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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster  

SciTech Connect

This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

ORAU

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

2

DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

3

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

4

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

6

A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing...

7

DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet  

SciTech Connect

This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

ORAU

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

9

Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

10

Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation: The statistician's role  

SciTech Connect

Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled.

Gilbert, E.S.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

Raddatz, C.T. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Division of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

17

DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

18

Evaluation of Occupational Magnetic Field Exposure Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a first step in assessing potential effects of EMF exposure guidelines on utility operations, EPRI sponsored a technical evaluation of the major occupational EMF exposure guidelines and an analysis of existing magnetic-field exposure databases. The research reported herein is a comprehensive extension of that work, that includes studies by several research groups on diverse topics related to guidelines.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Criteria Review and Approach Document 1.0 PURPOSE Subject: Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inqu v Acting Di...

20

Shellfish consumption and intertidal occupancy review, Sellafield, 2004. This note describes a review of public radiation exposure pathways due to liquid radioactive  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a review of public radiation exposure pathways due to liquid radioactive waste discharges from the British limited to adults. The results are shown in Tables 1 to 3. Data analysis Internal exposure In addition and external exposure pathways have also been conducted by the Centre for Environment, Fisheries

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2010, Prepared for the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research, May 2012  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission’s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2010 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no NRC-licensed low-level waste disposal facilities currently in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Annual reports for 2010 were received from a total of 190 NRC licensees. The summation of reports submitted by the 190 licensees indicated that 192,424 individuals were monitored, 81,961 of whom received a measurable dose. When adjusted for transient workers who worked at more than one licensee during the year, there were actually 142,471 monitored individuals and 62,782 who received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 10,617 person-rem, which represents a 12% decrease from the 2009 value. This decrease was primarily due to the decrease in collective dose at commercial nuclear power reactors, as well as a decrease in the collective dose for most of the other categories of NRC licensees. The number of individuals receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in an average measurable dose of 0.13 rem for 2010. The average measurable dose is defined as the total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) divided by the number of individuals receiving a measurable dose. In calendar year 2010, the average annual collective dose per reactor for light water reactor (LWR) licensees was 83 person-rem. This represents a 14% decrease from the value reported for 2009 (96 person-rem). The decrease in collective dose for commercial nuclear power reactors was due to an 11% decrease in total outage hours in 2010. During outages, activities involving increased radiation exposure such as refueling and maintenance are performed while the reactor is not in operation. The average annual collective dose per reactor for boiling water reactors (BWRs) was 137 personrem for 35 BWRs, and 55 person-rem for 69 pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Analyses of transient individual data indicate that 29,333 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient individuals by multiple licensees. The adjustment to account for transient individuals has been specifically noted in footnotes in the figures and tables for commercial nuclear power reactors. In 2010, the average measurable dose per individual for all licensees calculated from reported data was 0.13 rem. Although the average measurable dose per individual from data submitted by licensees was 0.13 rem, a corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose per individual of 0.17 rem.

D. E. Lewis D. A. Hagemeyer Y. U. McCormick

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

ORISE: DOE's Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring System (REMS) Monitoring System (REMS) ORISE maintains large database of radition exposure records for the U.S. Department of Energy ORISE staff monitoring radiation data for DOE Rule 10 CFR 835 establishes the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) occupational protection rule and requires assessment and recording of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or contamination. The Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) database is the radiation exposure data repository for all monitored DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors and members of the public. REMS maintains dose records for all monitored individuals dating back to 1969. Aggregated, site-specific data are available on the Radiation Exposure Monitoring System website for all years since 1986. Currently,

23

CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-35, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate occupational radiation protection programs against DOE policy, standards, and regulatory requirements. The approach includes evaluation of essential programmatic elements of radiation protection programs with additional emphasis on implementation of the core functions of integrated safety management. CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012

24

Sources Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure Of Average Individual Radiation Exposure Natural background Medical Consumer products Industrial, security, educational and research Occupational 0.311 rem 0.300 rem 0.013 rem 0.0003 rem 0.0005 rem Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, provides radiological protection services and oversight at the Savannah River Site (SRS). These services include radiation dose measurements for persons who enter areas where they may be exposed to radiation or radioactive material. The results are periodically reported to monitored individuals. The results listed are based on a radiation dose system developed by the International Commission on Radiation Protection. The system uses the terms "effective dose," "equivalent dose" and units of rem. You may be more familiar with the term "millirem" (mrem), which is 1/1000 of a rem.

25

11 Jul 2007 (updated 3 Feb 2009) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-005-R003 1 of 1 Authorization to Release Occupational Exposure Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information concerning the internal and external occupational radiation dose I received while at SLAC. (Please Occupational Exposure Information To obtain this authorization, print this form, fill it in, sign it

Wechsler, Risa H.

26

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation...

28

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system of contractually-based nuclear safety standards to regulatory based requirements. Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule More Documents & Publications Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

29

Types of Radiation Exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

External Irradiation Contamination Incorporation Biological Effects of Acute, Total Body Irradiation Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Types of radiation...

30

Occupational Noise Exposure and its Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue brief provides the electric power industry with a snapshot of the current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with noise exposure. Noise exposure types are varied and include continuous, intermittent and/or impulse noise. Prolonged occupational exposure to continuous noise or acoustic trauma can cause noise-induced hearing loss. Recent scientific data from the aluminum industry suggest that those exposed below levels requiring hearing protective devices may ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

31

Epidemiology of accidental radiation exposures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the information on the health effects of radiation exposure available to date comes from long-term studies of the atomic bombings in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Accidental exposures, such as those resulting from the Chernobyl and Kyshtym accidents, have as yet provided little information concerning health effects of ionizing radiation. This paper will present the current state of our knowledge concerning radiation effects, review major large-scale accidental exposures and the types of studies that are needed. 64 refs., 3 tabs.

Cardis, E. [International Agency for Research on Cancer, Lyon (France)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

EPRI EMF Exposure Database: EMDEX Occupational Study Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers from the EMDEX Occupational Study (WO2966-01) provided data from this study for inclusion in the EPRI EMF Exposure Database. This data set contains fourteen data products related to measurements of electric and magnetic field personal exposure: binary and ASCII time-series files of individual measurements, summaries of occupied environment by partition (continuous period in environment), by day and by entire measurement session, summaries of occupied environment for work status (work/non-work...

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Part 835-Occupational Radiation Protection Authority: 42 U.S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

''Development of the 1996 Proposed Amendment to 10 CFR part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection,'' (regulatory development document, November 1996) which may be viewed...

34

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency...

35

REGULATORY GUIDE 8.18 liNJFORMATIOiN RELEVANT TO EiNSURING THAT OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION EXPOSURES AT MEL)ICAL INSTITUTIONS,rILL BE AS LOW AS,IEASONAdLY ACHIEVABLE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paragraph 20.1(c) of 10 CFR Part 20, "Standards for Protection Against Radiation, " states that licensees should make every reasonable effort to keep radiation exposures, as well as releases of radioactive material to unrestricted

unknown authors

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The familiar level of this module is designed to provide the basic information to meet the requirements that are related to 10 CFR 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection," in the following DOE Functional Area Qualification Standards: DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management DOE-STD-1151-2002, Facility Representative DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager DOE-STD-1178-2004, Technical Program Manager DOE-STD-1155-2002, Transportation and Traffic Management DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection

37

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update  

SciTech Connect

This slide show presents the 2011 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure.Clarification is given on Reporting Data regarding: reporting Total Organ Dose (TOD); reporting Total Skin Dose (TSD), and Total Extremity Dose (TExD) ; and Special individuals reporting.

Rao, Nimi; Hagemeyer, Derek

2012-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

38

ORISE: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information and Reporting System (REIRS) Information and Reporting System (REIRS) ORISE maintains large database of radiation exposure records for the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is required by federal mandate to maintain and evaluate radiation protection data for workers at facilities that it licenses. As part of its mission of safety, the NRC operates the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS), a database system containing all occupational radiation exposure records that have been submitted to the NRC under 10 CFR Part 20. REIRS encompasses 1,800-plus NRC licensees and contains more than five million records for more than one million monitored individuals.

39

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure Pamela J Sykes, Michelle R Newman, Benjamin J Blyth and Rebecca J Ormsby Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Flinders Centre for Cancer Prevention and Control, Bedford Park, Adelaide, South Australia 5042 Australia. (pam.sykes@flinders.edu.au). Our goal is to study the mechanisms involved in biological responses to low doses of radiation in vivo in the dose range that is relevant to population and occupational exposures. At high radiation doses, DNA double-strand breaks are considered the critical lesion underlying the initiation of radiation-induced carcinogenesis. However, at the very low radiation doses relevant for the general public, the induction of DNA double-strand breaks

40

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - appendices. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff is in need of decommissioning bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2) located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clear structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure - main report. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), which is a boiling water reactor (BWR), located at Richland, Washington, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a {open_quotes}green field{close_quotes} condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low- level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities. Sensitivity of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances is also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J.; McDuffie, P.N.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Volume 2, Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, Final report  

SciTech Connect

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1998), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the 1978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference pressurized Water Reactor Power Station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure, Volume 1, Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the issuance of the final Decommissioning Rule (July 27, 1988), owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to provide some of the needed bases documentation. This report contains the results of a review and reevaluation of the {prime}978 PNL decommissioning study of the Trojan nuclear power plant (NUREG/CR-0130), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the nuclear power plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives. These alternatives now include an initial 5--7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool, prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. Included for information (but not presently part of the license termination cost) is an estimate of the cost to demolish the decontaminated and clean structures on the site and to restore the site to a ``green field`` condition. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste (i.e., Greater-Than-Class C), and reflects 1993 costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities.

