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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1974 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for AEC & AEC Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and its contractor employees during 1974.

2

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1980 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Thirteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1980.

3

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1983 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Sixteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1983.

4

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1986 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Nineteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1986.

5

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1982 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fifteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1982.

6

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1979 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Twelfth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1979.

7

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1985 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eighteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1985.

8

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1984 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Seventeenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1984.

9

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1981 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Fourteenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1981.

10

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1977 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Tenth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1977.

11

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1978 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eleventh Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1978.

12

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1975 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Eighth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for ERDA & ERDA Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA) and its contractor employees during 1975.

13

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1976 Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Ninth Annual Report of Radiation Exposures for DOE & DOE Contractor Employees analyzes occupational radiation exposures at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractor employees during 1976.

14

Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &...

15

DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

17

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Analysis & Reporting A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting September 2012 This pamphlet is intended to provide a short summary...

19

DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

20

DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Operating Experience Level 3, DOE Occupational Radiation Exposures for 2013  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Operating Experience Level 3 (OE-3) document provides an overview summary of radiation doses from occupational exposures at the Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration for the year 2013.

22

DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

ORAU

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

23

ANNUAL DOE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE | 2013 REPORT | Department of  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014Energy ANNUAL DOE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE |

24

Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for...

27

Reporting Occupational Radiation Exposure Data | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015Department of EnergyReporting Occupational Radiation

28

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Instructions for preparing occupational exposure data for submittal to the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) repository.

29

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

A PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT OF THE OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE FROM MAINTAINING THE US ITER DCLL TBM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper details an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This ORE analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for maintenance activities anticipated for the US DCLL TBM concept and its ancillary systems. Identification of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and estimates of the time required to perform these tasks were developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This paper details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

B. J. Merrill; L. C. Cadwallader; M. Dagher

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

Raddatz, C.T. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Division of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1995: Twenty-eighth annual report. Volume 17  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1995 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. In 1995, the annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor licensees (LWRs) was 199 person-cSv (person-rem). This is the same value that was reported for 1994. The annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 256 person-cSv (person-rem) and, for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), it was 170 person-cSv (person-rem). Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 17,153 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1995, the average measurable dose calculated from reported data was 0.26 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.32 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1994. Twenty-seventh annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). Annual reports for 1994 were received from a total of 303 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 303 licensees indicated that 152,028 individuals were monitored, 79,780 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 24,740 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 15% decrease from the 1993 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem) for 1994. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. In 1994, the annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor licensees (LWRs) was 198 person-cSv (person-rem). This represents a 18% decrease from the 1993 value of 242 person-cSv (person-rem). The annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 327 person-cSv (person-rem) and, for pressurized water reactors (PWRs), it was 131 person-cSv (person-rem). Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 18,178 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1994, the average measurable dose calculated from reported data was 0.28 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.31 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L.; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corporation, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Radiation Exposure Data Collection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resource Book How to Work With Us Contact Us Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Radiation Exposure Data Collection ORISE manages large, occupation radition exposure...

36

DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

37

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

38

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

& Publications Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION An Engine Exhaust Particle SizerTM Spectrometer for Transient Emission Particle Measurements...

39

Occupational exposure to DDT among mosquito control sprayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

DDT, a broad action insecticide whose use is restricted or banned in most industrialized countries is still often used for vector control in many tropical and developing countries. Despite the fact that DDT is accumulative and persistant in the ecosystem use of such substitutes as malathion or propoxur is not popular because these increases costs by 3.4 to 8.5 fold. As such DDT is economically attractive to poorer countries. As far as can be ascertained no systemic poisoning has resulted from occupational exposure to DDT. Due to the large particle size, the amount of DDT inhaled by workers is far less than the amount reaching exposed portions of skin. As such occupational exposure is mainly dermal or tropical. Occupational exposure to DDT studies have been done before. The present study is an analysis of some characteristics, (i.e. age, body size, relationship between plasma vitamin A and DDE levels, and smoking habits), of occupational exposure to DDT among spraymen in a Zimbabwe population.

Nhachi, C.F.B.; Kasilo, O.J. (Univ. of Zimbabwe, Harare (Zimbabwe))

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide show presents the 2011 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure.Clarification is given on Reporting Data regarding: reporting Total Organ Dose (TOD); reporting Total Skin Dose (TSD), and Total Extremity Dose (TExD) ; and Special individuals reporting.

Rao, Nimi; Hagemeyer, Derek

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Assessing exposure to radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Since the founding of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, we have been world leaders in evaluating the risks associated with radiation. Ultrasensitive tools allow us not only to measure radionuclides present in the body but also to reconstruct the radiation dose from past nuclear events and to project the levels of radiation that will still be present in the body for 50 years after the initial intake. A variety of laboratory procedures, including some developed here, give us detailed information on the effects of radiation at the cellular level. Even today, we are re-evaluating the neutron dose resulting from the bombing at Hiroshima. Our dose reconstruction and projection capabilities have also been applied to studies of Nagasaki, Chernobyl, the Mayak industrial complex in the former Soviet Union, the Nevada Test Site, Bikini Atoll, and other sites. We are evaluating the information being collected on individuals currently working with radioactive material at Livermore and elsewhere as well as previously collected data on workers that extends back to the Manhattan Project.

Walter, K.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Risk assessment and management of radiofrequency radiation exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiofrequency radiation (RFR) industry managers, occupational physicians, security department, and other practitioners must be advised on the basic of biophysics and the health effects of RF electromagnetic fields so as to guide the management of exposure. Information on biophysics of RFR and biological/heath effects is derived from standard texts, literature and clinical experiences. Emergency treatment and ongoing care is outlined, with clinical approach integrating the circumstances of exposure and the patient's symptoms. Experimental risk assessment model in RFR chronic exposure is proposed. Planning for assessment and monitoring exposure, ongoing care, safety measures and work protection are outlining the proper management.

Dabala, Dana [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [Railways Medical Clinic Cluj-Napoca, Occupational Medicine Department, 16-20 Bilascu Gheorghe St., 400015 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Surducan, Emanoil; Surducan, Vasile; Neamtu, Camelia [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)] [National Institute for Research and Development of Isotopic and Molecular Technologies, 65-103 Donath St., 400293 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

43

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

2013 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report Appendices  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustionImprovement3 Beryllium-Associated Worker Registry Summary 2013Evaluation Report Posted |Labor

46

DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists'Montana. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLEReport 2009SiteMajor Maintenance atT A * S H I E L D * A L

47

Occupational Radiation Exposure | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartment ofJaredOakscience-based,OHAGas and Oil ResearchDepartment

48

DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure, 1998 Report  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2Consolidated Edison5Operate WasteResearchEnergy

49

DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Annual Report 2004  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartnersDepartmentforDOEAdministrator |4 Report DOE

50

Paternal occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields and neuroblastoma in offspring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Investigators in Texas have reported an association between paternal employment in jobs linked with exposure to electromagnetic fields and risk of neuroblastoma in offspring. In an attempt to replicate this finding, the authors conducted a case-control study in Ohio. A total of 101 incident cases of neuroblastoma were identified through the Columbus (Ohio) Children's Hospital Tumor Registry. All cases were born sometime during the period 1942-1967. From a statewide roster of birth certificates, four controls were selected for each case, with individual matching on the case's year of birth, race, and sex, and the mother's county of residence at the time of the (index) child's birth. Multiple definitions were employed to infer the potential for paternal occupational exposure to electromagnetic fields from the industry/occupation statements on the birth certificates. Case-control comparisons revealed adjusted odds ratios ranging in magnitude from 0.5 to 1.9. For two of the exposure definitions employed--both of which are similar to one used by the Texas investigators--the corresponding odds ratios were modestly elevated (odds ratios = 1.6 and 1.9). Notably, the magnitude of these odds ratios is not inconsistent with the Texas findings, where the exposure definition referred to yielded an odds ratio of 2.1. Because the point estimates in this study are imprecise, and because the biologic plausibility of the association is uncertain, the results reported here must be interpreted cautiously. However, the apparent consistency between two independent studies suggests that future evaluation of the association is warranted.

Wilkins, J.R. 3d.; Hundley, V.D. (Ohio State Univ., Columbus (USA))

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Occupational exposures to uranium: processes, hazards, and regulations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States Uranium Registry (USUR) was formed in 1978 to investigate potential hazards from occupational exposure to uranium and to assess the need for special health-related studies of uranium workers. This report provides a summary of Registry work done to date. The history of the uranium industry is outlined first, and the current commercial uranium industry (mining, milling, conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication) is described. This description includes information on basic processes and areas of greatest potential radiological exposure. In addition, inactive commercial facilities and other uranium operations are discussed. Regulation of the commercial production industry for uranium fuel is reported, including the historic development of regulations and the current regulatory agencies and procedures for each phase of the industry. A review of radiological health practices in the industry - facility monitoring, exposure control, exposure evaluation, and record-keeping - is presented. A discussion of the nonradiological hazards of the industry is provided, and the final section describes the tissue program developed as part of the Registry.

Stoetzel, G.A.; Fisher, D.R.; McCormack, W.D.; Hoenes, G.R.; Marks, S.; Moore, R.H.; Quilici, D.G.; Breitenstein, B.D.

1981-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

53

Evaluation and Control of Radiation Dose to the Embryo/Fetus Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a program to control fetal exposure to ionizing radiation and evaluate the resultant dose that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835.

1999-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

54

Occupational ALARA Program Guide for Use with Title 10, CFR, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational "as low as is reasonably achievable" (ALARA) program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. For completeness, this Guide also references detailed guidance provided in the DOE-STD-1098-99, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL (DOE 1999a), hereinafter referred to as the RCS.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

55

Occupational Radiation Protection Record-Keeping and Reporting Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating an occupational radiation protection record-keeping and reporting program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms. A population-based study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in 6 cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms; 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalences of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared with unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR = 1.53, 95% Cl = 1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory symptoms and disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G. Jr.

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Occupational exposures and chronic respiratory symptoms: a population-based study  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Data from a random sample of 8515 white adults residing in six cities in the eastern and midwestern United States were used to examine the relationships between occupational exposures to dust or to gases and fumes and chronic respiratory symptoms. 31% of the population had a history of occupational dust exposure and 30% reported exposure to gas or to fumes. After adjusting for smoking habits, age, gender, and city of residence, subjects with either occupational exposure had significantly elevated prevalence of chronic cough, chronic phlegm, persistent wheeze, and breathlessness. The adjusted relative odds of chronic respiratory symptoms for subjects exposed to dust ranged from 1.32 to 1.60. Subjects with gas or fume exposure had relative odds of symptoms between 1.27 and 1.43 when compared to unexposed subjects. Occupational dust exposure was associated with a higher prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) as defined by an FEV1/FVC ratio of less than 0.6, when comparing exposed and unexposed participants (OR=1.53, 95% CI=1.17-2.08). Gas or fume exposure was associated with a small, but not significant, increase in COPD prevalence. Significant trends were noted for wheeze and phlegm with increasing duration of dust exposure. Although 36% of exposed subjects reported exposure to both dust and fumes, there was no evidence of a multiplicative interaction between the effects of the individual exposures. Smoking was a significant independent predictor of symptoms, but did not appear to modify the effect of dust or fumes on symptom reporting. These data, obtained in random samples of general populations, demonstrate that chronic respiratory disease can be independently associated with occupational exposures.

Korn, R.J.; Dockery, D.W.; Speizer, F.E.; Ware, J.H.; Ferris, B.G.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

DOE Radiation Records Contacts List  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

DOE radiation records contact list for individuals to obtain records of occupational exposure directly from a DOE site.

59

Some recent issues in low-exposure radiation epidemiology. Environ Health Perspect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Three areas of activity in the field of low-level radiation epidemiology have been reviewed. They concern the questions of cancer risk related to antenatal X-ray exposure, occupational radiation exposure, and residence in areas of real or supposed increased levels of radiation. Despite the a priori unlikelihood of useful information developing from studies in any of these areas, such investigations are being pursued, and the results are proving to be stimulating. Much important information will be forthcoming in the near future.

Brian Macmahon

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

acute radiation exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

62

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update Presented at the 32nd Annual International Dosimetry and Records Symposium, June 3-6, Scottsdale, AZ  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This slide-show presents the 2012 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure, compares those data with last year and the last five years, and clarifies reporting data.

none,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Mineral fiber content of lung tissue in patients with environmental exposures: household contacts vs building occupants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Analysis of tissue mineral fiber content in patients with environmental exposures has seldom been reported in the past. Our studies of six household contacts of asbestos workers indicate that these individuals often have pulmonary asbestos concentrations similar to some occupationally exposed individuals. In contrast, our studies of four occupants of buildings with asbestos-containing materials indicate that these individuals often have pulmonary asbestos burdens indistinguishable from the general nonoccupationally exposed population. However, one such building occupant exposed for many years and who later developed pleural mesothelioma was studied in detail, and it was concluded that her exposure as a teacher's aide in a school building containing acoustical plaster was the likely cause of her mesothelioma.

Roggli, V.L.; Longo, W.E. (Department of Pathology, Durham Veterans Administration, NC (United States))

1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

64

Radiation exposure inside reinforced concrete buildings at Nagasaki  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The biological effects on the residents of Hiroshima and Nagasaki due to initial-irradiation exposure during the nuclear attacks of World War II was recognized immediately as an important source of information. After the war, an extensive effort gathered data concerning the locations of individuals at the time of the attack and their subsequent medical histories. The data from personnel located in reinforced concrete buildings are particularly significant, since large groups of occupants received radiation injury without complications due to blast and thermal effects. In order to correlate the radiation dose with physiological effects, the dose to each individual must be calculated. Enough information about the construction of the buildings was available after the war to allow a radiation transport model to be constructed, but the accurate calculation of penetration into such large, thick-walled three dimensional structures was beyond the scope of computing technology until recently. Now, the availability of Cray vector computers and the development of a specially-constructed discrete ordinates transport code, TORT, have combined to allow the successful completion of such a study. This document describes the radiation transport calculations and tabulates the resulting doses by source component and individual case location. An extensive uncertainty analysis is also included. These data are to be used in another study as input to a formal statistical analysis, resulting in a new value for the LD50 dose, i.e., the dose at which the mortality risk is 50%. 55 refs., 67 figs., 70 tabs.

Rhoades, W.A.; Childs, R.L.; Ingersoll, D.T.

1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Occupational Radiation Exposures at the Department of Energy | Department  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge,8 8

66

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed.9-0s) AllMarch/AprilAnnex A Metrics forMay 19, 2006

67

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarly Career Scientists' ResearchThe OfficeUtility Fed.9-0s) AllMarch/AprilAnnex AEnergy 7

68

Pamphlet, A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring,  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

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69

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1987 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG, LLC -

70

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1988 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG, LLC -Energy 8

71

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1989 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG, LLC -Energy

72

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1990 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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73

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1991 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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74

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1992 - 1994 Report |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG, LLCEnergy

75

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1995 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG,

76

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1996 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG,Energy 6 Report

77

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1997 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG,Energy 6

78

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1999 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG,Energy 6Energy

79

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2000 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG,Energy

80

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2001 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG,EnergyEnergy 1

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2002 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova LNG,EnergyEnergy

82

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2003 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South42.2 (April 2012) 1 DocumentationAnalysisAnnova

83

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2004 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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84

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2005 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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85

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2006 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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86

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2007 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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87

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2008 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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88

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2009 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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89

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2010 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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90

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2011 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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91

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 2012 Report | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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92

DOE 2013 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report ALARA Activities at DOE  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

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93

A Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis &  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste and Materials2014 Chief FreedomServices » Program Management »

94

Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Reports | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

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95

User Survey User Survey DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track|SolarDepartment of Energy Use

96

Childhood nervous system tumors--an evaluation of the association with paternal occupational exposure to hydrocarbons  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Paternal occupational exposures to hydrocarbons have been associated with childhood nervous system cancer, but study results have not been consistent. This population-based case-control study was designed to examine this association using a large sample size to increase the precision of risk estimates. The birth certificates of 499 children who died in Texas from intracranial and spinal cord tumors were compared with 998 control certificates randomly selected from all Texas live births. Information on parental job title and industry at the time of birth was obtained from the birth certificates. No significant associations were identified for the dichotomized variable of all hydrocarbon-related occupations combined, as variously defined in previous studies, or for most of the specific jobs affiliated with exposures to hydrocarbons. Significant, relatively stable odds ratios (OR) were found for printers and graphics arts workers (OR = 4.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.4-14.7) and chemical and petroleum workers with high exposure levels (OR = 3.0; CI = 1.1-8.5). A discussion of the biases involved in this type of study design is presented.

Johnson, C.C.; Annegers, J.F.; Frankowski, R.F.; Spitz, M.R.; Buffler, P.A.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Radiation-Generating Devices Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

For use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a sealed radioactive source accountability and control program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart M of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

1999-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

98

Occupational and residential 60-Hz electromagnetic fields and high-frequency electric transients: exposure assessment using a new dosimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One problem that has limited past epidemiologic studies of cancer and exposure to extremely low-frequency (0-100 Hz) electric and magnetic fields has been the lack of adequate methods for assessing personal exposure to these fields. A new 60-Hz electromagnetic field dosimeter was tested to assess occupational and residential exposures of a group of electrical utility workers and a comparison background group over a 7-day period. Comparing work periods only, utility workers' exposures were significantly higher than background levels by a factor of about 10 for electric (E) and magnetic (B) fields and by a factor of 171 for high-frequency transient electric (HFTE) fields. When overall weekly time-weighted averages combining work and nonwork exposures were compared, ratios of the exposed to background groups were lower. B and HFTE exposure ratios remained statistically significant, with values of 3.5 and 58, respectively, whereas the electric field exposure ratio was no longer significant, with a value of 1.7. E-field exposures of the background group were the highest during the nonwork period, probably reflecting the use of electrical appliances at home. Residential E- and B-field exposures were in the same range as published results from other surveys, whereas occupational E-field exposures tended to be lower than exposures reported in other studies. The high variability associated with occupational exposures probably accounts for the latter discrepancy. Worker acceptance of wearing the dosimeter was good: 95% of participants found it to be of little or no inconvenience while at work. At home, 37% found the device to be inconvenient in its present form but would not object to wearing a slightly smaller and lighter dosimeter.

Deadman, J.E.; Camus, M.; Armstrong, B.G.; Heroux, P.; Cyr, D.; Plante, M.; Theriault, G.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Occupational Radiation Protection Program (10 CFR 835) | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAXBalanced ScorecardReactor TechnologyOFFICE: I Oak Ridge,8 8Energy Occupational

100

Radiation Safety Training Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a radiation safety training program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. In particular, this Guide provides guidance for achieving compliance with subpart J of 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Radiation exposure and central nervous system cancers: A case-control study among workers at two nuclear facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A nested case-control study was conducted among workers employed between 1943 and 1977 at two nuclear facilities to investigate the possible association of primary malignant neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) with occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external and internal sources. Eighty-nine white male and female workers, who according to the information on death certificates dies of primary CNS cancers, were identified as cases. Four matched controls were selected for each case. External radiation exposure data were available from film badge readings for individual workers, whereas radiation dose to lung from internally deposited radionuclides, mainly uranium, was estimated from area and personnel monitoring data and was used in analyses in lieu of the dose to the brain. Matched sets were included in the analyses only if information was available for the case and at least one of the corresponding controls. Thus, the analyses of external radiation included 27 cases and 90 matched controls, and 47 cases and 120 matched controls were analyzed for the effects of radiation from internally deposited uranium. No association was observed between deaths fron CNS cancers and occupational exposure to ionizing radiation from external or internal sources. However, due to the small number of monitored subjects and low doses, a weak association could not be ruled out. 43 refs., 1 fig., 15 tabs.

Carpenter, A.V.; Flanders, W.D.; Frome, E.L.; Crawford-Brown, D.J.; Fry, S.A.

1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High pressure argon ionization chamber systems for the measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates

DeCampo, J A; Raft, P D

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

105

DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure: 2004 Annual Report Exhibit A-1. Labor Categories and Occupation Codes.  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebratePartnersDepartmentforDOEAdministrator |4 Report

106

Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to low levels of ionizing radiation: BEIR VII Phase 2. TheBlake G, Genant HK (1999) Radiation exposure in bone mineralGuglielmi Thomas M. Link Radiation exposure in X-ray-based

Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Association between occupational exposure to arsenic and neurological, respiratory and renal effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational exposure by inhalation in copper smelter is associated with several subclinical health phenomena. The respiratory tract is usually involved in the process of detoxication of inhaled noxious agents which, as arsenic, can act as inductors of oxidative stress (Lantz, R.C., Hays, A.M., 2006. Role of oxidative stress in arsenic-induced toxicity. Drug Metab. Rev. 38, 791-804). It is also known that irritating fumes affect distal bronchioles of non-ciliated, epithelial Clara cells, which secrete anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive Clara cell protein (CC16) into the respiratory tract. The study group comprised 39 smelters employed at different workplaces in a copper foundry, matched for age and smoking habits with the control group (n = 16). Subjective neurological symptoms (SNS), visual evoked potentials (VEP), electroneurographic (EneG) and electroencephalographic (EEG) results were examined in the workers and the relationships between As concentration in the air (As-Air) and urine (As-U) were assessed. Effects of exposure were expressed in terms of biomarkers: CC16 as early pulmonary biomarker and {beta}{sub 2}-microglobulin ({beta}{sub 2}M) in urine and serum and retinol binding protein (RBP) as renal markers, measured by sensitive latex immunoassay. The concentrations of arsenic exceeded about two times the Threshold Limit Values (TLV) (0.01 mg/m{sup 3}). The contents of lead did not exceed the TLV (0.05 mg/m{sup 3}). Low CC16 levels in serum (12.1 {mu}g/l) of workers with SNS and VEP symptoms and highest level As-U (x{sub a} 39.0 {mu}g/l) were noted earliest in relation to occupational time. Moreover, those effects were associated with increased levels of urinary and serum {beta}{sub 2}M and urinary RBP. Results of our study suggested the initiative key role of oxidative stress in triggering the processes that eventually lead to the subclinical effects of arsenic on the nervous system.

Halatek, Tadeusz [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)], E-mail: halatek@imp.lodz.pl; Sinczuk-Walczak, Halina [Outpatient Clinic of Occupational Disease, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland); Rabieh, Sasan [Faculty of Biology, Chemistry, and Geosciences, University of Bayreuth, Bayreuth (Germany); Wasowicz, Wojciech [Department of Toxicology and Carcinogenesis, Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lodz (Poland)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

Answers to questions about updated estimates of occupational radiation doses at Three Mile Island, Unit 2  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this question and answer report is to provide a clear, easy-to-understand explanation of revised radiation dose estimates which workers are likely to receive over the course of the cleanup at Three Mile Island, Unit 2, and of the possible health consequences to workers of these new estimates. We will focus primarily on occupational dose, although pertinent questions about public health and safety will also be answered.

Not Available

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance.

Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Hong, K.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Exposure assessment of acrylates/methacrylates in radiation-cured applications  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational exposures to radiation-cured acrylates/methacrylates during their processing and use in coatings, inks, and adhesives were evaluated in 12 walk-through surveys at formulator and applicator sites. Inhalation and dermal-exposure routes were studied. According to the authors, the basic process used to formulate coatings, inks, and adhesives consists of blending raw materials in closed mixing vessels using local exhaust ventilation in the form of elephant trunks at vessel charging and packaging locations. Application methods surveyed included reverse-roll coaters, direct roll coaters, curtain/rain coaters, laminators, pneumatic injection, spray guns, and manual application. At the sites surveyed, the number of workers potentially exposed at each site ranged from two to 142. Process operators at applicator sites had the greatest potential for dermal exposure. Generally, the potential for inhalation exposure was low due to low volatility of the multifunctional acrylates/methacrylates used in the formulations. No reliable air-monitoring data were available at any site. Respirator use was limited and sporadic.

Not Available

1987-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

112

E-Print Network 3.0 - atm radiation exposure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

O'Connell Summary: tissues) 12;Sources of Background Radiation Exposure Naturally occurring radioactive materials... . Cosmic radiation. Fall-out from nuclear weapons...

