Zinner, Nikolaj T [ORNL

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Do Intermediate Radiation Doses Contribute to Late Rectal Toxicity? An Analysis of Data From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 94-06  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To investigate whether the volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses, from 30 to 50 Gy, contribute to the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity among patients with prostate cancer receiving radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Data from 1009 patients treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 94-06 were analyzed using three approaches. First, the contribution of intermediate doses to a previously published fit of the Lyman-Kutcher-Burman (LKB) normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) model was determined. Next, the extent to which intermediate doses provide additional risk information, after taking the LKB model into account, was investigated. Third, the proportion of rectum receiving doses higher than a threshold, VDose, was computed for doses ranging from 5 to 85 Gy, and a multivariate Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine which of these parameters were significantly associated with time to Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Results: Doses <60 Gy had no detectable impact on the fit of the LKB model, as expected on the basis of the small estimate of the volume parameter (n = 0.077). Furthermore, there was no detectable difference in late rectal toxicity among cohorts with similar risk estimates from the LKB model but with different volumes of rectum exposed to intermediate doses. The multivariate Cox proportional hazards model selected V75 as the only value of VDose significantly associated with late rectal toxicity. Conclusions: There is no evidence from these data that intermediate doses influence the risk of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity. Instead, the critical doses for this endpoint seem to be {>=}75 Gy. It is hypothesized that cases of Grade {>=}2 late rectal toxicity occurring among patients with V75 less than approximately 12% may be due to a 'background' level of risk, likely due mainly to biological factors.

Tucker, Susan L., E-mail: sltucker@mdanderson.org [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Dong, Lei [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Image-Guided Therapy QA Center, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Winter, Kathryn [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States)] [American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Purdy, James A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis Medical Center, Sacramento, CA (United States); Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Materials System for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work was to obtain a stable materials system for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density greater than 0.2 W/cm{sup 2}. The solid electrolyte chosen for this system was La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}, (LSGM). To select the right electrode materials from a group of possible candidate materials, AC complex impedance spectroscopy studies were conducted between 600-800 C on symmetrical cells that employed the LSGM electrolyte. Based on the results of the investigation, LSGM electrolyte supported SOFCs were fabricated with La{sub 0.6}Sr{sub 0.4}Co{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.2}O{sub 3}-La{sub 0.9}Sr{sub 0.1}Ga{sub 0.8}Mg{sub 0.2}O{sub 3} (LSCF-LSGM) composite cathode and Nickel-Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (Ni-LDC) composite anode having a barrier layer of Ce{sub 0.6}La{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LDC) between the LSGM electrolyte and the Ni-LDC anode. Electrical performance and stability of these cells were determined and the electrode polarization behavior as a function of cell current was modeled between 600-800 C. The electrical performance of the anode-supported SOFC was simulated assuming an electrode polarization behavior identical to the LSGM-electrolyte-supported SOFC. The simulated electrical performance indicated that the selected material system would provide a stable cell capable of operating between 600-800 C with a power density between 0.2 to 1 W/cm{sup 2}.

Uday B. Pal; Srikanth Gopalan

2006-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

111

Intermediate coating layer for high temperature rubbing seals for rotary regenerators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. Because of the YSZ intermediate layer, the coating is thermodynamically stable and resists swelling at high temperatures. 2 figs.

Schienle, J.L.; Strangman, T.E.

1995-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

112

Intermediate coating layer for high temperature rubbing seals for rotary regenerators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A metallic regenerator seal is provided having multi-layer coating comprising a NiCrAlY bond layer, a yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) intermediate layer, and a ceramic high temperature solid lubricant surface layer comprising zinc oxide, calcium fluoride, and tin oxide. Because of the YSZ intermediate layer, the coating is thermodynamically stable and resists swelling at high temperatures.

Schienle, James L. (Phoenix, AZ); Strangman, Thomas E. (Phoenix, AZ)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Transition Metal Donor-Peptide-Acceptor Complexes: From Intramolecular Electron Transfer Reactions to the Study of Reactive Intermediates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The trans-polyproline (PII) oligomers (Figure 1) are unusually rigid peptide structures which have been extensively studied by our group for peptide mediated intramolecular electron transfer (ET) at long distances. We have previously studied ET across a series of metal ion donor (D) acceptor (A) oligoproline peptides with different distances, driving forces and reorganizational energies. The majority of these experiments involve generating the ET intermediate using pulse radiolysis methods, although more recently photochemical methods are also used. Results of these studies showed that ET across peptides can vary by more than twelve orders of magnitude. Using ruthenium bipyridine donors, ET reaction rate constants across several proline residues (n = 4 - 9) occurred in the millisecond (ms) to {micro}s timescale, thus limiting the proline peptide conformational motions to only minor changes (far smaller than the large changes that occur on the ms to sec timescale, such as trans to cis proline isomerization). The present report describes our large data base of experimental results for D-peptide-A complexes in terms of a model where the involvement of both superexchange and hopping (hole and electron) mechanisms account for the long range ET rate constants observed. Our data shows that the change from superexchange to hopping mechanisms occurs at different distances depending on the type of D and A and their interactions with the peptides. Our model is also consistent with generalized models for superexchange and hopping which have been put forward by a number of theoretical groups to account for long range ET phenomena.

Isied, Stephan S.

2003-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

114

Predictability of an Atmospheric Blocking Event that Occurred on 15 December 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric blocking occurred over the Rocky Mountains at 1200 UTC 15 December 2005. The operational medium-range ensemble forecasts of the Canadian Meteorological Center (CMC), the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), and the National Centers for ...

Mio Matsueda; Masayuki Kyouda; Zoltan Toth; H. L. Tanaka; Tadashi Tsuyuki

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established.

Bertini, H.W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Descriptions of selected accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities  

SciTech Connect

This report was prepared at the request of the President's Commission on the Accident at Three Mile Island to provide the members of the Commission with some insight into the nature and significance of accidents that have occurred at nuclear reactor facilities in the past. Toward that end, this report presents a brief description of 44 accidents which have occurred throughout the world and which meet at least one of the severity criteria that were established.

Bertini, H.W.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

NEW CATHODE MATERIALS FOR INTERMEDIATE TEMPERATURE SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study are perovskite oxides based on Sr substituted LaFeO{sub 3}, where significant data in single cell tests exists at PNNL for cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ, and of Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions. A key component of the research strategy is to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. Results on electrical conductivity relaxation measurements on La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} samples are reported and compared with results from previous studies. Studies of the crystallization of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are reported. Such studies are a preliminary to the combinatorial synthesis approach described in the first report.

Allan J. Jacobson

2004-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

118

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode - electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study are perovskite oxides based on Sr substituted LaFeO{sub 3}, where significant data in single cell tests exists at PNNL for cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ, and Ln{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions. A key component of the research strategy is to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. Results on electrical conductivity relaxation measurements on additional compositions in the La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+x} series are presented in this report. Studies of the inter-diffusion of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} bilayer films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are described. Such studies are a preliminary to the combinatorial synthesis approach discussed in previous reports.

Allan J. Jacobson

2004-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

119

New Cathode Materials for Intermediate Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Operation of SOFCs at intermediate temperatures (500-800 C) requires new combinations of electrolyte and electrode materials that will provide both rapid ion transport across the electrolyte and electrode-electrolyte interfaces and efficient electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction and fuel oxidation reactions. This project concentrates on materials and issues associated with cathode performance that are known to become limiting factors as the operating temperature is reduced. The specific objectives of the proposed research are to develop cathode materials that meet the electrode performance targets of 1.0 W/cm{sup 2} at 0.7 V in combination with YSZ at 700 C and with GDC, LSGM or bismuth oxide based electrolytes at 600 C. The performance targets imply an area specific resistance of {approx}0.5 {Omega}cm{sup 2} for the total cell. The research strategy is to investigate both established classes of materials and new candidates as cathodes, to determine fundamental performance parameters such as bulk diffusion, surface reactivity and interfacial transfer, and to couple these parameters to performance in single cell tests. The initial choices for study were perovskite oxides based on substituted LaFeO{sub 3} (P1 compositions), where significant data in single cell tests exist at PNNL for example, for La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3} cathodes on both YSZ and CSO/YSZ. The materials selection was then extended to La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4} compositions (K1 compositions), and then in a longer range task we evaluated the possibility of completely unexplored group of materials that are also perovskite related, the ABM{sub 2}O{sub 5+{delta}}. A key component of the research strategy was to evaluate for each cathode material composition, the key performance parameters, including ionic and electronic conductivity, surface exchange rates, stability with respect to the specific electrolyte choice, and thermal expansion coefficients. In the initial phase, we did this in parallel with the perovskite compositions that were being investigated at PNNL, in order to assess the relative importance of the intrinsic properties such as oxygen ion diffusion and surface exchange rates as predictors of performance in cell tests. We then used these measurements to select new materials for scaled up synthesis and performance evaluation in single cell tests. The results of the single cell tests than provided feedback to the materials synthesis and selection steps. In this summary, the following studies are reported: (1) Synthesis, characterization, and DC conductivity measurements of the P1 compositions La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}FeO{sub 3-x} and La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.3}FeO{sub 3-x} were completed. A combinational approach for preparing a range P1 (La,Sr)FeO{sub 3} compositions as thin films was investigated. Synthesis and heat treatment of amorphous SrFeO{sub 3-x} and LaFeO{sub 3-x} films prepared by pulsed laser deposition are described. (2) Oxygen transport properties of K1 compositions La{sub x}Pr{sub 2-x}NiO{sub 4+d} (x =2.0, 1.9, 1.2, 1.0 and 0) measured by electrical conductivity relaxation are presented in this report. Area specific resistances determined by ac impedance measurements for La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} and Pr{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+{delta}} on CGO are encouraging and suggest that further optimization of the electrode microstructure will enable the target to be reached. (3) The oxygen exchange kinetics of the oxygen deficient double perovskite LnBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (Ln=Pr and Nd) were determined by electrical conductivity relaxation. The high electronic conductivity and rapid diffusion and surface exchange kinetics of PBCO suggest its application as cathode material in intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells. The first complete cell measurements were performed on Ni/CGO/CGO/PBCO/CGO cells. (4) The oxygen exchange kinetics of highly epitaxial thin films of PrBaCo{sub 2}O{sub 5.5+{delta}} (PBCO) has been determined by electrical conductivity relaxation and isotope exchange and depth profiling and confirm the high electronic conductivit

Allan J. Jacobson

2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

120

USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: USE OF NATURALLY-OCCURRING TRACERS TO MONITOR TWO-PHASE CONDITIONS IN THE COSO EGS PROJECT Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: A dramatic decrease in the ratio of chloride to boron was observed in the liquid discharge of a well proposed for EGS development in the Coso geothermal field. The decrease appears to be related to the transformation of some feed zones in the well from liquid-dominated to vapor-dominated. High concentrations of boron are transported to the wellbore in the steam, where it fractionates to the liquid phase flowing in from liquid-dominated feed zones. The high-boron steam is created when the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

HOPF BIFURCATION AS AN INTERMEDIATE-SCALE INSTABILITY IN SINGLE-STAGE POWER-FACTOR-CORRECTION POWER SUPPLIES: ANALYSIS, SIMULATIONS AND EXPERIMENTAL VERIFICATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper reports intermediate-scale instability in a single-stage power-factor-correction (PFC) power supply that employs a cascade configuration of a boost stage operating in discontinuous conduction mode (DCM) and a forward stage operating in continuous conduction mode (CCM). The two stages combine into a single stage by sharing one main switch and one control loop to achieve input PFC and tight output regulation. The main results are given by “exact ” cycle-bycycle circuit simulations. The effect of the intermediate-scale instability on the attainable power factor is illustrated in terms of total harmonic distortion (THD) which is found by taking the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) of the input current. The intermediate-scale instability usually manifests itself as local oscillations within a line cycle. Based on the stability analysis of a buck converter operating in CCM, the underlying mechanism of such instability can be attributed to the Hopf bifurcation that occurred in CCM forward stage. Finally, experimental results are presented for verification purposes.

Dong Dai; Chik. Tse; Bo Zhang; Xikui Ma

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Radiological dose assessment related to management of naturally occurring radioactive materials generated by the petroleum industry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A preliminary radiological dose assessment related to equipment decontamination, subsurface disposal, landspreading, equipment smelting, and equipment burial was conducted to address concerns regarding the presence of naturally occurring radioactive materials in production waste streams. The assessment evaluated the relative dose of these activities and included a sensitivity analysis of certain input parameters. Future studies and potential policy actions are recommended.

Smith, K.P.; Blunt, D.L.; Williams, G.P.; Tebes, C.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

781 New species of Mycosphaerella occurring on Eucalyptus leaves in Indonesia and Africa P.W. Crous and M.J. Wingfield Ahstract:Although Africa and Indonesia have not been particularly well surveyed Eucalyptus leaves from Indonesia. The former species is of particular interest, because its anamorph

124

Mathematical and computer modelling reports: Modeling and forecasting energy markets with the intermediate future forecasting system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the Intermediate Future Forecasting System (IFFS), which is the model used to forecast integrated energy markets by the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The model contains representations of supply and demand for all of the ...

Frederic H. Murphy; John J. Conti; Susan H. Shaw; Reginald Sanders

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

126

Semibalance Model—Connection between Geostrophic-Type and Balanced-Type Intermediate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hybrid intermediate model, called the semibalance model, is derived from a single truncation of the vector vorticity equation with a balanced vorticity approximation that neglects the advection and stretching–tilting of the unbalanced secondary ...

Qin Xu

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Conserved features of intermediates in amyloid assembly determine their benign or toxic states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some amyloid-forming polypeptides are associated with devastating human diseases and others provide important biological functions. For both, oligomeric intermediates appear during amyloid assembly. Currently we have few ...

Krishnan, Rajaraman

128

Interhemispheric teleconnections from tropical heat sources in intermediate and simple models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mechanisms that control the interhemispheric teleconnections from tropical heat sources are investigated using an intermediate complexity model (a Quasi-Equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model, QTCM) and a simple linear two-level model with dry ...

X. Ji; J. D. Neelin; S.-K. Lee; C. R. Mechoso

129

Non-linear climate responses to changes in Antarctic Intermediate Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The global impact of changes in Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) properties is demonstrated using idealized perturbation experiments in a coupled climate model. Properties of AAIW were altered between 10 and 20°S in the Atlantic, Pacific and ...

Jennifer A. Graham; David P. Stevens; Karen J. Heywood

130

Decadal Variability of Thermocline and Intermediate Waters at 24°S in the South Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New data are presented from 24°S in the South Atlantic in an investigation of the decadal variability of the intermediate and thermocline water masses at this latitude. Variation of salinity on neutral density surfaces is investigated with three ...

Gerard McCarthy; Elaine McDonagh; Brian King

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Simulation of Subantarctic Mode and Antarctic Intermediate Waters in Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Southern Ocean’s Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) are two globally significant upper-ocean water masses that circulate in all Southern Hemisphere subtropical gyres and cross the equator to enter the North ...

Bernadette M. Sloyan; Igor V. Kamenkovich

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Historical and idealized climate model experiments: an intercomparison of Earth system models of intermediate complexity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both historical and idealized climate model experiments are performed with a variety of Earth system models of intermediate complexity (EMICs) as part of a community contribution to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate ...

Monier, Erwan

133

Description of the Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM version 1.2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main characteristics of the new version 1.2 of the three-dimensional Earth system model of intermediate complexity LOVECLIM are briefly described. LOVECLIM 1.2 includes representations of the atmosphere, the ocean and ...

Goosse, H.

134

Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerala, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

Methods and intermediates for the synthesis of dipyrrin-substituted porphyrinic macrocycles  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides dipyrrin substituted porphyrinic macrocycles, intermediates useful for making the same, and methods of making the same. Such compounds may be used for purposes including the making of molecular memory devices, solar cells and light harvesting arrays.

Yu, Lianhe (Raleigh, NC); Muthukumaran, Kannan (Raleigh, NC); Sreedharan, Prathapan (Kerata, IN); Lindsey, Jonathan S. (Raleigh, NC)

2011-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

136

Dilute Group III-V nitride intermediate band solar cells with contact blocking layers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An intermediate band solar cell (IBSC) is provided including a p-n junction based on dilute III-V nitride materials and a pair of contact blocking layers positioned on opposite surfaces of the p-n junction for electrically isolating the intermediate band of the p-n junction by blocking the charge transport in the intermediate band without affecting the electron and hole collection efficiency of the p-n junction, thereby increasing open circuit voltage (V.sub.OC) of the IBSC and increasing the photocurrent by utilizing the intermediate band to absorb photons with energy below the band gap of the absorber layers of the IBSC. Hence, the overall power conversion efficiency of a IBSC will be much higher than an conventional single junction solar cell. The p-n junction absorber layers of the IBSC may further have compositionally graded nitrogen concentrations to provide an electric field for more efficient charge collection.

Walukiewicz, Wladyslaw (Kensington, CA); Yu, Kin Man (Lafayette, CA)

2012-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

137

Control of Mode and Intermediate Water Mass Properties in Drake Passage by the Amundsen Sea Low  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evolution of the physical properties of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the Drake Passage region is examined on time scales down to intraseasonal, within the 1969–2009 period. Both SAMW and AAIW ...

Sally E. Close; Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Elaine L. McDonagh; Brian A. King; Martin Biuw; Lars Boehme

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Design of compact intermediate heat exchangers for gas cooled fast reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two aspects of an intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for GFR service have been investigated: (1) the intrinsic characteristics of the proposed compact printed circuit heat exchanger (PCHE); and (2) a specific design optimizing ...

Gezelius, Knut, 1978-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Experimental Implementation of an Ensemble Adjustment Filter for an Intermediate ENSO Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The assimilation of sea surface temperature (SST) anomalies into a coupled ocean–atmosphere model of the tropical Pacific is investigated using an ensemble adjustment Kalman filter (EAKF). The intermediate coupled model used here is the ...

Alicia R. Karspeck; Jeffrey L. Anderson

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

An intermediate value theorem for sequences with terms in a finite set  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We prove an intermediate value theorem of an arithmetical flavor, involving the consecutive averages of sequences with terms in a given finite set A. For every such set we completely characterize the numbers x ("intermediate values") with the property that the consecutive averages of every sequence with terms in A cannot increase from a value less than x to a value greater than x without taking the value x somewhere in between.

Mihai Caragiu; Laurence D. Robinson

2005-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

High potential, but low actual, glycine uptake of dominant plant species in three Australian land-use types with intermediate N availability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with intermediate N availability Ansgar Kahmen & Stephen J.with different N availabilities. We here report patterns ofwith intermediate N availability, mineral N is the plants’

Kahmen, Ansgar; Livesley, Stephen J.; Arndt, Stefan K.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. Tebes is affiliated with the University of Illinois. ANL/EAD-2 Radiological Dose Assessment Related to Management of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials Generated by the Petroleum Industry by K.P. Smith, D.L. Blunt, G.P. Williams, and C.L. Tebes * Environmental Assessment Division Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 South Cass Avenue, Argonne, Illinois 60439 September 1996 Work sponsored by the United States Department of Energy, Office of Policy iii CONTENTS ACKNOWLEDGMENTS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . vii NOTATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . viii ABSTRACT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 SUMMARY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

143

Bibliography of reports, papers, and presentations on naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in petroleum industry wastes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This bibliography was created to support projects conducted by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) addressing issues related to naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) in petroleum industry wastes. The bibliography provides citations for many of the available published reports, papers, articles, and presentations on petroleum industry NORM. In the past few years, the rapid expansion of NORM treatment and disposal technologies, the efforts to characterize NORM wastes and their associated potential risks, and the promulgation of state-level NORM regulatory programs have been well-documented in project reports and in papers presented at technical conferences and symposia. There are 221 citations.

Smith, K.P.; Wilkey, M.L.; Hames, R.D.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Evaluation of Next Generation Nuclear Power Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarizes results of a preliminary evaluation to determine the operating conditions for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) that will transfer heat from the reactor primary system to the demonstration hydrogen production plant(s). The Department of Energy is currently investigating two primary options for the production of hydrogen using a high temperature reactor as the power source. These options are the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) and Sulfur-Iodine (SI) thermochemical hydrogen production processes. However, since the SI process relies entirely on process heat from the reactor, while the HTE process relies primarily on electrical energy with only a small amount of process heat required, the design of the IHX is dictated by the SI process heat requirements. Therefore, the IHX operating conditions were defined assuming 50 MWt is available for the production of hydrogen using the SI process. Three configurations for the intermediate loop were evaluated, including configurations for both direct and indirect power conversion systems. The HYSYS process analysis software was used to perform sensitivity studies to determine the influence of reactor outlet temperatures, intermediate loop working fluids (helium and molten salt), intermediate loop pressures, and intermediate loop piping lengths on NGNP performance and IHX operating conditions. The evaluation of NGNP performance included assessments of overall electric power conversion efficiency and estimated hydrogen production efficiency. Based on these evaluations, recommended IHX operating conditions are defined.

E. A. Harvego

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Formation of the intermediate baryon systems in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The centrality experiments indicate regime change and saturation in the behavior of some characteristics of the secondary particles emitted in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies. The phenomenon has a critical character. The simple models do not explain the effect. We suppose that the responsible mechanism to explain the phenomenon could be the formation and decay of the intermediate baryon systems. Such systems could be formed as a result of nucleon percolation in compressed baryonic matter. Formation of big percolation cluster may change the properties of the medium, e.g., it could lead to the changing its transparency. This could be used to get a signal of the intermediate baryonic system formation. We consider two signals to identify the formation of the intermediate baryon systems: the critical changing of transparency of the strongly interacting matter and the enhancement of light nuclei production with increase in centrality.

M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A Kravchakova; Mahnaz Q. Haseeb; S. M. Saleem; Y. H. Huseynaliyev; S Vokal; A. S. Vodopianov; O. B. Abdinov

2007-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

146

Intermediate Heat Transfer Loop Study for High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic and cycleefficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. This paper also includes a portion of stress analyses performed on pipe configurations.

C. H. Oh; C. Davis; S. Sherman

2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect

Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

Hoffman, M.Z.

1992-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

148

Systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies  

SciTech Connect

Some or all of the needs above can be addressed by embodiments of the invention. According to embodiments of the invention, systems and methods for facilitating hydrogen storage using naturally occurring nanostructure assemblies can be implemented. In one embodiment, a method for storing hydrogen can be provided. The method can include providing diatoms comprising diatomaceous earth or diatoms from a predefined culture. In addition, the method can include heating the diatoms in a sealed environment in the presence of at least one of titanium, a transition metal, or a noble metal to provide a porous hydrogen storage medium. Furthermore, the method can include exposing the porous hydrogen storage medium to hydrogen. In addition, the method can include storing at least a portion of the hydrogen in the porous hydrogen storage medium.

Fliermans; , Carl B. (Augusta, GA)

2012-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

149

BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF PRESSURE PHENOMENA OCCURRING INSIDE PROTECTIVE SHELTERS FOLLOWING A NUCLEAR DETONATION  

SciTech Connect

In two series of experiments 277 experimental animals, including 66 dogs, 52 rabbits, 52 guinea pigs, 63 rats, and 44 mice, were exposed under selected conditions in six different general types of instrumented above- and belowground shelters to blast produced by nuclear explosions. The distance of the several structures from Ground Zero ranged from 1050 to 5500 ft. The most severe alterations in the pressure environment occurring inside the structures followed the detonation of a nuclear device with a yield approximately 50% greater than nominal. The highest overpressure to which animals were exposed was 85.8 psi, the rise time of which was 4 msec. The overpressure endured for about 570 msec. Overpressures ranged from this maximum downward in 15 other exposure situations to a minimum of 1.3 psi enduring for nearly 1346 msec but rising to a maximum in about 420 msec. The latter pressure occurred inside a reinforced concrete bathroom shelter, which was the only surviving part of a house otherwise totally destroyed, at 4700 ft where the outside incident pressure was about 5 psi. Following the nuclear explosions, all animals were recovered, examined, sacrificed, and subjected to gross and microscopic pathological study. All lesions were tabulated and described. The results of pressure-time data, documenting the variations on the pressure environment, are presented and analyzed, and an exploratory attempt is made to relate the alterations in the pressure environment to the associated pathology observed. A critical review of selected material from the blast and related literature is presented. All data are discussed, and the several problems related to the design and construction of protective shelters are noted and briefly, but analytically, assessed. The most outstanding contribution of the field experiments and the related study of the literature was the unequivocal demonstration that the provision of adequate protective structures can indeed be an effective means of sharply reducing casualties which would otherwise be associated with the detonation of modern large-scale explosive devices. (auth)

White, C.S.; Chiffelle, T.L.; Richmond, D.R.; Lockyear, W.H.; Bowen, I.G.; Goldizen, V.C.; Merideth, H.W.; Kilgore, D.E.; Longwell, B.B.; Parker, J.T.; Sherping, F.; Cribb, M.E.

1956-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Single-Step Syngas-to-Distillates (S2D) Synthesis via Methanol and Dimethyl Ether Intermediates: Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of the work was to enhance price-competitive, synthesis gas (syngas)-based production of transportation fuels that are directly compatible with the existing vehicle fleet (i.e., vehicles fueled by gasoline, diesel, jet fuel, etc.). To accomplish this, modifications to the traditional methanol-to-gasoline (MTG) process were investigated. In this study, we investigated direct conversion of syngas to distillates using methanol and dimethyl ether intermediates. For this application, a Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 (PdZnAl) catalyst previously developed for methanol steam reforming was evaluated. The PdZnAl catalyst was shown to be far superior to a conventional copper-based methanol catalyst when operated at relatively high temperatures (i.e., >300°C), which is necessary for MTG-type applications. Catalytic performance was evaluated through parametric studies. Process conditions such as temperature, pressure, gas-hour-space velocity, and syngas feed ratio (i.e., hydrogen:carbon monoxide) were investigated. PdZnAl catalyst formulation also was optimized to maximize conversion and selectivity to methanol and dimethyl ether while suppressing methane formation. Thus, a PdZn/Al2O3 catalyst optimized for methanol and dimethyl ether formation was developed through combined catalytic material and process parameter exploration. However, even after compositional optimization, a significant amount of undesirable carbon dioxide was produced (formed via the water-gas-shift reaction), and some degree of methane formation could not be completely avoided. Pd/ZnO/Al2O3 used in combination with ZSM-5 was investigated for direct syngas-to-distillates conversion. High conversion was achieved as thermodynamic constraints are alleviated when methanol and dimethyl are intermediates for hydrocarbon formation. When methanol and/or dimethyl ether are products formed separately, equilibrium restrictions occur. Thermodynamic relaxation also enables the use of lower operating pressures than what would be allowed for methanol synthesis alone. Aromatic-rich hydrocarbon liquid (C5+), containing a significant amount of methylated benzenes, was produced under these conditions. However, selectivity control to liquid hydrocarbons was difficult to achieve. Carbon dioxide and methane formation was problematic. Furthermore, saturation of the olefinic intermediates formed in the zeolite, and necessary for gasoline production, occurred over PdZnAl. Thus, yield to desirable hydrocarbon liquid product was limited. Evaluation of other oxygenate-producing catalysts could possibly lead to future advances. Potential exists with discovery of other types of catalysts that suppress carbon dioxide and light hydrocarbon formation. Comparative techno-economics for a single-step syngas-to-distillates process and a more conventional MTG-type process were investigated. Results suggest operating and capital cost savings could only modestly be achieved, given future improvements to catalyst performance. Sensitivity analysis indicated that increased single-pass yield to hydrocarbon liquid is a primary need for this process to achieve cost competiveness.

Dagle, Robert A.; Lebarbier, Vanessa MC; Lizarazo Adarme, Jair A.; King, David L.; Zhu, Yunhua; Gray, Michel J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Biddy, Mary J.; Hallen, Richard T.; Wang, Yong; White, James F.; Holladay, Johnathan E.; Palo, Daniel R.

2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

151

Effect of natural convection on the current-voltage characteristic of a DC discharge in neon at intermediate pressures  

SciTech Connect

The parameters of the positive column of a glow discharge in neon are calculated with allowance for the induced hydrodynamic motion. It is shown that natural convection in the pressure range of {approx}0.1 atm significantly affects the profiles of the parameters of the positive column and its current-voltage characteristic. The convection arising at large deposited energies improves heat removal, due to which the temperature in the central region of the discharge becomes lower than that calculated from the heat conduction equation. As a result, the current-voltage characteristic is shifted. With allowance for convection, the current-voltage characteristic changes at currents much lower than the critical current at which a transition into the constricted state is observed. This change is uniquely related to the Rayleigh number in the discharge. Thus, a simplified analysis of thermal conduction and diffusion, even with detailed account of kinetic processes occurring in the positive column, does not allow one to accurately calculate the current-voltage characteristic and other discharge parameters at intermediate gas pressures.

Uvarov, A. V. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation); Sakharova, N. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Semenov Institute of Chemical Physics (Russian Federation); Vinnichenko, N. A. [Moscow State University, Faculty of Physics (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 3. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are the project description, list of participants, and system specifications for the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Effects of naturally occurring coumarins on hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes inmice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cytochromes P450 (P450s) and glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) constitute two important enzyme families involved in carcinogen metabolism. Generally, P450s play activation or detoxifying roles while GSTs act primarily as detoxifying enzymes. We previously demonstrated that oral administration of the linear furanocoumarins, isopimpinellin and imperatorin, modulated P450 and GST activities in various tissues of mice. The purpose of the present study was to compare a broader range of naturally occurring coumarins (simple coumarins, and furanocoumarins of the linear and angular type) for their abilities to modulate hepatic drug-metabolizing enzymes when administered orally to mice. We now report that all of the different coumarins tested (coumarin, limettin, auraptene, angelicin, bergamottin, imperatorin and isopimpinellin) induced hepatic GST activities, whereas the linear furanocoumarins possessed the greatest abilities to induce hepatic P450 activities, in particular P450 2B and 3A. In both cases, this corresponded to an increase in protein expression of the enzymes. Induction of P4502B10, 3A11, and 2C9 by xenobiotics often is a result of activation of the pregnane X receptor (PXR) and/or constitutive androstane receptor (CAR). Using a pregnane X receptor reporter system, our results demonstrated that isopimpinellin activated both PXR and its human ortholog SXR by recruiting coactivator SRC-1 in transfected cells. In CAR transfection assays, isopimpinellin counteracted the inhibitory effect of androstanol on full-length mCAR, a Gal4-mCAR ligand-binding domain fusion, and restored coactivator binding. Orally administered isopimpinellin induced hepatic mRNA expression of Cyp2b10, Cyp3a11, and GSTa in CAR(+/+) wild-type mice. In contrast, the induction of Cyp2b10 mRNA by isopimpinellin was attenuated in the CAR(-/-) mice, suggesting that isopimpinellin induces Cyp2b10 via the CAR receptor. Overall, the current data indicate that naturally occurring coumarins have diverse activities in terms of inducing various xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes based on their chemical structure.

Kleiner, Heather E. [Department of Carcinogenesis, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park-Research Division, Park Road 1-C, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)], E-mail: hklein@lsuhsc.edu; Xia, Xiaojun; Sonoda, Junichiro [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Zhang, Jun [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Pontius, Elizabeth; Abey, Jane [Department of Carcinogenesis, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park-Research Division, Park Road 1-C, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States); Evans, Ronald M. [Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Gene Expression Laboratory, Salk Institute for Biological Sciences, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States); Moore, David D. [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Baylor College of Medicine, One Baylor Plaza, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); DiGiovanni, John [Department of Carcinogenesis, University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Science Park-Research Division, Park Road 1-C, Smithville, TX 78957 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Technical Research of Thermal Adjusting in Pulverizing System Intermediate Storage Bunker  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the temperature change effect of the primary air and powder mixture in storage-type milling system, it is difficult to obtain accurate results of the direct measurement of the primary wind speed, resulting in this type of boiler system, the thermal ... Keywords: pulverizing system intermediate storage bunker, thermal adjustment, coal concentration, heat balance

Zhenning Zhao; Yaqin Ge; Hongwei Chen; Ying Zhang; Tao Sun; Xiao Lu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Soumis J Eur. Ceram. Soc. Intermediate temperature SOFC single cell test  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Soumis à J Eur. Ceram. Soc. Intermediate temperature SOFC single cell test using Nd1.95NiO4 Abstract This work deals with SOFC single cell tests using neodymium nickelate Nd1.95NiO4+ as cathode electrochemical activity with respect to classical materials. The SOFC cells were fabricated from an anode

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

156

Distribution and Modification of North Pacific Intermediate Water in the Kuroshio-Oyashio Interfrontal Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multiship CTD survey was conducted in the Kuroshio-Oyash interfrontal zone in the area of 30°–41°N, 140°E–180° from May to June 1992 to examine the distribution, modification process, and formation site of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW)...

Ichiro Yasuda; Kuniaki Okuda; Yugo Shimizu

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Conceptual study for total utilization of an intermediate temperature geothermal resource  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A multi-use, integrated project plan has been developed for the combined electrical and direct utilization of an intermediate temperature geothermal resource. This concept addresses an integrated project plan with industrial participation, which could make a significant contribution to the national plan for energy independence, by creating new and realistic energy choices for the immediate future.

Swink, D.G.; Schultz, R.J.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Multiple Equilibria of the Hadley Circulation in an Intermediate-Complexity Axisymmetric Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model of intermediate complexity based on quasi-equilibrium theory—a version of the Quasi-Equilibrium Tropical Circulation Model with a prognostic atmospheric boundary layer, as well as two free-tropospheric modes in momentum, and one each in ...

Gilles Bellon; Adam H. Sobel

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Limit on the strength of intermediate-range forces coupling to isospin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A laboratory experiment searching for intermediate-range forces coupling to N-Z of nuclei has been performed. This yields the bound on the strength of any such force to be less than 3.0 x 10/sup -3/ of gravity per baryon, for all ranges lambda>3 m.

Cowsik, R.; Krishnan, N.; Tandon, S.N.; Unnikrishnan, C.S.

1988-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

160

Economic impact of using nonmetallic materials in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction. Volume 1  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The results are presented of an exhaustive literature search and evaluation concerning the properties and economics of commercially available nonmetallic well casing and screens. These materials were studied in terms of their use in low to intermediate temperature geothermal well construction.

Not Available

1979-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

EE443L: Intermediate Control Lab Lab2: Modeling a DC motor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will develop and validate a basic model of a permanent magnet DC motor (Yaskawa Electric, Mini-series, Minertia of a permanent magnet DC motor, the field current is constant (i.e. a constant magnetic field). It can be shownEE443L: Intermediate Control Lab Lab2: Modeling a DC motor Introduction: In this lab we

Wedeward, Kevin

162

Generator-Absorber heat exchange transfer apparatus and method using an intermediate liquor  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Numerous embodiments and related methods for generator-absorber heat exchange (GAX) are disclosed, particularly for absorption heat pump systems. Such embodiments and related methods use the working solution of the absorption system for the heat transfer medium where the working solution has an intermediate liquor concentration.

Phillips, Benjamin A. (Benton Harbor, MI); Zawacki, Thomas S. (St. Joseph, MI)

1996-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Developing Financial Intermediation Mechanisms for Energy Efficiency Investments in Brazil, China and India Brazil-China-India Workshop on Energy Efficiency Financing Cross country exchange, outreach and dissemination Juan Zak URC Brazil, May 2004 #12;2 What is URC ? · URC is the UNEP Risoe Centre on Energy

164

Study of nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and intermediate cavities in a relativistic klystron amplifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In intermediate cavities of a relativistic klystron amplifier (RKA) driven by intense relativistic electron beam, the equivalent circuit model, which is widely adopted to investigate the interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a conventional klystron design, is invalid due to the high gap voltage and the nonlinear beam loading in a RKA. According to Maxwell equations and Lorentz equation, the self-consistent equations for beam-wave interaction in the intermediate cavity are introduced to study the nonlinear interaction between bunched beam and the intermediate cavity in a RKA. Based on the equations, the effects of modulation depth and modulation frequency of the beam on the gap voltage amplitude and its phase are obtained. It is shown that the gap voltage is significantly lower than that estimated by the equivalent circuit model when the beam modulation is high. And the bandwidth becomes wider as the beam modulation depth increases. An S-band high gain relativistic klystron amplifier is designed based on the result. And the corresponding experiment is carried out on the linear transformer driver accelerator. The peak output power has achieved 1.2 GW with an efficiency of 28.6% and a gain of 46 dB in the corresponding experiment.

Wu, Y. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Science and Technology on High Power Microwave Laboratory, Mianyang 621900 (China); Xu, Z.; Li, Z. H. [Institute of Applied Electronics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China); Tang, C. X. [Department of Engineering Physics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China)

2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

165

Seasonal Flow Reversals of Intermediate Waters in the Canary Current System East of the Canary Islands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two 9-yr current-meter and salinity records, together with climatological data, reveal marked seasonal variability of the intermediate flow at a key location in the Canary Basin. The region is characterized by a summer (July–September) and early ...