Konzek, G.J.; Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; McDuffie, P.N. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

10 CFR 835- Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

45

Code of Federal Regulations OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

46

{sup 125}I Measurements for Occupational Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Whenever there is a risk of occupational exposure to dispersible radioactive material, it is necessary to have a monitoring program to assess the effective dose arising from the intake of radionuclides by workers. In this paper we present our experience in bioassay measurements of {sup 125}I in urine samples of workers using high resolution gamma spectrometry. For a 24-hour excretion period, we found activity values of the order of one Bq and estimated the committed effective doses to be less than one {mu}Sv. Although very small, these values led to a re-evaluation and improvement of the laboratory safety conditions. We discuss the calibration procedure followed for the activity measurements, the estimation of the uncertainty in the excreted activity, the calculation of detection and quantification limits and estimation of performance indicators. Aspects regarding the spectral analysis, true coincidence summing and matrix effects are also considered.

Silva, L.; Pinhao, N. R. [Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, ITN-Nuclear and Technological Institute, Estrada Nacional N 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

47

Development of Occupational Exposure Limits for the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

Production of plutonium for the United States’ nuclear weapons program from the 1940’s to the 1980’s generated 53 million gallons of radioactive chemical waste, which is storedin 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern W 18 ashington State. Recent 19 attempts to begin the retrieval and treatment of these wastes require moving the waste to 20 more modern tanks results in potential exposure of the workers to unfamiliar odors 21 emanating from headspace in the tanks. Given the unknown risks involved, workers 22 were placed on supplied air respiratory protection. CH2M HILL, the managers of the 23 Hanford Site Tank Farms, asked an Independent Toxicology Panel (ITP) to assist them in issues relating to an Industrial Hygiene and risk assessment problem. The ITP was called upon to help determine the risk of exposure to vapors from the tanks, and in general develop a strategy for solution of the problem. This paper presents the methods used to determine the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) and the resultant development of screening values and Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for these COPCs. A total of 1,826 chemicals were inventoried and evaluated. Over 1,500 chemicals were identified in the waste tanks headspaces and more than 600 of these were assigned screening values; 72 of these compounds were recommended for AOEL development. Included in this list of 72 were 57 COPCs identified by the ITP and of these 47 were subsequently assigned AOELs. An exhaustive exposure assessment strategy was developed by the CH2M HILL industrial hygiene department to evaluate these COPCs.

Still, Kenneth; Gardner, Donald; Snyder, Robert; Anderson, Thomas; Honeyman, James; Timchalk, Charles

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Using Monte-Carlo simulation for risk assessment: application to occupational exposure during remediation works  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to apply the Monte-Carlo techniques to develop a probabilistic risk assessment. The risk resulting from the occupational exposure during the remediation activities of a uranium tailings disposal, in an abandoned uranium mining ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, occupational exposure, risk and dose assessment, uranium tailings disposal

M. L. Dinis; A. Fiúza

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

50

Effects of prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

Prenatal exposure to ionizing radiation induces some effects that are seen at birth and others that cannot be detected until later in life. Data from A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki show a diminished number of births after exposure under 4 wk of gestational age. Although a wide array of congenital malformations has been found in animal experimentation after such exposure to x rays, in humans only small head size (exposure at 4-17 wk) and mental retardation (exposure primarily at 8-15 wk) have been observed. In Hiroshima, small head size occurred after doses of 0.10-0.19 Gy or more, and an excess of mental retardation at 0.2-0.4 Gy or more. Intelligence test scores were reduced among A-bomb survivors exposed at 8-15 wk of gestational age by 21-29 IQ points per Gy. Other effects of in-utero exposure to atomic radiation include long-lasting complex chromosome abnormalities.

Miller, R.W. (National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (USA))

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) Data Update Presented at the 32nd Annual International Dosimetry and Records Symposium, June 3-6, Scottsdale, AZ  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This slide-show presents the 2012 draft data for DOE occupational radiation exposure, compares those data with last year and the last five years, and clarifies reporting data.

none,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect

The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Submitted Citation: Lewis, A; Long, CM; Peterson, MK; Weatherstone, S; Quick, W; Campleman, S; Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power. Submitted to INT J ENVIRON RES PUBLIC HEALTH. Biomass power plants will increasingly contribute to reaching international energy targets for renewable production of electricity and greenhouse gas emission reductions. Biomass combustors, common in small scale, industrial boiler applications, are being developed for ap...

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

54

10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Authority: 42 U.S.C. 2201; 7191. Source: 58 FR 65485, Dec. 14, 1993, unless otherwise noted. Subpart A-General Provisions 835.1 Scope. (a)...

55

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Main report, draft report for comment. Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s Washington Nuclear Plant Two (WNP-2), including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Revised analyses of decommissioning for the reference boiling water reactor power station. Effects of current regulatory and other considerations on the financial assurance requirements of the decommissioning rule and on estimates of occupational radiation exposure: Appendices, draft report for comment. Volume 2  

SciTech Connect

On June 27, 1988, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) published in the Federal Register (53 FR 24018) the final rule for the General Requirements for Decommissioning Nuclear Facilities. With the issuance of the final rule, owners and operators of licensed nuclear power plants are required to prepare, and submit to the NRC for review, decommissioning plans and cost estimates. The NRC staff is in need of updated bases documentation that will assist them in assessing the adequacy of the licensee submittals, from the viewpoint of both the planned actions, including occupational radiation exposure, and the probable costs. The purpose of this reevaluation study is to update the needed bases documentation. This report presents the results of a review and reevaluation of the PNL 1980 decommissioning study of the Washington Public Power Supply System`s WNP-2, including all identifiable factors and cost assumptions which contribute significantly to the total cost of decommissioning the plant for the DECON, SAFSTOR, and ENTOMB decommissioning alternatives, which now include an initial 5-7 year period during which time the spent fuel is stored in the spent fuel pool prior to beginning major disassembly or extended safe storage of the plant. This report also includes consideration of the NRC requirement that decontamination and decommissioning activities leading to termination of the nuclear license be completed within 60 years of final reactor shutdown, consideration of packaging and disposal requirements for materials whose radionuclide concentrations exceed the limits for Class C low-level waste. Costs for labor, materials, transport, and disposal activities are given in 1993 dollars. Sensitivities of the total license termination cost to the disposal costs at different low-level radioactive waste disposal sites, to different depths of contaminated concrete surface removal within the facilities, and to different transport distances are also examined.

Smith, R.I.; Bierschbach, M.C.; Konzek, G.J. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)] [and others

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)  

SciTech Connect

In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korca etj. The Department of Human and Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

Qafmolla, Luan [Centre of Applied nuclear Physics, Tirana (Albania); Hoxhaj, Enver [University 'Luigj GURAKUQI' Shkoder (Albania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

58

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Radiation Exposure Data Collection  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Overview Argonne Electronic Medical Records System Beryllium Testing and Surveillance Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) U.S. Department of Energy...

59

Radiation Protection at Industrial Radiography in Germany Exposures and Unusual Events  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. In the Federal Republic of Germany safety related events in the use and transportation of radioactive materials as well as in the operation of accelerators are registered. The analysis of these events reveals their causation and allows this conclusions on avoidable errors. In this paper, a special insight is given into events in the field of gamma radiography which is a technical application of ionising radiation for non destructive testing of materials. Conclusions from analysis are drawn. In addition, the occupational radiation exposure of workers is presented taking into account that industrial radiography is performed under particular working conditions with different risks. 1.

Renate Czarwinski; Uwe Häusler; Gerhard Frasch; Bundesamt Für; Strahlenschutz Fachbereich Strahlenschutz Und Gesundheit

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

General. The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Part 835-Occupational Radiation Protection Authority: 42 U.S.C. 2201; 7191  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wednesday Wednesday November 4, 1998 Part III Department of Energy 10 CFR Part 835 Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule 59662 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 213 / Wednesday, November 4, 1998 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 835 [Docket No.: EH-RM-96-835] RIN 1901-AA59 Occupational Radiation Protection AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system of contractually-based nuclear safety standards to regulatory-

62

DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR 835 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION LEARNING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Change No: 1 10 CFR 835 Level: Familiar Date:11/1/08 1 10/1/08 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION FAMILIAR LEVEL ___________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. State the scope of 10 CFR 835. 2. Define the following terms. annual limit on intake bioassay contamination area derived air concentration high contamination area radiation weighting factor 3. State the requirements of the general rule. 4. State the radiation protection program requirements. 5. State the requirements of the internal audit.

63

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to radioactive fallout in Radiation-Associated inIslanders, who were exposed to fallout H-bomb test explosion

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Low Dose Radiation Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects In Vivo.  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects Exposure: Exploring Bystander Effects In Vivo. 1 Blyth, B.J., 1 Sykes, P.J. 1 Department of Haematology and Genetic Pathology, Flinders University and Medical Centre, Bedford Park, South Australia, 5042, The general population is daily exposed to chronic, low doses of ionizing radiation from both natural and artificial sources. The shape of the radiation dose-response curve at these low doses is currently linearly extrapolated from data obtained after high dose exposure due to the low sensitivity of traditional biological assays after near-background exposures. At odds with this Linear No-Threshold model, are the phenomena collectively referred to as the radiation-induced bystander effect. The bystander effect describes a collection of in vitro

65

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits  

SciTech Connect

Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

67

Comparative pharmacokinetic study of the role of gender and developmental differences in occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it shows that physiological differences between men and women result in gender-specific exposures with respect to benzene. Second, it assesses the potential for a lactating woman's occupational and personal benzene exposure to impact a nursing infant's exposure, highlighting the possibility of subjecting an infant to the effects of industrial chemicals via breast feeding. This study employs physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to investigate the influence of physiological parameters and to evaluate the ability of inhaled benzene to transfer from mother to infant through breastmilk. The models are run through scenarios that simulate occupational, smoking, and background exposures. The gender comparison is facilitated by a sensitivity analysis. The blood/air partition coefficient and maximum velocity of metabolism were found to substantially impact model output. These values were both higher in women and caused an increase in the percentage of benzene metabolized in all of the exposure scenarios. The study of lactating women and infants is essentially theoretical. There is evidence that over 65% of an infant's benzene exposure can be attributed to contaminated breastmilk. A large portion of the ingested exposure can be eliminated by adjusting the mother's working or nursing schedule. Benzene, Physiologically based pharmacokinetics, PBPK.