113

Management and Administration of Radiation Protection Programs Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide discusses acceptable methods for ensuring that radiological activities will be managed and administered in accordance with a documented radiation protection program that complies with U.S. DOE requirements specified in Title 10 CFR Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection. Cancels DOE G 441.1-1. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

114

A population-based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a carbon monoxide passive sampler and occupational dosimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two devices, an occupational carbon monoxide (CO) dosimeter (LOCD), and an indoor air quality (IAQ) passive sampler were developed for use in population-based CO exposure assessment studies. CO exposure is a serious public health problem in the U.S., causing both morbidity and mortality (lifetime mortality risk approximately 10{sup -4}). Sparse data from population-based CO exposure assessments indicate that approximately 10% of the U.S. population is exposed to CO above the national ambient air quality standard. No CO exposure measurement technology is presently available for affordable population-based CO exposure assessment studies. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested in the laboratory and field. The palladium-molybdenum based CO sensor was designed into a compact diffusion tube sampler that can be worn. Time-weighted-average (TWA) CO exposure of the device is quantified by a simple spectrophotometric measurement. The LOCD and IAQ Passive Sampler were tested over an exposure range of 40 to 700 ppm-hours and 200 to 4200 ppm-hours, respectively. Both devices were capable of measuring precisely (relative standard deviation <20%), with low bias (<10%). The LOCD was screened for interferences by temperature, humidity, and organic and inorganic gases. Temperature effects were small in the range of 10{degrees}C to 30{degrees}C. Humidity effects were low between 20% and 90% RH. Ethylene (200 ppm) caused a positive interference and nitric oxide (50 ppm) caused a negative response without the presence of CO but not with CO.

Apte, M.G.

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne occupational exposure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Airborne Emissions . . . 8... -6 9-3. Normalized Impacts from One Year of Exposure to Fugitive Airborne Emissions . . ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection:...

116

Changes in the peripheral blood transcriptome associated with occupational benzene exposure identified by cross-comparison on two microarray platforms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Benzene is an established cause of leukemia and a possible cause of lymphoma in humans but the molecular pathways underlying this remain largely undetermined. This study sought to determine if the use of two different microarray platforms could identify robust global gene expression and pathway changes associated with occupational benzene exposure in the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) gene expression of a population of shoe-factory workers with well-characterized occupational exposures to benzene. Microarray data was analyzed by a robust t-test using a Quantile Transformation (QT) approach. Differential expression of 2692 genes using the Affymetrix platform and 1828 genes using the Illumina platform was found. While the overall concordance in genes identified as significantly associated with benzene exposure between the two platforms was 26% (475 genes), the most significant genes identified by either array were more likely to be ranked as significant by the other platform (Illumina = 64%, Affymetrix = 58%). Expression ratios were similar among the concordant genes (mean difference in expression ratio = 0.04, standard deviation = 0.17). Four genes (CXCL16, ZNF331, JUN and PF4), which we previously identified by microarray and confirmed by real-time PCR, were identified by both platforms in the current study and were among the top 100 genes. Gene Ontology analysis showed over representation of genes involved in apoptosis among the concordant genes while Ingenuity{reg_sign} Pathway Analysis (IPA) identified pathways related to lipid metabolism. Using a two-platform approach allows for robust changes in the PBMC transcriptome of benzene-exposed individuals to be identified.

McHale, Cliona M.; Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Li, Guilan; Hubbard, Alan E.; Forrest, Matthew S.; Vermeulen, Roel; Chen, Jinsong; Shen, Min; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

The EMDEX (Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure) Project: Technology transfer and occupational measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the EPRI EMDEX Project -- is a multifaceted project entailing technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. The specific objectives of the project in order to priority were: (1) to transfer the EMDEX technology to utilities; (2) to develop measurement protocols and data management capabilities for large exposure data sets; and (3) to collect, analyze, and document 60-Hz electric and magnetic field exposures for a diverse population. Transfer of the EPRI Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure system (EMDEX) technology to the participating utilities was accomplished through training and through extensive involvement in the exposure data collection effort. Documentation of the EMDEX Project is contained in three volumes: Volume 1 summarizes the methods and results, and provides an assessment of project objectives; Volume 2 provides detailed descriptions of methods, procedures, protocols, materials and analyses, and Volume 3 contains appendices with a complete set of project protocols, project materials, and extensive data tables. 12 refs., 27 figs., 23 tabs.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Management and Administration of Radiation Protection Programs Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide discusses acceptable methods for ensuring that radiological activities will be managed and administered in accordance with a documented radiation protection program (RPP) that complies with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (DOE 1998a), hereinafter referred to as 10 CFR 835. Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1A.

1999-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

119

Radiation Exposure in Nonvascular Fluoroscopy-Guided Interventional Procedures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To investigate the radiation exposure in non-vascular fluoroscopy guided interventions and to search strategies for dose reduction. Materials and Methods: Dose area product (DAP) of 638 consecutive non-vascular interventional procedures of one year were analyzed with respect to different types of interventions; gastrointestinal tract, biliary interventions, embolizations of tumors and hemorrhage. Data was analyzed with special focus on the fluoroscopy doses and frame doses. The third quartiles (Q3) of fluoroscopy dose values were defined in order to set a reference value for our in-hospital practice. Results: Mean fluoroscopy times of gastrostomy, jejunostomy, right and left sided percutaneous biliary drainage, chemoembolization of the liver and embolization due to various hemorrhages were 5.9, 8.6, 13.5, 16.6, 17.4 and 25.2 min, respectively. The respective Q3 total DAP were 52.9, 73.3, 155.1, 308.4, 428.6 and 529.3 Gy*cm{sup 2}. Overall, around 66% of the total DAP originated from the radiographic frames with only 34% of the total DAP applied by fluoroscopy (P < 0.001). The investigators experience had no significant impact on the total DAP applied, most likely since there was no stratification to intervention-complexity. Conclusion: To establish Diagnostic Reference Levels (DRLs), there is a need to establish a registry of radiation dose data for the most commonly performed procedures. Documentation of interventional procedures by fluoroscopy 'grabbing' has the potential to considerably reduce radiation dose applied and should be used instead of radiographic frames whenever possible.

Kloeckner, Roman, E-mail: kloeckner@radiologie.klinik.uni-mainz.de [Johannes Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Bersch, Anton [Kreuznacher Diakonie, Department of Trauma Surgery and Orthopedics (Germany); Santos, Daniel Pinto dos; Schneider, Jens; Dueber, Christoph; Pitton, Michael Bernhard [Johannes Gutenberg-University, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

120

Effects of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens; a comparison of effects of two different exposure rates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

'Donovan, Effect of gamma radiation on Serratia marcescens: Comparison of the radiosensi- tivity of pigmented and nonpigmented cells. Radiation Res, 48, 40-52 (1971). 18. Alison P. Casarett, Radiation ~Biolo . p. 159. Prentice-Hall, Inc. , Englewood Cliffs... EFFECTS OF GAMMA RADIATION ON SL'RNATIA MARCESCENS A COMPARISON OF EFFECTS OF TWO DIFFERENT EXPOSURE RATES A Thesis by CHRISTY ANNETTE MOORE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements...

Moore, Christy Annette

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

E-Print Network 3.0 - accidental radiation exposures Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

many uses, x-rays are the single largest source of man-made radiation exposure. X... -occurring radium and is a major ... Source: Yucca Mountain Project, US EPA Collection:...

122

Inferring ultraviolet anatomical exposure patterns while distinguishing the relative contribution of radiation components  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Exposure to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation is the main causative factor for skin cancer. UV exposure depends on environmental and individual factors, but individual exposure data remain scarce. While ground UV irradiance is monitored via different techniques, it is difficult to translate such observations into human UV exposure or dose because of confounding factors. A multi-disciplinary collaboration developed a model predicting the dose and distribution of UV exposure on the basis of ground irradiation and morphological data. Standard 3D computer graphics techniques were adapted to develop a simulation tool that estimates solar exposure of a virtual manikin depicted as a triangle mesh surface. The amount of solar energy received by various body locations is computed for direct, diffuse and reflected radiation separately. Dosimetric measurements obtained in field conditions were used to assess the model performance. The model predicted exposure to solar UV adequately with a symmetric mean absolute percentage error of 13% and half of the predictions within 17% range of the measurements. Using this tool, solar UV exposure patterns were investigated with respect to the relative contribution of the direct, diffuse and reflected radiation. Exposure doses for various body parts and exposure scenarios of a standing individual were assessed using erythemally-weighted UV ground irradiance data measured in 2009 at Payerne, Switzerland as input. For most anatomical sites, mean daily doses were high (typically 6.2-14.6 Standard Erythemal Dose, SED) and exceeded recommended exposure values. Direct exposure was important during specific periods (e.g. midday during summer), but contributed moderately to the annual dose, ranging from 15 to 24% for vertical and horizontal body parts, respectively. Diffuse irradiation explained about 80% of the cumulative annual exposure dose.

Vuilleumier, Laurent [Federal Office of Meteorology and Climatology, MeteoSwiss, Payerne (Switzerland); Milon, Antoine; Vernez, David [Institute of Work and Health, University of Lausanne and Geneva, Lausanne (Switzerland); Bulliard, Jean-Luc [Cancer Epidemiology Unit, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois and University of Lausanne, Lausanne (Switzerland); Moccozet, Laurent [Institute of Services Science, University of Geneva (Switzerland)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

123

A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring, Analysis & Reporting  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy Cooperation |South Valley ResponsibleSubmissionof Energy 5of

124

U.S. Department of Energy Summary of 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure (Poster)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This poster provides graphic data for 2010-2012 of collective total effective dose (TED) by site, and graphical data for 2008-2012 of components of TED, average measurable TED, percentage of collective TED above dose, collective dose and average measurable dose (1974-2012), and numbers of individuals in the DOE workforce, total number of records of monitored individuals, and number of individuals with a measurable dose. Also, there is a table of the number of individuals receiving >2 rems administrative control level and >5 rems annual limit for 2008-2012.

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radiation and Uranium Resources Exposure Control (South Dakota)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The public policy of South Dakota is to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, the proper development of uranium resources, and the control of any associated harmful effects. The disposal of...

126

Radiation Producing Equipment Exposures EHS Emergency Contact: Eric Boeldt (ejb6@psu.edu), 814-777-0215  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Producing Equipment Exposures EHS Emergency Contact: Eric Boeldt (ejb6@psu.edu), 814/Notifications/Documentation/Follow-Up: Radiation producing equipment includes x-ray generating devices and electron microscopes. All persons radiation source may result in serious injury. These accidental exposures typically occur during sample

Maroncelli, Mark

127

Radiation Exposure From Medical Imaging Time to Regulate?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

smaller population exposure. The current US situation is that quality control and qual- ity assurance modern medical imaging, there are serious is- sues of quality control, training, and, particularly of different standards and rules are in place; accreditation programs, through the American College

Brenner, David Jonathan

128

Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

Hermes, Robert E. (White Rock, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

cadwallader, lee

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Posting and Labeling for Radiological Control Guide for use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This Guide provides an acceptable methodology for establishing and operating a radiological hazard posting and labeling program that will comply with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements specified in Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection Canceled by DOE G 441.1-1B.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

131

Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

monitoring for nitrogen dioxide exposure: methodologyB.G. , Jr. (1983) Nitrogen dioxide inside and outside 137Personal Sampler for Nitrogen Dioxide. American Industrial

Apte, Michael G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

(DAC) values listed in appendix A or appendix C of this part. ALARA means "As Low As is Reasonably Achievable", which is the approach to radiation protection to manage...

133

Response of intracerebral human glioblastoma xenografts to multifraction radiation exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: We investigated the effects of fractionated radiation treatments on the life spans of athymic rats bearing intracerebral brain tumors. Methods and Materials: U-251 MG or U-87 MG human glioblastoma cells were implanted into the brains of athymic rats, and the resulting tumors were irradiated once daily with various doses of ionizing radiation for 5 consecutive days or for 10 days with a 2-day break after Day 5. Results: Five daily doses of 1 and 1.5 Gy, and 10 doses of 0.75 and 1 Gy, cured some U-251 MG tumors. However, five daily doses of 0.5 Gy increased the survival time of animals bearing U-251 MG tumors 5 days without curing any animals of their tumors. Ten doses of 0.3 Gy given over 2 weeks extended the lifespan of the host animals 9 days without curing any animals. For U-87 MG tumors, 5 daily doses of 3 Gy produced an increased lifespan of 8 days without curing any animals, and 10 doses of 1 Gy prolonged lifespan 5.5 days without curing any animals. The differences in extension of life span between the 5- and 10-fraction protocols were minor for either tumor type. Conclusion: The finding that the U-251 MG tumors are more sensitive than U-87 MG tumors, despite the fact that U-251 MG tumors contain many more hypoxic cells than U-87 MG tumors, suggests the intrinsic cellular radiosensitivities of these cell lines are more important than hypoxia in determining their in vivo radiosensitivities.

Ozawa, Tomoko [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Faddegon, Bruce A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hu, Lily J. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Bollen, Andrew W. [Department of Pathology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Lamborn, Kathleen R. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States); Deen, Dennis F. [Brain Tumor Research Center, Department of Neurological Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States) and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, CA (United States)]. E-mail: ddeen@itsa.ucsf.edu

2006-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Radiation Environments and Exposure Considerations for the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) is the next generation (RTG) being developed by DOE to provide reliable, long-life electric power for NASA's planetary exploration programs. The MMRTG is being developed by Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne and Teledyne Energy Systems Incorporated (TESI) for use on currently planned and projected flyby, orbital and planet landing missions. This is a significant departure from the design philosophy of the past which was to match specific mission requirements to RTG design capabilities. Undefined mission requirements provide a challenge to system designers by forcing them to put a design envelope around 'all possible missions'. These multi-mission requirements include internal and external radiation sources. Internal sources include the particles ejected by decaying Pu-238 and its daughters plus particles resulting from the interaction of these particles with other MMRTG materials. External sources include the full spectrum of charged particle radiation surrounding planets with magnetic fields and the surfaces of extraterrestrial objects not shielded by magnetic fields. The paper presents the results of investigations into the environments outlined above and the impact of radiation exposure on potential materials to be used on MMRTG and ground support personnel. Mission requirements were also reviewed to evaluate total integrated dose and to project potential shielding requirements for materials. Much of the information on mission shielding requirements was provided by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The primary result is an ionizing radiation design curve which indicates the limits to which a particular mission can take the MMRTG in terms of ionizing radiation exposure. Estimates of personnel radiation exposure during ground handling are also provided.

Kelly, William M.; Low, Nora M.; Zillmer, Andrew; Johnson, Gregory A. [Pratt and Whitney Rocketdyne, 6633 Canoga Avenue, Canoga Park, CA 91309 (United States); Normand, Eugene [Boeing Radiation Effects Laboratory, P.O. Box 3707, M/S 2T-50, Seattle, WA 98124-22079 (United States)

2006-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

135

Mesenchymal Stem Cells Retain Their Defining Stem Cell Characteristics After Exposure to Ionizing Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the ability to migrate to lesion sites and undergo differentiation into functional tissues. Although this function may be important for tissue regeneration after radiation therapy, the influence of ionizing radiation (IR) on cellular survival and the functional aspects of differentiation and stem cell characteristics of MSCs have remained largely unknown. Methods and Materials: Radiation sensitivity of human primary MSCs from healthy volunteers and primary human fibroblast cells was examined, and cellular morphology, cell cycle effects, apoptosis, and differentiation potential after exposure to IR were assessed. Stem cell gene expression patterns after exposure to IR were studied using gene arrays. Results: MSCs were not more radiosensitive than human primary fibroblasts, whereas there were considerable differences regarding radiation sensitivity within individual MSCs. Cellular morphology, cytoskeletal architecture, and cell motility were not markedly altered by IR. Even after high radiation doses up to 10 Gy, MSCs maintained their differentiation potential. Compared to primary fibroblast cells, MSCs did not show an increase in irradiation-induced apoptosis. Gene expression analyses revealed an upregulation of various genes involved in DNA damage response and DNA repair, but expression of established MSC surface markers appeared only marginally influenced by IR. Conclusions: These data suggest that human MSCs are not more radiosensitive than differentiated primary fibroblasts. In addition, upon photon irradiation, MSCs were able to retain their defining stem cell characteristics both on a functional level and regarding stem cell marker expression.

Nicolay, Nils H., E-mail: n.nicolay@dkfz.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sommer, Eva; Lopez, Ramon; Wirkner, Ute [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Trinh, Thuy [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Sisombath, Sonevisay [Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Debus, Jürgen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Ho, Anthony D.; Saffrich, Rainer [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Huber, Peter E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Heidelberg University Hospital, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Molecular and Radiation Oncology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg (Germany)

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-?B, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPAR?/?-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, and NF-?B signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ? Chronic As{sub 2}O{sub 3} exposure to lung epithelial cells resulted in a cancer-like phenotype. ? Mice injected with arsenic transformed (B-As) cells displayed metastatic tumors. ? Microarray profiling revealed changes in mitochondrial metabolism and ROS response. ? p21, EF1?, Akt, MAPK, PPAR? and NF-?B networks promoted pro-cancer signaling. ? B-As cells represent a lung cancer model to explore As-associated carcinogenesis.

Stueckle, Todd A., E-mail: tstueckle@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Lu, Yongju, E-mail: yongju6@hotmail.com [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Davis, Mary E., E-mail: mdavis@wvu.edu [Department of Physiology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Wang, Liying, E-mail: lmw6@cdc.gov [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Health Effects Laboratory Division, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); Jiang, Bing-Hua, E-mail: bhjiang@jefferson.edu [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States)] [Department of Pathology, Anatomy and Cell Biology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA 19107 (United States); Holaskova, Ida, E-mail: iholaskova@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Schafer, Rosana, E-mail: rschafer@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Barnett, John B., E-mail: jbarnett@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Cell Biology, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Rojanasakul, Yon, E-mail: yrojan@hsc.wvu.edu [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)] [Department of Basic Pharmaceutical Sciences, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States)

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) and the Advisory Board on Radiation and Worker Health (Advisory Board) are responsible for conducting occupational...

138

PLANNING TOOLS FOR ESTIMATING RADIATION EXPOSURE AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A set of computational tools was developed to help estimate and minimize potential radiation exposure to workers from material activation in the National Ignition Facility (NIF). AAMI (Automated ALARA-MCNP Interface) provides an efficient, automated mechanism to perform the series of calculations required to create dose rate maps for the entire facility with minimal manual user input. NEET (NIF Exposure Estimation Tool) is a web application that combines the information computed by AAMI with a given shot schedule to compute and display the dose rate maps as a function of time. AAMI and NEET are currently used as work planning tools to determine stay-out times for workers following a given shot or set of shots, and to help in estimating integrated doses associated with performing various maintenance activities inside the target bay. Dose rate maps of the target bay were generated following a low-yield 10{sup 16} D-T shot and will be presented in this paper.

Verbeke, J; Young, M; Brereton, S; Dauffy, L; Hall, J; Hansen, L; Khater, H; Kim, S; Pohl, B; Sitaraman, S

2010-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

139

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controls 1 Introduction Indoor chemistry is now recognized as an important factor influencing occupant exposure to air pollutants,

Morrison, G.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

United States Office of EPA-520/1-88-020 Environmental Protection Radiation Program September 1988  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Dose Conversion Factors For Inhalation, Submersion, And Ingestion Federal Guidance Report No.11 #12 and Exposure-to-Dose Conversion Factors for General Application, Based on the 1987 Federal Radiation Protection) and Derived Air Concentrations (DAC) for Occupational Exposure 31 2.1 Exposure-to-Dose Conversion Factors

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Radiation Exposures Associated with Shipments of Foreign Research Reactor Spent Nuclear Fuel  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experience has shown that the analyses of marine transport of spent fuel in the Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) were conservative. It is anticipated that for most shipments. The external dose rate for the loaded transportation cask will be more in line with recent shipments. At the radiation levels associated with these shipments, we would not expect any personnel to exceed radiation exposure limits for the public. Package dose rates usually well below the regulatory limits and personnel work practices following ALARA principles are keeping human exposures to minimal levels. However, the potential for Mure shipments with external dose rates closer to the exclusive-use regulatory limit suggests that DOE should continue to provide a means to assure that individual crew members do not receive doses in excess of the public dose limits. As a minimum, the program will monitor cask dose rates and continue to implement administrative procedures that will maintain records of the dose rates associated with each shipment, the vessel used, and the crew list for the vessel. DOE will continue to include a clause in the contract for shipment of the foreign research reactor spent nuclear fuel requiring that the Mitigation Action Plan be followed.

MASSEY,CHARLES D.; MESSICK,C.E.; MUSTIN,T.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

Lee Cadwallader

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

143

Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

none,

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

144

Comparative assessment of standards development for radiation and other hazardous exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A fundamental question in development of standards for allowable exposure is, {open_quotes}What levels of safety are the standards intended to achieve?{close_quotes} This question has clearly not received the attention it deserves. A comparative assessment of standards for radiation and other physical and chemical hazards indicates that differing concerns may have motivated their developmental process. In most cases, the organization formulating the standards stated their objective in general terms such as, {open_quotes}to ensure safety,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}to protect worker`s health,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}to cause no undue stress,{close_quotes} {open_quotes}to avoid adverse health effects,{close_quotes} or to {open_quotes}maintain exposure levels as low as reasonably achievable.{close_quotes} It was generally recognized that absolute safety was unachievable, and therefore, some {open_quotes}reasonable{close_quotes} level of safety would need to be determined. The problem is made even more complex with the understanding that there can be a wide range in individual sensitivity to various harmful agents.

Cohen, J.J. [Jerry J. Cohen, Walnut Creek, CA (United States); Kathren, R.L. [Washington State Univ.-Tri Cities, Richland, WA (United States); Smith, C.F. [Booz-Allen & Hamilton, Germantown, MD (United States)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

145

E-Print Network 3.0 - agent causing occupational Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pathology andor an occupational exposure defined by noxious agent, profession... as shown in fig. 1D. D) The tripartite network: disease-noxious agent-occupation is the...

146

Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

Gayle Woloschak

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

147

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval units of Operation CROSSROADS. Volume 1. Basic report. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

External radiation doses are reconstructed for crews of support and target ships of Joint Task Force One at Operation CROSSROADS, 1946. Volume I describes the reconstruction methodology, which consists of modeling the radiation environment, to include the radioactivity of lagoon water, target ships, and support ship contamination; retracing ship paths through this environment; and calculating the doses to shipboard personnel. The USS RECLAIMER, a support ship, is selected as a representative ship to demonstrate this methodology. Doses for all other ships are summarized. Volume II (Appendix A) details the results for target ship personnel. Volume III (Appendix B) details the results for support ship personnel. Calculated doses for more than 36,000 personnel aboard support ships while at Bikini range from zero to 1.7 rem. Of those approximately 34,000 are less than 0.5 rem. From the models provided, doses due to target ship reboarding and doses accrued after departure from Bikini can be calculated, based on the individual circumstances of exposure.

Weitz, R.; Thomas, C.; Klemm, J.; Stuart, J.; Knowles, M.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

148

Assessment of radiation exposure for materials in the LANSCE Spallation Irradiation Facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Materials samples were irradiated in the Los Alamos Radiation Effects Facility (LASREF) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) to provide data for the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project on the changes in mechanical and physical properties of materials in a spallation target environment. The targets were configured to expose samples to a variety of radiation environments including high-energy protons, mixed protons and neutrons, and predominantly neutrons. The irradiation was driven by an 800 MeV 1 mA proton beam with a circular Gaussian shape of approximately 2{sigma} = 3.5 cm. Two irradiation campaigns were conducted in which samples were exposed for approximately six months and two months, respectively. At the end of this period, the samples were extracted and tested. Activation foils that had been placed in proximity to the materials samples were used to quantify the fluences in various locations. The STAYSL2 code was used to estimate the fluences by combining the activation foil data with calculated data from the LAHET Code System (LCS) and MCNPX. The exposure for each sample was determined from the estimated fluences using interpolation based on a mathematical fitting to the fluence results. The final results included displacement damage (dpa) and gas (H, He) production for each sample from the irradiation. Based on the activation foil analysis, samples from several locations in both irradiation campaigns were characterized. The radiation damage to each sample was highly dependent upon location and varied from 0.023 to 13 dpa and was accompanied by high levels of H and He production.

