National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for occupational radiation exposure

  1. DOE 2010 occupational radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2011-11-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE.* The DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with DOE Part 835 dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. The occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site over the past 5 years.

  2. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) is the database of occupational radiation exposures for all monitored DOE employees, contractors,...

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

  13. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

  15. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

  16. 2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU

    2012-12-12

    This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

  17. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 2001 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2001-12-31

    The goal of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its operations, including radiological, to ensure the safety and health of all DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures to levels that are “As Low As Reasonably Achievable” (ALARA). The 2001 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides a summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE, and energy research.

  18. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2000 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2000-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Safety and Health publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE in making this report most useful to them. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  19. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1998 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1998-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health with support from Environment Safety and Health Technical Information Services publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  20. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1997 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1997-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  1. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    1996-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health publishes the DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE/DOE contractor managers in their management of radiological safety programs and to assist them in the prioritization of resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside the DOE and hope we have succeeded in making the report more useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of collective data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  2. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2004 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2004-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors, as well as members of the public. DOE is defined to include the National Nuclear Security Administration sites. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  3. DOE occupational radiation exposure 2002 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-12-31

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Corporate Performance Assessment (EH-3) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for DOE and DOE contractor managers and workers in managing radiological safety programs and to assist them in prioritizing resources. We appreciate the efforts and contributions from the various stakeholders within and outside DOE to make the report most useful. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and members of the public. The exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. For the purposes of examining trends, data for the past 5 years are included in the analysis.

  4. DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-31

    The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

  5. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2012-02-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

  6. DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

    2009-10-01

    A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

  7. DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

    2011-11-11

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

  8. DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

  9. DOE 2014 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Report REMS RF RL SLAC SNL SPEAR3 SPRU SRNS SRR SRS Sv TED TEqD TJNAF U-234 UMTRA USEC WIPP WVDP Y-12 Radiological Control Standard Roentgen equivalent in man Radiation Exposure...

  10. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    levels of risk similar to those for industrial activities (e.g., chemical, mining, transportation). The key U.S. limit for occupational exposure to radiation is 5 rems...

  11. DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    ORAU

    2012-08-08

    This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

  12. 2013 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report Appendices

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i sEnergy ItMisc. DOE Occupational Radiation

  13. Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure at Medical Institutions ALARA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammack, Richard

    Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure at Medical Institutions ALARA ALARA Program as low as is reasonably achievable (ALARA). In accord with this commitment, we hereby describe, and instructions to foster the ALARA concept within our institution. The organization will include a Radiation

  14. Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2012-07-07

    The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

  15. A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.),...

  16. Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

    2007-08-01

    This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

  17. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to...

  18. UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA Program for Maintaining Occupational Radiation Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    -Medical Licensed Activities at the University of Florida, As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) I. Management radiation exposures (individual and collective) as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). In accordance the necessary written policies, procedures, and instructions to foster the ALARA concept within our institution

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2006 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | DepartmentEnergy Occupational Radiation

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department ofEnergy reports occupational

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2002 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department ofEnergyEnergy Occupational

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2007 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | DepartmentEnergy Occupational

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | DepartmentEnergy OccupationalEnergy

  4. Perspective on occupational radiation exposures at a hypothetical fusion power station

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Easterly, C.E.; Cannon, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    If current technology were used, several major sources of potential occupational radiation exposure at fusion power stations would be quite similar to those at current light water reactor power stations. Based upon this similarity, crude estimates of doses received from various maintenance operations at fusion power reactors are made. The dose estimates reinforce the need for concurrent development of sophisticated remote maintenance devices and low-activation materials for fusion reactors. It is concluded that minimization of occupational doses can be best achieved by developing an overall maintenance strategy that combines the best features of remote techniques and low activation materials as opposed to developing one or the other exclusively.

  5. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

  6. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

    2009-12-01

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

  7. Impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposures at nuclear power plants. Case study: PWR during routine operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Haggard, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to present data in support of evaluating the impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposure. To determine quantitatively whether fuel cladding failure contributes significantly to occupational radiation exposure, radiation exposure measurements were taken at comparable locations in two mirror-image pressurized-water reactors (PWRs) and their common auxiliary building. One reactor, Unit B, was experiencing degraded fuel characterized as 0.125% fuel pin-hole leakers and was operating at approximately 55% of the reactor's licensed maximum core power, while the other reactor, Unit A, was operating under normal conditions with less than 0.01% fuel pin-hole leakers at 100% of the reactor's licensed maximum core power. Measurements consisted of gamma spectral analyses, radiation exposure rates and airborne radionuclide concentrations. In addition, data from primary coolant sample results for the previous 20 months on both reactor coolant systems were analyzed. The results of the measurements and coolant sample analyses suggest that a 3560-megawatt-thermal (1100 MWe) PWR operating at full power with 0.125% failed fuel can experience an increase of 540% in radiation exposure rates as compared to a PWR operating with normal fuel. In specific plant areas, the degraded fuel may elevate radiation exposure rates even more.

  8. The impact of fuel cladding failure events on occupational radiation exposures at nuclear power plants: Case study, PWR (pressurized-water reactor) during an outage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moeller, M.P.; Martin, G.F.; Kenoyer, J.L.

    1987-08-01

    This report is the second in a series of case studies designed to evaluate the magnitude of increase in occupational radiation exposures at commercial US nuclear power plants resulting from small incidents or abnormal events. The event evaluated is fuel cladding failure, which can result in elevated primary coolant activity and increased radiation exposure rates within a plant. For this case study, radiation measurements were made at a pressurized-water reactor (PWR) during a maintenance and refueling outage. The PWR had been operating for 22 months with fuel cladding failure characterized as 105 pin-hole leakers, the equivalent of 0.21% failed fuel. Gamma spectroscopy measurements, radiation exposure rate determinations, thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) assessments, and air sample analyses were made in the plant's radwaste, pipe penetration, and containment buildings. Based on the data collected, evaluations indicate that the relative contributions of activation products and fission products to the total exposure rates were constant over the duration of the outage. This constancy is due to the significant contribution from the longer-lived isotopes of cesium (a fission product) and cobalt (an activation product). For this reason, fuel cladding failure events remain as significant to occupational radiation exposure during an outage as during routine operations. As documented in the previous case study (NUREG/CR-4485 Vol. 1), fuel cladding failure events increased radiation exposure rates an estimated 540% at some locations of the plant during routine operations. Consequently, such events can result in significantly greater radiation exposure rates in many areas of the plant during the maintenance and refueling outages than would have been present under normal fuel conditions.

  9. JCCRER Project 2.3 -- Deterministic effects of occupational exposure to radiation. Phase 1: Feasibility study; Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okladnikova, N.; Pesternikova, V.; Sumina, M.

    1998-12-01

    Phase 1 of Project 2.3, a short-term collaborative Feasibility Study, was funded for 12 months starting on 1 February 1996. The overall aim of the study was to determine the practical feasibility of using the dosimetric and clinical data on the MAYAK worker population to study the deterministic effects of exposure to external gamma radiation and to internal alpha radiation from inhaled plutonium. Phase 1 efforts were limited to the period of greatest worker exposure (1948--1954) and focused on collaboratively: assessing the comprehensiveness, availability, quality, and suitability of the Russian clinical and dosimetric data for the study of deterministic effects; creating an electronic data base containing complete clinical and dosimetric data on a small, representative sample of MAYAK workers; developing computer software for the testing of a currently used health risk model of hematopoietic effects; and familiarizing the US team with the Russian diagnostic criteria and techniques used in the identification of Chronic Radiation Sickness.

  10. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

    2012-12-12

    This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

  11. Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

    2012-07-07

    This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

  12. Occupational Radiation Protection Program (10 CFR 835)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The occupational radiation protection program is governed by the Rule, specified as 10 CFR 835. The requirements given in 10 CFR 835 are matters of law, punishable by civil and criminal penalties.

  13. Parental occupational exposures and risk of childhood cancer: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Leary, L.M.; Hicks, A.M.; Peters, J.M.; London, S. (University of Southern California School of Medicine, Los Angeles (USA))

    1991-01-01

    The authors reviewed the literature in order to summarize the present knowledge on the association between parental occupational exposures to chemicals and the risk of childhood malignancy. The 32 studies pertaining to this topic were evaluated by considering various study qualities such as sample size, specificity of outcome, confounding, exposure specificity, and control selection. When evaluating the findings from any epidemiologic study, the potential sources of bias have to be considered. The selection of subjects, misclassification of exposure or outcome, and confounding from extraneous factors can contribute to a biased estimate of effect. Studies done to minimize these potential biases will be more valid, and these studies should be given the most weight when parental occupational exposures are evaluated as risk factors for childhood malignancy. We conclude that the preponderance of evidence supports the hypothesis that occupational exposure of parents to chemicals increases the risk of childhood malignancy. The parental occupational exposures implicated in childhood malignancy risk are exposure to chemicals including paints, petroleum products, solvents (especially chlorinated hydrocarbons) and pesticides, and exposure to metals. The available data do not allow the identification of specific etiologic agents within these categories of compounds. Future epidemiologic and toxicologic studies should be designed to pursue these leads. 49 references.

  14. RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Open Access Occupational exposure to asbestos and lung cancer in men: evidence consistently demonstrated that workplace exposure to it increases the risk of developing lung cancer. Few of lung cancer, and 2,053 controls recruited from 8 Canadian provinces between 1994 and 1997. Self

  15. Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Modeling Human Metabolism of Benzene Following Occupational and Environmental Exposures Sungkyoon) models to investigate nonlinear relationships between levels of benzene metabolites (E,E- muconic acid, S-phenylmercapturic acid, phenol, hydroqui- none, and catechol) and benzene exposure among 386 exposed and control workers

  16. Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabala, Dana; Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia

    2013-11-13

    Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

  17. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

    1995-11-01

    With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

  18. 2007 Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This document is available on the Department of Energy REMS Program Web Site at: http:www.hss.energy.gov Printed with soy ink on recycled paper 2007 Report iii Foreword Glenn S....

  19. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 1998 Report

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    and testing facilities account for the W e a p o n s F a b . & T e s t . W a s t e P r o c . M g m t . R e s e a r c h , F u s i o n R e s e a r c h , G e n e r a l R e a c...

  20. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergy Managing853926 NewsORMAT NEVADAEnergy Innovation andWelcome The

  1. DOE 2014 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of EnergyCyrus Wadia AboutDeal'T A * S H I E L D * A L A R

  2. 2014 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report Appendices

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReportOffice | Department of Energy Oakand14 U.S. DepartmentLabor

  3. DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORSSeries) |ReplaceThis report wasflLVTRON

  4. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORSSeries) |ReplaceThis report

  5. DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report: Achievements ofCOMPOSITION OF VAPORSSeries) |ReplaceThis report2013

  6. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEveryCustomerD=DISCLAIMER:1904-AC23,T A * S H I E

  7. DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEveryCustomerD=DISCLAIMER:1904-AC23,T A * S H IA

  8. DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report - User Survey

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department ofRefrigerators |DepartmentofNames New RichlandGas,DOEOUser

  9. Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof EnergyApril 2014Department ofWindOPEN

  10. Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

    1981-04-01

    The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

  11. Evaluation and Control of Radiation Dose to the Embryo/Fetus Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-04-29

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a program to control fetal exposure to ionizing radiation and evaluate the resultant dose that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835.

  12. 10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

  13. Occupational ALARA Program Guide for Use with Title 10, CFR, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational "as low as is reasonably achievable" (ALARA) program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. For completeness, this Guide also references detailed guidance provided in the DOE-STD-1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL (DOE 1999a), hereinafter referred to as the RCS.

  14. RPR 1B. REQUEST FOR RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RPR 1B. REQUEST FOR RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY (Please type or print legibly) Organization: Address:...

  15. DOE Radiation Records Contacts List

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

  16. Occupational Radiation Protection Record-Keeping and Reporting Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-05-20

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational radiation protection record-keeping and reporting program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  17. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

    1987-08-01

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  18. Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

    1987-01-01

    Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

  19. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McHale, Cliona M.

    2009-01-01

    Associated with Occupational Benzene Exposure Identified byY, Dosemeci M, and Linet M. Benzene and lymphohematopoieticamong workers exposed to benzene. Cancer Res 58: 2176-2181,

  20. Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

    2006-03-24

    A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

  1. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Jinsong

    Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure Available online 20 January 2009 Keywords: Benzene exposure Gene expression Human blood Toxicogenomics Benzene is an established cause of leukemia, and possibly lymphoma, in humans, but the underlying

  2. Occupational radiation dose assessment for a non site specific spent fuel storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, J. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Charlotte, NC (United States); Eble, R.G. Jr. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Vienna, VA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    To expedite the licensing process of the non site specific Centralized Interim Storage Facility (CISF) the Department of Energy has completed a phase I CISF Topical Safety Analysis Report (TSAR). The TSAR will be used in licensing the phase I CISF if a site is designated. An occupational radiation does assessment of the facility operations is performed as part of the phase I CISF design. The first phase of the CISF has the capability to receive, transfer, and store SNF in dual-purpose cask/canister systems (DPC`s). Currently there are five vendor technologies under consideration. The preliminary dose assessment is based on estimated occupational exposures using traditional power plant ISFSI and transport cask handling processes. The second step in the process is to recommend ALARA techniques to reduce potential exposures. A final dose assessment is completed implementing the ALARA techniques and a review is performed to ensure that the design is in compliance with regulatory criteria. The dose assessment and ALARA evaluation are determined using the following input information: Dose estimates from vendor SAR`s; ISFSI experience with similar systems; Traditional methods of operations; Expected CISF cask receipt rates; and feasible ALARA techniques. 5 refs., 1 tab.

  3. Occupational radiation dose assessment for the DOE spent-fuel storage facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hadley, J. [Duke Engineering and Services, Charlotte, NC (United States); Eble, R.G. Jr. [Duke Engineering & Services, Vienna, VA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    To expedite the licensing process of the centralized interim storage facility (CISF), the U.S. Department of Energy has completed a CISF topical safety analysis report (TSAR). The TSAR will be used in licensing the CISF when a site is designated. An occupational radiation dose assessment of the facility operations is performed as part of the CISF design. The first phase of the CISF has the capability to receive, transfer, and store spent nuclear fuel (SNF) in dual-purpose casks. Currently, there are five vendor technologies under consideration. The preliminary dose assessment is based on estimated occupational exposures using traditional power plant independent spent-fuel storage installation (ISFSI) and transport cask-handling processes. The second step in the process is to recommend as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) techniques to reduce potential exposures. A final dose assessment is completed implementing the ALARA techniques, and a review is performed to ensure that the design is in compliance with regulatory criteria. The dose assessment and ALARA evaluation are determined using the following input information: dose estimates from vendor safety analysis reports, ISFSI experience with similar systems, traditional methods of operations, expected CISF cask receipt rates, and feasible ALARA techniques.

  4. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

    2010-10-01

    The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

  5. STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED ELASTOMERS - RECENT INSIGHTS FROM EXPERIMENTS AND MODELING Citation Details In-Document Search Title: STRUCTURAL...

  6. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Program Policy for Submitting of PII information Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII information January 22, 2015 The REMS Program...

  7. Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, draft report for comment. Volume 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s WNP-2, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

  8. Occupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment--the role of spatial averaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    heating equipment is a source of strong and nonhomogeneous magnetic fields, which can exceed occupationalOccupational exposure assessment of magnetic fields generated by induction heating equipment for more Home Search Collections Journals About Contact us My IOPscience #12;IOP PUBLISHING PHYSICS

  9. Policy on Exposure to Blood Borne Pathogens (BBP) and other Occupational Exposures or Injuries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myers, Lawrence C.

    clinical site to provide evaluation and treatment of health care workers who have sustained a BBP exposure for initial evaluations. Effective management of HIV exposure may require the administration of antiviral at DMS during day hours or the Dean on Call at other times (numbers and schedule in the student handbook

  10. Department of Energy Occupational Radiation Exposure 1996 Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources. The process of data...

  11. Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-DMarchLLC Open Annual Report I. Basic

  12. DOE 2014 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report ALARA Activities at DOE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of EnergyCyrus Wadia AboutDeal'T A * S H I E L D * A L A R

  13. DOE 2011 occupational radiation exposure (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01Technical Information-- Energy,researchTRANSITION

  14. DOE 2012 occupational radiation exposure (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01Technical Information-- Energy,researchTRANSITIONConnect

  15. DOE 2013 occupational radiation exposure (Technical Report) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01Technical Information--

  16. DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report ALARA Activities at DOE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEveryCustomerD=DISCLAIMER:1904-AC23,T A * S H I

  17. DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report ALARA Activities at DOE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartmentEnergyEveryCustomerD=DISCLAIMER:1904-AC23,T A * S H

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of Energy TheAnneliseAnnova

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1987 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of Energy

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1988 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of EnergyEnergy first Annual

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1991 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of EnergyEnergy first

  2. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1992 - 1994 Report |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of EnergyEnergy

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1995 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of EnergyEnergyEnergy DOE

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1996 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of EnergyEnergyEnergy

  5. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1997 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department of

  6. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1999 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department ofEnergy reports

  7. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2000 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department ofEnergy reportsEnergy

  8. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2001 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department ofEnergy

  9. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2003 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department ofEnergyEnergy

  10. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department ofEnergyEnergyEnergy

  11. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2005 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | Department

  12. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2009 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | DepartmentEnergy

  13. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2010 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | DepartmentEnergyEnergy The DOE 2010

  14. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2011 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t yWaste | DepartmentEnergyEnergy The DOE

  15. Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring,

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuilding energy codes havePUBLIC

  16. Occupational Radiation Exposures at the Department of Energy | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailable forSiteWeatherization FundingFunding andof

  17. Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHighOffice ofProjectDepartmentOperating

  18. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1989 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FALGeologic CO2Solutions |Lawrence --

  19. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1990 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FALGeologic CO2Solutions |Lawrence --Energy Annual

  20. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FALGeologic CO2Solutions |Lawrence --Energy

  1. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2013 Report | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment| DepartmentAL/FALGeologic CO2Solutions |Lawrence --EnergyEnergy

  2. A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3 Racetracks25 AMO PeerServices6Program Management »

  3. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslieAlgaeAnatomy of a GroundwaterAnnaAnnouncing

  4. Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2014 Report | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12 Beta-3AUDITLeslieAlgaeAnatomy of a

  5. Chromosomal "Fingerprints" of Prior Exposure to Densely Ionizing Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    be detected and measured long after radiation exposure. Specifically, they produce an anomalously low ratio (F doses of densely ionizing radiation, such as a particles or neutrons. Consequently, determina- tion ion- izing radiation doses is an important societal and legal issue. Thus there has been considerable

  6. Radiation-Generating Devices Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-04-15

    For use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a sealed radioactive source accountability and control program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart M of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  7. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    RADIATION PROTECTION An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle Measurements Technical Position, Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing...