Brown, E.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Health Impacts from Acute Radiation Exposure  

SciTech Connect

Absorbed doses above1-2 Gy (100-200 rads) received over a period of a day or less lead to one or another of the acute radiation syndromes. These are the hematopoietic syndrome, the gastrointestinal (GI) syndrome, the cerebrovascular (CV) syndrome, the pulmonary syndrome, or the cutaneous syndrome. The dose that will kill about 50% of the exposed people within 60 days with minimal medical care, LD50-60, is around 4.5 Gy (450 rads) of low-LET radiation measured free in air. The GI syndrome may not be fatal with supportive medical care and growth factors below about 10 Gy (1000 rads), but above this is likely to be fatal. Pulmonary and cutaneous syndromes may or may not be fatal, depending on many factors. The CV syndrome is invariably fatal. Lower acute doses, or protracted doses delivered over days or weeks, may lead to many other health outcomes than death. These include loss of pregnancy, cataract, impaired fertility or temporary or permanent sterility, hair loss, skin ulceration, local tissue necrosis, developmental abnormalities including mental and growth retardation in persons irradiated as children or fetuses, radiation dermatitis, and other symptoms listed in Table 2 on page 12. Children of parents irradiated prior to conception may experience heritable ill-health, that is, genetic changes from their parents. These effects are less strongly expressed than previously thought. Populations irradiated to high doses at high dose rates have increased risk of cancer incidence and mortality, taken as about 10-20% incidence and perhaps 5-10% mortality per sievert of effective dose of any radiation or per gray of whole-body absorbed dose low-LET radiation. Cancer risks for non-uniform irradiation will be less.

Strom, Daniel J.

2003-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

69

Radiation exposure in X-ray-based imaging techniques used in osteoporosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to low levels of ionizing radiation: BEIR VII Phase 2. TheBlake G, Genant HK (1999) Radiation exposure in bone mineralGuglielmi Thomas M. Link Radiation exposure in X-ray-based

Damilakis, John; Adams, Judith E.; Guglielmi, Giuseppe; Link, Thomas M.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Environmental radiation exposure: Regulation, monitoring, and assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radioactive releases to the environment from nuclear facilities constitute a public health concern. Protecting the public from such releases can be achieved through the establishment and enforcement of regulatory standards. In the United States, numerous standards have been promulgated to regulate release control at nuclear facilities. Most recent standards are more restrictive than those in the past and require that radioactivity levels be as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA). Environmental monitoring programs and radiological dose assessment are means of ensuring compliance with regulations. Environmental monitoring programs provide empirical information on releases, such as the concentrations of released radioactivity in environmental media, while radiological dose assessment provides the analytical means of quantifying dose exposures for demonstrating compliance.

Chen, S.Y.; Yu, C.; Hong, K.J.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atomic Bomb by Radiation Dose, Years Research Research after Survivors, Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1950-71 Exposure, Age,atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki (36), and the Japanese Here, 'here is an The latent age-

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Reducing waste generation and radiation exposure by analytical method modification  

SciTech Connect

The primary goal of an analytical support laboratory has traditionally been to provide accurate data in a timely and cost effective fashion. Added to this goal is now the need to provide the same high quality data while generating as little waste as possible. At the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC), we have modified and reengineered several methods to decrease generated waste and hence reduce radiation exposure. These method changes involved improving detection limits (which decreased the amount of sample required for analysis), decreasing reaction and analysis time, decreasing the size of experimental set-ups, recycling spent solvent and reagents, and replacing some methods. These changes had the additional benefits of reducing employee radiation exposure and exposure to hazardous chemicals. In all cases, the precision, accuracy, and detection limits were equal to or better than the replaced method. Most of the changes required little or no expenditure of funds. This paper describes these changes and discusses some of their applications.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

15TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT Alpha radiation exposure decreases apoptotic cells in zebrafish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

15TH INTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON TOXICITY ASSESSMENT Alpha radiation exposure decreases apoptotic of an adaptive response by the ionizing radiation against sub- sequent exposures to Cd. Keywords Multiple embryos subjected to a priming exposure provided by one environmental stressor (low-dose alpha particles

Yu, K.N.

74

Health Physics Society Specialists in Radiation Safety Radiation Exposure and Pregnancy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Everyone is exposed to radiation every day. People are continuously exposed to low-level radiation found in food, soils, building materials, and the air and from outer space. All of this radiation originates from naturally occurring sources. For example, bananas contain naturally occurring radioactive potassium-40 and air contains radon, a radioactive gas. Your average natural background radiation dose * is about 3.0 mSv (300 mrem) each year (millisieverts and millirem are units of radiation dose, much like a gram or an ounce is a unit of weight). In addition to natural background radiation, you may be exposed to radiation from medical x rays and medical radiation tests or treatments. If you think, or there is a possibility, that you may be pregnant and need a medical x-ray or radiation procedure, the information below will help answer your question “Does a medical procedure involving radiation increase my baby’s health risks?” What are the health risks from medical x rays or radionuclide medical tests performed during pregnancy? There is a lot of reliable information about the effects of radiation exposure during pregnancy. Potential radiation effects vary depending on the fetal stage of development and the magnitude of the doses. Our best knowledge indicates that there is a threshold below which negative effects are not observed. According to the American College of Radiology, routine x rays of a mother’s abdomen, back, hips, and pelvis are not likely to pose a serious risk to the child (ACR/RSNA 2010). However, certain procedures (such as a computerized tomography [CT scan] or a lower GI fluoroscope exam) to the mother’s stomach or hips may give higher doses. If you are administered a radioactive drug (nuclear medicine), radioactivity in your urine or intestines could give a moderate dose to the fetus, and some compounds can cross the placenta *Words in italics are defined in the Glossary on page 3.

Melissa Arch; At Immanuel St. Joseph’s

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Radiation Safety Manual Dec 2012 Page 1 RADIATION SAFETY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Management Commitment B. Training C. Monitoring of Individual Radiation Exposures D. Program Reviews 1 of Radiation A. Research Applications 1. Non-Human User 2. Animal Use 3. Human Use B. Clinical Applications C Materials Chapter VI: Occupational Exposure to Radiation and Personnel Monitoring and Bioassay Program #12;A

Grishok, Alla

76

Implementation guide for use with DOE Order 440.1: Occupational exposure assessment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE O 440.1, Worker Protection Management for DOE Federal and Contractor Employees, establishes the framework for an effective worker protection program that will reduce or prevent accidental injuries and illnesses. One element of the worker protection program in DOE O 440.1 is Exposure Assessment (EA). This Guide provides acceptable methodologies for conducting EA for workers. Exposure assessment should be included in the DOE and contractor written worker protection program, as required by DOE O 440.1. EA documentation should describe the methods and rationale a site uses to characterize and monitor workers` potential and actual exposures to hazardous agents. DOE O 440.1 applies to all activities (including design, construction, operation, maintenance, decontamination and decommissioning, research and development, and environmental restoration activities) performed by DOE and its contractors (and their subcontractors).

NONE

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

77

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

University Abstract The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high...

78

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of the Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ........................................................................................................................1 2.0 Background .................................................................................................................1 3.0 Scope ...........................................................................................................................2 4.0 Results .........................................................................................................................2

79

Monitoring exposure to atomic bomb radiation by somatic mutation  

SciTech Connect

Atomic bomb survivors are a population suitable for studying the relationship between somatic mutation and cancer risk because their exposure doses are relatively well known and their dose responses in terms of cancer risk have also been thoroughly studied. An analysis has been made of erythrocyte glycophorin A (GPA) gene mutations in 1,226 atomic bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The GPA mutation frequency (Mf) increased slightly but significantly with age at the time of measurement and with the number of cigarettes smoked. After adjustment for the effect of smoking, the Mf was significantly higher in males than in females and higher in Hiroshima than in Nagasaki. All of these characteristics of the background GPA Mf were in accord with those of solid tumor incidence obtained from an earlier epidemiological study of A-bomb survivors. Analysis of the dose effect on Mf revealed the doubling dose to be about 1.20 Sv and the minimum dose for detection of a significant increase to be about 0.24 Sv. No significant dose effect for difference in sex, city, or age at the time of bombing was observed. Interestingly, the doubling dose for the GPA Mf approximated that for solid cancer incidence (1.59 Sv). And the minimum dose for detection was not inconsistent with the data for solid cancer incidence. The dose effect was significantly higher in those diagnosed with cancer before or after measurement than in those without a history of cancer. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that somatic mutations are the main cause of excess cancer risk from radiation exposure. 27 refs., 2 figs.

Akiyama, Mitoshi; Kyoizumi, Seishi; Kusunoki, Yoichiro [Radiation Effects Research Foundation, Hiroshima (Japan)] [and others

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Occupational Exposure Evaluation of Complex Vapor Mixtures at the Hanford Nuclear Waste Site, Washington Work-site Vapor Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Extensive sampling and analysis has been done over the years to characterize the radioactive and chemical properties of hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington State. The purpose of these analyses was to evaluate safety and environmental concerns related to tank stability. More recently, characterization studies have broadened to evaluate potential health hazards of chemical vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. The extensive sampling done during this campaign evaluated vapor concentrations of more than 100 different chemical at 70 sites in and around one section of the tank farms. Sampling identified only four vapors (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrosodimethylamine, and nitrosomethylethylamine) that were present above occupational exposure limits. These elevated concentrations were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors were measured above 10% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. This suggests that vapor controls can be focused on limited hazard zones around sources. (authors)

Anderson, T. J. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. / Environmental Health, P.O. Box 1000, S7-70, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Low dose diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice diagnostic radiation exposure and cancer risk in Trp53+/- mice K Taylor, N Phan, ME Cybulski, L Laframboise, DR Boreham Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton ON L8S 4K1 The cancer risk associated with exposure to low doses of ionizing radiation has traditionally been extrapolated from effects observed at high doses and high dose rates using a linear no threshold model. Based on this approach, it has been postulated that human exposure to medical imaging involving low doses of x-rays and gamma rays increase an individual's risk of developing cancer throughout their lifetime. Conversely, there is evidence that low doses of gamma radiation increase the latency period of cancer depending upon genotype, cancer type, and the magnitude of

82

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A- General Provisions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The rules in this part establish radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of DOE activities.