James, M. R. (Michael R.); Maloy, S. A. (Stuart A.); Sommer, W. F. (Walter F.), Jr.; Fowler, Malcolm M.; Dry, D. E. (Donald E.); Ferguson, P. D. (Phillip D.); Corzine, R. K. (R. Karen); Mueller, G. E. (Gary E.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

E-Print Network 3.0 - accepted radiation exposure Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ABOUT WEATHERING EXPOSURE AND UV... 201 CONSIDERATIONS ABOUT... WEATHERING EXPOSURE AND UV DEGRADATION OF POLYMERIC GEOMEMBRANES Paulo Csar Lodi Department of Civil......

150

Father's Occupational Exposure to Radiation and the Raised Level of Childhood Leukemia near the Sellafield Nuclear Plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The first indications that childhood leukemia rates may be raised near the Sellafield nuclear plant in West Cumbria, England, came from largely anecdotal evidence in a television progm "Wmdscale: The Nuclear Laundry " shown during 1983. During subsequent years, various epidemiological studies have investigated the claim in more detail. Geographical analyses of childhood leukemia incidence in the northern region and mortality in England and Wales using routinely available data made the first contribution. As a result, it was confirmed that leukemia rates in the area, particularly the neighboring village of Seascale, were high compared to other districts, although not totally extreme. Cohort studies of children born in Seascale or attending schools in Seascale were carried out to resolve some of the difficulties of interpretation of geographical analysis. Cohort studies indicated that the excess of leukemia was concentrated among children born in Seascale and was not found among those moving in after birth and su that any causal factors may be acting before birth or very early in life. A case-control study of leukemia (and lymphoma) among young people in West Cumbria has examined potentially important individual factors in detail. The study demonstrated a relationship between the raised incidence of lukenia in children and father's recorded exteral radiaton dose during work at Seilafield before his child's conception. The association can effectively explain statistically the observed geographical excess.

Martin J. Gardner

151

Tritium: a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The somatic, cytogenetic and genetic effects of single and chronic tritiated water (HTO) ingestion in mice was investigated. This study serves not only as an evaluation of tritium toxicity (TRITOX) but due to its design involving long-term low concentration ingestion of HTO may serve as a model for low level long-term ionizing radiation exposure in general. Long-term studies involved animals maintained on HTO at concentrations of 0.3 ..mu..Ci/ml, 1.0 ..mu..Ci/ml, 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml or depth dose equivalent chronic external exposures to /sup 137/Cs gamma rays. Maintenance on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml resulted in no effect on growth, life-time shortening or bone marrow cellularity, but did result in a reduction of bone marrow stem cells, an increase in DLM's in second generation animals maintained on this regimen and cytogenetic effects as indicated by increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCE's) in bone marrow cells, increased chromosome aberrations in the regenerating liver and an increase in micronuclei in red blood cells. Biochemical and microdosimetry studies showed that animals placed on the HTO regimen reached tritium equilibrium in the body water in approximately 17 to 21 days with a more gradual increase in bound tritium. When animals maintained for 180 days on 3.0 ..mu..Ci/ml HTO were placed on a tap water regimen, the tritium level in tissue dropped from the equilibrium value of 2.02 ..mu..Ci/ml before withdrawal to 0.001 ..mu..Ci/ml at 28 days. 18 references.

Carsten, A.L.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

Basis for radiation protection of the nuclear worker  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A description is given of the standards for protection of persons who work in areas that have a potential for radiation exposure. A review is given of the units of radiation exposure and dose equivalent and of the value of the maximum permissible dose limits for occupational exposure. Federal Regulations and Regulatory Guides for radiation protection are discussed. Average occupational equivalent doses experienced in several operations typical of the United States Nuclear Industry are presented and shown to be significantly lower than the maximum permissible. The concept of maintaining radiation doses to As-Low-As-Reasonably-Achievable is discussed and the practice of imposing engineering and administrative controls to provide effective radiation protection for the nuclear worker is described.

Guevara, F.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

Radiological Control Managers' Council

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

An evaluation of theories concerning the health effects of low-dose radiation exposures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The danger of high, acute doses of radiation is well documented, but the effects of low-dose radiation below 100 mSv is still heavily debated. Four theories concerning the effects of lowdose radiation are presented here: ...

Wei, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jay)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

P.A. Nelson S.M. Kajiura G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV-filtering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

P.A. Nelson Ã? S.M. Kajiura Ã? G.S. Losey Exposure to solar radiation may increase ocular UV levels of solar radiation than they had previously experienced in the source habitat in the turbid waters spectrum, but sharks exposed to greater solar radiation showed increased UV blocking in their corneal

Kajiura, Stephen

156

Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Estimating the risks of cancer mortality and genetic defects resulting from exposures to low levels of ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Estimators for calculating the risk of cancer and genetic disorders induced by exposure to ionizing radiation have been recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Committee on the Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiations, the UN Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation, and the International Committee on Radiological Protection. These groups have also considered the risks of somatic effects other than cancer. The US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements has discussed risk estimate procedures for radiation-induced health effects. The recommendations of these national and international advisory committees are summarized and compared in this report. Based on this review, two procedures for risk estimation are presented for use in radiological assessments performed by the US Department of Energy under the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA). In the first procedure, age- and sex-averaged risk estimators calculated with US average demographic statistics would be used with estimates of radiation dose to calculate the projected risk of cancer and genetic disorders that would result from the operation being reviewed under NEPA. If more site-specific risk estimators are needed, and the demographic information is available, a second procedure is described that would involve direct calculation of the risk estimators using recommended risk-rate factors. The computer program REPCAL has been written to perform this calculation and is described in this report. 25 references, 16 tables.

Buhl, T.E.; Hansen, W.R.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Radiation Exposure in Biliary Procedures Performed to Manage Anastomotic Strictures in Pediatric Liver Transplant Recipients: Comparison Between Radiation Exposure Levels Using an Image Intensifier and a Flat-Panel Detector-Based System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The aim of this study was to estimate radiation exposure in pediatric liver transplants recipients who underwent biliary interventional procedures and to compare radiation exposure levels between biliary interventional procedures performed using an image intensifier-based angiographic system (IIDS) and a flat panel detector-based interventional system (FPDS). Materials and Methods: We enrolled 34 consecutive pediatric liver transplant recipients with biliary strictures between January 2008 and March 2013 with a total of 170 image-guided procedures. The dose-area product (DAP) and fluoroscopy time was recorded for each procedure. The mean age was 61 months (range 4-192), and mean weight was 17 kg (range 4-41). The procedures were classified into three categories: percutaneous transhepatic cholangiography and biliary catheter placement (n = 40); cholangiography and balloon dilatation (n = 55); and cholangiography and biliary catheter change or removal (n = 75). Ninety-two procedures were performed using an IIDS. Seventy-eight procedures performed after July 2010 were performed using an FPDS. The difference in DAP between the two angiographic systems was compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum test and a multiple linear regression model. Results: Mean DAP in the three categories was significantly greater in the group of procedures performed using the IIDS compared with those performed using the FPDS. Statistical analysis showed a p value = 0.001 for the PTBD group, p = 0.0002 for the cholangiogram and balloon dilatation group, and p = 0.00001 for the group with cholangiogram and biliary catheter change or removal. Conclusion: In our selected cohort of patients, the use of an FPDS decreases radiation exposure.

Miraglia, Roberto, E-mail: rmiraglia@ismett.edu; Maruzzelli, Luigi [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)] [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy); Tuzzolino, Fabio [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Information Technology (Italy)] [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Information Technology (Italy); Indovina, Pietro Luigi [Medical Physic ISMETT Consultant, Fismeco (Italy)] [Medical Physic ISMETT Consultant, Fismeco (Italy); Luca, Angelo [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)] [Mediterranean Institute for Transplantation and Advanced Specialized Therapies (ISMETT), Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Italy)

2013-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

160

ORIGINAL PAPER Tree rings reveal extent of exposure to ionizing radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Pinus sylvestris located near Chernobyl, Ukraine, varying in the level of background radiation by almost in smaller trees. These findings suggest that radiation has suppressed growth rates of pines in Chernobyl their growth tra- jectories in complex ways. Keywords Chernobyl Á Growth Á Interaction between stressors Á

Mousseau, Timothy A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Health physics manual of good practices for reducing radiation exposure to levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A primary objective of the US Department of Energy (DOE) health physics and radiation protection program has been to limit radiation exposures to those levels that are as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). As a result, the ALARA concept developed into a program and a set of operational principles to ensure that the objective was consistently met. Implementation of these principles required that a guide be produced. The original ALARA guide was issued by DOE in 1980 to promote improved understanding of ALARA concepts within the DOE community and to assist those responsible for operational ALARA activities in attaining their goals. Since 1980, additional guidance has been published by national and international organizations to provide further definition and clarification to ALARA concepts. As basic ALARA experience increased, the value and role of the original guide prompted the DOE Office of Nuclear Safety (ONS) to support a current revision. The revised manual of good practices includes six sections: 1.0 Introduction, 2.0 Administration, 3.0 Optimization, 4.0 Setting and Evaluating ALARA Goals, 5.0 Radiological Design, and 6.0 Conduct of Operations. The manual is directed primarily to contractor and DOE staff who are responsible for conduct and overview of radiation protection and ALARA programs at DOE facilities. The intent is to provide sufficient guidance such that the manual, if followed, will ensure that radiation exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable and will establish the basis for a formally structured and auditable program. 118 refs., 16 figs., 3 tabs.

Herrington, W.N.; Higby, D.P.; Kathren,., R.L.; Merwin, S.E.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1988-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

Napier, Bruce A.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

163

Solar UV radiation exposure of seamen - Measurements, calibration and model calculations of erythemal irradiance along ship routes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Seamen working on vessels that go along tropical and subtropical routes are at risk to receive high doses of solar erythemal radiation. Due to small solar zenith angles and low ozone values, UV index and erythemal dose are much higher than at mid-and high latitudes. UV index values at tropical and subtropical Oceans can exceed UVI = 20, which is more than double of typical mid-latitude UV index values. Daily erythemal dose can exceed the 30-fold of typical midlatitude winter values. Measurements of erythemal exposure of different body parts on seamen have been performed along 4 routes of merchant vessels. The data base has been extended by two years of continuous solar irradiance measurements taken on the mast top of RV METEOR. Radiative transfer model calculations for clear sky along the ship routes have been performed that use satellite-based input for ozone and aerosols to provide maximum erythemal irradiance and dose. The whole data base is intended to be used to derive individual erythemal exposure of seamen during work-time.

Feister, Uwe [German Meteorological Service, Meteorological Observatory Lindenberg - Richard-Assmann-Observatory, Am Observatorium 12, 15848 Lindenberg (Germany); Meyer, Gabriele; Kirst, Ulrich [German Social Accident Insurance Institution for Transport and Traffic, Ottenser Hauptstrasse 54, 22765 Hamburg (Germany)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Personal Experience Reducing Radiation Exposures: Protecting Family in Kiev during the First Two Weeks after Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident occurred in 1986. The plume from the explosions and fires was highly radioactive and resulted in very high exposure levels in the surrounding regions. This paper describes how the people in Kiev, Ukraine, a city 90 miles (120 km) south of Chernobyl, and in particular one individual in that city, Professor Vitaly Eremenko, became aware of the threat before the official announcement and the steps he took to mitigate potential impacts to his immediate family. The combination of being informed and using available resources led to greatly reduced consequences for his family and, in particular, his newborn granddaughter. He notes how quickly word of some aspects of the hazard spread in the city and how other aspects appear to not have been understood. Although these events are being recalled as the 20th anniversary of the terrible event approaches, the lessons are still pertinent today. Threats of possible terrorist use of radiation dispersal devices makes knowledge of effective individual actions for self-protection from radiation exposures a topic of current interest.

Eremenko, Vitaly A.; Droppo, James G.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Structural evolution and degradation mechanism of Vectran upon exposure to UV-radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Structural evolution and degradation mechanism of VectranÃ? fibers upon exposure to UV performance fibers. How- ever, they are susceptible to degradation and undergo structural changes when exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation in service. The focus of this work is to investigate the photochemical aging

Guo, John Zhanhu

166

Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

Abbasi, Akbar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Experimental and Simulation of Gamma Radiation Dose Rate for High Exposure Building Material  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Natural radioactivity concentrations in high exposure building materials are commonly used in Iran, which is measured a direct exposure by using {\\gamma}-ray spectrometry. The values for 226Ra, 232Th and 40K were in the ranges 3.8 - 94.2, 6.5 - 172.2 and 556.9 - 1539.2 Bqkg-1, respectively. The absorbed dose rates in the standard dwelling room due to 238U, 232Th series and 40K were calculated with MCNPX code. The simulation and experimental results were between 7.95 - 41.74 and 8.36 - 39.99 nGy h-1, respectively. These results were compared with experimental outing and there was overlap closely. The simulation results are able to develop for any kind of dwelling places.

Akbar Abbasi; Mustfa Hassanzadeh

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

168

Radiation safety at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This is a report on the Radiation Safety Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP). This Program covers a number of activities that support high-level waste solidification, stabilization of facilities, and decontamination and decommissioning activities at the Project. The conduct of the Program provides confidence that all occupational radiation exposures received during operational tasks at the Project are within limits, standards, and program requirements, and are as low as reasonably achievable.

Hoffman, R.L.

1997-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

169

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MARYLAND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY and HEALTH ACT safety and health protection on the job STATE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS, AND OTHER APPLICABLE REGULATIONS MAY BE OBTAINED FROM Complaints about State Program administration may be made to Regional Administrator, Occupational Safety

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

170

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH AND SAFETY MANAGEMENT SYSTEM Department of Occupational Health and Safety Revised December 2009 #12;Occupational Health and Safety (OHS) Management System 1. Introduction.............................................................................................................. 3 2.2 Management of Health and Safety

171

Occupational Populations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

? The general population may be exposed to radon in indoor and outdoor air and drinking water. ? The primary source of indoor radon is from soil; radon in the soil can enter the home through cracks in the floors, walls, or foundations. The release of radon from water may also contribute to indoor levels. ? Exposures to radon gas are accompanied by exposure to radon progeny which are the decay products of radon-222 [e.g., bismuth-214 ( 214 Bi), lead-210 ( 210 Pb), 214 Pb, polonium-210 ( 210 Po), and 218 Po.

unknown authors

172

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval units of Operation Crossroads. Volume 2. (Appendix A) target ships. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

External radiation doses are reconstructed for crews of support and target ships of Joint Task Force One at Operation CROSSROADS, 1946. Volume I describes the reconstruction methodology, which consists of modeling the radiation environment, to include the radioactivity of lagoon water, target ships, and support ship contamination; retracing ship paths through this environment; and calculating the doses to shipboard personnel. The USS RECLAIMER, a support ship, is selected as a representative ship to demonstrate this methodology. Doses for all other ships are summarized. Volume II (Appendix A) details the results for target ship personnel. Volume III (Appendix B) details the results for support ship personnel. Calculated doses for more than 36,000 personnel aboard support ships while at Bikini range from zero to 1.7 rem. Of those, approximately 34,000 are less than 0.5 rem. From the models provided, doses due to target ship reboarding and doses accrued after departure from Bikini can be calculated, based on the individual circumstances of exposure.

Weitz, R.; Thomas, C.; Klemm, J.; Stuart, J.; Knowles, M.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

173

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval units of Operation Crossroads. Volume 3. (Appendix B) support ships. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

External radiation doses are reconstructed for crews of support and target ships of Joint Task Force One at Operation CROSSROADS, 1946. Volume I describes the reconstruction methodology, which consists of modeling the radiation environment, to include the radioactivity of lagoon water, target ships, and support ship contamination; retracing ship paths through this environment; and calculating the doses to shipboard personnel. The USS RECLAIMER, a support ship, is selected as a representative ship to demonstrate this methodology. Doses for all other ships are summarized. Volume II (Appendix A) details the results for target ship personnel. Volume III (Appendix B) details the results for support ship personnel. Calculated doses for more than 36,000 personnel aboard support ships while at Bikini range from zero to 1.7 rem. Of those approximately 34,000 are less than 0.5 rem. From the models provided, doses due to target ship reboarding and doses accrued after departure from Bikini can be calculated, based on the individual circumstances of exposure.

Weitz, R.; Thomas, C.; Klemm, J.; Stuart, J.; Knowles, M.

1982-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

174

Method and apparatus for reducing radiation exposure through the use of infrared data transmission  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and apparatus is described for transmitting information, for exae, dosimetry data from a hazardous environment such as a radioactive area to a remote relatively safe location. A radiation detector senses the radiation and generates an electrical signal which is fed as a binary coded decimal signal to an infrared transmitter having a microprocessor. The microprocessor formats the detected information into digits of data and modulates a 40 kHz oscillator, the output of which is fed to and intensity modulates one or more infrared emitting diodes. The infrared signal from the diodes is transmitted to a portable hand-held infrared receiver remote from the hazardous environment. The receiver includes an infrared sensitive diode which decodes the data and generates an electrical signal which is coupled to a microcomputer. The microcomputer synchronizes itself to the transmitter, reads the digits of data as they are received, sums the digits and compares the sum with a checksum signal generated and transmitted from the transmitter. If a match of the checksum signals exists, the received data is displayed, otherwise it is described and the receiver conditions itself for the next transmission of data.

Austin, Frank S. (Schaghticoke, NY); Hance, Albert B. (Schenectady, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Radiation Exposure to Patient and Staff in Hepatic Chemoembolization: Risk Estimation of Cancer and Deterministic Effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to determine the risks of radiation-induced cancer and deterministic effects for the patient and staff in transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sixty-five patients with HCC underwent the first cycle of TACE. Thermoluminescence dosemeters and conversion factors were used to measure surface doses and to calculate organ doses and effective dose. For the patient, the risk of fatal cancer and severe genetic defect was in the magnitude of 10{sup -4} and 10{sup -5}, respectively. Five patients showed surface doses over the first lumbar vertebra exceeding 2000 mSv and 45 patients showed doses over the spine or the liver region above 500 mSv. The risk of fatal cancer and severe genetic defect for the radiologist and assistant was in the magnitude of 10{sup -7} to 10{sup -8}. They could exceed the threshold for lens opacity in the case of more than 490 and 1613 TACE yearly for a period of many years, respectively. Radiation dose could lead to local transient erythema and/or local depression of hematopoiesis in many patients after TACE. For the radiologist and assistant, risk of fatal cancer and genetic defect and lens opacity might arise when they perform interventions such as TACE intensively.

Hidajat, Nico, E-mail: nico.hidajat@gmx.de; Wust, Peter; Felix, Roland; Schroeder, Ralf Juergen [Charite Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Humboldt-University of Berlin, Department of Radiology (Germany)

2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

176

Off-Site Radiation Exposure Review Project: Phase 2 soils program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To help estimate population doses of radiation from fallout originating at the Nevada Test Site, soil samples were collected throughout the western United States. Each sample was prepared by drying and ball-milling, then analyzed by gamma-spectrometry to determine the amount of {sup 137}Cs it contained. Most samples were also analyzed by chemical separation and alpha-spectrometry to determine {sup 239 + 240}Pu and by isotope mass spectroscopy to determine the ratios of {sup 240}Pu to {sup 239}Pu and {sup 241}Pu to {sup 239}Pu. The total inventories of cesium and plutonium at 171 sites were computed from the results. This report describes the sample collection, processing, and analysis, presents the analytical results, and assesses the quality of the data. 10 refs., 9 figs., 12 tabs.

McArthur, R.D.; Miller, F.L. Jr.

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Signal-to-noise and radiation exposure considerations in conventional and diffraction x-ray microscopy  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

Using a signal-to-noise ratio estimation based on correlations between multiple simulated images, we compare the dose efficiency of two soft x-ray imaging systems: incoherent brightfield imaging using zone plate optics in a transmission x-ray microscope (TXM), and x-ray diffraction microscopy (XDM) where an image is reconstructed from the far-field coherent diffraction pattern. In XDM one must computationally phase weak diffraction signals; in TXM one suffers signal losses due to the finite numerical aperture and efficiency of the optics. In simulations with objects representing isolated cells such as yeast, we find that XDM has the potential for delivering equivalent resolution images using fewer photons. This can be an important advantage for studying radiation-sensitive biological and soft matter specimens.

Huang, Xiaojing; Miao, Huijie; Steinbrener, Jan; Nelson, Johanna; Shapiro, David; Stewart, Andrew; Turner, Joshua; Jacobsen, Chris

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

assessing inhalation exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of Total- Body Radiation Exposure Dosimetry CiteSeer Summary: The risk of radiation exposure, due to accidental or malicious release of ionizing radiation, is a major public...

179

Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Analysis of radiation exposure for naval personnel at Operation Ivy. Technical report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The radiological environments are reconstructed for eighteen ships and the residence islands of Enewetak, Kwajalein, and Bikini Atolls that received fallout following Shots MIKE and KING during Operation IVY (November 1952). Secondary (late-time) fallout from Shot MIKE was the primary contributor to the low-level radiation encountered on the majority of the ships and atolls; only the M/V HORIZON received primary (early-time) fallout from this event. Fallout from Shot KING was minimal. From the reconstructed operations and radiological environments, equivalent personnel film badge doses are calculated and compared with available dosimetry data for fourteen of the ships. Calculated doses for the majority of the ships are in good agreement with the film badge data; however, for three of the participating destroyers (DDEs), calculated doses are significantly lower than the dosimetry data indicates. Calculated mean doses for typical shipboard personnel range from a high of 0.062 rem on the HORIZON to a low of 0.001 rem on the SPENCER F. BAIRD; for island-based personnel, calculated mean doses are less than 0.06 rem.

Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Stuart, J.; Klemm, J.

1983-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Analysis of radiation exposure for Naval personnel at Operation Castle. Technical report, 1 January 1983-31 January 1984  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Film-badge doses are reconstructed for sixteen ships and the residence islands of Enewetak and Kwajalein Atolls resulting from the six nuclear detonations comprising Operation CASTLE (March-May 1954). Fallout from Shots BRAVO and ROMEO was the major source of contamination on most of the ships and islands. Varying amounts of fallout from Shots UNION, YANKEE, and NECTAR contributed somewhat to the total doses of the shipboard and island-based personnel; no fallout was experienced as a result of Shot KOON. Shipboard personnel received additional exposure from hulls and salt water piping systems that had become contaminated from operating in the radioactive waters of Bikini Lagoon. From the reconstructed radiation environments, both topside and below, an equivalent film badge dose is calculated and compared to actual dosimetry data. Agreement is very good during badged periods when the ships received significant fallout. When topside intensities were not documented, generally late in the operation when intensity levels were low, agreement is not as good. Calculated ship contamination doses of significance are in excellent agreement with limited available dosimetry data. Calculated average doses for shipboard personnel range from a low of 0.19 rem for the crew of the USS LST-825 to a high of 3.56 rem for the crew of the USS PHILIP. Average doses on the residence islands of Enewetak and Kwajalein Atolls are 1.09 rem and 0.32 rem, respectively.

Thomas, C.; Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.; Weitz, R.

1984-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

182

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

184

Types of Radiation Exposure  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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185

Effect of ultraviolet radiation exposure on room-temperature hydrogen sensitivity of nanocrystalline doped tin oxide sensor incorporated into microelectromechanical systems device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation exposure on the room-temperature hydrogen (H{sub 2}) sensitivity of nanocrystalline indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3})-doped tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin-film gas sensor is investigated in this article. The present sensor is incorporated into microelectromechanical systems device using sol-gel dip-coating technique. The present sensor exhibits a very high sensitivity, as high as 65 000-110 000, at room temperature, for 900 ppm of H{sub 2} under the dynamic test condition without UV exposure. The H{sub 2} sensitivity is, however, observed to reduce to 200 under UV radiation, which is contrary to the literature data, where an enhanced room-temperature gas sensitivity has been reported under UV radiation. The observed phenomenon is attributed to the reduced surface coverage by the chemisorbed oxygen ions under UV radiation, which is in consonance with the prediction of the constitutive equation, proposed recently by the authors, for the gas sensitivity of nanocrystalline semiconductor oxide thin-film sensors.