Francisco Machín; Josep L. Pelegrí; E. Fraile-Nuez; P. Vélez-Belchí; F. López-Laatzen; A. Hernández-Guerra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Regulatory Initiatives for Control and Release of Technologically Enhanced Naturally-Occurring Radioactive Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current drafts of proposed standards and suggested State regulations for control and release of technologically-enhanced naturally-occurring radioactive material (TENORM), and standards for release of volumetrically-contaminated material in the US are reviewed. These are compared to the recommendations of the International Atomic Energy Association (IAEA) Safety Series and the European Commission (EC) proposals. Past regulatory efforts with respect to TENORM in the US dealt primarily with oil-field related wastes. Currently, nine states (AK, GA, LA, MS, NM, OH, OR SC, TX) have specific regulations pertaining to TENORM, mostly based on uranium mill tailings cleanup criteria. The new US proposals are dose- or risk-based, as are the IAEA and EC recommendations, and are grounded in the linear no threshold hypothesis (LNT). TENORM wastes involve extremely large volumes, particularly scrap metal and mine wastes. Costs to control and dispose of these wastes can be considerable. The current debate over the validity of LNT at low doses and low dose rates is particularly germane to this discussion. Most standards setting organizations and regulatory agencies base their recommendations on the LNT. The US Environmental Protection Agency has released a draft Federal Guidance Report that recommends calculating health risks from low-level exposure to radionuclides based on the LNT. However, some scientific and professional organizations are openly questioning the validity of LNT and its basis for regulations, practices, and costs to society in general. It is not clear at this time how a non-linear regulatory scheme would be implemented.

Egidi, P.V.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

167

Alternatives for the disposal of NORM (naturally occurring radioactive materials) wastes in Texas  

SciTech Connect

Some of the Texas wastes containing naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) have been disposed of in a uranium mill tailings impoundment. There is currently no operating disposal facility in Texas to accept these wastes. As a result, some wastes containing extremely small amounts of radioactivity are sent to elaborate disposal sites at extremely high costs. The Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has sponsored a study to investigate lower cost, alternative disposal methods for certain wastes containing small quantities of NORM. This paper presents the results of a multipathway safety analysis of various scenarios for disposing of wastes containing limited quantities of NORM in Texas. The wastes include pipe scales and sludges from oil and gas production, residues from rare-earth mineral processing, and water treatment resins, but exclude large-volume, diffuse wastes (coal fly ash, phosphogypsum). The purpose of the safety analysis is to define concentration and quantity limits for the key nuclides of NORM that will avoid dangerous radiation exposures under different waste disposal scenarios.

Nielson, K.K.; Rogers, V.C. (Rogers Associates Engineering Corporation, Salt Lake City, UT (USA)); Pollard, C.G. (Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority, Austin (USA))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Methane flux and oxidation at two types of intermediate landfill covers  

SciTech Connect

Methane emissions were measured on two areas at a Florida (USA) landfill using the static chamber technique. Because existing literature contains few measurements of methane emissions and oxidation in intermediate cover areas, this study focused on field measurement of emissions at 15-cm-thick non-vegetated intermediate cover overlying 1-year-old waste and a 45-cm-thick vegetated intermediate cover overlying 7-year-old waste. The 45 cm thick cover can also simulate non-engineered covers associated with older closed landfills. Oxidation of the emitted methane was evaluated using stable isotope techniques. The arithmetic means of the measured fluxes were 54 and 22 g CH{sub 4} m{sup -2} d{sup -1} from the thin cover and the thick cover, respectively. The peak flux was 596 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thin cover and 330 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thick cover. The mean percent oxidation was significantly greater (25%) at the thick cover relative to the thin cover (14%). This difference only partly accounted for the difference in emissions from the two sites. Inverse distance weighing was used to describe the spatial variation of flux emissions from each cover type. The geospatial mean flux was 21.6 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thick intermediate cover and 50.0 g m{sup -2} d{sup -1} for the thin intermediate cover. High emission zones in the thick cover were fewer and more isolated, while high emission zones in the thin cover were continuous and covered a larger area. These differences in the emission patterns suggest that different CH{sub 4} mitigation techniques should be applied to the two areas. For the thick intermediate cover, we suggest that effective mitigation of methane emissions could be achieved by placement of individualized compost cells over high emission zones. Emissions from the thin intermediate cover, on the other hand, can be mitigated by placing a compost layer over the entire area.

Abichou, Tarek [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States)]. E-mail: abichou@eng.fsu.edu; Chanton, Jeffery [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Powelson, David [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Fleiger, Jill [Department of Oceanography, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States); Escoriaza, Sharon [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Lei, Yuan [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Florida A and M University, Florida State University, College of Engineering, Tallahassee, FL 32310 (United States); Stern, Jennifer [Department of Geology, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

In-situ remediation of naturally occurring radioactive materials with high-permeability hydraulic fracturing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis addresses the problem of removal of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Materials, NORM, and describes an effective alternative to the current treatment method for their removal. High-pen-meability fracturing, recently established in the petroleum industry, is the recommended technique. NORM are found throughout subterranean formations. Whenever fluids from petroleum or water reservoirs are produced NORM are present in varying quantities. NORM can only be sensed with radiation detectors. However, they have proven carcinogens, and the US Environmental Protection Agency has set a limit on the maximum contaminated level of any stream. Until now, the preferred method of treatment was to remove NORM from contaminated waters with specially designed filters, which in turn create a new problem. The same filters that are used to treat the water themselves become highly radioactive with a considerable disposal problem. In the petroleum industry, NORM become concentrated in the scale that is deposited inside the well or surface pipes. When scale is removed, it can be so radioactive that it can only be stored in toxic sites. Additionally, as water is produced along with oil, so are NORM. Until now, for the Gulf of Mexico at least, produced water has been released into the ocean, but the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is threatening to change this. In the North Sea the regulations are already stricter. There is then a compelling motivation to remove NORM before they are produced, and thus, eliminate the disposal problem. A high-permeability fracture design is presented which modifies existing petroleum practices by introducing within the proppant pack highly selective radionuclide sorbents. These sorbents, at calculated concentrations, can remove NORM readily for several years from typical flow rates containing typical NORM concentrations.

Demarchos, Andronikos Stavros

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Acetaminophen hepatotoxicity and HIF-1{alpha} induction in acetaminophen toxicity in mice occurs without hypoxia  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HIF-1{alpha} is a nuclear factor important in the transcription of genes controlling angiogenesis including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Both hypoxia and oxidative stress are known mechanisms for the induction of HIF-1{alpha}. Oxidative stress and mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT) are mechanistically important in acetaminophen (APAP) toxicity in the mouse. MPT may occur as a result of oxidative stress and leads to a large increase in oxidative stress. We previously reported the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in mice with APAP toxicity and have shown that VEGF is important in hepatocyte regeneration following APAP toxicity. The following study was performed to examine the relative contribution of hypoxia versus oxidative stress to the induction of HIF-1{alpha} in APAP toxicity in the mouse. Time course studies using the hypoxia marker pimonidazole showed no staining for pimonidazole at 1 or 2 h in B6C3F1 mice treated with APAP. Staining for pimonidazole was present in the midzonal to periportal regions at 4, 8, 24 and 48 h and no staining was observed in centrilobular hepatocytes, the sites of the toxicity. Subsequent studies with the MPT inhibitor cyclosporine A showed that cyclosporine A (CYC; 10 mg/kg) reduced HIF-1{alpha} induction in APAP treated mice at 1 and 4 h and did not inhibit the metabolism of APAP (depletion of hepatic non-protein sulfhydryls and hepatic protein adduct levels). The data suggest that HIF-1{alpha} induction in the early stages of APAP toxicity is secondary to oxidative stress via a mechanism involving MPT. In addition, APAP toxicity is not mediated by a hypoxia mechanism.

Chaudhuri, Shubhra, E-mail: schaudhuri@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); McCullough, Sandra S., E-mail: mcculloughsandras@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Hennings, Leah, E-mail: henningsleah@uams.edu [Department of Pathology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Letzig, Lynda [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States); Simpson, Pippa M., E-mail: psimpson@mcw.edu [Department of Pediatrics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Hinson, Jack A., E-mail: hinsonjacka@uams.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); James, Laura P., E-mail: lameslaurap@uams.edu [Department of Pediatrics, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (United States); Arkansas Children's Hospital Research Institute, Little Rock, AR (United States)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Manufactured Home Testing in Simulated and Naturally Occurring High Winds for WCTE Conference  

SciTech Connect

A typical double-wide manufactured home was tested in simulated and naturally occurring high winds to understand structural behavior and improve performance during severe windstorms. Seven (7) lateral load tests were conducted on a double-wide manufactured home at a remote field test site in Wyoming. An extensive instrumentation package monitored the overall behavior of the home and collected data vital to validating computational software for the manufactured housing industry. The tests were designed to approach the design load of the home without causing structural damage, thus allowing the behavior of the home to be accessed when the home was later exposed to high winds (to 80-mph). The data generally show near-linear initial system response with significant non-linear behavior as the applied loads increase. Load transfer across the marriage line is primarily compression. Racking, while present, is very small. Interface slip and shear displacement along the marriage line are nearly insignificant. Horizontal global displacements reached 0.6 inch. These tests were designed primarily to collect data necessary to calibrate a desktop analysis and design software tool, MHTool, under development at the Idaho National Laboratory specifically for manufactured housing. Currently available analysis tools are, for the most part, based on methods developed for "stick built" structures and are inappropriate for manufactured homes. The special materials utilized in manufactured homes, such as rigid adhesives used in the connection of the sheathing materials to the studs, significantly alter the behavior of manufactured homes under lateral loads. Previous full scale tests of laterally loaded manufactured homes confirm the contention that conventional analysis methods are not applicable. System behavior dominates the structural action of manufactured homes and its prediction requires a three dimensional analysis of the complete unit, including tie-downs. This project was sponsored by the US Department of Energy, US Department of Housing and Urban Development, and the Manufactured Housing Institute. The results of this research can lead to savings in annual losses of life and property by providing validated information to enable the advancement of code requirements and by developing engineering software that can predict and optimize wind resistance.

William D. Richins; Thomas K. Larson; Jeffrey M. Lacy; Ryan G. Kobbe

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

A study of nuclear stopping in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear stopping has been investigated in central symmetric nuclear collisions at intermediate energies. Firstly, it is found that the isotropy ratio, Riso, reaches a minimum near the Fermi energy and saturates or slowly increases depending on the mass of the system as the beam energy increases. An approximate scaling based on the size of the system is found above the Fermi energy suggesting the increasing role of in-medium nucleon-nucleon collisions. Secondly, the charge density distributions in velocity space, dZ/dvk and dZ/dv?, reveal a strong memory of the entrance channel and, as such, a sizeable nuclear transparency in the intermediate energy range. Lastly, it is shown that the width of the transverse velocity distribution is proportional to the beam velocity.

C. Escano-Rodriguez; D. Durand; A. Chbihi; J. D. Frankland; the INDRA Collaboration

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

173

Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions  

SciTech Connect

During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

Hoffman, M.Z.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

174

Intermediate leak protection/automatic shutdown for B and W helical coil steam generator  

SciTech Connect

The report summarizes a follow-on study to the multi-tiered Intermediate Leak/Automatic Shutdown System report. It makes the automatic shutdown system specific to the Babcock and Wilcox (B and W) helical coil steam generator and to the Large Development LMFBR Plant. Threshold leak criteria specific to this steam generator design are developed, and performance predictions are presented for a multi-tier intermediate leak, automatic shutdown system applied to this unit. Preliminary performance predictions for application to the helical coil steam generator were given in the referenced report; for the most part, these predictions have been confirmed. The importance of including a cover gas hydrogen meter in this unit is demonstrated by calculation of a response time one-fifth that of an in-sodium meter at hot standby and refueling conditions.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Interim Storage of Low and Intermediate Level Wastes: Guidelines for Extended Storage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Domestic utilities are responding to impending changes in low-level waste (LLW) disposal site facility availability by extending their capabilities for interim on-site storage of LLW. International utilities likewise face challenges in implementing complete low and intermediate waste disposal options. Therefore, our members asked EPRI to revise and update our series of documents devoted to on-site interim LLW storage. This report represents the key guidelines document for the series.

2002-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

176

AN INTERMEDIATE LUMINOSITY TRANSIENT IN NGC 300: THE ERUPTION OF A DUST-ENSHROUDED MASSIVE STAR  

SciTech Connect

We present multi-epoch high-resolution optical spectroscopy, UV/radio/X-ray imaging, and archival Hubble and Spitzer observations of an intermediate luminosity optical transient recently discovered in the nearby galaxy NGC 300. We find that the transient (NGC 300 OT2008-1) has a peak absolute magnitude of M{sub bol} {approx} -11.8 mag, intermediate between novae and supernovae, and similar to the recent events M85 OT2006-1 and SN 2008S. Our high-resolution spectra, the first for this event, are dominated by intermediate velocity ({approx}200-1000 km s{sup -1}) hydrogen Balmer lines and Ca II emission and absorption lines that point to a complex circumstellar environment, reminiscent of the yellow hypergiant IRC+10420. In particular, we detect asymmetric Ca II H and K absorption with a broad red wing extending to {approx}10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}, indicative of gas inflow at high velocity (possibly the wind of a massive binary companion). The low luminosity, intermediate velocities, and overall similarity to a known eruptive star indicate that the event did not result in a complete disruption of the progenitor. We identify the progenitor in archival Spitzer observations, with deep upper limits from Hubble data. The spectral energy distribution points to a dust-enshrouded star with a luminosity of about 6 x 10{sup 4} L{sub sun}, indicative of a {approx}10-20 M{sub sun} progenitor (or binary system). This conclusion is in good agreement with our interpretation of the outburst and circumstellar properties. The lack of significant extinction in the transient spectrum indicates that the dust surrounding the progenitor was cleared by the outburst. We thus predict that the progenitor should be eventually visible with Hubble if the transient event marks an evolutionary transition to a dust-free state, or with Spitzer if the event marks a cyclical process of dust formation.

Berger, E.; Soderberg, A. M.; Foley, R. J.; Dupree, A. K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Chevalier, R. A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Fransson, C. [Department of Astronomy, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Leonard, D. C. [Department of Astronomy, San Diego State University, PA-210, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Debes, J. H. [Carnegie Institution of Washington, Department of Terrestrial Magnetism, 5241 Broad Branch Road, Washington, DC 20015 (United States); Diamond-Stanic, A. M.; Tremonti, C. A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ivans, I. I.; Thompson, I. B. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution of Washington, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Simmerer, J. [Lund Observatory, Box 43, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2009-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

177

Block IV solar cell module design and test specification for Intermediate Load Center applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Requirements are established for performance of terrestial solar cell modules intended for use in various test applications typically characterized as Intermediate Load Centers. During the 1979 to 1980 time period, such applications are expected to be in the 20 kilowatt to 500 kilowatt size range. In addition to module design and performance requirements, a series of characterization and qualification tests necessary to certify the module design for production, and the necessary performance tests for acceptance of modules are also specified.

Not Available

1978-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

A Remarkable Angular Distribution of the Intermediate Subclass of Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the article a test is developed, which allows to test the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness in the angular distribution of gamma-ray bursts collected at the Current BATSE Catalog. The method is a modified version of the well-known counts-in-cells test, and fully eliminates the non-uniform sky-exposure function of BATSE instrument. Applying this method to the case of all gamma-ray bursts no intrinsic non-randomness is found. The test also did not find intrinsic non-randomnesses for the short and long gamma-ray bursts, respectively. On the other hand, using the method to the new intermediate subclass of gamma-ray bursts, the null-hypothesis of the intrinsic randomness for 181 intermediate gamma-ray bursts is rejected on the 96.4% confidence level. Taking 92 dimmer bursts from this subclass itself, we obtain the surprising result: This "dim" subclass of the intermediate subclass has an intrinsic non-randomness on the 99.3% confidence level. On the other hand, the 89 "bright" bursts show no intrinsic non-randomness.

A. Meszaros; Z. Bagoly; I. Horvath; L. G. Balazs; R. Vavrek

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

179

Kinetic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compound Intermediates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm the proposed mechanisms a kentic study of several possible intermediates was done under similar acidolysis conditions. Epoxystyrene and 1-phenyl-1,2-ethandiol were used as intermediates. 2-phenoxyvinylbenzene was synthesized and subsequently deconstructed in H2SO4. The kinetics and product distribution of these intermediates were then used in confirming our proposed mechanisms.

Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

MCNP5 CRITICALITY VALIDATION AND BIAS FOR INTERMEDIATE ENRICHED URANIUM SYSTEMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this analysis is to validate the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) code Version 1.40 (LA-UR-03-1987, 2005) and its cross-section database for k-code calculations of intermediate enriched uranium systems on INTEL{reg_sign} processor based PC's running any version of the WINDOWS operating system. Configurations with intermediate enriched uranium were modeled with the moderator range of 39 {le} H/Fissile {le} 1438. See Table 2-1 for brief descriptions of selected cases and Table 3-1 for the range of applicability for this validation. A total of 167 input cases were evaluated including bare and reflected systems in a single body or arrays. The 167 cases were taken directly from the previous (Version 4C [Lan 2005]) validation database. Section 2.0 list data used to calculate k-effective (k{sub eff}) for the 167 experimental criticality benchmark cases using the MCNP5 code v1.40 and its cross section database. Appendix B lists the MCNP cross-section database entries validated for use in evaluating the intermediate enriched uranium systems for criticality safety. The dimensions and atom densities for the intermediate enriched uranium experiments were taken from NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03, September 2005, which will be referred to as the benchmark handbook throughout the report. For these input values, the experimental benchmark k{sub eff} is approximately 1.0. The MCNP validation computer runs ran to an accuracy of approximately {+-} 0.001. For the cases where the reported benchmark k{sub eff} was not equal to 1.0000 the MCNP calculational results were normalized. The difference between the MCNP validation computer runs and the experimentally measured k{sub eff} is the MCNP5 v1.40 bias. The USLSTATS code (ORNL 1998) was utilized to perform the statistical analysis and generate an acceptable maximum k{sub eff} limit for calculations of the intermediate enriched uranium type systems.

FINFROCK SH

2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Comparative genomics in acid mine drainage biofilm communities reveals metabolic and structural differentiation of co-occurring archaea  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

co-occurring archaea. BMC Genomics 2013 14:485. Submit yourgenomes. Yelton et al. BMC Genomics 2013, 14:485 http://work was supported by DOE Genomics: GTL project Grant No.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Response of the NCAR Community Climate Model to the Radiative Forcing by the Naturally Occurring Tropospheric Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We insert the effect of naturally occurring tropospheric aerosols on solar radiation into the NCAR Community Climate Model (CCM). The effect of the aerosol depends on concentration and type (continental, maritime), surface albedo, solar zenith ...

James A. Coakley Jr.; Robert D. Cess

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Local Coupled Equatorial Variability versus Remote ENSO Forcing in an Intermediate Coupled Model of the Tropical Atlantic  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relative roles played by the remote El Niño–Southern Oscillation (ENSO) forcing and the local air–sea interactions in the tropical Atlantic are investigated using an intermediate coupled model (ICM) of the tropical Atlantic. The oceanic ...

Serena Illig; Boris Dewitte

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 13. For Newman Power Station, El Paso, Texas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are the data accumulated during June at the intermediate photovoltaic project at Newman Power Station, El Paso, Texas. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

Not Available

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Online measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds from aircraft  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A detailed understanding of the climate and air quality impacts of aviation requires measurements of the emissions of intermediate-volatility and semi-volatile organic compounds (I/SVOCs) from aircraft. Currently both the ...

Herndon, S. C.

186

Assessment of the Effects of Tidal Mixing in the Kuril Straits on the Formation of the North Pacific Intermediate Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To assess accurately the effect of tidal mixing in the Kuril Straits on the formation of the North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW), the spatial distribution of diapycnal diffusivity recently obtained by the present authors is incorporated into ...

Yuki Tanaka; Toshiyuki Hibiya; Yoshihiro Niwa

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Impact of Geographic-Dependent Parameter Optimization on Climate Estimation and Prediction: Simulation with an Intermediate Coupled Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Because of the geographic dependence of model sensitivities and observing systems, allowing optimized parameter values to vary geographically may significantly enhance the signal in parameter estimation. Using an intermediate atmosphere–ocean–land ...

Xinrong Wu; Shaoqing Zhang; Zhengyu Liu; Anthony Rosati; Thomas L. Delworth; Yun Liu

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Distribution and Modification of North Pacific Intermediate Water around the Subarctic Frontal Zone East of 150°E  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modification and distribution of North Pacific Intermediate Water (NPIW) in the area north of 30°N and east of 150°E are discussed based on an isopycnal particle tracking experiment with the velocity field estimated from a ?-spiral inverse method ...

Masachika Masujima; Ichiro Yasuda

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Collision Efficiencies of Ice Crystals at Low–Intermediate Reynolds Numbers Colliding with Supercooled Cloud Droplets: A Numerical Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiencies with which ice crystals at low–intermediate Reynolds numbers collide with supercooled cloud droplets are determined numerically. Three ice crystal habits are considered here: hexagonal ice plates, broad-branch crystals, and ...

Pao K. Wang; Wusheng Ji

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and Small Non-Road Engines, Report 1 - Updated  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Intended for policymakers and others who make decisions about, and set guidelines for, the proper use of intermediate ethanol blends such as E20 in both vehicle engines and other engine types.

Knoll, K.; West, B.; Clark, W.; Graves, R.; Orban, J.; Przesmitzki, S.; Theiss, T.

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

SOFAR Float Observations of an Intermediate-Depth Eastern Boundary Current and Mesoscale Variability in the Eastern Tropical Atlantic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two neutrally buoyant SOFAR floats vigorously looped and meandered at depths of 950–1150 m in the eastern tropical Atlantic Ocean. The float trajectories illustrate a poleward flow along the tropical eastern boundary and significant intermediate-...

David M. Fratantoni; Philip L. Richardson

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Structural Transitions, Melting, and Intermediate Phases for Stripe and Clump Forming Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We numerically examine the properties of a two-dimensional system of particles which have competing long range repulsive and short range attractive interactions as a function of density and temperature. For increasing density, there are well defined transitions between a low density clump phase, an intermediate stripe phase, an anticlump phase, and a high density uniform phase. To characterize the transitions between these phases we propose several measures which take into account the different length scales in the system. For increasing temperature, we find an intermediate phase that is liquid-like on the short length scale of interparticle spacing but solid-like on the larger length scale of the clump, stripe, or anticlump pattern. This intermediate phase persists over the widest temperature range in the stripe state when the local particle lattice within an individual stripe melts well below the temperature at which the entire stripe structure breaks down, and is characterized by intra-stripe diffusion of particles without inter-stripe diffusion. This is followed at higher temperatures by the onset of inter-stripe diffusion in an anisotropic diffusion phase, and then by breakup of the stripe structure. We identify the transitions between these regimes through diffusion, specific heat, and energy fluctuation measurements, and find that within the intra-stripe liquid regime, the excess entropy goes into disordering the particle arrangements within the stripe rather than affecting the stripe structure itself. The clump and anticlump phases also show multiple temperature-induced diffusive regimes which are not as pronounced as those of the stripe phase.

C. J. Olson Reichhardt; C. Reichhardt; A. R. Bishop

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

193

Advanced Intermediate Heat Transport Loop Design Configurations for Hydrogen Production Using High Temperature Nuclear Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy is investigating the use of high-temperature nuclear reactors to produce hydrogen using either thermochemical cycles or high-temperature electrolysis. Although the hydrogen production processes are in an early stage of development, coupling either of these processes to the high-temperature reactor requires both efficient heat transfer and adequate separation of the facilities to assure that off-normal events in the production facility do not impact the nuclear power plant. An intermediate heat transport loop will be required to separate the operations and safety functions of the nuclear and hydrogen plants. A next generation high-temperature reactor could be envisioned as a single-purpose facility that produces hydrogen or a dual-purpose facility that produces hydrogen and electricity. Early plants, such as the proposed Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), may be dual-purpose facilities that demonstrate both hydrogen and efficient electrical generation. Later plants could be single-purpose facilities. At this stage of development, both single- and dual-purpose facilities need to be understood. A number of possible configurations for a system that transfers heat between the nuclear reactor and the hydrogen and/or electrical generation plants were identified. These configurations included both direct and indirect cycles for the production of electricity. Both helium and liquid salts were considered as the working fluid in the intermediate heat transport loop. Methods were developed to perform thermal-hydraulic evaluations and cycle-efficiency evaluations of the different configurations and coolants. The thermal-hydraulic evaluations estimated the sizes of various components in the intermediate heat transport loop for the different configurations. The relative sizes of components provide a relative indication of the capital cost associated with the various configurations. Estimates of the overall cycle efficiency of the various configurations were also determined. The evaluations determined which configurations and coolants are the most promising from thermal-hydraulic and efficiency points of view.

Chang Oh; Cliff Davis; Rober Barner; Paul Pickard

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

A possible method to produce a polarized antiproton beam at intermediate energies  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A feasible and conservative design for a medium energy polarized antiproton beam has been presented. The design requires an intense beam of unpolarized antiprotons ({ge} 10{sup 7}/sec) from a typical secondary beam line in order to achieve reasonable {anti p}p elastic scattering count rates. All three beam spin directions can be achieved. Methods were discussed to reverse the spin directions in modest times, and to change to a polarized proton beam if desired. It is expected that experiments with such a beam would have a profound effect on the understanding of the {anti N}N interaction at intermediate energies.

Spinka, H.; Vaandering, E.W.; Hofmann, J.S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). High Energy Physics Div.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis IV. The Identity and Sequencefo the Intermediates in Sucrose Synthesis  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis of sucrose from C{sup 14}0{sub 22} by green algae has been investigated and the intermediates separated by the method of paper chromatography. It is shown that sucrose is the first free sugar appearing during photosynthesis. It is apparently formed by condensation of the glucose-I-phosphate and a fructose phosphate. A series of radioautographs of paper chromatograms of extracts from plants which have photosynthesized for different periods of time has been prepared. The results indicate that 2-phosphoglyceric acid is the first product synthesized from C0{sub 2} during photosynthesis.

Calvin, M.; Benson, A.

1948-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

196

Intermediate States of Ribonuclease III in Complex with Double-Stranded RNA  

SciTech Connect

Bacterial ribonuclease III (RNase III) can affect RNA structure and gene expression in either of two ways: as a processing enzyme that cleaves double-stranded (ds) RNA, or as a binding protein that binds but does not cleave dsRNA. We previously proposed a model of the catalytic complex of RNase III with dsRNA based on three crystal structures, including the endonuclease domain of RNase III with and without bound metal ions and a dsRNA binding protein complexed with dsRNA. We also reported a noncatalytic assembly observed in the crystal structure of an RNase III mutant, which binds but does not cleave dsRNA, complexed with dsRNA. We hypothesize that the RNase III {center_dot} dsRNA complex can exist in two functional forms, a catalytic complex and a noncatalytic assembly, and that in between the two forms there may be intermediate states. Here, we present four crystal structures of RNase III complexed with dsRNA, representing possible intermediates.

Gan, Jianhua; Tropea, Joseph E.; Austin, Brian P.; Court, Donald L.; Waugh, David S.; Ji, Xinhua (NIH)

2010-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

197

Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There will be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service, can economically remove most of the variation from electric-power demands. Therefore, the analysis assesses the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. Section 2 provides a condensed description of the models used in the analysis. (Details and data sets are contained in the appendixes.) Results of sensitivities on growth rates, model parameters, and appliance saturations are discussed in Section 3, which also contains the analysis of the potential impacts of customer energy storage, appliance control, and time-of-use pricing. The future need for intermediate and peaking technologies is analyzed in Section 4.

Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Tidal Disruptions of White Dwarfs from Ultra-Close Encounters with Intermediate Mass Spinning Black Holes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present numerical relativity results of tidal disruptions of white dwarfs from ultra-close encounters with a spinning, intermediate mass black hole. These encounters require a full general relativistic treatment of gravity. We show that the disruption process and prompt accretion of the debris strongly depend on the magnitude and orientation of the black hole spin. However, the late-time accretion onto the black hole follows the same decay, $\\dot{M}$ ~ t^{-5/3}, estimated from Newtonian gravity disruption studies. We compute the spectrum of the disk formed from the fallback material using a slim disk model. The disk spectrum peaks in the soft X-rays and sustains Eddington luminosity for 1-3 yrs after the disruption. For arbitrary black hole spin orientations, the disrupted material is scattered away from the orbital plane by relativistic frame dragging, which often leads to obscuration of the inner fallback disk by the outflowing debris. The disruption events also yield bursts of gravitational radiation with characteristic frequencies of ~3.2 Hz and strain amplitudes of ~10^{-18} for galactic intermediate mass black holes. The optimistic rate of considered ultra-close disruptions is consistent with no sources found in ROSAT all-sky survey. The future missions like Wide-Field X-ray Telescope (WFXT) could observe dozens of events.

Roland Haas; Roman V. Shcherbakov; Tanja Bode; Pablo Laguna

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Substellar Companion to the Intermediate-Mass Giant 11 Com  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of a substellar companion orbiting the intermediate-mass giant star 11 Com (G8 III). Precise Doppler measurements of the star from Xinglong station and Okayama Astrophysical Observatory (OAO) revealed Keplerian velocity variations with an orbital period of 326.03 +/- 0.32 days, a semiamplitude of 302.8 +/- 2.6 m/s, and an eccentricity of 0.231 +/- 0.005. Adopting a stellar mass of 2.7 +/- 0.3 M_solar, the minimum mass of the companion is 19.4 +/- 1.5 M_Jup, well above the deuterium burning limit, and the semimajor axis is 1.29 +/- 0.05 AU. This is the first result from the joint planet search program between China and Japan aiming at revealing statistics of substellar companions around intermediate-mass giants. 11 Com b emerged from 300 targets of the planet search program at OAO. The current detection rate of a brown dwarf candidate seems to be comparable to that around solar-type stars within orbital separations of $\\sim$3 AU.

Y. J. Liu; Bun'ei Sato; G. Zhao; Kunio Noguchi; H. Wang; Eiji Kambe; Hiroyasu Ando; Hideyuki Izumiura; Y. Q. Chen; Norio Okada; Eri Toyota; Masashi Omiya; Seiji Masuda; Yoichi Takeda; Daisuke Murata; Yoichi Itoh; Michitoshi Yoshida; Eiichiro Kokubo; Shigeru Ida

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

200

Evolution and Dynamics of a Late-Stage Squall Line That Occurred on 20 February 1993 during TOGA COARE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne Doppler and flight-level data are used to document the structure and evolution of portions of a late-stage horseshoe-shaped squall line system and its effect on vertical momentum and mass transports. This system, which occurred on 20 ...

Sharon A. Lewis; Margaret A. LeMone; David P. Jorgensen

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

A DOUBLE PLANETARY SYSTEM AROUND THE EVOLVED INTERMEDIATE-MASS STAR HD 4732  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report the detection of a double planetary system orbiting around the evolved intermediate-mass star HD 4732 from precise Doppler measurements at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory and Australian Astronomical Observatory. The star is a K0 subgiant with a mass of 1.7 M {sub Sun} and solar metallicity. The planetary system is composed of two giant planets with minimum mass of msin i = 2.4 M {sub J}, orbital period of 360.2 days and 2732 days, and eccentricity of 0.13 and 0.23, respectively. Based on dynamical stability analysis for the system, we set the upper limit on the mass of the planets to be about 28 M {sub J} (i > 5 Degree-Sign ) in the case of coplanar prograde configuration.

Sato, Bun'ei; Omiya, Masashi; Harakawa, Hiroki; Nagasawa, Makiko; Ida, Shigeru [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan)] [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Wittenmyer, Robert A. [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics, University of NSW 2052 (Australia)] [Department of Astrophysics, School of Physics, University of NSW 2052 (Australia); Izumiura, Hideyuki; Kambe, Eiji [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Kamogata, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan)] [Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, Kamogata, Okayama 719-0232 (Japan); Takeda, Yoichi; Kokubo, Eiichiro [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan)] [The Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Shonan Village, Hayama, Kanagawa 240-0193 (Japan); Yoshida, Michitoshi [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan)] [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Itoh, Yoichi [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2, Nishigaichi, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan)] [Nishi-Harima Astronomical Observatory, Center for Astronomy, University of Hyogo, 407-2, Nishigaichi, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5313 (Japan); Ando, Hiroyasu, E-mail: satobn@geo.titech.ac.jp [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)] [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis. XVI. Kinetic Relationshipsof the Intermediates in Steady State Photosynthesis  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A kinetic study of the accumulation of C{sup 14} in the intermediates of steady state photosynthesis in C{sup 14}O{sub 2} provides information regarding the sequence of reactions involved. The work described applied the radio-chromatographic technique for analysis of the labeled early products. The simultaneous carboxylation reaction resulting in malic acid as well as phosphoglycerate is demonstrated in experiments at high light intensity. A comparison of radioactivities in a number of phosphorylated sugars as a function of time reveals concurrent synthesis of fructose and sedoheptulose phosphates followed by that of ribulose phosphates and later by that of glucose phosphates. The possibility that the cleavage of C{sub 4} compounds to C{sub 2} carbon dioxide acceptors may involve C{sub 7} and C{sub 5} sugars and evidence for this mechanism is presented.

Benson, A.A.; Kawaguchi, S.; Hayes, P.; Calvin, M.

1952-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

203

The equivalent electrical permittivity of gas-solid mixtures at intermediate solid volume fractions.  

SciTech Connect

Several mixture models are evaluated for their suitability in predicting the equivalent permittivity of dielectric particles in a dielectric medium for intermediate solid volume fractions (0.4 to 0.6). Predictions of the Maxwell, Rayleigh, Bottcher and Bruggeman models are compared to computational simulations of several arrangements of solid particles in a gas and to the experimentally determined permittivity of a static particle bed. The experiment uses spherical glass beads in air, so air and glass permittivity values (1 and 7, respectively) are used with all of the models and simulations. The experimental system used to measure the permittivity of the static particle bed and its calibration are described. The Rayleigh model is found to be suitable for predicting permittivity over the entire range of solid volume fractions (0-0.6).

Torczynski, John Robert; Ceccio, Steven Louis; Tortora, Paul Richard

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Evidence for alkyl intermediates during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis and their relation to hydrocarbon products  

SciTech Connect

Fisher-Tropsch synthesis mechanisms have been postulated in which alkyl fragments are both the chain-growing intermediate and the precursor to hydrocarbon products. The conversion of CO/H/sub 2/ into small alkyl fragments was investigated by scavenging C/sub 1/-C/sub 3/ alkyl species from the surface of an iron catalyst during Fischer-Tropsch synthesis. The experiments were performed in a steady-state mode revealing that pyridine did not inhibit or poison the Fischer-Tropsch reaction, rather it suppressed the overall rate slightly. Scavenged ..cap alpha..-alkylpyridine distributions were dependent upon synthesis variables and displayed a dependence which was proportional to the dependence upon synthesis variables and displayed a dependence which was proportional to the dependence of C/sub 1/-C/sub 3/ Fischer-Tropsch products. These dependences are used to demonstrate that alkyl fragments are the immediate precursors to Fischer-Tropsch products.

Wang, C.J.; Ekerdt, J.G.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Using open clusters to study mixing in low- and intermediate-mass stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many evolutionary stages, low- and intermediate-mass stars show signs of mixing of the surface material with material from the interior. To account for all the details revealed by the observations it is necessary to include non-standard physical processes in the models (e.g. atomic diffusion and rotation-induced mixing). The study of mixing in stars of different masses, ages, and chemical composition helps to identify and constrain these processes. In this sense, stars in open clusters are the ideal targets. All stars in one given cluster have the same age and chemical composition, and their masses can be well estimated. By studying many clusters, one can separate and trace the effects of these different parameters.

Smiljanic, Rodolfo

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

MCNP6 Fission Cross Section Calculations at Intermediate and High Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MCNP6 has been Validated and Verified (V&V) against intermediate- and high-energy fission cross-section experimental data. An error in the calculation of fission cross sections of 181Ta and a few nearby target nuclei by the CEM03.03 event generator in MCNP6 and a "bug: in the calculation of fission cross sections with the GENXS option of MCNP6 while using the LAQGSM03.03 event generator were detected during our V&V work. After fixing both problems, we find that MCNP6 using CEM03.03 and LAQGSM03.03 calculates fission cross sections in good agreement with available experimental data for reactions induced by nucleons, pions, and photons on both subactinide and actinide nuclei at incident energies from several tens of MeV to about 1 TeV.