83

REGULATORY GUIDE 8.13 (Draft was issued as DG-8014) INSTRUCTION CONCERNING PRENATAL RADIATION EXPOSURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inspection and Investigations, ” in Section 19.12, “Instructions to Workers, ” requires instruction in “the health protection problems associated with exposure to radiation and/or radioactive material, in precautions or procedures to minimize exposure, and in the purposes and functions of protective devices employed. ” The

unknown authors

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMANEXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION . Jacob I. Fabrikant, MD,Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation, Yale University School of

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the Current State of Radiation Protection Philosophy.Against Pergamon Ionizing Radiation from External Sources,for Protection Against Ionizing Radiation from Supplement to

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

ORISE: Illness and Injury Surveillance, Radiation Exposure, and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Surveillance Data, December 2012 (PDF) Technical Report: Health Surveillance of Rocky Flats Radiation Workers, April 2006 (PDF) Technical Basis Document for the Neutron Dose...

87

Video Camera Use at Nuclear Power Plants: Tools for Increasing Productivity and Reducing Radiation Exposure: Tools for Increasing Pr oductivity and Reducing Radiation Exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear power plants have increased the use of industrial video cameras as support tools for a variety of plant operations and outage tasks. This survey on utility use of video cameras, the equipment being used, and the benefits derived found that the video camera is an important tool for reducing radiation exposure and improving productivity through more efficient use of personnel.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

88

Literature Highlight: Radiation Exposure to the Heart and the Risk of Ischemic Heart Disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, fish, and olive oil.1-4 This diet discourages dairy products, saturated fats, and red meats.1-4 Older have helped to limit radiation exposure to unaffected tissues, radiation expo- sure to the heart may benefit from an -linolenic acid-rich Mediterranean diet which emphasizes bread, fruits, nuts, vegetables

Vonessen, Nikolaus

89

U.S. Department of Energy Summary of 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure (Poster)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster provides graphic data for 2010-2012 of collective total effective dose (TED) by site, and graphical data for 2008-2012 of components of TED, average measurable TED, percentage of collective TED above dose, collective dose and average measurable dose (1974-2012), and numbers of individuals in the DOE workforce, total number of records of monitored individuals, and number of individuals with a measurable dose. Also, there is a table of the number of individuals receiving >2 rems administrative control level and >5 rems annual limit for 2008-2012.

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

90

POSITION STATEMENT DOCUMENTING IONIZING RADIATION EXPOSURE IN THE ELECTRONIC HEALTH RECORD  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IEEE-USA believes that maintaining an accurate record of a patient’s cumulative exposure to ionizing radiation can be of substantial value for clinical, health services management and research purposes. Excessive radiation can cause cancer, skin and bone marrow disease and a variety of other diseases. Radiation exposure can come from a number of sources, both natural and manmade. Over the lifetime of the individual, medical procedures, such as X-rays, Computed Tomography (CT) scans, and isotope radiation therapy, contribute significant radiation dosages. Monitoring the use of radiological procedures, measuring the radiation dose directly, and recording the dose in the Electronic Health Record (EHR) can help assess and reduce the risk posed by excessive radiation while optimizing the diagnostic value of these procedures. With these risks and benefits in mind, IEEE-USA recommends the following: 1. Health Level Seven International (HL7), the global authority responsible for standards for interoperability of health information technology, should add the appropriate "dose object " radiation parameters, as defined in the IHE Radiology Technical Framework Supplement, Radiation Exposure Monitoring (REM), to HL7/CDA format longitudinal electronic health records (EHRs), to create a longitudinal record of a patient's exposure to radiation resulting from medical procedures. These records should note both the procedure and estimated radiation dose from each procedure. 2. The Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONCHIT) should make radiation dose monitoring a part of meaningful use criteria for EHRs. 3. Healthcare accreditation organizations (JCAHO, NCQA and URAC), in collaboration with the American College of Radiologists (ACR), should continue

Adopted The Ieee-usa

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Radiation and Uranium Resources Exposure Control (South Dakota)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The public policy of South Dakota is to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, the proper development of uranium resources, and the control of any associated harmful effects. The disposal of...

92

Risk equivalent of exposure versus dose of radiation  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a risk analysis study of low-dose irradiation and the resulting biological effects on a cell. The author describes fundamental differences between the effects of high-level exposure (HLE) and low-level exposure (LLE). He stresses that the concept of absorbed dose to an organ is not a dose but a level of effect produced by a particular number of particles. He discusses the confusion between a linear-proportional representation of dose limits and a threshold-curvilinear representation, suggesting that a LLE is a composite of both systems. (TEM)

Bond, V.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Assessment of potential radiation exposures by uncontrolled recycle or reuse of radioactive scrap metals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With current waste monitoring technology it is reasonable to assume that much of the material designated as low-level waste, generated within nuclear facilities, is in fact uncontaminated. A criterion for uncontrolled disposal of low-level radioactive contaminated waste is that the radiation exposure of the public and of each individual caused by this disposal is so low that radiation protection measures need not be taken. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) suggests an annual effective dose of 10 {micro}Sv as a limit for the individual radiation dose and derived the initial control levels of residual radioactivity based on the Publication 30 of the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). In 1990, new recommendations on radiation protection standards were developed by ICRP to take into account new biological information related to the detriment associated with radiation exposure. Adoption of these recommendations necessitated a revision of the Commission's secondary limits contained in Publication 30. This study summarizes the potential radiation exposure from valuable scrap metal considered for uncontrolled recycle by new ICRP recommendations. Potential exposure pathways to people were analyzed and concentrations leading to an individual dose of 10 {micro}Sv/year were calculated for 14 key radionuclides. These potential radiation doses are compared with the results of previous study.

Lee, S.Y.; Lee, K.J.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Body radiation exposure in breast cancer radiotherapy: Impact of breast IMRT and virtual wedge compensation techniques  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: Recent reports demonstrate a dramatically increased rate of secondary leukemia for breast cancer patients receiving adjuvant high-dose anthracycline and radiotherapy, and that radiation is an independent factor for the development of leukemia. This study aimed to evaluate the radiation body exposure during breast radiotherapy and to characterize the factors associated with an increased exposure. Patients and Methods: In a prospective cohort of 120 women, radiation measurements were taken from four sites on the body at the time of adjuvant breast radiotherapy. Multiple regression analysis was performed to analyze patient and treatment factors associated with the amount of scattered radiation. Results: For standard 50 Gy breast radiotherapy, the minimal dose received by abdominal organs is on average 0.45 Gy, ranging from 0.06 to 1.55 Gy. The use of physical wedges as a compensation technique was the most significant factor associated with increased scattered dose (p < 0.001), resulting in approximately three times more exposure compared with breast intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and dynamic wedge. Conclusions: The amount of radiation that is scattered to a patient's body is consistent with exposure reported to be associated with excess of leukemia. In accordance with the As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) principle, we recommend using breast IMRT or virtual wedging for the radiotherapy of breast cancer receiving high-dose anthracycline chemotherapy.

Woo, Tony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pignol, Jean-Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)]. E-mail: Jean-Philippe.Pignol@sw.ca; Rakovitch, Eileen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Vu, Toni [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Hicks, Deanna [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); O'Brien, Peter [Department of Medical Physics, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Pritchard, Kathleen [Department of Medical Oncology, Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Light scattering apparatus and method for determining radiation exposure to plastic detectors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved system and method of analyzing cumulative radiation exposure registered as pits on track etch foils of radiation dosimeters. The light scattering apparatus and method of the present invention increases the speed of analysis while it also provides the ability to analyze exposure levels beyond that which may be properly measured with conventional techniques. Dosimeters often contain small plastic sheets that register accumulated damage when exposed to a radiation source. When the plastic sheet from the dosimeter is chemically etched, a track etch foil is produced wherein pits or holes are created in the plastic. The number of these pits, or holes, per unit of area (pit density) correspond to the amount of cumulative radiation exposure which is being optically measured by the apparatus. To measure the cumulative radiation exposure of a track etch foil a high intensity collimated beam is passed through foil such that the pits and holes within the track etch foil cause a portion of the impinging light beam to become scattered upon exit. The scattered light is focused with a lens, while the primary collimated light beam (unscattered light) is blocked. The scattered light is focused by the lens onto an optical detector capable of registering the optical power of the scattered light which corresponds to the cumulative radiation to which the track etch foil has been exposed.

Hermes, Robert E. (White Rock, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Increased radiation dose at mammography due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening  

SciTech Connect

Four single-emulsion films introduced over the past 2 years--Du Pont Microvision, Fuji MiMa, Konica CM, and Eastman Kodak OM--were compared with Eastman Kodak OM SO-177 (Min-RE) film to evaluate their varying effects on mean glandular dose of reciprocity law failure due to prolonged exposure, delayed processing, and increased film darkening as a result of increased radiation exposure to improve penetration of glandular tissue. Exposures over 1.3 seconds led to increased radiation doses of 20%-30%. Delays in processing of 6 hours decreased processing speed by 11%-32% for all films except Du Pont Microvision. Optical density increases of 0.40 required 20%-30% more skin exposure for all five films. Optimal viewing densities were also evaluated and found to be different for each of the five films. Mammographers need to be aware of these differences in mammographic films to achieve maximum contrast at mammography.