Shukla, Satyajit; Agrawal, Rajnikant; Cho, Hyoung J.; Seal, Sudipta; Ludwig, Lawrence; Parish, Clyde [Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center (AMPAC) and Mechanical Materials Aerospace Engineering (MMAE) Department, Engineering 381, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), John F. Kennedy Space Center, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida 32899 (United States)

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human In vivo Dose-Response to Controlled, Low-Dose Low Linear EnergyTransfer Ionizing Radiation Purpose: The effect of low doses of low ^ linear energy transfer (photon) ionizing radiation (LDIR, and pathway. Conclusions: These results show for the first time that low doses of radiation have an identifi

Rocke, David M.

187

Effects of an acute dose of gamma radiation exposure on stem diameter growth, carbon gain, and biomass partitioning in Helianthus annuus  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nineteen-day-old dwarf sunflower plants (Helianthus annuus, variety NK894) received a variable dose (0-40 Gy) from a cobalt-60 gamma source. A very sensitive stem monitoring device, developed at Battelle's Pacific Northwest Laboratories, Richland, Washington was used to measure real-time changes in stem diameter. Exposure of plants caused a significant reduction in stem growth and root biomass. Doses as low as 5 Gy resulted in a significant increase in leaf density, suggesting that nonreversible morphological growth changes could be induced by very low doses of radiation. Carbohydrate analysis of 40-Gy irradiated plants demonstrated significantly more starch content in leaves and significantly less starch content in stems 18 days after exposure than did control plants. In contrast, the carbohydrate content in roots of 40-Gy irradiated plants were not significantly different from unirradiated plants 18 days after exposure. These results indicate that radiation either decreased phloem transport or reduced the availability of sugar reducing enzymes in irradiated plants. 44 refs., 12 figs.

Thiede, M.E.

1988-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

188

Occupational Health Nurse  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Occupational Health Nurse position is located in the Talent Sustainment group within the Human Capital Management (HCM) organization. The Talent Sustainment organization ensures that effective...

189

Review of exposure limits and experimental data for corneal and lenticular damage from short pulsed UV and IR laser radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UV and infrared spectral ranges. In the UV spectral range, thermal and photochemical damage duration. The thermal UV damage data are compared with levels inferred from CO2 radiation thresholds below 355 nm is identified. Available experimental data for infrared radiation 1.4­4 m can be fitted

190

Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J. (Environmental Science Division); (USDOE)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

191

Rehabilitation Services Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

/Industries Correction Agencies Drug Treatment Centers Addiction Counselor Advocacy Occupations Art Therapist BehavioralRehabilitation Services Sample Occupations Sample Work Settings Child & Day Care Centers Clinics................................ IIB 29-1000 E4 Careers in Counseling and Human Services .........IIB 21-1010 C7 Careers in Health Care

Ronquist, Fredrik

192

Occupational dose reduction at Department of Energy contractor facilities: Study of ALARA programs. Status 1990  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides the US Department of Energy (DOE) and its contractors with information that will be useful for reducing occupational radiation doses at DOE`s nuclear facilities. In 1989 and 1990, health physicists from the Brookhaven National Laboratory`s (BNL) ALARA Center visited twelve DOE contractor facilities with annual collective dose equivalents greater than 100 person-rem (100 person-cSv). The health physicists interviewed radiological safety staff, engineers, and training personnel who were responsible for dose control. The status of ALARA practices at the major contractor facilities was compared with the requirements and recommendation in DOE Order 5480.11 ``Radiation Protection for Occupational Workers`` and PNL-6577 ``Health Physics Manual of Good Practices for Reducing Radiation Exposure to Levels that are as Low as Reasonably Achievable.`` The information and data collected are described and examples of successful practices are presented. The findings on the status of the DOE Contractor ALARA Programs are summarized and evaluated. In addition, the supplement to this report contains examples of good-practice documents associated with implementing the major elements of a formally documented ALARA program for a major DOE contractor facility.

Dionne, B.J.; Meinhold, C.B.; Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Occupational neurotoxicology of organic solvents and solvent mixtures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The results of two field studies in painters and spray painters, the outcomes of examinations of workers with suspected work-related disease due to solvents, as well as data from an evaluation of an epidemiologic study in painters with confirmed occupational disease, are presented and discussed. The results of these studies and the experiences in occupational medicine in the Federal Republic of Germany do not support the assumption of high neurotoxic risks in solvent-exposed workers, which can be postulated from various epidemiologic studies from Scandinavian countries. Several factors may explain the different conclusions: (1) lower solvent exposures of German painters in the past decades; (2) false positive diagnosis of a toxic encephalopathy; (3) aetiological misclassification; (4) differences in legislation relevant for the acknowledgement of occupational diseases. In conclusion, there is a need for further well-designed epidemiologic studies in occupationally solvent-exposed workers. Suggestions regarding assessment of exposure and neurobehavioral tests are given.

Triebig, G. (Univ. of Heidelberg (Germany, F.R.))

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382391 Occupational Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391 Journal of Occupational Health Relationships of Job and Some National Institute for Health and Medical Research (Inserm), U 420, IFR25-RFRH, Réseau Fédératif de disorders. (J Occup Health 2003; 45: 382­391) Key words: Occupational injury, Job, Sex, Age, Overweight

Boyer, Edmond

195

Properties of Natural Radiation and Radioactivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ubiquitous natural sources of radiation and radioactive material (naturally occurring radioactive material, NORM) have exposed humans throughout history. To these natural sources have been added technologically-enhanced naturally occurring radioactive material (TENORM) sources and human-made (anthropogenic) sources. This chapter describes the ubiquitous radiation sources that we call background, including primordial radionuclides such as 40K, 87Rb, the 232Th series, the 238U series, and the 235U series; cosmogenic radionuclides such as 3H and 14C; anthropogenic radionuclides such as 3H, 14C, 137Cs, 90Sr, and 129I; radiation from space; and radiation from technologically-enhanced concentrations of natural radionuclides, particularly the short-lived decay products of 222Rn ("radon") and 220Rn ("thoron") in indoor air. These sources produce radiation doses to people principally via external irradiation or internal irradiation following intakes by inhalation or ingestion. The effective doses from each are given, with a total of 3.11 mSv y-1 (311 mrem y-1) to the average US resident. Over 2.5 million US residents receive over 20 mSv y-1 (2 rem y-1), primarily due to indoor radon. Exposure to radiation from NORM and TENORM produces the largest fraction of ubiquitous background exposure to US residents, on the order of 2.78 mSv (278 mrem) or about 89%. This is roughly 45% of the average annual effective dose to a US resident of 6.2 mSv y-1 (620 mrem y-1) that includes medical (48%), consumer products and air travel (2%), and occupational and industrial (0.1%). Much of this chapter is based on National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) Report No. 160, "Ionizing Radiation Exposure of the Population of the United States," for which the author chaired the subcommittee that wrote Chapter 3 on "Ubiquitous Background Radiation."

Strom, Daniel J.

2009-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

196

Effects of p60 sCo gamma radiation on Sarcina lutea: A comparison of effects at two different exposure rates and a study of the radiosensitizing properties of prodigiosin.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pigmented and nonpigmented cells. Radiation Res. 48, 40-52 (1971). 8. R. P. Williams, Biosynthesis of Prodigiosin, a Secondary Metabolite of Serratia marcescens, ~A 1. Microbiol. 25, 396-402 (1973). 9. M. M. Matthews, and N. I. Krinsky, The relatioship... Radiation on Sarcina ]utes: A Comparison of Effects at Two Different Exposure Rates and A Study of the Radiosensitizing Properties of. Prodigiosin (August 1973) George W. Blair, Jr. , B. S, , University of Chattanooga Directed by: Dr. R. D. Neff...

Blair, George Washington

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Development and Validation of a Heart Atlas to Study Cardiac Exposure to Radiation Following Treatment for Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Cardiac toxicity is an important sequela of breast radiotherapy. However, the relationship between dose to cardiac structures and subsequent toxicity has not been well defined, partially due to variations in substructure delineation, which can lead to inconsistent dose reporting and the failure to detect potential correlations. Here we have developed a heart atlas and evaluated its effect on contour accuracy and concordance. Methods and Materials: A detailed cardiac computed tomography scan atlas was developed jointly by cardiology, cardiac radiology, and radiation oncology. Seven radiation oncologists were recruited to delineate the whole heart, left main and left anterior descending interventricular branches, and right coronary arteries on four cases before and after studying the atlas. Contour accuracy was assessed by percent overlap with gold standard atlas volumes. The concordance index was also calculated. Standard radiation fields were applied. Doses to observer-contoured cardiac structures were calculated and compared with gold standard contour doses. Pre- and post-atlas values were analyzed using a paired t test. Results: The cardiac atlas significantly improved contour accuracy and concordance. Percent overlap and concordance index of observer-contoured cardiac and gold standard volumes were 2.3-fold improved for all structures (p < 0.002). After application of the atlas, reported mean doses to the whole heart, left main artery, left anterior descending interventricular branch, and right coronary artery were within 0.1, 0.9, 2.6, and 0.6 Gy, respectively, of gold standard doses. Conclusions: This validated University of Michigan cardiac atlas may serve as a useful tool in future studies assessing cardiac toxicity and in clinical trials which include dose volume constraints to the heart.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Koelling, Todd [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chughtai, Aamer [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chan, June L.; Freedman, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Jolly, Shruti; Larouere, Janice; Soriano, Julie; Marsh, Robin; Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Occupational Health Services - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnderOccupational Health Services Part IIIIServices

199

Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

200

Radiation Impact of Very Low Level Radioactive Steel Reused in Building Industry with Emphasis on External Exposure Pathway - 12569  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Considerable quantities of various materials are accumulated during the decommissioning process of nuclear installations. Some of arising materials are activated or contaminated. However, many of them continue to have an economic value and exist in a form that can be recycled or reused for special purposes. Furthermore much of the material generated during decommissioning process will contain only small amounts of radionuclides. For these materials there exist environmental and economic incentives to maximize the use of the concept of clearance from further regulatory control. This impact analysis is devoted to mentioned incentives. The aim is to conditionally clear maximum amount of the scrap steel and consequently recycle and reuse it in form of reinforcing components in tunnel and bridge building scenarios. Recent calculations relevant for external exposure pathway indicate that concept of conditional clearance represent a feasible option for the management of radioactive materials. Even in chosen specific industrial applications it is possible to justify new, approximately one order of magnitude higher, clearance levels. However analysis of other possible exposure pathways relevant for particular scenario of reuse of conditionally cleared materials has to be performed in order to confirm indications from partially obtained results. Basically, the concept of conditional clearance can bring two basic benefits. Firstly it is saving of considerable funds, which would be otherwise used for treatment, conditioning and disposal of materials at appropriate radioactive waste repository. Moreover materials with intrinsic value (particularly metals) can be recycled and reused in industrial applications instead of investing resources on mining and production process in order to obtain new, 'fresh' materials. (authors)

Panik, Michal; Hrncir, Tomas; Necas, Vladimir [Slovak University of Technology in Bratislava, Bratislava (Slovakia)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Occupational health experience with organic additives  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For many decades, interest in occupational medicine has been focused on the wide variety of organic additives, which includes a large number of substances, for example, dyestuffs, pigments, and auxiliaries for the textile, leather, and paper industries. The reason is that, if the recommended precautions are not observed, there is a risk of exposure to most of these substances during both production and use. Moreover, over the years, some additives have caused concern and aroused suspicion regarding adverse effects on health. In order to deal with health problems in this field, it is important to be aware of how, what, and where occupational diseases or accidents arise. Much knowledge has been gained about these, and it would be an impossible task to give a systematic survey of the data that have accumulated, especially since it is necessary to take account of the problem of exposure to more than one substance. Thus an attempt is made to report on occupational health experience in general, and to demonstrate how an industrial hygienist may approach the many and various problems. Some epidemiological studies on organic additives (auramine, anthraquinone dyestuffs, organic dyes, etc.) are discussed.

Thiess, A.M.; Wellenreuther, G.

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Occupational Health and Safety Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Addressing Health and Safety Concerns and Resolution of Work RefusalsOccupational Health and Safety Manual #12;1 Introduction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 York University Occupational Health and Safety Policy and Programs

203

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

204

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Program Act (EEOICPA) Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

205

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees'...

206

E-Print Network 3.0 - ambient ultraviolet radiation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation. In particular, several members of class amphibia are negatively... affected by exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation. Exposure to ultraviolet-B radiation can cause...

207

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute exposure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exposure is that which occurs within a 24 h period, subacute exposure... germline by low-dose chronic exposure to -radiation and fission neutrons". The authors of this...

208

Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Comprehensive progress report, July 1991--June 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This comprehensive progress report provides a synopsis of major research accomplishments during the years of 1991-1994, including the technical aspects of the project. The objectives and accomplishments are as follows: 1. Defining the chromosome segments associated with radiation and chemically-induced leukemogenesis (treatment-related acute myeloid leukemia, t-AML); A. Continued genetic analysis of chromosomes 5 and 7, B. Correlation of treatment with balanced and unbalanced translocations. 2. Cloning the breakpoints in balanced translocations in t-AML; A. Clone the t(9;11) and t(11;19) breakpoints, B. Clone the t(3,21)(q26,q22) breakpoint, C. Determine the relationship of these translocations to prior exposure to topoisomerase II inhibitors. 3. Compare the breakpoint junctions in patients who have the same translocations in t-AML and AML de novo. 4. Map the scaffold attachment regions in the genes that are involved in balanced translocations in t-AML. Plans for the continuation of present objectives and possible new objectives in consideration of past results are also provided.

Rowley, J.D.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9, influence cataract development and thus radiosensitivity. These observations have direct applicability to various human populations including accidentally exposed individuals, interventional medical workers, astronauts and nuclear plant workers.

Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University] [Columbia University

2013-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

210

Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) PIA, Idaho National...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medicine -...

211

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Occupational Medical...

212

Occupational Medicine Variance Request  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnderOccupational Health Services PartDepartment

213

An exposure assessment survey of the Mont Belvieu polyethylene plant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to selected employees. The objectives included determining the amount of occupational chemical, dust, noise, and heat-stress exposure experienced by those selected workers. Data collected from job descriptions, questionnaires, walk-through surveys and personal...

Tucker, Thomas Franklin

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Section 5 -Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Section 5 - Termination of Occupancy A. Involuntary Termination of Occupancy 1. Housing and Dining number of credits at UAA as stipulated in Section 2 - Eligibility, and for non-payment of Housing charges. 2. The University may terminate this agreement without cause with ten days written notice. 3

Pantaleone, Jim

215

Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6,LocalNuclear SecurityOfficeMatterDosimetry Report

217

WI Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

218

ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA,...

219

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A...

220

FAQS Reference Guide – Occupational Safety  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in the July 2011 version of DOE-STD-1160-2011, Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Environmental Studies & Ecology Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Relations Specialist Recreation Leader Renewable Energy Consultant Safety Inspector Sales Representative. Programs Farms/Ranches FEDERAL AGENCIES Department of Defense (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers) Environmental Conservationist Consultant Earth Scientist Ecologist Economic Analyst Energy Occupations Entomologist

Ronquist, Fredrik

223

E-Print Network 3.0 - arrbod acute radiation Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 5 Summary: to years). Exposure to naturally occurring background radiation is an example of chronic exposure. Acute......

224

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute radiation syndrones Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 5 Summary: to years). Exposure to naturally occurring background radiation is an example of chronic exposure. Acute......

225

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute radiation effects Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

... 5 Summary: to years). Exposure to naturally occurring background radiation is an example of chronic exposure. Acute......

226

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers’ compensation, and much more.

227

Occupational Health and Safety Animal Job Exposure Form  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

symptoms within the past year? Chronic Cough Asthma Hay Fever Skin Rash Eczema Chronic Allergies (food

California at Santa Barbara, University of

228

ORAU: Occupational Exposure and Worker Health fact sheet  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory | NationalJohnSecurityControlsOMB Policies OR I GI N A L SWorker

229

Evaluation of occupational noise exposure using a wireless microphone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

at the P&0. 05 level indicating a satisfactory correlation between the two microphone systems. Mean values were generated for the General Radio (GR Mike) and the Vega (Vega Mike) microphones at each of the five locations around the radial-arm saw... (Table VIII). 52 Table VIII. Mean Values for Each Microphone Location of Mike Pairs of GR Nike Vega Mike Readings dB dB 96. 6 95. 6 94. 8 98. 0 96. 6 95. 8 95. 2 95 ' o 97. 6 97. 0 The mean values for the GR and Vega microphones were...

Nash, Robert Bacot

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Radiation Protection Group Annual Report 2003  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The RP Annual Report summarises the activities carried out by CERN’s Radiation Protection Group in the year 2003. It includes contribution from the EN section of the TIS/IE Group on environmental monitoring. Chapter 1 reports on the measurements and estimations of the impact on the environment and public exposure due to the Organisation’s activities. Chapter 2 provides the results of the monitoring of CERN’s staff, users and contractors to occupational exposure. Chapter 3 deals with operational radiation protection around the accelerators and in the experimental areas. Chapter 4 reports on RP design studies for the LHC and CNGS projects. Chapter 5 addresses the various services provided by the RP Group to other Groups and Divisions at CERN, which include managing radioactive waste, high-level dosimetry, lending radioactive test sources and shipping radioactive materials. Chapter 6 describes activities other than the routine and service tasks, i.e. development work in the field of instrumentation and res...

Silari, M

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Radiation Processing -an overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of radiation · Facilities ­ Gamma ­ electrons ­ X-ray ­ Safety · Sterilisation of medical devices · Food irradiation · Material modification #12;3 Content ­ Part 2 · Environmental applications · Other applications Radiation · Energy in the form of waves or moving subatomic particles Irradiation · Exposure to radiation

232

Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

The EMDEX Project: Technology transfer and occupational measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the EPRI EMDEX Project -- is a multifaceted project entailing technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. The specific objectives of the project in order of priority were: to transfer the EMDEX technology to utilities; to develop measurement protocols and data management capabilities for large exposure data sets; and to collect, analyze, and document 60-Hz electric and magnetic field exposures for a diverse population. Transfer of the EPRI Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure system (EMDEX) technology to the participating utilities was accomplished through training and through extensive involvement in the exposure data collection effort. Field exposure data measured by an EMDEX system were collected by volunteer utility employees at 59 sites in the US and three other countries between October 1988 and September 1989. Approximately 50,000 hours of magnetic field and 23,000 hours of electric field exposure records taken at 10-second intervals were obtained, of which 70% were from Work environments. Exposures and time spent in environments have been analyzed by Primary Work Environment, by occupied environment, and by job classification. Generally, the measured fields and exposures in the Generation, Transmission, Distribution and Substation environments were higher than in other occupational environments in utilities. The Nonwork fields and exposures for workers associated with various categories were comparable. Evaluation of the project by participants indicated general satisfaction with the EMDEX system and with this approach to technology transfer. This document, Volume 3 contains appendices with a complete set of project protocols, project materials, and extensive data tables.

Not Available

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

A Reanalysis of Curvature in the Dose Response for Cancer and Modifications by Age at Exposure Following Radiation Therapy for Benign Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To assess the shape of the dose response for various cancer endpoints and modifiers by age and time. Methods and Materials: Reanalysis of the US peptic ulcer data testing for heterogeneity of radiogenic risk by cancer endpoint (stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia, all other). Results: There are statistically significant (P<.05) excess risks for all cancer and for lung cancer and borderline statistically significant risks for stomach cancer (P=.07), and leukemia (P=.06), with excess relative risks Gy{sup -1} of 0.024 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.011, 0.039), 0.559 (95% CI 0.221, 1.021), 0.042 (95% CI -0.002, 0.119), and 1.087 (95% CI -0.018, 4.925), respectively. There is statistically significant (P=.007) excess risk of pancreatic cancer when adjusted for dose-response curvature. General downward curvature is apparent in the dose response, statistically significant (P<.05) for all cancers, pancreatic cancer, and all other cancers (ie, other than stomach, pancreas, lung, leukemia). There are indications of reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure (for all cancers, pancreatic cancer), but no evidence for quadratic variations in relative risk with age at exposure. If a linear-exponential dose response is used, there is no significant heterogeneity in the dose response among the 5 endpoints considered or in the speed of variation of relative risk with age at exposure. The risks are generally consistent with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers. Conclusions: There are excess risks for various malignancies in this data set. Generally there is a marked downward curvature in the dose response and significant reduction in relative risk with increasing age at exposure. The consistency of risks with those observed in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors and in groups of nuclear workers implies that there may be little sparing effect of fractionation of dose or low-dose-rate exposure.

Little, Mark P., E-mail: mark.little@nih.gov [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Stovall, Marilyn; Smith, Susan A. [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)] [Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kleinerman, Ruth A. [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States)] [Radiation Epidemiology Branch, National Cancer Institute, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

European Union Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 Jobs Jobs Transition Just Department #12;Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;#12;InternatIonal labour offIce · Geneva european commIssIon Skills and Occupational Needs in Green Building 2011 #12;photocomposed

236

alpha radiation detection: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

237

alpha radiation measuring: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

238

Introduction to NIH Hazard Communication Program The National Institutes of Health's comprehensive Occupational Safety and Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Introduction to NIH Hazard Communication Program The National Institutes of Health's comprehensive Occupational Safety and Health Program has been established to provide NIH employees with places and conditions of employment in which the risk of exposures to potential hazards is minimized. The NIH Hazard Communication

Bandettini, Peter A.

239

Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

National Laboratory Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program...

240

Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Radiation issues for the nuclear industry  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These proceedings are organized under the following categories: Radiation Control: New Issues; Exploring the Use of a De Minimus Concept in Radiation Protection; Evolving Radiation Protection Standards; Occupational Radiation Protection: Are We Doing Enough; and Emergency Planning: the Potassium Iodide Issue. A separate abstract was prepared for each of 22 papers for the Energy Data Base (EDB) and for Energy Abstracts for Policy Analysis (EAPA); 6 of the papers are included in Energy Research Abstracts (ERA). Three papers were processed earlier.

Harward, E.D. (ed.)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy) [Amy; Suter, Jonathan D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Occupational Medicine | The Ames Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratorySpeeding access toSpeedingScientificASecurityObservationOccupant

245

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

the program claimants to make sure that all available worker and DOE facility records and data are provided to DOL, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health...

246

Occupant Emergency Plans | Department of Energy  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Emergency Plans Occupant Emergency Plans On this page is the collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the Washington,...

247

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

The 1986 residential occupant survey  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1986, Pacific Northwest Laboratory developed the Residential Occupant Survey-Spring '86, which was implemented. The overall purpose of the study was to collect demographic, attitudinal, and behavioral data related to the use and conservation of electricity in dwellings participating in the Bonneville Power Administration's End-Use Load and Conservation Assessment Program (ELCAP). Information was collected on the respondents' perceptions of the energy efficiency of their dwelling, temperature the dwelling was kept when people were at home and awake during the last heating season, which rooms, if any, were not heated during the last heating season, number of times the dwelling was unoccupied for at least one week, number of times pets were let out of the dwelling per day, attitudes toward energy use and conservation and several socio-demographic variables such as age, sex, and total household income. The results of the data analyses showed age to be an important factor for reported indoor temperature and perceived energy efficiency of the dwelling. The results also showed that almost 60% of the ELCAP occupants do not heat one or more rooms during the heating season, and almost 45% of the ELCAP dwellings were unoccupied for at least one week during the reporting period. In terms of the reported allocation of household income for household energy expenses, the results showed that the reported dollar amount spent for the expenses remained relatively constant over income levels.