  8. Radiation Safety Training Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a radiation safety training program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart J of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  9. Savannah River Plant/Savannah River Laboratory radiation exposure report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, C.D.; Hyman, S.D.; Keisler, L.L. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Plant); Reeder, D.F.; Jolly, L.; Spoerner, M.T.; Schramm, G.R. and Co., Aiken, SC . Savannah River Lab.)

    1989-01-01

    The protection of worker health and safety is of paramount concern at the Savannah River Site. Since the site is one of the largest nuclear sites in the nation, radiation safety is a key element in the protection program. This report is a compendium of the results in 1988 of the programs at the Savannah River Plant and the Savannah River Laboratory to protect the radiological health of employees. By any measure, the radiation protection performance at this site in 1988 was the best since the beginning of operations. This accomplishment was made possible by the commitment and support at all levels of the organizations to reduce radiation exposures to ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable). The report provides detailed information about the radiation doses received by departments and work groups within these organizations. It also includes exposure data for recent years to allow Plant and Laboratory units to track the effectiveness of their ALARA efforts. Many of the successful practices and methods that reduced radiation exposure are described. A new goal for personnel contamination cases has been established for 1989. Only through continual and innovative efforts to minimize exposures can the goals be met. The radiation protection goals for 1989 and previous years are included in the report. 27 figs., 58 tabs.

  10. RADIATION EXPOSURE TO HUMAN SUBJECTS, COMMITTEE ON The responsibilities of the Committee on Radiation Exposure to Human Subjects, established in 1974, are: 1) review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    RADIATION EXPOSURE TO HUMAN SUBJECTS, COMMITTEE ON The responsibilities of the Committee on Radiation Exposure to Human Subjects, established in 1974, are: 1) review for authorization applications involving ionizing radiation exposure to human research subjects, insofar as the proposed study involves

  11. Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2003-09-30

    Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

  12. Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

    2006-02-06

    Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

  13. Coronary calcium scans and radiation exposure in the multi-ethnic study of atherosclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Messenger, B; Li, D; Nasir, K; Carr, JJ; Blankstein, R; Budoff, MJ

    2015-01-01

    10]. The risk of low dose radiation exposure remains spec-2.3 mSv [6]. While low radiation doses have been reported inactually exist at the low radiation doses associ- ated with

  14. Subject Title: UV Radiation Safety Program at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    programs. The current UV radiation safety program does not cover exposure to solar UV light. Exposure to solar UV radiation is the predominant cause of skin cancer, particularly when the sun is highest exposure in both occupational and recreational activities. Solar UV radiation also affects the eyes

  15. Management and Administration of Radiation Protection Programs Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-10-20

    This Guide discusses acceptable methods for ensuring that radiological activities will be managed and administered in accordance with a documented radiation protection program that complies with U.S. DOE requirements specified in Title 10 CFR Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Cancels DOE G 441.1-1. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Low Dose Arsenic and Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Keratinocytes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocke, David M.

    Proteomic Analysis of Low Dose Arsenic and Ionizing Radiation Exposure on Keratinocytes Susanne R that keratinocytes responded to either low dose arsenic and/or low dose ionizing radiation exposure, resulting arsenic; human; ionizing radiation; keratinocyte; low dose *Corresponding author: Susanne Berglund

  17. Molecular stress response in the CNS of mice after systemic exposure to interferon-alpha, ionizing radiation and ketamine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Xiu R.

    2009-01-01

    demonstrated that low-dose radiation (at 10 cGy whole body)brain response to low- dose radiation exposure involvesafter exposure to low-dose ionizing radiation. International

  18. Radiation exposures for DOE and DOE contractor employees - 1991. Twenty-fourth annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, M.H.; Hui, T.E.; Millet, W.H.; Scholes, V.A.

    1994-11-01

    This is the 24th annual radiation exposure report published by US DOE and its predecessor agencies. This report summarizes the radiation exposures received by both employees and visitors at DOE and COE contractor facilities during 1991. Trends in radiations exposures are evaluated. The significance of the doses is addressed by comparing them to the DOE limits and by correlating the doses to health risks based on risk estimates from expert groups.

  19. #AskBerkeleyLab: A Pill to Treat Exposure to Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abergel, Rebecca

    2014-10-30

    Berkeley Lab chemist, Rebecca Abergel, answers a question from Oakland resident Yelena on how a pill can treat exposure to radiation.

  20. New Easy-to-Use Medical Field Guide for Radiation Emergencies...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Site in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the guide includes: Basic radiation protection concepts, terminology, and definitions Occupational exposure and...

  1. Occupational and patient exposure as well as image quality for full spine examinations with the EOS imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damet, J., E-mail: jerome.damet@chuv.ch; Fournier, P.; Monnin, P.; Sans-Merce, M.; Verdun, F. R.; Baechler, S. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1007 (Switzerland)] [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1007 (Switzerland); Ceroni, D. [Department of Paediatrics, Division of paediatric orthopaedic, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)] [Department of Paediatrics, Division of paediatric orthopaedic, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland); Zand, T. [Department of Radiology, Division of paediatric radiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)] [Department of Radiology, Division of paediatric radiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: EOS (EOS imaging S.A, Paris, France) is an x-ray imaging system that uses slot-scanning technology in order to optimize the trade-off between image quality and dose. The goal of this study was to characterize the EOS system in terms of occupational exposure, organ doses to patients as well as image quality for full spine examinations. Methods: Occupational exposure was determined by measuring the ambient dose equivalents in the radiological room during a standard full spine examination. The patient dosimetry was performed using anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adolescent and a five-year-old child. The organ doses were measured with thermoluminescent detectors and then used to calculate effective doses. Patient exposure with EOS was then compared to dose levels reported for conventional radiological systems. Image quality was assessed in terms of spatial resolution and different noise contributions to evaluate the detector's performances of the system. The spatial-frequency signal transfer efficiency of the imaging system was quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Results: The use of a protective apron when the medical staff or parents have to stand near to the cubicle in the radiological room is recommended. The estimated effective dose to patients undergoing a full spine examination with the EOS system was 290?Sv for an adult and 200 ?Sv for a child. MTF and NPS are nonisotropic, with higher values in the scanning direction; they are in addition energy-dependent, but scanning speed independent. The system was shown to be quantum-limited, with a maximum DQE of 13%. The relevance of the DQE for slot-scanning system has been addressed. Conclusions: As a summary, the estimated effective dose was 290?Sv for an adult; the image quality remains comparable to conventional systems.

  2. Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Hubbard, Alan E.; Forrest, Matthew S.; Vermeulen, Roel; Chen, Jinsong; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2009-03-01

    Benzene is an established cause of leukemia and a possible cause of lymphoma in humans but the molecular pathways underlying this remain largely undetermined. This study sought to determine if the use of two different microarray platforms could identify robust global gene expression and pathway changes associated with occupational benzene exposure in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression of a population of shoe-factory workers with well-characterized occupational exposures to benzene. Microarray data was analyzed by a robust t-test using a Quantile Transformation (QT) approach. Differential expression of 2692 genes using the Affymetrix platform and 1828 genes using the Illumina platform was found. While the overall concordance in genes identified as significantly associated with benzene exposure between the two platforms was 26% (475 genes), the most significant genes identified by either array were more likely to be ranked as significant by the other platform (Illumina = 64%, Affymetrix = 58%). Expression ratios were similar among the concordant genes (mean difference in expression ratio = 0.04, standard deviation = 0.17). Four genes (CXCL16, ZNF331, JUN and PF4), which we previously identified by microarray and confirmed by real-time PCR, were identified by both platforms in the current study and were among the top 100 genes. Gene Ontology analysis showed over representation of genes involved in apoptosis among the concordant genes while Ingenuity{reg_sign} Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified pathways related to lipid metabolism. Using a two-platform approach allows for robust changes in the PBMC transcriptome of benzene-exposed individuals to be identified.

  3. Determination of the accuracy of noise dosimeters used for the evaluation of occupational noise exposure 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abel, Robert Dalton

    1977-01-01

    , the percentage of permissible exposure would 'oe C/T (100) = 15/360 (100) = 4. 2. In the laboratory test, at the 92 dBA level, a portion of the data is illustrated below: Exposure time, minutes 15 30 45 60 $0 Permissible Exposure 4. 2 8. 3 12. 5 16. 7 g.... VI-2. VI-3. VII. VIII. Results of Lab Test--92 dBA I. ocation. Results of Lab Test--95 dBA Location. Results of' Lab Test--97 dBA Location. Octave Band Analysis of 92, 95, and 97 dBA Locations a* Power Plant. . . . . . Octave Band Analysis...

  4. Occupational Exposure to Benzene from Painting with Epoxy and Other High Performance Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    JAHN, STEVEN

    2005-04-20

    Following the discovery of trace benzene in paint products, an assessment was needed to determine potential for benzene exposures to exceed the established ACGIH Threshold Limit Value (TLV) during painting operations. Sample data was collected by area industrial hygienists for benzene during routine maintenance and construction activities at Savannah River Site. A set of available data from the IH database, Sentry, was analyzed to provide guidance to the industrial hygiene staff and draw conclusions on the exposure potential during typical painting operations.

  5. Management and Administration of Radiation Protection Programs Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-03-17

    This Guide discusses acceptable methods for ensuring that radiological activities will be managed and administered in accordance with a documented radiation protection program (RPP) that complies with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1A.

  6. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Radiation Exposure Data Collection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) is assessing the radiation dose to the world population from all sources, and data from the effluent database...

  7. Benefits of Medical Radiation Exposures http://hps.org/hpspublications/articles/Benefitsofmedradexposures.html[10/3/2011 11:48:08 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Hue Sun

    Members Login Contact Us Site Map Search #12;Benefits of Medical Radiation Exposures httpBenefits of Medical Radiation Exposures http Events . State of the Science Workshop: Radiation Exposure, Medical Countermeasures and Treatment 11 Oct

  8. INDOOR RADIATION EXPOSURES FROM RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS: A VIEW OF THE ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero Jr., A.V.

    2010-01-01

    ach range. Because of occupant behavior-- opening doors ,that- -considering occupant behavior--net ventilation rates

  9. INDOOR RADIATION EXPOSURES FROM RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS: A VIEW OF THE ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero Jr., Anthony V.

    2013-01-01

    ach range. Because of occupant behavior-- opening doors ,that- -considering occupant behavior--net ventilation rates

  10. Exposure of Treating Physician to Radiation during Pro-state Brachytherapy using Iodine-125 Seeds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krusche, Bernd

    1 Exposure of Treating Physician to Radiation during Pro- state Brachytherapy using Iodine-125 brachytherapy duration by the most experienced physician was 19.2 min (standard deviation = 1.2 min) (novices. Key Words: Prostate cancer, brachytherapy, Iodine-125 seeds, radiation expos- ure, TLD Short Title

  11. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    carcinogenic risk of low-dose, low-LET radiation is subjectcan be made for low-dose, low- LET radiation. Nevertheless,for radiation carcino­ Extrapolation to low doses. Radiation

  12. Radiation Safety Manual March 21, 2015 RADIATION SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lance, Veronica P.

    . Radioactive Drug Research Committee D. Radiation Safety Officers E. Authorized Users Chapter II: Radiation. Clinical Applications C. Loans and Transfers of Radioactive Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure of Packages Containing Radioactive Materials A. Packages Delivered to the Radiation Safety Office B. Packages

  13. The Department of Energy`s Rocky Flats Plant: A guide to record series useful for health-related research. Volume VII. Employee occupational exposure and health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-08-01

    This is the seventh in a series of seven volumes which constitute a guide to records of the Rocky Flats Plant useful for conducting health-related research. The primary purpose of Volume VII is to describe record series pertaining to employee occupational exposure and health at the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Rocky Flats Plant, now named the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, near Denver, Colorado. History Associates Incorporated (HAI) prepared this guide as part of its work as the support services contractor for DOE`s Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project. This introduction briefly describes the Epidemiologic Records Inventory Project and HAI`s role in the project, provides a history of occupational exposure monitoring and health practices at Rocky Flats, and identifies organizations contributing to occupational exposure monitoring and health policies and activities. Other topics include the scope and arrangement of the guide and the organization to contact for access to these records. Comprehensive introductory and background information is available in Volume 1. Other volumes in the guide pertain to administrative and general subjects, facilities and equipment, production and materials handling, environmental and workplace monitoring, and waste management. In addition, HAI has produced a subject-specific guide, titled The September 1957 Rocky Flats Fire: A Guide to Record Series of the Department of Energy and Its Contractors, which researchers should consult for further information about records related to this incident.

  14. Radiation and Uranium Resources Exposure Control (South Dakota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The public policy of South Dakota is to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, the proper development of uranium resources, and the control of any associated harmful effects. The disposal of...

  15. Indoor exposure to radiation in the case of an outdoorrelease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Phillip N.; Jayaraman, Buvana

    2006-06-01

    This report quantifies the effectiveness of ''sheltering in place'' in a commercial building in the event of an outdoor radiological release. The indoor exposure to airborne particles is calculated by solving the mass balance equation that accounts for the loss of particles due to deposition, filtration and exhaust. Quantitative estimates of shelter-inplace effectiveness are provided for typical commercial buildings.

  16. Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, Tony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Vu, Toni [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hicks, Deanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pritchard, Kathleen [Department of Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2006-05-01

    Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

  17. Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hermes, Robert E. (White Rock, NM)

    2002-01-01

    An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

  18. EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    Implications for radio­ low doses: Radiation Res 71:61-74,effect of ological low-dose radiation in man, and surveyscarcinogenic of low-dose, low-LET radiation is subject to

  19. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Xiu R

    2009-01-01

    Early brain response to low-dose radiation exposure involvesRunning Title: Low dose radiation affects cognitive functionEarly brain response to low-dose radiation exposure involves

  20. U.S. Department of Energy Summary of 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-02-02

    This poster provides graphic data for 2010-2012 of collective total effective dose (TED) by site, and graphical data for 2008-2012 of components of TED, average measurable TED, percentage of collective TED above dose, collective dose and average measurable dose (1974-2012), and numbers of individuals in the DOE workforce, total number of records of monitored individuals, and number of individuals with a measurable dose. Also, there is a table of the number of individuals receiving >2 rems administrative control level and >5 rems annual limit for 2008-2012.

  1. A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s iof1 of 8 2Seismic Response of Fractures

  2. Radiation effects in concrete for nuclear power plants Part I: Quantification of radiation exposure and radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, Kevin G; Pape, Yann Le; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A large fraction of light water reactor (LWR) construction utilizes concrete, including safety-related structures such as the biological shielding and containment building. Concrete is an inherently complex material, with the properties of concrete structures changing over their lifetime due to the intrinsic nature of concrete and influences from local environment. As concrete structures within LWRs age, the total neutron fluence exposure of the components, in particular the biological shield, can increase to levels where deleterious effects are introduced as a result of neutron irradiation. This work summarizes the current state of the art on irradiated concrete, including a review of the current literature and estimates the total neutron fluence expected in biological shields in typical LWR configurations. It was found a first-order mechanism for loss of mechanical properties of irradiated concrete is due to radiation-induced swelling of aggregates, which leads to volumetric expansion of the concrete. This phenomena is estimated to occur near the end of life of biological shield components in LWRs based on calculations of estimated peak neutron fluence in the shield after 80 years of operation.

  3. 10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart A - General Provisions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l De p u t y A s s i s t a n t S eOF 11 DOCUMENT5-OCCUPATIONAL

  4. Evaluation and comparison of occupational noise exposure among workers on offshore and onshore oil well drilling rigs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez Garcia, Humberto

    1984-01-01

    Drilling Rig Specifications . . . 47 51 Appendix B: Noise Exposure Data . 54 Appendix C Actual Exposure Time "C" for Onshore Workers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Appendix D Actual Exposure Time "C" for Offshore Workers... . . . . . 19 5. Flow Diagram of the Offshore Survey Procedure. Sound Level Meter and Microphone Assembly. 22 Type 1562-A Sound Level Calibrator. . . . . . . . 24 The Sound Pressure Level Measured in dBA at Approximate Operator Ear Level. 26 Onshore...

  5. Posting and Labeling for Radiological Control Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-05-24

    This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a radiological hazard posting and labeling program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

  6. Radiation Environments and Exposure Considerations for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, William M.; Low, Nora M.; Zillmer, Andrew; Johnson, Gregory A. [Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, CA 91309 (United States); Normand, Eugene [Boeing Radiation Effects Laboratory, P.O. Box 3707, M/S 2T-50, Seattle, WA 98124-22079 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) is the next generation (RTG) being developed by DOE to provide reliable, long-life electric power for NASA's planetary exploration programs. The MMRTG is being developed by Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne and Teledyne Energy Systems Incorporated (TESI) for use on currently planned and projected flyby, orbital and planet landing missions. This is a significant departure from the design philosophy of the past which was to match specific mission requirements to RTG design capabilities. Undefined mission requirements provide a challenge to system designers by forcing them to put a design envelope around 'all possible missions'. These multi-mission requirements include internal and external radiation sources. Internal sources include the particles ejected by decaying Pu-238 and its daughters plus particles resulting from the interaction of these particles with other MMRTG materials. External sources include the full spectrum of charged particle radiation surrounding planets with magnetic fields and the surfaces of extraterrestrial objects not shielded by magnetic fields. The paper presents the results of investigations into the environments outlined above and the impact of radiation exposure on potential materials to be used on MMRTG and ground support personnel. Mission requirements were also reviewed to evaluate total integrated dose and to project potential shielding requirements for materials. Much of the information on mission shielding requirements was provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The primary result is an ionizing radiation design curve which indicates the limits to which a particular mission can take the MMRTG in terms of ionizing radiation exposure. Estimates of personnel radiation exposure during ground handling are also provided.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Debus, Jürgen; Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

  8. Using a mobile transparent plastic-lead-boron shielding barrier to reduce radiation dose exposure in the work place

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, S A; Mecozzi, J M

    2001-01-11

    Moveable radiation shielding barriers made of plastic material containing lead and boron can be used to reduce radiation exposure near the work place. Personnel can maneuver and position the transparent radiation shielding barriers anywhere within the work place. The lead in the shielding barrier provides an effective shielding material against radiation exposure (approximately a 1.0 mm lead equivalent protection) while the boron in the shielding barrier provides neutron absorption to reduce the moderation/reflection effects of the shielding materials (approximately a 2% {Delta}k/k reduction).