Stepan G. Mashnik; Arnold J. Sierk; Richard E. Prael

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Anisotropic intermediate valence in Yb2M3Ga9 (M = Rh, Ir)  

SciTech Connect

The intermediate valence compounds Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} (M = Rh, Ir) exhibit an anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. We report measurements of the temperature dependence of the 4f occupation number, n{sub f}(T), for Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9} as well as the magnetic inelastic neutron scattering spectrum S{sub mag}({Delta}E) at 12 and 300 K for Yb{sub 2}Rh{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}. Both n{sub f}(T) and S{sub mag}({Delta}E) were calculated for the Anderson impurity model with crystal field terms within an approach based on the non-crossing approximation. These results corroborate the importance of crystal field effects in these materials; they also suggest that Anderson lattice effects are important to the physics of Yb{sub 2}M{sub 3}Ga{sub 9}.

Christianson, A.D.; Lawrence, J.M.; Lobos, A.M.; Aligia, A.A.; Bauer, E.D.; Moreno, N.O.; Booth, C.H.; Goremychkin, E.A.; Sarrao, J.L.; Thompson, J.D.; Batista, C.D.; Trouw, F.R.; Hehlen, M.P.

2005-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

208

Learning to Argue with Intermediate Macro Theory: A Semester-Long Team Writing Project ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe experiences from integrating a semester-long economic analysis project into an intermediate macroeconomic theory course. Students work in teams of “economic advisors ” to write a series of nested reports for a decision-maker, analyzing the current economic situation, evaluating and proposing policies while responding to events during the semester in real-time. The project simulates real-world policy consulting with an emphasis on applying economic theory and models. We describe the project setup and how to tailor its theme to current events, explain methods for keeping it manageable in larger classes, and document student learning outcomes by survey results and report summaries. Besides improving the learning experience, this project equips economics students to contribute their own views to policy debates and buttress them with tight macroeconomic reasoning.

Jel Classification A

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

The NewFLOW Computational Model and Intermediate Format - Version 1.04  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report motivates and defines a general-purpose, architecture independent, parallel computational model, which captures the intuitions which underlie the design of the United Functions and Objects (UFO) programming language. The model has two aspects, which turn out to be a traditional dataflow model and an actor-like model, with a very simple interface between the two. Certain aspects of the model, particularly strictness, maximum parallelism, and lack of suspension are stressed. The implications of introducing stateful objects are carefully spelled out. The model has several purposes, although we primarily describe it as a vehicle for the compilation and optimisation of UFO, and for visualising the execution of programs. Having motivated the model, this report specifies, in detail, both the syntax and semantics of the model, and provides some examples of its use. 1 Motivation The primary purpose of this report is to define the semantics and syntax of NewFLOW, an intermediate rep...

Julian Seward; John Sargeant; Chris Kirkham

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Recovery of Valuable Chlorosilane Intermediates by a Novel Waste Conversion Process  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

From 1994 to 2001, Dow Corning studied a waste recycling process to recover direct process residues (DPR) resulting from the production of silicone precursors. Over the course of eight years, Dow Corning constructed and operated a pilot plant, a small scale commercial plant, and a full scale plant. The process reacts DPR with hydrogen and chlorosilane monomers at high temperature and high pressure. The process converted 85% of the DPR to valuable chlorosilane monomers such as dimethyldichlorosilane and methyldichlorosilane. When feeding methyltrichlorosilane, the process converted 30% of the MeSiCl3 to other monomers. Alternate co-feed monomers were tested. By converting waste DPR to valuable intermediates, the technology significantly reduces waste from the basic silicones manufacturing process.

J. Ashley Brinson

2002-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

211

Cross sections for electron scattering by propane in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a joint theoretical-experimental study on electron scattering by propane (C{sub 3}H{sub 8}) in the low- and intermediate-energy ranges. Calculated elastic differential, integral, and momentum transfer as well as total (elastic + inelastic) and total absorption cross sections are reported for impact energies ranging from 2 to 500 eV. Also, experimental absolute elastic cross sections are reported in the 40- to 500-eV energy range. A complex optical potential is used to represent the electron-molecule interaction dynamics. A theoretical method based on the single-center-expansion close-coupling framework and corrected by the Pade approximant is used to solve the scattering equations. The experimental angular distributions of the scattered electrons are converted to absolute cross sections using the relative flow technique. The comparison of our calculated with our measured results, as well as with other experimental and theoretical data available in the literature, is encouraging.

Souza, G. L. C. de; Lee, M.-T.; Sanches, I. P.; Rawat, P.; Iga, I.; Santos, A. S. dos; Machado, L. E.; Sugohara, R. T.; Brescansin, L. M.; Homem, M. G. P.; Lucchese, R. R. [Departamento de Quimica, UFSCar, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, UFSCar, 13565-905 Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil); Instituto de Fisica 'Gleb Wataghin', UNICAMP, 13083-970 Campinas, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Fisica, UFSC, 88010-970 Florianopolis, SC (Brazil); Department of Chemistry, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 7784-3255 (United States)

2010-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

212

Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots having tunneling barrier embedded in organic matrix  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of quantum dots each have a shell. The quantum dots are embedded in an organic matrix. At least the quantum dots and the organic matrix are photoconductive semiconductors. The shell of each quantum dot is arranged as a tunneling barrier to require a charge carrier (an electron or a hole) at a base of the tunneling barrier in the organic matrix to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the respective quantum dot. A first quantum state in each quantum dot is between a lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) and a highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) of the organic matrix. Wave functions of the first quantum state of the plurality of quantum dots may overlap to form an intermediate band.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI)

2008-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

213

Intermediate-band photosensitive device with quantum dots embedded in energy fence barrier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A plurality of layers of a first semiconductor material and a plurality of dots-in-a-fence barriers disposed in a stack between a first electrode and a second electrode. Each dots-in-a-fence barrier consists essentially of a plurality of quantum dots of a second semiconductor material embedded between and in direct contact with two layers of a third semiconductor material. Wave functions of the quantum dots overlap as at least one intermediate band. The layers of the third semiconductor material are arranged as tunneling barriers to require a first electron and/or a first hole in a layer of the first material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach the second material within a respective quantum dot, and to require a second electron and/or a second hole in a layer of the first semiconductor material to perform quantum mechanical tunneling to reach another layer of the first semiconductor material.

Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wei, Guodan (Ann Arbor, MI)

2010-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

214

HIGH TEMPERATURE TREATMENT OF INTERMEDIATE-LEVEL RADIOACTIVE WASTES - SIA RADON EXPERIENCE  

SciTech Connect

This review describes high temperature methods of low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW) treatment currently used at SIA Radon. Solid and liquid organic and mixed organic and inorganic wastes are subjected to plasma heating in a shaft furnace with formation of stable leach resistant slag suitable for disposal in near-surface repositories. Liquid inorganic radioactive waste is vitrified in a cold crucible based plant with borosilicate glass productivity up to 75 kg/h. Radioactive silts from settlers are heat-treated at 500-700 0C in electric furnace forming cake following by cake crushing, charging into 200 L barrels and soaking with cement grout. Various thermochemical technologies for decontamination of metallic, asphalt, and concrete surfaces, treatment of organic wastes (spent ion-exchange resins, polymers, medical and biological wastes), batch vitrification of incinerator ashes, calcines, spent inorganic sorbents, contaminated soil, treatment of carbon containing 14C nuclide, reactor graphite, lubricants have been developed and implemented.

Sobolev, I.A.; Dmitriev, S.A.; Lifanov, F.A.; Kobelev, A.P.; Popkov, V.N.; Polkanov, M.A.; Savkin, A.E.; Varlakov, A.P.; Karlin, S.V.; Stefanovsky, S.V.; Karlina, O.K.; Semenov, K.N.

2003-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

215

Alternatives generation and analysis for the Phase I intermediate waste feed staging system design requirements  

SciTech Connect

This alternatives generation and analysis (AGA) addresses the question: What is the design basis for the facilities required to stage low-level waste (LLW) feed to the Phase I private contractors? Alternative designs for the intermediate waste feed staging system were developed, analyzed, and compared. Based on these analyses, this document recommends installing mixer pumps in the central pump pit of double-shell tanks 241-AP-102 and 241-AP-104. Also recommended is installing decant/transfer pumps at these tanks. These recommendations have clear advantages in that they provide a low shedule impact/risk and the highest operability of all the alternatives investigated. This revision incorporates comments from the decision board.

Claghorn, R.D., Fluor Daniel Hanford

1997-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

216

Galactic fountains and their connection with high and intermediate velocity clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The aim of this paper is to calculate the expansion law and chemical enrichment of a supershell powered by the energetic feedback of a typical Galactic OB association at various galactocentric radii. We study then the orbits of the fragments created when the supershell breaks out and we compare their kinetic and chemical properties with the available observations of high - and intermediate - velocity clouds. We use the Kompaneets (1960) approximation for the evolution of the superbubble driven by sequential supernova explosions and we compute the abundances of oxygen and iron residing in the thin cold supershell. We assume that supershells are fragmented by means of Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities and we follow the orbit of the clouds either ballistically or by means of a hybrid model considering viscous interaction between the clouds and the extra-planar gas.Given the self-similarity of the Kompaneets solutions, clouds are always formed ~ 448 pc above the plane. If the initial metallicity is solar, the pollution from dying stars of the OB association has a negligible effect on the chemical composition of the clouds. The maximum height reached by the clouds above the plane seldom exceeds 2 kpc and when averaging over different throwing angles, the landing coordinate differs from the throwing coordinate ~ 1 kpc at most. The range of heights and [O/Fe] ratios spun by our clouds suggest us that the high velocity clouds cannot have a Galactic origin, whereas intermediate velocity clouds have kinematic properties similar to our modeled clouds but overabundance observed for the [O/Fe] ratios which can be reproduced only with initial metallicities which are too low compared for those of the Galaxy disk.

E. Spitoni; S. Recchi; F. Matteucci

2008-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

217

Review of Current Experience on Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) and A Recommended Code Approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the ASME/DOE Gen IV Task 7 Part I is to review the current experience on various high temperature reactor intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) concepts. There are several different IHX concepts that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850C to 950C. The concepts that will be primarily discussed herein are: (1) Tubular Helical Coil Heat Exchanger (THCHE); (2) Plate-Stamped Heat Exchanger (PSHE); (3) Plate-Fin Heat Exchanger (PFHE); and (4) Plate-Machined Heat Exchanger (PMHE). The primary coolant of the NGNP is potentially subject to radioactive contamination by the core as well as contamination from the secondary loop fluid. To isolate the radioactivity to minimize radiation doses to personnel, and protect the primary circuit from contamination, intermediate heat exchangers (IHXs) have been proposed as a means for separating the primary circuit of the NGNP (Next Generation Nuclear Plant) or other process heat application from the remainder of the plant. This task will first review the different concepts of IHX that could be envisioned for HTR/VHTR applications in a range of temperature from 850 to 950 C. This will cover shell-and-tube and compact designs (including the platefin concept). The review will then discuss the maturity of the concepts in terms of design, fabricability and component testing (or feedback from experience when applicable). Particular attention will be paid to the feasibility of developing the IHX concepts for the NGNP with operation expected in 2018-2021. This report will also discuss material candidates for IHX applications and will discuss specific issues that will have to be addressed in the context of the HTR design (thermal aging, corrosion, creep, creep-fatigue, etc). Particular attention will be paid to specific issues associated with operation at the upper end of the creep regime.

Duane Spencer; Kevin McCoy

2010-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

218

Constraining deflagration models of Type Ia supernovae through intermediate-mass elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical structure of a nuclear flame is a basic ingredient of the theory of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa). Assuming an exponential density reduction with several characteristic times we have followed the evolution of a planar nuclear flame in an expanding background from an initial density 6.6 10^7 g/cm3 down to 2 10^6 g/cm3. The total amount of synthesized intermediate-mass elements (IME), from silicon to calcium, was monitored during the calculation. We have made use of the computed mass fractions, X_IME, of these elements to give an estimation of the total amount of IME synthesized during the deflagration of a massive white dwarf. Using X_IME and adopting the usual hypothesis that turbulence decouples the effective burning velocity from the laminar flame speed, so that the relevant flame speed is actually the turbulent speed on the integral length-scale, we have built a simple geometrical approach to model the region where IME are thought to be produced. It turns out that a healthy production of IME involves the combination of not too short expansion times, t_c > 0.2 s, and high turbulent intensities. According to our results it could be difficult to produce much more than 0.2 solar masses of intermediate-mass elements within the deflagrative paradigma. The calculations also suggest that the mass of IME scales with the mass of Fe-peak elements, making it difficult to conciliate energetic explosions with low ejected nickel masses, as in the well observed SN1991bg or in SN1998de. Thus a large production of Si-peak elements, especially in combination with a low or a moderate production of iron, could be better addressed by either the delayed detonation route in standard Chandrasekhar-mass models or, perhaps, by the off-center helium detonation in the sub Chandrasekhar-mass scenario.

D. Garcia-Senz; E. Bravo; R. M. Cabezon; S. E. Woosley

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

219

Progress report on development of intermediate fidelity full assembly analysis methods.  

SciTech Connect

While high fidelity modeling capabilities for various physics phenomena are being pursued under advanced modeling and simulation initiatives under the DOE Office of Nuclear Energy, they generally rely on high-performance computation facilities and are too expensive to be used for parameter-space exploration or design analysis. One-dimensional system codes have been used for a long time and have reached a degree of maturity, but limit their validity to specific applications. Thus, an intermediate fidelity (IF) modeling method is being pursued in this work for a fast-running, modest-fidelity, whole-core transient analyses capability. The new approach is essential for design scoping and engineering analyses and could lead to improvements in the design of the new generations of reactors and to the reduction of uncertainties in safety analysis. This report summarizes the initial effort on the development of the intermediate-fidelity full assembly modeling method. The requirements and the desired merits of the IF approach have been defined. A three-dimensional momentum source model has been developed to model the anisotropic flow in the wire-wrapped rod bundle without the need to resolve the geometric details. It has been confirmed that the momentum source model works well if its affecting region is accurately imposed. The validity of the model is further verified by mesh and parameter sensitivity studies. The developed momentum source model, in principle, can be applied to any wire-wrapped bundle geometries and any flow regimes; while the modeling strategy can be applied to other conditions with complex or distorted geometry, such as flow in blocked channels.

Hu, R.; Fanning, T. H. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

220

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occuring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Leg 204 scientific party members presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Geophysical Union Fall meeting, which was held in San Francisco, CA; and, (2) a report was prepared by Dr. Gilles Guerin and David Goldberg from Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University on their postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used for vertical seismic profiling (VSP) experiments during ODP Leg 204. The VSP report is provided herein. Intermediate in scale and resolution between the borehole data and the 3-D seismic surveys, the Vertical Seismic Profiles (VSP) carried during Leg 204 were aimed at defining the gas hydrate distribution on hydrate ridge, and refining the signature of gas hydrate in the seismic data. VSP surveys were attempted at five sites, following completion of the conventional logging operations. Bad hole conditions and operational difficulties did not allow to record any data in hole 1245E, but vertical and constant offset VSP were successful in holes 1244E, 1247B and 1250F, and walk-away VSP were successfully completed in holes 1244E, 1250F and 1251H. Three different tools were used for these surveys. The vertical VSP provided the opportunity to calculate interval velocity that could be compared and validated with the sonic logs in the same wells. The interval velocity profiles in Holes 1244E and 1247B are in very good agreement with the sonic logs. Information about the Leg 204 presentations at the AGU meeting are included in a separate Topical Report, which has been provided to DOE/NETL in addition to this Quarterly Report. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

Frank Rack; Gilles Guerin; David Goldberg; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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221

Assessment of high temperature nuclear energy storage systems for the production of intermediate and peak-load electric power  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Increased cost of energy, depletion of domestic supplies of oil and natural gas, and dependence on foreign suppliers, have led to an investigation of energy storage as a means to displace the use of oil and gas presently being used to generate intermediate and peak-load electricity. Dedicated nuclear thermal energy storage is investigated as a possible alternative. An evaluation of thermal storage systems is made for several reactor concepts and economic comparisons are presented with conventional storage and peak power producing systems. It is concluded that dedicated nuclear storage has a small but possible useful role in providing intermediate and peak-load electric power.

Fox, E. C.; Fuller, L. C.; Silverman, M. D.

1977-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

222

Supernova rates from the Southern inTermediate Redshift ESO Supernova Search (STRESS)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To measure the supernova (SN) rates at intermediate redshift we performed the Southern inTermediate Redshift ESO Supernova Search (STRESS). Unlike most of the current high redshift SN searches, this survey was specifically designed to estimate the rate for both type Ia and core collapse (CC) SNe. We counted the SNe discovered in a selected galaxy sample measuring SN rate per unit blue band luminosity. Our analysis is based on a sample of ~43000 galaxies and on 25 spectroscopically confirmed SNe plus 64 selected SN candidates. Our approach is aimed at obtaining a direct comparison of the high redshift and local rates and at investigating the dependence of the rates on specific galaxy properties, most notably their colour. The type Ia SN rate, at mean redshift z=0.3, amounts to 0.22^{+0.10+0.16}_{-0.08 -0.14} h_{70}^2 SNu, while the CC SN rate, at z=0.21, is 0.82^{+0.31 +0.30}_{-0.24 -0.26} h_{70}^2 SNu. The quoted errors are the statistical and systematic uncertainties. With respect to local value, the CC SN rate at z=0.2 is higher by a factor of ~2 already at redshift, whereas the type Ia SN rate remains almost constant. This implies that a significant fraction of SN Ia progenitors has a lifetime longer than 2-3 Gyr. We also measured the SN rates in the red and blue galaxies and found that the SN Ia rate seems to be constant in galaxies of different colour, whereas the CC SN rate seems to peak in blue galaxies, as in the local Universe. SN rates per unit volume were found to be consistent with other measurements showing a steeper evolution with redshift for CC SNe with respect to SNe Ia. Finally we have exploited the link between star formation (SF) and SN rates to predict the evolutionary behaviour of the SN rates and compare it with the path indicated by observations.

M. T. Botticella; M. Riello; E. Cappellaro; S. Benetti; G. Altavilla; A. Pastorello; M. Turatto; L. Greggio; F. Patat; S. Valenti; L. Zampieri; A. Harutyunyan; G. Pignata; S. Taubenberger

2007-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

223

Naturally Occurring Radionuclides of Ash Produced by Coal Combustion. The Case of the Kardia Mine in Northern Greece  

SciTech Connect

West Macedonia Lignite Center (WMLC), located in Northwest Greece, releases into the atmosphere about 21,400 tons/year of fly ash through the stacks of four coal fired plants. The lignite ash contains naturally occurring radionuclides, which are deposited on the WMLC basin. This work investigates the natural radioactivity of twenty six ash samples, laboratory produced from combustion of lignite, which was sampled perpendicularly to the benches of the Kardia mine. The concentrations of radionuclides {sup 40}K, {sup 235}U, {sup 238}U, {sup 226}Ra, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 232}Th, were measured spectroscopically and found round one order of magnitude as high as those of lignite. Subsequently the Radionuclide Partitioning Coefficients of radionuclides were calculated and it was found that they are higher for {sup 232}Th, {sup 228}Ra and {sup 40}K, because the latter have closer affinity with the inorganic matrix of lignite. During combustion up to one third of the naturally occurring radioisotopes escape from the solid phase into the flue gases. With comparison to relative global data, the investigated ash has been found to have relatively high radioactivity, but the emissions of the WMLC radionuclides contribute only 0.03% to the mean annual absorbed dose.

Fotakis, M.; Tsikritzis, L.; Tzimkas, N.; Kolovos, N.; Tsikritzi, R. [Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of West Macedonia, Department of Pollution Control Technologies, Koila, Kozani, 50100 (Greece)

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Energy and Mass Dependences of the Parameters of the Semimicroscopic Folding Model for Alpha Particles at Low and Intermediate Energies  

SciTech Connect

The energy and mass dependences of the parameters of the semimicroscopic alpha-particle potential are investigated for the first time in the region of low and intermediate energies. Within the semimicroscopic folding model, both elastic and inelastic differential and total cross sections for reactions on various nuclei are well described by using global parameters obtained in this study.

Kuterbekov, K.A.; Zholdybayev, T.K. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan, Almaty, 480082 (Kazakhstan); Kukhtina, I.N.; Penionzhkevich, Yu.E. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow oblast, 141980 (Russian Federation)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Methane activation on ruthenium: the nature of the surface intermediates T.V. Choudhary and D.W. Goodman*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) by steam reforming [1,2], partial oxidation [3,4], autothermal reforming [2,5] or CO2 reforming [6,20]. In a similar fashion, we have investigated step- wise methane reforming (methane decomposition in step IMethane activation on ruthenium: the nature of the surface intermediates T.V. Choudhary and D

Goodman, Wayne

226

EMatch: Discovery of High Resolution Structural Homologues of Protein Domains in Intermediate Resolution Cryo-EM Maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cryo-EM has become an increasingly powerful technique for elucidating the structure, dynamics, and function of large flexible macromolecule assemblies that cannot be determined at atomic resolution. However, due to the relatively low resolution of cryo-EM ... Keywords: Structural bioinformatics, intermediate resolution cryo-EM maps, 3D alignment of secondary structures, macromolecular assemblies, cyclic symmetry.

Keren Lasker; Oranit Dror; Maxim Shatsky; Ruth Nussinov; Haim J. Wolfson

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Impacts of Climate Change on the Subduction of Mode and Intermediate Water Masses in the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Changes in the temperature, salinity, and subduction of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) between the 1950s and 2090s are diagnosed using the CSIRO Mark version 3.5 (Mk3.5) climate system model Caps under a CO...

Stephanie M. Downes; Nathaniel L. Bindoff; Stephen R. Rintoul

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Proceedings of the workshop on program options in intermediate-energy physics. Volume 1. Summary and panel reports  

SciTech Connect

A Workshop on Program Options in Intermediate-Energy Physics sponsored by the US Department of Energy was held at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory, August 20 to 31, 1979. The scope of the workshop included all laboratories in intermediate-energy physics, worldwide, and all of these sent representatives to the workshop. The workshop addressed itself to the critical questions on nuclear and particle physics and how they can best be investigated by intermediate-energy accelerators. Among the questions that the workshop members considered were: (1) what are the important physics topics which might be understood through research on these accelerators in the next 10 years. These topics include, but are not restricted to, fundamental interactions and symmetries in particle physics, and nuclear modes of motion, structure, and reaction mechanisms; (2) what experiments should be undertaken to carry out the program. What are the kinematical conditions, accuracies, resolutions, and other parameters required to obtain the desired knowledge; (3) which accelerators are best suited for each experiment. What work at other laboratories (low-, intermediate-, or high-energy) could be undertaken to complement and/or supplement the proposed LAMPF program; and (4) what new facility capabilities should be explored for the long-term future. The workshop was divided into small panels in order to promote effective interchange of ideas. After reports to other panels and plenary sessions, the panelists prepared reports stating the results of their deliberations. These reports comprise the principal part of Volume I.

Allred, J.C.; Talley, B. (comps.)

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Analysis of the need for intermediate and peaking technologies in the year 2000. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This analysis was conducted to assess the impact of load management on the future need for intermediate- and peak-generating technologies (IPTs) such as combustion turbines, pumped storage, and cycling coal plants. There would be a reduced need for IPTs if load-management activities such as time-of-use pricing, together with customer-owned energy-storage devices, hot-water-heater controls, and interruptible service can economically remove most of the variation from electric power demands. The objective of this analysis is to assess the need for IPTs in an uncertain future, which will probably include load management and time-differentiated electricity prices. The analysis is exploratory in nature and broad in scope. It does not attempt to predict the future or to model precisely the technical characteristics or economic desirability of load management. Rather, its purpose is to provide research and development planners with some basic insights into the order of magnitude of possible hourly demand shifts on a regional basis and to determine the impact of load management on daily and seasonal variations in electricity demand.

Barrager, S.M.; Campbell, G.L.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Warm Gas in the Inner Disks around Young Intermediate Mass Stars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The characterization of gas in the inner disks around young stars is of particular interest because of its connection to planet formation. In order to study the gas in inner disks, we have obtained high-resolution K-band and M-band spectroscopy of 14 intermediate mass young stars. In sources that have optically thick inner disks, i.e. E(K-L)>1, our detection rate of the ro-vibrational CO transitions is 100% and the gas is thermally excited. Of the five sources that do not have optically thick inner disks, we only detect the ro-vibrational CO transitions from HD 141569. In this case, we show that the gas is excited by UV fluorescence and that the inner disk is devoid of gas and dust. We discuss the plausibility of the various scenarios for forming this inner hole. Our modeling of the UV fluoresced gas suggests an additional method by which to search for and/or place stringent limits on gas in dust depleted regions in disks around Herbig Ae/Be stars.

Sean Brittain; Theodore Simon; Joan Najita; Terrence Rettig

2006-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

231

Effects of Porous Medium Heterogeneity on Vadose Zone Desiccation: Intermediate-scale Laboratory Experiments and Simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil desiccation (drying), involving water evaporation induced by dry gas injection, is a potentially robust vadose zone remediation process to limit contaminant transport through the vadose zone. A series of four intermediate-scale flow cell experiments was conducted in homogeneous and simple layered heterogeneous porous medium systems to investigate the effects of heterogeneity on desiccation of unsaturated porous media. The permeability ratios of porous medium layers ranged from about five to almost two orders of magnitude. The insulated flow cell was equipped with twenty humidity and temperature sensors and a dual-energy gamma system was used to determine water saturations at various times. The multiphase code STOMP was used to simulate the desiccation process. Results show that injected dry gas flowed predominantly in the higher permeability layer and delayed water removal from the lower permeability material. For the configurations tested, water vapor diffusion from the lower to the higher permeability zone was considerable over the duration of the experiments, resulting in much larger relative humidity values of the outgoing air than based on permeability ratios alone. Acceptable numerical matches with the experimental data were obtained when an extension of the saturation-capillary pressure relation below the residual water saturation was used. The agreements between numerical and experimental results suggest that the correct physics are implemented in the simulator and that the thermal and hydraulic properties of the porous media, flow cell wall and insulation materials were properly represented.

Oostrom, Martinus; Freedman, Vicky L.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Dane, Jacob H.; Truex, Michael J.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Intermediate-scale high-solids anaerobic digestion system operational development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Anaerobic bioconversion of solid organic wastes represents a disposal option in which two useful products may be produced, including a medium Btu fuel gas (biogas) and a compost-quality organic residue. The application of high-solids technology may offer several advantages over conventional low-solids digester technology. Operation of the anaerobic digestion process at high solids reduces the level of process water and thereby the size and capital costs for the digester system. In addition, by virtue of the lack of available water, the microbial catalysts are more productive in feedstock polymer hydrolysis. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has developed a unique digester system capable of uniformly mixing high-solids materials at low cost. Information gained from laboratory-scale digester research was used to develop die intermediate-scale digester system. This system represents a 50-fold scale-up of the original digester system and includes continuous feed addition and computer monitoring and control. During the first 1.15 years of operation, a variety of modifications and improvements were instituted to increase the safety, reliability, and performance of the system. Those improvements -- which may be critical in further scale-up efforts using the NREL high-solids digester design -- are detailed in this report.

Rivard, C.J.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Dredge-up and envelope burning in intermediate mass giants of very low metallicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abbreviated) The evolution of intermediate mass stars at very low metallicity during their final thermal pulse asymptotic giant branch phase is studied in detail. As representative examples models with initial masses of 4Msun and 5Msun with a metallicity of Z=0.0001 ([Fe/H] ~ -2.3) are discussed. The 1D stellar structure and evolution model includes time- and depth dependent overshooting motivated by hydrodynamical simulations, as well as a full nuclear network and time-dependent mixing. Particular attention is given to high time and space resolution to avoid numerical artefacts related to third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning predictions. The model calculations predict very efficient third dredge-up which mixes the envelope with the entire intershell layer or a large fraction thereof, and in some cases penetrates into the C/O core below the He-shell. In all cases primary oxygen is mixed into the envelope. The models predict efficient envelope burning during the interpulse phase. Depending on the envelope b...

Herwig, F

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Intermediate Photovoltaic System Application Experiment. Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts. Phase II. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the key results of the Phase II efforts for the Intermediate PV System Applications Experiment at the Oklahoma Center for Science and Arts (OCSA). This phase of the project involved fabrication, installation and integration of a nominal 140 kW flat panel PV system made up of large, square polycrystalline-silicon solar cell modules, each nominally 61 cm x 122 cm in size. The output of the PV modules, supplied by Solarex Corporation, was augmented, 1.35 to 1 at peak, by a row of glass reflectors, appropriately tilted northward. The PV system interfaces with the Oklahoma Gas and Electric Utility at the OCSA main switchgear. Any excess power generated by the system is fed into the utility under a one to one buyback arrangement. Except for a shortfall in the system output, presently suspected to be due to the poor performance of the modules, no serious problems were encountered. Certain value engineering changes implemented during construction and early operational failure events associated with the power conditioning system are also described. The system is currently undergoing extended testing and evaluation.

Not Available

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Removal of n-tributyl phosphate from synthetic intermediate level waste  

SciTech Connect

Experiments were carried out on the removal on n-tributyl phosphate (TBP) from the synthetic effluents of intermediate level waste (ILW). The candidate materials selected for this study were XAD-4 resin, Tulsion-A-72 MP resin, activated charcoal, and polyurethane foam. These materials were characterized for their distribution coefficients of TBP in a TBP-ethanol-water medium. XAD resin and PU foam showed better removal of TBP. To understand the mechanism of removal of TBP by the candidate materials, such physical properties as specific surface area, pore size distribution, and zeta potentials were determined. The zeta potential of the TBP in an ethanol-water medium was measured. The pore size distribution compared to the specific surface area and surface charges of the samples played an important role in the removal of TBP. XAD-4 resin was used in column studies for the removal of TBP from synthetic ILW. About 13,500 bed volumes of ILW could be passed before a 0.1% breakthrough capacity was attained.

Rao, S.V.S.; Raj, S.S.; Lal, K.B. [Centralized Waste Management Facility, Kalpakkam (India)] [and others

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Sensor and numerical simulator evaluation for porous medium desiccation and rewetting at the intermediate laboratory scale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil desiccation, in conjunction with surface infiltration control, is considered at the Hanford Site as a potential technology to limit the flux of technetium and other contaminants in the vadose zone to the groundwater. An intermediate-scale experiment was conducted to test the response of a series of instruments to desiccation and subsequent rewetting of porous media. The instruments include thermistors, thermocouple psychrometers, dual-probe heat pulse sensors, heat dissipation units, and humidity probes. The experiment was simulated with the multifluid flow simulator STOMP, using independently obtained hydraulic and thermal porous medium properties. All instrument types used for this experiment were able to indicate when the desiccation front passed a certain location. In most cases the changes were sharp, indicating rapid changes in moisture content, water potential, or humidity. However, a response to the changing conditions was recorded only when the drying front was very close to a sensor. Of the tested instruments, only the heat dissipation unit and humidity probes were able to detect rewetting. The numerical simulation results reasonably match the experimental data, indicating that the simulator captures the pertinent gas flow and transport processes related to desiccation and rewetting and may be useful in the design and analysis of field tests.

Oostrom, Martinus; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Strickland, Christopher E.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Truex, Michael J.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

EXTENDED STAR FORMATION IN THE INTERMEDIATE-AGE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD STAR CLUSTER NGC 2209  

SciTech Connect

We present observations of the 1 Gyr old star cluster NGC 2209 in the Large Magellanic Cloud made with the GMOS imager on the Gemini South Telescope. These observations show that the cluster exhibits a main-sequence turnoff that spans a broader range in luminosity than can be explained by a single-aged stellar population. This places NGC 2209 amongst a growing list of intermediate-age (1-3 Gyr) clusters that show evidence for extended or multiple epochs of star formation of between 50 and 460 Myr in extent. The extended main-sequence turnoff observed in NGC 2209 is a confirmation of the prediction in Keller et al. made on the basis of the cluster's large core radius. We propose that secondary star formation is a defining feature of the evolution of massive star clusters. Dissolution of lower mass clusters through evaporation results in only clusters that have experienced secondary star formation surviving for a Hubble time, thus providing a natural connection between the extended main-sequence turnoff phenomenon and the ubiquitous light-element abundance ranges seen in the ancient Galactic globular clusters.

Keller, Stefan C.; Mackey, A. Dougal; Da Costa, Gary S. [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra (Australia)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Neutron cross section evaluations for actinides at intermediate energies sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Investigations aimed at the development of neutron cross section evaluations for actinides performed at IPPE in collaboration with Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm at intermediate energies in the range of 0-200 MeV are briefly described on the example of sup 2 sup 3 sup 9 Pu. The coupled-channels optical model is used to calculate the neutron total, elastic and reaction cross sections and the elastic scattering angular distributions. Evaluations of the neutron and charged particle emission cross sections and of the fission cross sections are obtained on the basis of the statistical description that includes direct, preequilibrium and equilibrium mechanisms of nuclear reactions. The Kalbach parametrization of angular distributions is used to describe the double-differential cross sections of emitted neutrons and charged particles in ENDF/B-VI format. These investigations resulted in creation of complete neutron and proton data files for sup 2 sup 3 sup 8 U and sup 2 sup 3 sup 2 Th and neutron data file...

Ignatyuk, A V; Gudowski, W; Lunev, V P; Shubin, Yu N; Titarenko, N N

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Constraining deflagration models of Type Ia supernovae through intermediate-mass elements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The physical structure of a nuclear flame is a basic ingredient of the theory of Type Ia supernovae (SNIa). Assuming an exponential density reduction with several characteristic times we have followed the evolution of a planar nuclear flame in an expanding background from an initial density 6.6 10^7 g/cm3 down to 2 10^6 g/cm3. The total amount of synthesized intermediate-mass elements (IME), from silicon to calcium, was monitored during the calculation. We have made use of the computed mass fractions, X_IME, of these elements to give an estimation of the total amount of IME synthesized during the deflagration of a massive white dwarf. Using X_IME and adopting the usual hypothesis that turbulence decouples the effective burning velocity from the laminar flame speed, so that the relevant flame speed is actually the turbulent speed on the integral length-scale, we have built a simple geometrical approach to model the region where IME are thought to be produced. It turns out that a healthy production of IME invol...

García-Senz, D; Cabezon, R M; Woosley, S E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Direct Gravitational Imaging of Intermediate Mass Black Holes in Extragalactic Halos  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A galaxy halo may contain a large number of intermediate mass black holes (IMBHs) with masses in the range of 10^{2-6} solar mass. We propose to directly detect these IMBHs by observing multiply imaged QSO-galaxy or galaxy-galaxy strong lens systems in the submillimeter bands with high angular resolution. The silhouette of an IMBH in the lensing galaxy halo would appear as either a monopole-like or a dipole-like variation at the scale of the Einstein radius against the Einstein ring of the dust-emitting region surrounding the QSO. We use a particle tagging technique to dynamically populate a Milky Way-sized dark matter halo with black holes, and show that the surface mass density and number density of IMBHs have power-law dependences on the distance from the center of the host halo if smoothed on a scale of ~ 1 kpc. Most of the black holes orbiting close to the center are freely roaming as they have lost their dark matter hosts during infall due to tidal stripping. Next generation submillimeter telescopes with high angular resolution (solar mass in a lensing galaxy that harbours a O(10^9) solar mass supermassive black hole in its nucleus.

Kaiki Taro Inoue; Valery Rashkov; Joseph Silk; Piero Madau

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

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241

Synoptic-Scale Environments of Predecessor Rain Events Occurring East of the Rocky Mountains in Association with Atlantic Basin Tropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The synoptic-scale environments of predecessor rain events (PREs) occurring to the east of the Rocky Mountains in association with Atlantic basin tropical cyclones (TCs) are examined. PREs that occurred during 1988–2010 are subjectively classified ...

Benjamin J. Moore; Lance F. Bosart; Daniel Keyser; Michael L. Jurewicz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Comment on 'Existence of long-lived isomeric states in naturally-occurring neutron-deficient Th isotopes'  

SciTech Connect

In their article ''Existence of Long-Lived Isomeric States in Naturally-Occuring Neutron-Deficient Th Isotopes''[Phys. Rev. C 76, 021303 (2007)], Marinov et al. fail to demonstrate that basic mass spectrometric protocols, such as abundance sensitivity, linearity, and freedom from possible interferences, have been met. In particular, the claim that four isomeric states of Th have been discovered, using an inductively coupled plasma-sector field mass spectrometer (ICP-SFMS), with abundances from (1-10)x10{sup -11} relative to {sup 232}Th, cannot be accepted, given the known abundance sensitivities of other sector field mass spectrometers. Accelerator mass spectrometry is the only mass spectrometric methodology capable of measuring relative abundances of the magnitude claimed by Marinov et al.