Ivey, D.L.; Alley, P.K.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Benzene Exposure and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Martyn T. Smith, Rachael M. Jones, and Allan H. Smith  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Benzene Exposure and Risk of Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Martyn T. Smith, Rachael M. Jones, and Allan H. Smith Center for Occupational and Environmental Health, School of Public Health, University

California at Berkeley, University of

250

Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrated Daylight Harvesting and Occupancy Detection Using Digital Imaging Abhijit Sarkar dynamic range CMOS video camera to integrate daylight harvesting and occupancy sensing functionalities by these sensors. The prototype involves three algorithms, daylight estimation, occupancy detection and lighting

Salvaggio, Carl

251

aggregated occupational cohorts: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

on Occupation Caf Wednesday,November 2,2011 from 7:30 to 9:30 pm Handy, Todd C. 33 Newsletter of The Department of Occupational Science & Occupational Therapy Engineering...

252

RESEARCH Open Access A case study on co-exposure to a mixture of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to underestimate true exposure levels, some figures exceed European and American occupational exposure guidelines, these solvents can be released into the environment during production, sto- rage, transportation and utilisation the chemical risks listed in the Tunisian adhe- sive producing companies, organic solvents occupy by far

Boyer, Edmond

253

Occupancy change detection system and method  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2012 Page 1 of 8 Radiation Safety Retraining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2012 Page 1 of 8 Radiation Safety Retraining Spring 2012 Contents: Thank You Responsibilities for Radiation Safety Biological Effects and Exposure Limits Training for Non-Radiation Workers Training for Radiation Workers What Everyone in Your Lab Should Know Security

Kaye, Jason P.

255

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2013 Page 1 of 7 Radiation Safety Retraining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2013 Page 1 of 7 Radiation Safety Retraining Spring 2013 Contents: Thank You Responsibilities for Radiation Safety Biological Effects and Exposure Limits Training for Non-Radiation Workers Training for Radiation Workers What Everyone in Your Lab Should Know Security

Kaye, Jason P.

256

Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

257

Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Federal Employee Occupational Safety And Health (FEOSH) Program Overview Congress established Public Law...

258

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and...

259

LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

260

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Review of High Occupancy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services November 14, 2011 -...

262

Radiation Dose From Medical Imaging: A Primer for Emergency Physicians  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

taking charge of radiation dose. J Am Coll Radiol. 2010;7:Diederich S, Lenzen H. Radiation exposure associated withand computed ionizing radiation. Health Phys. 2008;95:612–

Jones, Jesse G.A.; Mills, Christopher N.; Mogensen, Monique A.; Lee, Christoph I.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartmentPolicyClean,CoalbedDepartment of

264

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartmentPolicyClean,CoalbedDepartment

265

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion | Department ofT ib l L d F SSales LLCDiesel Enginesthe U.S. --NNSA) FEDERALTECHNICALNNSA

266

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: Top FiveDepartment ofCarrie NoonanClassificationDepartmentClosingCoal toCoast

267

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION |  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankCombustion |Energyon ArmedWaste andAccessCO2 Injection Begins8:Energy ChuCleanCrosscuttingDepartment

268

CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 |  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTie Ltd:June 2015 <Ones |Laboratory, JuneDid yRequirementsDepartment

269

A Correlation of Diesel Engine Performance with Measured NIR...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Radiation Exposure | 1998 Report Annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure | 1999 Report 2014 DOE Biomass Program Integrated Biorefinery Project Comprehensive Project Review...

270

alpha-radiation construction calibration: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

plant species. Search method: In nature, most alpha radiation exposure is caused by radon progeny. Exposure is particularly high below ground, and is also elevated on plant...

271

Radiation Safety Edward O'Connell  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tissues) #12;Sources of Background Radiation Exposure · Naturally occurring radioactive materialsRadiation Safety Edward O'Connell Radiation Safety Officer Stony Brook University New York #12;STONY BROOK UNIVERSITY & U. HOSPITAL MEDICAL CENTER #12;Why Radiation Safety · Working with radioactive

272

ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK Mapping Application ORISECenterMakingDOE Illness

273

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Submittal Notification |  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans |QuerylNuclearRadBallEnergy

274

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH GUIDELINE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH GUIDELINE Subject: Training for the Safe prior to shipping hazardous chemicals. REFERENCE REGULATIONS: Federal Hazardous Materials Transportation disease in otherwise healthy humans or animals. Infectious substances meeting these criteria which cause

Shyy, Wei

275

A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Identity work and control in occupational communities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This chapter is about three highly intertwined concepts. The first concerns occupational communities and the work cultures they nourish. The second concerns the work identities that are valued (and devalued) in such ...

Van Maanen, John

277

Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising...

Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

278

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

pollutants, using green materials, giving occupants personal control over operable windows, task air-

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

E-Print Network 3.0 - artificial ultraviolet radiation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

exposure to ultraviolet radiation, came under suspicion almost as soon... limbs, whereas tad- poles exposed to full doses of natural lev- els of ultraviolet radiation developed......

280

New Easy-to-Use Medical Field Guide for Radiation Emergencies...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

radiation dose Delayed effects of radiation exposure, and Psychological considerations "Health care providers are expected to treat patients injured in a multitude of possible...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2009 Page 1 of 8 Radiation Safety Retraining  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation Safety Refresher Training 2009 Page 1 of 8 Radiation Safety Retraining Spring 2009 Contents: · Thank You! · Biological Effects and Exposure Limits · Training for Radiation Workers · Training for Non-radiation Workers in Your Laboratory · Care and Use of Your Personal Dosimeter · What All

Kaye, Jason P.

282

Track 3: Exposure Hazards  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 3: Exposure Hazards

283

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment occupational health Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

results for: assessment occupational health Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 UWO Occupational Health Care Policy The Occupational Health Care Policy is designed to ensure that all...

284

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

RADIATION ALERT User Manual  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Area Monitoring 16 Checking for Surface Contamination 16 5 Maintenance 17 Calibration 17 · Monitoring possible radiation exposure while working with radionuclides · Screening for environmental. Water can damage the circuitry and the mica surface of the Geiger tube. · Do not put the Inspector

Haller, Gary L.

286

Potential Occupational Risks for Neurodegenerative Diseases  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

associations may be unaccounted for. Some limitations of theby attributable but unaccounted-for cases and that exposure-

Bondy, Stephen Bondy C

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

E-Print Network 3.0 - atomic bomb exposure Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hiyama, K. Toyama, Lack of effects of atomic bomb radiation on genetic... germline by low-dose chronic exposure to -radiation and fission neutrons". The authors of this article......

288

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

289

Reducing Blood-borne Exposure in Interventional Radiology: What the IR Should Know  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interventional radiologists are at risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens in their day-to-day practice. Percutaneous exposure from unsafe sharps handling, mucocutaneous exposure from body fluid splashes, and glove perforation from excessive wear can expose the radiologist to potentially infectious material. The increasing prevalence of blood-borne pathogens, including hepatitis B and C, and human immunodeficiency virus, puts nurses, residents, fellows, and interventional radiologists at risk for occupational exposure. This review outlines suggestions to establish a culture of safety in the interventional suite.

Tso, David K. [University of British Columbia, Department of Radiology (Canada); Athreya, Sriharsha, E-mail: sathreya@stjoes.ca [St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, Department of Diagnostic Imaging (Canada)

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Occupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of health and safety hazards with the work environment. For the safety professional, the environmentalOccupational Safety, Health, and Environmental Management Certificate Program CorporateTraining extension.uci.edu/corporate #12;Safety and health professionals play an important role in maintaining

Stanford, Kyle

291

Resident Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Resident Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary The Resident Advisor (RA) is assigned and Residence Hall policies. The Resident Advisor provides programming based on an assessment of the community and individual needs. The responsibilities of the Resident Advisor position are implemented under the supervision

Bogaerts, Steven

292

Community Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Community Advisor Position Description Occupational Summary The Community Advisor (CA) is a full success; personal growth; and responsible citizenship. Terms of Appointment The Community Advisor position Monday, May 12, 2014 (5:00pm). Eligibility The Community Advisor must be a full-time student

Bogaerts, Steven

293

Merger of Occupational Health & Safety Directorate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manager, Mrs Melanie Phillips. As well as being a highly qualified and experienced occupational health as well as being an ex HSE specialist inspector. These attributes will be a strong addition to the new function should be addressed in the first instance to Melanie Phillips (OH Manager) on ext: 8701 (m

Chittka, Lars

294

Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards Occupancy-Driven Heating and Cooling Kamin Whitehouse, Juhi Ranjan, Jiakang Lu, Tamim Burke Parabola Architects Galen Staengl Staengl Engineering h HEATING, VENTILATION, AND cooling (HVAC required for heating, ventilation, and cooling (HVAC) by 20%­30% by tailoring the conditioning of buildings

Whitehouse, Kamin

295

Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information that will be useful in estimating human health risks due to radiation that may occur during exposures in the work environment, nuclear/radiological catastrophes, as well as radiotherapy. Several papers have been published, accepted for publication or are in preparation. A number of poster and oral presentations have been made at scientific conferences and workshops. Archived tissues of various types will continue to be evaluated via funding from other sources (the DoE Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science and this specific grant will be appropriately included in the Acknowledgements of all subsequent publications/presentations). A post-doc and several students have participated in this study. More detailed description of the accomplishments is described in attached file.

Daila S. Gridley, PhD

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

296

Staff Radiation Doses in a Real-Time Display Inside the Angiography Room  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MethodsThe evaluation of a new occupational Dose Aware System (DAS) showing staff radiation doses in real time has been carried out in several angiography rooms in our hospital. The system uses electronic solid-state detectors with high-capacity memory storage. Every second, it archives the dose and dose rate measured and is wirelessly linked to a base-station screen mounted close to the diagnostic monitors. An easy transfer of the values to a data sheet permits further analysis of the scatter dose profile measured during the procedure, compares it with patient doses, and seeks to find the most effective actions to reduce operator exposure to radiation.ResultsThe cumulative occupational doses measured per procedure (shoulder-over lead apron) ranged from 0.6 to 350 {mu}Sv when the ceiling-suspended screen was used, and DSA (Digital Subtraction Acquisition) runs were acquired while the personnel left the angiography room. When the suspended screen was not used and radiologists remained inside the angiography room during DSA acquisitions, the dose rates registered at the operator's position reached up to 1-5 mSv/h during fluoroscopy and 12-235 mSv/h during DSA acquisitions. In such case, the cumulative scatter dose could be more than 3 mSv per procedure.ConclusionReal-time display of doses to staff members warns interventionists whenever the scatter dose rates are too high or the radiation protection tools are not being properly used, providing an opportunity to improve personal protection accordingly.

Sanchez, Roberto, E-mail: rmsanchez.hcsc@salud.madrid.org; Vano, E.; Fernandez, J. M. [Hospital Clinico San Carlos, Medical Physics Department (Spain); Gallego, J. J. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Radiology Department (Spain)

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

297

Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts March 2014 Issued by;#12;Occupational health and safety specification for construction works contracts Contents 1 Scope 1 2 Definitions Health and Safety 1 Specification for Construction Works Contracts Occupational health and safety

Wagner, Stephan

298

Textured Occupancy Grids for Monocular Localization Without Features  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and Ronald Parr Abstract-- A textured occupancy grid map is an extremely versatile data structure. It can map representation, the textured occupancy grid, can now be used for humans, robots with laser- dimensional textured occupancy grid map. In such a map, three-dimensional space is discretized into a set

Parr, Ronald

299

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

indiv. indiv. Gilbertetal. (Hanford & Combined) Gilbertetal.on both radiation and the Hanford facility. The data used toG. Radiation exposures of Hanford workers dying from cancer

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Post Occupancy Evaluation of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green of Indoor Environmental Quality in Commercial Buildings: Do green buildings have more satisfied occupants the promise of a bright future ­ just like the green building movement. i #12;Post Occupancy Evaluation

Kammen, Daniel M.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of biochemist William D. Moss, conducted November 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report is a transcript of an interview with William D. Moss by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Mr. Moss was selected for this interview because of his work at Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning analytical methods in the chemical determination of plutonium in biological materials. After a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Moss relates his understanding of how occupational exposure limits were determined for the Manhattan Project, how data from those workers who were exposed to plutonium was collected and analyzed, how the experiments were planned and data was gathered from plutonium or polonium injections in man, how problems with analytical procedures compounded health physics aspects of the project, and problems remaining in the interpretation of these data.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

Radiation-induced risk of resettling Bikini atoll. Final report, November 7, 1981-May 28, 1982  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) has concluded that the Bikini atoll is unsafe for resettlement. In response to the Bikinians' request for an independent review, we have examined the following DOE findings: (a) radionuclide contamination of Eneu and Bikini Islands, (b) radiation dosage to those who might resettle the islands, and (c) risks to the health of such settlers. We are in practical agreement with the DOE estimates. Resettlement of either island in 1983 would lead to a range of annual or 30-year cumulative doses that exceed the Federal Radiation Council (FRC) guides for the general population, but not those for occupation exposure. By 2013 resettlement of Eneu probably would be permissible. The principal source of radiation dose is local food, especially coconut, owing to contamination of the soil by cesium-137. A precise estimate of dose is impossible. The availability of imported foods would lessen local food consumption, but not sufficiently to meet the FRC guides for the general population. The 30-year cumulative index dose is 61 (25-122) rem for Bikini, and about 8 (3-16) rem for Eneu.

Kohn, H.I.; Dreyer, N.A.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), UA Huntsville (United States); Space Radiation Analysis Group, NASA Johnson Space Center (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

305

Occupational safety and health training in DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his ``Ten Point Initiative`` charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent ``Tiger Teams`` are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

Farabaugh, M.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); O`Dell, C. [USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States)

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Occupational safety and health training in DOE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupational safety and health (OSH) policies, programs and activities within DOE are changing rapidly. In June 1989, Secretary of Energy Watkins launched his Ten Point Initiative'' charting a new course for the Department of Energy (DOE) toward full accountability in the areas of environment, safety and health. Full compliance with Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) standards is now mandatory within the Department. Independent Tiger Teams'' are performing safety and health compliance assessments at DOE facilities to identify OSH deficiencies. A recent extensive OSHA audit of DOE OSH programs and related activities has resulted in additional changes in DOE OSH requirements. These changes coupled with those pending in the proposed OSHA Reform Act, have had, and will continue to have, a tremendous impact on the roles and responsibilities each of us has within DOE, particularly in the area of OSH training. This presentation focuses on the specific implications these changes have relating to OSH Training Requirements.

Farabaugh, M.J. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); O'Dell, C. (USDOE Office of Safety and Qualtiy Assurance, Germantown, Maryland (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

308

IEQ and the impact on building occupants  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research into indoor environmental quality (IEQ) and its effects on health, comfort and performance of occupants is becoming increasingly essential. Facility managers are interested in IEQ's close relationship to energy use. Employers hope to enhance employee comfort and productivity, reduce absenteeism and health-care costs, and reduce risk of litigation. The rising interest in this field has placed additional pressure on the research community for practical guidelines on creating a safe, healthy and comfortable indoor environment.

Kumar, Satish; Fisk, William J.

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Common occupational classification system - revision 3  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Workforce planning has become an increasing concern within the DOE community as the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER/WM or EM) seeks to consolidate and refocus its activities and the Office of Defense Programs (DP) closes production sites. Attempts to manage the growth and skills mix of the EM workforce while retaining the critical skills of the DP workforce have been difficult due to the lack of a consistent set of occupational titles and definitions across the complex. Two reasons for this difficulty may be cited. First, classification systems commonly used in industry often fail to cover in sufficient depth the unique demands of DOE`s nuclear energy and research community. Second, the government practice of contracting the operation of government facilities to the private sector has introduced numerous contractor-specific classification schemes to the DOE complex. As a result, sites/contractors report their workforce needs using unique classification systems. It becomes difficult, therefore, to roll these data up to the national level necessary to support strategic planning and analysis. The Common Occupational Classification System (COCS) is designed to overcome these workforce planning barriers. The COCS is based on earlier workforce planning activities and the input of technical, workforce planning, and human resource managers from across the DOE complex. It provides a set of mutually-exclusive occupation titles and definitions that cover the broad range of activities present in the DOE complex. The COCS is not a required record-keeping or data management guide. Neither is it intended to replace contractor/DOE-specific classification systems. Instead, the system provides a consistent, high- level, functional structure of occupations to which contractors can crosswalk (map) their job titles.

Stahlman, E.J.; Lewis, R.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Headquarters Occupational Safety and Health Program  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

To implement the Occupational Safety and Health Program for Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters employees as an element of the DOE Integrated Safety Management System. Cancels: HQ 3790.2A. Canceled by DOE O 251.91. This directive was reviewed and certified as current and necessary by Bruce M. Carnes, Director, Office of Management, Budget and Evaluation/Chief Financial Officer, 9/18/02. Canceled by DOE N 251.91.

2001-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

311

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

314

Occupational health and safety regulation in the coal mining industry: public health at the workplace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The strategy for preventing occupational disease and injury in the coal mining industry employs several elements. Standards are set and enforced; technical assistance, research, and development are provided; and surveillance is conducted. Compensation for black lung is a vivid reminder of the consequences of failure to prevent disease. And, workers are represented by a union that encourages active participation in all aspects of this strategy. There are significant problems in each of these elements. Regulatory reform threatens to weaken many standards, there is a decline in government research budgets, surveillance is not well monitored, and compensation for black lung is significantly more difficult to obtain now than in the past. Moreover, the conservative governments of the past decade are not friendly towards unions. Nevertheless, the fundamental structure of disease and injury prevention remains intact and, more importantly, it has a historical record of success. The Mine Safety and Health Act provided for a wide array of basic public health measures to prevent occupational disease and injury in the mining industry. These measures have been effective in reducing both risk of fatal injury and exposure to respirable coal mine dust. They are also associated with temporary declines in productivity. In recent years, however, productivity has increased, while risk of fatal injury and exposure to respirable dust have declined. At individual mines, productivity with longwall mining methods appear to be associated with increases in exposure to respirable dust. These trends are not inconsistent with similar trends following implementation of regulations by OSHA. When OSHA promulgated regulations to control exposure to vinyl chloride monomer, enforcement of the standard promoted significant efficiencies in vinyl chloride production (5).21 references.

Weeks, J.L. (Department of Occupational Health and Safety, United Mine Workers of America, Washington, DC (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Differences in serum concentrations of organochlorine compounds by occupational social class in pancreatic cancer  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: The relationships between social factors and body concentrations of environmental chemical agents are unknown in many human populations. Some chemical compounds may play an etiopathogenic role in pancreatic cancer. Objective: To analyze the relationships between occupational social class and serum concentrations of seven selected organochlorine compounds (OCs) in exocrine pancreatic cancer: dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (p,p'-DDT), dichlorodiphenyldichloroethene (p,p'-DDE), 3 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorobenzene, and {beta}-hexachlorocyclohexane. Methods: Incident cases of exocrine pancreatic cancer were prospectively identified, and interviewed face-to-face during hospital admission (n=135). Serum concentrations of OCs were analyzed by high-resolution gas chromatography with electron-capture detection. Social class was classified according to occupation. Results: Multivariate-adjusted concentrations of all seven compounds were higher in occupational social classes IV-V (the less affluent) than in classes I-II; they were higher as well in class III than in classes I-II for four compounds. Concentrations of six OCs were higher in manual workers than in non-manual workers (p<0.05 for PCBs). Social class explained statistically between 3.7% and 5.7% of the variability in concentrations of PCBs, and 2% or less variability in the other OCs. Conclusions: Concentrations of most OCs were higher in the less affluent occupational social classes. In pancreatic cancer the putative causal role of these persistent organic pollutants may not be independent of social class. There is a need to integrate evidence on the contribution of different social processes and environmental chemical exposures to the etiology of pancreatic and other cancers.

Porta, Miquel [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)], E-mail: mporta@imim.es; Bosch de Basea, Magda [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica CIBERESP (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Benavides, Fernando G. [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Lopez, Tomas [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Fernandez, Esteve [Universitat Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona (Spain); Institut Catala d'Oncologia, L'Hospitalet de Llobregat, Barcelona (Spain); Marco, Esther [Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Research (IIQAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Alguacil, Juan [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Universidad de Huelva (Spain); Grimalt, Joan O. [CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain); Department of Environmental Chemistry, Institute of Chemical and Environmental Research (IIQAB-CSIC), Barcelona (Spain); Puigdomenech, Elisa [Institut Municipal d'Investigacio Medica, Barcelona (Spain); Facultat de Medicina, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona (Spain); CIBER en Epidemiologia y Salud Publica (CIBERESP) (Spain)

2008-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

316

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Environmental and occupational hazards of the anesthesia workplace  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Our present state of research and knowledge strongly suggests that the volatile agents, halothane, enflurane and isoflurane, present only a minimal threat to our environment. Nitrous oxide, however, has ozone-depleting potential as well as a greenhouse gas effect which may contribute much to the problem of global warming over the next few decades. Release of anesthetic gases into the atmosphere presents a small problem in contrast to other sources of ozone-depleting chemicals and greenhouse gases, but anesthesia providers have a responsibility to minimize unnecessary atmospheric pollution by reevaluating the use of N2O, using low flows of gases and exploring the use of activated charcoal absorption in the scavenging systems to remove volatile agents. Infectious waste, radiation, lasers, chemicals and waste gases pose possible occupational health hazards in the operating room. Each of us should play a critical role in monitoring harmful substances and should actively practice techniques which would lessen the hazards. We should be cognizant of the fact that sources not yet introduced into our environment may have adverse effects on our health and that vigilance and education are key factors in maintaining a safe work environment.24 references.

Kole, T.E.

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Using an Occupant Energy Index for Achieving Zero Energy Homes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the occupants from the house, turn off all of the HVAC systems, flip off the lights and unplug all the appliances. Is the result a zero energy home? Most would think not, because once the occupants return the odds are good that consumption...-conservative occupants, an ENERGY STAR refrigerator and a best-available efficiency refrigerator were modeled, as well as no refrigerator at all. These modifications impacted the appliances, heating and cooling energy consumption of the baseline home...

Dean, B.; Gamble, D.; Kaiser, D.; Meisegeier, D.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Technical Position, Regarding Acceptable Methods for Assessing...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

for Assessing and Recording Radiation Doses to Individuals More Documents & Publications Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide Annual DOE Occupational...

320

Systems and methods for sensing occupancy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A computer implemented method for sensing occupancy of a workspace includes creating a difference image that represents luminance differences of pixels in past and current images of the workspace resulting from motion in the workspace, determining motion occurring in regions of the workspace based on the difference image, and altering a workspace environment based at least in part on the determined motion. The method also includes determining which pixels in the difference image represent persistent motion that can be ignored and determining which pixels representing motion in the difference image are invalid because the pixels are isolated from other pixels representing motion.

Dasu, Aravind; Mathias, Dean; Liu, Chenguang; Christensen, Randy; Christensen, Bruce

2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Case Management - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New Substation Sites ProposedOccupational Health Services > Return to Work >

322

Worksite Visits - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear SecurityTensile Strain Switched FerromagnetismWaste and MaterialsWenjun1 TableContactsOccupational Health Services

323

Medical Exams - HPMC Occupational Health Services  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces andMapping the NanoscaleMechanical BehaviorSummerwelcome dayOccupational

324

Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual Occupational Safety and Health Report for Federal Employees to the Secretary of Labor Fiscal Year 2013 Department of Energy Annual...