  9. PLANNING TOOLS FOR ESTIMATING RADIATION EXPOSURE AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verbeke, J; Young, M; Brereton, S; Dauffy, L; Hall, J; Hansen, L; Khater, H; Kim, S; Pohl, B; Sitaraman, S

    2010-10-22

    A set of computational tools was developed to help estimate and minimize potential radiation exposure to workers from material activation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). AAMI (Automated ALARA-MCNP Interface) provides an efficient, automated mechanism to perform the series of calculations required to create dose rate maps for the entire facility with minimal manual user input. NEET (NIF Exposure Estimation Tool) is a web application that combines the information computed by AAMI with a given shot schedule to compute and display the dose rate maps as a function of time. AAMI and NEET are currently used as work planning tools to determine stay-out times for workers following a given shot or set of shots, and to help in estimating integrated doses associated with performing various maintenance activities inside the target bay. Dose rate maps of the target bay were generated following a low-yield 10{sup 16} D-T shot and will be presented in this paper.

  10. Occupational Electric Shocks, Electromagnetic Fields and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergara, Ximena Patricia

    2012-01-01

    working near machines with electric motors, and welders haveelectric shock exposure categorization is somewhat uncertain, especially for specific occupations such as office machineelectric shocks and electrocutions were precision production, craft and repair occupations, followed by service occupations and machine

  11. Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowe, Xiu R

    2009-01-01

    map (modified from IPA), all genes that were modulated in the mouse brain by exposure to ionizing radiationmap (modified from IPA), the genes that were modulated in the mouse brain by exposure to ionizing radiation

  12. Biological effects of long-term exposure to low dose-rate radiation -- Comparisons of WAM model and LQ model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wada, Takahiro; Nakamura, Issei; Tsunoyama, Yuichi; Nakajima, Hiroo; Bando, Masako

    2015-01-01

    Newly proposed Whack-A-Mole (WAM) model which is to be used to estimate the biological effects of artificial radiations is compared with conventionally used Linear-Quadratic model. Basic properties of WAM model are discussed emphasizing on the dose-rate dependence. By adopting the parameters that are determined to fit the mega mouse experiments, biological effects of long-term exposure to extremely low dose-rate radiation are discussed. In WAM model, the effects of the long-term exposure show a saturation property, which makes a clear distinction from the LNT hypothesis which predicts a linear increase of the effects with time.

  13. Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-06-06

    There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

  14. Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Cadwallader

    2005-01-31

    This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

  15. Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petithuguenin, T.D.P.

    2009-01-01

    and strength, on occupants’ behavior, on the ventilationSince the occupants’ behavior drives ventilation (viaa more realistic approach to occupant behavior and exposure

  16. Consequences of low dose ionizing radiation exposure on the hippocampal microenvironment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    June 4, 2015 Low Dose Radiation Alters HippocampalJune 4, 2015 Low Dose Radiation Alters HippocampalJune 4, 2015 Low Dose Radiation Alters Hippocampal

  17. Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

    2010-01-01

    associated with a low radiation dose because radiosensitiveand pQCT involve low radiation doses enables these techni-small because radiation doses are low. Despite uncertainty

  18. HELLE: Health Effects of Low Level Exposures/ Gezondheidseffecten van lage blootstellingniveaus [International workshop: Influence of low level exposures to chemicals and radiation on human and ecological health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schoten, Eert

    1998-11-26

    The Health Council is closely involved in establishing the scientific foundation of exposure limits for substances and radiation in order to protect public health. Through the years, the Council has contributed to the formulation of principles and procedures, both for carcinogenic and for noncarcinogenic agents. As a rule, the discussion with regard to the derivation of health-based recommended exposure limits centers around the appropriateness of extrapolation methods (What can be inferred from data on high exposure levels and on experimental animals?). Generally speaking, there is a lack of direct information on the health effects of low levels of exposure. Effects at these levels cannot usually be detected by means of traditional animal experiments or epidemiological research. The capacity of these analytical instruments to distinguish between ''signal'' and ''noise'' is inadequate in most cases. Annex B of this report contains a brief outline of the difficulties and the established methods for tackling this problem. In spite of this, the hope exists that the posited weak signals, if they are indeed present, can be detected by other means. The search will have to take place on a deeper level. In other words, effort must be made to discover what occurs at underlying levels of biological organization when organisms are exposed to low doses of radiation or substances. Molecular and cell biology provide various methods and techniques which give an insight into the processes within the cell. This results in an increase in the knowledge about the molecular and cellular effects of exposure to agents, or stated differently, the working mechanisms which form the basis of the health effects. Last year, the Health Council considered that the time was ripe to take stock of the state of knowledge in this field. To this end, an international working conference was held from 19 to 21 October 1997, entitled ''Health Effects of Low Level Exposures: Scientific Developments and Perspectives for Risk Assessment''. The central question was the extent to which the sometimes fast-growing knowledge about molecular and cellular effects offers the desired basis for extrapolation. Against this setting, a number of more specific questions which have been hotly debated for some time were also addressed. One of the primary questions concerned the traditional but increasingly questioned division between stochastic and non-stochastic working agents, and the corresponding division between exposure-effect relations without a threshold and with a threshold. Thoughts were also exchanged on what is often referred to as hormesis: the notion that low levels of exposure could actually improve health. For the purpose of illuminating the many aspects of these issues, experts from a number of areas were invited. In addition to this, three agents were selected to serve as points of crystallization for the general debate: ionizing radiation, ultraviolet (UV) radiation and dioxins. The present report calls attention to a selection of issues which emerged during the discussions on the above-mentioned central topic. Various more detailed questions and the wider context of the points considered are described at greater length in the enclosed conference report and in the background documents attached to the report. What follows is a series of considerations regarding the scientific basis for the derivation of recommended exposure levels, viewed in the light of current procedures and against the background of the work of the Health Council. In the preparation of the following comments and recommendations, various Dutch experts have been consulted.

  19. Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carsten, A.L.

    1984-01-01

    The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 ..mu..Ci/ml, 1.0 ..mu..Ci/ml, 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 ..mu..Ci/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 ..mu..Ci/ml at 28 days. 18 references.

  20. An evaluation of theories concerning the health effects of low-dose radiation exposures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jay)

    2012-01-01

    The danger of high, acute doses of radiation is well documented, but the effects of low-dose radiation below 100 mSv is still heavily debated. Four theories concerning the effects of lowdose radiation are presented here: ...

  1. Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guevara, F.A.

    1982-01-01

    A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described.

  2. P.A. Nelson S.M. Kajiura G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV-filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kajiura, Stephen

    P.A. Nelson Æ S.M. Kajiura Æ G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV levels of solar radiation than they had previously experienced in the source habitat in the turbid waters spectrum, but sharks exposed to greater solar radiation showed increased UV blocking in their corneal

  3. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council

    2008-06-01

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

  4. Measurement and Analysis of Radio-frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Different Mobile Base Transceiver Stations in Ajaokuta and Environs, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ushie, P O; Bolaji, Ayinmode; Osahun, O D

    2013-01-01

    We present the result of a preliminary assessment of radio-frequency radiation exposure from selected mobile base stations in Ajaokuta environs. The Power density of RF radiation within a radial distance of 125m was measured. Although values fluctuated due to the influence of other factors, including wave interference from other electromagnetic sources around reference base stations, we show from analysis that radiation exposure level is below the standard limit (4.5W/sqm for 900MHz and 9W/sqm for 18000MHz) set by the International Commission on Non-ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) and other regulatory agencies.

  5. Simulated Microgravity and Radiation Exposure Effects on the Regulation of Skeletal Muscle Protein Synthesis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiggs, Michael

    2012-10-19

    and is likely not the only mechanism for determining muscle mass. In the final study, the effects of radiation...

  6. Vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms and Parkinson's disease in a population with high ultraviolet radiation exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gatto, NM; Sinsheimer, JS; Cockburn, M; Escobedo, LA; Bordelon, YM; Ritz, BR

    2015-01-01

    8. [39] Lin CH, et al. Vitamin D receptor genetic variantsZ, et al. Association study between vitamin d receptor geneet al. Sun exposure, vitamin D receptor gene polymorphisms

  7. Previous Radiation Exposure Release Form This information is requested under the provisions of the Rules of the City of New York Article

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    of the Rules of the City of New York Article 175. So that we may complete the Radiation Exposure Record 175 of the Rules of the City of New York. EMPLOYEE SIGNATURE: TODAY'S DATE: PLEASE CIRCLE YOUR CURRENT Office 630W 168th Street (mail code 70) New York, NY 10032 COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY Radiation Safety Dosimetry

  8. TU-C-18A-01: Models of Risk From Low-Dose Radiation Exposures: What Does the Evidence Say?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bushberg, J; Boreham, D; Ulsh, B

    2014-06-15

    At dose levels of (approximately) 500 mSv or more, increased cancer incidence and mortality have been clearly demonstrated. However, at the low doses of radiation used in medical imaging, the relationship between dose and cancer risk is not well established. As such, assumptions about the shape of the dose-response curve are made. These assumptions, or risk models, are used to estimate potential long term effects. Common models include 1) the linear non-threshold (LNT) model, 2) threshold models with either a linear or curvilinear dose response above the threshold, and 3) a hormetic model, where the risk is initially decreased below background levels before increasing. The choice of model used when making radiation risk or protection calculations and decisions can have significant implications on public policy and health care decisions. However, the ongoing debate about which risk model best describes the dose-response relationship at low doses of radiation makes informed decision making difficult. This symposium will review the two fundamental approaches to determining the risk associated with low doses of ionizing radiation, namely radiation epidemiology and radiation biology. The strengths and limitations of each approach will be reviewed, the results of recent studies presented, and the appropriateness of different risk models for various real world scenarios discussed. Examples of well-designed and poorly-designed studies will be provided to assist medical physicists in 1) critically evaluating publications in the field and 2) communicating accurate information to medical professionals, patients, and members of the general public. Equipped with the best information that radiation epidemiology and radiation biology can currently provide, and an understanding of the limitations of such information, individuals and organizations will be able to make more informed decisions regarding questions such as 1) how much shielding to install at medical facilities, 2) at what dose level are risk vs. benefit discussions with patients appropriate, 3) at what dose level should we tell a pregnant woman that the baby’s health risk from a prenatal radiation exposure is “significant”, 4) is informed consent needed for patients undergoing medical imaging, and 5) at what dose level is evacuation appropriate after a radiological accident. Examples of the tremendous impact that choosing different risks models can have on the answers to these types of questions will be given.A moderated panel discussion will allow audience members to pose questions to the faculty members, each of whom is an established expert in his respective discipline. Learning Objectives: Understand the fundamental principles, strengths and limitations of radiation epidemiology and radiation biology for determining the risk from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation Become familiar with common models of risk used to describe the dose-response relationship at low dose levels Learn to identify strengths and weaknesses in studies designed to measure the effect of low doses of ionizing radiation Understand the implications of different risk models on public policy and health care decisions.

  9. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W.

    1995-05-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  10. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

  11. Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

    1988-06-01

    A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Lead exposure among small-scale battery recyclers, automobile radiator mechanics, and their children in Manila, the Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suplido, M.L.; Ong, C.N.

    2000-03-01

    Blood lead (PbB) and hemoglobin levels (Hb) were determined in 40 battery repair/recycling shop workers, 16 radiator repair shop workers, and 20 children living in the immediate vicinity of these shops. Unexposed residents with similar socio-economic status were also investigated. Mean PbB level was significantly higher for battery workers when compared to radiator workers and unexposed adults. Among battery workers, 94% had PbB levels above the WHO permissible exposure limit of 40 {micro}g/dL for males and 30 {micro}g/dL for females. There was no demarcation between workplace and living quarters; therefore, workers' families were similarly exposed to hazards. Children living in the immediate vicinity of battery shops also had significantly higher mean PbB levels compared to radiator shop children and unexposed children. For workers with PbB > 40 {micro}g/dL, 90% were anemic. Linear regression showed a correlation between Hb level and log{sub 10}PbB. There was no significant relationship between anemia and blood lead in children. The authors conclude that radiator repair activities appeared to increase the body burden of lead, although not up to a level significantly different from unexposed counterparts. Battery recycling/repair activities, however, significantly increased blood lead levels in workers and their children.

  13. Assessment of Radio-Frequency Radiation Exposure Level from Selected Mobile Base Stations (MBS) in Lokoja, Kogi State, Nigeria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Victor, U J Nwankwo; Dada, S S; Onugba, A A; Ushie, P

    2012-01-01

    The acquisition and use of mobile phone is tremendously increasing especially in developing countries, but not without a concern. The greater concern among the public is principally over the proximity of mobile base stations (MBS) to residential areas rather than the use of handsets. In this paper, we present an assessment of Radio-Frequency (RF) radiation exposure level measurements and analysis of radiation power density (in \\mu W/sq m) from mobile base stations relative to radial distance (in metre). The minimum average power density from individual base station in the town was about 47\\mu W/sq m while the average maximum was about 1.5mW/sq m. Our result showed that average power density of a base station decreases with increase in distance (from base station) and that radiation intensity varies from one base station to another even at the same distance away. Our result (obtained signature of power density variation) was also compared with the 'expected' signature. It was found that radiation from external...

  14. Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khan, T.A.; Vulin, D.S.; Lane, S.G.; Baum, J.W. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States))

    1991-10-01

    In the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants, the ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. This is the sixth report in that series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of information databases of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from the use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Also included is material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations, as well as on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. This report contains 266 abstracts along with subject and author indices. The author index is exclusively for this volume. The subject index contains headings for this volume in bold face, as well as reference to previous volumes. All information in this and previous volumes of the series is also available through our on-line information system called ACE (ALARA Center Exchange). ACE is accessible through fax machines or personal computers interfaced with modems. The bibliography database and other databases are kept current with new abstracts, information on research projects, and recent news of international events related to ALARA at nuclear power plants. Access to the system is provided freely to the ALARA community. For password certification, manuals, and other information about our system, please contact the ALARA CENTER, Building 703M, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973, or call (516) 282-3228.

  15. Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Napier, Bruce A.

    2012-03-26

    A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

  16. Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Ed. ) American Industrial Hygiene Association: 2008.occupational medicine and industrial hygiene is hampered byThe vast majority of industrial hygiene exposure limits for

  17. Solar UV radiation exposure of seamen - Measurements, calibration and model calculations of erythemal irradiance along ship routes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feister, Uwe; Meyer, Gabriele; Kirst, Ulrich

    2013-05-10

    Seamen working on vessels that go along tropical and subtropical routes are at risk to receive high doses of solar erythemal radiation. Due to small solar zenith angles and low ozone values, UV index and erythemal dose are much higher than at mid-and high latitudes. UV index values at tropical and subtropical Oceans can exceed UVI = 20, which is more than double of typical mid-latitude UV index values. Daily erythemal dose can exceed the 30-fold of typical midlatitude winter values. Measurements of erythemal exposure of different body parts on seamen have been performed along 4 routes of merchant vessels. The data base has been extended by two years of continuous solar irradiance measurements taken on the mast top of RV METEOR. Radiative transfer model calculations for clear sky along the ship routes have been performed that use satellite-based input for ozone and aerosols to provide maximum erythemal irradiance and dose. The whole data base is intended to be used to derive individual erythemal exposure of seamen during work-time.

  18. RADIATION MONITORING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, R.H.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation Exposure due to a Boiling Water Reactor Plume fromIN THE VICINITY OF A BOILING WATER REACTOR EXPOSURE RATE

  19. INDOOR RADIATION EXPOSURES FROM RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS: A VIEW OF THE ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero Jr., Anthony V.

    2013-01-01

    to 4 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/l). (A picocurie is anradon-222 concentration of 1 pCi/l would result in an annualnational housing stock (0.2 to 4 pCi/l) exposures would be

  20. INDOOR RADIATION EXPOSURES FROM RADON AND ITS DAUGHTERS: A VIEW OF THE ISSUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero Jr., A.V.

    2010-01-01

    to 4 picocuries per liter of air (pCi/l). (A picocurie is anradon-222 concentration of 1 pCi/l would result in an annualnational housing stock (0.2 to 4 pCi/l) exposures would be

  1. Ann. Occup. Hyg. Page 1 of 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    in the industrial hygiene literature due to its common occurrence among exposure data and due to the challengesOxfordUniversityPresson behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society. Tests for an Upper Percentile of a Lognormal

  2. SU-E-I-49: The Evaluation of Usability of Multileaf Collimator for Diagnostic Radiation in Cephalometric Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, S; Kim, K; Jung, H; Kim, M; Ji, Y; Park, S; Choi, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: This study evaluated usability of Multileaf collimator (MLC) for diagnostic radiation in cephalometric exposure using optical stimulated luminance dosimeters (OSLDs) Methods: The MLC material was made alloy tool steel (SKD-11) and the density of it is 7.89g/m3 that is similar to it of steel (Fe, 7.85 g/m3) and the MLC was attached to general radiography unit (Rex-650R, Listem Inc, Korea) for cephalometric exposure. The OSLDs that used were nanoDotTM Dosimeter (Landauer Inc, Glenwood, USA) and we read out OSLDs with micro star system (Landauer Inc, Glenwood, USA). The Optical annealing system contained fluorescent lamps (Osram lumilux, 24 W, 280 ?780 nm). To measure absorbed dose using OSLDs, was carried out dosimetric characteristics of OSLDs. Based on these, we evaluated dose reduction of critical organ (Eyes, Thyroids) with MLC in cephalometric exposure Results: The dosimetric characteristics were following that batch homogeneity was 1.21% and reproducibility was 0.96% of the coefficient of variation The linearity was that the correlation of between dose and count was fitted by linear function (dose,mGy = 0.00029 × Count, R2 =0.997). The range of angular dependence was from ?3.6% to 3.7% variation when each degree was normalized by zero degree. The organ dose of Rt. eye, Lt eye, thyroids were 77.8 ?Gy, 337.0 ?Gy, 323.1?Gy, respectively in open field and the dose reduction of organ dose was 10.6%(8.3?Gy), 12.4 %(42 ?Gy), 87.1%(281.4?Gy) with MLC Conclusion: We certified dose reduction of organ dose in cephalometric exposure. The dose reduction of Eye was 11% because of reduction of field size and it of thyroids was 87% by primary beam shielding.