Barber, R. C.; De Laeter, J. R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2 (Canada); Department of Applied Physics, Curtin University, Perth, Western Australia (Australia)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

A Multidisciplinary Investigation of the Intermediate Depths of the Atlantic Ocean: AAIW delta^13C Variability During the Younger Dryas and Lithoherms in the Straits of Florida  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A transect of cores ranging from 798 m to 1585 m water depth in the South Atlantic Ocean document the relative intermediate water mass nutrient geometry and stable isotopic variability of AAIW during the Younger Dryas cooling event. The data reveal concurrent delta^13 C and delta^18 O excursions of 0.59 ppt and 0.37 ppt within the core of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) centered at 11,381 calendar years before present based on radiometric age control. A portion of the delta^1 3C variability (0.22 ppt) can be explained by a shift in thermodynamic equilibrium concurrent with a drop in temperature of 1.8°C at the locus of AAIW formation. The remaining 0.37 ppt increase in delta^13 C most likely resulted from increased wind velocities, and a greater coupling between the ocean and the atmosphere at the locus of AAIW formation (increased efficiency of the thermodynamic process). Deepwater coral mounds are aggregates of corals, other organisms, their skeletal remains, and sediments that occur on the seafloor of the world’s oceans. In the Straits of Florida, these features have been referred to as lithoherms. We use digital, side-scan sonar data collected from the submarine NR-1 from an 10.9 km^2 area at ~650 m water depth to characterize quantitatively aspects of the morphology of 216. Their lengths, widths, heights, areas, orientations and concentration on the seafloor have been determined. Analysis indicates that the outlines of relatively small to medium sized lithoherms can be effectively described with a piriform function. This shape is less applicable to the largest lithoherms because they are aggregates of smaller lithoherms. Nearly all of the lithoherms studied have axes parallel to the northward flowing Florida Current, and the heads of 80 percent of these features face into the current. The shape and orientation of the lithoherms, and evidence of megaripples and scouring in the sonar data suggest that these features are formed by a unidirectional current. Following an extensive investigation of over 200 lithoherms via side-scan sonar imagery and direct observation, we have developed a qualitative model for the formation of the lithoherm type of deep-water coral mounds in the Straits of Florida. Lithoherm formation can be characterized by four main stages of development: nucleating, juvenile, mature singular, and fused. Fused lithoherms can form via transverse and/or longitudinal accretion, however, transverse accretion at the head of the mound is likely the most efficient mechanism. A comparison of lithoherm spatial relationship to local bathymetry agrees with previous observations of deep-water coral mound formations along the levied margins of density flow scour channels.

Brookshire, Brian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Preliminary issues associated with the next generation nuclear plant intermediate heat exchanger design.  

SciTech Connect

The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), which is an advanced high temperature gas reactor (HTGR) concept with emphasis on production of both electricity and hydrogen, involves helium as the coolant and a closed-cycle gas turbine for power generation with a core outlet/gas turbine inlet temperature of 900-1000 C. In the indirect cycle system, an intermediate heat exchanger is used to transfer the heat from primary helium from the core to the secondary fluid, which can be helium, nitrogen/helium mixture, or a molten salt. The system concept for the vary high temperature reactor (VHTR) can be a reactor based on the prismatic block of the GT-MHR developed by a consortium led by General Atomics in the U.S. or based on the PBMR design developed by ESKOM of South Africa and British Nuclear Fuels of U.K. This report has made a preliminary assessment on the issues pertaining to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP. Two IHX designs namely, shell and tube and compact heat exchangers were considered in the assessment. Printed circuit heat exchanger, among various compact heat exchanger (HX) designs, was selected for the analysis. Irrespective of the design, the material considerations for the construction of the HX are essentially similar, except may be in the fabrication of the units. As a result, we have reviewed in detail the available information on material property data relevant for the construction of HX and made a preliminary assessment of several relevant factors to make a judicious selection of the material for the IHX. The assessment included four primary candidate alloys namely, Alloy 617 (UNS N06617), Alloy 230 (UNS N06230), Alloy 800H (UNS N08810), and Alloy X (UNS N06002) for the IHX. Some of the factors addressed in this report are the tensile, creep, fatigue, creep fatigue, toughness properties for the candidate alloys, thermal aging effects on the mechanical properties, American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code compliance information, and performance of the alloys in helium containing a wide range of impurity concentrations. A detailed thermal hydraulic analysis, using a model developed at ANL, was performed to calculate heat transfer, temperature distribution, and pressure drop inside both printed circuit and shell-and-tube heat exchangers. The analysis included evaluation of the role of key process parameters, geometrical factors in HX designs, and material properties. Calculations were performed for helium-to-helium, helium-to-helium/nitrogen, and helium-to-salt HXs. The IHX being a high temperature component, probably needs to be designed using ASME Code Section III, Subsection NH, assuming that the IHX will be classified as a class 1 component. With input from thermal hydraulic calculations performed at ANL, thermal conduction and stress analyses for both compact and shell-and-tube HXs were performed.

Natesan, K.; Moisseytsev, A.; Majumdar, S.; Shankar, P. S.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2007-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

245

Phase equilibrium and intermediate phases in the Eu-Sb system  

SciTech Connect

Rapid heating rate thermal analysis, X-ray diffraction, fluorescence spectrometry, and differential dissolution method were used to study the high-temperature phase equilibrium in the Eu-Sb system within the composition range between 37 and 96 at% Sb. The techniques were effective in determination of the vapor-solid-liquid equilibrium since intermediate phases except Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3} evaporated incongruently after melting. A thermal procedure was developed to determine the liquidus and solidus lines of the T-x diagram. Six stable phases were identified: two phases, EuSb{sub 2} and Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}, melt congruently at 1045{+-}10 deg. C and 1600{+-}15 deg. C, the Eu{sub 2}Sb{sub 3}, Eu{sub 11}Sb{sub 10}, Eu{sub 5}Sb{sub 4}, and Eu{sub 5}Sb{sub 3} phases melt incongruently at 850{+-}8 deg. C, 950{+-}10 deg. C, 1350{+-}15 deg. C, and 1445{+-}15 deg. C, respectively. The exact composition shifting of Sb-rich decomposable phases towards Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}, the most refractory compound, was determined. The topology of the Eu-Sb phase diagram was considered together with that of the Yb-Sb system. - Graphical abstract: The high-temperature range of the T-x phase diagram for the Eu-Sb system. Highlights: > The phase relations in the Eu-Sb system were studied over a large composition and temperature scale. > The liquidus and solidus lines of the T-x diagram were well established using effective techniques. > In the system, six binary phases are stable and they melt incongruently except EuSb{sub 2} and Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}. > Incongruent evaporation was found to be typical of all the phases besides Eu{sub 4}Sb{sub 3}.

Abdusalyamova, M.N. [Institute of Chemistry of Tajik Academy of Sciences, Ajni Str. 299/2, 734063 Dushanbe (Tajikistan); Vasilyeva, I.G., E-mail: kamarz@niic.nsc.ru [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Siberian Branch, Lavrentiev Avenue, 3, 630090 Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

246

Effects of petroleum distillate on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Experimental and analytical studies have been carried out to better understand the effects of additives on viscosity, density and surface tension of intermediate and heavy crude oils. The studies have been conducted for the following oil samples: San Francisco oil from Columbia with specific gravity of 28o-29o API, Duri oil with gravity of 19o-21o API, Jobo oil with gravity of 8o-9o API and San Ardo oil gravity of 11o-13o API. The additive used in all of the experiments is petroleum distillate. The experiments consist of using petroleum distillate as an additive for different samples of heavy crude oils. The experiments include making a mixture by adding petroleum distillate to oil samples and measuring surface tension, viscosity and density of pure oil samples and mixtures at different temperatures. The petroleum distillate/oil ratios are the following ratios: 1:100, 2:100, 3:100, 4:100 and 5:100. Experimental results showed that use of petroleum distillate as an additive increases API gravity and leads to reduction in viscosity and surface tension for all the samples. Results showed for all petroleum distillate/oil ratios viscosity and interfacial tension decreases with temperature. As petroleum distillate/oil ratio increases, oil viscosity and surface tension decrease more significantly at lower temperatures than at higher temperatures. After all experiments were completed an analytical correlation was done based on the experiment results to develop “mixing rules”. Using this correlation viscosity, density and surface tension of different petroleum distillate/oil mixtures were obtained (output).These had properties of pure oil and petroleum distillate, mixture ratios and temperatures at which measurement is supposed to be done (output). Using this correlation a good match was achieved. For all of the cases (viscosity, density and surface tension), correlation coefficient (R²) was more than 0.9 which proved to be optimum for a really good match.

Abdullayev, Azer

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Zeroing the Stellar Isochrone Scale: The Red Giant Clump Luminosity at Intermediate Metallicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The color-magnitude diagrams of the open clusters NGC 2420 and NGC 2506 have been investigated as intermediate links between the solar neighborhood and the Magellanic Clouds. Two sets of theoretical isochrones which include convective overshoot are zeroed to the sun at solar abundance and to the unevolved main sequence dwarfs of the Hipparcos catalog at [Fe/H] = -0.4, requiring a differential of 0.4 mag between the unevolved main sequences at a given color. Adopting E(B-V) = 0.04 and [Fe/H] = -0.39 for NGC 2506 and 0.04 and -0.29 for NGC 2420,the respective apparent moduli are 12.70 and 12.15, while the ages of both clusters are approximately 1.9 +/- 0.2 or 2.2 +/- 0.2 Gyr, depending on the choice of isochrones. From the composite giant branch of the two clusters, the mean clump magnitudes in V and I are found to be 0.47 and -0.48 (-0.17,+0.14). Applying a metallicity correction to the M_I values, the cluster sample of Udalski (1998) leads to (m-M)_0 = 18.42 (+0.17,--0.15) and 18.91 (+0.18,--0.16) for the LMC and SMC, respectively. A caveat to this discussion and to the claim that clusters of the same abundance and age are identical is the observation that the (V-I) colors of the red giants in NGC 2506 are significantly redder at a given (B-V) than the giants in clusters of comparable age and/or metallicity. If the CCD photometry for NGC 2506 is tied to the standard system rather than using a general cluster relation between (B-V) and (V-I), the M_I for the clump will decrease by 0.1 mag.

B. A. Twarog; B. J. Anthony-Twarog; A. R. Bricker

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

248

Geographic market suitability analysis for low- and intermediate-temperature solar IPH systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Previous studies of the industrial market for solar energy systems have considered the level of solar radiation as the main determinant of geographic markets in the US. This study evaluates geographical markets extensively based on such criteria as output of different types of low- and intermediate-temperature solar thermal collectors, air quality constraints for competitive fuels, state solar tax incentives, fuel costs, low industrial use of coal, high industrial growth areas, and industry energy consumption in different parts of the US. Market suitability analysis and mapping techniques, refined in the past 20 years by land use planners, were used to evaluate geographical markets. A computer-aided system, Generalized Map Analysis Planning System (GMAPS), performed interactive, cellular, computer mapping, and composite mapping. Results indicate that the US Southwest and West are the most attractive geographical markets for solar IPH, based on an equal weighting of the evaluation criteria. The West North-Central and East South-Central regions appear to have the least attractive markets. Specific areas within states where solar IPH systems have distinct marketing advantages also are apparent from the composite maps. However, when different weights are assigned to the various criteria, the results change significantly for some regions of the country, such as the New England, Mid-Atlantic, and West South-Central 2 regions. The results of this work will become less valid in the future as state incentives for solar IPH, air quality regulations, and the status of competitive fuels all change. Volume I contains study results and maps.

Turner, A.K.; Weber, J.C.; DeAngelis, M.

1981-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

THE EGNoG SURVEY: MOLECULAR GAS IN INTERMEDIATE-REDSHIFT STAR-FORMING GALAXIES  

SciTech Connect

We present the Evolution of molecular Gas in Normal Galaxies (EGNoG) survey, an observational study of molecular gas in 31 star-forming galaxies from z = 0.05 to z = 0.5, with stellar masses of (4-30) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} M{sub Sun} and star formation rates of 4-100 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}. This survey probes a relatively un-observed redshift range in which the molecular gas content of galaxies is expected to have evolved significantly. To trace the molecular gas in the EGNoG galaxies, we observe the CO(J = 1 {yields} 0) and CO(J = 3 {yields} 2) rotational lines using the Combined Array for Research in Millimeter-wave Astronomy (CARMA). We detect 24 of 31 galaxies and present resolved maps of 10 galaxies in the lower redshift portion of the survey. We use a bimodal prescription for the CO to molecular gas conversion factor, based on specific star formation rate, and compare the EGNoG galaxies to a large sample of galaxies assembled from the literature. We find an average molecular gas depletion time of 0.76 {+-} 0.54 Gyr for normal galaxies and 0.06 {+-} 0.04 Gyr for starburst galaxies. We calculate an average molecular gas fraction of 7%-20% at the intermediate redshifts probed by the EGNoG survey. By expressing the molecular gas fraction in terms of the specific star formation rate and molecular gas depletion time (using typical values), we also calculate the expected evolution of the molecular gas fraction with redshift. The predicted behavior agrees well with the significant evolution observed from z {approx} 2.5 to today.

Bauermeister, A.; Blitz, L.; Wright, M. [Department of Astronomy and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, B-20 Hearst Field Annex, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bolatto, A.; Teuben, P. [Department of Astronomy and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Bureau, M. [Sub-department of Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Oxford, Denys Wilkinson Building, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom); Leroy, A. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ostriker, E. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Wong, T., E-mail: amberb@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, MC-221, 1002 W. Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

250

Periodicities In The X-Ray Intensity Variations of TV Columbae: An Intermediate Polar  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results from a temporal analysis of the longest and the most sensitive X-ray observations of TV Columbae--an intermediate polar. The observations were carried out with the RXTE PCA, ROSAT PSPC, and ASCA. Data were analyzed using a 1-dimensional CLEAN and Bayesian algorithms. The presence of a nearly sinusoidal modulation due to the spin of the white dwarf is seen clearly in all the data, confirming the previous reports based on the EXOSAT data. An improved period of 1909.7+/-2.5s is derived for the spin from the RXTE data.The binary period of 5.5hr is detected unambiguously in X-rays for the first time. Several side-bands due to the interaction of these periods are observed in the power spectra, thereby suggesting contributions from both the disk-fed and the stream-fed accretion for TV Col. The accretion disk could perhaps be precessing as side-bands due to the influence of 4 day period on the orbital period are seen. The presence of a significant power at certain side-bands of the spin frequency indicates that the emission poles are asymmetrically located. The strong power at the orbital side-bands seen in both the RXTE and ROSAT data gives an indication for an absorption site fixed in the orbital frame. Both the spin and the binary modulation are found to be energy-dependent. Increased hardness ratio during a broad dip in the intensity at binary phase of 0.75--1.0 confirms the presence of a strong attenuation due to additional absorbers probably from an impact site of the accretion stream with the disk or magnetosphere. Hardness ratio variations and the energy dependent modulation depth during the spin modulation can be explained by partially covered absorbers in the path of X-ray emission region in the accretion stream.

V. R. Rana; K. P. Singh; E. M. Schlegel; P. Barrett

2003-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

251

Fully integrated transport approach to heavy ion reactions with an intermediate hydrodynamic stage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a coupled Boltzmann and hydrodynamics approach to relativistic heavy ion reactions. This hybrid approach is based on the Ultra-relativistic Quantum Molecular Dynamics (UrQMD) transport approach with an intermediate hydrodynamical evolution for the hot and dense stage of the collision. Event-by-event fluctuations are directly taken into account via the non-equilibrium initial conditions generated by the initial collisions and string fragmentations in the microscopic UrQMD model. After a (3+1)-dimensional ideal hydrodynamic evolution, the hydrodynamical fields are mapped to hadrons via the Cooper-Frye equation and the subsequent hadronic cascade calculation within UrQMD proceeds to incorporate the important final state effects for a realistic freeze-out. This implementation allows to compare pure microscopic transport calculations with hydrodynamic calculations using exactly the same initial conditions and freeze-out procedure. The effects of the change in the underlying dynamics - ideal fluid dynamics vs. non-equilibrium transport theory - will be explored. The freeze-out and initial state parameter dependences are investigated for different observables. Furthermore, the time evolution of the baryon density and particle yields are discussed. We find that the final pion and proton multiplicities are lower in the hybrid model calculation due to the isentropic hydrodynamic expansion while the yields for strange particles are enhanced due to the local equilibrium in the hydrodynamic evolution. The results of the different calculations for the mean transverse mass excitation function, rapidity and transverse mass spectra for different particle species at three different beam energies are discussed in the context of the available data.

Hannah Petersen; Jan Steinheimer; Gerhard Burau; Marcus Bleicher; Horst Stöcker

2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

252

Dredge-up and envelope burning in intermediate mass giants of very low metallicity  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(abbreviated) The evolution of intermediate mass stars at very low metallicity during their final thermal pulse asymptotic giant branch phase is studied in detail. As representative examples models with initial masses of 4Msun and 5Msun with a metallicity of Z=0.0001 ([Fe/H] ~ -2.3) are discussed. The 1D stellar structure and evolution model includes time- and depth dependent overshooting motivated by hydrodynamical simulations, as well as a full nuclear network and time-dependent mixing. Particular attention is given to high time and space resolution to avoid numerical artefacts related to third dredge-up and hot-bottom burning predictions. The model calculations predict very efficient third dredge-up which mixes the envelope with the entire intershell layer or a large fraction thereof, and in some cases penetrates into the C/O core below the He-shell. In all cases primary oxygen is mixed into the envelope. The models predict efficient envelope burning during the interpulse phase. Depending on the envelope burning temperature, oxygen is destroyed to varying degrees. The combined effect of dredge-up and envelope burning does not lead to any significant oxygen depletion in any of the cases considered in this study. The large dredge-up efficiency in our model is closely related to the particular properties of the H-shell during the dredge-up phase in low-metallicity very metal poor stars, which is followed here over many thermal pulses. During the dredge-up phase, the temperature just below the convective boundary is large enough for protons to burn vigorously when they are brought into the C-rich environment below the convection boundary by the time- and depth dependent overshooting. H-burning luminosities of 10^5 to ~2* 10^6L_sun are generated. [...

Falk Herwig

2003-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

253

A Dark Energy Model with Generalized Uncertainty Principle in the Emergent, Intermediate and Logamediate Scenarios of the Universe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This work is motivated by the work of Kim et al (2008), which considered the equation of state parameter for the new agegraphic dark energy based on generalized uncertainty principle coexisting with dark matter without interaction. In this work, we have considered the same dark energy inter- acting with dark matter in emergent, intermediate and logamediate scenarios of the universe. Also, we have investigated the statefinder, kerk and lerk parameters in all three scenarios under this inter- action. The energy density and pressure for the new agegraphic dark energy based on generalized uncertainty principle have been calculated and their behaviors have been investigated. The evolu- tion of the equation of state parameter has been analyzed in the interacting and non-interacting situations in all the three scenarios. The graphical analysis shows that the dark energy behaves like quintessence era for logamediate expansion and phantom era for emergent and intermediate expansions of the universe.

Rahul Ghosh; Surajit Chattopadhyay; Ujjal Debnath

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

254

THE INTERMEDIATE-MASS BLACK HOLE CANDIDATE IN THE CENTER OF NGC 404: NEW EVIDENCE FROM RADIO CONTINUUM OBSERVATIONS  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of deep, high-resolution, 5 GHz Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) observations of the nearby, dwarf lenticular galaxy and intermediate-mass black hole candidate (M{sub BH} {approx} 4.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 5} M{sub Sun }), NGC 404. For the first time, radio emission at frequencies above 1.4 GHz has been detected in this galaxy. We found a modestly resolved source in the NGC 404 nucleus with a total radio luminosity of 7.6 {+-} 0.7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} W Hz{sup -1} at 5 GHz and a spectral index from 5 to 7.45 GHz of {alpha} = -0.88 {+-} 0.30. NGC 404 is only the third central intermediate-mass black hole candidate detected in the radio regime with subarcsecond resolution. The position of the radio source is consistent with the optical center of the galaxy and the location of a known, hard X-ray point source (L{sub X} {approx} 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 37} erg s{sup -1}). The faint radio and X-ray emission could conceivably be produced by an X-ray binary, star formation, a supernova remnant, or a low-luminosity active galactic nucleus powered by an intermediate-mass black hole. In light of our new EVLA observations, we find that the most likely scenario is an accreting intermediate-mass black hole, with other explanations being either incompatible with the observed X-ray and/or radio luminosities or statistically unlikely.

Nyland, Kristina; Marvil, Josh; Young, Lisa M. [Department of Physics, New Mexico Tech., 801 Leroy Place, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Wrobel, J. M. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Zauderer, B. Ashley, E-mail: knyland@nmt.edu [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Radial flow has little effect on clusterization at intermediate energies in the framework of the Lattice Gas Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Lattice Gas Model was extended to incorporate the effect of radial flow. Contrary to popular belief, radial flow has little effect on the clusterization process in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions except adding an ordered motion to the particles in the fragmentation source. We compared the results from the lattice gas model with and without radial flow to experimental data. We found that charge yields from central collisions are not significantly affected by inclusion of any reasonable radial flow.

C. B. Das; L. Shi; S. Das Gupta

2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

256

Soil-to-Crop Transfer Factors of Naturally Occurring Radionuclides and Stable Elements for Long-Term Dose Assessment  

SciTech Connect

A soil-to-crop transfer factor, TF, is a key parameter that directly affects the internal dose assessment for the ingestion pathway, however, obtaining TFs of various long-lived radionuclides occurred during operation of nuclear power plants is difficult because most of them could not be found in natural environments. In this study, therefore, we collected crops and their associated soils throughout Japan and measured more than 50 elements to obtain TFs under equilibrium conditions. The TFs were calculated for 42 elements (Li, Na, Mg, Al, Si, P, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, As, Se, Rb, Sr, Y, Mo, Cd, Sn, I, Cs, Ba, La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Dy, Ho, Er, Tl, Pb, Th and U) from their concentrations in both crop and soil samples. The TF is defined as the concentration of an isotope in a crop (in Bq/kg or mg/kg dry weight) divided by the concentration of the isotope in soil (in Bq.kg or mg/kg dry weight). Probability distributions of TFs for 62 upland field crops were usually log-normal type so that geometric means (GMs) were calculated. The values for the elements of interest from the viewpoint of long-term dose assessment were 2.5E-02 for Se, 7.9E-02 for Sr, 3.1E-03 for Cs, 4.2E-04 for Th and 4.6E-04 for U. Leafy vegetable showed the highest TFs for all the elements among the crop groups. It was clear that these data were usually within the 95% confidence limits of TFs compiled by IAEA in Technical Report Series 364. (authors)

Uchida, S.; Tagami, K. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, Inage-ku, Chiba (Japan)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Equivalent Circuit Description of Non-compensated n-p Codoped TiO2 as Intermediate Band Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The novel concept of non-compensated n-p codoping has made it possible to create tunable intermediate bands in the intrinsic band gap of TiO2, making the codoped TiO2 a promising material for developing intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs). Here we investigate the quantum efficiency of such IBSCs within two scenarios - with and without current extracted from the extended intermediate band. Using the ideal equivalent circuit model, we find that the maximum efficiency of 57% in the first scenario and 53% in the second are both much higher than the Shockley-Queisser limit from single gap solar cells. We also obtain various key quantities of the circuits, a useful step in realistic development of TiO2 based solar cells invoking device integration. These equivalent circuit results are also compared with the efficiencies obtained directly from consideration of electron transition between the energy bands, and both approaches reveal the intriguing existence of double peaks in the maximum quantum efficiency as a function of the relative location of IBs.

Tian-Li Feng; Guang-Wei Deng; Yi Xia; Feng-Cheng Wu; Ping Cui; Hai-Ping Lan; Zhen-Yu Zhang

2010-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

258

Technical Issues Associated With the Use of Intermediate Ethanol Blends (>E10) in the U.S. Legacy Fleet  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supports the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) in assessing the impact of using intermediate ethanol blends (E10 to E30) in the legacy fleet of vehicles in the U.S. fleet. The purpose of this report is to: (1) identify the issues associated with intermediate ethanol blends with an emphasis on the end-use or vehicle impacts of increased ethanol levels; (2) assess the likely severity of the issues and whether they will become more severe with higher ethanol blend levels, or identify where the issue is most severe; (3) identify where gaps in knowledge exist and what might be required to fill those knowledge gaps; and (4) compile a current and complete bibliography of key references on intermediate ethanol blends. This effort is chiefly a critical review and assessment of available studies. Subject matter experts (authors and selected expert contacts) were consulted to help with interpretation and assessment. The scope of this report is limited to technical issues. Additional issues associated with consumer, vehicle manufacturer, and regulatory acceptance of ethanol blends greater than E10 are not considered. The key findings from this study are given.

Rich, Bechtold [Alliance Technical Services; Thomas, John F [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Szybist, James P [ORNL; West, Brian H [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Timbario, Tom [Alliance Technical Services; Goodman, Marc [Alliance Technical Services

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Tailoring Fe-Base Alloys for Intermediate Temperature SOFC Interconnect Application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report summarized the research efforts and major conclusions for our SECA Phase I and II project focused on Cr-free or low Cr Fe-Ni based alloy development for intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnect application. Electrical conductivity measurement on bulk (Fe,Ni){sub 3}O{sub 4} coupons indicated that this spinel phase possessed a higher electrical conductivity than Cr{sub 1.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} spinel and Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}, which was consistent with the low area specific resistance (ASR) of the oxide scale formed on these Fe-Ni based alloys. For Cr-free Fe-Ni binary alloys, although the increase in Ni content in the alloys improved the oxidation resistance, and the Fe-Ni binary alloys exhibited adequate CTE and oxide scale ASR, their oxidation resistance needs to be further improved. Systematic alloy design efforts have led to the identification of one low-Cr (6wt.%) Fe-Ni-Co based alloy which formed a protective, electrically-conductive Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3} inner layer underneath a Cr-free, highly conductive spinel outer layer. This low-Cr, Fe-Ni-Co alloy has demonstrated a good CTE match with other cell components; high oxidation resistance comparable to that of Crofer; low oxide scale ASR with the formation of electrically-insulating phases in the oxide scale; no scale spallation during thermal cycling; adequate compatibility with cathode materials; and comparable mechanical properties with Crofer. The existence of the Cr-free (Fe,Co,Ni){sub 3}O{sub 4} outer layer effectively reduced the Cr evaporation and in transpiration testing resulted in a 6-fold decrease in Cr evaporation as compared to a state-of-the-art ferritic interconnect alloy. In-cell testing using an anode supported cell with a configuration of Alloy/Pt/LSM/YSZ/Ni+YSZ indicates that the formation of the Cr-free spinel layer via thermal oxidation was effective in blocking the Cr migration and thus improving the cell performance stability. Electroplating of the Fe-Ni-Co alloys as precursor to synthesize a protective spinel layer on commercial ferritic steels has been initiated to facilitate the utilization of the Cr-free spinel as a surface seal to block Cr evaporation. It is suggested that low-cost Fe-Ni-Co alloy coating on commercial ferritic steels might be the best approach to completely eliminate the Cr poisoning problem in SOFC stacks, while maintaining the relatively low overall cost of the interconnect component.

J.H. Zhu; M.P. Brady; H.U. Anderson

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41329 between Joint Oceanographic Institutions and DOE-NETL was divided into two phases based on successive proposals and negotiated statements of work pertaining to activities to sample and characterize methane hydrates on ODP Leg 204 (Phase 1) and on IODP Expedition 311 (Phase 2). The Phase 1 Final Report was submitted to DOE-NETL in April 2004. This report is the Phase 2 Final Report to DOE-NETL. The primary objectives of Phase 2 were to sample and characterize methane hydrates using the systems and capabilities of the D/V JOIDES Resolution during IODP Expedition 311, to enable scientists the opportunity to establish the mass and distribution of naturally occurring gas and gas hydrate at all relevant spatial and temporal scales, and to contribute to the DOE methane hydrate research and development effort. The goal of the work was to provide expanded measurement capabilities on the JOIDES Resolution for a dedicated hydrate cruise to the Cascadia continental margin off Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada (IODP Expedition 311) so that hydrate deposits in this region would be well characterized and technology development continued for hydrate research. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. The statement of work for this project included three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd.; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). Additional small tasks that arose during the course of the research were included under these three primary tasks in consultation with the DOE-NETL Program Manager. All tasks outlined in the original statement of work were accomplished except for the deployment and use of the X-ray CT system under Subtask 2-2. This reduction in scope provided resources that were applied to other activities to support the overall project. Post-expedition analysis of results and report writing will continue beyond this reporting period, however, all field deployments associated with this project have been successfully concluded as of this writing.

Frank R. Rack

2006-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the deployment of tools and measurement systems on ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September, 2002. During Leg 204, we cored and logged 9 sites on the Oregon continental margin to determine the distribution and concentration of gas hydrates in an accretionary ridge and adjacent slope basin, investigate the mechanisms that transport methane and other gases into the gas hydrate stability zone (GHSZ), and obtain constraints on physical properties of hydrates in situ. A 3D seismic survey conducted in 2000 provided images of potential subsurface fluid conduits and indicated the position of the GHSZ throughout the survey region. After coring the first site, we acquired Logging-While-Drilling (LWD) data at all but one site to provide an overview of downhole physical properties. The LWD data confirmed the general position of key seismic stratigraphic horizons and yielded an initial estimate of hydrate concentration through the proxy of in situ electrical resistivity. These records proved to be of great value in planning subsequent coring. The second new hydrate proxy to be tested was infrared thermal imaging of cores on the catwalk as rapidly as possible after retrieval. The thermal images were used to identify hydrate samples and to map estimate the distribution and texture of hydrate within the cores. Geochemical analyses of interstitial waters and of headspace and void gases provide additional information on the distribution and concentration of hydrate within the stability zone, the origin and pathway of fluids into and through the GHSZ, and the rates at which the process of gas hydrate formation is occurring. Bio- and lithostratigraphic description of cores, measurement of physical properties, and in situ pressure core sampling and thermal measurements complement the data set, providing ground-truth tests of inferred physical and sedimentological properties. Among the most interesting preliminary results are: (1) the discovery that gas hydrates are distributed through a broad depth range within the GHSZ and that different physical and chemical proxies for hydrate distribution and concentration give generally consistent results; (2) evidence for the importance of sediment properties for controlling the migration of fluids in the accretionary complex; (3) geochemical indications that the gas hydrate system at Hydrate Ridge contains significant concentrations of higher order hydrocarbons and that fractionation and mixing signals will provide important constraints on gas hydrate dynamics; and (4) the discovery of very high chlorinity values that extend for at least 10 mbsf near the summit, indicating that hydrate formation here must be very rapid.

Frank Rack; Gerhard Bohrmann; Anne Trehu; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

262

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishment of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter was the preparation of tools and measurement systems for deployment, testing and use on ODP Leg 204, which will study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon. Additional accomplishments were related to the postcruise evaluation of tools and measurements systems used on ODP Leg 201 along the Peru margin from January through March, 2002. The operational results from the use of the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool and the PCS Gas Manifold on ODP Leg 201 are evaluated in this progress report in order to prepare for the upcoming deployments on ODP Leg 204 in July, 2002. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane gas hydrates. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, was also deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at three shallow-water sites located offshore Peru. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The testing of these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively during ODP Leg 201. The data obtained from the successful deployments of these tools is still being evaluated by the scientists and engineers involved in this testing; however, preliminary results are presented in this report. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was deployed for the first time on ODP Leg 201. This system was used to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. Initial discussions of these experiments are provided in this report. This report is an overview of the field measurements made on recovered sediment cores and the downhole measurements made during ODP Leg 201. These results are currently being used to incorporate the ''lessons learned'' from these deployments to prepare for a dedicated ODP leg to study the characteristics of naturally-occurring hydrates in the subsurface environment of Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon during ODP Leg 204, which will take place from July through September, 2002.

Dr. Frank R. Rack; Dr. Gerald Dickens; Kathryn Ford; Derryl Schroeder; Michael Storms; ODP Leg 201 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Next Generation Nuclear Plant Intermediate Heat Exchanger Materials Research and Development Plan (PLN-2804)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE has selected the High Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) design for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) Project. The NGNP will demonstrate the use of nuclear power for electricity and hydrogen production. It will have an outlet gas temperature in the range of 900°C and a plant design service life of 60 years. The reactor design will be a graphite moderated, helium-cooled, prismatic or pebble-bed reactor and use low-enriched uranium, Tri-Isotopic (TRISO)-coated fuel. The plant size, reactor thermal power, and core configuration will ensure passive decay heat removal without fuel damage or radioactive material releases during accidents. The NGNP Materials Research and Development (R&D) Program is responsible for performing R&D on likely NGNP materials in support of the NGNP design, licensing, and construction activities. Today’s high-temperature alloys and associated ASME Codes for reactor applications are approved up to 760°C. However, some primary system components, such as the Intermediate Heat Exchanger (IHX) for the NGNP will require use of materials that can withstand higher temperatures. The thermal, environmental, and service life conditions of the NGNP will make selection and qualification of some high-temperature materials a significant challenge. Examples include materials for the core barrel and core internals, such as the control rod sleeves. The requirements of the materials for the IHX are among the most demanding. Selection of the technology and design configuration for the NGNP must consider both the cost and risk profiles to ensure that the demonstration plant establishes a sound foundation for future commercial deployments. The NGNP challenge is to achieve a significant advancement in nuclear technology while at the same time setting the stage for an economically viable deployment of the new technology in the commercial sector soon after 2020. A number of solid solution strengthened nickel based alloys have been considered for application in heat exchangers and core internals for the NGNP. The primary candidates are Inconel 617, Haynes 230, Incoloy 800H and Hastelloy XR. Based on the technical maturity, availability in required product forms, experience base, and high temperature mechanical properties all of the vendor pre-conceptual design studies have specified Alloy 617 as the material of choice for heat exchangers. Also a draft code case for Alloy 617 was developed previously. Although action was suspended before the code case was accepted by ASME, this draft code case provides a significant head start for achieving codification of the material. Similarly, Alloy 800H is the material of choice for control rod sleeves. In addition to the above listed considerations, Alloy 800H is already listed in the nuclear section of the ASME Code; although the maximum use temperature and time need to be increased.

J. K. Wright

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Environemental Health and Safety www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environemental Health and Safety ­ www.ehs.cornell.edu October 2010 When a large-scale disaster occurs, there response systems are place, but emergency responders can't be everywhere, helping everyone in your home or work, and the disasters that are most likely to occur in your community. Talk about what

Manning, Sturt

265

Evaluation of Interior Circulation in a High-Resolution Global Ocean Model. Part II: Southern Hemisphere Intermediate, Mode, and Thermocline Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-resolution, offline ocean general circulation model, incorporating a realistic parameterization of mixed layer convection, is used to diagnose pathways and time scales of Southern Hemisphere intermediate, mode, and lower thermocline water ...

Alexander Sen Gupta; Matthew H. England

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Assimilation of Subsurface Thermal Data into a Simple Ocean Model for the Initialization of an Intermediate Tropical Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Forecast Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An adjoint variational assimilation technique is used to assimilate observations of both the oceanic state and wind stress data into an intermediate coupled ENSO prediction model. This method of initialization is contrasted with the more usual ...

Richard Kleeman; Andrew M. Moore; Neville R. Smith

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Intermediate photovoltaic system application experiment operational performance report. Volume 5. For G. N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii for September 1982  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presented are the data accumulated during September 1982 at the intermediate photovoltaic project at G.N. Wilcox Memorial Hospital, Kauai, Hawaii. Generated energy and environmental (weather) data are presented graphically. Explanations of irregularities not attributable to weather are provided.

Not Available

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Variability of Subantarctic Mode Water and Antarctic Intermediate Water in the Drake Passage during the Late-Twentieth and Early-Twenty-First Centuries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time series of the physical and biogeochemical properties of Subantarctic Mode Water (SAMW) and Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW) in the Drake Passage between 1969 and 2005 is constructed using 24 transects of measurements across the passage. ...

Alberto C. Naveira Garabato; Loïc Jullion; David P. Stevens; Karen J. Heywood; Brian A. King

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Extreme Value Statistics of the Total Energy in an Intermediate-Complexity Model of the Midlatitude Atmospheric Jet. Part I: Stationary Case  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A baroclinic model of intermediate complexity for the atmospheric jet at middle latitudes is used as a stochastic generator of atmosphere-like time series. In this case, time series of the total energy of the system are considered. Statistical ...

Mara Felici; Valerio Lucarini; Antonio Speranza; Renato Vitolo

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Verifying the no-hair property of massive compact objects with intermediate-mass-ratio inspirals in advanced gravitational-wave detectors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The detection of gravitational waves from the inspiral of a neutron star or stellar-mass black hole into an intermediate-mass black hole (IMBH) promises an entirely new look at strong-field gravitational physics. Gravitational ...

Gair, Jonathan R.

271

ENSO Simulated by Intermediate Coupled Models and Evaluated with Observations over 1970–98. Part I: Role of the Off-Equatorial Variability  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ENSO simulations are investigated in 30-yr integrations of various intermediate coupled models and compared with observed SST, wind, and thermocline depth anomalies over the tropical Pacific. The Cane and Zebiak model simulates warm events with a ...