325

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

326

PROMOTING ENERGY CONSERVATION THROUGH OCCUPATIONAL LICENSURE: A FEASIBILITY STUDY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interim Criteria for Energy Conservation in New Buildings",Robert and others, "Energy Conservation Program Guide forDivision Promoting Energy Conservation Through Occupational

Wilms, W.W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,office buildings, comparing green with non-green buildings.On average, occupants in green buildings were more satisfied

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

Briant, James K. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352); Driver, Crystal J. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

330

HANFORD CHEMICAL VAPORS WORKER CONCERNS & EXPOSURE EVALUATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site in eastern Washington State are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. Tank farm contractors are in the process of retrieving all remaining waste from aging single-shell tanks, some of which date to World War II, and transferring it to newer double-shell tanks. During the waste retrieval process, tank farm workers are potentially exposed to fugitive chemical vapors that can escape from tank headspaces and other emission points. The tanks are known to hold more than 1,500 different species of chemicals, in addition to radionuclides. Exposure assessments have fully characterized the hazards from chemical vapors in half of the tank farms. Extensive sampling and analysis has been done to characterize the chemical properties of hazardous waste and to evaluate potential health hazards of vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Worker concerns. risk communication, and exposure assessment are discussed, including evaluation of the potential hazards of complex mixtures of chemical vapors. Concentrations of vapors above occupational exposure limits-(OEL) were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors have been measured above 50% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. Vapor controls are focused on limited hazard zones around sources. Further evaluations of vapors include analysis of routes of exposure and thorough analysis of nuisance odors.

ANDERSON, T.J.

2006-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

331

Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Updated Mortality Analysis of Radiation Workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 46,970 workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). Overall, 5,801 workers were involved in radiation activities, including 2,232 who were monitored for intakes of radionuclides, and 41,169 workers were engaged in rocket testing or other non-radiation activities. The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought, updated and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). Because only negligible exposures were received by the 247 workers monitored for radiation activities after 1999, the mean dose from external radiation remained essentially the same at 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv) as reported previously, as did the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined at 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional 9 years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation for the radiation workers by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included external comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models and the computation of relative risks (RRs). A low SMR for all causes of death (SMR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.85) continued to indicate that the Rocketdyne radiation workers were healthier than the general population and were less likely to die. The SMRs for all cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the RR at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17), and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but no significant increases in lung and kidney disease were seen. The extended follow-up reinforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger combined studies of early workers in the United States using similar methodologies are warranted to refine and clarify radiation risks after protracted exposures.

Boice Jr JD, Colen SS, Mumma MT, Ellis ED, Eckerman DF, Leggett RW, Boecker BB, Brill B, Henderson BE

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Instructions for Preparing Occupational Exposure Data for Submittal to REMS Repository  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGY TAX POLICIES7.pdfFuel2007 | Department7 InspectionDepartment of

334

Study of the exposure of British mineworkers to nitrous fumes and the effects on their health. Final report August 77-January 80  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Shift-average exposures to nitric oxide and nitrogen dioxide have been found to be well within the recommended safety limits in nine British collieries. Differences in the exposures of miners in different collieries and between different locations and occupations within collieries were observed, with diesel locomotive drivers having consistently higher shift-average exposures than other workers. Possible health effects of oxides of nitrogen were investigated by comparing the respiratory health of men with low past exposure against men with higher past exposure to these gases. No differences in forced expired volumes in one second or in the prevalences of cough, phlegm and breathlessness were found between the two population groups.

Robertson, A.; Collings, P.; Gormley, I.P.; Dodgeon, J.

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Natural radiation environment III. [Lead Abstract  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Separate abstracts were prepared for the 52 research papers presented at this symposium in April 1978. The major topics in this volume deal with penetrating radiation measurements, radiation surveys and population exposure, radioactivity in the indoor environment, and technologically enhanced natural radioactivity. (KRM)

Gesell, T.F.; Lowder, W.M. (eds.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Albert Ludwig University of Freiburg Occupational health and safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective safety at work can be accomplished only if the employees cooperate. You are obligated to · payAlbert Ludwig University of Freiburg Occupational health and safety Leaflet for employees Numerous laws and regulations have been passed to guarantee occupational health and safety. Industrial safety

Schindelhauer, Christian

337

MINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, e.g. the Health Care Corporation, Basic Medical Sciences, Pharmacy, etc. and that no definite safetyMINUTES OF THE JOINT OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH & SAFETY COMMITTEE (JOHSC) MEETING Wednesday, February 7 as the Committee's newest member. Dr. LeFort has completed the Occupational Health & Safety Certification Training

deYoung, Brad

338

Air movement as an energy efficient means toward occupant comfort  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

architects involved in energy-efficient design. It might beenergy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.energy efficient, comfortable and acceptable to occupants, visually attractive to building management and designers, and straightforward to design.

Arens, Edward; Zhang, Hui; Pasut, Wilmer; Zhai, Yongchao; Hoyt, Tyler; Huang, Li

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming Hern´an Badino1Chrysler AG, Stuttgart Abstract. The computation of free space available in an environment is an essential, which builds a stochastic occupancy grid to address the free space problem as a dynamic pro- gramming

Mester, Rudolf

340

ThermoSense: Occupancy Thermal Based Sensing for HVAC Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ThermoSense: Occupancy Thermal Based Sensing for HVAC Control Alex Beltran Elect. Eng. & Comp Occupancy Sensing, Thermal Sensing, HVAC Control 1. INTRODUCTION From 1980 to 2010, energy in the United, November 13-14 2013, Rome, Italy. Copyright 2013 ACM 978-1-4503-2431-1/13/11 ...$15.00. (HVAC) consumed 42

Cerpa, Alberto E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1430 NIH OCCUPANT EVACUATION PLAN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1430 NIH OCCUPANT EVACUATION PLAN Issuing Office & Phone: ORS/DPS 496-1985 Release Date: 2/14/02 1. Explanation of Material Transmitted: This Chapter establishes the NIH Occupant life and property during emergencies in all buildings occupied by NIH employees. 2. Filing Instructions

Bandettini, Peter A.

342

"Designing equipment and buildings to more quickly respond to occupant  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GRANTS · NSF ­ Occupant Oriented Heating and Cooling · NSF ­ Body Area Sensor Networks: A Holistic building technology to improve building efficiency by using information about occupant locations energy with only $25 in sensors. As an extension of this work, we propose installing servers into homes

Acton, Scott

343

Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wavelet Occupancy Grids: a Method for Compact Map Building Manuel Yguel, Olivier Aycard for multi-resolution map building based on wavelets, which we call the wavelet occupancy grid (WavOG). Pai representation and data storage for large maps, under the constraints of multi-sensor real-time updates

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

344

Radioactivity in man: levels, effects and unknowns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report discusses the potential for significant human exposure to internal radiation. Sources of radiation considered include background radiation, fallout, reactor accidents, radioactive waste, and occupational exposure to various radioisotopes. (ACR)

Rundo, J.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

An examination of factors affecting high occupancy/toll lane demand  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In recent years, high occupancy/toll (HOT) lanes have gained increasing recognition as a potential method of managing traffic congestion. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand for high occupancy vehicle...

Appiah, Justice

2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

CROSS-CULTURAL EXPLORATORY ANALYSIS OF OCCUPATIONAL ENGAGEMENT BETWEEN ASIAN AMERICAN AND CAUCASIAN AMERICAN COLLEGE STUDENTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

values and no significant relationship with level of acculturation. Results from the study yielded two newly developed measures of occupational engagement, the Occupational Engagement Scale-Asian American (OES-AA) and Occupational Engagement...

Le, Quoc (Thai) My

2012-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

347

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

348

Danger radiations  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Le conférencier Mons.Hofert parle des dangers et risques des radiations, le contrôle des zones et les précautions à prendre ( p.ex. film badge), comment mesurer les radiations etc.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

349

Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

Janeen Denise Robertson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

E-Print Network 3.0 - antibody-targeted radiation cancer Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is an increased risk of cancer. The amount of risk depends on the amount of radiation dose... low-level radiation exposure increases one's risk of cancer, medical studies have...

351

Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an 'inverse dose rate effect' for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

352

National Ambient Radiation Database  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

353

Electronic equilibrium as a function of depth in tissue from Cobalt-60 point source exposures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Skin exposure can arise from both the beta and gamma components of radioactive particles and gamma radiation can contribute significantly to skin doses. The gamma component of dose increases dramatically when layers of protective clothing are interposed...

Myrick, Jo Ann

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupational Hygiene & Chemical Safety Division Department of Environmental Health & Safety Risk all connections and fittings prior to start of anesthesia. Carefully pour Isoflurane from Environmental Health & Safety before re-entering the laboratory. REFERENCES 1. Procedure

Machel, Hans

355

Safety Guidelines for Fieldwork Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Safety Department  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Safety Guidelines for Fieldwork Industrial Hygiene and Occupational Safety Department Environmental Safety Division University of Georgia Adapted from the Safety Guidelines for Field Researchers published by the Office of Environment, Health & Safety at University of California, Berkeley #12;Safety Guidelines

Arnold, Jonathan

356

Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Such knowledge facilitates proper diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of chemical exposurerelated diseases Center for Occupational and Environmental Health School of Public Health University of chemicals and working towards greater collaboration with respect to sharing data and information

357

Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Occupational Safety and Health Administration and Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program MOU

358

Occupational status orientations and perception of opportunity: A racial comparison of rural youth from depressed areas.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Occupational Expectation Anticipatory Deflection Perception of Opportunity Conclusions 18 20 22 26 27 CHAPTER IV, METHOD AND PROCEDURES, ~ ~ . . ~ ~ ~ 30 Source and Collection of Data Negro-White Background Characteristics Instruments... Summary of Findings on Occupational Aspirations, Expectations and Anticipatory Deflection by Race 25 A Comparison Between Negro and White Youth on Occupational Aspirations 42 A Comparison Between Negro and White Youth on Occupational Aspiration...

Ameen, Bilquis Ara

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Division of Occupational Health & Safety/ORS NIH Safety Programs in Support of the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Division of Occupational Health & Safety/ORS NIH Safety Programs in Support of the NIH Animal Care and Use Program Occupational Safety and Health Protection for Federal Employees Poster NIH Safety Policies PM 1340 Occupational Safety and Health Management PM 1430 NIH Occupant Evacuation Plan PM 3015

Bandettini, Peter A.

360

Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, London W1T 3JH, UK Building Research & Information Publication details, including instructions for authors and subscription information: http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/rbri20 Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation Mardelle Mc... published: 08 Aug 2012. To cite this article: Mardelle McCuskey Shepley , Zofia Rybkowski , Jennifer Aliber & Cathleen Lange (2012): Ambulatory infusion suite: pre- and post-occupancy evaluation, Building Research & Information, 40:6, 700-712 To link...

Shepley, Mardelle McCuskey; Rybkowski, Zofia; Aliber, Jennifer; Lange, Cathleen

2015-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

362

Occupational orientations of Mexican American youth in selected Texas counties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOU1'H IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1968 Major Subject: Sociology OCCUPATIONAL ORIENTATIONS OF MEXICAN AMERICAN YOUTH IN SELECTED TEXAS COUNTIES A. Thesis by DAVID E. WRIGHT, JR. Approved as to style and oontent by: Chairman of' Committee . -e . ~ - c...

Wright, David Edgar

1968-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Causal Analysis of the Unanticipated Extremity Exposure at HFEF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report covers the unintended extremity exposure to an operator while handling a metallurgical mount sample of irradiated fuel following an off-scale high beta radiation reading of the sample. The decision was made to continue working after the meter indicated high off-scale by the HPT Supervisor, which resulted in the operator at the next operation being exposed.

David E. James; Charles R. Posegate; Thomas P. Zahn; Alan G. Wagner

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Integrating fiber optic radiation dosimeter  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this research effort was to determine the feasibility of forming a radiation sensor coupled to an optical fiber capable of measuring gamma photon, x-ray, and beta particle dose rates and integrated dose, and to construct a prototype dosimeter read-out system utilizing the fiber optic sensor. The key component of the prototype dosimeter system is a newly developed radiation sensitive storage phosphor. When this phosphor is excited by energetic radiation, a proportionate population of electron-hole pairs are created which become trapped at specific impurities within the phosphor. Trapped electrons can subsequently be stimulated optically with near-infrared at approximately 1 micrometer wavelength; the electrons can recombine with holes at luminescent centers to produce a luminescence which is directly proportional to the trapped electron population, and thus to the radiation exposure. By attaching the phosphor to the end of an optical fiber, it is possible to transmit both the IR optical stimulation and the characteristic phosphor luminescence through the fiber to and from the read-out instrument, which can be located far (e.g., kilometers) from the radiation field. This document reports on the specific design of the prototype system and its operating characteristics, including its sensitivity to various radiation dose rates and energies, its dynamic range, signal-to-noise ratio at various radiation intensities, and other system characteristics. Additionally, the radiation hardness of the phosphor and fiber are evaluated. 17 refs., 29 figs., 5 tabs.

Soltani, P.K.; Wrigley, C.Y.; Storti, G.M.; Creager, R.E.

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Investigation of lane occupancy as a freeway control parameter for use during incident conditions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

freeway safety warning device, using critical occupancy parameters, was developed and simulated in real-time. Evaluation of the simulated operation of the device revealed. that relia'cle detection of shock waves generated by freeway incidents... Detection of Shock Waves Page 38 Sensitivity of Occupancy Measurements 38 Occupancy Differential Concept Determination of' Occupancy D"' fzerence Parameters Det, ection of Shock Waves 41 RESULTS Critical Occupancy Concept Determination of Critical...

Friebele, John Duncan

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

UNDERSTANDING THE GENETIC CONSEQUENCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANT EXPOSURE: CHERNOBYL AS A MODEL SYSTEM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNDERSTANDING THE GENETIC CONSEQUENCES OF ENVIRONMENTAL TOXICANT EXPOSURE: CHERNOBYL AS A MODEL to Chernobyl radiation. Our results suggest that genetic diversity in radioactive regions of Ukraine to elucidate the effects of toxicant exposure. Keywords--Chernobyl Bank vole Population genetics Comparative

Baker, Robert J.

367

Halo occupation numbers and galaxy bias  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a heuristic model that displays the main features of realistic theories for galaxy bias. We show that the low-order clustering statistics of the dark-matter distribution depend almost entirely on the locations and density profiles of dark-matter haloes. A hypothetical galaxy catalogue depends on (i) the efficiency of galaxy formation, as manifested by the halo occupation number -- the number of galaxies brighter than some sample limit contained in a halo of a given mass; (ii) the location of these galaxies within their halo. The first factor is constrained by the empirical luminosity function of groups. For the second factor, we assume that one galaxy marks the halo centre, with any remaining galaxies acting as satellites that trace the halo mass. These simple assumptions amount to a recipe for non-local bias, in which the probability of finding a galaxy is not a simple function of its local mass density. We have applied this prescription to some CDM models of current interest, and find that the predictions are close to the observed galaxy correlations for a flat $\\Omega=0.3$ model ($\\Lambda$CDM), but not for an $\\Omega=1$ model with the same power spectrum ($\\tau$CDM). This is an inevitable consequence of cluster normalization for the power spectra: cluster-scale haloes of given mass have smaller core radii for high $\\Omega$, and hence display enhanced small-scale clustering. Finally, the pairwise velocity dispersion of galaxies in the $\\Lambda$CDM model is lower than that of the mass, allowing cluster-normalized models to yield a realistic Mach number for the peculiar velocity field. This is largely due to the strong variation of galaxy-formation efficiency with halo mass that is required in this model.

J. A. Peacock; R. E. Smith

2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

368

1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

369

Asbestos exposure--quantitative assessment of risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Methods for deriving quantitative estimates of asbestos-associated health risks are reviewed and their numerous assumptions and uncertainties described. These methods involve extrapolation of risks observed at past relatively high asbestos concentration levels down to usually much lower concentration levels of interest today--in some cases, orders of magnitude lower. These models are used to calculate estimates of the potential risk to workers manufacturing asbestos products and to students enrolled in schools containing asbestos products. The potential risk to workers exposed for 40 yr to 0.5 fibers per milliliter (f/ml) of mixed asbestos fiber type (a permissible workplace exposure limit under consideration by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) ) are estimated as 82 lifetime excess cancers per 10,000 exposed. The risk to students exposed to an average asbestos concentration of 0.001 f/ml of mixed asbestos fiber types for an average enrollment period of 6 school years is estimated as 5 lifetime excess cancers per one million exposed. If the school exposure is to chrysotile asbestos only, then the estimated risk is 1.5 lifetime excess cancers per million. Risks from other causes are presented for comparison; e.g., annual rates (per million) of 10 deaths from high school football, 14 from bicycling (10-14 yr of age), 5 to 20 for whooping cough vaccination. Decisions concerning asbestos products require participation of all parties involved and should only be made after a scientifically defensible estimate of the associated risk has been obtained. In many cases to date, such decisions have been made without adequate consideration of the level of risk or the cost-effectiveness of attempts to lower the potential risk. 73 references.

Hughes, J.M.; Weill, H.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Electrothermal controlled-exposure technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A technology is presented for exposing the contents of microfabricated cavities in a substrate. These contents are hermetically sealed until exposure is triggered by an electronic signal. The exposure mechanism uses ...

Maloney, John Mapes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

RSF Workshop Session IV: Occupant Behavior  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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372

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and X-rays generated in backscatter Mossbauer effect spectroscopy and X-ray spectrometry, which has a large "window" for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, Brent T. (Berkeley, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Radiation detector  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Apparatus is provided for detecting radiation such as gamma rays and x-rays generated in backscatter Moessbauer effect spectroscopy and x-ray spectrometry, which has a large window for detecting radiation emanating over a wide solid angle from a specimen and which generates substantially the same output pulse height for monoenergetic radiation that passes through any portion of the detection chamber. The apparatus includes a substantially toroidal chamber with conductive walls forming a cathode, and a wire anode extending in a circle within the chamber with the anode lying closer to the inner side of the toroid which has the least diameter than to the outer side. The placement of the anode produces an electric field, in a region close to the anode, which has substantially the same gradient in all directions extending radially from the anode, so that the number of avalanche electrons generated by ionizing radiation is independent of the path of the radiation through the chamber.

Fultz, B.T.

1980-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

374

Pollutant Exposures from Natural Gas Cooking Burners: A Simulation-Based Assessment for Southern California  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. The objective of this study is to quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO{sub 2} and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO{sub 2} were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%. The simulation model estimates that in homes using NGCBs without coincident use of venting range hoods, 62%, 9%, and 53% of occupants are routinely exposed to NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO levels that exceed acute health-based standards and guidelines. NGCB use increased the sample median of the highest simulated 1-hr indoor concentrations by 100, 3000, and 20 ppb for NO{sub 2}, CO, and HCHO, respectively. Reducing pollutant exposures from NGCBs should be a public health priority. Simulation results suggest that regular use of even moderately effective venting range hoods would dramatically reduce the percentage of homes in which concentrations exceed health-based standards.

Logue, Jennifer M.; Klepeis, Neil E.; Lobscheid, Agnes B.; Singer, Brett C.

2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

X-ray radiation effects in multilayer epitaxial graphene Jeremy Hicks1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 X-ray radiation effects in multilayer epitaxial graphene Jeremy Hicks1 , Rajan Arora2 , Eleazar and after exposure to a total ionizing dose (TID) of 12 Mrad(SiO2) using a 10 keV X-ray source. While we are mostly unaffected by radiation exposure. Combined with X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data

376

Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: “Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks?” The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic “How important is ATM?” The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Exposure Evaluation Process  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsing ZirconiaPolicy and Assistance100JeffersonMarkExploratorysurfaceExposure

378

Oriel UV Exposure Station  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 - September 2006 The 2002Optics Group (X-rayLSD Logo About UsAboutOriel UV Exposure

379

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) Update, 2012  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of graphs gives data through the year 2012 for annual collective doses, collective dose per reactor, number of individuals with measurable doses both in total and per reactor, number of reactors, electricity generated, measurable doses per individual and per megawatt-year, and collective outage hours. Reactors considered include BWR, PWR, and LWR. Also, the total effective dose equivalent for the period 2010-2012 is tabulated for each nuclear power plant considered, and the change over 2009-2011.

none,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

ORISE: Illness and Injury Surveillance, Radiation Exposure, and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACK MappingHistory The Oak Ridge Institute

384

ORISE: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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385

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Radiation Exposure Data Collection  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recoveryLaboratory |CHEMPACKRadiologicalEric DulmesHow ORISE is Making a Difference

386

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems - Other Related Sites | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans |QuerylNuclearRadBall

387

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Data Reporting Guide | Department of  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of Energy Power.pdf11-161-LNG |September 15,2015 | DepartmentLoans |QuerylNuclearRadBallEnergy Data

388

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems Program Policy for Submitting of PII  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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389

accidents radiation exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of California eScholarship Repository Summary: and C.V. Zegeer. ITS and Pedestrian Safety at SignalizedPedestrian Counting Devices Report March 2007 Dan Burden The mission of...

390

accident radiation exposure: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of California eScholarship Repository Summary: and C.V. Zegeer. ITS and Pedestrian Safety at SignalizedPedestrian Counting Devices Report March 2007 Dan Burden The mission of...

391

ORISE Video: What is the difference between radiation exposure and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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392

Request For Report Of Radiation Exposure History Form | Department of  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen OwnedofDepartmentEnergyFrequency | DepartmentDepartment ofDepartment

393

RPR 1B. REQUEST FOR RADIATION EXPOSURE HISTORY  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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394

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY TRAINING MANUAL Radiation Safety Office 130 DeSoto Street G-7 Parran with sources of ionizing radiation are required to be instructed in the basic principles of radiation protection and the potential risks of ionizing radiation. Radiation Safety Office personnel provide

Sibille, Etienne

395

Appendix G. Radiation Appendix G. Radiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-made sources. People are exposed to naturally occurring radiation constantly. For example, cosmic radiation of radiation and its effects on the environment and biological systems. Radiation comes from natural and humanAppendix G. Radiation #12;#12;Appendix G. Radiation This appendix presents basic facts about

Pennycook, Steve

396

U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PRIVACY ACT INFORMATION REQUEST  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Check the type of records you are requesting: Medical Personnel Records X-Ray Reports Radiation Exposure Report Occupational and Industrial Records Other If "other" is checked,...

397

E-Print Network 3.0 - age-specific dosimetry final Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

is attached. LIST ALL EMPLOYMENT DURING THE CURRENT CALENDAR YEAR INVOLVING... A SUMMARY REPORT OF MY PERTINENT PREVIOUS OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURE DATA.. Signature Date I:...

398

DCLL TBM Safety Assessment A key objective for ITER includes integrated testing of blanket concepts suitable for demonstrating fusion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

prototypical blanket modules into designated ports. Because ITER will be a licensed nuclear facility, occupation radiation exposure (ORE) analyzed, and decommissioning and waste disposal analysis performed

399

NIOSH: Role in EEOICPA- Part B  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The NIOSH Division of Compensation Analysis and Support (DCAS) develops scientific guidelines for determining whether a worker's cancer is related to the worker's occupational exposure to radiation...

400

Ph. D. Major in Occupational Safety and Health Rev 10/18/2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the application of scientific principles to anticipate, recognize, evaluate, control and manage occupational Energy Technology Laboratory in Morgantown and Pittsburgh and the Institute for Occupational research 5. Toxicology 6. Industrial hygiene including ventilation 7. Engineering control technology 8

Mohaghegh, Shahab

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Growing a green job : essays on social movements and the emergence of a new occupation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Professions and occupations play a central role in shaping institutional arrangements, organizational forms, and individual organizations. I argue the emergence and development of new occupations should be among the central ...

Hammond, Ryan Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene programs at the MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility at the Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project.

404

Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2010 Reducing Occupant-Controlled Electricity Consumption in Campus Buildings Kill­09 and is expected to spend more than $17.1 million in 2009­10. In an effort to reduce electricity consumption; 1 EXECUTIVE SUMMARY UC Berkeley spent $16.39 million on purchased electricity in 2008

Doudna, Jennifer A.

405

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1340 -NIH Occupational Safety and Health Management  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NIH POLICY MANUAL 1340 - NIH Occupational Safety and Health Management Issuing Office: ORS the responsibilities of NIH personnel to foster a safe work environment. 2. Filing Instructions: Remove: NIH Manual 1340, dated 11/29/96 Insert: NIH Manual Chapter 1340 dated 2/27/06 PLEASE NOTE: For information on

Bandettini, Peter A.

406

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California an efficient demand response HVAC control strategy, actual room usage must be considered. Temperature and CO2 are used for simulations but not for predictive demand response strategies. In this paper, we develop

Cerpa, Alberto E.