  3. UW Occupational Health Program Requisition Form for Pre-Exposure Services This form confirms the eligibility for the employee listed below to receive all preventive services checked.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emshwiller, Eve

    Title Supervisor Employee Department/Lab & Address Supervisor E-mail Department Funding String Dept Fund or wastes. Please complete the Animal Contact Questionnaire prior to appointment. Infectious Agent Exposure Nuclear Reactor Medical Evaluation Medical Surveillance Consult Quantiferon TB-Gold Pesticide User Exam

  4. Exposure to Ionizing Radiation Causes Long-Term Increase in Serum Estradiol and Activation of PI3K-Akt Signaling Pathway in Mouse Mammary Gland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Johnson, Michael D.; Fornace, Albert J.; Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University, Washington, DC ; Datta, Kamal

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: Exposure to ionizing radiation is an established risk factor for breast cancer. Radiation exposure during infancy, childhood, and adolescence confers the highest risk. Although radiation is a proven mammary carcinogen, it remains unclear where it acts in the complex multistage process of breast cancer development. In this study, we investigated the long-term pathophysiologic effects of ionizing radiation at a dose (2 Gy) relevant to fractionated radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Adolescent (6-8 weeks old; n = 10) female C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 2 Gy total body {gamma}-radiation, the mammary glands were surgically removed, and serum and urine samples were collected 2 and 12 months after exposure. Molecular pathways involving estrogen receptor-{alpha} (ER{alpha}) and phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K)-Akt signaling were investigated by immunohistochemistry and Western blot. Results: Serum estrogen and urinary levels of the oncogenic estrogen metabolite (16{alpha}OHE1) were significantly increased in irradiated animals. Immunostaining for the cellular proliferative marker Ki-67 and cyclin-D1 showed increased nuclear accumulation in sections of mammary glands from irradiated vs. control mice. Marked increase in p85{alpha}, a regulatory sub-unit of the PI3K was associated with increase in Akt, phospho-Akt, phospho-BAD, phospho-mTOR, and c-Myc in irradiated samples. Persistent increase in nuclear ER{alpha} in mammary tissues 2 and 12 months after radiation exposure was also observed. Conclusions: Taken together, our data not only support epidemiologic observations associating radiation and breast cancer but also, specify molecular events that could be involved in radiation-induced breast cancer.

  5. Prenatal Risk and Protective Factors for Childhood Cancer: Investigating the Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation, Pesticide Exposure, and Maternal Diet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lombardi, Christina

    2013-01-01

    study based on solar radiation data from NASA relying onwith data from the National Solar Radiation Database. Ourusing data from the National Solar Radiation Database from

  6. Method and apparatus for reducing radiation exposure through the use of infrared data transmission

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Austin, Frank S. (Schaghticoke, NY); Hance, Albert B. (Schenectady, NY)

    1989-01-01

    A method and apparatus is described for transmitting information, for exae, dosimetry data from a hazardous environment such as a radioactive area to a remote relatively safe location. A radiation detector senses the radiation and generates an electrical signal which is fed as a binary coded decimal signal to an infrared transmitter having a microprocessor. The microprocessor formats the detected information into digits of data and modulates a 40 kHz oscillator, the output of which is fed to and intensity modulates one or more infrared emitting diodes. The infrared signal from the diodes is transmitted to a portable hand-held infrared receiver remote from the hazardous environment. The receiver includes an infrared sensitive diode which decodes the data and generates an electrical signal which is coupled to a microcomputer. The microcomputer synchronizes itself to the transmitter, reads the digits of data as they are received, sums the digits and compares the sum with a checksum signal generated and transmitted from the transmitter. If a match of the checksum signals exists, the received data is displayed, otherwise it is described and the receiver conditions itself for the next transmission of data.

  7. Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution imagesmore »using fewer photons. As a result, this can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.« less

  8. OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Department of Occupational Health and Safety Revised December 2009 #12;Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management System 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Management of Health and Safety

  9. The annual occupational dose limits as specified in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation," and in the Florida

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    , Title 10, Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation," and in the Florida Department of Health, Chapter 64E-5 (July 1997), "Control of Radiation Hazards Regulations" are listed below

  10. PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PIA - Richland Occupational Medicine Contract PDF icon PIA - Richland Occupational...

  11. Types of Radiation Exposure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With WIPP UPDATE: April 15, 2014Twodimensional timeKurt'sFuel Cells

  12. Effect of ultraviolet radiation exposure on room-temperature hydrogen sensitivity of nanocrystalline doped tin oxide sensor incorporated into microelectromechanical systems device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shukla, Satyajit; Agrawal, Rajnikant; Cho, Hyoung J.; Seal, Sudipta; Ludwig, Lawrence; Parish, Clyde [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC) and Mechanical Materials Aerospace Engineering (MMAE) Department, Engineering 381, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), John F. Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida 32899 (United States)

    2005-03-01

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure on the room-temperature hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensitivity of nanocrystalline indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3})-doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin-film gas sensor is investigated in this article. The present sensor is incorporated into microelectromechanical systems device using sol-gel dip-coating technique. The present sensor exhibits a very high sensitivity, as high as 65 000-110 000, at room temperature, for 900 ppm of H{sub 2} under the dynamic test condition without UV exposure. The H{sub 2} sensitivity is, however, observed to reduce to 200 under UV radiation, which is contrary to the literature data, where an enhanced room-temperature gas sensitivity has been reported under UV radiation. The observed phenomenon is attributed to the reduced surface coverage by the chemisorbed oxygen ions under UV radiation, which is in consonance with the prediction of the constitutive equation, proposed recently by the authors, for the gas sensitivity of nanocrystalline semiconductor oxide thin-film sensors.

  13. Review of exposure limits and experimental data for corneal and lenticular damage from short pulsed UV and IR laser radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at the international level by ICNIRP the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection.1,2 Other Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection are compared to relevant experimental animal injury data UV and IR laser radiation Karl Schulmeistera Austrian Research Centers, A-2444 Seibersdorf, Austria

  14. Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rocke, David M.

    Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Purpose: The effect of low doses of low ^ linear energy transfer (photon) ionizing radiation (LDIR, and pathway. Conclusions: These results show for the first time that low doses of radiation have an identifi

  15. Radiation Safety (Revised March 2010)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of radiation and a unit of exposure 14 Biological effects of radiation and units of dose 19 ALARA policy

  16. Occupational Health and Safety Manual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Occupational Health and Safety Manual #12;1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 York University Occupational Health and Safety Policy and Programs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Occupational Health and Safety Legislation

  17. Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

  18. Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho...

  19. Improving the Success Rate of Delivering Annual Occupational Dosimetry Reports to Persons Issued Temporary External Dosimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallett, Michael Wesley [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-09-09

    Workers who are not routinely monitored for occupational radiation exposure at LANL may be issued temporary dosimeters in the field. Per 10CFR835 and DOE O 231.1A, the Laboratory's radiation protection program is responsible for reporting these results to the worker at the end of the year. To do so, the identity of the worker and their mailing address must be recorded by the delegated person at the time the dosimeter is issued. Historically, this data has not been consistently captured. A new online application was developed to record the issue of temporary dosimeters. The process flow of the application was structured such that: 1) the worker must be uniquely identified in the Lab's HR database, and 2) the mailing address of record is verified live time via a commercial web service, for the transaction to be completed. A COPQ savings (Type B1) of $96K/year is demonstrated for the new application.

  20. Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

  1. OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARYLAND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH ACT safety and health protection on the job STATE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE REGULATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM and Health Administration, The Curtis Center, Suite 740 West, 170 S. Independence Mall West, Philadelphia, PA

  2. Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Lijser, Peter

    Lead Exposure Management Plan 1.0. Policy CSUF has developed the Lead Exposure Management Plan to reduce occupational and environmental exposure to lead, a potent neurotoxin and carcinogen that causes considers the nature of the task involved, confirmed and presumed exposures, and the lead content

  3. National radiation exposures and risks caused by implementing EPA`s proposed revised national primary drinking water regulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morris, S.C.; Rowe, M.D.; Holtzman, S.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1993-05-01

    This report estimates risks to workers and the public associated with treatment processes and their associated waste products that would be mandated under proposed regulations of radium, radon, and uranium in drinking water. Three scenarios were examined: (1) all wastes flushed to the sanitary sewer; (2) all wastes disposed on land; (3) similar to (2) but radon removal by granulated activated carbon rather than packed tower aeration. Risks considered included accidental injury and cancer. Worker risks for both scenarios I and II were estimated to be 0.025 and 0.01 deaths per year of operation for radium-226 and radium-228, respectively. Worker risks for uranium were estimated to be 0.13 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 0.5 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Worker risks for radon removal were estimated to be 1.7 deaths/year of operation for scenario I and 2.2 deaths/year of operation for scenario II. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for radium-226 were 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} and for radium-228 were 9 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} deaths/year of operation. Risks to the public for scenarios I and II for uranium were 7.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}2} and 2 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}, respectively. Risks to the public for scenario I and II for radon were 24 deaths/year of operation and for scenario III were nil. Public risks were quantified only for people exposed during a year of operation. For example, effects of public exposures in future years via groundwater contamination associated with landfill of treatment waste were not considered.

  4. Formaldehyde Exposure Control Plan Procedure: 6. 09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    Formaldehyde Exposure Control Plan Procedure: 6. 09 Version: 2.0 Effective 8.2.2013 1 A. PURPOSE To maintain formaldehyde exposure below the Federal Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Formaldehyde Standard 29 CFR 1910.1048 established action level (AL) 0.5 ppm, permissible

  5. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidential Permit authorizingAward FeeEducationOCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE-

  6. PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidential Permit authorizingAwardOccupational Safety & Health -

  7. Applied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene Volume 17(2): 121130, 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broday, David

    Industrial Hygiene 1047-322X/02 $12.00 + .00 Occupational Exposure to Cotton Dust in Cottonseed Oil MillsApplied Occupational and Environmental Hygiene Volume 17(2): 121­130, 2002 Copyright c 2002 Applied and cellulose industries. The cottonseed delivered to the mill is contaminated with varying amounts of trash

  8. Window Signaling Systems: Control Strategies & Occupant Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

    2012-01-01

    Control Strategies & Occupant Behavior Katie Ackerly a ,signals play a role in occupant behavior and response. Theignored. Results: Occupant Behavior While thermal comfort

  9. Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing Occupant Behavior in Buildings: Towards a to thermal comfort – Occupant behavior and  energy use in at the relationship between occupant behavior, information 

  10. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9, influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

  11. "We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuchinskaya, Olga

    2007-01-01

    of health effects from low-dose radiation exposures, andis suggested. conditions of low-dose radiation is available,imperceptibility, low-dose radiation exposure is associated

  12. Pill to Treat Radiation Exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abergel, Rebecca

    2014-10-17

    Rebecca Abergel explains how one pill could be used to treat people exposed to radioactive materials at our '8 Big Ideas' Science at the Theater event on October 8th, 2014, in Oakland, California.

  13. WI Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

  14. Chapter 16: Log-linear regression for Poisson counts Exposure to ionizing radiation is recognized as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardsley, John

    as a cancer risk. In the United States, EPA sets guidelines specifying upper limits on the amount of exposure groups than low exposure. The objective of regression analysis is to estimate the rate of cancer deaths cases or deaths attributable to cancer) using a number of explanatory variables believed to be related

  15. Ann. Occup. Hyg., pp. 110 # The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    exposure level for a job group have been well demonstrated in the industrial hygiene literature of the British Occupational Hygiene Society doi:10.1093/annhyg/mem013 Upper Limits for Exceedance Probabilities as computationally simple. Two data sets involving industrial exposure data are used to illustrate the methods

  16. Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverseIMPACTThousand CubicResourcelogo and-E CChinaC LLos t!darnosNuclearOffice

  17. Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

    2011-05-01

    Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

  18. DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program | Department of...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program DOE HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program HQ Occupational Safety and Health Program Procedures PDF icon DOE HQ Occupational Safety...

  19. HEALTH EFFECTS OF LOW-LEVEL IONIZING RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Jacob I.

    2012-01-01

    any exposure to radiation at low levels of dose carries some1 as the dose of radiation increases above very low levels,any exposure to radiation at low levels of dose carries some

  20. Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliver, Douglas L.

    Occupational Disease in Connecticut, 2014 This report covers data for 2012 and was prepared under contract for the State of Connecticut Workers' Compensation Commission, John A. Mastropietro, Chairman, as part of the Occupational Disease Surveillance Program, operated in cooperation with the Connecticut

  1. Image-based occupancy sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Polese, Luigi Gentile; Brackney, Larry

    2015-05-19

    An image-based occupancy sensor includes a motion detection module that receives and processes an image signal to generate a motion detection signal, a people detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a people detection signal, a face detection module that receives the image signal and processes the image signal to generate a face detection signal, and a sensor integration module that receives the motion detection signal from the motion detection module, receives the people detection signal from the people detection module, receives the face detection signal from the face detection module, and generates an occupancy signal using the motion detection signal, the people detection signal, and the face detection signal, with the occupancy signal indicating vacancy or occupancy, with an occupancy indication specifying that one or more people are detected within the monitored volume.

  2. Modeling Contaminant Exposure in a Single-Family House

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Qingyan "Yan"

    occupational exposure to household contaminants in a single-family house under different ventilation, heating the performance of two heating systems, two cooling systems and three ventilation systems in summer and winter contaminant exposure in a generic, small single-family house with a floor area of 100 m2 and a height of 2.5 m

  3. Safety & Occupational Health Specialist | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    & Occupational Health Specialist Safety & Occupational Health Specialist Submitted by admin on Sat, 2015-10-17 00:14 Job Summary Organization Name Department Of Energy Agency...

  4. Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

    1983-03-01

    The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

  5. ORISE: Occupational Exposure and Worker Health Fact Sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic ScienceHowNews ReleasesdiseaseOak

  6. Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells Exposed from 1 to 10 cGy of Acute Gamma Radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wyrobek, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    Low Dose Radiation Response Curves, Networks and Pathways inbrain response to low- dose radiation exposure involves245-257. G. Bauer, Low dose radiation and intercellular

  7. A Reanalysis of Curvature in the Dose Response for Cancer and Modifications by Age at Exposure Following Radiation Therapy for Benign Disease

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, Mark P.; Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A.; Kleinerman, Ruth A.

    2013-02-01

    Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose response for various cancer endpoints and modifiers by age and time. Methods and Materials: Reanalysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by cancer endpoint (stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia, all other). Results: There are statistically significant (P<.05) excess risks for all cancer and for lung cancer and borderline statistically significant risks for stomach cancer (P=.07), and leukemia (P=.06), with excess relative risks Gy{sup -1} of 0.024 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.011, 0.039), 0.559 (95% CI 0.221, 1.021), 0.042 (95% CI -0.002, 0.119), and 1.087 (95% CI -0.018, 4.925), respectively. There is statistically significant (P=.007) excess risk of pancreatic cancer when adjusted for dose-response curvature. General downward curvature is apparent in the dose response, statistically significant (P<.05) for all cancers, pancreatic cancer, and all other cancers (ie, other than stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia). There are indications of reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure (for all cancers, pancreatic cancer), but no evidence for quadratic variations in relative risk with age at exposure. If a linear-exponential dose response is used, there is no significant heterogeneity in the dose response among the 5 endpoints considered or in the speed of variation of relative risk with age at exposure. The risks are generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers. Conclusions: There are excess risks for various malignancies in this data set. Generally there is a marked downward curvature in the dose response and significant reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure. The consistency of risks with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

  8. Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ashford, Nicholas

    2008-01-01

    The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

  9. Alberta's Occupational Health and Safety

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Machel, Hans

    Alberta's Occupational Health and Safety Regulations An Explanation of the New First Aid Regulation of the First Aid Regulation Alberta's newest edition of the First Aid Regulation (AR 48/2000) came into effect

  10. FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

  11. Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers’ compensation, and much more.

  12. Guidelines for beamline and front-end radiation shielding design at the Advanced Photon Source.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fernandez, P.; X-Ray Science Division

    2008-09-11

    Shielding for the APS will be such that the individual radiation worker dose will be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). The ALARA goals for the APS are to keep the total of the work-related radiation exposure (exposure coming from other than natural or medical sources) as far below 500 person-mrem per year, collective total effective dose equivalent, as reasonably achievable. For an individual APS radiation worker, the goal is to keep the maximum occupational total effective dose equivalent of any one employee as far below 200 mrem/yr as reasonably achievable. The ALARA goal for APS beamline scientists is to keep the total of the work-related radiation exposure (exposure coming from other than natural or medical sources) as far below 100 person-mrem per year, collective total effective dose equivalent, as reasonably achievable. For an individual APS beamline scientist, the goal is to keep the maximum occupational total effective dose equivalent of any one scientist as far below 50 mrem/yr as reasonably achievable. The dose is actively monitored by the radiation monitors on the storage ring wall in each sector and by the frequent area surveys performed by the health physics personnel. For cases in which surveys indicate elevated hourly dose rates that may impact worker exposure, additional local shielding is provided to reduce the radiation field to an acceptable level. Passive area monitors are used throughout the facility to integrate doses in various areas. The results are analyzed for trends of increased doses, and shielding in these areas is evaluated and improved, as appropriate. The APS policy for on-site nonradiation workers in the vicinity of the APS facilities requires that the average nonradiation worker dose be below 0.2 mSv/yr (20 mrem/yr). In addition, the dose at the site boundary from all pathways is required to be below 0.1 mSv/yr (10 mrem/yr). For future modifications of the facility, the doses shall be evaluated and additional shielding provided to meet the policy requirements.

  13. Ionizing radiation predisposes non-malignant human mammary epithelial cells to undergo TGF beta-induced epithelial to mesenchymal transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01

    Health Effects; the Low Dose Radiation Program of the DOElong-term, low-dose ionizing radiation exposure in humans.