C. Perigaud; F. Melin; C. Cassou

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

On Intermediate Models for Barotropic Continental Shelf and Slope Flow Fields. Part II: Comparison of Numerical Model Solutions in Doubly Periodic Domains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As part of a program to improve understanding of the dynamics of the complicated, vigorous eddy and jet flow fields recently observed over the continental shelf and slope, we investigate the potential of intermediate models for use in both ...

J. A. Barth; J. S. Allen; P. A. Newberger

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Application of transient resonance Raman spectroscopy to the structure of a photoinduced electron-transfer intermediate  

SciTech Connect

Transient resonance Raman spectra have been acquired for the chromophore-quencher complexes fac-[(bpy)-Re{sup I}(CO){sub 3}(MQ{sup +})]{sup 2+} and cis-[(bpy){sub 2}Os{sup II}(CO)(MQ{sup +})]{sup 3+} (MQ{sup +} is monoquat, N-methyl-4,4{prime}=bipyridinium cation; bpy is 2,2{prime}-bipyridine) following metal-to-ligand charge-transfer excitation. The transient spectra verify that bpy{sup {sm_bullet}{minus}} {yields} MQ{sup +} intramolecular electron transfer occurs ({tau} < 7 ns) with the excited electron residing ultimately on the monoquat ligand. By comparison to vibrational data for biphenyl, 4,4{prime}-bipyridine, N,N{prime}-dihydro-4,4{prime}-bipyridinium dication, and methyl viologen (paraquat) and their corresponding, one-electron reduced forms, it can be inferred that, in the MQ{sup +}-based MLCT excited state, the electron is delocalized over the entire ligand and the two pyridyl rings assume a coplanar geometry.

Schoonover, J.R.; Chen, Pingyun; Bates, W.D.; Meyer, T.J. [Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

1994-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

274

Low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol and ethanol-PRF blends: An experimental and modeling study  

SciTech Connect

In this brief communication, we present new experimental species profile measurements for the low and intermediate temperature oxidation of ethanol under knock-prone conditions. These experiments show that ethanol exhibits no global low temperature reactivity at these conditions, although we note the heterogeneous decomposition of ethanol to ethylene and water. Similar behavior is reported for an E85 blend in n-heptane. Kinetic modeling results are presented to complement these experiments and elucidate the interaction of ethanol and primary reference fuels undergoing cooxidation. (author)

Haas, Francis M.; Chaos, Marcos; Dryer, Frederick L. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

275

Experimental investigation of H/sub 2/ combustion in the Sandia VGES intermediate-scale burn tank. [PWR; BWR  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories is presently involved in several NRC-sponsored experimental projects to provide data that will help quantify the threat of hydrogen combustion during LWR accidents. One project, which employs several experimental facilities: is the Variable Geometry Experimental System (VGES). The purpose of this paper is to present the experimental results from one of these facilities; the intermediate-scale burn tank (approx.5m/sup 3/). The data provided by this facility can be used in the development and assessment of analytical models used to predict hydrogen combustion behavior.

Benedick, W.B.; Cummings, J.C.; Berman, M.; Prassinos, P.G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Three MCS Cases Occurring in Different Synoptic Environments in the Sub-Sahelian Wet Zone during the 2002 West African Monsoon  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) occurring in the sub-Sahelian wet zone of West Africa are examined using observations from the 2002 Integrated Approach to the Efficient Management of Scarce Water Resources in West Africa (IMPETUS) field ...

Jon M. Schrage; Andreas H. Fink; Volker Ermert; Epiphane D. Ahlonsou

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Real-time NMR monitoring of intermediates and labile products of the bifunctional enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

time time NMR monitoring of intermediates and labile products of the bifunctional enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase Paul Guyett , John Glushka, Xiaogang Gu, Maor Bar-Peled * Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, and BioEnergy Science Center 315 Riverbend Rd., University of Georgia, Athens, GA 30602, United States a r t i c l e i n f o Article history: Received 11 February 2009 Received in revised form 17 March 2009 Accepted 23 March 2009 Available online 27 March 2009 Keywords: Apiose UDP-apiose UDP-xylose synthase NMR spectroscopy Stocsy a b s t r a c t The conversion of UDP-a-D-glucuronic acid to UDP-a-D-xylose and UDP-a-D-apiose by a bifunctional potato enzyme UDP-apiose/UDP-xylose synthase was studied using real-time nuclear magnetic reso- nance (NMR) spectroscopy. UDP-a-D-glucuronic acid is converted via the intermediate uridine 5 0 -b-L- threo-pentapyranosyl-4 00 -ulose

278

Oblique-incidence sputtering of Ru intermediate layer for decoupling of intergranular exchange in perpendicular recording media  

SciTech Connect

During the Ru deposition process for granular type perpendicular magnetic recording media, both a reduction in the Ru intermediate layer thickness and lowering of sputtering gas pressure were successfully achieved by focusing on a self-shadowing effect. Oblique-incidence sputtering with a 60 deg. incident angle under an Ar gas pressure of 0.6 Pa yielded (1) columnar Ru grains with a growth direction of 30 deg. from the film normal, (2) c-plane sheet texture by epitaxial growth on the Pt underlayer, and (3) a flat envelope of the surface and a deep gap at grain boundaries. This change in the Ru structure significantly contributes to reducing exchange coupling among magnetic grains, especially in the initial growth region in an overlying granular medium.

Saito, Shin; Inoue, Ken [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 Japan (Japan); Takahashi, Migaku [Department of Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-05, Aoba, Aramaki, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8579 (Japan); Center for Nanobioengineering and Spintronics, Chungnam National University, 220, Gung-Dong, Yuseong-Gu., Daejeon, 305-764 (Korea, Republic of)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Rigorous luminosity function determination in presence of a background: theory and application to two intermediate redshift clusters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a rigorous derivation of the luminosity function (LF) in presence of a background. Our approach is free from the logical contradictions of assigning negative values to positively defined quantities and avoid the use of incorrect estimates for the 68 % confidence interval (error bar). It accounts for Poisson fluctuations ignored in previous approaches and does not requires binning of the data. The method is extensible to more complex situations, does not require the existence of an environment--independent LF, and clarifies issues common to field LF derivations. We apply the method to two clusters of galaxies at intermediate redshift (z~0.3) with among the deepest and widest K_s observations ever taken. Finally, we point out short-comings of flip--flopping magnitudes.

S. Andreon; G. Punzi; A. Grado

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

280

Test of 6-inch-thick pressure vessels. Series 1: intermediate test vessels V-1 and V-2  

SciTech Connect

The intermediate vessel tests have been subdivided into four seriesi flaws in cylindrical vessels, A508, class 2 forging steel-two vessels; flaws in cylindrical vessels with longitudinal weld seams, A508, class 2 forging steel, submerged-arc welds-three vessels; flaws in cylindrical vessels wlth longitudinal weld seams, A533, grade B, class l plate steel, submerged-arc weld-two vessels; and cylindrical vessels with radially attached nozzles, vessels of A508, chass 2 forging steel and A533, grade B, class 1 plate steel; nozzle of A508 class 2 forging steel-three vessels. A comprehensive description of the pertinent factors considered in the design of the vessels is presented. Construction of the test facility and documentation of test results and fracture predictions are included. Emphasis is placed on providing the test results in such a manner that they form a resource for amy investigators interested in the problem of fracture. (auth)

Derby, R.W.; Merkle, J.G.; Robinson, G.C.; Whitman, G.D.; Witt, F.J.

1974-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Simultaneous maximum-likelihood reconstruction for x-ray grating based phase-contrast tomography avoiding intermediate phase retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Phase-wrapping artifacts, statistical image noise and the need for a minimum amount of phase steps per projection limit the practicability of x-ray grating based phase-contrast tomography, when using filtered back projection reconstruction. For conventional x-ray computed tomography, the use of statistical iterative reconstruction algorithms has successfully reduced artifacts and statistical issues. In this work, an iterative reconstruction method for grating based phase-contrast tomography is presented. The method avoids the intermediate retrieval of absorption, differential phase and dark field projections. It directly reconstructs tomographic cross sections from phase stepping projections by the use of a forward projecting imaging model and an appropriate likelihood function. The likelihood function is then maximized with an iterative algorithm. The presented method is tested with tomographic data obtained through a wave field simulation of grating based phase-contrast tomography. The reconstruction result...

Ritter, André; Durst, Jürgen; Gödel, Karl; Haas, Wilhelm; Michel, Thilo; Rieger, Jens; Weber, Thomas; Wucherer, Lukas; Anton, Gisela

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Development of a Raman spectroscopy technique to detect alternate transportation fuel hydrocarbon intermediates in complex combustion environments.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Spontaneous Raman spectra for important hydrocarbon fuels and combustion intermediates were recorded over a range of low-to-moderate flame temperatures using the multiscalar measurement facility located at Sandia/CA. Recorded spectra were extrapolated to higher flame temperatures and then converted into empirical spectral libraries that can readily be incorporated into existing post-processing analysis models that account for crosstalk from overlapping hydrocarbon channel signal. Performance testing of the developed libraries and reduction methods was conducted through an examination of results from well-characterized laminar reference flames, and was found to provide good agreement. The diagnostic development allows for temporally and spatially resolved flame measurements of speciated hydrocarbon concentrations whose parent is more chemically complex than methane. Such data are needed to validate increasingly complex flame simulations.

Ekoto, Isaac W.; Barlow, Robert S.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

97e Intermediate Temperature Catalytic Reforming of Bio-Oil for Distributed Hydrogen Production  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the world's energy demands rapidly increasing, it is necessary to look to sources other than fossil fuels, preferably those that minimize greenhouse emissions. One such renewable source of energy is biomass, which has the added advantage of being a near-term source of hydrogen. While there are several potential routes to produce hydrogen from biomass thermally, given the near-term technical barriers to hydrogen storage and delivery, distributed technologies such that hydrogen is produced at or near the point of use are attractive. One such route is to first produce bio-oil via fast pyrolysis of biomass close to its source to create a higher energy-density product, then ship this bio-oil to its point of use where it can be reformed to hydrogen and carbon dioxide. This route is especially well suited for smaller-scale reforming plants located at hydrogen distribution sites such as filling stations. There is also the potential for automated operation of the conversion system. A system has been developed for volatilizing bio-oil with manageable carbon deposits using ultrasonic atomization and by modifying bio-oil properties, such as viscosity, by blending or reacting bio-oil with methanol. Non-catalytic partial oxidation of bio-oil is then used to achieve significant conversion to CO with minimal aromatic hydrocarbon formation by keeping the temperature at 650 C or less and oxygen levels low. The non-catalytic reactions occur primarily in the gas phase. However, some nonvolatile components of bio-oil present as aerosols may react heterogeneously. The product gas is passed over a packed bed of precious metal catalyst where further reforming as well as water gas shift reactions are accomplished completing the conversion to hydrogen. The approach described above requires significantly lower catalyst loadings than conventional catalytic steam reforming due to the significant conversion in the non-catalytic step. The goal is to reform and selectively oxidize the bio-oil and catalyze the water gas shift reaction without catalyzing methanation or oxidation of CO and H{sub 2}, thus attaining equilibrium levels of H{sub 2}, CO, H{sub 2}O, and CO{sub 2} at the exit of the catalyst bed. Experimental Bio-oil (mixed with varied amounts of methanol to reduce the viscosity and homogenize the bio-oil) or selected bio-oil components are introduced at a measured flow rate through the top of a vertical quartz reactor which is heated using a five zone furnace. The ultrasonic nozzle used to feed the reactants allows the bio-oil to flow down the center of the reactor at a low, steady flow rate. Additionally, the fine mist created by the nozzle allows for intimate mixing with oxygen and efficient heat transfer, providing optimal conditions to achieve high conversion at relatively low temperatures in the non-catalytic step thus reducing the required catalyst loading. Generation of the fine mist is especially important for providing good contact between non-volatile bio-oil components and oxygen. Oxygen and helium are also delivered at the top of the reactor via mass flow meters with the amount of oxygen being varied to maximize the yields of H{sub 2} and CO and the amount of helium being adjusted such that the gas phase residence time in the hot zone is {approx}0.3 and {approx}0.45 s for bio-oil and methanol experiments, respectively. A catalyst bed can be located at the bottom of the reactor tube. To date, catalyst screening experiments have used Engelhard noble metal catalysts. The catalysts used for these experiments were 0.5 % rhodium, ruthenium, platinum, and palladium (all supported on alumina). Experiments were performed using pure alumina as well. Both the catalyst type and the effect of oxygen and steam on the residual hydrocarbons and accumulated carbon containing particulates were investigated. The residence time before the catalyst is varied to determine the importance of the non-catalytic step and its potential effect on the required catalyst loading. Non-catalytic experiments (primarily homogeneous cracking) use a bed of quartz p

Marda, J. R.; Dean, A. M.; Czernik, S.; Evans, R. J.; French, R.; Ratcliff, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Planetary Companions around Three Intermediate-Mass G and K Giants: 18 Del, xi Aql, and HD 81688  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report the detection of 3 new extrasolar planets from the precise Doppler survey of G and K giants at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. The host stars, namely, 18 Del (G6 III), xi Aql (K0 III) and HD 81688 (K0 III-IV), are located at the clump region on the HR diagram with estimated masses of 2.1-2.3 M_solar. 18 Del b has a minimum mass of 10.3 M_Jup and resides in a nearly circular orbit with period of 993 days, which is the longest one ever discovered around evolved stars. xi Aql b and HD 81688 b have minimum masses of 2.8 and 2.7 M_Jup, and reside in nearly circular orbits with periods of 137 and 184 days, respectively, which are the shortest ones among planets around evolved stars. All of the substellar companions ever discovered around possible intermediate-mass (1.7-3.9 M_solar) clump giants have semimajor axes larger than 0.68 AU, suggesting the lack of short-period planets. Our numerical calculations suggest that Jupiter-mass planets within about 0.5 AU (even up to 1 AU depending on the metallicity and adopted models) around 2-3 M_solar stars could be engulfed by the central stars at the tip of RGB due to tidal torque from the central stars. Assuming that most of the clump giants are post-RGB stars, we can not distinguish whether the lack of short-period planets is primordial or due to engulfment by central stars. Deriving reliable mass and evolutionary status for evolved stars is highly required for further investigation of formation and evolution of planetary systems around intermediate-mass stars.

Bun'ei Sato; Hideyuki Izumiura; Eri Toyota; Eiji Kambe; Masahiro Ikoma; Masashi Omiya; Seiji Masuda; Yoichi Takeda; Daisuke Murata; Yoichi Itoh; Hiroyasu Ando; Michitoshi Yoshida; Eiichiro Kokubo; Shigeru Ida

2008-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

285

Planetary Companions to Evolved Intermediate-Mass Stars: 14 Andromedae, 81 Ceti, 6 Lyncis, and HD 167042  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on the detection of four extrasolar planets orbiting evolved intermediate-mass stars from a precise Doppler survey of G and K giants at Okayama Astrophysical Observatory. All of the host stars are considered to be formerly early F-type or A-type dwarfs when they were on the main sequence. 14 And (K0 III) is a clump giant with a mass of 2.2 M_solar and has a planet of minimum mass m_2sin i=4.8 M_Jup in a nearly circular orbit with a 186 day period. This is one of the innermost planets around evolved intermediate-mass stars and such planets have only been discovered in clump giants. 81 Cet (G5 III) is a clump giant with 2.4 M_solar hosting a planet of m_2sin i=5.3 M_Jup in a 953 day orbit with an eccentricity of e=0.21. 6 Lyn (K0 IV) is a less evolved subgiant with 1.7 M_solar and has a planet of m_2sin i=2.4 M_Jup in a 899 day orbit with e=0.13. HD 167042 (K1 IV) is also a less evolved star with 1.5 M_solar hosting a planet of m_2sin i=1.6 M_Jup in a 418 day orbit with e=0.10. This planet was independently announced by Johnson et al. (2008, ApJ, 675, 784). All of the host stars have solar or sub-solar metallicity, which supports the lack of metal-rich tendency in planet-harboring giants in contrast to the case of dwarfs.

Bun'ei Sato; Eri Toyota; Masashi Omiya; Hideyuki Izumiura; Eiji Kambe; Seiji Masuda; Yoichi Takeda; Yoichi Itoh; Hiroyasu Ando; Michitoshi Yoshida; Eiichiro Kokubo; Shigeru Ida

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

286

The conquest of the nano-cosmos is occurring simultaneously in almost ev-ery field with a strong interdisciplinary and an increasing transdisciplinary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preface The conquest of the nano-cosmos is occurring simultaneously in almost ev- ery field, optical, magnetic, and (bio)chemical properties of materials are beginning to be mastered on a nano-scale. This enables the fabrication of devices that rely on effects on the nano-scale. For the creation

Grundmann, Marius

287

Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. [Annual] progress report, August 1, 1989--July 31, 1992  

SciTech Connect

Conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used to study the intermediates involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. These intermediates were excited state of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and species formed in reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern was the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes. (DLC)

Hoffman, M.Z.

1992-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

288

Belay: To secure or make fast a line. In-frequently used in the fishi ng industry.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or belayed m coils. Bilge: Area next to keel, under the engine or m the fishhold where waste water and oil accumulates. Some bilges have a sump at theIr lowest pomt from which the bilge pump draws when pumping out the bilges. (See SLImp.) Bilge pump: Centrifugal or displacement type pumps used to pump the vanous bilges

289

Rankine cycle energy conversion system design considerations for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources. Geothermal, waste heat, and solar thermal conversion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Design considerations are described for energy conversion systems for low and intermediate temperature sensible heat sources such as found in geothermal, waste heat, and solar-thermal applications. It is concluded that the most cost effective designs for the applications studied did not require the most efficient thermodynamic cycle, but that the efficiency of the energy conversion hardware can be a key factor.

Abbin, J.P. Jr.

1976-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

HOT BOTTOM BURNING IN INTERMEDIATE MASS STARS JOHN LATTANZIO 1;2 , CHERYL FROST 1;2 , ROBERT CANNON 2;3 , PETER WOOD 4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HOT BOTTOM BURNING IN INTERMEDIATE MASS STARS JOHN LATTANZIO 1;2 , CHERYL FROST 1;2 , ROBERT CANNON burning in the bottom of the convective envelope. We find strong CN cycling, with substantial Al include the recently discovered ``Hot Bottom Burning''. Hot Bottom Burning (hereafter HBB

Lattanzio, John

291

Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 1 BL3.199 Wake Modelling for intermediate and large wind farms Ole Rathmann1, 3 , Sten Frandsen1 , and Rebecca Barthelmie2, 1 1 Wind Energy to after the rotor) AT . #12;Paper BL3.199 EWEC 2007 Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition 2 Figure 1

292

High-Intensity and High-Density Charge-Exchange Injection Studies into the CERN PS Booster at Intermediate Energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

For the high brilliance LHC ultimate beam and the high intensity CNGS beam, single batch injections into the CERN Proton Synchrotron (PS) will be used to increase the overall machine intensity compared with the present double batch injections. Charge-exchange injection into the PS Booster with a new linac at intermediate energies is thus examined. A key parameter to consider is the energy dependence of beam incoherent tune shifts at injection. Increasing the linac energy from the present 50 MeV to 160 MeV should yield a safer tune shift. For each PS Booster ring, a charge-exchange injection scheme is envisaged inside a proper straight section, redesigned with new bends to make a local bump and using the existing fast bump magnets for horizontal phase-space painting. ACCSIM simulations for charge-exchange injection at 160 MeV have been investigated for both LHC and CNGS beams. After optimizing the parameters that are used for the space charge tracking routines, the results of the simulations agree well with ex...

Martini, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Superheater/intermediate temperature airheater tube corrosion tests in the MHD Coal Fired Flow Facility (Eastern Coal Phase)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Corrosion data have been obtained for tub is exposed for 1500--2000 hours in a proof-of-concept magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) power generation test facility to conditions representative of superheater and intermediate temperature air heater (ITAH) components. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}-rich deposits, were corroded more than in most pulverized coal fired superheater service, but much less than the highly aggressive liquid phase attack encountered in conventional plants with certain coals and temperatures. Results indicated that, with parabolic corrosion kinetics, type 310 and 253MA stainless steels should be usable to 1400F at hot end of ITAH. At final superheater temperatures, 2.25 and 5 Cr steels were indicated to have parabolic corrosion rates generally below a 0.5 mm/yr criterion, based on corrosion scale thickness. However, unknown amounts of scale loss from spallation made this determination uncertain. Stainless steels 304H, 316H, and 321H had parabolic rates variably above the criterion, but may be servicable under less cyclic conditions. Corrosion rates derived from scale thickness and intergranular corrosion depth measurements are reported, along with scale morphologies and compositions. Implications of results on commercial MHD utilization of the alloys are discussed, as well as the indicated need for more corrosion resistant alloys or coatings under the most severe exposure conditions.

White, M.K.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Proton conductivity of CsH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}WPA composites at intermediate temperatures  

SciTech Connect

CsH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}6H{sub 2}O (WPA6H{sub 2}O) were mechanically milled by using planetary ball mill to obtain xCsH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}--(1-x)WPA6H{sub 2}O(%mol) composites. Characterizations of the composites indicate that there were changes of structure of CsH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}WPA composite after mechanical milling. {sup 1}H MAS NMR measurements suggested a hydrogen bond was newly developed between CsH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} and WPA which correlated with conductivity of the composites. 95CsH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}5WPA shows the highest conductivity at 70-170 deg. C range of temperature. The mechanical milling succeed to increase the conductivity under non-humidified atmosphere and intermediate temperature.

Insani, Evan Kamaratul [Department of Material Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Department of Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, West Java 40132 (Indonesia); Nguyen, Van H.; Kawamura, Go; Hamagami, Jun-ichi; Sakai, Mototsugu; Matsuda, Atsunori [Department of Material Science, Toyohashi University of Technology, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan); Yuliarto, Brian [Department of Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung, Bandung, West Java 40132 (Indonesia)

2010-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

295

COMBINED EFFECTS OF BINARIES AND STELLAR ROTATION ON THE COLOR-MAGNITUDE DIAGRAMS OF INTERMEDIATE-AGE STAR CLUSTERS  

SciTech Connect

About 70% of intermediate-age star clusters in the Large Magellanic Clouds have been confirmed to have broad main sequence, multiple or extended turnoffs, and dual red giant clumps. The observed result seems to be at odds with the classical idea that such clusters are simple stellar populations. Although many models have been used to explain the results via factors such as prolonged star formation history, metallicity spread, differential reddening, selection effect, observational uncertainty, stellar rotation, and binary interaction, the reason for the special color-magnitude diagrams is still uncertain. We revisit this question via the combination of stellar rotation and binary effects. As a result, it shows 'golf club' color-magnitude diagrams with broad or multiple turnoffs, dual red clumps, blue stragglers, red stragglers, and extended main sequences. Because both binaries and massive rotators are common, our result suggests that most color-magnitude diagrams, including extended turnoff or multiple turnoffs, can be explained using simple stellar populations including both binary and stellar rotation effects, or composite populations with two components.

Li Zhongmu; Mao Caiyan; Chen Li; Zhang Qian, E-mail: zhongmu.li@gmail.com [Institute for Astronomy and History of Science and Technology, Dali University, Dali 671003 (China)

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

296

Signal and background in NLO QCD for the search of the intermediate mass Higgs boson at the SSC  

SciTech Connect

The signal and background for the search of the Standard Model Higgs boson in the intermediate mass range 80 GeV < m{sub H} < 2M{sub Z} is studied based on calculations of the cross sections in next-to-leading order QCD perturbation theory for the production of the Higgs boson via gluon-gluon fusion and for the hadronic two-photon production. The method of Monte-Carlo integration allows the application of realistic cuts (p{sub T}, rapidity, photon isolation) to the cross section. Results are given for the K-factors of the signal and the background. It turns out that the NLO corrections improve the situation for a Higgs boson mass in the range of 80--120 GeV. Furthermore, the influence of a cut on the transverse momentum of the additional jet produced in the processes gg {yields} Hg, gq {yields} Hq, q{bar q} {yields} Hg is compared to a similar cut for the background.

Bailey, B. [Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL (United States). Dept. of Physics; Graudenz, D. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1993-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Induction of nuclear factor kB after low-dose ionizing radiation involves a reactive oxygen intermediate signaling pathway  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reactive oxygen intermediates (ROIs) have been found to be the messengers in the activation of the kB transcription regulator in mitogen- or cytokine-stimulated cells, operating in conjunction with or independently of various other mechanisms; these include Ca{sup ++}-dependent and PKC-dependent cytoplasmic signaling pathways. We have recently reported that low-dose ionizing radiation induces NF-kB in human lymphoblastoid 244B cells. Since ionizing radiation generates free radicals in cells, we have investigated whether the ROIs generated by ionizing radiation induce NF-kB activity, and also whether they do so by a similar mechanism as in cells treated with PMA or H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. The results not only confirm a previous observation from our laboratory that low-dose ionizing radiation (0.1-2.0 Gy) activates kB transcription factor transiently with a maximal induction at 0.5 Gy exposure, but also demonstrate mechanistically that the activation of NF-kB by low-dose ionizing radiation can be inhibited considerably by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine, indicating that at least the major part of the activation process is mediated by ROIs. These findings support the idea that ROIs can regulate the kB elements which in turn can serve as response elements for oxidant stress. 37 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

Mohan, N.; Meltz, M.L. [Univ. of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Intermediate-scale, semicontinuous solid-phase fermentation process for production of fuel ethanol from sweet sorghum. [Saccharomyces cerevisiae  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel, semicontinuous solid-phase fermentation system was used to produce fuel ethanol from sweet sorghum. The process was at an intermediate scale. In the process, dried and shredded sweet sorghum was rehydrated to 70% moisture, acidified to pH 2.0 to 3.0, and either pasteurized (12 h at 70 to 80/sup 0/C) or not pasteurized before spray inoculation with a broth culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Fermented pulp exited the semicontinuous fermentor after a retention time of 72 h and contained approximately 6% (vol/vol) ethanol. Ethanol yields from dry sweet sorghum were 176 to 179 liters/10/sup 3/kg (85% of theoretical). Production costs for a greatly scaled-up (x1400) conceptual version of this system were projected by calculation to average $0.47/liter for 95% ethanol. The calculated energy balance (energy output/energy input ratio) was estimated to be 1.05 when pasteurization was included and 1.31 when pasteurization was omitted. In calculating the energy balances, the output energy of the protein feed byproduct and the input energy for growing the sweet sorghum were not considered. A design for the scaled-up plant (farm scale) is provided.

Gibbons, W.R.; Westby, C.A.; Dobbs, T.L.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

West Texas Intermediate  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2 of 19 2 of 19 Notes: World oil prices have nearly tripled from their low point in December 1998 to August this year, pulling product prices up as well. But crude prices are expected to show a gradual decline as increased oil production from OPEC and others enters the world oil market. We expect to see some decline over the next two months as prices are expected to end the year at about $30 per barrel. The average price of WTI was almost $30 per barrel in March, but dropped to $26 in April as the market responded to the additional OPEC production. However, prices strengthened again, averaging $30-$32 in July through August. In September, prices increased again to nearly $34, but then decreased to $33 in October. These crude oil price projections reflect: Fairly low world demand growth during 2000 of 1.5 percent, or 1.1 million

300

INTERMEDIATE PHASES INVOLVING SCANDIUM  

SciTech Connect

The existence of several new intermetallic compounds of the Sc/sub 2/B and ScB stoichiometries, where B is from group VIII or IB of the periodic table, is reported along with their structures and lattice parameters. The Sc/sub 2/B compounds include Sc/sub 2/Ni, Sc/sub 2/Pd, Sc/sub 2/Co, and Sc/sub 2/Au, while the ScB compounds are ScCo, ScNi, ScCu, ScRu, ScRh, ScPd, ScAg, ScIr, ScPt, and ScAu, all of the ordered bcc CsCl structure. The trends in a plot of lattice contractions of the ScB compounds are discussed. (D.L.C.)

Aldred, A.T.

1962-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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301

intermediate-scale experiments  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The project is a collaborative task with a larger project headed by Jack Istok at Oregon State University, which is conducted under the same title. The project was conceptualized as follows. A ''geochemical'' model of microbial communities was hypothesized, in which microbes were characterized as mineral species according to the chemical transformations they used for metabolic function. The iron-reducing bacteria, for example, would be represented by the iron reducing chemical reaction, including a specific electron donor, the fraction of the consumed donor used for biomass maintenance or growth, and a free energy for the reaction. The pseudomineral species would then be included in a standard geochemical model, and community succession could be calculated according to the thermodynamically favored microbially mediated reactions under progressive consumption of electron donors and receptors, and evolving geochemical conditions. The project includes relatively minor participation by the University of Oklahoma and Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, with the major component at OSU. The PNNL project was funded to provide assistance to Dr. Istok in formulating the appropriate modeling approach and geochemical constraints on the modeling effort.

McKinley, James P.; Liu, Chongxuan; Istok, Jack; Krumholz, Lee

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

/sup 14/CO/sub 2/ incorporation into C/sub 4/ acids by leaves of the C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ intermediate species, Moricandia arvensis and Panicum milioides, at Gamma-levels of CO/sub 2/  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The crucifer M. arvensis is a species with photorespiratory characteristics intermediate between C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ plants. Although the precise mechanism promoting decreased photorespiration has yet to be elucidated, evidence to date disfavors participation of C/sub 4/ metabolism. In order to conclusively assess the possible contribution, if any, of limited C/sub 4/ metabolism to the reduction of photorespiration, detached leaves of M. arvensis and M. moricandioides (C/sub 3/) were labeled with /sup 14/CO/sub 2/. When M. arvensis was illuminated and pulsed for 10 s the amount of label in malate increased from 4.5% of total soluble dpm fixed at 21% O/sub 2/ and 340 ..mu..l/l CO/sub 2/ to 10.3% at 20 ..mu..l/l. A two-fold increase was also evident for aspartate (from 2.9% to 6.5%). The C/sub 3/ Moricandia species failed to show a similar response to decreased CO/sub 2/. The physiological significance of the increase in C/sub 4/ acid-labeling which occurred in the intermediate species will be investigated by pulse-chase analyses of C/sub 4/ acids and glycine. Similar data for Panicum milioides (C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/) will also be presented.

Chastain, C.J.; Chollet, R.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Superheater/intermediate temperature air heater tube corrosion tests in the MHD coal fired flow facility (Montana Rosebud POC tests)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nineteen alloys have been exposed for approximately 1000 test hours as candidate superheater and intermediate temperature air heater tubes in a U.S. DOE facility dedicated to demonstrating Proof of Concept for the bottoming or heat and seed recovery portion of coal fired magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) electrical power generating plants. Corrosion data have been obtained from a test series utilizing a western United States sub-bituminous coal, Montana Rosebud. The test alloys included a broad range of compositions ranging from carbon steel to austenitic stainless steels to high chromium nickel-base alloys. The tubes, coated with K{sub 2}SO-containing deposits, developed principally, oxide scales by an oxidation/sulfidation mechanism. In addition to being generally porous, these scales were frequently spalled and/or non-compact due to a dispersed form of outward growth by oxide precipitation in the adjacent deposit. Austenitic alloys generally had internal penetration as trans Tranular and/or intergranular oxides and sulfides. While only two of the alloys had damage visible without magnification as a result of the relatively short exposure, there was some concern about Iona-term corrosion performance owing to the relatively poor quality scales formed. Comparison of data from these tests to those from a prior series of tests with Illinois No. 6, a high sulfur bituminous coal, showed less corrosion in the present test series with the lower sulfur coal. Although K{sub 2}SO{sub 4}was the principal corrosive agent as the supplier of sulfur, which acted to degrade alloy surface scales, tying up sulfur as K{sub 2}SO{sub 4} prevented the occurrence of complex alkali iron trisulfates responsible for severe or catastrophic corrosion in conventional power plants with certain coals and metal temperatures.

White, M.

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Engineering Analysis of Intermediate Loop and Process Heat Exchanger Requirements to Include Configuration Analysis and Materials Needs  

SciTech Connect

The need to locate advanced hydrogen production facilities a finite distance away from a nuclear power source necessitates the need for an intermediate heat transport loop (IHTL). This IHTL must not only efficiently transport energy over distances up to 500 meters but must also be capable of operating at high temperatures (>850oC) for many years. High temperature, long term operation raises concerns of material strength, creep resistance and general material stability (corrosion resistance). IHTL design is currently in the initial stages. Many questions remain to be answered before intelligent design can begin. The report begins to look at some of the issues surrounding the main components of an IHTL. Specifically, a stress analysis of a compact heat exchanger design under expected operating conditions is reported. Also the results of a thermal analysis performed on two ITHL pipe configurations for different heat transport fluids are presented. The configurations consist of separate hot supply and cold return legs as well as annular design in which the hot fluid is carried in an inner pipe and the cold return fluids travels in the opposite direction in the annular space around the hot pipe. The effects of insulation configurations on pipe configuration performance are also reported. Finally, a simple analysis of two different process heat exchanger designs, one a tube in shell type and the other a compact or microchannel reactor are evaluated in light of catalyst requirements. Important insights into the critical areas of research and development are gained from these analyses, guiding the direction of future areas of research.

T.M. Lillo; R.L. Williamson; T.R. Reed; C.B. Davis; D.M. Ginosar

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Search for a signal on intermediate baryon systems formation in hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions at high energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have analyzed the behavior of different characteristics of hadron-nuclear and nuclear-nuclear interactions as a function of centrality to get a signal on the formation of intermediate baryon systems. We observed that the data demonstrate the regime change and saturation. The angular distributions of slow particles exhibit some structure in the above mentioned reactions at low energy. We believe that the structure could be connected with the formation and decay of the percolation cluster. With increasing the mass of colliding nuclei, the structure starts to become weak and almost disappears ultimately. This shows that the number of secondary internuclear interactions increases with increasing the mass of the colliding nuclei. The latter could be a reason of the disintegration of any intermediate formations as well as clusters, which decrease their influence on the angular distribution of the emitted particles.

Y. H. Huseynaliyev; M. K. Suleymanov; E. U. Khan; A. Kravchakova; S. Vokal

2007-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

306

Study of intermediates from transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. Progress report, August 1, 1989--December 31, 1991  

SciTech Connect

During this period, conventional and fast-kinetics techniques of photochemistry, photophysics, radiation chemistry, and electrochemistry were used for the characterization of the intermediates that are involved in transition metal excited-state electron-transfer reactions. The intermediates of interest were the excited states of Ru(II) and Cr(III) photosensitizers, their reduced forms, and the species formed in the reactions of redox quenchers and electron-transfer agents. Of particular concern has been the back electron-transfer reaction between the geminate pair formed in the redox quenching of the photosensitizers, and the dependence of its rate on solution medium and temperature in competition with transformation and cage escape processes.

Hoffman, M.Z.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

307

Does Local Recurrence of Prostate Cancer After Radiation Therapy Occur at the Site of Primary Tumor? Results of a Longitudinal MRI and MRSI Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine if local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation therapy occurs at the same site as the primary tumor before treatment, using longitudinal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging to assess dominant tumor location. Methods and Materials: This retrospective study was HIPAA compliant and approved by our Committee on Human Research. We identified all patients in our institutional prostate cancer database (1996 onward) who underwent endorectal MR imaging and MR spectroscopic imaging before radiotherapy for biopsy-proven prostate cancer and again at least 2 years after radiotherapy (n = 124). Two radiologists recorded the presence, location, and size of unequivocal dominant tumor on pre- and postradiotherapy scans. Recurrent tumor was considered to be at the same location as the baseline tumor if at least 50% of the tumor location overlapped. Clinical and biopsy data were collected from all patients. Results: Nine patients had unequivocal dominant tumor on both pre- and postradiotherapy imaging, with mean pre- and postradiotherapy dominant tumor diameters of 1.8 cm (range, 1-2.2) and 1.9 cm (range, 1.4-2.6), respectively. The median follow-up interval was 7.3 years (range, 2.7-10.8). Dominant recurrent tumor was at the same location as dominant baseline tumor in 8 of 9 patients (89%). Conclusions: Local recurrence of prostate cancer after radiation usually occurs at the same site as the dominant primary tumor at baseline, suggesting supplementary focal therapy aimed at enhancing local tumor control would be a rational addition to management.