Kimme-Smith, C.; Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.; Chow, S. (UCLA Medical Center (USA))

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Exposure to ionizing radiation in the emergency department from commonly performed portable radiographs  

SciTech Connect

To accurately assess the potential hazard of exposure to ionizing radiation from portable radiographs taken in the emergency department, a study was performed to measure such radiation at different distances from the edge of an irradiated field during portable cervical-spine (pC-S), portable chest radiograph (pCXR), and portable anteroposterior-pelvis (pAP-pelvis) radiographs. For all three types of portable radiographs, radiation exposure is a function of distance from the beam. However, at 40 cm (15 inches) away from the beam during a pC-S or pCXR and at 160 cm (63 inches) from a pAP-pelvis film, exposure is minimal. At these distances one would need to be exposed to more than 1,200 such radiographs to equal background environmental ionizing radiation. Medical personnel should not have to leave a patient care area for fear of undue acute and chronic radiation exposure while portable radiographs are performed in the ED. By using protective garments and standing appropriate distances away from the patient, continuous patient care can be maintained while portable radiographs are taken in the ED.

Grazer, R.E.; Meislin, H.W.; Westerman, B.R.; Criss, E.A.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

cadwallader, lee

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Measurement of environmental radiation exposure rates from Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland area shores. Addendum 1  

SciTech Connect

Environmental radiation exposure rate measurements are taken on and around the Hanford Site for Pacific Northwest Laboratory`s Hanford Site Surface Environmental Surveillance Project. In 1992, environmental radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from shoreline and island areas ranging from Vernita, along the Hanford Reach, down to the Richland Pumphouse. Measurements were taken primarily at locations known or expected to have elevated exposure rates as determined by examination of aerial photographs depicting radiation exposure measurements. Results from the 1992 survey indicated radiation exposure rates taken from the Hanford Reach area were elevated in comparison to the measurements taken from the Vernita area with ranges of 8 to 28 {mu}R/hr and 4 to 11 {mu}R/hr, respectively. In January 1994, additional shoreline radiation exposure rate measurements were taken from the Vernita, Hanford Reach, and Richland areas to determine the relationship of radiation exposure rates along the Richland area shores when compared to Vernita and Hanford Reach area exposure rates (measurements along the Richland area were not collected during the 1992 survey). This report discusses the 1994 results and is an addendum to the report that discussed the 1992 survey. An analysis of variance indicated a significant location interaction at a p-value of 0.0014. To determine differences between paried locations a post-hoc comparison of location means was performed on log transformed data using the Scheff{acute e}`s F-test. This test indicated a significant difference between Hanford Reach and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.075 /{mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.0014. No significant difference was found between Hanford Reach and Vernita area means: The mean difference was 0.031 {mu}R/hr and the p-value was 0.3138. No significant difference was found between Vernita and Richland area means with a mean difference of 0.044 {mu}R/hr and a p-value of 0.1155.

Cooper, A.T.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

EPIDEMIOLOGICAL STUDIES ON RADIATION CARCINOGENESIS IN HUMAN POPULATIONS FOLLOWING ACUTE EXPOSURE: NUCLEAR EXPLOSIONS AND MEDICAL RADIATION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Atomic Bomb Radiation Effects Life Span Study Report 8.reports derive mainly from the epidemiological studies of the Japanese atomic bomb

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

On the Use of SRIM/TRIM for Computing Radiation Damage Exposure  

SciTech Connect

The SRIM (formerly TRIM) Monte Carlo simulation code is widely used to compute a number of parameters relevant to ion beam implantation and ion beam processing of materials. It also has the capability to compute a common radiation damage exposure unit known as atomic displacements per atom (dpa). Since dpa is a standard measure of primary radiation damage production, most researchers who employ ion beams as a tool for inducing radiation damage in materials use SRIM to determine the dpa associated with their irradiations. The use of SRIM for this purpose has been evaluated and comparisons with an internationally-recognized standard definition of dpa, as well as more detailed atomistic simulations of atomic displacement cascades have been made. Differences between the standard and SRIM-based dpa are discussed and recommendations for future usage of SRIM in radiation damage studies are made.

Stoller, Roger E [ORNL; Toloczko, M [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Was, Gary [University of Michigan; Certain, Alicia [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Dwaraknath, Shyam [University of Michigan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

A significantly joint effect between arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of urothelial carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cigarette smoking, arsenic and occupational exposures are well-known risk factors for the development of urothelial carcinoma (UC). Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures on risk of UC could be modified by genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 2E1 and glutathione S-transferase omega. A hospital-based case-control study consisted of 520 histologically confirmed UC cases, and 520 age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls were carried out from September 1998 to December 2007. Genotyping of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Subjects with both of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have a significantly increased UC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9-4.4). Significantly increased UC risks of 1.5 and 1.9 were found for study subjects with high arsenic exposure and those who have been exposed to two or more occupational exposures, respectively. A significantly increased UC risk of 3.9 was observed in study subjects with H2-H2 diplotype of GSTO1 and GSTO2. The significantly highest UC risk of 9.0 was found for those with all environmental risk factors of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and two or more risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2. Our findings suggest that a significantly joint effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of UC was found.

Wang, Y.-H. [School of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Yeh, S.-D. [Department of Urology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Shen, K.-H. [Department of Urology, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan 710, Taiwan (China); Shen, Cheng-Huang [Department of Urology, Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chia-Yi 600, Taiwan (China); Juang, G.-D. [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Hsu, L.-I [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chiou, H.-Y., E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.t [School of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-J. [The Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

Comparison of radon fluxes with gamma-radiation exposure rates and soil /sup 226/Ra concentrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radon fluxes and contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates were measured at the grid points of rectangular grids on three properties in Edgemont, South Dakota that were known to have deposits of residual radioactivity relatively near to the surface. The coefficient of determination, r/sup 2/, between the radon fluxes and the contact gamma-radiation-exposure rates varied from 0.89 to 0.31 for the three properties. The property having the highest fluxes and residual radioactivity of relatively uniform depth showed the highest correlation between fluxes and exposure rates, and the property having residual radioactivity that varied considerably in depth showed the lowest. Correlations between fluxes and /sup 226/Ra concentrations measured in boreholes that varied in depth from 60 to 195 cm were lower than those between fluxes and exposure rates, indicating that exposure rates are better than /sup 226/Ra measurements for detecting elevated radon fluxes from near-surface deposits. Measurements made on one property at two different times indicated that if the average flux were determined from a large number (40) of measurements at one time, the average flux at a later time could be estimated from a few measurements using the assumption that the change in the flux at individual locations will be equal to the change in the average flux. Flux measurements around two buildings showing elevated indoor radon-daughter concentrations, but around which no residual radioactivity had been discovered by /sup 226/Ra and gamma-radiation measurements, provided no clear indication of the presence of such material, possibly because none was present.

Young, J.A.; Thomas, V.W.

1984-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Individual Radiation Exposure Dose Due to Support Activities at Safe Shelters in Fukushima Prefecture  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Immediately after the accidents in the nuclear power stations in Fukushima on March 11, the Japanese Government ordered the evacuation of the residents within a 20-km radius from the station on March 12, and asked various institutions to monitor the contamination levels of the residents. Hirosaki University, which is located 355 km north of Fukushima City, decided to send support staff to Fukushima. This report summarizes the results of the exposure of 13 individual teams from March 15 to June 20. The support teams surveyed more than 5,000 people during this period. Almost all subjects had external contamination levels of less than 13 kcpm on Geiger-Müller (GM) survey meter, which is categorized as ‘‘no contamination level.’ ’ The 1 st team showed the highest external exposure dose, but the 4 th team onward showed no significant change. Subsequently, the internal radiation exposure was measured using a whole body counter that indicated undetectable levels in all staff members. Although the measured external radiation exposure dose cannot have serious biological effects on the health of an individual, a follow-up study of the residents in Fukushima and other regions where

Satoru Monzen; Masahiro Hosoda; Shinji Tokonami; Minoru Osanai; Hironori Yoshino; Mitsuaki A. Yoshida; Masatoshi Yamada; Yasushi Asari; Kei Satoh; Ikuo Kashiwakura

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Agencies with Radiation Regulatory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Agencies with Radiation Regulatory Concerns and Involvement Biological Effects of Low Level Exposures (BELLE) Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission Center for Risk Excellence Health Protection Agency The Health Risks of Extraterrestrial Environments International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements, Inc. International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) International Radiation Protection Association (IRPA) NASA Space Radiation Program National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Nuclear and Radiation Studies Board National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA OBRR Task Book Publication National Council on Radiation Protection (NCRP) National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS) National Toxicology Program (NTP) Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA)

106

Radiation dose reconstruction US occupation forces in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, 1945-1946. Final report 1 March-6 August 80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper limit dose estimates (internal and external) are determined for those units of the U.S. occupation forces assigned to Hiroshima or Nagasaki following the detonations of atomic weapons in those two cities. In the absence of specific maneuver and patrol data, these dose estimates are based on the maximum recorded activity levels with exposure over the entire stay period for each unit. The upper limit external dose is .03 rem for Hiroshima and .08 rem for Nagasaki. For the Nishiyama area, the upper limit is 0.63 rem. The dose from internal emitters (inhalation and ingestion) is considerably less. There is no basis for assuming that any individual in the occupation units received these upper limit doses.

McRaney, W.; McGahan, J.