  14. Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

    2009-04-20

    The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

  15. Occupant Behavior: Impact on Energy Use of Private Offices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hong, Tianzhen

    2014-01-01

    H. 2009. Impact of occupant behavior on lighting energy use,ATIONAL L ABORATORY Occupant Behavior: Impact on Energy Useopportunity employer. Occupant Behavior: Impact on Energy

  16. Window signalling systems: control strategies and occupant behaviour

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

    2013-01-01

    strategies and occupant behavior”. Building Research &control strategies and occupant behavior Katie Ackerly a,signals play a role in occupant behavior and response. The

  17. Revealing Occupancy Diversity Factors in Buildings Using Sensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouffaron, Pierrick

    2014-01-01

    prediction based on occupant behavior assessment. Energy andbehavior is considered stochastic in nature. Occupants’behavior is considered stochastic in nature (Virote 2012). Occupants

  18. Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office | Department...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office Occupational Health Manager PIA, Carlsbad Field Office PDF icon...

  19. Stromal Modulation of Radiation Carcinogenesis in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, David Hiendat Hua

    2011-01-01

    human exposures, we focused subsequent radiation-chimera experimentstumors of the radiation chimera experiments to human breastradiation chimera experiments and compares them to gene expression profiles of human

  20. FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joe M. Aldrich

    2004-11-01

    The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

  1. Stairwells are lit 24 hours per day regardless of occupancy. In stairwells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are vacant. However, building owners and code officials have had little exposure to these emerging fixtures this technology for use in new stairwells · Inform code officials about successful applications and acceptance by code. In contrast, a new bi-level stairwell fixture with integrated occupancy sensors are easy

  2. Demo Abstract: TOSS: Thermal Occupancy Sensing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    occupancy. These include passive infrared sensors (PIR) [4] [8], carbon dioxide detection [2], and optical be remotely adjusted. Based on current detected occupancy, TOSS is able to control HVAC and lighting actuators

  3. Linking occupant complaints to building performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goins, John; Moezzi, Mithra

    2012-01-01

    behavior is likely in commercial buildings too, especially where occupantsOccupant Complaints http://escholarship.org/uc/item/09z5423x Reflecting on Homburg and Furst's trio of defensive organizational behavior

  4. Stromal Modulation of Radiation Carcinogenesis in Breast Cancer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen, David Hiendat Hua

    2011-01-01

    radiation research related to human health is to predict the biological impact of exposure to low dose (

  5. RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL 2014 RICE UNIVERSITY 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Natelson, Douglas

    microscopes. Notify the RSO of any new radiation sources. Notify the RSO if any radiation sources with radioactive materials must attend formal radiation safety training provided by EHS. #12;RADIATION SAFETY with information concerning risk. 4. Provide suggestions for reducing exposure. 5. Monitor your radiation dose wit

  6. Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Suter, Jonathan D.

    2012-09-01

    Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

  7. Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory More Documents & Publications Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Injury & Illness System...

  8. Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

  9. Benzene Exposure and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Martyn T. Smith, Rachael M. Jones, and Allan H. Smith

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Benzene Exposure and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Martyn T. Smith, Rachael M. Jones, and Allan H of California, Berkeley, California Abstract Exposure to benzene, an important industrial chemical and component studies that identified probable occupational exposures to benzene and NHL morbidity or mortality. We

  10. Radiation Emergency Assistance Center / Training Site | National...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    assistance involving the exposure to ionizing radiation or radiological contamination. REACTS, located in Methodist Medical Center of Oak Ridge in Oak Ridge,...

  11. Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

  12. Beryllium - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O OLaura| National2.11DESERT *BerkeleyBerkeley SiteOccupational

  13. Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katherine

    2012-01-01

    and conventional  cooling systems.  Building Research & occupant type, cooling system and climate).  Understanding the hydronic  heating and cooling systems in the perimeter 

  14. Occupant Emergency Plans | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area. Emergency Procedures Pamphlets Building Evacuation Routes Occupant...

  15. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Submittal Notification |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-D rendering ofForm documentsEnergy

  16. ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE The 2014Capabilities ORISEandMakingMonitoring System

  17. The 1986 residential occupant survey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

    1987-04-01

    In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

  18. Graduate Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Graduate Diploma in Occupational Safety & Health/ MSc in Occupational Safety & Health UCD School of Public Health, Physiotherapy and Sports Science www.ucd.ie/cshw/ GRADUATE Understanding your Degree Safety and Health (OSH), who have not previously achieved a higher level qualification in OSH. At the end

  19. Promising Technology: Wireless Lighting Occupancy Sensors

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Occupancy sensors and controls detect human presence, and modulate light settings accordingly. When there is no human presence detected, the system can dim or turn off lights. This technology ensures that lights are not used when there are no occupants present, which can lead to significant energy savings.

  20. UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Jonathan

    UNIVERSITY HEALTH CENTER UGA OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH APPROVAL FOR PHYSICAL EXAMS, EYE EXAMS, LAB WORK No Faculty/Staff: Yes No UGA Employment: Full-Time Part-Time New to Occupational Health Program? Yes No E: Release of Information: I authorize the University Health Center ("UHC") at The University of Georgia

  1. Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram:Y-12Power,5 BUDGETUCivil Penalty - Policy0Climateofof Energy

  2. Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energyof the CleanClient

  3. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p aDepartment of Energyof the CleanClientSubpart A - General

  4. CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a l DeInsulation at04-86)ContractorsCNGFact SLCriticality|- January

  5. Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties -DepartmentAvailableHighOffice|Order Module--DOE OrderOrder

  6. Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) chargingWASHINGTON, DCTheBelow areyouDepartment of

  7. A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK INCORPORATING HUMAN AND SOCIAL BEHAVIORS FOR OCCUPANT-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    A COMPUTATIONAL FRAMEWORK INCORPORATING HUMAN AND SOCIAL BEHAVIORS FOR OCCUPANT- CENTRIC highlighted the need to consider occupants' behaviors for better understanding of evacuation framework, occupants' behaviors in emergencies are analyzed by conducting a thorough review

  8. Journal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 642650 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545-9632 online

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krishnamoorthy, Kalimuthu

    equivalent to those based on the Land's method. We want to draw the attention of the industrial hygieneJournal of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, 3: 642­650 ISSN: 1545-9624 print / 1545 distributions. Several examples involving industrial exposure data are used to illustrate the methods. An added

  9. Occupancy change detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  10. The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

  11. LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

  12. Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medicine - Assistant PIA, Idaho National Laboratory VisitDosimBadgeTrckg-PIA.pdf...

  13. Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered Nanoscale Particulate Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    New England Journal of Medicine 1993, 329, 7. S. v. Klot; A.34 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered35 of 42 Occupational Medicine Implications of Engineered

  14. 2015 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) - March 16-17, 2015 The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity...

  15. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility A section of...

  16. Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Congress established Public Law...

  17. Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and...

  18. Final Report - Epigenetics of low dose radiation effects in an animal model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kovalchuk, Olga

    2014-10-22

    This project sought mechanistic understanding of the epigenetic response of tissues as well as the consequences of those responses, when induced by low dose irradiation in a well-established model system (mouse). Based on solid and extensive preliminary data we investigated the molecular epigenetic mechanisms of in vivo radiation responses, particularly – effects of low, occupationally relevant radiation exposures on the genome stability and adaptive response in mammalian tissues and organisms. We accumulated evidence that low dose irradiation altered epigenetic profiles and impacted radiation target organs of the exposed animals. The main long-term goal was to dissect the epigenetic basis of induction of the low dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response and the specific fundamental roles of epigenetic changes (i.e. DNA methylation, histone modifications and miRNAs) in their generation. We hypothesized that changes in global and regional DNA methylation, global histone modifications and regulatory microRNAs played pivotal roles in the generation and maintenance low-dose radiation-induced genome instability and adaptive response. We predicted that epigenetic changes influenced the levels of genetic rearrangements (transposone reactivation). We hypothesized that epigenetic responses from low dose irradiation were dependent on exposure regimes, and would be greatest when organisms are exposed in a protracted/fractionated manner: fractionated exposures > acute exposures. We anticipated that the epigenetic responses were correlated with the gene expression levels. Our immediate objectives were: • To investigate the exact nature of the global and locus-specific DNA methylation changes in the LDR exposed cells and tissues and dissect their roles in adaptive response • To investigate the roles of histone modifications in the low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To dissect the roles of regulatory microRNAs and their targets in low dose radiation effects and adaptive response • To correlate the levels of epigenetic changes with genetic rearrangement levels and gene expression patterns. In sum, we determined the precise global and locus-specific DNA methylation patterns in the LDR-exposed cells and tissues of mice, and to correlated DNA methylation changes with the gene expression patterns and manifestations of genome instability. We also determined the alterations of global histone modification pattern in the LDR exposed tissues. Additionally, we established the nature of microRNAome changes in the LDR exposed tissue. In this study we for the first time found that LDR exposure caused profound tissue-specific epigenetic changes in the exposed tissues. We established that LDR exposure affect methylation of repetitive elements in the murine genome, causes changes in histone methylation, acetylation and phosphorylation. Importantly, we found that LDR causes profound and persistent effects on small RNA profiles and gene expression, and that miRNAs are excellent biomarkers of LDR exposure. Furthermore, we extended our analysis and studied LDR effects in rat tissues and human tissues and cell lines. There we also analyzed LDR-induced gene expression, DNA methylation and miRNA changes. Our datasets laid foundation for several new research projects aimed to understand molecular underpinnings of low dose radiation responses, and biological repercussions of low dose radiation effects and radiation carcinogenesis.

  19. SIRAD e Personal radiation detectors Hani Alnawaf c

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    , Australia c Illawarra Health and Medical Research Institute, Centre for Medical Radiation Physics qualitative measurement of exposure to radiation for mid range dose exposure. This is performed using;Cheung et al., 2002, 2004, 2006a, b). When measuring low-level personal radiation, devices

  20. Track 3: Exposure Hazards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

  1. Miniaturized radiation chirper

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

  2. Radiation dosimeters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoelsher, James W. (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA)

    1992-01-01

    Radiation dosimeters and dosimeter badges. The dosimeter badges include first and second parts which are connected to join using a securement to produce a sealed area in which at least one dosimeter is held and protected. The badge parts are separated to expose the dosimeters to a stimulating laser beam used to read dose exposure information therefrom. The badge is constructed to allow automated disassembly and reassembly in a uniquely fitting relationship. An electronic memory is included to provide calibration and identification information used during reading of the dosimeter. Dosimeter mounts which reduce thermal heating requirements are shown. Dosimeter constructions and production methods using thin substrates and phosphor binder-layers applied thereto are also taught.

  3. RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE Campus Radiation Safety Manual UNIVERSITY OF NEW ORLEANS Previous Revision: May 1999

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    : May 1999 Current Revision: July 2012 SECTION 4 ALARA PROGRAM 4.1 POLICY The University of New Orleans, the public and the environment will be As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) and that no radiation exposure to monitor the Radiation Safety Program to ensure that exposures are ALARA and to search for new and better

  4. Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

    2009-01-01

    Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising...

  5. NREL: Continuum Magazine - Smart Occupancy Sensor Debuts

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of activity, and the amount of light in each. All of this allows for highly targeted control of lighting, heating, and other building systems based on occupant need. "The...

  6. SAR Assessment and Analysis of Cumulative Body Exposure to Multi Transmitters from a Mobile Phone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    against possible negative health effects of radiofrequency electromagnetic radiation. Basic restriction evaluated ones from each transmitter separately. Index Terms -- SAR, Multiple exposure, Radiofrequency I Commission on Non Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) [1] and the Institute of Electronics and Electrical

  7. Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

    1993-09-01

    This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

  8. Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

    2007-08-09

    Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

  9. A quantitative approach to the characterization of cumulative and average solvent exposure in paint manufacturing plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, D.P.; Schwartz, B.S.; Powell, S.; Nelson, T.; Keller, L.; Sides, S.; Agnew, J.; Bolla, K.; Bleecker, M. )

    1991-06-01

    Previous reports have attributed a range of neurobehavioral effects to low-level, occupational solvent exposure. These studies have generally been limited in their exposure assessments and have specifically lacked good estimates of exposure intensity. In the present study, the authors describe the development of two exposure variables that quantitatively integrate industrial hygiene sampling data with estimates of exposure duration--a cumulative exposure (CE) estimate and a lifetime weighted average exposure (LWAE) estimate. Detailed occupational histories were obtained from 187 workers at two paint manufacturing plants. Historic industrial hygiene sampling data for total hydrocarbons (a composite variable of the major neurotoxic solvents present) were grouped according to 20 uniform, temporally stable exposure zones, which had been defined during plant walk-through surveys. Sampling at the time of the study was used to characterize the few zones for which historic data were limited or unavailable. For each participant, the geometric mean total hydrocarbon level for each exposure zone worked in was multiplied by the duration of employment in that zone; the resulting products were summed over the working lifetime to create the CE variable. The CE variable was divided by the total duration of employment in solvent-exposed jobs to create the LWAE variable. The explanatory value of each participant's LWAE estimate in the regression of simple visual reaction time (a neurobehavioral test previously shown to be affected by chronic solvent exposure) on exposure was compared with that of several other exposure variables, including exposure duration and an exposure variable based on an ordinal ranking of the exposure zones.

  10. Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daila S. Gridley, PhD

    2012-03-30

    FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information that will be useful in estimating human health risks due to radiation that may occur during exposures in the work environment, nuclear/radiological catastrophes, as well as radiotherapy. Several papers have been published, accepted for publication or are in preparation. A number of poster and oral presentations have been made at scientific conferences and workshops. Archived tissues of various types will continue to be evaluated via funding from other sources (the DoE Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science and this specific grant will be appropriately included in the Acknowledgements of all subsequent publications/presentations). A post-doc and several students have participated in this study. More detailed description of the accomplishments is described in attached file.

  11. THE CONTRIBUTION OF MODERN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY TO RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS IN EXPOSED POPULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    health hazards of low-dose radiation exposure. During thethe body exposed to very low radiation doses and dose rates.carcinogenic risk of low-dose, low-LET radiation is subject

  12. THE CONTRIBUTION OF MODERN MEDICAL IMAGING TECHNOLOGY TO RADIATION HEALTH EFFECTS IN EXPOSED POPULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    health hazards of low-dose radiation exposure. During thecarcinogenic risk of low-dose, low-LET radiation is subjectcan be made for low-dose, low-LET radiation. What are the

  13. THE BEIR-III REPORT AND ITS IMPLICATIONS FOR RADIATION PROTECTION AND PUBLIC HEALTH POLICY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancersof risk from low-dose low-LET radiation. For exposure toi s not observed at low radiation doses ( 1 7 ) , and dose-

  14. Spatiotemporal characterization of ionizing radiation induced DNA damage foci and their relation to chromatin organization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Costes, Sylvain V

    2010-01-01

    germ cells and after low-dose gamma-radiation: relationshipsexposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. Mutat Res (after exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation. Mutat Res

  15. THE HEALTH EFFECTS IN WOMEN EXPOSED TO LOW-LEVELS OF IONIZING RADIATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, J.I.

    2010-01-01

    cancer following low-dose radiation exposure. Radiology 131:is the matter of low-dose radiation and the pregnant woman.considered incorrect; low-dose radiation can cause cancer,

  16. Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

    2012-01-01

    relationship between occupant behavior and energy efficiencyin relation to occupant behavior, understand how occupantpresence is a subset of occupant behavior, which includes a

  17. Human Behavior Meets Building Intelligence: How Occupants Respond to “Open Window” Signals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

    2012-01-01

    the signal message and occupant behavior were by and largesystem is in moving occupant behavior towards design teamobjectives and occupant control behaviors related to comfort

  18. Occupant Control of Windows: Accounting for Human Behavior in Building Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgeson, Sam; Brager, Gail

    2008-01-01

    Through the study of occupant behavior and mixed- modeCharacterizing Occupant Behavior in Buildings: Towards ato thermal comfort – Occupant behavior and energy use in

  19. A technical framework to describe occupant behavior for building energy simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner Ph.D., William

    2014-01-01

    Hong and H. Lin, “Occupant Behavior?: Impact on Energy Useand validation of occupant behavior models, while alsoframework to describe occupant behavior for building energy

  20. Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohn, Michael D.

    2010-01-01

    Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:Occupancy-Based Energy Management System. The objective ofOccupancy-Based Energy Management System. The experiments to

  1. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

    1994-08-16

    A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

  2. Method for microbeam radiation therapy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

    1994-01-01

    A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

  3. Radiation-induced risk of resettling Bikini atoll. Final report, November 7, 1981-May 28, 1982

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohn, H.I.; Dreyer, N.A.

    1982-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that the Bikini atoll is unsafe for resettlement. In response to the Bikinians' request for an independent review, we have examined the following DOE findings: (a) radionuclide contamination of Eneu and Bikini Islands, (b) radiation dosage to those who might resettle the islands, and (c) risks to the health of such settlers. We are in practical agreement with the DOE estimates. Resettlement of either island in 1983 would lead to a range of annual or 30-year cumulative doses that exceed the Federal Radiation Council (FRC) guides for the general population, but not those for occupation exposure. By 2013 resettlement of Eneu probably would be permissible. The principal source of radiation dose is local food, especially coconut, owing to contamination of the soil by cesium-137. A precise estimate of dose is impossible. The availability of imported foods would lessen local food consumption, but not sufficiently to meet the FRC guides for the general population. The 30-year cumulative index dose is 61 (25-122) rem for Bikini, and about 8 (3-16) rem for Eneu.

  4. MARSAME References 10 CFR 20.1003. Standards for Protection Against Radiation, Definitions. Code of Federal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARSAME References REFERENCES 10 CFR 20.1003. Standards for Protection Against Radiation://www.hss.energy.gov/enforce/rands/10CFR820.pdf (accessed October 24, 2008). 10 CFR 835. Occupational Radiation Protection. Code (ANSI) 1997. Radiation Protection Instrumentation Test and Calibration, Portable Survey Instruments

  5. Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

  6. RADIATION CONTROL GUIDE 2/97 A-1 APPLICATION FOR THE NON-HUMAN USE OF RADIATION PRODUCING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    RADIATION CONTROL GUIDE 2/97 A-1 APPENDIX J APPLICATION FOR THE NON-HUMAN USE OF RADIATION _____ Formal X-RAY MACHINE OPERATING EXPERIENCE TYPE OF MACHINE LOCATION DATES USAGE Have radiation exposure PRODUCING DEVICES TO THE RADIATION CONTROL COMMITTEE 1. Principal Investigator

  7. Low Level Radiation SEAB Ltr. to Moniz

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    on how DOE should pursue research on the question of a 'linear' or 'threshold' low-level radiation exposure model. Should DOE continue its efforts on this subject or...