Arrayeh, Elnasif; Westphalen, Antonio C. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Kurhanewicz, John [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Jung, Adam J. [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Carroll, Peter R. [Department of Urology, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Coakley, Fergus V., E-mail: fergus.coakley@radiology.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, University of California San Francisco, California (United States); Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of California San Francisco, California (United States)

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Methods of forming single source precursors, methods of forming polymeric single source precursors, and single source precursors and intermediate products formed by such methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods of forming single source precursors (SSPs) include forming intermediate products having the empirical formula 1/2{L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'X.sub.2}.sub.2, and reacting MER with the intermediate products to form SSPs of the formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2, wherein L is a Lewis base, M is a Group IA atom, N is a Group IB atom, M' is a Group IIIB atom, each E is a Group VIB atom, each X is a Group VIIA atom or a nitrate group, and each R group is an alkyl, aryl, vinyl, (per)fluoro alkyl, (per)fluoro aryl, silane, or carbamato group. Methods of forming polymeric or copolymeric SSPs include reacting at least one of HE.sup.1R.sup.1E.sup.1H and MER with one or more substances having the empirical formula L.sub.2N(.mu.-ER).sub.2M'(ER).sub.2 or L.sub.2N(.mu.-X).sub.2M'(X).sub.2 to form a polymeric or copolymeric SSP. New SSPs and intermediate products are formed by such methods.

Fox, Robert V.; Rodriguez, Rene G.; Pak, Joshua J.; Sun, Chivin; Margulieux, Kelsey R.; Holland, Andrew W.

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

309

Study of the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow?_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}?^{+}?^{-}$ and its intermediate states  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the decay $\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$, reconstructing the \\Lambda_{c}^{+} baryon in the $p K^{-}\\pi^{+}$ mode, using a data sample of $467\\times 10^{6}$ $B\\bar{B}$ pairs collected with the BaBar detector at the PEP-2 storage rings at SLAC. We measure branching fractions for decays with intermediate $\\Sigma_{c}$ baryons to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(21.3 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 1.0 \\pm 5.5) \\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{++}\\bar{p}\\pi^{-}]=(11.5\\pm 1.0 \\pm 0.5 \\pm 3.0)\\times 10^{-5}$, ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2455)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]=(9.1 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.4 \\pm 2.4)\\times10^{-5}$, and ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Sigma_{c}(2520)^{0}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}]= (2.2 \\pm 0.7 \\pm 0.1\\pm 0.6) \\times 10^{-5}$, where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic, and due to the uncertainty on the $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\rightarrow\\proton\\Km\\pi^{+}$ branching fraction, respectively. For decays without $\\Sigma_{c}(2455)$ or $\\Sigma_{c}(2520)$ resonances, we measure ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{non-\\Sigma_{c}}}=(79 \\pm 4 \\pm 4 \\pm 20)\\times10^{-5}$. The total branching fraction is determined to be ${\\cal B}[\\bar{B}^{0}\\rightarrow\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}]_{\\mathrm{total}}=(123 \\pm 5 \\pm 7 \\pm 32)\\times10^{-5}$. We examine multibody mass combinations in the resonant three-particle $\\Sigma_{c}\\bar{p}\\pi$ final states and in the four-particle $\\Lambda_{c}^{+}\\bar{p}\\pi^{+}\\pi^{-}$ final state, and observe different characteristics for the $\\bar{p}\\pi$ combination in neutral versus doubly-charged $\\Sigma_{c}$ decays.

The Babar Collaboration; J. P. Lees; V. Poireau; V. Tisserand; E. Grauges; A. Palano; G. Eigen; B. Stugu; D. N. Brown; L. T. Kerth; Yu. G. Kolomensky; G. Lynch; H. Koch; T. Schroeder; D. J. Asgeirsson; C. Hearty; T. S. Mattison; J. A. McKenna; R. Y. So; A. Khan; V. E. Blinov; A. R. Buzykaev; V. P. Druzhinin; V. B. Golubev; E. A. Kravchenko; A. P. Onuchin; S. I. Serednyakov; Yu. I. Skovpen; E. P. Solodov; K. Yu. Todyshev; A. N. Yushkov; D. Kirkby; A. J. Lankford; M. Mandelkern; H. Atmacan; J. W. Gary; O. Long; G. M. Vitug; C. Campagnari; T. M. Hong; D. Kovalskyi; J. D. Richman; C. A. West; A. M. Eisner; J. Kroseberg; W. S. Lockman; A. J. Martinez; B. A. Schumm; A. Seiden; D. S. Chao; C. H. Cheng; B. Echenard; K. T. Flood; D. G. Hitlin; P. Ongmongkolkul; F. C. Porter; A. Y. Rakitin; R. Andreassen; Z. Huard; B. T. Meadows; M. D. Sokoloff; L. Sun; P. C. Bloom; W. T. Ford; A. Gaz; U. Nauenberg; J. G. Smith; S. R. Wagner; R. Ayad; W. H. Toki; B. Spaan; K. R. Schubert; R. Schwierz; D. Bernard; M. Verderi; P. J. Clark; S. Playfer; D. Bettoni; C. Bozzi; R. Calabrese; G. Cibinetto; E. Fioravanti; I. Garzia; E. Luppi; L. Piemontese; V. Santoro; R. Baldini-Ferroli; A. Calcaterra; R. de Sangro; G. Finocchiaro; P. Patteri; I. M. Peruzzi; M. Piccolo; M. Rama; A. Zallo; R. Contri; E. Guido; M. Lo Vetere; M. R. Monge; S. Passaggio; C. Patrignani; E. Robutti; B. Bhuyan; V. Prasad; M. Morii; A. Adametz; U. Uwer; H. M. Lacker; T. Lueck; P. D. Dauncey; U. Mallik; C. Chen; J. Cochran; W. T. Meyer; S. Prell; A. E. Rubin; A. V. Gritsan; N. Arnaud; M. Davier; D. Derkach; G. Grosdidier; F. Le Diberder; A. M. Lutz; B. Malaescu; P. Roudeau; M. H. Schune; A. Stocchi; G. Wormser; D. J. Lange; D. M. Wright; C. A. Chavez; J. P. Coleman; J. R. Fry; E. Gabathuler; D. E. Hutchcroft; D. J. Payne; C. Touramanis; A. J. Bevan; F. Di Lodovico; R. Sacco; M. Sigamani; G. Cowan; D. N. Brown; C. L. Davis; A. G. Denig; M. Fritsch; W. Gradl; K. Griessinger; A. Hafner; E. Prencipe; R. J. Barlow; G. Jackson; G. D. Lafferty; E. Behn; R. Cenci; B. Hamilton; A. Jawahery; D. A. Roberts; C. Dallapiccola; R. Cowan; D. Dujmic; G. Sciolla; R. Cheaib; D. Lindemann; P. M. Patel; S. H. Robertson; P. Biassoni; N. Neri; F. Palombo; S. Stracka; L. Cremaldi; R. Godang; R. Kroeger; P. Sonnek; D. J. Summers; X. Nguyen; M. Simard; P. Taras; G. De Nardo; D. Monorchio; G. Onorato; C. Sciacca; M. Martinelli; G. Raven; C. P. Jessop; J. M. LoSecco; W. F. Wang; K. Honscheid; R. Kass; J. Brau; R. Frey; N. B. Sinev; D. Strom; E. Torrence; E. Feltresi; N. Gagliardi; M. Margoni; M. Morandin; M. Posocco; M. Rotondo; G. Simi; F. Simonetto; R. Stroili; S. Akar; E. Ben-Haim; M. Bomben; G. R. Bonneaud; H. Briand; G. Calderini; J. Chauveau; O. Hamon; Ph. Leruste; G. Marchiori; J. Ocariz; S. Sitt; M. Biasini; E. Manoni; S. Pacetti; A. Rossi; C. Angelini; G. Batignani; S. Bettarini; M. Carpinelli; G. Casarosa; A. Cervelli; F. Forti; M. A. Giorgi; A. Lusiani; B. Oberhof; A. Perez; G. Rizzo; J. J. Walsh; D. Lopes Pegna; J. Olsen; A. J. S. Smith; F. Anulli; R. Faccini; F. Ferrarotto; F. Ferroni; M. Gaspero; L. Li Gioi; M. A. Mazzoni; G. Piredda; C. Bünger; O. Grünberg; T. Hartmann; T. Leddig; H. Schröder; C. Voß; R. Waldi; T. Adye; E. O. Olaiya; F. F. Wilson; S. Emery; G. Hamel de Monchenault; G. Vasseur; Ch. Y\\`; D. Aston; R. Bartoldus; J. F. Benitez; C. Cartaro; M. R. Convery; J. Dorfan; G. P. Dubois-Felsmann; W. Dunwoodie; M. Ebert; R. C. Field; M. Franco Sevilla; B. G. Fulsom; A. M. Gabareen; M. T. Graham; P. Grenier; C. Hast; W. R. Innes; M. H. Kelsey; P. Kim; M. L. Kocian; D. W. G. S. Leith; P. Lewis; B. Lindquist; S. Luitz; V. Luth; H. L. Lynch; D. B. MacFarlane; D. R. Muller; H. Neal; S. Nelson; M. Perl; T. Pulliam; B. N. Ratcliff; A. Roodman; A. A. Salnikov; R. H. Schindler; A. Snyder; D. Su; M. K. Sullivan; J. Va'vra; A. P. Wagner; W. J. Wisniewski; M. Wittgen; D. H. Wright; H. W. Wulsin; C. C. Young; V. Ziegler; W. Park; M. V. Purohit; R. M. White; J. R. Wilson; A. Randle-Conde; S. J. Sekula; M. Bellis; P. R. Burchat; T. S. Miyashita; E. M. T. Puccio; M. S. Alam; J. A. Ernst; R. Gorodeisky; N. Guttman; D. R. Peimer; A. Soffer; S. M. Spanier; J. L. Ritchie; A. M. Ruland; R. F. Schwitters; B. C. Wray; J. M. Izen; X. C. Lou; F. Bianchi; D. Gamba; S. Zambito; L. Lanceri; L. Vitale; F. Martinez-Vidal; A. Oyanguren; P. Villanueva-Perez; H. Ahmed; J. Albert; Sw. Banerjee; F. U. Bernlochner; H. H. F. Choi; G. J. King; R. Kowalewski; M. J. Lewczuk; I. M. Nugent; J. M. Roney; R. J. Sobie; N. Tasneem; T. J. Gershon; P. F. Harrison; T. E. Latham; H. R. Band; S. Dasu; Y. Pan; R. Prepost; S. L. Wu

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

TUBE-TO-TUBESHEET WELDING DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS FOR 30 MEGAWATT PROTOTYPE SODIUM INTERMEDIATE HEAT EXCHANGER AND STEAM GENERATOR  

SciTech Connect

Special welding techniques for joining Inconel weld overlays on type 316 stainless steel tubesheets and channels are described. The program for the development of the required welding procadures are divided into three specific progranns: overlaying Inconel filler Metal 82 on type 316 stainless steel, welding type 316 stainless steel tubes to a type 316 stainless steel tubesheet, and welding Inconel-type 316 stainless steel composite tubes to Inconel weld overlaid type 316 tubesheets. Shock tests are described which attempt to assimulate the most drastic thermal transient that could occur in both units and to evaluate the effect of the resulting stresses on the Inconel overlay and the tube-totubesheet welds. (N.W.R.)

1963-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gas-phase chemistry during the conversion of cyclohexane to carbon: Flow reactor studies at low and intermediate pressure  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The gas-phase branching during the conversion of cyclohexane to solid carbon has been measured in a high-temperature-flow reactor. The experiments show that cyclohexane decomposes into a broad distribution of hydrocarbons that further decompose into the more kinetically stable products hydrogen, methane, acetylene, ethylene, benzene, and PAH. At 1363 K, the evolution to these species occurs quickly. We also observe the buildup of significant amounts of aromatic molecules at later stages in the decomposition, with as much as 15% of the total carbon in PAH and 25% in benzene. At later stages, the gas-phase molecules react slowly, even though the system is not at equilibrium, because of their kinetic stability and the smaller radical pool. The decomposition does not appear to depend sensitively on pressure in the regime of 25 to 250 torr. Thus, to a first approximation, these results can be extrapolated to atmospheric pressure.

Osterheld, T.H.; Allendorf, M.D.; Larson, R.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Biochemical Control With Radiotherapy Improves Overall Survival in Intermediate and High-Risk Prostate Cancer Patients Who Have an Estimated 10-Year Overall Survival of >90%  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To identify subgroups of patients with carcinoma of the prostate treated with radical radiotherapy that have improved overall survival when disease is biochemically controlled. Methods and Materials: A cohort of 1,060 prostate cancer patients treated with radical radiotherapy was divided into nine subgroups based on National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk category and estimated 10-year overall survival (eOS 10y) derived from the age adjusted Charlson Comorbidity Index. Patients with and without biochemical control were compared with respect to overall survival. Actuarial estimates of overall survival were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models were used for analysis of overall survival. Results: Median follow-up was 125 months (range, 51-176 months). Only the subgroups with high or intermediate risk disease and an eOS 10y of >90% had a statistically significantly improved overall survival when prostate cancer was biochemically controlled. In all other groups, biochemical control made no significant difference to overall survival. In the subgroup with high-risk disease and eOS 10y >90%, actuarial overall survival was 86.3% (95% confidence interval [CI] 78.5%-94.1%) and 62.1% (95% CI 52.9%-71.3%) for patients with biochemical control and biochemical relapse respectively (p = 0.002). In the intermediate risk group with eOS >90%, actuarial overall survival was 95.3% (95% CI 89.0%-100%) and 79.8% (95% CI 68.0%-91.6%) for biochemically controlled and biochemically relapsed patients (p = 0.033). On multivariate analysis, National Comprehensive Cancer Network risk group (p = 0.005), biochemical control (p = 0.033) and eOS 10y (p < 0.001) were statistically significant. Conclusion: Biochemical control translates into improved overall survival in patients with high or intermediate risk disease and an estimated 10-year overall survival of >90%.

Herbert, Christopher, E-mail: cherbert@bccancer.bc.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Liu, Mitchell; Tyldesley, Scott; Morris, W. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Joffres, Michel [Department of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University, Surrey, BC (Canada); Khaira, Mandip; Kwan, Winkle [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Fraser Valley Centre, Surrey, BC (Canada); Moiseenko, Vitali [Department of Medical Physics, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada); Pickles, Thomas [Department of Radiation Oncology, British Columbia Cancer Agency, Vancouver Centre, Vancouver, BC (Canada)

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The nature and alternate rates of the ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) oxygenation intermediate  

SciTech Connect

Mutant ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) were employed to investigate the partitioning of carbon flow between photosynthesis or photorespiration. Previous functional and structural studies implicate active site Lys329 and Glu48 or R. rubrum RuBp in promoting addition of CO2 to the RuBP-enediol. Two novel O2-dependent side products generated by the K329A and E49Q mutants provided insight into RuBP oxygenase intermediate and roles of Lys329 and Glu48 in oxygenation.

Harpel, M.R.; Chen, Yuh-Ru; Hartman, F.C.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

314

Novel passive approach to protecting the primary containment barrier formed by the intermediate heat exchanger from the effects of an uncontrolled sodium water reaction  

SciTech Connect

This patent describes, in a steam generator utilized with a liquid sodium cooled nuclear reactor, provision is made to vent the violent sodium water reaction emanating from a tube rupture casualty. The steam generator includes a sodium plenum at the bottom thereof containing a conventional rupture disk for venting sodium, steam, and reaction products including hydrogen immediately upon a tube rupture casualty. The invention includes providing an alternative concentric flow path interior to the steam generator and parallel to the tube bundle. This alternative concentric flow path extends from the upper portion of the steam generator down into the lower head or plenum adjacent to the pressure relief diaphragm. This alternate path is partially filled with sodium during normal reactor operation. In the event of a tube bundle break, the alternative flow path dumps its sodium through the conventional rupture disk and then provides an immediate alternate pressure release path in parallel with the tube bundle for steam and water flow from the tube rupture site to the rupture disk. This parallel flow path reduces the pressure differential from the water/steam flow through the tube bundle such that water/steam does not flow back through the intermediate heat transport system to the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) where it would react with residual sodium and potentially damage the IHX tube bundle which is part of the reactor primary containment barrier.

Boardman, C.E.; Maurer, J.P.

1991-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

315

Splitting a C-O bond in dialkylethers with bis(1,2,4-tri-t-butylcyclopentadienyl) cerium-hydride does not occur by a sigma-bond metathesis pathway: a combined experimental and DFT computational study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Addition of diethylether to [1,2,4(Me3C)3C5H2]2CeH, abbreviated Cp'2CeH, gives Cp'2CeOEt and ethane. Similarly, di-n-propyl- or di-n-butylether gives Cp'2Ce(O-n-Pr) and propane or Cp'2Ce(O-n-Bu) and butane, respectively. Using Cp'2CeD, the propane and butane contain deuterium predominantly in their methyl groups. Mechanisms, formulated on the basis of DFT computational studies, show that the reactions begin by an alpha or beta-CH activation with comparable activation barriers but only the beta-CH activation intermediate evolves into the alkoxide product and an olefin. The olefin then inserts into the Ce-H bond forming the alkyl derivative, Cp'2CeR, that eliminates alkane. The alpha-CH activation intermediate is in equilibrium with the starting reagents, Cp'2CeH and the ether, which accounts for the deuterium label in the methyl groups of the alkane. The one-step sigma-bond metathesis mechanism has a much higher activation barrier than either of the two-step mechanisms.

Werkema, Evan; Yahia, Ahmed; Maron, Laurent; Eisenstein, Odile; Andersen, Richard

2010-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

316

Caught in the Act: The 1.5 Å Resolution Crystal Structures of the HIV-1 Protease and the I54V Mutant Reveal a Tetrahedral Reaction Intermediate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

HIV-1 protease (PR) is the target for several important antiviral drugs used in AIDS therapy. The drugs bind inside the active site cavity of PR where normally the viral polyprotein substrate is bound and hydrolyzed. We report two high-resolution crystal structures of wild-type PR (PR{sub WT}) and the multi-drug-resistant variant with the I54V mutation (PR{sub I54V}) in complex with a peptide at 1.46 and 1.50 {angstrom} resolution, respectively. The peptide forms a gem-diol tetrahedral reaction intermediate (TI) in the crystal structures. Distinctive interactions are observed for the TI binding in the active site cavity of PR{sub WT} and PR{sub I54V}. The mutant PR{sub I54V}/TI complex has lost water-mediated hydrogen bond interactions with the amides of Ile50 and Ile50{prime} in the flap. Hence, the structures provide insight into the mechanism of drug resistance arising from this mutation. The structures also illustrate an intermediate state in the hydrolysis reaction. One of the gem-diol hydroxide groups in the PR{sub WT} complex forms a very short (2.3 {angstrom}) hydrogen bond with the outer carboxylate oxygen of Asp25. Quantum chemical calculations based on this TI structure are consistent with protonation of the inner carboxylate oxygen of Asp25{prime}, in contrast to several theoretical studies. These TI complexes and quantum calculations are discussed in relation to the chemical mechanism of the peptide bond hydrolysis catalyzed by PR.

Kovalevsky, Andrey Y.; Chumanevich, Alexander A.; Liu, Fengling; Louis, John M.; Weber, Irene T. (GSU)

2008-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

317

Sequestration of Technology Enhanced Naturally Occurring Nuclear ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to unconventional deposits bringing along the need to dispose of, or sequester, ... The ILS process allows recycling of mineral oils from drill cuttings into new ...

318

Institutional vs spontaneously occurring metaphor - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dec 24, 2003... way of the dodo, burning the midnight oil and so on), and metaphors that ... The example of the Lord Privy Seal, well illustrates the kinds of ...

319

High-Dose Radiotherapy With or Without Androgen Deprivation Therapy for Intermediate-Risk Prostate Cancer: Cancer Control and Toxicity Outcomes  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: To evaluate the impact of short-course androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) on cancer control outcomes and toxicity in intermediate-risk prostate cancer treated with dose-escalated external beam radiotherapy (high-dose radiotherapy [HDRT]). Methods and Materials: Demographic, disease, and treatment characteristics of prostate cancer patients at 2 institution consortiums were charted. Of 296 men with intermediate-risk prostate cancer (defined as {>=}T2b, prostate-specific antigen level >10 ng/mL, or Gleason score [GS] of 7, with none of the following: {>=}T3, prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng/mL, GS {>=}8, or positive nodes) treated with HDRT to a dose of 72 Gy or greater, 123 received short-course ADT and 173 did not. Univariate and multivariate analyses on biochemical failure-free survival (BFFS) (including subset analysis by disease factors) and on overall survival (OS) were performed, as were comparisons of gastrointestinal (GI) and genitourinary (GU) toxicity rates. Results: For the whole group, the median dose was 75.6 Gy; the minimum follow-up was 2 years, and the median follow-up was 47.4 months. For ADT vs. no ADT, the 5-year BFFS rate was 86% vs. 79% (p = 0.138) and the 5-year OS rate was 87% vs. 80% (p = 0.159). On multivariate analysis, percent positive cores (PPC) (p = 0.002) and GS (p = 0.008) were significantly associated with BFFS, with ADT showing a trend (p = 0.055). The impact of ADT was highest in the subsets with PPC greater than 50% (p = 0.019), GS 4+3 (p = 0.078), and number of risk factors greater than 1 (p = 0.022). Only intensity-modulated radiotherapy use (p = 0.012) and GS (p = 0.023) reached significance for OS, and there were no significant differences in GU or GI toxicity. Conclusions: Although the use of ADT with HDRT did not influence BFFS, our study suggests a benefit in patients with PPC greater than 50%, GS 4+3, or multiple risk factors. No OS benefit was shown, and ADT was not associated with additional radiotherapy-related GI or GU toxicity.

Edelman, Scott [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Liauw, Stanley L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States); Rossi, Peter J.; Cooper, Sherrie [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Jani, Ashesh B., E-mail: abjani@emory.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neutral pion cross section and spin asymmetries at intermediate pseudorapidity in polarized proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 200 GeV  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The differential cross section and spin asymmetries for neutral pions produced within the intermediate pseudorapidity range 0.8 < {\\eta} < 2.0 in polarized proton-proton collisions at sqrt{s} = 200 GeV are presented. Neutral pions were detected using the endcap electromagnetic calorimeter in the STAR detector at RHIC. The cross section was measured over a transverse momentum range of 5 < p_T < 16 GeV/c and is found to be within the scale uncertainty of a next-to-leading order perturbative QCD calculation. The longitudinal double-spin asymmetry, A_LL, is measured in the same pseudorapidity range. This quantity is sensitive to the gluonic contribution to the proton spin, {\\Delta}g(x), at low Bjorken-x (down to x approx 0.01), where it is less constrained by measurements at central pseudorapidity. The measured A_LL is consistent with model predictions. The parity-violating asymmetry, A_L, is also measured and found to be consistent with zero. The transverse single-spin asymmetry, A_N, is measured within a previously unexplored kinematic range in Feynman-x and p_T. Such measurements may aid our understanding of the on-set and kinematic dependence of the large asymmetries observed at more forward pseudorapidity ({\\eta} approx 3) and their underlying mechanisms. The A_N results presented are consistent with a twist-3 model prediction of a small asymmetry within the present kinematic range.

STAR Collaboration; L. Adamczyk; J. K. Adkins; G. Agakishiev; M. M. Aggarwal; Z. Ahammed; I. Alekseev; J. Alford; C. D. Anson; A. Aparin; D. Arkhipkin; E. C. Aschenauer; G. S. Averichev; J. Balewski; A. Banerjee; B. Barber; Z. Barnovska; D. R. Beavis; R. Bellwied; A. Bhasin; A. K. Bhati; P. Bhattarai; H. Bichsel; J. Bielcik; J. Bielcikova; L. C. Bland; I. G. Bordyuzhin; W. Borowski; J. Bouchet; A. V. Brandin; A. Bridgeman; S. G. Brovko; S. Bültmann; I. Bunzarov; T. P. Burton; J. Butterworth; H. Caines; M. Calderón de la Barca Sánchez; D. Cebra; R. Cendejas; M. C. Cervantes; P. Chaloupka; Z. Chang; S. Chattopadhyay; H. F. Chen; J. H. Chen; L. Chen; J. Cheng; M. Cherney; A. Chikanian; W. Christie; J. Chwastowski; M. J. M. Codrington; R. Corliss; J. G. Cramer; H. J. Crawford; X. Cui; S. Das; A. Davila Leyva; L. C. De Silva; R. R. Debbe; T. G. Dedovich; J. Deng; A. A. Derevschikov; R. Derradi de Souza; S. Dhamija; B. di Ruzza; L. Didenko; C. Dilks; F. Ding; P. Djawotho; X. Dong; J. L. Drachenberg; J. E. Draper; C. M. Du; L. E. Dunkelberger; J. C. Dunlop; L. G. Efimov; J. Engelage; K. S. Engle; G. Eppley; L. Eun; O. Evdokimov; R. Fatemi; S. Fazio; J. Fedorisin; P. Filip; E. Finch; Y. Fisyak; C. E. Flores; C. A. Gagliardi; D. R. Gangadharan; D. Garand; F. Geurts; A. Gibson; M. Girard; S. Gliske; D. Grosnick; Y. Guo; A. Gupta; S. Gupta; W. Guryn; B. Haag; O. Hajkova; A. Hamed; L-X. Han; R. Haque; J. W. Harris; J. P. Hays-Wehle; W. He; S. Heppelmann; A. Hirsch; G. W. Hoffmann; D. J. Hofman; S. Horvat; B. Huang; H. Z. Huang; P. Huck; T. J. Humanic; G. Igo; W. W. Jacobs; H. Jang; E. G. Judd; S. Kabana; D. Kalinkin; K. Kang; K. Kauder; H. W. Ke; D. Keane; A. Kechechyan; A. Kesich; Z. H. Khan; D. P. Kikola; I. Kisel; A. Kisiel; D. D. Koetke; T. Kollegger; J. Konzer; I. Koralt; W. Korsch; L. Kotchenda; P. Kravtsov; K. Krueger; I. Kulakov; L. Kumar; R. A. Kycia; M. A. C. Lamont; J. M. Landgraf; K. D. Landry; J. Lauret; A. Lebedev; R. Lednicky; J. H. Lee; W. Leight; M. J. LeVine; C. Li; W. Li; X. Li; X. Li; Y. Li; Z. M. Li; L. M. Lima; M. A. Lisa; F. Liu; T. Ljubicic; W. J. Llope; R. S. Longacre; X. Luo; G. L. Ma; Y. G. Ma; D. M. M. D. Madagodagettige Don; D. P. Mahapatra; R. Majka; R. Manweiler; S. Margetis; C. Markert; H. Masui; H. S. Matis; D. McDonald; T. S. McShane; N. G. Minaev; S. Mioduszewski; B. Mohanty; M. M. Mondal; D. A. Morozov; M. G. Munhoz; M. K. Mustafa; B. K. Nandi; Md. Nasim; T. K. Nayak; J. M. Nelson; L. V. Nogach; S. Y. Noh; P. M. Nord; J. Novak; S. B. Nurushev; G. Odyniec; A. Ogawa; K. Oh; A. Ohlson; V. Okorokov; E. W. Oldag; R. A. N. Oliveira; M. Pachr; B. S. Page; S. K. Pal; Y. X. Pan; Y. Pandit; Y. Panebratsev; T. Pawlak; B. Pawlik; H. Pei; C. Perkins; W. Peryt; A. Peterson; P. Pile; M. Planinic; J. Pluta; D. Plyku; W. Pochron; N. Poljak; J. Porter; A. M. Poskanzer; N. K. Pruthi; M. Przybycien; P. R. Pujahari; H. Qiu; A. Quintero; S. Ramachandran; R. Raniwala; S. Raniwala; R. L. Ray; C. K. Riley; H. G. Ritter; J. B. Roberts; O. V. Rogachevskiy; J. L. Romero; J. F. Ross; A. Roy; L. Ruan; J. Rusnak; N. R. Sahoo; P. K. Sahu; I. Sakrejda; S. Salur; A. Sandacz; J. Sandweiss; E. Sangaline; A. Sarkar; J. Schambach; R. P. Scharenberg; J. Schaub; A. M. Schmah; W. B. Schmidke; N. Schmitz; J. Seger; I. Selyuzhenkov; P. Seyboth; N. Shah; E. Shahaliev; P. V. Shanmuganathan; M. Shao; B. Sharma; W. Q. Shen; S. S. Shi; Q. Y. Shou; E. P. Sichtermann; R. N. Singaraju; M. J. Skoby; D. Smirnov; N. Smirnov; D. Solanki; P. Sorensen; U. G. deSouza; H. M. Spinka; B. Srivastava; T. D. S. Stanislaus; J. R. Stevens; R. Stock; M. Strikhanov; B. Stringfellow; A. A. P. Suaide; M. Sumbera; X. Sun; X. M. Sun; Y. Sun; Z. Sun; B. Surrow; D. N. Svirida; T. J. M. Symons; A. Szanto de Toledo; J. Takahashi; A. H. Tang; Z. Tang; T. Tarnowsky; J. H. Thomas; A. R. Timmins; D. Tlusty; M. Tokarev; S. Trentalange; R. E. Tribble; P. Tribedy; B. A. Trzeciak; O. D. Tsai; J. Turnau; T. Ullrich; D. G. Underwood; G. Van Buren; G. van Nieuwenhuizen; J. A. Vanfossen, Jr.; R. Varma; G. M. S. Vasconcelos; A. N. Vasiliev; R. Vertesi; F. Videbæk; Y. P. Viyogi; S. Vokal; A. Vossen; M. Wada; M. Walker; F. Wang; G. Wang; H. Wang; J. S. Wang; X. L. Wang; Y. Wang; Y. Wang; G. Webb; J. C. Webb; G. D. Westfall; H. Wieman; S. W. Wissink; R. Witt; Y. F. Wu; Z. Xiao; W. Xie; K. Xin; H. Xu; N. Xu; Q. H. Xu; Y. Xu; Z. Xu; W. Yan; C. Yang; Y. Yang; Y. Yang; Z. Ye; P. Yepes; L. Yi; K. Yip; I-K. Yoo; Y. Zawisza; H. Zbroszczyk; W. Zha; J. B. Zhang; S. Zhang; X. P. Zhang; Y. Zhang; Z. P. Zhang; F. Zhao; J. Zhao; C. Zhong; X. Zhu; Y. H. Zhu; Y. Zoulkarneeva; M. Zyzak

2013-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

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321

A PAN-CARINA YOUNG STELLAR OBJECT CATALOG: INTERMEDIATE-MASS YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE CARINA NEBULA IDENTIFIED VIA MID-INFRARED EXCESS EMISSION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a catalog of 1439 young stellar objects (YSOs) spanning the 1.42 deg{sup 2} field surveyed by the Chandra Carina Complex Project (CCCP), which includes the major ionizing clusters and the most active sites of ongoing star formation within the Great Nebula in Carina. Candidate YSOs were identified via infrared (IR) excess emission from dusty circumstellar disks and envelopes, using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope (the Vela-Carina survey) and the Two-Micron All Sky Survey. We model the 1-24 {mu}m IR spectral energy distributions of the YSOs to constrain physical properties. Our Pan-Carina YSO Catalog (PCYC) is dominated by intermediate-mass (2 M{sub sun} 2 x 10{sup 4} YSOs and a present-day star formation rate (SFR) of >0.008 M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. The global SFR in the Carina Nebula, averaged over the past {approx}5 Myr, has been approximately constant.

Povich, Matthew S.; Getman, Konstantin V.; Townsley, Leisa K.; Broos, Patrick S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Smith, Nathan [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Majewski, Steven R.; Indebetouw, Remy [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904-4325 (United States); Babler, Brian L.; Meade, Marilyn R.; Whitney, Barbara A. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 N. Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Robitaille, Thomas P. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Stassun, Keivan G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37235 (United States); Yonekura, Yoshinori [Department of Physical Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Fukui, Yasuo, E-mail: povich@astro.psu.edu [Department of Astrophysics, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Nucleon-induced fission cross-sections of tantalum and separated tungsten isotopes and "compound nucleus" effect in intermediate energy region  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Neutron- and proton-induced fission cross-sections of separated isotopes of tungsten (182W, 183W, 184W, and 186W) and 181Ta relative to 209Bi have been measured in the incident nucleon energy region 50 - 200 MeV using fission chambers based on thin-film breakdown counters (TFBC) using quasi-monoenergetic neutrons from the 7Li(p,n) reaction and at the proton beams of The Svedberg Laboratory (TSL), Uppsala University (Uppsala, Sweden). The results are compared with predictions by the CEM03.01 event generator, as well as with the recent data for nuclei in the lead-bismuth region. The effect of "compound nucleus" in the intermediate energy region is discussed, displaying in exponential dependence of nucleon-induced fission cross-sections on the parameter Z^2/A of the composite system (projectile+target nucleus), and in other characteristics of the fission process for which parameter Z^2/A plays a role similar to the one of the usual liquid-drop parameter Z^2/A of compound nuclei.

A. N. Smirnov; O. I. Batenkov; V. P. Eismont; N. P. Filatov; J. Blomgren; H. Conde; A. V. Prokofiev; S. G. Mashnik

2007-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

323

The Uncertainties in the 22Ne + alpha-capture Reaction Rates and the Production of the Heavy Magnesium Isotopes in Asymptotic Giant Branch Stars of Intermediate Mass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present new rates for the 22Ne(alpha, n)25Mg and 22Ne(alpha,gamma)26Mg reactions, with uncertainties that have been considerably reduced compared to previous estimates, and we study how these new rates affect the production of the heavy magnesium isotopes in models of intermediate mass Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars of different initial compositions. All the models have deep third dredge-up, hot bottom burning and mass loss. Calculations have been performed using the two most commonly used estimates of the 22Ne + alpha rates as well as the new recommended rates, and with combinations of their upper and lower limits. The main result of the present study is that with the new rates, uncertainties on the production of isotopes from Mg to P coming from the 22Ne + alpha-capture rates have been considerably reduced. We have therefore removed one of the important sources of uncertainty to effect models of AGB stars. We have studied the effects of varying the mass-loss rate on nucleosynthesis and discuss other uncertainties related to the physics employed in the computation of stellar structure, such as the modeling of convection, the inclusion of a partial mixing zone and the definition of convective borders. These uncertainties are found to be much larger than those coming from 22Ne + alpha-capture rates, when using our new estimates. Much effort is needed to improve the situation for AGB models.

A. Karakas; M. Lugaro; M. Wiescher; J. Goerres; C. Ugalde

2006-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

324

Methane, ammonia, and their irradiation products at the surface of an intermediate-size KBO? A portrait of Plutino (90482) Orcus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Orcus is an intermediate-size 1000km-scale Kuiper Belt Object in 3:2 mean-motion resonance with Neptune, in an orbit very similar to that of Pluto. We present visible and near-infrared photometry and spectroscopy obtained with the Keck 10m-telescope and the Gemini 8m-telescope . We confirm the unambiguous detection of crystalline water ice as well as absorption in the 2.2\\mu m region. Both in the visible and near-infrared Orcus' spectral properties appear to be homogeneous over time (and probably rotation) at the resolution available. From Hapke radiative transfer models involving intimate mixtures of various ices we find for the first time that ammonium (NH+4) and traces of ethane (C2 H6), which are most probably solar irradiation products of ammonia and methane, and a mixture of methane and ammonia (diluted or not) are the best candidates to improve the description of the data with respect to a simple water ice mixture (Haumea type surface). The possible more subtle structure of the 2.2\\mu m band(s) should ...

Delsanti, Audrey; Guilbert, Aurélie; Bauer, James; Yang, Bin; Meech, Karen J

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

When low- to intermediate mass...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present the Spectral Energy Distribution of HR 4049 based on literature data and new continuum measurements at 850 µm. The SED shows variable absorption in the UV, and a large IR excess, both caused by circumstellar dust. The shape of the IR excess from 1 µm all the way down to 850 µm can be nearly perfectly fitted with a single blackbody function at T ? 1150 K or alternatively with a sum of blackbodies in a narrow temperature range. The energy emitted in this IR continuum radiation is about one-third of the stellar luminosity. We show that this blackbody radiation must be due to the presence of a circumbinary disk with a large height. This disk must also be gas-rich, in agreement with the observations of molecular bands in the ISO-SWS spectrum. We present two possible scenario’s for explaining the shape and the intensity of the IR excess. The first scenario involves large grains (a ? 1 mm) that each radiate like a blackbody. The second scenario argues that the blackbody radiation is due to a very optically thick circumbinary disk. We investigate if such a disk would indeed produce blackbody radiation by presenting results from radiative transfer calculations. We further quantify the properties of such a disk and its stability in the framework of (hydro)dynamics, grain settling, radiation pressure and grain drift. The virtues and shortcomings of both models for the origin of the IR blackbody are discussed by contrasting

C. Dominik; C. P. Dullemond; J. Cami; H. Van Winckel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Intermediate temperature electrolytes for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify a new set of materials that would allow the operation of the solid oxide fuel cell in the 600--800{sup degrees}C temperature range. The approach that is being used is to start with a systematic evaluation of new electrolyte materials and then to develop compatible electrode and interconnect materials.