1980-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effects of radiation exposure on SRL 131 composition glass in a steam environment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Monoliths of SRL 131 borosilicate glass were irradiated in a saturated air-steam environment, at temperatures of 150{degree}C, to examine the effects of radiation on nuclear waste glass behavior. Half of the tests used actinide and Tc-99 doped glass and were exposed to an external ionizing gamma source, while the remaining glass samples were doped only with uranium and were reacted without any external radiation exposure. The effects of radiation exposure on glass alteration and secondary phase formation were determined by comparing the reaction rates and mineral paragenesis of the two sets of samples. All glass samples readily reacted with the water that condensed on their surfaces, producing a smectite clay layer within the first three days of testing. Additional crystalline phases precipitated on the altered glass surface with increasing reaction times, including zeolites, smectite, calcium and sodium silicates, phosphates, evaporitic salts, and uranyl silicates. Similar phases were produced on both the nonirradiated and irradiated samples; however, the quantity of precipitates was increased and the rate of paragenetic sequence development was accelerated in the latter. After 56 days of testing, the smectite layer developed at an average rate of {approximately}0.16 and 0.63 {mu}m/day for the nonirradiated and irradiated samples, respectively. These comparisons indicate that layer development is accelerated approximately four-fold due to the radiation exposure at high glass surface area/liquid volume (SA/V) conditions. This increase apparently occurs in response to the rapid concentration of radiolytic products, including nitric acid, in the thin films of water contacting the sample monoliths.

Wronkiewicz, D.J.; Bradley, C.R.; Bates, J.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Wang, L.M. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Geology

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Review of exposure limits and experimental data for corneal and lenticular damage from short pulsed UV and IR laser radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for publication 30 October 2007; published 22 April 2008 Laser exposure limits as promulgated by the International at the international level by ICNIRP the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection.1,2 OtherReview of exposure limits and experimental data for corneal and lenticular damage from short pulsed

109

Limitations and Problems in Deriving Risk Estimates for Low-level Radiation Exposure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Some of the problems in determining the cancer risk of low-level radiation from studies of exposed groups are reviewed and applied to the study of Hanford workers by Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale. Problems considered are statistical limitations, variation of cancer rates with geography and race, the "healthy worker effect, " calendar year and age variation of cancer mortality, choosing from long lists, use of proportional mortality rates, cigarette smoking-cancer correlations, use of averages to represent data distributions, ignoring other data, and correlations between radiation exposure and other factors that may cause cancer. The current status of studies of the Hanford workers is reviewed. There have been several papers in recent years purporting to give evidence that low level radiation (- 10 rad) is more dangerous than indicated by conventional estimates like those of the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) [1], the United Nations Scientific Committee on Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) [21, and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) [3]. The best known of these is the study by Mancuso, Stewart, and Kneale [4] (hereafter referred to as MSK) on workers at the

Bernard L. Cohen; D. Sc

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Measuring Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement Activity SI Units and Prefixes Conversions Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration...

111

Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

Lee Cadwallader

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

112

Carcinogenesis and low-level ionizing radiation with special reference to lung cancer and exposure to radon daughters  

SciTech Connect

Of the important health effects of ionizing radiation, three important late effects - carcinogenesis, teratogenesis and mutagenesis are of greatest concern. This is because any exposure, even at low levels, carries some risk of such deleterious effects. As the dose of radiation increases above very low levels, the risk of health effects increases. Cancer-induction is the most important late somatic effect of low-dose ionizing radiation. Solid cancers, rather than leukemia, are principal late effects in exposed individuals. Tissues vary greatly in their susceptibility to radiation carcinogenesis. The most frequently occurring radiation-induced cancers in man include, in decreasing order of susceptibility: the female breast, the thyroid gland, the blood-forming tissues, the lung, certain organs of the gastrointestinal tract, and the bones. A number of biological and physical factors affect the cancer risk, such as age, sex, life-style, LET, and RBE. Despite uncertainty about low-level radiation risks, regulatory and advisory bodies must set standards for exposure, and individuals need information to be able to make informed judgments for themselves. From the point of view of the policy maker, the overriding concern is the fact that small doses of radiation can cause people to have more cancers than would otherwise be expected. While concern for all radiation effects exists, our human experience is limited to cancer-induction in exposed populations. This discussion is limited to cancer risk estimation and decision-making in relation to the health effects on populations of exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation. Here, low-level radiation will refer to yearly whole-body doses up to 5 rems or 0.05 Sv, or to cumulative doses up to 50 rems or 0.5 Sv from low-LET radiation and from high-LET radiation. (ERB)

Fabrikant, J.I.

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Solar Radiation and Tidal Exposure as Environmental Drivers of Enhalus acoroides Dominated Seagrass  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There is strong evidence of a global long-term decline in seagrass meadows that is widely attributed to anthropogenic activity. Yet in many regions, attributing these changes to actual activities is difficult, as there exists limited understanding of the natural processes that can influence these valuable ecosystem service providers. Being able to separate natural from anthropogenic causes of seagrass change is important for developing strategies that effectively mitigate and manage anthropogenic impacts on seagrass, and promote coastal ecosystems resilient to future environmental change. The present study investigated the influence of environmental and climate related factors on seagrass biomass in a large solar radiation. This study documents how natural long-term tidal variability can influence long-term seagrass dynamics. Exposure to desiccation, high UV, and daytime temperature regimes are discussed as the likely mechanisms for the action of these factors in causing this decline. The results emphasise the importance of understanding and assessing natural environmentally-driven change when

Richard K. F. Unsworth; Michael A. Rasheed; Kathryn M. Chartr; Anthony J. Roelofs

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Workshop Report on Atomic Bomb Dosimetry--Residual Radiation Exposure: Recent Research and Suggestions for Future Studies  

SciTech Connect

There is a need for accurate dosimetry for studies of health effects in the Japanese atomic bomb survivors because of the important role that these studies play in worldwide radiation protection standards. International experts have developed dosimetry systems, such as the Dosimetry System 2002 (DS02), which assess the initial radiation exposure to gamma rays and neutrons but only briefly consider the possibility of some minimal contribution to the total body dose by residual radiation exposure. In recognition of the need for an up-to-date review of the topic of residual radiation exposure in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, recently reported studies were reviewed at a technical session at the 57th Annual Meeting of the Health Physics Society in Sacramento, California, 22-26 July 2012. A one-day workshop was also held to provide time for detailed discussion of these newer studies and to evaluate their potential use in clarifying the residual radiation exposures to the atomic-bomb survivors at Hiroshima and Nagasaki. Suggestions for possible future studies are also included in this workshop report.

none,

2013-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

115

Occupational Injuries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injuries Injuries Jacqueline Agnew, PhD Burden of Occupational Injury and Illness in U.S. * Study by Leigh et al., 1997 * Estimated incidence, mortality, direct & indirect costs- occupational injury & illness * 1992 data- primary and secondary sources o Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries o National Traumatic Occupational Fatality Study o Annual Survey of Occ. Injuries & Illnesses o Bureau of Labor Statistics, Health Care Financing Administration, etc. Direct & Indirect Costs * Indirect * Lost earnings * Fringe benefits * Home production * Training, restaffing, disruption * Time delays Direct & Indirect Costs * Direct * Physicians, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation, medication * Medical and indemnity insurance administration expenses

116

Effective Personnel Exposure Control in Shortened Refueling Outages: Final Report: Review of Remote Monitoring Systems in Radiation Protection Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Remote monitoring technology (RMT) significantly enhances worker protection and reduces worker radiation exposure, particularly during shortened refueling outages. This report provides a brief description of the hardware and features of remote monitoring systems, then focuses on nuclear plant experiences in applying such systems for enhanced radiation protection. It also discusses EPRI's RMT research program and formation of the RMT Working Group to support research in this area. Such information will gr...

2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

117

Radiation Risk from Chronic Low Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: The Role of Life-Time Animal Studies - Workshop October 2005  

SciTech Connect

As a part of Radiation research conference, a workshop was held on life-long exposure studies conducted in the course of irradiation experiements done at Argonne National Laboratory between 1952-1992. A recent review article documents many of the issues discussed at that workshop.

Gayle Woloschak

2009-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Out-of-Field Cell Survival Following Exposure to Intensity-Modulated Radiation Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Purpose: To determine the in-field and out-of-field cell survival of cells irradiated with either primary field or scattered radiation in the presence and absence of intercellular communication. Methods and Materials: Cell survival was determined by clonogenic assay in human prostate cancer (DU145) and primary fibroblast (AGO1552) cells following exposure to different field configurations delivered using a 6-MV photon beam produced with a Varian linear accelerator. Results: Nonuniform dose distributions were delivered using a multileaf collimator (MLC) in which half of the cell population was shielded. Clonogenic survival in the shielded region was significantly lower than that predicted from the linear quadratic model. In both cell lines, the out-of-field responses appeared to saturate at 40%-50% survival at a scattered dose of 0.70 Gy in DU-145 cells and 0.24 Gy in AGO1522 cells. There was an approximately eightfold difference in the initial slopes of the out-of-field response compared with the {alpha}-component of the uniform field response. In contrast, cells in the exposed part of the field showed increased survival. These observations were abrogated by direct physical inhibition of cellular communication and by the addition of the inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitor aminoguanidine known to inhibit intercellular bystander effects. Additional studies showed the proportion of cells irradiated and dose delivered to the shielded and exposed regions of the field to impact on response. Conclusions: These data demonstrate out-of-field effects as important determinants of cell survival following exposure to modulated irradiation fields with cellular communication between differentially irradiated cell populations playing an important role. Validation of these observations in additional cell models may facilitate the refinement of existing radiobiological models and the observations considered important determinants of cell survival.