  8. Development and Validation of an Occupational Skills Assessment Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01

    The development and validation of an occupational skills assessment instrument is described. The instrument was designed to describe accurately a participant's actual level of occupational skills in a variety of job-related ...

  9. Occupational and Environmental Clinical Medicine II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    Occupational and Environmental Medicine Years I-IV 2014-2015 Year II Clinical Medicine II · Toxicology- 4 lecture unit · Clinical Correlations: Poisoned Patient- 2 lecture unit Year I Clinical MedicineDetroit · Earthworks · Greening of Detroit Street Medicine · Detroit Clean Up Clinical Education Year III Family

  10. Using occupancy to reduce energy consumption of buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balaji, Bharathan

    2011-01-01

    and is designed with Smart Home applications in mind.Smart Thermostat: Using Occupancy Sensors to Save Energy in Homes.

  11. Occupation by “induction”: The American Army of Occupation in Cuba, December 1898-December 1899 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Askew, Mark C

    2015-04-30

    Many historians of the first American occupation of Cuba (1898-1902) assert that the military government of the island began and ended with a single strategic objective in mind: annexation. This assertion, however, ignores ...

  12. Occupational therapy is a healthcare profession that provides services to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sibille, Etienne

    Occupational therapy is a healthcare profession that provides services to individuals of all ages of occupational therapy services, and contributor to the profession. The occupational therapist practitioner and healthcare, participates in clinical research, and advocates appropriately for clients and the profession

  13. Forecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network James Howard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoff, William A.

    Forecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network Data James Howard Colorado School of Mines@mines.edu ABSTRACT Forecasting the occupancy of buildings can lead to signif- icant improvement of smart heating throughout a building, we perform data mining to forecast occupancy a short time (i.e., up to 60 minutes

  14. Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems; Appendix C: Mixed-mode Signal Case Study Summary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

    2011-01-01

    independently of occupant behavior. System Description Thein group 4 because occupant behavior has no bearing on the

  15. Avian inhalation exposure chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

    1992-05-05

    An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

  16. Handbook of radiation effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes-Siedle, A. (ed.) (Radiation Experiments and Monitors, Oxford (United Kingdom) Univ. of West London (United Kingdom)); Adams, L. (ed.) (European Space Agency-ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands). Radiation Effects and Analysis Techniques Unit)

    1993-01-01

    This handbook is intended to serve as a tool for designers of equipment and scientific instruments in cases where they are required to ensure the survival of the equipment in radiation environments. High-technology materials, especially semiconductors and optics, tend to degrade on exposure to radiation in many different ways. Intense high-energy radiation environments are found in nuclear reactors and accelerators, machines for radiation therapy, industrial sterilization, and space. Some engineers have to build equipment which will survive a nuclear explosion from a hostile source. Proper handling of a disaster with radioactive materials requires equipment which depends utterly on semiconductor microelectronics and imaging devices. Thus the technology of radiation-tolerant electronics is an instrument for good social spheres as diverse as disaster planning and the exploration of Mars. In order to design equipment for intense environments like those described above, then degradation from high-energy irradiation must be seen as a basic design parameter. The aim of this handbook is to assist the engineer or student in that thought; to make it possible to write intelligent specifications; to offer some understanding of the complex variety of effects which occur when high-technology components encounter high-energy radiation; and to go thoroughly into the balance of choices of how to alleviate the effects and hence achieve the design aims of the project. Separate abstracts were prepared for 15 chapters of this book.

  17. An assessment of crew exposures during nuclear-powered manned Mars missions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delisle, Christine Louise

    1994-01-01

    , the radiation transport code MCNP has been used to make initial estimates of crew exposures to reactor radiation fields for a specific manned NIFP vehicle design. In this design, three 25 MWt scaled SP-1 00-class reactor radiations are shielded by three...

  18. Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M.

    1980-01-01

    Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

  19. Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-11-03

    To implement the Occupational Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees as an element of the DOE Integrated Safety Management System. Cancels: HQ 3790.2A. Canceled by DOE O 251.91. This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Bruce M. Carnes, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 9/18/02. Canceled by DOE N 251.91.

  20. Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

    2013-06-01

    Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

  1. Updated Mortality Analysis of Radiation Workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boice Jr JD, Colen SS, Mumma MT, Ellis ED, Eckerman DF, Leggett RW, Boecker BB, Brill B, Henderson BE

    2011-08-01

    Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 46,970 workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). Overall, 5,801 workers were involved in radiation activities, including 2,232 who were monitored for intakes of radionuclides, and 41,169 workers were engaged in rocket testing or other non-radiation activities. The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought, updated and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). Because only negligible exposures were received by the 247 workers monitored for radiation activities after 1999, the mean dose from external radiation remained essentially the same at 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv) as reported previously, as did the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined at 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional 9 years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation for the radiation workers by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included external comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models and the computation of relative risks (RRs). A low SMR for all causes of death (SMR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.85) continued to indicate that the Rocketdyne radiation workers were healthier than the general population and were less likely to die. The SMRs for all cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the RR at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17), and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but no significant increases in lung and kidney disease were seen. The extended follow-up reinforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger combined studies of early workers in the United States using similar methodologies are warranted to refine and clarify radiation risks after protracted exposures.

  2. Study of the exposure of British mineworkers to nitrous fumes and the effects on their health. Final report August 77-January 80

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Collings, P.; Gormley, I.P.; Dodgeon, J.

    1981-06-01

    Shift-average exposures to nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide have been found to be well within the recommended safety limits in nine British collieries. Differences in the exposures of miners in different collieries and between different locations and occupations within collieries were observed, with diesel locomotive drivers having consistently higher shift-average exposures than other workers. Possible health effects of oxides of nitrogen were investigated by comparing the respiratory health of men with low past exposure against men with higher past exposure to these gases. No differences in forced expired volumes in one second or in the prevalences of cough, phlegm and breathlessness were found between the two population groups.

  3. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

  4. Remote radiation dosimetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

    1991-03-12

    Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

  5. Using an Occupant Energy Index for Achieving Zero Energy Homes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dean, B.; Gamble, D.; Kaiser, D.; Meisegeier, D.

    2006-01-01

    efficient appliances and by using the appliances more or less than a typical occupant. This energy use that is currently not capable of being analyzed or tracked can have significant impact on the actual performance of a utility or government... produces power onsite. How much might energy consumption increase when occupants return to this home? Past research has demonstrated that occupant behavior can have dramatic impacts on energy consumption. Maintained interior temperatures...

  6. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini

    2011-01-01

    Number Number Table 6 – Air conditioning usage. Statisticsn=3559).   Do you use air-conditioning? Yes No Don’t knowCDC Survey Table 6 – Air conditioning usage. Statistics from

  7. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini

    2011-01-01

    zip file with the output formaldehyde concentrations andEmission Factors For Formaldehyde and Other Volatile OrganicTests Reveal High Formaldehyde Levels in FEMA Trailers.

  8. A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parthasarathy, Srinandini

    2011-01-01

    GS = Gulfstream Cavalier; KS = Keystone; PI = Pilgrim Temp =River Fleetwood Gulfstream Keystone Reference Upper Lower RForest River Gulfstream Keystone Pilgrim Cavalier Coachman

  9. Acceleration, due to occupational exposure, of time to onset of a disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huber, Catherine

    of specific diseases. A pecuniary compensation, to be paid by the state or the company, is then due not be the proper choice here. Several other models, though, can be used in order to solve our problem. One factors that could also induce lung cancer, like family history of cancer and tobacco consump- tion

  10. Instructions for Preparing Occupational Exposure Data for Submittal to REMS Repository

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURING OFFICE INDUSTRIAL TECHNICAL8-02 Inspection Report:Department

  11. Danger radiations

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25

    Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

  12. Systems and methods for sensing occupancy

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dasu, Aravind; Mathias, Dean; Liu, Chenguang; Christensen, Randy; Christensen, Bruce

    2014-09-09

    A computer implemented method for sensing occupancy of a workspace includes creating a difference image that represents luminance differences of pixels in past and current images of the workspace resulting from motion in the workspace, determining motion occurring in regions of the workspace based on the difference image, and altering a workspace environment based at least in part on the determined motion. The method also includes determining which pixels in the difference image represent persistent motion that can be ignored and determining which pixels representing motion in the difference image are invalid because the pixels are isolated from other pixels representing motion.

  13. Weight Loss Convoy Year-Long Program - HPMC Occupational Health...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    RSVP Required-Space is limited. Class Instructors: Kelly Harnish & Audrey Wickman, Health Education Specialists Phone: 376-3939 Where: HPMC Occupational Medical Services, 1979...

  14. Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual...

  15. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah...

  16. PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

  17. Office of Radiation Safety Request for Dosimetry Services -Radiation Monitoring Badges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    body, collar and extremity dosimeters MD - Interventional Radiologist MD - Interventional Cardiologist requires workers entering a high radiation area to wear a radiation dosimeter. You will be issued a dosimeter because we have determined that there will be a potential for exposures. You must wear dosimetry

  18. Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Janeen Denise Robertson

    1999-02-01

    In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

  19. Mini-review Radiation-induced bystander effect: Early process and rapid assessment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    brings potential hazards to normal tissues in radiotherapy, and imparts a higher risk from low-dose researches have been carried out on victims of atomic bomb explosions, occupational and accidental radiationMini-review Radiation-induced bystander effect: Early process and rapid assessment Hongzhi Wang

  20. AN ACCELERATOR-BASED NEUTRON MICROBEAM SYSTEM FOR STUDIES OF RADIATION EFFECTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    radiation risk to very low doses. Because the primary energy damage patterns are so different radi- ation effects due to low-energy neutron radiation, a primary reason is because a significant number of individuals are occupationally exposed to low doses of neutrons, mostly low-energy neutrons

  1. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing occupant behavior in buildings: Towards aoccupants or how occupant behavior affects the anticipatedEQ credit) compare with occupant behavior and subjective

  2. Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konis, Kyle Stas

    2011-01-01

    Characterizing occupant behavior in buildings: Towards aoccupants or how occupant behavior affects the anticipatedEQ credit) compare with occupant behavior and subjective

  3. Occupational safety and health law handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sarvadi, D.G. [ed.; Keller; Heckman

    1999-09-01

    This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

  4. Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boudreaux, Philip R; Gehl, Anthony C; Christian, Jeffrey E

    2012-01-01

    Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

  5. Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

    2013-09-25

    The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

  6. A review of ground-based heavy-ion radiobiology relevant to space radiation risk assessment: Part II. Cardiovascular and immunological effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blakely, Eleanor A.

    2008-01-01

    individuals exposed to low-dose radiation exposures can inS.C. Darby, Low doses of ionizing radiation and circulatoryconstant, relatively low-dose complex radiation field in an

  7. Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Jo Ann

    1994-01-01

    . Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed...

  8. Changes in gene expression following EMF exposure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woloschak, G.E.; Paunesku, T.; Chang-Liu, C.M.; Loberg, L.; Gauger, J.; McCormick, D.

    1997-10-01

    Experiments were designed to examine the effects of electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure on specific gene expression, an effect that can be deleterious, beneficial, or neutral, depending on the long-term consequences; however, the proof of a reproducible, quantitative biological effect (such as change in gene expression) will lead to latter experiments aimed at determining the relative contribution of these changes to cellular consequences. Past work by ourselves and by others has shown that measures of gene expression are extremely sensitive indicators of the cellular and biological effects of ionizing radiation, with transcriptional changes being detected by exposure of cells to doses of {gamma}-rays as low as 0.01 cGy that have no pronounced cellular consequences. On the basis of this work, the authors hypothesized that measures of gene expression will be equally sensitive to EMF effects on cells.

  9. RADIATION EFFECTS IN MATERIAL MICROSTRUCTURE.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SIMOS,N.

    2007-05-30

    Next generation nuclear power systems, high-power particle accelerators and space technology will inevitably rely on higher performance materials that will be able to function in the extreme environments of high irradiation, high temperatures, corrosion and stress. The ability of any material to maintain its functionality under exposure to harsh conditions is directly linked to the material structure at the nano- and micro-scales. Understanding of the underlying processes is key to the success of such undertakings. This paper presents experimental results of the effects of radiation exposure on several unique alloys, composites and crystals through induced changes in the physio-mechanical macroscopic properties.

  10. Causal Analysis of the Unanticipated Extremity Exposure at HFEF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David E. James; Charles R. Posegate; Thomas P. Zahn; Alan G. Wagner

    2011-11-01

    This report covers the unintended extremity exposure to an operator while handling a metallurgical mount sample of irradiated fuel following an off-scale high beta radiation reading of the sample. The decision was made to continue working after the meter indicated high off-scale by the HPT Supervisor, which resulted in the operator at the next operation being exposed.

  11. Towards Building Occupants Positioning: Track and Trace for Optimal Process Control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler, W.; Labeodan, T.; Bozem, G.; Maaijen, R.

    2013-01-01

    Building occupancy information is a crucial factor that should be considered in the control strategy of building operations for improved energy efficiency and occupant comfort. As occupancy is stochastic and challenging to measure, a number of real...

  12. A social demographic study of the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality resulting in death 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Traut, Rachel Lynn

    2009-05-15

    This thesis explores occupational fatalities to American males for the years 1998 and 1999. The focus is on predicting the likelihood that the individual will sustain an occupational injury resulting in death based on an occupational status score...

  13. Commercial Office Plug Load Energy Consumption Trends and the Role of Occupant Behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gandhi, Priya

    2015-01-01

    of adaptive occupant behaviors in offices. Building andDefinition and Simulation of Occupant Behavior in Buildings.and the Role of Occupant Behavior By Priya Bipin Gandhi A

  14. TUBERCULOSIS EXPOSURE CONTROL PLAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    Biosafety Committee, the Infection Policy and Education Committee or the Environmental Health and Safety and Education Committee and Environmental Health and Safety. June 2013: Summary of Document Changes The major Provided by: Environmental Health &Safety Department June 2013 #12;TB Exposure Control Plan Environmental

  15. Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A Simulation-based Assessment for Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-01-01

    Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants, and they are typically used without venting range hoods. In this study, LBNL researchers quantified pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes.The simulation model estimated that—in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods -- 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO2, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3,000, and 20 ppb for NO2, CO, and HCHO, respectively. The study recommends that reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

  16. Biological effects in unirradiated human tissue induced by radiation damage up to 1 mm away

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    in extrapolating radiation risk estimates from epidemi- ologically accessible doses down to very low doses where) and for assessing the risk from a low-dose exposure to a carcinogen such as ionizing radiation, where only a small, New York, NY 10032; Radiation Biology Laboratory, Research and Environmental Surveillance, Radiation

  17. RADIATION SAFETY POLICY Effective Date: April 4, 2012 Originating Office: Office of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doedel, Eusebius

    and responsibility. It does not deal with issues related to use of non-ionizing radiation. This Policy radiation exposure "As Low as Reasonably Achievable" "Internal Radiation Permit" ("IRP") meansRADIATION SAFETY POLICY Effective Date: April 4, 2012 Originating Office: Office of the Vice

  18. 1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-31

    The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

  19. Electrothermal controlled-exposure technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maloney, John Mapes

    2006-01-01

    A technology is presented for exposing the contents of microfabricated cavities in a substrate. These contents are hermetically sealed until exposure is triggered by an electronic signal. The exposure mechanism uses ...

  20. Radiation detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fultz, B.T.

    1980-12-05

    Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

  1. Performance studies of scintillating ceramic samples exposed to ionizing radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dissertori, G; Nessi-Tedaldi, F; Pauss, F; Wallny, R

    2012-01-01

    Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy.

  2. Performance studies of scintillating ceramic samples exposed to ionizing radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Dissertori; D. Luckey; F. Nessi-Tedaldi; F. Pauss; R. Wallny

    2012-11-16

    Scintillating ceramics are a promising, new development for various applications in science and industry. Their application in calorimetry for particle physics experiments is expected to involve an exposure to high levels of ionizing radiation. In this paper, changes in performance have been measured for scintillating ceramic samples of different composition after exposure to penetrating ionizing radiation up to a dose of 38 kGy.

  3. Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

    1986-01-01

    Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

  4. Bioelectromagnetics32:234^242(2011) Exposure Assessmentin Frontofa Multi-Band

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ljubljana, University of

    2011-01-01

    on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP) Guidelines [ICNIRP, 1998] and the Institute of ElectricalEngineering, UniversityofLjubljana, Ljubljana, Slovenia 2 INIS ^ Institute of Non-ionizingRadiation, Ljubljana, Slovenia on compliance testing with basic restrictions. Exposure limits are defined in the International Commission

  5. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, R.J.

    1981-09-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  6. Radiation dosimeter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1983-01-01

    A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

  7. Comparison of personal radio frequency electromagnetic field exposure in different urban areas across Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph, Wout; University of Basel ; Thuroczy, Gyoergy; French National Institute for Industrial Environment and Risks , Verneuil en Halatte ; Gajsek, Peter; Trcek, Tomaz; Bolte, John; Vermeeren, Guenter; University of Basel ; Juhasz, Peter; Finta, Viktoria

    2010-10-15

    Background: Only limited data are available on personal radio frequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) exposure in everyday life. Several European countries performed measurement studies in this area of research. However, a comparison between countries regarding typical exposure levels is lacking. Objectives: To compare for the first time mean exposure levels and contributions of different sources in specific environments between different European countries. Methods: In five countries (Belgium, Switzerland, Slovenia, Hungary, and the Netherlands), measurement studies were performed using the same personal exposure meters. The pooled data were analyzed using the robust regression on order statistics (ROS) method in order to allow for data below the detection limit. Mean exposure levels were compared between different microenvironments such as homes, public transports, or outdoor. Results: Exposure levels were of the same order of magnitude in all countries and well below the international exposure limits. In all countries except for the Netherlands, the highest total exposure was measured in transport vehicles (trains, car, and busses), mainly due to radiation from mobile phone handsets (up to 97%). Exposure levels were in general lower in private houses or flats than in offices and outdoors. At home, contributions from various sources were quite different between countries. Conclusions: Highest total personal RF-EMF exposure was measured inside transport vehicles and was well below international exposure limits. This is mainly due to mobile phone handsets. Mobile telecommunication can be considered to be the main contribution to total RF-EMF exposure in all microenvironments.