407

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

408

Forecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network James Howard  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the forecasting algorithm for the different conditions. 1. INTRODUCTION According to the U.S. Department of Energy could take advantage of times when electricity cost is lower, to chill a cold water storage tankForecasting Building Occupancy Using Sensor Network Data James Howard Colorado School of Mines

Hoff, William A.

409

A Qualitative Understanding of Occupational Engagement in College Students  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

that contribute to the decision-maker's fund of information and experience of the larger world, not just the world as processed when a career decision is imminent" (Krieshok, Black, & McKay, 2009, p. 284). The Occupational Engagement Scale - Student, OES-S (Cox...

Bjornsen, Abby Lea

2010-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

410

Radiological health aspects of uranium milling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the operation of conventional and unconventional uranium milling processes, the potential for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation at the mill, methods for radiological safety, methods of evaluating occupational radiation exposures, and current government regulations for protecting workers and ensuring that standards for radiation protection are adhered to. In addition, a survey of current radiological health practices is summarized.

Fisher, D.R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

412

A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A New Method for Occupancy Grid Maps Merging: Application to Multi-vehicle Cooperative Local that are challenging for a single vehicle system. In this paper, a new method for occupancy grid maps merging the proposed occupancy grid maps merging method is also introduced. Real-data tests are given to demonstrate

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

413

Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

Voelz, G.L. (comp.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

The dragon's tail: Radiation safety in the Manhattan Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The book's contents are: Introduction: radiation safety in World War II. Foundations of Manhattan Project radiation safety. Role of the Chicago Health Division. Radiation safety at Los Alamos, Trinity. From Japan to Bikini. Crossroads. Epilogue: continuity and change in radiation safety. Appendix: chronological index of radiation exposure standards. Index. The United States Department of Energy and the Energy Research and Development Administration financially supported this book which provides a historical account of radiological safety in nuclear weapons testing during World War II. The author relied on archival sources and the oral testimony of participants and eyewitnesses. He provides a bibliography with full citations.

Hacker, B.C.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles. 5 figs.

Hunt, A.J.

1983-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

416

Radiation receiver  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The apparatus for collecting radiant energy and converting same to alternate energy form includes a housing having an interior space and a radiation transparent window allowing, for example, solar radiation to be received in the interior space of the housing. Means are provided for passing a stream of fluid past said window and for injecting radiation absorbent particles in said fluid stream. The particles absorb the radiation and because of their very large surface area, quickly release the heat to the surrounding fluid stream. The fluid stream particle mixture is heated until the particles vaporize. The fluid stream is then allowed to expand in, for example, a gas turbine to produce mechanical energy. In an aspect of the present invention properly sized particles need not be vaporized prior to the entrance of the fluid stream into the turbine, as the particles will not damage the turbine blades. In yet another aspect of the invention, conventional fuel injectors are provided to inject fuel into the fluid stream to maintain the proper temperature and pressure of the fluid stream should the source of radiant energy be interrupted. In yet another aspect of the invention, an apparatus is provided which includes means for providing a hot fluid stream having hot particles disbursed therein which can radiate energy, means for providing a cooler fluid stream having cooler particles disbursed therein, which particles can absorb radiant energy and means for passing the hot fluid stream adjacent the cooler fluid stream to warm the cooler fluid and cooler particles by the radiation from the hot fluid and hot particles.

Hunt, Arlon J. (Oakland, CA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Radiation Protection Programs Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides guidance for implementing the provisions of the functional areas contained in 10 CFR 835. The revision to the guide reflects changes in the June 2007 amendment to 10 CFR 835, Worker Safety and Health Program. Cancels DOE G 441.1-1B. Admin Chg 1 dated 7-8-11.

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

418

Radiation Protection Programs Guide for Use with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations, Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

Provides guidance for implementing the provisions of the functional areas contained in 10 CFR 835. The revision to the guide reflects changes in the June 2007 amendment to 10 CFR 835, Worker Safety and Health Program. Cancels DOE G 441.1-1B. Admin Chg 1, dated 7-8-11, cancels DOE G 441.1-1C.

2008-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

419

Radiation at FUSRAP Sites U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Building Strong  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2012 Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP) The Nature of Radiation Radiation is a naturally occurring type of energy. It is released by unstable forms of atoms, the basic units of matter year from the ground surface. Food accounts for about 20 mrem of our annual radiation exposure. Natural

US Army Corps of Engineers

420

Laboratory Specific Training Form (APPENDIX L) Checklist for Worker Training in Radiation Laboratories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and contamination survey requirements to minimize radiation exposure. 7. Security requirements for radioactive Laboratories This form needs to be filled by every radiation worker who may work with radioactive material have been instructed as to the type and location of all the radioactive materials and/or radiation

Berdichevsky, Victor

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Evaluation of Radiation Impacts of Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP - 13495  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Radiation effects are estimated for the operation of a new dry storage facility for spent nuclear fuel (SNFS-2) of Chernobyl NPP RBMK reactors. It is shown that radiation exposure during normal operation, design and beyond design basis accidents are minor and meet the criteria for safe use of radiation and nuclear facilities in Ukraine. (authors)

Paskevych, Sergiy; Batiy, Valiriy; Sizov, Andriy [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36 a Kirova str. Chornobyl, Kiev region, 07200 (Ukraine)] [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 36 a Kirova str. Chornobyl, Kiev region, 07200 (Ukraine); Schmieman, Eric [Battelle Memorial Institute, PO Box 999 MSIN K6-90, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)] [Battelle Memorial Institute, PO Box 999 MSIN K6-90, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart A - General Provisions  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment( Sample of Shipment Notice)

423

Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Radiation Embrittlement Archive Project (REAP), which is being conducted by the Probabilistic Integrity Safety Assessment (PISA) Program at Oak Ridge National Laboratory under funding from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission s (NRC) Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, aims to provide an archival source of information about the effect of neutron radiation on the properties of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. Specifically, this project is an effort to create an Internet-accessible RPV steel embrittlement database. The project s website, https://reap.ornl.gov, provides information in two forms: (1) a document archive with surveillance capsule(s) reports and related technical reports, in PDF format, for the 104 commercial nuclear power plants (NPPs) in the United States, with similar reports from other countries; and (2) a relational database archive with detailed information extracted from the reports. The REAP project focuses on data collected from surveillance capsule programs for light-water moderated, nuclear power reactor vessels operated in the United States, including data on Charpy V-notch energy testing results, tensile properties, composition, exposure temperatures, neutron flux (rate of irradiation damage), and fluence, (Fast Neutron Fluence a cumulative measure of irradiation for E>1 MeV). Additionally, REAP contains data from surveillance programs conducted in other countries. REAP is presently being extended to focus on embrittlement data analysis, as well. This paper summarizes the current status of the REAP database and highlights opportunities to access the data and to participate in the project.

Klasky, Hilda B [ORNL] [ORNL; Bass, Bennett Richard [ORNL] [ORNL; Williams, Paul T [ORNL] [ORNL; Phillips, Rick [ORNL] [ORNL; Erickson, Marjorie A [ORNL] [ORNL; Kirk, Mark T [ORNL] [ORNL; Stevens, Gary L [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

NEW SOURCES OF RADIATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Project Report No. 75/07.IBL 79M0733 Fig. 20. Radiation emission pattern by electronsWinick, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory. Fig. 21.

Schimmerling, W.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Radiation-induced angiosarcoma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1a Figure 1b Figure 1. Radiation-induced angiosarcoma in afollowing completion of radiation therapy. Figure 2a Figurecell histiocytosis after radiation for breast carcinoma: can

Anzalone, C Lane; Cohen, Philip R; Diwan, Abdul H; Prieto, Victor G

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Radiation Protection Act (Pennsylvania)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

This Act combines the radiation safety provisions of The Atomic Energy Development and Radiation Control Act and the Environmental Radiation Protection Act, and empowers the Department of...

427

Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; McGinn, Wilson [ORNL; Meck, Dr. Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Coronary heart diseases: Assessment of risk associated with work exposure to ultralow-frequency magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present analysis was stimulated by previous findings on the possible influence of natural ultralow-frequency (ULF; 0.001--10 Hz) geomagnetic field variations on the cardiovascular system and indications of an effect of man-made ULF magnetic fields on the rate of myocardial infarction. In the present study, the authors considered the occupational health hazards of the strongest ULF magnetic fields in densely populated urban areas. Measurements of ULF magnetic field fluctuations produced by trains powered by DC electricity were performed by means of a computer-based, highly sensitive, three-component magnetometer. The authors found that the magnitude of magnetic field pulses inside the driver`s cab of electric locomotives (ELs) could be {ge} 280 {micro}T in the vertical component, and, in the driver`s compartment of electric motor unit (EMU) trains, they were approximately 50 and 35 {micro}T, respectively. The authors have investigated the relationships between the occupational exposure to ULF magnetic field fluctuations produced by electric trains and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) among railroad workers in the former Soviet Union. They have analyzed medical statistical data for a period of 3 years for approximately 45,000 railroad workers and 4,000 engine drivers. The authors have also analyzed 3 years of morbidity data for three subgroups of engine drivers ({approximately} 4,000 in each group) operating different types of trains. They find that EL drivers have a twofold increase in risk (2.00 {+-} 0.27) of coronary heart diseases (CHDs) compared with EMU drivers. Because the analysis of major CVDs shows that the examined subpopulations of drivers can be considered to have had equal exposure to all known risk factors, the elevated CHD risk among El drivers could be attributed to the increased occupational exposure to ULF magnetic fields.

Ptitsyna, N.G.; Kopytenko, Y.A.; Tyasto, M.I.; Kopytenko, E.A.; Voronov, P.M.; Zaitsev, D.B. [Inst. of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation)] [Inst. of Terrestrial Magnetism, Ionosphere, and Radio Wave Propagation, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Villoresi, G. [CNR, Frascati (Italy). Inst. di Fisica Spazio Interplanetario] [CNR, Frascati (Italy). Inst. di Fisica Spazio Interplanetario; Kudrin, V.A. [Inst. of Railroad Workers` Hygiene, Moscow (Russian Federation)] [Inst. of Railroad Workers` Hygiene, Moscow (Russian Federation); Iucci, N. [Terza Univ. di Roma, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica E. Amaldi] [Terza Univ. di Roma, Rome (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica E. Amaldi

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

429

Title: Analyzing Occupancy Profiles from a Lighting Controls Field Study Authors: Francis Rubinstein, Nesrin Colak, Judith Jennings, and Danielle Neils  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The lighting energy usage in each zone was recorded automatically every 15 minutes. Using this data, we were of the occupancy sensor to reduce lighting energy usage. In selecting data for analysis, we chose to examine only-4], only one US study [5] examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow

430

Effects on chickens of continuous exposure to low level electromagnetic, electric, and magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1972 Major Subjects Nuclear Engineering (Health Physics) EFFECTS ON CHI CKENS OF CONT INUOUS EXPOSURE TO LOW LEVEL ELECTRONAGNETIC, ELECTRIC, AND MAGNETIC 1 IELDS A Thesis by ROBERT SHERWOOD HOWELL Approved... exposure to ionizing radiation. The treated groups appear to have a significantly reduced growth rate and a slightly increased feed conversion ratio. The spleen weight in the 260 MHz {calculated average input power density of 0. 029 mW/cm ) group...

Howell, Robert Sherwood

1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

EFFECTS OF ONE WEEK TRITIUM EXPOSURE ON EPDM ELASTOMER  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents test results for the exposure of four formulations of EPDM (ethylene-propylene diene monomer) elastomer to tritium gas at one atmosphere for approximately one week and characterization of material property changes and changes to the exposure gas during exposure. All EPDM samples were provided by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Material properties that were characterized include mass, sample dimensions, appearance, flexibility, and dynamic mechanical properties. The glass transition temperature was determined by analysis of the dynamic mechanical property data per ASTM standards. No change of glass transition temperature due to the short tritium gas exposure was observed. Filled and unfilled formulations of Dupont{reg_sign} Nordel{trademark} 1440 had a slightly higher glass transition temperature than filled and unfilled formulations of Uniroyal{reg_sign} Royalene{reg_sign} 580H; filled formulations had the same glass transition as unfilled. The exposed samples appeared the same as before exposure--there was no evidence of discoloration, and no residue on stainless steel spacers contacting the samples during exposure was observed. The exposed samples remained flexible--all formulations passed a break test without failing. The unique properties of polymers make them ideal for certain components in gas handling systems. Specifically, the resiliency of elastomers is ideal for sealing surfaces, for example in valves. EPDM, initially developed in the 1960s, is a hydrocarbon polymer used extensively for sealing applications. EPDM is used for its excellent combination of properties including high/low-temperature resistance, radiation resistance, aging resistance, and good mechanical properties. This report summarizes initial work to characterize effects of tritium gas exposure on samples of four types of EPDM elastomer: graphite filled and unfilled formulations of Nordel{trademark} 1440 and Royalene{reg_sign} 580H.

Clark, E

2007-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

432

Kidney cancer and hydrocarbon exposures among petroleum refinery workers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To evaluate the hypothesis of increased kidney cancer risk after exposure to hydrocarbons, especially those present in gasoline, we conducted a case-control study in a cohort of approximately 100,000 male refinery workers from five petroleum companies. A review of 18,323 death certificates identified 102 kidney cancer cases, to each of whom four controls were matched by refinery location and decade of birth. Work histories, containing an average of 15.7 job assignments per subject, were found for 98% of the cases and 94% of the controls. Tb each job, industrial hygienists assigned semiquantitative ratings for the intensity and frequency of exposures to three hydrocarbon categories: nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, aromatic hydrocarbons, and the more volatile hydrocarbons. Ratings of {open_quotes}present{close_quotes} or {open_quotes}absent{close_quotes} were assigned for seven additional exposures: higher boiling hydrocarbons, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, asbestos, chlorinated solvents, ionizing radiation, and lead. Each exposure had either no association or a weak association with kidney cancer. For the hydrocarbon category of principal a priori interest, the nonaromatic liquid gasoline distillates, the estimated relative risk (RR) for any exposure above refinery background was 1.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.5-1.9). Analyses of cumulative exposures and of exposures in varying time periods before kidney cancer occurrence also produced null or near-null results. In an analysis of the longest job held by each subject (average duration 9.2 years or 40% of the refiner&y work history), three groups appeared to be at increased risk: laborers (RR = 1.9,95% CI 1.0-3.9); workers in receipt, storage, and movements (RR = 2.5,95% CI 0.9-6.6); and unit cleaners (RR = 2.3, 95% CI 0.5-9.9). 53 refs., 7 tabs.

Poole, C.; Dreyer, N.A.; Satterfield, M.H. [Epidemiology Resources Inc., Newton Lower Falls, MA (United States); Levin, L. [Drexel Univ., Philadelphia, PA (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

The beryllium quandary: will the lower exposure limits spur new developments in sampling and analysis?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

At the time this article was written, new rulemakings were under consideration at OSHA and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) that would propose changes to occupational exposure limits for beryllium. Given these developments, it’s a good time to review the tools and methods available to IHs for assessing beryllium air and surface contamination in the workplace—what’s new and different, and what’s tried and true. The article discusses limit values and action levels for beryllium, problematic aspects of beryllium air sampling, sample preparation, sample analysis, and data evaluation.

Brisson, Michael

2013-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

434

Reproductive toxicity of low-level lead exposure in men  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Parameters of semen quality, seminal plasma indicators of secretory function of the prostate and seminal vesicles, sex hormones in serum, and biomarkers of lead, cadmium, copper, zinc, and selenium body burden were measured in 240 Croatian men 19-52 years of age. The subjects had no occupational exposure to metals and no known other reasons suspected of influencing male reproductive function or metal metabolism. After adjusting for age, smoking, alcohol, blood cadmium, and serum copper, zinc, and selenium by multiple regression, significant (P<0.05) associations of blood lead (BPb), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD), and/or erythrocyte protoporphyrin (EP) with reproductive parameters indicated a lead-related increase in immature sperm concentration, in percentages of pathologic sperm, wide sperm, round sperm, and short sperm, in serum levels of testosterone and estradiol, and a decrease in seminal plasma zinc and in serum prolactin. These reproductive effects were observed at low-level lead exposure (BPb median 49 {mu}g/L, range 11-149 {mu}g/L in the 240 subjects) common for general populations worldwide. The observed significant synergistic effect of BPb and blood cadmium on increasing serum testosterone, and additive effect of a decrease in serum selenium on increasing serum testosterone, may have implications on the initiation and development of prostate cancer because testosterone augments the progress of prostate cancer in its early stages.

Telisman, Spomenka [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska cesta 2, P.O. Box 291, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia)], E-mail: telisman@imi.hr; Colak, Bozo [University Clinic for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases 'Vuk Vrhovac', Zagreb (Croatia); Pizent, Alica; Jurasovic, Jasna [Institute for Medical Research and Occupational Health, Ksaverska cesta 2, P.O. Box 291, HR-10001 Zagreb (Croatia); Cvitkovic, Petar [University Clinic for Diabetes, Endocrinology and Metabolic Diseases 'Vuk Vrhovac', Zagreb (Croatia)

2007-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MAPPING CLIMATE CHANGE EXPOSURES, VULNERABILITIES, AND ADAPTATION TO PUBLIC HEALTH RISKS's California Climate Change Center JULY 2012 CEC5002012041 Prepared for: California Energy Commission of California. #12; ii ABSTRACT This study reviewed first available frameworks for climate change adaptation

436

Stochastic Microenvironment Models for Air Pollution Exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

human exposure to air pollution." SIMS Technical Report No.human exposure to air pollution." Environment International.Annual Meeting of the A i r Pollution Control Association,

Naihua Duan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure | Department...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Comparing Accelerated Testing and Outdoor Exposure Presented at the PV Module Reliability Workshop, February 26 - 27 2013,...

438

Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Method of Measuring Exposure to Pedestrian Accident Risk.Accident Analysis and Prevention, Vol. 14, 1982, pp 397-405.Estimating Pedestrian Accident Exposure: Protocol Report,

Greene-Roesel, Ryan; Diogenes, Mara Chagas; Ragland, David R

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Gender and snow crab occupational asthma in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fish and shellfish processing employs many thousands of people globally, with shellfish processing becoming more important in recent years. Shellfish processing is associated with multiple occupational health and safety (OHS) risks. Snow crab occupational asthma (OA) is work-related asthma associated with processing snow crab. We present a gender analysis of findings from a 3-year multifaceted study of snow crab OA in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. The study was carried out in four snow crab processing communities between 2001 and 2004. An anonymous survey questionnaire on knowledge, beliefs, and concerns related to processing snow crab administered to 158 workers attending community meetings at the start of the research found that women were significantly more likely than men to associate certain health problems, especially chest tightness, difficulty breathing, and cough, with crab processing (P<0.001). Worker health assessments carried out with 215 processing workers (187 current/28 former; 120 female/95 male) found that female participants were more likely to be diagnosed as almost certain/highly probable snow crab OA and allergy (P=0.001) and to be sensitized to snow crab (P=0.01) than male participants. Work histories from the health assessments were used to classify processing jobs as male or female. Allergen sampling (211 allergen samples: 115 area, 96 personal breathing zone) indicated that the plant areas where these male jobs were concentrated were associated with lower levels of aerosolized crab allergens (the agents responsible for OA to snow crab) than areas associated with female jobs. This difference was statistically significant in the two plants with poor ventilation (p<0.001 and P=0.017 for these plants). A gender analysis of work history data showed that female health assessment participants were likely to have worked longer processing snow crab than males (5 years versus 3.5 years, respectively). Cross-referencing of work history results with allergen sampling data for male and female job areas showed a gender difference in median cumulative exposures (duration of exposurexlevel of exposures) for health assessment participants. Health assessment participants with estimated higher median cumulative exposures were more likely to receive a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable OA and allergy. Semistructured interviews with 27 health assessment participants (24 female/ 3 male) with a diagnosis of almost certain/highly probable or possible snow crab OA indicated that these workers can experience substantial quality of life impacts while working and that they seek to reduce the economic impact of their illness by remaining at their jobs as long as possible. Indications of selection bias and other study limitations point to the need for more research exploring the relationship between the gender division of labor and knowledge, beliefs, and concerns about snow crab processing, as well as gender differences in prevalence, quality of life, and socioeconomic impact.

Howse, Dana [SafetyNet, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Nfld., Canada A1B 3V6 (Canada); Gautrin, Denyse [Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, Montreal, Que., H4J 1C5 (Canada); Neis, Barbara [SafetyNet, Newfoundland and Labrador Centre for Applied Health Research, Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University, St. John's, Nfld., A1B 3V6 (Canada)]. E-mail: bneis@mun.ca; Cartier, Andre [Hopital du Sacre-Coeur de Montreal, Montreal, Que., H4J 1C5 (Canada); Horth-Susin, Lise [Valley Regional Hospital, Kentville, NS, B4N 5E3 (Canada); Jong, Michael [Faculty of Medicine, Memorial University and Health Labrador Corporation, Happy Valley, NL, AOP 1EO (Canada); Swanson, Mark C. [Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, MN 55905 (United States)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

440

Alpha Radiation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth (AOD)ProductssondeadjustsondeadjustAbout theOFFICE OF RESEARCHThermal SolarAllocatioBasics of Radiation Gamma

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Monoxide in Seatde Ice Skating Rinks." American Journal ofHockey Players in Ice Skating Rinks." Veterinary and Human

Apte, Michael G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Evaluation and comparison of occupational noise exposure among workers on offshore and onshore oil well drilling rigs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Engineering Department, for the loan of equipment used for th is research. A special gratitude goes to Ing. Jav ier Mendieta, Safety Manager of Petroleos Mexicanos, for his help for the use of PEMEX facilities in my data collection. I would also like... to thank Ing. Ignacio Torres of PEMEX Safety Engineering Division for assisting in the data collection. DEDICATION This thesis is dedicated to my parents, Estela and Humberto, and also to my little sister Kary. CONTENTS I. INTRODUCTION The Problem...

Suarez Garcia, Humberto

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Epidemiologic evidence for asthma and exposure to air toxics: linkages between occupational, indoor, and community air pollution research.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

709 (1999). 47. Health Effects Institute. Executive Summary:Cambridge, MA:Health Effects Institute, 48. Wade JF III,asthmatic subjects. Health Effects Institute Research Report

Delfino, Ralph J

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Population based exposure assessment methodology for carbon monoxide: Development of a Carbon Monoxide Passive Sampler and Occupational Dosimeter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

levels of internal combustion engine emission. It may beemissions from a blast furnace and exhaust from internal combustion engine

Apte, Michael G.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

The DOE Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness...  

Energy Savers [EERE]

compensation to workers with beryllium disease, silicosis, or radiation-induced cancer. Legitimate claimants may receive a lump-sum payment of 150,000. Additionally,...

446

Human Occupancy as a Source of Indoor Airborne Bacteria  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to specific airborne bacteria indoors is linked to infectious and noninfectious adverse health outcomes. However, the sources and origins of bacteria suspended in indoor air are not well understood. This study ...