Butterworth, Karl T., E-mail: k.butterworth@qub.ac.u [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); McGarry, Conor K. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Trainor, Colman [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); O'Sullivan, Joe M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Clinical Oncology, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Hounsell, Alan R. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Radiotherapy Physics, Northern Ireland Cancer Centre, Belfast Health and Social Care Trust, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom); Prise, Kevin M. [Centre for Cancer Research and Cell Biology, Queen's University Belfast, Belfast, Northern Ireland (United Kingdom)

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Medical Surveillance in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Occupational in Occupational Health Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM The Johns Hopkins UniversHy Bloomberg School of Public Health + Compliance with legal requirements + Early detection (preclinical) and therapy - many established occupational diseases are not curable + Prevention of disease in co-worlexposure controls + Detect previously unrecognized heaHh effects . l e s of Suroeilltmce + Condition of interest should be an important heaHh problem * Accepted treatment available when adverse health effect or disease diagnosed (may be cessation of exposure in occupational disease) * Suitable & acceptable test available + Early or latent stage to screen for

120

An evaluation of theories concerning the health effects of low-dose radiation exposures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The danger of high, acute doses of radiation is well documented, but the effects of low-dose radiation below 100 mSv is still heavily debated. Four theories concerning the effects of lowdose radiation are presented here: ...

Wei, Elizabeth J. (Elizabeth Jay)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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121

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program - Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) Part 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection,' establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (on-site or off-site) U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration off-site projects. This NTS RPP promulgates the radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for occupational exposure to ionizing radiation resulting from NNSA/NSO activities at the NTS and other operational areas as stated in 10 CFR 835.1(a). NNSA/NSO activities (including design, construction, operation, and decommissioning) within the scope of this RPP may result in occupational exposures to radiation or radioactive material. Therefore, a system of control is implemented through specific references to the site-specific NV/YMP RCM. This system of control is intended to ensure that the following criteria are met: (1) occupational exposures are maintained as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA), (2) DOE's limiting values are not exceeded, (3) employees are aware of and are prepared to cope with emergency conditions, and (4) employees are not inadvertently exposed to radiation or radioactive material.

Radiological Control Managers' Council

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 7  

SciTech Connect

The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in the continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This is volume 7 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected from proceedings of technical meetings and conferences, journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges from use of robotics to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 7 contains 293 abstract, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 7. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

Kaurin, D.G.; Khan, T.A.; Sullivan, S.G.; Baum, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Occupational dose reduction at nuclear power plants: Annotated bibliography of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA. Volume 8  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ALARA Center at Brookhaven National Laboratory publishes a series of bibliographies of selected readings in radiation protection and ALARA in a continuing effort to collect and disseminate information on radiation dose reduction at nuclear power plants. This volume 8 of the series. The abstracts in this bibliography were selected form proceedings of technical meetings and conference journals, research reports, and searches of the Energy Science and Technology database of the US Department of Energy. The subject material of these abstracts relates to the many aspects of radiation protection and dose reduction, and ranges form use of robotics, to operational health physics, to water chemistry. Material on the design, planning, and management of nuclear power stations is included, as well as information on decommissioning and safe storage efforts. Volume 8 contains 232 abstracts, an author index, and a subject index. The author index is specific for this volume. The subject index is cumulative and lists all abstract numbers from volumes 1 to 8. The numbers in boldface indicate the abstracts in this volume; the numbers not in boldface represent abstracts in previous volumes.

Sullivan, S.G.; Khan, T.A.; Xie, J.W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Analysis of radiation exposure for additional naval personnel at Operation CASTLE - supplemental report. Technical report, 24 Apr-20 Nov 89  

SciTech Connect

This report supplements DNA-TR-84-6 by analyzing the radiation exposure for typical crewmembers of eight additional ships at Operation CASTLE in 1954: RECLAIMER, SHEA, COCOPA, MENDER, MOLALA, TAWAKONI, PC-1546, and LST-1146. Utilizing the reconstructed radiation environments from deck contamination, water shine, proximate ship shine, and contaminated hulls and piping, equivalent film badge doses are calculated and compared with analyzed film badge dosimetry. Comparisons are hampered by a shortage of badge readings and by cohort badging that may have emphasized non-representative crew activities. Considering this, agreement is good (within a few hundred millirem) when doses were high but less when doses were low. In all cases, overall totals appear to be in excellent agreement.

Thomas, C.; Geotz, J.; Klemm, J.; Ortlieb, E.

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Estimation of Internal Radiation Dose from both Immediate Releases and Continued Exposures to Contaminated Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A brief description is provided of the basic concepts related to 'internal dose' and how it differs from doses that result from radioactive materials and direct radiation outside of the body. The principles of radiation dose reconstruction, as applied to both internal and external doses, is discussed based upon a recent publication prepared by the US National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Finally, ideas are introduced related to residual radioactive contamination in the environment that has resulted from the releases from the damaged reactors and also to the management of wastes that may be generated in both regional cleanup and NPP decommissioning.

Napier, Bruce A.

2012-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

126

The risk equivalent of an exposure to-, versus a dose of radiation  

SciTech Connect

The long-term potential carcinogenic effects of low-level exposure (LLE) are addressed. The principal point discussed is linear, no-threshold dose-response curve. That the linear no-threshold, or proportional relationship is widely used is seen in the way in which the values for cancer risk coefficients are expressed - in terms of new cases, per million persons exposed, per year, per unit exposure or dose. This implies that the underlying relationship is proportional, i.e., ''linear, without threshold''. 12 refs., 9 figs., 1 tab.

Bond, V.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Personal Experience Reducing Radiation Exposures: Protecting Family in Kiev during the First Two Weeks after Chernobyl  

SciTech Connect

The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident occurred in 1986. The plume from the explosions and fires was highly radioactive and resulted in very high exposure levels in the surrounding regions. This paper describes how the people in Kiev, Ukraine, a city 90 miles (120 km) south of Chernobyl, and in particular one individual in that city, Professor Vitaly Eremenko, became aware of the threat before the official announcement and the steps he took to mitigate potential impacts to his immediate family. The combination of being informed and using available resources led to greatly reduced consequences for his family and, in particular, his newborn granddaughter. He notes how quickly word of some aspects of the hazard spread in the city and how other aspects appear to not have been understood. Although these events are being recalled as the 20th anniversary of the terrible event approaches, the lessons are still pertinent today. Threats of possible terrorist use of radiation dispersal devices makes knowledge of effective individual actions for self-protection from radiation exposures a topic of current interest.

Eremenko, Vitaly A.; Droppo, James G.

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Thyroid cancer in the Marshallese: relative risk of short-lived internal emitters and external radiation exposure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a study of the comparative effects of internal versus external irradiation of the thyroid in young people, we determined that the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times less thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. We determined this finding for a group of 85 Marshall Islands children, who were less than 10 years of age at the time of exposure and who were accidentially exposed to internal and external thyroid radiation at an average level of 1400 rad. The external risk coefficient ranged between 2.5 and 4.9 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk, and thus, from our computations, the internal risk coefficient for the Marshallese children was estimated to range between 1.0 and 1.4 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk. In contrast, for individual more than 10 years of age at the time of exposure, the dose from internal irradiation of the thyroid with short-lived internal emitters produced several times more thyroid cancer than did the same dose of radiation given externally. The external risk coefficients for the older age groups were reported in the literature to be in the range of 1.0 to 3.3 cancers per million person-rad-years-at risk. We computed internal risk coefficients of 3.3 to 8.1 cancers per million person-rad-years at risk for adolescent and adult groups. This higher sensitivity to cancer induction in the exposed adolescents and adults, is different from that seen in other exposed groups. 14 refs., 8 tabs.

Lessard, E.T.; Brill, A.B.; Adams, W.H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

How to Detect Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How to Detect Radiation How to Survey Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Detection How...

130

RADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 2. RADIATION EXPOSURE CONTROL . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 2.2.2. Internal ExposureRADIATION SAFETY OFFICE UNIVERSITYOF MARYLAND RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL UNIVERSITY OF MARYLAND

Rubloff, Gary W.

131

Method and apparatus for reducing radiation exposure through the use of infrared data transmission  

SciTech Connect

A method and apparatus is described for transmitting information, for exae, dosimetry data from a hazardous environment such as a radioactive area to a remote relatively safe location. A radiation detector senses the radiation and generates an electrical signal which is fed as a binary coded decimal signal to an infrared transmitter having a microprocessor. The microprocessor formats the detected information into digits of data and modulates a 40 kHz oscillator, the output of which is fed to and intensity modulates one or more infrared emitting diodes. The infrared signal from the diodes is transmitted to a portable hand-held infrared receiver remote from the hazardous environment. The receiver includes an infrared sensitive diode which decodes the data and generates an electrical signal which is coupled to a microcomputer. The microcomputer synchronizes itself to the transmitter, reads the digits of data as they are received, sums the digits and compares the sum with a checksum signal generated and transmitted from the transmitter. If a match of the checksum signals exists, the received data is displayed, otherwise it is described and the receiver conditions itself for the next transmission of data.

Austin, Frank S. (Schaghticoke, NY); Hance, Albert B. (Schenectady, NY)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Direct Hire Occupations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Critical Shortage Occupational Coverage: ... General Engineer; 0803 – Safety Engineer; 0804 ... Mechanical Engineer; 0840 – Nuclear Engineer; 0850 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

133

Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed. (auth)

Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Linking Environmental Exposures to Health Effects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

studies conducted by his group, including occupational and environmental exposures to benzene and other VOCs and air levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons following the World...