  8. Ground-State Cooling of a Trapped Ion Using Long-Wavelength Radiation J. Randall,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hensinger, Winfried

    Ground-State Cooling of a Trapped Ion Using Long-Wavelength Radiation S. Weidt,1 J. Randall,1,2 S June 2015) We demonstrate ground-state cooling of a trapped ion using radio-frequency (rf) radiation after sideband cooling, corresponding to a ground-state occupation probability of 88(7)%. After

  9. Oriel UV Exposure Station

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access toOctoberConsumption (Million CubicLSDOriel UV Exposure Station

  10. Exposure Evaluation Process

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8)highlightsNew PhaseExposure Evaluation Process

  11. U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U.S. Department of Labor Occupational Safety & Health Administration www.osha.gov MyOSHA [skip with the background and experience to review such potential contamination and risk, in accordance

  12. Job Title: Occupational Health Nurse Department: Human Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    and/or evaluation of a variety of wellness programs and injury, illness, and disease prevention program, medical surveillance and immunization, ergonomics, and occupational health and safety initiatives. Continuously evaluate the early intervention and case management strategies, ensuring resources

  13. A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Review...

  14. Behavioral Assessment of Occupational Skills of Learning Disabled Adolescents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathews, R. Mark; Whang, Paula L.; Fawcett, Stephen B.

    1980-01-01

    This study, using direct observation and measurement techniques, analyzed the differences in occupational skills among learning disabled youths and their non-learning disabled peers . The results showed low levels of ...

  15. In-situ measurement of electrodermal activity during occupational therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hedman, Elliott B. (Elliot Bruce)

    2010-01-01

    Physiological arousal is an important part of occupational therapy for children with Sensory Processing Disorder (SPD) but therapists do not have a way to objectively measure how therapy affects arousal. We hypothesized ...

  16. Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1997-01-01

    In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

  17. Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

    2011-10-19

    We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

  18. Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) Update, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    A series of graphs gives data through the year 2012 for annual collective doses, collective dose per reactor, number of individuals with measurable doses both in total and per reactor, number of reactors, electricity generated, measurable doses per individual and per megawatt-year, and collective outage hours. Reactors considered include BWR, PWR, and LWR. Also, the total effective dose equivalent for the period 2010-2012 is tabulated for each nuclear power plant considered, and the change over 2009-2011.

  19. Use of a radiopaque localizer grid to reduce radiation exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kee D; Li, Wentao; Galloway, Caren L

    2011-01-01

    pinpoint the ideal entry point for the procedure with justDemarcating the ideal entry point on the skin is a criticalprocedure. A subopti- mal entry point leads to inadequate

  20. ORISE Video: What is the difference between radiation exposure and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass map shinesSolarNewsusceptometer underI REEECNO OF DOCUMENT2

  1. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems - Other Related Sites | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-D rendering ofForm documents

  2. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-D rendering ofForm documentsEnergyinformation |

  3. Request For Report Of Radiation Exposure History Form | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct.7, 2015Verizon and VerizonCells:|ofRequest For

  4. STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTech ConnectDiagnostics (Technical

  5. STRUCTURAL AND MECHANICAL EFFECTS OF RADIATION EXPOSURE ON FILLED

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail. (Conference) | SciTech ConnectDiagnostics (TechnicalELASTOMERS - RECENT INSIGHTS

  6. Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudget ||Department ofRequest forTools |Racing AheadEnergy

  7. Request For Report Of Radiation Exposure History Form | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice|inWestMay 13, 2015 The newManagement | DepartmentEnergy

  8. ORISE: Illness and Injury Surveillance, Radiation Exposure, and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSE TheForensic ScienceHow to Work With UsEpidemiologic

  9. ORISE: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSEHow ORISE is MakingScienceOakHistorical Climatologyand

  10. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Radiation Exposure Data Collection

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSEHow ORISE isParis CornwellDuringWorkerMedical DataHow

  11. Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

    2014-06-01

    Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

  12. Examination of the Influence of Same-Race Occupational Role Models and Occupational Stereotypes on Elementary-Aged Black Students' School Engagement. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Karlen Brook

    2011-10-21

    Oppositional Culture Theory and Social Cognitive Career Theory propositions were explored via employment of social cognitive career theory mechanisms. The effects of observed same-race occupational role models and occupational stereotypes...

  13. Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

    2000-06-30

    We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

  14. Radiation Safety The University of Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicholson, Bruce J.

    of Personnel 11 3.2 Radiation Exposure Assessment & Dosimeter Application 11 3.3 How to Wear a Whole Body Dosimeter 12 3.4 How to Wear an Extremity Monitor 12 3.5 How to Wear a Fetal Monitor 13 3.6 Protective

  15. Occupational hygiene in terms of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols at two solid waste management plants in Finland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehtinen, Jenni; Tolvanen, Outi; Nivukoski, Ulla; Veijanen, Anja; Hänninen, Kari

    2013-04-15

    Highlights: ? Odorous VOCs: acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene. ? VOC concentrations did not exceed occupational exposure limit concentrations. ? 2,3-Butanedione as the health effecting compound is discussed. ? Endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems in waste treatment. - Abstract: Factors affecting occupational hygiene were measured at the solid waste transferring plant at Hyvinkää and at the optic separation plant in Hämeenlinna. Measurements consisted of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and bioaerosols including microbes, dust and endotoxins. The most abundant compounds in both of the plants were aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons, esters of carboxylic acids, ketones and terpenes. In terms of odour generation, the most important emissions were acetic acid, 2,3-butanedione, ethyl acetate, alpha-pinene and limonene due to their low threshold odour concentrations. At the optic waste separation plant, limonene occurred at the highest concentration of all single compounds of identified VOCs. The concentration of any single volatile organic compound did not exceed the occupational exposure limit (OEL) concentration. However, 2,3-butanedione as a health risk compound is discussed based on recent scientific findings linking it to lung disease. Microbe and dust concentrations were low at the waste transferring plant. Only endotoxin concentrations may cause health problems; the average concentration inside the plant was 425 EU/m{sup 3} which clearly exceeded the threshold value of 90 EU/m{sup 3}. In the wheel loader cabin the endotoxin concentrations were below 1 EU/m{sup 3}. High microbial and endotoxin concentrations were measured in the processing hall at the optic waste separation plant. The average concentration of endotoxins was found to be 10,980 EU/m{sup 3}, a concentration which may cause health risks. Concentrations of viable fungi were quite high in few measurements in the control room. The most problematic factor was endotoxins whose average measured concentrations was 4853 EU/m{sup 3}.

  16. Short CommunicationJ. Radiat. Res., 53, 475481 (2012) Triphasic Low-dose Response in Zebrafish Embryos Irradiated by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu, Peter K.N.

    2012-01-01

    Short CommunicationJ. Radiat. Res., 53, 475­481 (2012) Triphasic Low-dose Response in Zebrafish from an ionizing-radiation exposure is linearly proportional to the dose normalized by the radiation weighting factor, and which assumes no threshold dose val- ue below which no radiation risk is expected

  17. Industrial hygiene survey report of worker exposures to organotins at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eissler, A.W.; Ferrel, T.W.; Bloom, T.F.; Fajen, J.M.

    1985-06-24

    Breathing-zone samples were analyzed for organotin compounds, copper, and xylene during spray application of organotin containing marine antifouling paint at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, Virginia, March, 1984. The survey was part of a NIOSH study of occupational exposures to organotin compounds, conducted as a component of an assessment to determine the feasibility of conducting a study of reproductive effects. Company personnel records were reviewed. Work practices were observed. The authors conclude that a potential exists for exposures to organotins and copper. As all employees were wearing respiratory protective equipment, actual exposures may be less than that indicated by the analytical data. The facility could contribute 16 potentially exposed workers to the reproductive effects study.

  18. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, A.J.

    1983-09-13

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

  19. Radiation receiver

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

    1983-01-01

    The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

  20. Radiation physics, biophysics, and radiation biology. Progress report, December 1, 1993--November 30, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, E.J.; Zaider, M.

    1994-05-01

    Research at the Center for Radiological Research is a blend of physics, chemistry and biology and epitomizes the multidisciplinary approach towards understanding the mechanisms involved in the health problems resulting from human exposure to ionizing radiations. To an increasing extent, the focus of attention is on biochemistry and the application of the techniques of molecular biology to the problems of radiation biology. Research highlights from the past year are briefly described.

  1. U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PRIVACY ACT INFORMATION REQUEST

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Medical Personnel Records X-Ray Reports Radiation Exposure Report Occupational and Industrial Records Other If "other" is checked, please describe the type of records you are...

  2. NIOSH: Role in EEOICPA- Part B

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The NIOSH Division of Compensation Analysis and Support (DCAS) develops scientific guidelines for determining whether a worker's cancer is related to the worker's occupational exposure to radiation...

  3. OHS 601 -Ionising Radiation Procedure Version 4.2. October 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New South Wales, University of

    , from the effects of using and storing ionising radiation used in research projects and provide all ionising radiation exposures as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA); and to minimise adverse to radiation greater than one-fifth of the relevant dose limit given in Table 4.1 of the Standard. (b

  4. Evaluation of Radiation Impacts of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP - 13495

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paskevych, Sergiy; Batiy, Valiriy; Sizov, Andriy; Schmieman, Eric

    2013-07-01

    Radiation effects are estimated for the operation of a new dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP RBMK reactors. It is shown that radiation exposure during normal operation, design and beyond design basis accidents are minor and meet the criteria for safe use of radiation and nuclear facilities in Ukraine. (authors)

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    ORIGINAL PAPER The effect of low dose rate on metabolomic response to radiation in mice Maryam assessment. Keywords Metabolomics Á Low dose rate radiation Á Mass spectrometry Introduction The adverse at high dose rates (HDR), but many will experience exposure to low dose rate (LDR) radiation from fallout

  6. RADIATION RESEARCH 169, 2837 (2008) 0033-7587/08 $15.00

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerby, Eli

    2008-01-01

    Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields for 72 Hours. Radiat. Res. 169, 2828 RADIATION RESEARCH 169, 28­37 (2008) 0033-7587/08 $15.00 2008 by Radiation Research Society. All In Vitro Exposure of Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes to Radiofrequency Electromagnetic Fields for 72

  7. Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klasky, Hilda B; Bass, Bennett Richard; Williams, Paul T; Phillips, Rick; Erickson, Marjorie A; Kirk, Mark T; Stevens, Gary L

    2013-01-01

    The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

  8. Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

  9. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01

    I. Applications of Radiation Detectors 1) X-Rays, Gammaof the Conference DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY VictorT E D LBL9651 DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY - DISCLAIM*

  10. Whole mouse blood microRNA as biomarkers for exposure to c-rays and THOMAS TEMPLIN, SALLY A. AMUNDSON, DAVID J. BRENNER, &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenner, David Jonathan

    as samples exposed to low doses of radiation from samples exposed to high doses. Additionally, functional as biomarkers for exposures to radiation with low and high linear energy transfers. Materials and methods: Mice signatures were radiation type-specific and dose- and time-dependent. The differentially expressed miRNA were

  11. Assessing Exposures to Particulate Matter and Manganese in Welding Fumes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIU, SA

    2010-01-01

    causes, respiratory effects including impaired lung function, metal fume fever, occupational asthma,

  12. Risk Level Based Management System: a control banding model for occupational health and safety risk management in a highly regulated environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zalk, D; Kamerzell, R; Paik, S; Kapp, J; Harrington, D; Swuste, P

    2009-05-27

    The Risk Level Based Management System (RLBMS) is an occupational risk management (ORM) model that focuses occupational safety, hygeiene, and health (OSHH) resources on the highest risk procedures at work. This article demonstrates the model's simplicity through an implementation within a heavily regulated research institution. The model utilizes control banding strategies with a stratification of four risk levels (RLs) for many commonly performed maintenance and support activities, characterizing risk consistently for comparable tasks. RLBMS creates an auditable tracking of activities, maximizes OSHH professional field time, and standardizes documentation and control commensurate to a given task's RL. Validation of RLs and their exposure control effectiveness is collected in a traditional quantitative collection regime for regulatory auditing. However, qualitative risk assessment methods are also used within this validation process. Participatory approaches are used throughout the RLBMS process. Workers are involved in all phases of building, maintaining, and improving this model. This work participation also improves the implementation of established controls.

  13. Detecting and tracing building occupants to optimize process control 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zeiler,W.; Labeodan,T.; Boxem,G.

    2014-01-01

    Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 PAGE 1 Workspace (micro climate) Human in the loop approach ESL-IC-14-09-29a Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014... Occupancy profile PAGE 211-11-2014 ESL-IC-14-09-29a Proceedings of the 14th International Conference for Enhanced Building Operations, Beijing, China, September 14-17, 2014 Drawbacks of Traditional-BEMS Comfort Time ? Operation based on assumed occupancy...

  14. Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Rybkowski, Zofia; Aliber, Jennifer; Lange, Cathleen

    2015-02-08

    dans ce contexte. Mots cle´s: e´tablissement de lutte contre le cancer, e´valuation d’e´tablissement, soins de sante´, centre de perfusion, occupation, vie prive´e, interaction sociale Introduction This study focuses on an evaluation of infusion suites... facility, facility evaluation, healthcare, infusion suite, post-occupancy, privacy, social interaction Il est pre´sente´ une e´valuation de l’expe´rience ve´cue par les patients, les familles et les employe´s dans deux centres de perfusion. L’un des centres...

  15. Beyond occupational differences : the importance of cross-cutting demographics and dyadic toolkits for collaboration in a US hospital

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DiBenigno, Julia Marie

    2014-01-01

    Scholars of work and occupations have long shown that asking members from different occupations to collaborate with one another is difficult because of differences in status, meanings, and expertise across occupational ...

  16. Radiation experience with the CMS pixel detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viktor Veszpremi; for the CMS Collaboration

    2014-12-09

    The CMS pixel detector is the innermost component of the CMS tracker occupying the region around the centre of CMS, where the LHC beams are crossed, between 4.3 cm and 30 cm in radius and 46.5 cm along the beam axis. It operates in a high-occupancy and high-radiation environment created by particle collisions. Studies of radiation damage effects to the sensors were performed throughout the first running period of the LHC. Leakage current, depletion voltage, pixel readout thresholds, and hit finding efficiencies were monitored as functions of the increasing particle fluence. The methods and results of these measurements will be described together with their implications to detector operation as well as to performance parameters in offline hit reconstruction.

  17. RADON DAUGHTER EXPOSURES IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nero, A.V.

    2010-01-01

    EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero, J.V.EXPOSURES IN ENERGY-EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero, J.V.EXPOSURES IN ENERGY EFFICIENT BUILDINGS A.V. Nero, J.V.

  18. EFFECTS OF ONE WEEK TRITIUM EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, E

    2007-06-07

    This report documents test results for the exposure of four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer to tritium gas at one atmosphere for approximately one week and characterization of material property changes and changes to the exposure gas during exposure. All EPDM samples were provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Material properties that were characterized include mass, sample dimensions, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. No change of glass transition temperature due to the short tritium gas exposure was observed. Filled and unfilled formulations of Dupont{reg_sign} Nordel{trademark} 1440 had a slightly higher glass transition temperature than filled and unfilled formulations of Uniroyal{reg_sign} Royalene{reg_sign} 580H; filled formulations had the same glass transition as unfilled. The exposed samples appeared the same as before exposure--there was no evidence of discoloration, and no residue on stainless steel spacers contacting the samples during exposure was observed. The exposed samples remained flexible--all formulations passed a break test without failing. The unique properties of polymers make them ideal for certain components in gas handling systems. Specifically, the resiliency of elastomers is ideal for sealing surfaces, for example in valves. EPDM, initially developed in the 1960s, is a hydrocarbon polymer used extensively for sealing applications. EPDM is used for its excellent combination of properties including high/low-temperature resistance, radiation resistance, aging resistance, and good mechanical properties. This report summarizes initial work to characterize effects of tritium gas exposure on samples of four types of EPDM elastomer: graphite filled and unfilled formulations of Nordel{trademark} 1440 and Royalene{reg_sign} 580H.

  19. Radiation Protection Programs Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-05-19

    Provides guidance for implementing the provisions of the functional areas contained in 10 CFR 835. The revision to the guide reflects changes in the June 2007 amendment to 10 CFR 835, Worker Safety and Health Program. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-8-11, cancels DOE G 441.1-1C.

  20. Radiation Protection Programs Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2008-05-19

    Provides guidance for implementing the provisions of the functional areas contained in 10 CFR 835. The revision to the guide reflects changes in the June 2007 amendment to 10 CFR 835, Worker Safety and Health Program. Supersedes DOE G 441.1-1B. Admin Chg 1 dated 7-8-11.

  1. The occupational status of partnered lesbians, compared to married women and heterosexual cohabiting women 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Chin-Huei

    2009-05-15

    This thesis utilizes a regression model and three different occupational status scores, namely, Duncan‘s SEI, Nam-Powers-Boyd Occupational Status Score and Prestige Score of Nakao and Treas, to examine the impact of sexual ...

  2. Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

    2012-01-01

    Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

  3. Growing a green job : essays on social movements and the emergence of a new occupation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hammond, Ryan Alan

    2012-01-01

    Professions and occupations play a central role in shaping institutional arrangements, organizational forms, and individual organizations. I argue the emergence and development of new occupations should be among the central ...

  4. IEEE Antennas and Propagation Magazine, Vol. 54, No. 6, December 2012 69 A Study of RF Dosimetry from Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, John B.

    -frequency (RF) exposure caused by cell phones, where the position of the phone relative to the body is somewhat multiple antennas and radiate at different frequencies, ranging from 850 MHz to 2.4 GHz. Unlike radio radiating element and when one ignored the actual duty cycle of these meters did the SAR values exceed

  5. Cardiovascular effects of lead exposure.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaziri, N D; Gonick, H C

    2008-01-01

    air quality standards for lead exposure, 2006. ReferencesM, Wen SW. Environmental lead level and pregnancy-inducedDong W, Poulter N. Blood lead and blood pressure: evidence

  6. MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

  7. Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voelz, G.L. (comp.)