Bloom, I.; Krumpelt, M.; Hash, M.C.; Zebrowski, J.P.; Zurawski, D.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Intermediate temperature electrolytes for SOFC  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this work is to identify a new set of materials that would allow the operation of the solid oxide fuel cell in the 600--800{sup degrees}C temperature range. The approach that is being used is to start with a systematic evaluation of new electrolyte materials and then to develop compatible electrode and interconnect materials.

Bloom, I.; Krumpelt, M.; Hash, M.C.; Zebrowski, J.P.; Zurawski, D.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Radiological consequences of ship collisions that might occur in U.S. Ports during the shipment of foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel to the United States in break-bulk freighters  

SciTech Connect

Accident source terms, source term probabilities, consequences, and risks are developed for ship collisions that might occur in U.S. ports during the shipment of spent fuel from foreign research reactors to the United States in break-bulk freighters.

Sprung, J.L.; Bespalko, S.J.; Massey, C.D.; Yoshimura, R. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Johnson, J.D. [GRAM Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Reardon, P.C. [PCRT Technologies, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Ebert, M.W.; Gallagher D.W. [Science Applications International Corp., Reston, VA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Structure and Phase Transitions of Monolayers of Intermediate-length n-alkanes on Graphite Studied by Neutron Diffraction and Molecular Dynamics Simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present evidence from neutron diffraction measurements and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of three different monolayer phases of the intermediate-length alkanes tetracosane (n-C(24)H(50) denoted as C24) and dotriacontane (n-C(32)H(66) denoted as C32) adsorbed on a graphite basal-plane surface. Our measurements indicate that the two monolayer films differ principally in the transition temperatures between phases. At the lowest temperatures, both C24 and C32 form a crystalline monolayer phase with a rectangular-centered (RC) structure. The two sublattices of the RC structure each consists of parallel rows of molecules in their all-trans conformation aligned with their long axis parallel to the surface and forming so-called lamellas of width approximately equal to the all-trans length of the molecule. The RC structure is uniaxially commensurate with the graphite surface in its [110] direction such that the distance between molecular rows in a lamella is 4.26 A=sqrt[3a(g)], where a(g)=2.46 A is the lattice constant of the graphite basal plane. Molecules in adjacent rows of a lamella alternate in orientation between the carbon skeletal plane being parallel and perpendicular to the graphite surface. Upon heating, the crystalline monolayers transform to a 'smectic' phase in which the inter-row spacing within a lamella expands by approximately 10% and the molecules are predominantly oriented with the carbon skeletal plane parallel to the graphite surface. In the smectic phase, the MD simulations show evidence of broadening of the lamella boundaries as a result of molecules diffusing parallel to their long axis. At still higher temperatures, they indicate that the introduction of gauche defects into the alkane chains drives a melting transition to a monolayer fluid phase as reported previously.

Taub, H. [University of Missouri, Columbia; Hansen, F.Y. [Technical University of Denmark; Diama, Amand [National University of the Ivory Coast; Matthies, Blake [Goodyear Tire and Rubber Company, The; Criswell, Leah [University of Missouri, Columbia; Mo, Haiding [Advanced Optowave Corporation; Bai, M [University of Missouri, Columbia; Herwig, Kenneth W [ORNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Raman Spectra, Structural Units and Durability of Nuclear Waste Glasses With Variations in Composition and Crystallization: Implications for Intermediate Order in the Glass Network  

SciTech Connect

The Raman spectra of nuclear waste glasses are composed of large variations in half-width and intensity for the commonly observed bridging (Q0) and nonbridging (Q1 to Q4) bands in silicate structures. With increase in waste concentration in a boroaluminosilicate melt, the bands of quenched glasses are distinctly localized with half-width and intensity indicative of increase in atomic order. Since the nuclear waste glasses contain disparate components, and since the bands depart from the typical random network, a systematic study for the origin of these bands as a function of composition and crystallization was undertaken. From a comparative study of Raman spectra of boroaluminosilicate glasses containing Na2O-ZrO2, Na2O-MgO, MgO-Na2O-ZrO2, Na2O-CaO-ZrO2, Na2O-CaO, and Na2O-MgO-CaF2 component sets and orthosilicate crystals of zircon and forsterite, intermediate order is inferred. An edge-sharing polyhedral structural unit is proposed to account for narrow bandwidth and high intensity for Q2 antisymmetric modes, and decreased leaching of sodium with ZrO2 concentration in glass. The intense Q4 band in nuclear waste glass is similar to the intertetrahedral antisymmetric modes in forsterite. The Raman spectra of zircon contains intratetrahedral quartz-like peaks and intertetrahedral non-bridging silicate peaks. The quartz-like peaks nearly vanish in the background of forsterite spectrum. This difference between the Raman spectra of the two orthosilicate crystals presumably results from their biaxial and uniaxial effects on polarizability ellipsoids. The results also reveal formation of 604, 956 and 961 cm-1 defect bands with composition and crystallization.

Raman, Swaminathan Venkat

2002-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Using decision analysis to determine the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy in the treatment of intermediate risk prostate cancer  

SciTech Connect

Background: The specific aim of this study is to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) compared with three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT) in the treatment of a 70-year-old with intermediate-risk prostate cancer. Methods: A Markov model was designed with the following states; posttreatment, hormone therapy, chemotherapy, and death. Transition probabilities from one state to another were calculated from rates derived from the literature for IMRT and 3D-CRT. Utility values for each health state were obtained from preliminary studies of preferences conducted at Fox Chase Cancer Center. The analysis took a payer's perspective. Expected mean costs, cost-effectiveness scatterplots, and cost acceptability curves were calculated with commercially available software. Results: The expected mean cost of patients undergoing IMRT was $47,931 with a survival of 6.27 quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). The expected mean cost of patients having 3D-CRT was $21,865 with a survival of 5.62 QALYs. The incremental cost-effectiveness comparing IMRT with CRT was $40,101/QALYs. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curve analysis revealed a 55.1% probability of IMRT being cost-effective at a $50,000/QALY willingness to pay. Conclusion: Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was found to be cost-effective, however, at the upper limits of acceptability. The results, however, are dependent on the assumptions of improved biochemical disease-free survival with fewer patients undergoing subsequent salvage therapy and improved quality of life after the treatment. In the absence of prospective randomized trials, decision analysis can help inform physicians and health policy experts on the cost-effectiveness of emerging technologies.

Konski, Andre [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)]. E-mail: andre.konski@fccc.edu; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah [Department of Population Sciences, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Feigenberg, Steven [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Hanlon, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Kulkarni, Sachin M.S. [Department of Population Sciences, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Beck, J. Robert [Department of Information and Science Technologies, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Horwitz, Eric M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Pollack, Alan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Development of ultrafiltration and inorganic adsorbents for reducing volumes of low-level and intermediate-level liquid waste. Quarterly report, October, November, December 1976  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this program is to develop and demonstrate separation methods for removing radionuclides from liquid process waste streams. As part of this program, Mound Laboratory will develop lower cost alternatives for use i n1980 fuel reprocessing and waste solidification plants, evaluate the processes within the nuclear fuel cycle which contribute to low-level and intermediate-level waste, and determine the feasibility of ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, inorganic adsorbents and other separation concepts as additions to process design to reduce the generation of this type of waste. In the initial phase of this program, membrane equipment will be obtained from a commercial membrane manufacturer. After the pilot plant is installed, it will be checked out on cold feed in order to obtain initial flux and rejection data for comparison to data obtained later in the program. After completion of the cold tests, the membrane pilot plant will be run on a combined contaminated feed emanating from showers, laboratory drains, janitorial sinks and decontamination in processing areas, as well as a laundry waste stream containing alpha-contaminated wastes. This combined waste stream contains only alpha contamination (uranium and plutonium). However, as part of this program, gamma activity will be added to the waste stream. These wastes will be representative of those streams found at fuel reprocessing plants, as well as various ERDA processing facilities such as Mound, LASL, Hanford, and Rocky Flats. For the second part of the program, laboratory tests will be run on various adsorbents to evaluate their capacities for removing radionuclides. As part of this program, a technique for screening adsorbents developed at Mound Laboratory will be utilized.

1976-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

333

Snowstorms over the Puget Sound Lowlands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Snowfall over the Puget Sound lowlands is the product of complex interactions between the synoptic-scale flow and the mesoscale topography of the region. Although heavy snowfall is relatively infrequent in this region, when it does occur it ...

Garth K. Ferber; Clifford F. Mass; Gary M. Lackmann; Michael W. Patnoe

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Effects of momentum-dependent nuclear potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions RID A-2398-2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Using an isospin- and momentum-dependent transport model, we study the effects due to the momentum dependence of isoscalar nuclear potential as well as that of symmetry potential on two-nucleon correlation functions and light cluster production in intermediate energy heavy-ion collisions induced by neutron-rich nuclei. It is found that both observables are affected significantly by the momentum dependence of nuclear potential, leading to a reduction of their sensitivity to the stiffness of nuclear symmetry energy. However, the t/He-3 ratio remains a sensitive probe of the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy.

Chen, LW; Ko, Che Ming; Li, Ba.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

ANALYSIS OF THE HEAT GENERATION IN THE PRIMARY SODIUM PIPE TUNNELS, INTERMEDIATE HEAT EXCHANGER CELLS, AND THE PRIMARY SODIUM FILL TANK VAULT FOR THE HALLAM NUCLEAR POWER FACILITY (HNPF)  

SciTech Connect

I. An adequate and conservative calculational method for evaluation of the heat generation distribution in the primary sodium system substructural areas was developed. The method was programed for the IBM 704 and the IBM 709. The results obtained from analysis of the gamma heat generation in the primary sodium pipe tunnels and in the intermediate heat exchanger cells are presented. Calculations are outlined, and gamma attenuation coefficients for concrete, sodium, and steel are given. II. Results obtained from analysis of the gamma heat generation in areas where the primary sodium system piping layout was changed from that of the previous analysis are presented. Major changes in magnitude of the hot spot heat generation due to the changes are pointed out. (auth)

Legendre, P.J.

1959-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

336

Exclusive Electroproduction of meson rho on the nucleon Virtualite Intermediate With the CLAS Detector at Jlab; Electroproduction Exclusive de meson rho sur le nucleon Virtualite Intermediaire Avec le Detecteur CLAS at Jlab  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the exclusive rho0 meson electroproduction on the nucleon at intermediate square momentum transfers Q{sup 2} (1.5 < Q{sup 2} < 3 GeV{sup 2}) and above the resonance region. The experiment has been taken place at the Jefferson laboratory with the CLAS detector, with a 4.2 GeV beam energy on a hydrogen target in the February-March 1999 period. They present the results and in particular the L/T separated cross sections. This experimentally unexplored domain experimentally is at the intersection between traditional ''soft'' hadronic physics models (VDM and Regge inspired models) and ''hard'' pQCD inspired approaches (recently introduced Generalized Parton Distribution). They discuss both approaches and their domain of validity.

Cynthia Hadjidakis

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Direct Kinetic Measurements of a Criegee Intermediate  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

well as enable new detection methods beyond photoionization that might be deployed for in situ atmospheric sensing. Sandia combustion researchers Craig Taatjes and David Osborn...

338

Nuclear structure studies with intermediate energy probes  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear structure studies with pions are reviewed. Results from a recent study of 1 p-shell nuclei using (e,e{prime}), ({pi}, {pi}{prime}), and ({gamma},{pi}) reactions are reported. Future nuclear structure studies with GeV electrons at CEBAF are also briefly discussed.

Lee, T.S.H.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Intermediate-Term Uranium Supply Curve Estimation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A study was undertaken to estimate U.S. natural uranium supply capacities and associated production costs over the period 1979-1990 and to develop the general supply outlook to 2000. Annual supply capacity schedules were estimated on an individual mill and mine family basis. Future production schedules were estimated by balancing estimated supply capacity with DOE's future demand projections; the impact of private-sector inventory levels was accounted for.

1981-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Specializing Financial Intermediation: Evidence from venture capital  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

While many parts of the financial systems are becoming increasingly commoditized, there is a concurrent trend towards greater specialization of financial intermediaries, especially in information-intensive market segments. This paper examines the impact of this specialization, focusing on venture capital. We use a unique hand-collected dataset on European venture capital deals that includes detail on the services provided by venture capital firms. We find that the willingness to invest in information-intensive deals, and the extent to which investor provide services (from corporate governance to additional financing) to their companies, critically depends on how specialized investors are. This applies not only to the organizational structure of the venture capital firm, but also to the human capital of its venture partners.

Laura Bottazzi; Marco Da Rin; Thomas Hellmann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Comprehensive Treatment and Utilization of Dye Intermediate ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hot Section Corrosion Issues in Microturbines Operating on B100 Bio-Diesel · Impact of Impurities and ... Large-Scale Technique for Dye Solar Cells Preparation.

342

INTERMEDIATE SCALE F'IRE EXTINGUISHMENT BY ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The optical transmissivity probes used infrared light emitting diode sources and photodiode detectors with peak sensitivities at about 0.9 pm. ...

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Climatic Warming of Atlantic Intermediate Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Interdecadal temperature variability of the Atlantic Ocean is investigated by differencing hydrographic sections taken from the 1920s through the 1990s. A comprehensive reanalysis of North Atlantic sections and the inclusion of South Atlantic ...

Brian K. Arbic; W. Brechner Owens

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Enol Intermediates Unexpectedly Found in Flames  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at ALS Chemical Dynamics Beamline 9.0.2. In the apparatus, premixed reagent gases enter the flame chamber through the porous flat face of a burner that translates...

345

Available Technologies: Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate ...  

Iron and steel production; Food and ... The implementation of OFC in these industries has the potential of an annual recovery of up to 1,703 quadrillion BTUs from ...

346

Intermediates of Photosynthesis: Isolation and Degradation Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

r minutes of normal photosynthesis being required t o obtainof Glycolic Acid during Photosynthesis When leaves o r algaefollowing C Up t o O2 photosynthesis) copious farmation of

Benson, A.A.; Calvin, M.

1954-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

EIA Energy Kids - Intermediate - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Solar: Cook (with your own Solar Cooker) a Hot Dog; Energy in the Round - Solar; Solar Distiller; Wind: Wind Logic Puzzles; Wind Turbine;

348

Negative wholesale electricity prices occur in RTOs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Short-Term Energy Outlook › Annual ... maintenance and fuel-cost penalties when operators shut down and start up large steam turbine (usually fossil-fueled) plants ...

349

Naturally Occurring Melanin Synthesis Regulators and Their Modes of Action  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. , Oxygenation of Phenols to Catechols by A (µ-? 2 :? 2 -than the oxidation of catechol to ortho-quinone; hence, theas tyrosinase, hemocyanin and catechol oxidase are type III

Satooka, Hiroki

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

INTRODUCTION Environmental hypoxia occurs commonly in aquatic environments.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-F, and Eyraud C (1977) A new method for the simul- taneous determination of the size and shape of pores, the thermoporometry. Thermochim Acta 21 : 59-88. 2. Campbell GS and Shiozawa S (1992) Prediction of hydraulic

Vellend, Mark

351

With radiation constantly oc-curring from natural sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

James of the Lab's Nonproliferation & National Security Department for the 460th Brookhaven Lecture unprecedented advances in medical and in- dustrial imaging, basic science, and the nonproliferation of nuclear

Ohta, Shigemi

352

On the Prediction of the Occurence of dates of GLEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ground level enhancements (GLEs) are relativistic sol particles measured at ground level by a worldwide network of cosmic ray detectors. These sporadic events are associated with solar flares and are assumed to be of a quasi-random nature. Their study gives us information about their source and propagation processes, about the maximum capacity of the sun as a particle accelerator engine, about the magnetic structure of the medium traversed, etc. Space vehicles may be damaged by this kind of radiation, as well as electric transformers and gas pipes at high latitudes. As a result, their prediction has turned out to be very important, but because of their random occurrence, up to now few efforts to this end have been made. The results of these efforts have been limited to possible warnings in real time, just before GLE occurrence, but no specific dates have been predicted well enough in advance to prevent possible hazards. In this study we show that, in spite of the quasi-stochastic nature of GLEs, it is possibl...

Pérez-Peraza, Jorge; Zapotitla-Román, Julián; Alvarez-Madrigal, Manuel

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

POPULATION ECOLOGY Comparative Predation on Naturally Occurring Gypsy Moth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bacterium.16 Another health worry is horizontal gene transfer. Because diseases like Ebola, AIDS, Lyme

Berkowitz, Alan R.

354

Why Presence Occurs: Evolutionary Psychology, Media Equation, and Presence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite the intense interest in the phenomena of presence, there have been limited attempts to explain the fundamental reason why human beings can feel presence when they use media and/or simulation technologies. This is mainly because previous ...

Kwan Min Lee

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Evaluation of Mixing Occurring in the SRS Saltstone Transfer Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Influence of Cation Composition and Temperature on the Solubility and Oxidation State ... Secure and Certify Studies to Work on Production of Spiked Plutonium.

356

[an error occurred while processing this directive] site search  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Applications E1.6 N. Shibata Junction Temperature Measurements in Deep-UV Light-Emitting Diodes E1.7 Y. Xi, J Emitting Diodes E1.8 Muhammad Jamil, James R. Grandusky, and Fatemeh Shahedipour-Sandvik Moth-Eye Light-EmittingGaN/GaN Light Emitting Diode With Multiquantum Barriers E3.27 Jen-Cheng Wang, Chung-Han Lin, Ray-Ming Lin, Tzer

Wetzel, Christian M.

357

Negative wholesale electricity prices occur in RTOs - Today in ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration - EIA - Official Energy Statistics from the U.S. Government ... such as those providing nuclear, hydroelectric, or wind energy, ...

358

Distribution and pharmacokinetics of methamphetamine in the human body: clinical implications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methamphetamine is one of the most toxic of the drugs of abuse, which may reflect its distribution and accumulation in the body. However no studies have measured methamphetamine's organ distribution in the human body. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) was used in conjunction with [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine to measure its whole-body distribution and bioavailability as assessed by peak uptake (% Dose/cc), rate of clearance (time to reach 50% peak-clearance) and accumulation (area under the curve) in healthy participants (9 Caucasians and 10 African Americans). Methamphetamine distributed through most organs. Highest uptake (whole organ) occurred in lungs (22% Dose; weight {approx}1246 g), liver (23%; weight {approx}1677 g) and intermediate in brain (10%; weight {approx}1600 g). Kidneys also showed high uptake (per/cc basis) (7%; weight 305 g). Methamphetamine's clearance was fastest in heart and lungs (7-16 minutes), slowest in brain, liver and stomach (>75 minutes), and intermediate in kidneys, spleen and pancreas (22-50 minutes). Lung accumulation of [{sup 11}C]d-methamphetamine was 30% higher for African Americans than Caucasians (p < 0.05) but did not differ in other organs. The high accumulation of methamphetamine, a potent stimulant drug, in most body organs is likely to contribute to the medical complications associated with methamphetamine abuse. In particular, we speculate that methamphetamine's high pulmonary uptake could render this organ vulnerable to infections (tuberculosis) and pathology (pulmonary hypertension). Our preliminary findings of a higher lung accumulation of methamphetamine in African Americans than Caucasians merits further investigation and questions whether it could contribute to the infrequent use of methamphetamine among African Americans.

Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.; Volkow, N.D.; Fowler, J.S.; Wang, G.-J.; Shumay, E.; Telang, F.; Thanos, P.; Alexoff, D.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

/sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse-/sup 12/CO/sub 2/ chase analyses of C/sub 4/-acid metabolism in C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ intermediate species of Flaveria at the CO/sub 2/ compensation concentration (r). [Flaveria floridana; Flaveria anomala  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Photosynthetic C/sub 4/-acid metabolism in leaves of C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ intermediate Flaveria species was examined by /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ pulse-/sup 12/CO/sub 2/ chase experiments conducted at external CO/sub 2/-levels approximating air and ..gamma... Analysis of the percent distribution of /sup 14/C after a 10-s pulse showed an enhanced labeling of malate and aspartate at ..gamma.. in the C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ species. This stimulation of /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ fixation by PEP carboxylase ranged from 1.7-(F. floridana) to 3.6-fold (F. anomala). A /sup 12/CO/sub 2/-chase at ..gamma.. revealed a significant turnover of C/sub 4/ acids for only F. floridana. C/sub 4/-acid labeling in C/sub 3/ and C/sub 4/ Flaveria species was relatively unresponsive to changes in pCO/sub 2/. These data imply that the C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ intermediate Flaveria species with less advanced C/sub 4/ attributes have a greater capacity for increased CO/sub 2/ fixation via PEP carboxylase at ..gamma.. versus air. Thus, labeling of C/sub 3/-C/sub 4/ leaves at ..sigma.. may be an effective tool for assessing the degree of true C/sub 4/-photosynthesis as well as the potential mechanism involved in reducing photorespiration.

Chastain, C.J.; Chollet, R.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

2.51 Intermediate Heat and Mass Transfer, Fall 2001  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysis, modeling, and design of heat and mass transfer processes with application to common technologies. Unsteady heat conduction in one or more dimensions, steady conduction in multidimensional configurations, numerical ...

Lienhard, John H., 1961-

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Intermediate Species Profiles in Low-Pressure Methane ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... inhibited by CHF3 at an equal loading of ffuo ... 10 using the experimental temperature profile as input ... HFC mechanism may be down- loaded from http ...

2012-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

362

Intermediate-to-High-Rate Material Behavior - Programmaster.org  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Oct 19, 2011 ... High-Strain-Rate & Shock Response of Lightweight Materials: How Dynamic Properties Influence the Future Design Landscape for ...

363

Magnetic effects in heavy-ion collisions at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The time-evolution and space-distribution of internal electromagnetic fields in heavy-ion reactions at beam energies between 200 and 2000 MeV/nucleon are studied within an Isospin-dependent Boltzmann-Uhling-Uhlenbeck transport model IBUU11. While the magnetic field can reach about $7\\times 10^{16}$ G which is significantly higher than the estimated surface magnetic field ($\\sim 10^{15}$ G) of magnetars, it has almost no effect on nucleon observables as the Lorentz force is normally much weaker than the nuclear force. Very interestingly, however, the magnetic field generated by the projectile-like (target-like) spectator has a strong focusing/diverging effect on positive/negative pions at forward (backward) rapidities. Consequently, the differential $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio as a function of rapidity is significantly altered by the magnetic field while the total multiplicities of both positive and negative pions remain about the same. At beam energies above about 1 GeV/nucleon, while the integrated ratio of total $\\pi^-$ to $\\pi^+$ multiplicities is not, the differential $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio is sensitive to the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy $E_{\\rm{sym}}(\\rho)$. Our findings suggest that magnetic effects should be carefully considered in future studies of using the differential $\\pi^-/\\pi^+$ ratio as a probe of the $E_{\\rm{sym}}(\\rho)$ at supra-saturation densities.

Li Ou; Bao-An Li

2011-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

364

Financial Intermediation and Credit Policy Business Cycle Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

increasing at 100 years, suggesting that it will take much longer for the hydrological system to reclaim

365

Intermediate Temperature Carbon - Carbon Composite Structures. CRADA Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the "Contractor") and Synterials, Inc. (the "Participant") was to demonstrate promising processing methods, which can lead to producing Carbon-Carbon Composites (CCC), with tensile and interlaminar properties comparable to those of organic matrix composites and environmental stability at 1200 F for long periods of time. The participant synthesized carbon-carbon composites with two different fiber coatings and three different matrices. Both parties evaluated the tensile and interlaminar properties of these materials and characterized the microstructure of the matrices and interfaces. It was found that fiber coatings of carbon and boron carbide provided the best environmental protection and resulted in composites with high tensile strength.

Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

NREL UL Fuel Dispensing Infrastructure Intermediate Blends Performance Testing (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation provides an overview of NREL's project to determine compatibility and safe performance of installed fuel dispensing infrastructure with E15.

Moriarty, K.; Clark, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Observation of Inverse Diproton Photodisintegration at Intermediate Energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The fundamental reaction pp{yields}(pp){sub s}{gamma}, where (pp){sub s} is a proton pair with low excitation energy, has been observed with the ANKE spectrometer at COSY-Juelich for proton beam energies of T{sub p}=0.353, 0.500, and 0.550 GeV. This is equivalent to photodisintegration of a free {sup 1}S{sub 0} diproton for photon energies E{sub {gamma}}{approx_equal}T{sub p}/2. The differential cross sections measured for c.m. angles 0 deg. <{theta}{sub pp}<20 deg. exhibit a steep increase with angle that is compatible with E1 and E2 multipole contributions. The ratio of the measured cross sections to those of np{yields}{gamma}d is on the 10{sup -3}-10{sup -2} level. The increase of the pp{yields}(pp){sub s}{gamma} cross section with T{sub p} might reflect the influence of the {delta}(1232) excitation.

Komarov, V.; Azaryan, T.; Kulikov, A.; Kurbatov, V.; Tsirkov, D.; Uzikov, Yu. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Chiladze, D.; Keshelashvili, I. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Tbilisi (Georgia); Dymov, S. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Physikalisches Institut II, Universitaet Erlangen-Nuernberg, 91058 Erlangen (Germany); Dzyuba, A. [High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation); Hartmann, M.; Kacharava, A.; Rathmann, F.; Stroeher, H. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Khoukaz, A.; Papenbrock, M. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Universitaet Muenster, 48149 Muenster (Germany); Macharashvili, G. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); High Energy Physics Institute, Tbilisi State University, 0186 Tbilisi (Georgia); Merzliakov, S.; Serdyuk, V. [Laboratory of Nuclear Problems, Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, 141980 Dubna (Russian Federation); Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Mikirtychiants, S. [Institut fuer Kernphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); High Energy Physics Department, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, 188350 Gatchina (Russian Federation)] (and others)

2008-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

368

Photodissociation Dynamics and Spectroscopy of Free Radical Combustion Intermediates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

t c u = iuw + i u s + i u z tcl = ilw + i l s + i l z fwu =u fzu = i u z / t c u fwl = i l w / t c l fsl = ils/tcl fzl= ilz/tcl c x u ( i c o ) = -awedgeu*(fwu+(ctwzu-1)*fzu+(-

Osborn, David L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Small and Intermediate-Angle Scattering Instruments for Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is becoming clear that even at such low power sources, we can conduct ... Scattering Methods for Investigations on Magnetic Thin Film Nanostructures.

370

Directed and elliptic flow in Au + Au at intermediate energies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Directed and elliptic flow for the Au + Au system at incident energies between 40 and 150 MeV per nucleon has been measured using the INDRA 4 pi multi-detector. For semi-central collisions, the elliptic flow of Z directed flow changes sign at a bombarding energy between 50 and 60 MeV per nucleon and remains negative at lower energies. The conditions for the appearance and possible origins of negative flow are discussed.

J. Lukasik; G. Auger; M. L. Begemann-Blaich; N. Bellaize; R. Bittiger; F. Bocage; B. Borderie; R. Bougault; B. Bouriquet; J. L. Charvet; A. Chbihi; R. Dayras; D. Durand; J. D. Frankland; E. Galichet; D. Gourio; D. Guinet; S. Hudan; P. Lautesse; F. Lavaud; A. Le Fevre; R. Legrain; O. Lopez; U. Lynen; W. F. J. Mueller; L. Nalpas; H. Orth; E. Plagnol; E. Rosato; A. Saija; C. Schwarz; C. Sfienti; B. Tamain; W. Trautmann; A. Trzcinski; K. Turzo; E. Vient; M. Vigilante; C. Volant; B. Zwieglinski

2004-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

371

Intermediate Species Profiles in LowPressure Premixed ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... kinetics are relatively sparse in comparison to the analogous hydro- carbon reactions ... the H/C/O chemistry for one-carbon and two-car- bon species ...

2013-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

372

Candelabra and Intermediate Base Lamps Enforcement Policy Statement  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Department issued guidance today advising manufacturers, importers and private labelers that DOE will not enforce the energy conservation standards and compliance certification requirements for...

373

West Texas Intermediate First Purchase Price (Dollars per Barrel)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Release Date: 7/1/2013: Next Release Date: 8/1/2013: Referring Pages: Domestic Crude Oil First Purchase Prices for Selected Crude Streams

374

UCLA Intermediate Energy Nuclear and Particle Physics Research: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

This project covers the following research: (a) Investigations into the structure of the proton and neutron. This is done by investigating the different resonance states of nucleons with beams of tagged, polarized photons, linearly as well as circularly, incident on polarized hydrogen/deuterium targets and measuring the production of {pi}{sup #25;0}, 2{pi}{sup #25;}0, 3{pi}{sup #25;0}, {eta}#17;, {eta}', {omega}, etc. The principal detector is the Crystal Ball multiphoton spectrometer which has an acceptance of nearly 4#25;. It has been moved to the MAMI accelerator facility of the University of Mainz, Germany. We investigate the conversion of electromagnetic energy into mesonic matter and conversely. (b) We investigate the consequences of applying the "standard" symmetries of isospin, G�parity, charge conjugation, C, P, T, and chirality using rare and forbidden decays of light mesons such as the {eta}#17;,{eta}' and {omega}. We also investigate the consequences of these symmetries being slightly broken symmetries. We do this by studying selected meson decays using the Crystal Ball detector. (c) We determine the mass, or more precisely the mass difference of the three light quarks (which are inputs to Quantum Chromodynamics) by measuring the decay rate of specially selected {eta}#17; and {eta}' decay modes, again we use the Crystal Ball. (d)We have started a new program to search for the 33 missing cascade baryons using the CLAS detector at the Thomas Jefferson Laboratory. Cascade resonances are very special: they have double strangeness and are quite narrow. This implies that they can be discovered by the missing mass technique in photoproduction reactions such as in {gamma}p{yields}{Xi}{sup #4;�}K{sup +}K{sup +}. The cascade program is of particular importance for the upgrade to 12 GeV of the CLAS detector and for design of the Hall D at JLab. (e) Finally, we are getting more involved in a new program to measure the hadronic matter form factor of complex nuclei, in particular the "neutron skin" of {sup 208}Pb, which is of great interest to astroparticle physics for determining the properties of neutron stars. Processes of study are coherent and non�coherent #25;0 photoproduction. The Crystal Ball is uniquely suited for these studies because of the large acceptance, good direction and energy resolution and it is an inclusive detector for the #25;{pi}{sup 0} final state and exclusive for background such as 2#25;{pi}{sup 0}.

B.M.K. Nefkens (Principal Investigator, ed.); J. Goetz; A. Lapik; M. Korolija; S. Prakhov; A. Starostin (ed.)

2011-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

Coherent. pi. /sup 0/ photoproduction at intermediate energy  

SciTech Connect

Coherent ..pi../sup 0/ photoproduction from nuclei is calculated in the ..delta..-hole framework. Important background production terms are included, and a comparison with data is presented. Sensitivity to various aspects of the dynamics, such as recoil and the ..delta.. spreading potential, are examined.

Koch, J.H.; Moniz, E.J.

1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Nuclear response in N?nucleus scattering at intermediate energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The nuclear response is examined by considering quasi?elastic spin observables. These are compared to both non?relativistic (Schrödinger) and relativistic (Dirac) models and the effects of medium modifications are emphasized. Furthermore

M. C. Vetterli

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Intermediate long-lived nuclear waste management: an ...  

management: an integrated ... Nuclear Energy Division / Department of Physico-Chemistry. ... CIMETAL Project Air carbonation phenomenology Transport ...

378

Classifier-specific Intermediate Representation for Multimedia Tasks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

using both motion and dy- namic texture information. We detect spatial-temporal interest points (STIP in spatio-temporal regions localized around each STIP. For both HOG and HOF features, we generated multiple STIP can be detected in the same frame, we also explore computing a BoW histogram for each frame

Hauptmann, Alexander G.

379

Intermediate Strain Rate Testing for Single and Multiple Loading ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Author(s), John J Lewandowski. On-Site Speaker (Planned), John J Lewandowski. Abstract Scope, MTS Systems has developed MTS Model 311.13 for CWRU ...

380

Intermediate Models of Planetary Circulations in the Atmosphere and Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Large-scale extratropical motions (with dimensions comparable to, or somewhat smaller than, the planetary radius) in the atmosphere and ocean exhibit a more restricted range of phenomena than are admissible in the primitive equations for fluid ...

James C. McWilliams; Peter R. Gent

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Annals of Mathematics The Intermediate Jacobian of the Cubic Threefold  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning Xcel Energy #12;September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 2 Xcel Energy and Wind ·Who we are? ·Amount of wind? ·Issues and Experiences #12;September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 3 Xcel Energy Utilities ·Northern States Power ·Cheyenne Light ·PSC of Colorado ·Southwestern PSC #12;September 22, 2004 Xcel Energy 4 Wind on Xcel Energy

382

Intermediate Report on the development of an optimization code for ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We find very often in the industry simulators of huge chemical reactors, simulators of huge ..... “Theory of Algorithm for Unconstraned Optimization”.

383

Strength of intermediate-range forces coupling to isospin  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental search for new forces coupling to nuclear isospin with a range of {ge}3 m was conducted using a torsion balance driven in resonance by a set of masses configured to generate a nearly pure isospin source field. The strength of any such coupling {xi} in units of gravity per atomic mass unit is found to be bounded by {minus}2.3{times}10{sup {minus}4}{le}{xi}{le}+2.7{times}10{sup {minus}5}, where the positive sign represents an attractive force between like isospin charges.

Cowsik, R.; Krishnan, N.; Tandon, S.N.; Unnikrishnan, S. (Tata Institute of Fundamental Research, Bombay 400005, India (IN))

1990-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

Experimental investigations in particle physics at intermediate energies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The major elements of this project continues to be on fundamental symmetries and parameters of the Standard Model. The projects in the current period have been BNL E791 (a search for the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e, which would violate the rule of separate lepton number conservation), test of an upgrade proposal (E871), and LSND, a neutrino experiment at LAMPF. For E791, data taking was completed in June 1990, and preliminary results are now available for the decays K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e and K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{mu}from the entire data set. The data for decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} ee are still being analysed. These are an upper limit for the branching fraction for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e of 3.5 {times} 10{sup {minus}11} (90% C.L.). From the 1990 data alone, we have a new (preliminary) value of the branching fraction for K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}{mu} of (6.96{plus minus}0. 4{plus minus}0.22) {times} 10{sup {minus}9}, with a sample of 349 events. Combining this with earlier data gives (6.96{plus minus}0.34) {times} 10{sup 9}, by far the most precise value. The limit on the decay K{sub L}{sup 0} {yields} {mu}e places a lower limit on the mass of a new particle mediating such decays of 85 TeV. The LSND (Large Scintillator Neutrino Detector), a search for neutrino oscillations at LAMPF, has been approved, and is now underway. Other neutrino work at Los Alamos, E764, has resulted in a final publication. This includes the best, measurement of {nu}-nuclear scattering, in {nu}{sub mu} {sup 12}C inclusive cross sections. The measurement of the cross section for the exclusive reaction {nu}{sup mu}{sup 12}C {yields} {mu}{sup {minus}12} N is unique. In a new development, Dr. Martoff has established a facility for fabrication of superconducting detectors of nuclear radiation; the equipment has been funded and is partly installed. Planned uses include scattering for Dark Matter.' In summary, the objectives for this year have been met.

Auerbach, L.B.; Highland, V.L.; Martoff, C.J.; McFarlane, K.W.; Guss, C.; Kettell, S.

1991-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

385

Reduction of Utility Usage in a Glyphosate Intermediate (GI) Unit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In 1991, the World Business Council for Sustainable Development (WBCSD) introduced “Eco- Efficiency” as a management strategy to link financial and environmental performance to create more value with less ecological impact. Based on this strategy, CETAC-WEST (Canadian Environmental Technology Advancement Corporation - West), in mid-2000, introduced a practical approach to eco-efficiency to Western Canada's upstream oil and gas sector. The CETAC-WEST Eco-Efficiency Program, focused primarily on sour gas processing facilities, has developed methods and programs to identify opportunities for energy conservation and GHG reductions. The program outlined in this paper consists of four interrelated phases that are used to identify and track efficiency opportunities as well as promote the use of energy efficient methodologies and technologies. If, as program results suggest, 15% to 20% of the gas that is now consumed at by plant operations can be saved through efficiencies, it would save $500 to $700 million worth of gas for sale on the market. Although this small Pilot Program in the gas processing sector has surfaced major opportunities, there are significantly greater opportunities in other sectors with high GHG emissions intensity, such as sweet gas processing, conventional oil, heavy oil and oil sands. Capturing these opportunities will require a carefully considered strategy. This strategy should include, in addition to commitments for expanding the scope of the current Program, sustained leadership by industry champions and by governments - all aimed at changing the operating mode and improving the culture in the oil and gas industry.

Sander, M. L.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Organic Flash Cycles for Intermediate and High Temperature Waste Reclamation  

Researchers at Berkeley Lab have developed a highly efficient technology for the reclamation of waste heat in mechanical heat engines widely used in ...