Hospodsky, Denina

447

Critical Dose of Internal Organs Internal Exposure - 13471  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The health threat posed by radionuclides has stimulated increased efforts to developed characterization on the biological behavior of radionuclides in humans in all ages. In an effort motivated largely by the Chernobyl nuclear accident, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) is assembling a set of age specific biokinetic models for environmentally important radioelements. Radioactive substances in the air, mainly through the respiratory system and digestive tract, is inside the body. Radioactive substances are unevenly distributed in various organs and tissues. Therefore, the degree of damage will depend not only on the dose of radiation have but also on the critical organ, which is the most accumulation of radioactive substances, which leads to the defeat of the entire human body. The main objective of radiation protection, to avoid exceeding the maximum permissible doses of external and internal exposure of a person to prevent the physical and genetic damage people. The maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of radiation is called a dose of radiation a person in uniform getting her for 50 years does not cause changes in the health of the exposed individual and his progeny. The following classification of critical organs, depending on the category of exposure on their degree of sensitivity to radiation: First group: the whole body, gonads and red bone marrow; Second group: muscle, fat, liver, kidney, spleen, gastrointestinal tract, lungs and lens of the eye; The third group: bone, thyroid and skin; Fourth group: the hands, forearms, feet. MTD exposure whole body, gonads and bone marrow represent the maximum exposures (5 rem per year) experienced by people in their normal activities. The purpose of this article is intended dose received from various internal organs of the radionuclides that may enter the body by inhalation, and gastrointestinal tract. The biokinetic model describes the time dependent distribution and excretion of different radionuclides that have intake into the organism or absorbed into blood. Transport of different radionuclides between compartments is assumed to follow first order kinetics provided the concentration in red blood cells (RBCs) stays below a nonlinear threshold concentration. When the concentration in RBCs exceeds that threshold, the transfer rate from diffusible plasma to RBCs is assumed to decrease as the concentration in RBCs increases. For the calculations used capabilities AMBER by using the traces of radionuclides in the body. Model for the transfer of radionuclides in the body has been built on the basis of existing models at AMBER for lead. (authors)

Grigoryan, G.; Amirjanyan, A. [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia)] [Nuclear and Radiation Safety Centre (Armenia); Grigoryan, N. [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)] [Yerevan State Medical University 4Tigran Mets,375010 Yerevan (Armenia)

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Exposure Evaluation for Benzene, Lead and Noise in Vehicle and Equipment Repair Shops  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An exposure assessment was performed at the equipment and vehicle maintenance repair shops operating at the U. S. Department of Energy Hanford site, in Richland, Washington. The maintenance shops repair and maintain vehicles and equipment used in support of the Hanford cleanup mission. There are three general mechanic shops and one auto body repair shop. The mechanics work on heavy equipment used in construction, cranes, commercial motor vehicles, passenger-type vehicles in addition to air compressors, generators, and farm equipment. Services include part fabrication, installation of equipment, repair and maintenance work in the engine compartment, and tire and brake services. Work performed at the auto body shop includes painting and surface preparation which involves applying body filler and sanding. 8-hour time-weighted-average samples were collected for benzene and noise exposure and task-based samples were collected for lead dust work activities involving painted metal surfaces. Benzene samples were obtained using 3M™ 3520 sampling badges and were analyzed for additional volatile organic compounds. These compounds were selected based on material safety data sheet information for the aerosol products used by the mechanics for each day of sampling. The compounds included acetone, ethyl ether, toluene, xylene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone, and trichloroethylene. Laboratory data for benzene, VM&P naphtha, methyl ethyl ketone and trichloroethylene were all below the reporting detection limit. Airborne concentrations for acetone, ethyl ether, toluene and xylene were all less than 10% of their occupational exposure limit. The task-based samples obtained for lead dusts were submitted for a metal scan analysis to identify other metals that might be present. Laboratory results for lead dusts were all below the reporting detection limit and airborne concentration for the other metals observed in the samples were less than 10% of the occupational exposure limit. Noise dosimetry sampling was performed on a random basis and was representative of the different work activities within the four shops. Twenty three percent of the noise samples exceeded the occupational exposure limit of 85 decibels for an 8-hour time-weightedaverage. Work activities where noise levels were higher included use of impact wrenches and grinding wheels.

Sweeney, Lynn C.

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

GENII. Environmental Radiation Dosimetry Suite  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

GENII was developed to incorporate the internal dosimetry models recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) into the environmental pathway analysis models used at Hanford. GENII is a coupled system of seven programs and the associated data libraries that comprise the Hanford Dosimetry System (Generation II) to estimate potential radiation doses to individuals or populations from both routine and accidental releases of radionuclides to air or water and residual contamination from spills or decontamination operations. The GENII system includes interactive menu-driven programs to assist the user with scenario generation and data input,internal and external dose factor generators, and environmental dosimetry programs. The programs analyze environmental contamination resulting from both far-field and near-field scenarios. A far-field scenario focuses outward from a source, while a near-field scenario focuses in toward a receptor. GENII can calculate annual dose, committed dose, and accumulated dose from acute and chronic releases from ground or elevated sources to air or water and from initial contamination of soil or surfaces and can evaluate exposure pathways including direct exposure via water, soil, air, inhalation pathways, and ingestion pathways. In addition, GENII can perform 10,000 years migration analyses and can be used for retrospective calculations of potential radiation doses resulting from routine emissions and for prospective dose calculations for purposes such as siting facilities, environmental impact statements, and safety analysis reports.

Napier, B.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA, (United States)

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Office of Occupational Medicine. FY 1993, Annual report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

To date, we have assessed every DOE site at least once, many twice. With the information collected during these visits, EH-43 is developing a solid understanding of the occupational medical program activities at each site and will be better able to monitor progress. The assessment staff provided more specific technical assistance than in the past, especially in the area of compliance. In addition, the cardiovascular medical guidelines are near completion and the personnel assurance, firefighters, and protective force personnel medical guidelines are ready for the concurrence process.

Not Available

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Standards  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "ofEarlyEnergyDepartmentNationalRestart of the Review of theOFFICE OF8/%2AAdministration 97 Occupational

452

Office of radiation and indoor air: Program description  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The goal of the Environmental Protection Agency`s (EPA) Office of Radiation and Indoor Air is to protect the public and the environment from exposures to radiation and indoor air pollutants. The Office develops protection criteria, standards, and policies and works with other programs within EPA and other agencies to control radiation and indoor air pollution exposures; provides technical assistance to states through EPA`s regional offices and other agencies having radiation and indoor air protection programs; directs an environmental radiation monitoring program; responds to radiological emergencies; and evaluates and assesses the overall risk and impact of radiation and indoor air pollution. The Office is EPA`s lead office for intra- and interagency activities coordinated through the Committee for Indoor Air Quality. It coordinates with and assists the Office of Enforcement in enforcement activities where EPA has jurisdiction. The Office disseminates information and works with state and local governments, industry and professional groups, and citizens to promote actions to reduce exposures to harmful levels of radiation and indoor air pollutants.

Not Available

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009. Payne FW. Energy management control system handbook.5] F. W. Payne. Energy management control system hand- book.Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:

Sohn, Michael D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings. ” Proceedings,on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, ACEEE, Washington DC,System User Interface for Building Occupants. ” ASHRAE

Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Collecting Occupant Presence Data for Use in Energy Management of Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ed. The Fairmont Press, Inc. EPRI. 1994. Occupancy sensors:Institute, Palo Alto, CA. EPRI BR-100323. Ekahau. Real TimePower Research Institute (EPRI) identified approximately 30%

Rosenblum, Benjamin Tarr

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

E-Print Network 3.0 - active site occupancy Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

to concerns of accidental... -specific luminaire that integrates a low-wattage light-emitting diode (LED) nightlight and an occupancy sensor... that saves energy while improving...

457

E-Print Network 3.0 - air-conditioning systemsfor occupant Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

University Collection: Biology and Medicine 3 Introduction Prior research has shown that energy savings are Summary: conditions for human occupancy. American Society of Heating,...

458

Low-cost coarse airborne particulate matter sensing for indoor occupancy detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the energy-efficient smart building, occupancy detection andare being added to smart buildings to ensure the quality ofvaluable information for smart buildings. An important next

Weekly, Kevin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollutants occupational Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

info@pacinst.org www.pacinst.org Summary: will be the greatest beneficiary of air pollution improvements in terms of occupational safety and health. The Pacific......

460

E-Print Network 3.0 - achieving effective occupational Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Ecology 14 VECIMS 2003 -International Symposium on Virtual Environments, Human-Computer Interfaces, and Measurement Systems Summary: with probabilistic encoding of occupancy...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

E-Print Network 3.0 - analyzing occupational injuries Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Laboratory's occupational medicine office are analyzed to reduce and... injuries. Ergonomics--The Science of Fitting the Job to the Worker From the work bench to the garden......

462

E-Print Network 3.0 - age human occupations Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

occupations among a population. This dynamics is assessed with a database... of wedding certificates that can be seen as a network made of links between (fathers and sons)...

463

Summary Report: Post-Occupancy Evaluation Surveys in K-12 Learning Environments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

were designated as “green” buildings (defined here as havingrecent discussions in the green building industry, regardingthe impacts that green buildings have on their occupants.

Baker, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Method for detecting radiation dose utilizing thermoluminescent material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The amount of ionizing radiation to which a thermoluminescent material has been exposed is determined by first cooling the thermoluminescent material and then optically stimulating the thermoluminescent material by exposure to light. Visible light emitted by the thermoluminescent material as it is allowed to warm up to room temperature is detected and counted. The thermoluminescent material may be annealed by exposure to ultraviolet light. 5 figs.

Miller, S.D.; McDonald, J.C.; Eichner, F.N.; Durham, J.S.

1992-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

465

Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Measured Lighting-Switch Data  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Occupancy profile is one of the driving factors behind discrepancies between the measured and simulated energy consumption of buildings. The frequencies of occupants leaving their offices and the corresponding durations of absences have significant impact on energy use and the operational controls of buildings. This study used statistical methods to analyze the occupancy status, based on measured lighting-switch data in five-minute intervals, for a total of 200 open-plan (cubicle) offices. Five typical occupancy patterns were identified based on the average daily 24-hour profiles of the presence of occupants in their cubicles. These statistical patterns were represented by a one-square curve, a one-valley curve, a two-valley curve, a variable curve, and a flat curve. The key parameters that define the occupancy model are the average occupancy profile together with probability distributions of absence duration, and the number of times an occupant is absent from the cubicle. The statistical results also reveal that the number of absence occurrences decreases as total daily presence hours decrease, and the duration of absence from the cubicle decreases as the frequency of absence increases. The developed occupancy model captures the stochastic nature of occupants moving in and out of cubicles, and can be used to generate a more realistic occupancy schedule. This is crucial for improving the evaluation of the energy saving potential of occupancy based technologies and controls using building simulations. Finally, to demonstrate the use of the occupancy model, weekday occupant schedules were generated and discussed.

Chang, Wen-Kuei; Hong, Tianzhen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Adaptors for radiation detectors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described herein are adaptors and other devices for radiation detectors that can be used to make accurate spectral measurements of both small and large bulk sources of radioactivity, such as building structures, soils, vessels, large equipment, and liquid bodies. Some exemplary devices comprise an adaptor for a radiation detector, wherein the adaptor can be configured to collimate radiation passing through the adapter from an external radiation source to the radiation detector and the adaptor can be configured to enclose a radiation source within the adapter to allow the radiation detector to measure radiation emitted from the enclosed radiation source.

Livesay, Ronald Jason

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

467

Environmental exposure and lifestyle predictors of lead, cadmium, PCB, and DDT levels in Great Lakes fish eaters  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A previously characterized cohort of 115 Great Lakes fish eaters and 95 non-fish-eating regional controls was reexamined in 1989. Levels of blood lead and cadmium and serum PCB and DDT were measured. Lifestyle characteristics, including recent and historic fish consumption, were evaluated as predictors of contaminant levels using multivariate regression analysis. Significantly elevated serum PCB and DDT levels were observed in fish eaters, compared with controls. Historic fish consumption, rather than recent consumption, was identified as the primary predictor of current serum levels. Mean blood lead and cadmium were also significantly higher in fish eaters than in controls. However, the primary predictors of lead and cadmium were behavioral exposures--specifically smoking and self-reported occupational and recreational exposure-rather than fish consumption. These findings illustrate the importance of evaluating a variety of possible sources when investigating human exposure to environmental contaminants.

Hovinga, M.E.; Sowers, M.; Humphrey, H.E. (Univ. of Alabama, Birmingham (United States))

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Effects of High Dietary Iron and Gamma Radiation on Oxidative Stress and Bone  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(induced by feeding a high iron diet) and gamma radiation exposure would independently increase markers of oxidative stress and markers of oxidative damage and result in loss of bone mass, with the combined treatment having additive or synergistic effects...

Yuen, Evelyn P

2013-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

469

E-Print Network 3.0 - acute radiation risk Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

pared with risks from acute or high-dose-rate exposure... - mates of risk of induction by low doses of radiation lies in the choice of the value of the DDREF (6... , Sources,...

470

Irradiated Esophageal Cells are Protected from Radiation-Induced Recombination by MnSOD Gene Therapy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiation-induced DNA damage is a precursor to mutagenesis and cytotoxicity. During radiotherapy, exposure of healthy tissues can lead to severe side effects. We explored the potential of mitochondrial SOD (MnSOD) gene ...

Niu, Yunyun

471

Tryptophan Cluster Protects Human ?D-Crystallin from Ultraviolet Radiation-Induced Photoaggregation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a significant risk factor for age-related cataract, a disease of the human lens and the most prevalent cause of blindness in the world. Cataract pathology involves protein misfolding ...

Schafheimer, Steven Nathaniel

472

UNIVERSITY OF PITTSBURGH RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE G-7 Parran Hall Phone: 412-624-2728 Fax: 412-624-3562  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of obtaining dosimetry only First Middle Last (Maiden) Sex Social Security No. X X X - X __ - __ __ __ __ Date Nuclear medicine Nuclear cardiology Other __________________________ OCCUPATIONAL EXTERNAL RADIATION the current year. ~ A copy of my termination report(s) or current year dosimetry report(s) is attached. LIST

Sibille, Etienne

473

Final Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in ventilation rate standards for Big Box stores in California: predicted indoor air quality and energy consumption using a matrix of ventilation scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MG. (2010). Balancing energy conservation and occupant needsReport   Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs Report Balancing energy conservation and occupant needs in

Apte, Michael G.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

In Vivo Identification of Solar Radiation-Responsive Gene Network: Role of the p38 Stress-Dependent Kinase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Vivo Identification of Solar Radiation-Responsive Gene Network: Role of the p38 Stress Solar radiation is one of the most common threats to the skin, with exposure eliciting a specific 44K) to study epidermis gene expression in vivo in skin exposed to simulated solar radiation (SSR

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

475

Evaluation of the association between birth defects and exposure to ambient vinyl chloride  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Birth defects incidence for infants born to residents of Shawinigan, Canada in 1966-1979 were significantly higher than in three comparison communities. Since there has been a vinyl chloride polymerization plant in this town since 1943 from which ten cases of angiosarcoma of the liver have been identified, this study explores the possible association between exposure to vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) in ambient air and the occurrence of birth defects in the community. The excess of birth defects fluctuated seasonally in a way that corresponded to changes in VCM concentration in the environment. Mothers who gave birth to malformed children were younger on average in Shawinigan than in the comparison communities. However, there was no excess of still-births in Shawinigan. The excess in birth defects involved most organ systems, and variation in birth-defect rates among school districts could not be accounted for by estimates of VCM in the atmosphere. The occupational and residential histories of parents who gave birth to malformed infants were compared with those of parents of normal infants. The two groups did not differ in occupational exposure or closeness of residence to the vinyl chloride polymerization plant. Some descriptive data from this study raised the hypothesis of an association between VCM in the air and birth defects in the exposed community, but as a whole, within the sample size available, such an association could not be substantiated.

Theriault, G.; Iturra, H.; Gingras, S.

1983-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1.2. Radiation Safety Committee (RSC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 1.4. Radiation Safety Office (RSO

Rubloff, Gary W.

477

The EMDEX Project: Technology transfer and occupational measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Electric and Magnetic Field Measurement Project for Utilities -- the EPRI EMDEX Project -- is a multifaceted project entailing technology transfer, measurement protocol design, data management, and exposure assessment analyses. The specific objectives of the project in order of priority were: (1) to transfer the EMDEX technology to utilities; (2) to develop measurement protocols and data management capabilities for large exposure data sets; and (3) to collect, analyze, and document 60-Hz electric and magnetic field exposures for a diverse population. Transfer of the EPRI Electric and Magnetic Field Digital Exposure system (EMDEX) technology to the participating utilities was accomplished through training and through extensive involvement in the exposure data collection effort. Documentation of the EMDEX Project is contained in three volumes: Volume 1 summarizes the methods and results, and provides and assessment of project objectives; Volume 2 provides detailed descriptions of methods, procedures, protocols, materials and analyses; and Volume 3 contains appendices with a complete set of project protocols, project materials, and extensive data tables. 8 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs.

Bracken, T.D.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Post-accident inhalation exposure and experience with plutonium  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses the issue of inhalation exposure immediately afterward and for a long time following a nuclear accident. For the cases where either a nuclear weapon burns or explodes prior to nuclear fission, or at locations close to a nuclear reactor accident containing fission products, a major concern is the inhalation of aerosolized plutonium (Pu) particles producing alpha-radiation. We have conducted field studies of Pu- contaminated real and simulated accident sites at Bikini, Johnston Atoll, Tonopah (Nevada), Palomares (Spain), Chernobyl, and Maralinga (Australia).

Shinn, J

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is a nuclear radiation-warning detector that measures impedance of silver-silver halide on an interdigitated electrode to detect light or radiation comprised of alpha particles, beta particles, gamma rays, X rays, and/or neutrons. The detector is comprised of an interdigitated electrode covered by a layer of silver halide. After exposure to alpha particles, beta particles, X rays, gamma rays, neutron radiation, or light, the silver halide is reduced to silver in the presence of a reducing solution. The change from the high electrical resistance (impedance) of silver halide to the low resistance of silver provides the radiation warning that detected radiation levels exceed a predetermined radiation dose threshold.

Savignac, Noel Felix; Gomez, Leo S; Yelton, William Graham; Robinson, Alex; Limmer, Steven

2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

480

Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation detector using micromechanical sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Electromagnetic and nuclear radiation is detected by micromechanical sensors that can be coated with various interactive materials. As the micromechanical sensors absorb radiation, the sensors bend and/or undergo a shift in resonance characteristics. The bending and resonance changes are detected with high sensitivity by any of several detection methods including optical, capacitive, and piezoresistive methods. Wide bands of the electromagnetic spectrum can be imaged with picoJoule sensitivity, and specific absorptive coatings can be used for selective sensitivity in specific wavelength bands. Microcantilevers coated with optical cross-linking polymers are useful as integrating optical radiation dosimeters. Nuclear radiation dosimetry is possible by fabricating cantilevers from materials that are sensitive to various nuclear particles or radiation. Upon exposure to radiation, the cantilever bends due to stress and its resonance frequency shifts due to changes in elastic properties, based on cantilever shape and properties of the coating.

Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Warmack, Robert J. (Knoxville, TN); Wachter, Eric A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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481

Radiation Control (Virginia)  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The Department of Health is responsible for regulating radiation and radioactive materials in the Commonwealth of Virginia. Although the Department's Radiation Control Program primarily focuses on...

482

Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback and workplace culture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Occupant comfort and engagement in green buildings: Examining the effects of knowledge, feedback years to their design, performance and evaluation. The successful delivery of green buildings requires within economic means. Occupant comfort and behaviour can have a significant impact on green building

Pedersen, Tom

483

Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety, therefore generating high  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Abstract--Airborne pollution and explosive gases threaten human health and occupational safety and a thumb-drive sized prototype system. I. INTRODUCTION xposure to air pollution consistently ranks among to occupational safety as energy demands rise. Airborne pollutants and explosive gases vary in both time and space

Mason, Andrew

484

APPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for (check): Medical Studies Health Care Administration Dental Studies Occupational Therapy VeterinaryAPPLICATION FOR SCHOLARSHIPS Health Science Studies, Pre-Professional Studies, and Environmental & Occupational Health You are able to complete this application by simply typing your information into the spaces

Barrash, Warren

485

Indra Prasad Paneru Livelihood strategy and occupational vulnerability of street ice cream vendors in Kathmandu Valley  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Indra Prasad Paneru Livelihood strategy and occupational vulnerability of street ice cream vendors in Kathmandu Valley Livelihood strategy and occupational vulnerability of street ice cream vendors in Kathmandu-cream vendors of Kathmandu valley, Case study of Jawalakhel, Ratnapark area and Balaju area' explores

Richner, Heinz

486

The Application and Energy Savings Potential of Occupancy Counters/Transmitters in Office Buildings  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

because the occupancy is below the design occupancy. In hot and humid climates, such as the Gulf Southwest, a considerable portion of the cooling energy in a commercial building is expended cooling and dehumidifying the air needed to maintain fresh air...

Medlin, J. W.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2014-2015 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

Barrash, Warren

488

Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2013-2014 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health ENVHLTH 416

Barrash, Warren

489

Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bachelor of Science, Environmental and Occupational Health, 2012-2013 Name ID# Date General Degree and Humanities 3-4 DLS ENGL 202 Technical Communication 3 DLS ENVHLTH 102 Global Environmental Health 3 BIOL 192 Management ENVHLTH 320 Community Environmental Health Management ENVHLTH 415 Occupational Safety and Health

Barrash, Warren

490

Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LBNL-6080E Statistical Analysis and Modeling of Occupancy Patterns in Open-Plan Offices using Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;1 Statistical Analysis statistical methods to analyze the occupancy status, based on measured lighting-switch data in five

491

Predicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, occupancy prediction, smart heating, energy management, smart home, energy efficiency Corresponding author.e. the household having too low a temperature when the residents come back home ­ triggering the heatingPredicting household occupancy for smart heating control: A comparative performance analysis

492

OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á & control General Terms Algorithms, Machine Learning, Measurement Keywords Occupancy, HVAC, Ventilation for heating, ventilation, and air-conditioning (HVAC) systems[2]. Studies suggest that 15% to 25% of HVAC

Carreira-Perpiñán, Miguel Á.

493

Updated: 10/03/08! Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated: 10/03/08! ! ! ! TLL Option in Occupational Education Studies (OCED) The Occupational Education Studies (OCED) option in the TLL is intended for professionals in the general field of workforce education and development. Teachers and administrators in career and technical education; personnel

Veiga, Pedro Manuel Barbosa

494

The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Two-Day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior: Presentations and discussions at the two-day CERC-BEE Forum on Building Integrated Design and Occupant Behavior for High employer. #12;2013 CERC-BEE Forum on Human Behavior and Integrated Design for High Performance Buildings

495

Modeling exposure to depleted uranium in support of decommissioning at Jefferson Proving Ground, Indiana  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Jefferson Proving Ground was used by the US Army Test and Evaluation Command for testing of depleted uranium munitions and closed in 1995 under the Base Realignment and Closure Act. As part of the closure of JPG, assessments of potential adverse health effects to humans and the ecosystem were conducted. This paper integrates recent information obtained from site characterization surveys at JPG with environmental monitoring data collected from 1983 through 1994 during DU testing. Three exposure scenarios were evaluated for potential adverse effects to human health: an occasional use scenario and two farming scenarios. Human exposure was minimal from occasional use, but significant risk were predicted from the farming scenarios when contaminated groundwater was used by site occupants. The human health risk assessments do not consider the significant risk posed by accidents with unexploded ordnance. Exposures of white-tailed deer to DU were also estimated in this study, and exposure rates result in no significant increase in either toxicological or radiological risks. The results of this study indicate that remediation of the DU impact area would not substantially reduce already low risks to humans and the ecosystem, and that managed access to JPG is a reasonable model for future land use options.

Ebinger, M.H. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Oxenburg, T.P. [Army Test and Evaluation Command, Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD (United States)

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 564 (2006) 319323 Passive monitoring of the equilibrium factor inside a radon exposure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. r 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. PACS: 29.40; 23.60 Keywords: Radon progeny; Equilibrium-lived radon progeny contributes about half of the total exposure of human beings to ionizing radiation, but instead to its short-lived progeny. Exposure to radon progeny is measured through the product of PAEC Ã? t

Yu, K.N.

497

Discoloration resistant, flexible, radiation curable coating compositions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A low dosage radiation polymerizable protective and decorative coating composition or paint, coated articles bearing such a protective coating and processess for preparing such articles. The radiation polymerizable coating composition comprises an organic resin/monomer mixture of: (A) between about 97 and about 3 weight percent alphabeta olefinically unsaturated organic resin containing between about 0.5 and about 5 vinyl unsaturation units per 1000 molecular weight of said resin, and (B) between about 3 and about 97 weight percent vinyl monomers polymerizable with said resin upon exposure to radiation, characterized in that said vinyl monomers include N-vinyl-2-pyrrolidone in an amount of from about 3 and up to about 10 wei