    1985-05-01

    The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

  8. Occupational Health and Safety Checklist Home Based Work

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    Occupational Health and Safety Checklist Home Based Work (to be completed by the Applicant) SAFETY RISK REQUIREMENTS COMMENTS Computer workstation Ensure appropriate workstation ergonomics, including as a result of computer use. Manual handling Know correct manual handling techniques. Know risks associated

  9. MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihler, Alexander

    MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL Jon Hutchins, Alexander Ihler using real data from a network of optical counting sensors in a campus building. Index Terms--- sensor Knowledge of the number of people in a building at a given time is crucial for applications

  10. MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihler, Alexander

    MODELING COUNT DATA FROM MULTIPLE SENSORS: A BUILDING OCCUPANCY MODEL Jon Hutchins, Alexander Ihler using real data from a network of optical counting sensors in a campus building. Index Terms-- sensor Knowledge of the number of people in a building at a given time is crucial for applications

  11. Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The average number of persons occupying a car is 1.59 and has not changed much since 1995. The largest increases from 1995 to 2009 have been in the occupancy rates for vans – from 2.07 to 2.35 –...

  12. Runway Occupancy Time Extraction and Analysis Using Surface Track Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vkumar3@gmu.edu lsherry@gmu.edu Rafal Kicinger kicinger@metronaviation.com Center for Air Transportation's runway occupancy time would add another 1-1.5 movements per hour [at London47 #12;3 Heathrow]' [7] [2

  13. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene programs at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

  14. POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    is electrical energy [1]. Of this total, 50% of the energy consumed in buildings is used for heating, air-conditioningPOEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System Varick L. Erickson Elect. Eng for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based

  15. Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerpa, Alberto E.

    Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California an efficient demand response HVAC control strategy, actual room usage must be considered. Temperature and CO2 are used for simulations but not for predictive demand response strategies. In this paper, we develop

  16. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

  17. "Designing equipment and buildings to more quickly respond to occupant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigilei, Leonid V.

    prediction system Energy Efficient Smart Buildings In the near future, intelligent buildings"Designing equipment and buildings to more quickly respond to occupant behavior." Kamin Whitehouse University of Virginia Charlottesville, VA 434.982.2211 Whitehouse Research Group Our group is creating smart

  18. Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naihua Duan

    2011-01-01

    human exposure to air pollution." SIMS Technical Report No.human exposure to air pollution." Environment International.Annual Meeting of the A i r Pollution Control Association,

  19. Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

    2013-01-24

    This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

  20. 10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    to a standard (e.g., primary, secondary, or tertiary) or conventionally true value. Contamination area means any area where contamination levels are greater than the values...

  1. Occupancy Agreement *This Facility is partially funded through the Federal Government

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    10893605_1 Occupancy Agreement *This Facility is partially funded through the Federal Government 6 9. Termination by the Occupant 6 10. Default by Occupant and Notice 7 11. Privacy 7 11 accepts the terms and conditions contained in the letter of offer. Termination Date The date contained

  2. Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Telisman, Spomenka Colak, Bozo; Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna; Cvitkovic, Petar

    2007-10-15

    Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

  3. Standard Guide for Radiation Protection Program for Decommissioning Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1987-01-01

    1.1 This guide provides instruction to the individual charged with the responsibility for developing and implementing the radiation protection program for decommissioning operations. 1.2 This guide provides a basis for the user to develop radiation protection program documentation that will support both the radiological engineering and radiation safety aspects of the decommissioning project. 1.3 This guide presents a description of those elements that should be addressed in a specific radiation protection plan for each decommissioning project. The plan would, in turn, form the basis for development of the implementation procedures that execute the intent of the plan. 1.4 This guide applies to the development of radiation protection programs established to control exposures to radiation and radioactive materials associated with the decommissioning of nuclear facilities. The intent of this guide is to supplement existing radiation protection programs as they may pertain to decommissioning workers, members of...

  4. Radiation Safety

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMassR&D100 Winners * Impacts on GlobalRachel Ruggirello RachelRadiation DrySafety Home

  5. Human exposure to mercury: A critical assessment of the evidence of adverse health effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliffe, H.E.; Swanson, G.M.; Fischer, L.J. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1996-10-25

    The ubiquitous nature of mercury in the environment, its global atmospheric cycling, and its toxicity to humans at levels that are uncomfortably close to exposures experienced by a proportion of the population are some of the current concerns associated with this pollutant. The purpose of this review is to critically evaluate the scientific quality of published reports involving human exposures to mercury and associated health outcomes as an aid in the risk evaluation of this chemical. A comprehensive review of the scientific literature involving human exposures to mercury was performed and each publication evaluated using a defined set of criteria that are considered standards in epidemiologic and toxicologic research. Severe, sometimes fatal, effects of mercury exposure at high levels were primarily reported as case studies. The disasters in Minamata, Japan, in the 1950s and in Iraq in 1971-1972 clearly demonstrated neurologic effects associated with ingestion of methylmercury both in adults and in infants exposed in utero. The effects were convincingly Associated with methylmercury ingestion, despite limitations of the study design. Several well-conducted studies have investigated the effects of methylmercury at levels below those in the Iraq incident but have not provided clear evidence of an effect. The lower end of the dose-response curve constructed from the Iraq data therefore still needs to be confirmed. The studies of mercury exposure in the workplace were mainly of elemental or inorganic mercury, and effects that were observed at relatively low exposure levels were primarily neurologic and renal. Several studies have investigated effects associated with dental amalgam but have been rated as inconclusive because of methodologic deficiencies. In our overall evaluation, 29 of 110 occupational studies and 20 of 54 studies where exposure occurred in the natural environment provided at least suggestive evidence of an exposure-related effect. 259 refs., 4 tabs.

  6. The beryllium quandary: will the lower exposure limits spur new developments in sampling and analysis?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brisson, Michael

    2013-06-03

    At the time this article was written, new rulemakings were under consideration at OSHA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that would propose changes to occupational exposure limits for beryllium. Given these developments, it’s a good time to review the tools and methods available to IHs for assessing beryllium air and surface contamination in the workplace—what’s new and different, and what’s tried and true. The article discusses limit values and action levels for beryllium, problematic aspects of beryllium air sampling, sample preparation, sample analysis, and data evaluation.

  7. Occupational Electric Shocks, Electromagnetic Fields and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vergara, Ximena Patricia

    2012-01-01

    including engineering and industrial hygiene, is the best= Foundation; IH = Industrial hygiene; JEM = Job ExposureSpecialized in Industrial Hygiene University of California,

  8. Potential single-occupancy vehicle demand for the Katy Freeway and Northwest Freeway high-occupancy vehicle lanes 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Lei

    2006-10-30

    relatively low patronage after operating for over 6 years on the Katy Freeway and over 4 years on the Northwest Freeway. There existed an opportunity to increase the usage of these HOT lanes by allowing single-occupancy vehicle (SOV) travelers to use...

  9. Non-Targeted Effects of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Risk Assessment and the Radiation Dose Response Profile

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, William F.; Sowa, Marianne B.

    2009-11-01

    Radiation risks at low doses remain a hotly debated topic. Recent experimental advances in our understanding of effects occurring in the progeny of irradiated cells, and/or the non-irradiated neighbors of irradiated cells, i.e., non-targeted effects associated with exposure to ionizing radiation, have influenced this debate. The goal of this document is to summarize the current status of this debate and speculate on the potential impact of non-targeted effects on radiation risk assessment and the radiation dose response profile.

  10. Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leggett, Richard Wayne; Eckerman, Keith F; McGinn, Wilson; Meck, Dr. Robert A.

    2012-01-01

    This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

  11. Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A. [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia)] [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia); Grigoryan, N. [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)

    2013-07-01

    The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different radionuclides that have intake into the organism or absorbed into blood. Transport of different radionuclides between compartments is assumed to follow first order kinetics provided the concentration in red blood cells (RBCs) stays below a nonlinear threshold concentration. When the concentration in RBCs exceeds that threshold, the transfer rate from diffusible plasma to RBCs is assumed to decrease as the concentration in RBCs increases. For the calculations used capabilities AMBER by using the traces of radionuclides in the body. Model for the transfer of radionuclides in the body has been built on the basis of existing models at AMBER for lead. (authors)

  12. Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-06-01

    The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

  13. Development of a combined model of tissue kinetics and radiation response of human bronchiolar epithelium with single cell resolution 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ostrovskaya, Natela Grigoryevna

    2006-10-30

    cells of the airways due to internal exposure to alpha-particle emitters, e.g. radon. Inhalation of radon, a colorless and odorless gas, one of the products of the decay of uranium which occurs naturally in the earth?s crust, is the second major cause... epithelial tissue plays an important role in normal lung physiology. square4 lung epithelia are target tissues for occupational internal exposures and for radon exposure (26); square4 the epithelium of bronchioles appears to be the origin...

  14. Irradiated Esophageal Cells are Protected from Radiation-Induced Recombination by MnSOD Gene Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niu, Yunyun

    Radiation-induced DNA damage is a precursor to mutagenesis and cytotoxicity. During radiotherapy, exposure of healthy tissues can lead to severe side effects. We explored the potential of mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) gene ...

  15. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2014-04-22

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  16. Adaptors for radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Livesay, Ronald Jason

    2015-07-28

    Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

  17. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The very reactive superoxide anion O[sub 2] is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20[sub 2][sup [minus

  18. PAPER www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Alteration of chromophoric dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sommaruga, Ruben

    dissolved organic matter by solar UV radiation causes rapid changes in bacterial community composition of the lagoon was exposed to different regions of the solar spectrum (full solar radiation, UV-A + PAR, PAR increases significantly after exposure of CDOM to solar radiation.4,9,10,11­13 This increase in bacterial

  19. PERSPECTIVE www.rsc.org/pps | Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Effects of solar UV radiation on aquatic ecosystems and interactions with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    species and aquatic ecosystems (e.g., lakes, rivers, marshes, oceans). Solar UV radiation penetrates and high to mid latitudes have aroused concern about the effects of increased solar UV-B radiation of low temperatures.7 Exposure to solar UV radiation can reduce productivity, affect reproduction

  20. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better estimate the risks and modify assign limits to radiation worker and astronauts. Additionally, confirmation that tissue analogs represent a realistic in vivo response to radiation will allow scientists to perform tissue relevant experiments without the expense of using animals. Confirmation of the in vivo approximation of our model will strengthen our findings from the recent completion of our DOE funding which is the subject of the current proposal.

  1. Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweeney, Lynn C.

    2013-04-10

    An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

  2. Avoiding Sick Buildings while Assuring Occupant Productivity and Building Optimization 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Int-Hout, D.

    2002-01-01

    of diffusers is necessary to ensure that both occupant comfort and adequate ventilation mixing are provided. As the choice of diffusers is based on both engineering and architectural concerns, both the engineer and the architect need to have input... into the final selection. In addition, the ideal selection is dependent on the type and operation of the air supply to the diffuser. While there are many ways of supplying conditioned air to an office space including displacement ventilation, underfloor...

  3. DETECTORS FOR RADIATION DOSIMETRY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    2010-01-01

    J. Price, "Nuclear Radiation Detection" (2nd ed. , New York:4) G. F. Knoll, "Radiation Detection and Measurement" (NewSons, Inc. from "Radiation Detection and Measurement," G. F.

  4. mMamee: A mHealth Platform for Monitoring and Assessing Maternal Environmental Exposure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stylianou, Yannis

    to a wide range of environmental risks (e.g. air pollution and nutrition) that adverse health effects of location-based services into mHealth platforms for evaluating the human long-term exposure air pollutants (e.g. air pollution, noise, ultra violet radiation, temperature, humidity, biosignals) should

  5. A True Measure of Exposure 234 Los Alamos Science Number 23 1995

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massey, Thomas N.

    news media and, more recently, by the President's Advisory Committee on Human Radiation Experiments. AlA True Measure of Exposure 234 Los Alamos Science Number 23 1995 #12;T he human tissue analysis pro- though this program does not technical- ly fall under the description of "human experimentation

  6. Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    continue testing and evaluation of sensors, in collaborationCharacteristics General evaluation of sensor Standard MD-1on the CO sampler sensors. Evaluation ofsampler materials

  7. An Investigation into Household and Occupational Pesticide Exposures with Genetic Variants as Risk Factors for Parkinson's Disease

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narayan, Shilpa

    2015-01-01

    subjects from Kern, Fresno, and Tulare counties in centralresidents of Fresno, Kern, or Tulare Counties, were not inprimarily in Fresno, Kern, or Tulare counties. Controls ages

  8. Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    In. - Patty's Industrial Hygiene and Toxicology, Vol. 3A,Monoxide Detection. Industrial Hygiene Journal Match-April,Monoxide." Applied Industrial Hygiene, 4,119-125. Jabara, J.

  9. Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apte, Michael G.

    2010-01-01

    Passive Colorimetric Dosimeter Tubes for Carbon Monoxide."Passive Colorimetric Dosimeter Tubes for Ammonia, CarbonPassive Badges, and Dosimeter Tubes." In: Air Sampling

  10. Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

    2013-06-04

    This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

  11. Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    2000-01-01

    Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

  12. Radiation Control (Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

  13. RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, M.

    2011-01-01

    Ext. 6782 Radiative and Passive Cooling Marlo Martin andof the Second Nation- al Passive Solar Conference (owned rights. ,I I RADIATIVE AND PASSIVE COOLING* LAIVRENCE

  14. Post-accident inhalation exposure and experience with plutonium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shinn, J

    1998-06-01

    This paper addresses the issue of inhalation exposure immediately afterward and for a long time following a nuclear accident. For the cases where either a nuclear weapon burns or explodes prior to nuclear fission, or at locations close to a nuclear reactor accident containing fission products, a major concern is the inhalation of aerosolized plutonium (Pu) particles producing alpha-radiation. We have conducted field studies of Pu- contaminated real and simulated accident sites at Bikini, Johnston Atoll, Tonopah (Nevada), Palomares (Spain), Chernobyl, and Maralinga (Australia).

  15. Gender and snow crab occupational asthma in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howse, Dana; Gautrin, Denyse; Neis, Barbara . E-mail: bneis@mun.ca; Cartier, Andre; Horth-Susin, Lise; Jong, Michael; Swanson, Mark C.

    2006-06-15

    Fish and shellfish processing employs many thousands of people globally, with shellfish processing becoming more important in recent years. Shellfish processing is associated with multiple occupational health and safety (OHS) risks. Snow crab occupational asthma (OA) is work-related asthma associated with processing snow crab. We present a gender analysis of findings from a 3-year multifaceted study of snow crab OA in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The study was carried out in four snow crab processing communities between 2001 and 2004. An anonymous survey questionnaire on knowledge, beliefs, and concerns related to processing snow crab administered to 158 workers attending community meetings at the start of the research found that women were significantly more likely than men to associate certain health problems, especially chest tightness, difficulty breathing, and cough, with crab processing (P<0.001). Worker health assessments carried out with 215 processing workers (187 current/28 former; 120 female/95 male) found that female participants were more likely to be diagnosed as almost certain/highly probable snow crab OA and allergy (P=0.001) and to be sensitized to snow crab (P=0.01) than male participants. Work histories from the health assessments were used to classify processing jobs as male or female. Allergen sampling (211 allergen samples: 115 area, 96 personal breathing zone) indicated that the plant areas where these male jobs were concentrated were associated with lower levels of aerosolized crab allergens (the agents responsible for OA to snow crab) than areas associated with female jobs. This difference was statistically significant in the two plants with poor ventilation (p<0.001 and P=0.017 for these plants). A gender analysis of work history data showed that female health assessment participants were likely to have worked longer processing snow crab than males (5 years versus 3.5 years, respectively). Cross-referencing of work history results with allergen sampling data for male and female job areas showed a gender difference in median cumulative exposures (duration of exposurexlevel of exposures) for health assessment participants. Health assessment participants with estimated higher median cumulative exposures were more likely to receive a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable OA and allergy. Semistructured interviews with 27 health assessment participants (24 female/ 3 male) with a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable or possible snow crab OA indicated that these workers can experience substantial quality of life impacts while working and that they seek to reduce the economic impact of their illness by remaining at their jobs as long as possible. Indications of selection bias and other study limitations point to the need for more research exploring the relationship between the gender division of labor and knowledge, beliefs, and concerns about snow crab processing, as well as gender differences in prevalence, quality of life, and socioeconomic impact.

  16. Radiation Protection and Licensing FNAL Radiation Physics Team

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    (ALARA). January 13, 2012 Radiation Protection and Licensing #12;4 Shielding for Prompt Radiation Protect

  17. Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hospodsky, Denina

    Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

  18. The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    compensation to workers with beryllium disease, silicosis, or radiation-induced cancer. Legitimate claimants may receive a lump-sum payment of 150,000. Additionally,...

  19. Second Solid Cancers After Radiation Therapy: A Systematic Review of the Epidemiologic Studies of the Radiation Dose-Response Relationship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berrington de Gonzalez, Amy; Gilbert, Ethel; Curtis, Rochelle; Inskip, Peter; Kleinerman, Ruth; Morton, Lindsay; Rajaraman, Preetha; Little, Mark P.

    2013-06-01

    Rapid innovations in radiation therapy techniques have resulted in an urgent need for risk projection models for second cancer risks from high-dose radiation exposure, because direct observation of the late effects of newer treatments will require patient follow-up for a decade or more. However, the patterns of cancer risk after fractionated high-dose radiation are much less well understood than those after lower-dose exposures (0.1-5 Gy). In particular, there is uncertainty about the shape of the dose-response curve at high doses and about the magnitude of the second cancer risk per unit dose. We reviewed the available evidence from epidemiologic studies of second solid cancers in organs that received high-dose exposure (>5 Gy) from radiation therapy where dose-response curves were estimated from individual organ-specific doses. We included 28 eligible studies with 3434 second cancer patients across 11 second solid cancers. Overall, there was little evidence that the dose-response curve was nonlinear in the direction of a downturn in risk, even at organ doses of ?60 Gy. Thyroid cancer was the only exception, with evidence of a downturn after 20 Gy. Generally the excess relative risk per Gray, taking account of age and sex, was 5 to 10 times lower than the risk from acute exposures of <2 Gy among the Japanese atomic bomb survivors. However, the magnitude of the reduction in risk varied according to the second cancer. The results of our review provide insights into radiation carcinogenesis from fractionated high-dose exposures and are generally consistent with current theoretical models. The results can be used to refine the development of second solid cancer risk projection models for novel radiation therapy techniques.

  20. Review and validation of exposure assessment methods 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaw, Eduardo

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this research is twofold, to standardize and to validate exposure assessment methods. First, the attempt is made to standardize the manner in which exposure assessment methods are developed. Literature on the subject is reviewed...