387

SDC Infiltrated LSM Cathode for Intermediate-Temperature SOFCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hot Section Corrosion Issues in Microturbines Operating on B100 Bio-Diesel · Impact of Impurities and ... Large-Scale Technique for Dye Solar Cells Preparation.

388

A new rf structure for intermediate-velocity particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an rf structure with high shunt impedance and good field stability for particle velocities o.1 {le} {beta} {le} 0.5. Traditionally, the drift-tube linac (DTL) has been the structure of choice for this velocity range. The new structure, called a coupled-cavity drift-tube linac (CCDTL), combines features of the Alvarez DTL and the {pi}-mode coupled-cavity linac (CCL). Each accelerating cavity is a two-cell, 0-mode DTL. The center-to-center distance between gaps is {gamma}{lambda}. Adjacent accelerating cavities have oppositely directed electric fields, alternating in phase by 180{degrees}. The chain of cavities operates in a {pi}/2 structure mode so the coupling cavities are nominally unexcited. We will discuss 2-D and 3-D electromagnetic code calculations, and some initial measurements on a low-power model of a CCDTL. We will compare shunt impedance calculations for DTL, CCL, and CCDTL structures. The CCDTL has potential application for a wide range of ion linacs. For example, high-intensity proton linacs could use the CCDTL instead of a DTL up to an energy of about 200 MeV. Another example is a stand-alone, low-duty, low-current, very high gradient, proton, cancer therapy machine. The advantage for this application would be a saving in the cost of the machine because the linac would be short.

Billen, J.H.; Krawczyk, F.L.; Wood, R.L.; Young, L.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Legacy Vehicle Fuel System Testing with Intermediate Ethanol Blends  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of E10 and E17 on legacy fuel system components from three common mid-1990s vintage vehicle models (Ford, GM, and Toyota) were studied. The fuel systems comprised a fuel sending unit with pump, a fuel rail and integrated pressure regulator, and the fuel injectors. The fuel system components were characterized and then installed and tested in sample aging test rigs to simulate the exposure and operation of the fuel system components in an operating vehicle. The fuel injectors were cycled with varying pulse widths during pump operation. Operational performance, such as fuel flow and pressure, was monitored during the aging tests. Both of the Toyota fuel pumps demonstrated some degradation in performance during testing. Six injectors were tested in each aging rig. The Ford and GM injectors showed little change over the aging tests. Overall, based on the results of both the fuel pump testing and the fuel injector testing, no major failures were observed that could be attributed to E17 exposure. The unknown fuel component histories add a large uncertainty to the aging tests. Acquiring fuel system components from operational legacy vehicles would reduce the uncertainty.

Davis, G. W.; Hoff, C. J.; Borton, Z.; Ratcliff, M. A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Effects of Intermediate Ethanol Blends on Legacy Vehicles and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The law puts a 15-billion-gallon limit on credits available for the amount of corn ethanol that can contribute to the renewable fuel standard. Less than 1% of the...

391

Direct Drive Wave Energy Buoy – Intermediate scale experiment  

SciTech Connect

Columbia Power Technologies deployed a scaled prototype wave energy converter (WEC) in the Puget Sound in February 2011. Other than a brief period (10 days) in which the WEC was removed for repair, it was in the water from Feb. 15, 2011 until Mar. 21, 2012. The SeaRay, as this WEC is known, consists of three rigid bodies which are constrained to move in a total of eight degrees of freedom (DOF). The SeaRay is kept on station with a spread, three-point mooring system. This prototype WEC is heavily instrumented, including but not limited to torque transducers and encoders reporting generator torque applied to and relative pitch of the floats, an inertial measurement unit (IMU) reporting translational acceleration and rotational position of the spar/nacelle, a GPS sensor reporting position, load cells reporting mooring loads at the WEC connection points and a number of strain gauges embedded in the fiberglass reinforced plastic (FRP) hull. Additionally, wave and current data are collected using an Acoustic Wave And Current Profiler (AWAC), allowing performance and design data to be correlated to environmental input conditions. This data – quality controlled, processed and analyzed – is used to characterize the metocean conditions (i.e. sea states). The WEC response will be correlated to the metocean conditions. These results will primarily be used to validate numerical models. The validated numerical models will be used optimize the commercial scale WEC and inform the design process. This document details the SeaRay experiment, including the quality control, processing and subsequent analysis of the data. Furthermore, the methodology and the results of numerical model validation will be described.

Rhinefrank, Kenneth E. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Lenee-Bluhm, Pukha [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Prudell, Joseph H.; Schacher, Alphonse A. [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.; Hammagren, Erik J.; Zhang, Zhe [Columbia Power Technologies, Inc.

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

392

Highly Mismatched Alloys for Intermediate Band Solar Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

edges span much of the solar spectrum, demonstrating thatthat fall within the solar energy spectrum, Zn 1-x Mn x O y

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Intermediate Temperature Creep Deformation in CMSX-3 Single ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

itates in the narrow matrix gaps. This Orowan bowing process is the major source of creep resistance. In the early stages of primary creep, over large regions ...

394

Typed Common Intermediate Format Dept. of Computer Science  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FLINT, to model the semantics and interactions of vari­ ous language­specific features. FLINT is based of primitive types and functions. FLINT provides a common compiler infrastructure that can be quickly adapted system, FLINT serves as a great platform for reasoning about cross­ language interoperations. FLINT types

395

Polaritonics : an intermediate regime between electronics and photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contains the foundational work behind the field of polaritonics. Corresponding to a frequency range from roughly 100 gigahertz up to 10 terahertz, polaritonics bridges the gap between electronics and photonics. ...

Ward, David W. (David Wayne), 1970-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Fusion Policy Advisory Committee FINAL REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The bubble modes for small, large (mushroom), and intermediate size bubbles are illustrated from left for intermediate size bubbles. This mode occurs when a cavity bubble is larger than the gap between the fins

397

Evidence for structural and electronic instabilities at intermediate temperatures in K-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}X for X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl, Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br and Cu(NCS){sub 2} : implications for the phase diagram of these quasi-2D organic superconductors.  

SciTech Connect

We present high-resolution measurements of the coefficient of thermal expansion {alpha}(T)={partial_derivative} ln l(T)/{partial_derivative}T of the quasi-two-dimensional (quasi-2D) salts {kappa}-(BEDT-TTF){sub 2}X with X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl, Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br and Cu(NCS){sub 2} in the temperature range T<{approx}150 K. Three distinct kinds of anomalies corresponding to different temperature ranges have been identified. These are (A) phase-transition anomalies into the superconducting (X=Cu(NCS){sub 2}, Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br) and antiferromagnetic (X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl) ground state, (B) phase-transition-like anomalies at intermediate temperatures (30-50) K for the superconducting salts, and (C) kinetic, glasslike transitions at higher temperatures, i.e., (70-80) K for all compounds. By a thermodynamic analysis of the discontinuities at the second-order phase transitions that characterize the ground state of system (A), the uniaxial-pressure coefficients of the respective transition temperatures could be determined. We find that in contrast to what has been frequently assumed, the intraplane-pressure coefficients of Tc for this family of quasi-2D superconductors do not reveal a simple form of systematics. This demonstrates that attempts to model these systems by solely considering in-plane electronic parameters are not appropriate. At intermediate temperatures (B), distinct anomalies reminiscent of second-order phase transitions have been found at T*=38 K and 45 K for the superconducting X=Cu(NCS){sub 2} and Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br salts, respectively. Most interestingly, we find that the signs of the uniaxial pressure coefficients of T*, {partial_derivative}T*/{partial_derivative}p{sub i} (i=a,b,c), are strictly anticorrelated with those of {Tc}. Based on comparative studies including the nonsuperconducting X=Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Cl salt as well as isotopically labeled compounds, we propose that T* marks the transition to a density-wave state forming on minor, quasi-1D parts of the Fermi surface. Our results are compatible with two competing order parameters that form on disjunct portions of the Fermi surface. At elevated temperatures (C), all compounds show {alpha}(T) anomalies that can be identified with a kinetic, glasslike transition where, below a characteristic temperature T{sub g}, disorder in the orientational degrees of freedom of the terminal ethylene groups becomes frozen in. Our results provide a natural explanation for the unusual time- and cooling-rate dependences of the ground-state properties in the hydrogenated and deuterated Cu[N(CN){sub 2}]Br salts reported in the literature.

Muller, J.; Lang, M.; Steglich, F.; Schlueter, J. A.; Kini, A. M.; Sasaki T.; Materials Science Division; Max-Planck-Inst. fur Chemische Physik fester Stoffe; Physikalisches Inst. der Univ. Frankfurt; Tohoku Univ.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Wildlife Species of the Yakima Subbasin Wildlife Species Occurring in the Yakima Subbasin (IBIS 2003)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Pacific Giant Salamander Dicamptodon tenebrosus Red-legged Frog Rana aurora Rough-skinned Newt Taricha vandykei Western Red-backed Salamander Plethodon vehiculum Western Toad Bufo boreas Woodhouse's Toad Bufo nigrescens Black-throated Sparrow Amphispiza bilineata Blue Grouse Dendragapus obscurus Blue-winged Teal Anas

399

Methods of and apparatus for recording images occurring just prior to a rapid, random event  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and a method are disclosed for recording images of events in a medium wherein the images that are recorded are of conditions existing just prior to and during the occurrence of an event that triggers recording of these images. The apparatus and method use an optical delay path that employs a spherical focusing mirror facing a circular array of flat return mirrors around a central flat mirror. The image is reflected in a symmetric pattern which balances astigmatism which is created by the spherical mirror. Delays on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds are possible.

Kelley, Edward F. (Montpelier, ID)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Naturally occurring data as research instrument: analyzing examination responses to study the novice programmer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In New Zealand and Australia, the BRACElet project has been investigating students' acquisition of programming skills in introductory programming courses. The project has explored students' skills in basic syntax, tracing code, understanding code, and ... Keywords: CS1, SOLO, comprehension, novice programmers, taxonomy, tracing

Raymond Lister; Tony Clear; Simon; Dennis J. Bouvier; Paul Carter; Anna Eckerdal; Jana Jacková; Mike Lopez; Robert McCartney; Phil Robbins; Otto Seppälä; Errol Thompson

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Sensitive Species and Natural Communities Known to Occur on the Picket Wire Canyonlands, Comanche  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to search for objects or areas of contamination. Features include: · Calculation of the probability . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3.39 3.6 Definition of Terms for the Comparisons Conducted by the RTI goal of interest is selected from the sampling goals pull-down menu. The next step is to enter design

402

Naturally Occurring Variants of Human A9 Nicotinic Receptor Differentially Affect Bronchial Cell Proliferation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

: 633­637. 2. Amos CI, Wu X, Broderick P, Gorlov IP, Gu J, et al. (2008) Genome-wide association scan

Loudon, Catherine

403

Nanostructural organization of naturally occurring composites-part II: silica-chitin-based biocomposites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigations of the micro-and nanostructures and chemical composition of the sponge skeletons as examples for natural structural biocomposites are of fundamental scientific relevance. Recently, we show that some demosponges (Verongula gigantea, Aplysina ...

Hermann Ehrlich; Dorte Janussen; Paul Simon; Vasily V. Bazhenov; Nikolay P. Shapkin; Christiane Erler; Michael Mertig; René Born; Sascha Heinemann; Thomas Hanke; Hartmut Worch; John N. Vournakis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Investigation of Naturally Occurring Radio Nuclides in Shir-kuh Granites  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the principle natural radiation resources is Granite which can be dangerous for human because of its radiations. Based on this fact, in this research we attempt to specify the activity amount of these natural radio nuclides, existing in Shir-kuh Granite of Yazd state. To specify the activity amount of this natural radio nuclides, it has been applied the measurement method of Gamma spectroscopy using high purity Germanium (HPGe) detector.

Mazarei, Mohammad Mehdi; Zarei, Mojtaba [Department of Science, Bushehr Branch, Islamic Azad University, City of Aalishahr, Bushehr Province, Iran P.O.Box: 7519619555 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

405

A Diagnosis of Two Blocking Events That Occurred Simultaneously in the Midlatitude Northern Hemisphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres Goddard Earth Observing System-1 analyses, the horizontal distribution of atmospheric forcing processes involved in the growth, maintenance, and decay of two Northern Hemisphere midlatitude blocking ...

Anthony R. Lupo

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Why Did the California Electricity Crisis Occur?: A Numerical Analysis Using a Multiagent Intelligent Simulator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the summer of 2000, wholesale electricity prices in California were approximately 500% higher than those during the same months in 1998-1999. The price hike was unexpected by many policy makers and individuals who were involved in the electric ... Keywords: Agent-based approach, cybernetics, reinforcement learning

T. Sueyoshi; G. R. Tadiparthi

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Systematic reappraisal of Coniella and Pilidiella, with specific reference to species occurring on Eucalyptus and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, including its teleomorphs in Schizoparme, has a cosmopolitan distribution and is associated with disease and Pilidiella have a cosmopolitan distribution and include plant pathogens that cause leaf, stem and root

408

Changes in the Proportion of Precipitation Occurring as Snow in New England (1949–2000)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ratio of snow to total precipitation (S/P) is a hydrologic indicator that is sensitive to climate variability and can be used to detect and monitor hydrologic responses to climatic change. Changes in S/P ratio over time could influence the ...

Thomas G. Huntington; Glenn A. Hodgkins; Barry D. Keim; Robert W. Dudley

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

The Nature of a Heat Wave in Eastern Argentina Occurring during SALLJEX  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes the physical processes associated with the occurrence of a heat wave over central Argentina during the austral summer of 2002/03, during which the South American Low-Level Jet Experiment (SALLJEX) was carried out. The SALLJEX ...

S. Bibiana Cerne; Carolina S. Vera; Brant Liebmann

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Radioactive mineral occurences of Colorado and bibliography. [2500 citations in bibliography  

SciTech Connect

This two-part report provides an essentially complete listing of radioactive occurrences in Colorado, with a comprehensive bibliography and bibliographic cross-indexes. Part 1 lists approximately 3000 known radioactive occurrences with their locations and brief accounts of the geology, mineralogy, radioactivity, host rock, production data, and source of data for each. The occurrences are classified by host rock and plotted on U.S. Geological Survey 1/sup 0/ x 2/sup 0/ topographic quadrangle maps with a special 1 : 100,000-scale base map for the Uravan mineral belt. Part 2 contains the bibliography of approximately 2500 citations on radioactive mineral occurrences in the state, with cross-indexes by county, host rock, and the special categories of ''Front Range,'' ''Colorado Plateau,'' and ''thorium.'' The term ''occurrence'' as used in this report is defined as any site where the concentration of uranium or thorium is at least 0.01% or where the range of radioactivity is greater than twice the background radioactivity. All citations and occurrence data are stored on computer diskettes for easy retrieval, correction, and updating.

Nelson-Moore, J.L.; Collins, D.B.; Hornbaker, A.L.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

High-resolution array CGH clarifies events occurring on 8p in carcinogenesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

). PMC42, HCC38 and HCC1569 had losses from the telomere to 2.2 Mb, 3.4 Mb and 3.7 Mb respectively; HCC1500 had a deletion between 1.3 Mb and 36.5 Mb; DU4475 had a hetero- zygous deletion between 1.1 Mb and 1.9 Mb and MIA PaCa-2 had a homozygous deletion... .5 Mb 3 Mb 3.5 Mb 8p23.28p23.3 OR4F21 ZNF596 FBXO25 ERICH1 DLGAP2 MYOM2 KBTBD11 CSMD1 C8orf42 CLN8 ARHGEF10 C8orf61 hsa-mir-596 PMC42 HCC38 HCC1569 HCC1500 MIA PaCa-2 DU4475 ARHGEF10 C8orf61 CLN8 hsa-mir-596 a b Homo sapiens GQLYQDLQNLL HDLNVIGQITQL...

Cooke, Susanna L; Pole, Jessica C M; Chin, Suet-Feung; Ellis, Ian O; Caldas, Carlos; Edwards, Paul A W

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

412

The warmest global temperatures of the Cenozoic Era occurred in early Eocene time,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

evaporite deposits, including shortite, halite, and the world's largest known trona reserves (Culbertson

Wilf, Peter

413

DISTRIBUTION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING RADIONUCLIDES (U, Th) IN TIMAHDIT'S BLACK SHALE (MOROCCO)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

focused on the use of Moroccan's black oil shales as the raw materials for production of a new type, 1991). These adsorbents were produced from oil shale, which is abundant in Morocco. The choice

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

414

ORIGINAL PAPER Range expansion and population dynamics of co-occurring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at Harvard Forest, Petersham, MA, USA. High pressure flow meter (HPFM) The HPFM was constructed according

Preisser, Evan

415

Health Consultation Evaluation of Community-Wide Asbestos Exposures EL DORADO HILLS NATURALLY OCCURRING ASBESTOS SITE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A health consultation is a verbal or written response from ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partners to a specific request for information about health risks related to a specific site, a chemical release, or the presence of hazardous material. In order to prevent or mitigate exposures, a consultation may lead to specific actions, such as restricting use of or replacing water supplies; intensifying environmental sampling; restricting site access; or removing the contaminated material. In addition, consultations may recommend additional public health actions, such as conducting health surveillance activities to evaluate exposure or trends in adverse health outcomes; conducting biological indicators of exposure studies to assess exposure; and providing health education for health care providers and community members. This concludes the health consultation process for this site, unless additional information is obtained by ATSDR or ATSDR’s Cooperative Agreement Partner which, in the Agency’s opinion, indicates a need to revise or append the conclusions previously issued.

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

n December 30, 1958, an acci-dent occurred in the Los Alam-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melting/Heating Agarose Melting/Heating Buffer Solution Heating Water Melting/Heating Slide Drying Sample, and radioactive materials is STRICTLY PROHIBTED. The following hazard control measures must be implemented aluminum foil and plastic coated magnetic stirrer bars. o Overheat liquids. It is possible to raise water

Massey, Thomas N.

417

Characterization of Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material (NORM) in Oil and Gas Industry Equipment and Wastes  

SciTech Connect

This Sampling and Analysis (S and A) Plan was developed for the NORM Characterization Program, and describes the information to be gained through the program, how the required information is to be collected, and the anticipated form and content of the final data. The S and A Plan provides detailed procedures describing the work to be performed, how and why the work will be performed, and who will be responsible for conducting the various aspects of the work. The S and A Plan has been prepared with input from all parties involved with the program. Where appropriate, portions of the procedures described in the S and A Plan will be field tested by personnel of the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) and the Grand Junction Project Office (GJPO), as well as representatives of the cosponsor organizations prior to their use in the field.

Rood, A.S.; White, G.J.

1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

418

Evaluation of WRF Model Simulations of Tornadic and Nontornadic Outbreaks Occurring in the Spring and Fall  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent studies, investigating the ability to use the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to distinguish tornado outbreaks from primarily nontornadic outbreaks when initialized with synoptic-scale data, have suggested that accurate ...

Chad M. Shafer; Andrew E. Mercer; Lance M. Leslie; Michael B. Richman; Charles A. Doswell III

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

VU Incident # Classification LocationReport Occurred on or Between Disposition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

People who were not supposed to be in the area were seen handling copper pipes. Burglary 08-30117 1203 17 Student Ipod was stolen from vehicle.Theft from Motor Vehicle 08-30124 Edgehill at 17th Ave S6/1/08 18, June 02, 2008 15:00 15:30 Inactive Other Vehicle immobilation boot was stolenTheft from Motor Vehicle

Palmeri, Thomas

420

Investigation of BAS 100, a Naturally Occurring CYP3A Inhibitor, as a Bioavailability Boosting Agent.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Numerous drug agents exhibit low and erratic oral bioavailability. Drug metabolizing enzymes (DMEs) such as cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) and efflux transporters (DTs) such as… (more)

Li, Fang

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occurs infrequently intermediate" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

. Liquid or solid particles suspended in the air . Some occur naturally, originating from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, absorption by particles and surrounding atmosphere causes net warming. . magnitude of cooling depends on size) . Aerosols produce more vivid sunsets . We are not sure whether aerosols are overall warming or cooling by underlying Earth surface albedo . Although reduction in sunlight reaching ground produces net cooling

McCready, Mark J.

422

average shedding rate for each type oftag. Type-I shedding, which occurs immediately after release,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-tall O'Shaughnessy Dam provided the city with a reliable, gravity-fed supply of water so clean- ing of a dam in the naturalist's beloved Yosemite National Park. Muir had fought the proposal that it still needs no filtration. The environmental cost was steep, however: The dam flooded Hetch Hetchy

423

Methods of and apparatus for recording images occurring just prior to a rapid, random event  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and a method are disclosed for recording images of events in a medium wherein the images that are recorded are of conditions existing just prior to and during the occurrence of an event that triggers recording of these images. The apparatus and method use an optical delay path that employs a spherical focusing mirror facing a circular array of flat return mirrors around a central flat mirror. The image is reflected in a symmetric pattern which balances astigmatism which is created by the spherical mirror. Delays on the order of hundreds of nanoseconds are possible.

Kelley, E.F.

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

424

MORB that have formed in conjunction with continental rifting and where EM-1 component signatures occur. A  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

there is a relationship between the property and the logs. Similar opinions have been emphasised in Wendt et al. (1986

425

This chapter reviews tidal wetlands that occur along the Atlantic coast of the United States from the northern border  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

borrow it from our children. Native American proverb E " " 16 #12;In recent testimony before the U at the Savannah River National Lab. We hope to gain insight into the fundamentals underlying the way the materials

Pennings, Steven C.

426

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the deployment of tools and measurement systems for testing on ODP Leg 201, which is intended to study hydrate deposits on the Peru margin as part of other scientific investigations. Additional accomplishments were related to the continuing evolution of tools and measurements systems in preparation for deployment on ODP Leg 204, Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon in July 2002. The design for PCS Gas Manifold was finalized and parts were procured to assemble the gas manifold and deploy this system with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) tool on ODP Leg 201. The PCS was deployed 17 times during ODP Leg 201 and successfully retrieved cores from a broad range of lithologies and sediment depths along the Peru margin. Eleven deployments were entirely successful, collecting between 0.5 and 1.0 meters of sediment at greater than 75% of hydrostatic pressure. The PCS gas manifold was used in conjunction with the Pressure Core Sampler (PCS) throughout ODP Leg 201 to measure the total volume and composition of gases recovered in sediment cores associated with methane hydrates. The results of these deployments will be the subject of a future progress report. The FUGRO Pressure Corer (FPC), one of the HYACE/HYACINTH pressure coring tools, and two FUGRO engineers were deployed on the D/V JOIDES Resolution during ODP Legs 201 to field-test this coring system at sites located offshore Peru. The HYACINTH project is a European Union (EU) funded effort to develop tools to characterize methane hydrate and measure physical properties under in-situ conditions. The field-testing of these tools provides a corollary benefit to DOE/NETL at no cost to this project. The opportunity to test these tools on the D/V JOIDES Resolution was negotiated as part of a cooperative agreement between JOI/ODP and the HYACINTH partners. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were deployed onboard the R/V JOIDES Resolution and used extensively during ODP Leg 201. Preliminary results indicate successful deployments of these tools. An infrared-thermal imaging system (IR-TIS) was delivered to JOI/ODP for testing and use on ODP Leg 201 to identify methane hydrate intervals in the recovered cores. The results of these experiments will be the subject of a future progress report. This report presents an overview of the primary methods used for deploying the ODP memory tools and PCS on ODP Leg 201 and the preliminary operational results of this leg. Discussions regarding the laboratory analysis of the recovered cores and downhole measurements made during these deployments will be covered in a future progress report.

Frank Rack; Derryl Schroeder; Michael Storms; ODP Leg 201 Shipboard Scientific Party

2001-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

427

The Interactions between a Midlatitude Blocking Anticyclone and Synoptic-Scale Cyclones That Occurred during the Summer Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using the Goddard Laboratory for Atmospheres Goddard Earth Observing System 5-yr analyses and the Zwack–Okossi equation as the diagnostic tool, the horizontal distribution of the dynamic and thermodynamic forcing processes contributing to the ...

Anthony R. Lupo; Phillip J. Smith

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Chapter 5. Conclusion Uranium, a naturally occurring element, contributes to low levels of natural background radiation in the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are extracted from the earth. Protore is mined uranium ore that is not rich enough to meet the market demand conventional open-pit and underground uranium mining include overburden (although most overburden is not necessarily enriched in uranium as is protore), unreclaimed protore, waste rock, evaporites from mine water

429

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were to refine budgets and operational plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the scheduling of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution. The proposed statement of work for Phase 2 will include three primary tasks: (1) research management oversight, provided by JOI; (2) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of pressure coring and core logging systems, through a subcontract with Geotek Ltd., who will work with Fugro and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to accomplish some of the subtasks; and, (3) mobilization, deployment and demobilization of a refrigerated container van that will be used for degassing of the Pressure Core Sampler and density logging of these pressure cores, through a subcontract with the Texas A&M Research Foundation (TAMRF). More details about these tasks are provided in the following sections of this report. The appendices to this report contain a copy of the scientific prospectus for the upcoming IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Hydrates), which provides details of operational and scientific planning for this expedition.

Frank Rack

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

430

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were (1) the preliminary postcruise evaluation of the tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 to study hydrate deposits on Hydrate Ridge, offshore Oregon from July through September 2002; and (2) the preliminary study of the hydrate-bearing core samples preserved in pressure vessels and in liquid nitrogen cryofreezers, which are now stored at the ODP Gulf Coast Repository in College Station, TX. During ODP Leg 204, several newly modified downhole tools were deployed to better characterize the subsurface lithologies and environments hosting microbial populations and gas hydrates. A preliminary review of the use of these tools is provided herein. The DVTP, DVTP-P, APC-methane, and APC-Temperature tools (ODP memory tools) were used extensively and successfully during ODP Leg 204 aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution. These systems provided a strong operational capability for characterizing the in situ properties of methane hydrates in subsurface environments on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. Pressure was also measured during a trial run of the Fugro piezoprobe, which operates on similar principles as the DVTP-P. The final report describing the deployments of the Fugro Piezoprobe is provided in Appendix A of this report. A preliminary analysis and comparison between the piezoprobe and DVTP-P tools is provided in Appendix B of this report. Finally, a series of additional holes were cored at the crest of Hydrate Ridge (Site 1249) specifically geared toward the rapid recovery and preservation of hydrate samples as part of a hydrate geriatric study partially funded by the Department of Energy (DOE). In addition, the preliminary results from gamma density non-invasive imaging of the cores preserved in pressure vessels are provided in Appendix C of this report. An initial visual inspection of the samples stored in liquid nitrogen is provided in Appendix D of this report.

Frank Rack; Michael Storms; Derryl Schroeder; Brandon Dugan; Peter Schultheiss; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2002-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

431

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were the implementation of a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 311 using the R/V JOIDES Resolution and the deployment of all required equipment and personnel to provide the required services during this expedition. IODP Expedition 311 shipboard activities on the JOIDES Resolution began on August 28 and were concluded on October 28, 2005. New ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) aluminum autoclave chambers were fabricated prior to the expedition. During the expedition, 16 PCS autoclaves containing pressure cores were X-rayed before and after depressurization using a modified Geotek MSCL-P (multi-sensor core logger-pressure) system. These PCS cores were density scanned using the MSCL-V (multi-sensor core logger-vertical) during depressurization to monitor gas evolution. The MSCL-V was set up in a 20-foot-long refrigerated container provided by Texas A&M University through the JOI contract with TAMRF. IODP Expedition 311 was the first time that PCS cores were examined before (using X-ray), during (using MSCL-V gamma density) and after (using X-ray) degassing to determine the actual volume and distribution of sediment and gas hydrate in the pressurized core, which will be important for more accurate determination of mass balances between sediment, gas, gas hydrate, and fluids in the samples collected. Geotek, Ltd was awarded a contract by JOI to provide equipment and personnel to perform pressure coring and related work on IODP Expedition 311 (Cascadia Margin Gas Hydrates). Geotek, Ltd. provided an automated track for use with JOI's infrared camera systems. Four auxiliary monitors showed infrared core images in real time to aid hydrate identification and sampling. Images were collected from 185 cores during the expedition and processed to provide continuous core temperature data. The HYACINTH pressure coring tools, subsystems, and core logging systems were mobilized to Astoria, Oregon. Both HYACINTH pressure coring tools, the HRC (HYACE Rotary Corer) and the FPC (Fugro Pressure Corer) were mobilized and used during the expedition. Two HYACINTH engineers supervised the use of the tools and five good pressure cores were obtained. Velocity, density and X-ray linear scanning data were collected from these cores at near in situ pressure using the MSCL-P system. Dr. Barry Freifeld from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory provided an X-ray source and detector for X-ray imaging of pressure cores and helped Geotek with the design and mobilization of the MSCL-P system. Pressure core handling, transfer, and logging was performed in a refrigerated 20-foot container supplied by Geotek, Ltd. After scanning, the pressure cores were stored for on-shore analysis in aluminum barrels. Additional studies were conducted at the Pacific Geoscience Center (PGC), where a shore based laboratory was established after Expedition 311.

Frank Rack; Peter Schultheiss; IODP Expedition 311 Scientific Party

2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

432

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) follow-up logging of pressure cores containing hydrate-bearing sediment; and (2) opening of some of these cores to establish ground-truth understanding. The follow-up measurements made on pressure cores in storage are part of a hydrate geriatric study related to ODP Leg 204. These activities are described in detail in Appendices A and B of this report. Work also continued on developing plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on evolving plans to schedule a scientific ocean drilling expedition to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, in the NE Pacific as part of the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) using the R/V JOIDES Resolution.

Frank R. Rack; Peter Schultheiss; Melanie Holland

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

Frank R. Rack; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

434

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Frank Rack presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the DOE/NETL project review and two made two presentations at the ChevronTexaco Gulf of Mexico Hydrate JIP meeting, which were both held in Westminster, CO; and, (2) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

Frank R. Rack

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) post-cruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

Frank Rack; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

436

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments of the JOI Cooperative Agreement with DOE/NETL in this quarter were that: (1) Frank Rack, Anne Trehu, and Tim Collett presented preliminary results and operational outcomes of ODP Leg 204 at the American Association of Petroleum Geologists annual meeting in Salt Lake City, UT; (2) several Leg 204 scientists participated in special hydrate sessions at the international EGS/AGU/EUG meeting in Nice, France and presented initial science results from the cruise, which included outcomes arising from this cooperative agreement; and, (3) postcruise evaluation of the data, tools and measurement systems that were used during ODP Leg 204 continued in the preparation of deliverables under this agreement. At the EGS/EUG/AGU meeting in Nice, France in April, Leg 204 Co-chiefs Anne Trehu and Gerhard Bohrmann, as well as ODP scientists Charlie Paull, Erwin Suess, and Jim Kennett, participated in a press conference on hydrates. The well-attended press conference entitled ''Gas Hydrates: Free methane found and controversy over the 'hydrate gun''' led to stories in Nature on-line and BBC radio, among others. There were six (6) oral and fifteen (15) poster presentations on ODP Leg 204 hydrate science at the EGS/AGU/EUG Meeting in Nice, France on April 6-11, 2003. This was a very strong showing at a meeting just over six month following the completion of the drilling cruise and highlighted many of the results of the leg, including the results obtained with instruments and equipment funded under this cooperative agreement. At the AAPG annual meeting in Salt Lake City, UT on May 11-14, 2003, Anne Trehu gave an oral presentation about the scientific results of Leg 204, and Frank Rack presented a poster outlining the operational and technical accomplishments. Work continued on analyzing data collected during ODP Leg 204 and preparing reports on the outcomes of Phase 1 projects as well as developing plans for Phase 2.

Frank Rack; ODP Leg 204 Shipboard Scientific Party

2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

437

Diabetes Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire: Change version for use alongside status version provides appropriate solution where ceiling effects occur. Diabetes Care  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(DTSQc) evaluated in insulin glargine trials shows greater responsiveness to improvements than the original DTSQ

Clare Bradley; Rosalind Plowright; John Stewart; John Valentine

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

In-Situ Sampling and Characterization of Naturally Occurring Marine Methane Hydrate Using the D/V JOIDES Resolution  

SciTech Connect

The primary accomplishments during the first quarter were to mobilize materials and supplies to meet the deployment schedule for equipment and activities, as proposed under the DOE/NETL cooperative agreement with JOI, with initial testing and use of specialized tools and equipment on Ocean Drilling Program (ODP) Leg 201. As a requirement of the award, two copies of a technical feasibility report entitled ''Preliminary Evaluation of Existing Pressure/Temperature Coring Systems'' were delivered to DOE/NETL on October 22, 2001. The report was written to provide a discussion of the availability and compatibility of the four existing pressure coring devices in existence. Most of these systems are available for use by JOI/ODP aboard the D/V JOIDES Resolution, via purchase, lease, modification, etc. and the proposed capabilities to upgrade existing devices or systems for use on other platforms. In addition, the report provided a discussion of the compatibility of each existing coring device in conjunction with the use of the other coring devices, such as the advanced piston coring (APC) system used by ODP. Based on an evaluation of the JOI report, the DOE/NETL Program Manager William Gwilliam provided a ''Go'' decision to JOI for the further development of the ODP Pressure Coring System (PCS) and PCS Gas Manifold. During the reporting period negotiations were conducted with various potential subcontractors and vendors to establish the specific cost-sharing arrangements and work breakdown necessary to definitize the terms of the DOE/NETL cooperative agreement with JOI. The discussions were communicated with the DOE/NETL Program Manager, William Gwilliam, to keep NETL closely informed about events as this project evolved. A series of meetings were also held with ODP engineers, technical staff, and to plan for the implementation of the various tasks outlined in the JOI proposal to DOE for deployment during ODP Legs 201 and 204. These meetings helped to answer numerous unresolved questions and establish a firm timetable of remaining activities that needed to be accomplished by January 28, 2002, when ODP Leg 201 will begin.

Frank Rack

2001-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

439

IN-SITU SAMPLING AND CHARACTERIZATION OF NATURALLY OCCURRING MARINE METHANE HYDRATE USING THE D/V JOIDES RESOLUTION  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary activities accomplished during this quarter were continued efforts to develop plans for Phase 2 of this cooperative agreement based on the evolving operational planning for IODP Expedition 311, which will use the JOIDES Resolution to study marine methane hydrates along the Cascadia margin, offshore Vancouver Island. IODP Expedition 311 has been designed to further constrain the models for the formation of marine gas hydrate in subduction zone accretionary prisms. The objectives include characterizing the deep origin of the methane, its upward transport, its incorporation in gas hydrate, and its subsequent loss to the seafloor. The main attention of this expedition is on the widespread seafloor-parallel layer of dispersed gas hydrate located just above the base of the predicted stability field. In a gas hydrate formation model, methane is carried upward through regional sediment or small-scale fracture permeability, driven by the tectonic consolidation of the accretionary prism. The upward moving methane is incorporated into the gas hydrate clathrate as it enters the methane hydrate stability zone. Also important is the focusing of a portion of the upward methane flux into localized plumes or channels to form concentrations of near-seafloor gas hydrate. The amount of gas hydrate in local concentrations near the seafloor is especially important for understanding the response of marine gas hydrate to climate change. The expedition includes coring and downhole measurements at five sites across the Northern Cascadia accretionary prism. The sites will track the history of methane in an accretionary prism from (1) its production by mainly microbiological processes over a thick sediment vertical extent, (2) its upward transport through regional or locally focused fluid flow, (3) its incorporation in the regional hydrate layer above the BSR or in local concentrations at or near the seafloor, (4) methane loss from the hydrate by upward diffusion, and (5) methane oxidation and incorporation in seafloor carbonate, or expulsion to the ocean. This expedition builds on the previous Cascadia gas hydrate drilling of ODP Leg 146 and on more recent ODP Leg 204 off Oregon. Important experiments being considered for DOE/NETL funding as part of the JOI cooperative agreement include, (1) Logging-While-Drilling/Measurements-While-Drilling (LWD/MWD), (2) Pressure Core Sampling (PCS/HYACINTH) of gas hydrate, and fluid recovery under in situ conditions, (3) X-ray CT logging of whole cores under in situ conditions, and (4) Infrared thermal imaging of whole round cores to map temperature variations resulting from the presence of hydrate. Preliminary budget estimates have been made for each of these tasks and discussions are ongoing with DOE/NETL program managers to develop a final plan that can be implemented within the constraints of the available funding and logistical considerations.

Frank R. Rack; Tim Francis; Peter Schultheiss; Philip E. Long; Barry M. Freifeld

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

mates of 4-6 mo gestation periods, which assume that copulation and conception do not occur until  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ceans including Dungeness crabs. On 18 April 1979 large numbers ofdead Dunge- ness crabs on the beach of Fisheries (WDF). Inspection ofthe beach between Westport and the northern end ofWillapa Bay confirmed crabs in the pots of commercial fishermen in Willapa Bay in February 1979, and these find- ings were