135

Cell Type-dependent Gene Transcription Profile in Three Dimensional Human Skin Tissue Model Exposed to Low Doses of Ionizing Radiation: Implications for Medical Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The concern over possible health risks from exposures to low doses of ionizing radiation has been driven largely by the increase in medical exposures, the routine implementation of X-ray backscatter devices for airport security screening, and, most recently, the nuclear incident in Japan. Due to a paucity of direct epidemiological data at very low doses, cancer risk must be estimated from high dose exposure scenarios. However, there is increasing evidence that low and high dose exposures result in different signaling events and may have different mechanisms of cancer induction. We have examined the radiation induced temporal response of an in vitro three dimensional (3D) human skin tissue model using microarray-based transcriptional profiling. Our data shows that exposure to 100 mGy of X-rays is sufficient to affect gene transcription. Cell type specific analysis showed significant changes in gene expression with the levels of > 1400 genes altered in the dermis and > 400 genes regulated in the epidermis. The two cell types rarely exhibited overlapping responses at the mRNA level. Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) measurements validated the microarray data in both regulation direction and value. Key pathways identified relate to cell cycle regulation, immune responses, hypoxia, reactive oxygen signaling, and DNA damage repair. We discuss in particular the role of proliferation and emphasizing how the disregulation of cellular signaling in normal tissue may impact progression towards radiation induced secondary diseases.

Freiin von Neubeck, Claere H.; Shankaran, Harish; Karin, Norman J.; Kauer, Paula M.; Chrisler, William B.; Wang, Xihai; Robinson, Robert J.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Sowa, Marianne B.

2012-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

136

Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility  

SciTech Connect

Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell migration of primary endothelial cells upon low LET radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell SHP-2 tyrosine phosphate-dependent focal adhesion kinase mediated cell migration of primary endothelial cells upon low LET radiation exposure Xiangpeng Zheng, 1 Sumathy Mohan, 3 and Mohan Natarajan 1,2 Departments of 1 Otolaryngology, 2 Radiation Oncology, and 3 Pathology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78229 The influence and mechanism of low LET radiation exposure on wound healing process is not yet fully understood. Based on the vital role of endothelial cells in migration and wound healing, this study investigated the response of endothelial cells to low-dose irradiation and the underlying mechanism. A wound was inflicted in the confluent monolayer of primary vascular endothelial cells exposing a cell-free zone on the plate. The cells were then exposed

138

PROCEEDINGS Open Access Occupational cancer in developed countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of occupational exposures have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. About one third of the factors identified as definite or probable human carcinogens were first investigated in the workplace and these exposures exact a considerable toll on working populations. There are many additional workplace exposures that are suspect carcinogens that require further evaluation to ensure a safe work environment. Information from occupational investigations is also relevant to the general population because many occupational exposures can be found outside the workplace. Much of our understanding about occupational cancer has been obtained from studies largely composed of white men in developed countries. The movement of industry from developed to developing countries underscores the need for future investigations to include more diverse populations. What do we know? Studies of exposures in the workplace have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs on the Evaluation of

Aaron Blair; Loraine Marrett; Laura Beane Freeman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Occupational Medicine - Occupational Medicine Guiding Principles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the President's Fiscal Year 2011 Budget and Performance Plans" (June 11, 2009) DOE Human Capital Strategic Plan For additional information regarding the Occupational...

140

Occupational hazards associated with geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure to noise, H{sub 2}S, NH/sub 3/, hazardous chemicals and wastes, and heat are the major occupational health hazards associated with geothermal energy development - from drilling to power production. Exposures to these agents, although not unique to geothermal energy development, occur in situations peculiar to the industry. Reports show that occupational illnesses associated with geothermal energy development are increasing, while the corresponding rates from all power production are decreasing. Most of those related to geothermal energy result from the H{sub 2}S-abatement systems used in response to environmental pollution regulations.

Hahn, J.L.

1979-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Estimates of Radiation Exposures for Human Crews in Deep Space from the January 15, 2005, Solar Energetic Particle Event Using the Earth-Moon-Mars Radiation Environment Module  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Special Issue on the 16th Biennial Topical Meeting of the Radiation Protection and Shielding Division / Radiation Transport and Protection

Mahmoud PourArsalan; Lawrence W. Townsend; Nathan A. Schwadron; Kamen Kozarev; Maher A. Dayeh; Mihir I. Desai

142

Characterization of Emissions and Occupational Exposure ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 1, 2008 ... Topic Summary: Study conducted to evaluate the GHG emissions and ... supplied by Polycontrols Inc.), and frozen carbon dioxide (CO2) and ...

143

Ethical Issues in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETillCAL ISSUES IN ETillCAL ISSUES IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 OH Ethical Issues * Autonomy * Confidentiality * Right to Know * Putcmalism * Informed Consent OH Ethical Issues * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others - Engineering controls - Exposure monitoring/ walk throughs - Health screening/ Health surveillance - Health promotion - Occupational Health Research Ethical Principles * Autonomy: The right to self-determination * Nonmaleficence: The duty to do no harm * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others * .Justice: Fairness or giving person what is due them OH Ethical Issues * Nonmale.ficence - High risk jobs - Second Party induced Hazards - Incompetent , wtethical, illegal practices

144

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) and Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) - Agency Roles/Programs for Assisting DOE Covered Workers, January 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FWP FWP FWP UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Department of Energy (DOE) - Former Worker Medical Screening Program and Responsibilities under EEOICPA * Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) FWP provides no-cost medical screenings to all former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees. The screening focuses on the early detection of health conditions that may be related to occupational exposures such as beryllium, asbestos, radiation, silica, etc. * Medical screenings include a physical exam, hearing test,

145

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

146

Early Brain Response to Low-Dose Radiation Exposure Involves Molecular Networks and Pathways Associated with Cognitive Functions, Advanced Aging and Alzheimer's Disease  

SciTech Connect

Understanding the cognitive and behavioral consequences of brain exposures to low-dose ionizing radiation has broad relevance for health risks from medical radiation diagnostic procedures, radiotherapy, environmental nuclear contamination, as well as earth orbit and space missions. Analyses of transcriptome profiles of murine brain tissue after whole-body radiation showed that low-dose exposures (10 cGy) induced genes not affected by high dose (2 Gy), and low-dose genes were associated with unique pathways and functions. The low-dose response had two major components: pathways that are consistently seen across tissues, and pathways that were brain tissue specific. Low-dose genes clustered into a saturated network (p < 10{sup -53}) containing mostly down-regulated genes involving ion channels, long-term potentiation and depression, vascular damage, etc. We identified 9 neural signaling pathways that showed a high degree of concordance in their transcriptional response in mouse brain tissue after low-dose radiation, in the aging human brain (unirradiated), and in brain tissue from patients with Alzheimer's disease. Mice exposed to high-dose radiation did not show these effects and associations. Our findings indicate that the molecular response of the mouse brain within a few hours after low-dose irradiation involves the down-regulation of neural pathways associated with cognitive dysfunctions that are also down regulated in normal human aging and Alzheimer's disease.

Lowe, Xiu R; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Marchetti, Francesco; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

2008-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

The association betweeen cancers and low level radiation: An evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cancer has traditionally been linked to exposure to high doses of radiation, but there is considerable controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of low doses of ionizing radiation in humans. Over the past 30 years there have been 14 studies conducted on employees at the Hanford nuclear weapons facility to investigate the relationship between exposure to low doses of radiation and mortality due to cancer (1-14). Interest in this issue was originally stimulated by the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) which was trying to determine whether the linear extrapolation of health effects from high to low dose exposure was accurate. If the risk has been underestimated, then the maximum permissible occupational radiation exposure in the United States had been set too high. Because the health risk associated with low level radiation are unclear and controversial it seems appropriate to review the studies relating to Hanford at this time.

Britton, J. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). School of Public Health]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCCUPATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Dllte DepartmentAll Element~&Slte 06-16-2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building Number: WCB Building Name: WCB Name of Information System!«)r IT Project Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) ExhlbllProJect UIO 72 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - OMSS Finallxw.doc

149

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

150

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Biologically Based Analysis of Lung  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Biologically Based Analysis of Lung Cancer Incidence in a Large Canadian Occupational Cohort with Low-LET Low-dose Radiation Exposure, and Comparison with Japanese Atomic Bomb Survivors. Authors: W.D. Hazelton, D. Krewski, S.H. Moolgavkar Lung cancer incidence is analyzed in a large Canadian National Dose Registry (CNDR) cohort with individual annual dosimetry for low-dose occupational exposure to gamma and tritium radiation using several types of multistage models. The primary analysis utilizes the two-stage clonal expansion model (TSCE), with sensitivity analyses using extensions of this model incorporating additional stages. Characteristic and distinct temporal patterns of risk are found for dose-response affecting early, middle, or late stages of carcinogenesis, e.g., initiation with one or more stages,

151

Cellular and molecular level responses after radiofrequency radiation exposure, alone or in combination with x-rays or chemicals. Final report, 1 April 1991-30 September 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project was initiated to explore the potential bioeffects of microwave radiation, alone or in combination with ionizing radiation and chemicals. Over the time period of the project, an automated thermal control system, to be used for maintaining the temperature in tissue culture medium during microwave exposures, was designed, constructed, and software was created. While this was underway during the project period, numerous positive control biological experiments were performed on two different cell types, the Epstein Barr Virus transformed 244B human lymphoblastoid cell, and the freshly isolated peripheral human lymphocyte. The 244B cells were used to address the question of whether a physical agent, ionizing radiation, at low doses where cells would predominantly remain viable, would induce the DNA binding protein NF-kB, and/or four immediate early genes (IEG) (protooncogenes).

Meltz, M.L.; Natarajan, M.; Prasad, A.V.

1995-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

152

Results of calculations of external gamma radiation exposure rates from local fallout and the related radionuclide compositions of selected US Pacific events  

SciTech Connect

This report presents data on calculated gamma radiation exposure rates and local surface deposition of related radionuclides resulting from selected US Pacific events. Results of the calculations of relative external gamma radiation exposure rate and related radionuclide ground deposition are given in six appendices. The output of the calculation has 30 decay times: 10 from 1 to 21 h, 10 from 1 to 300 d, and 10 from 1 to 50 y. For each of these times and for zero time, there are values of the external gamma radiation exposure rate normalized to 1 mR/h, 1 m above the surface, 12 h after the event; the associated values of ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/ for each radionuclide; and the total ..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/. Surface roughness effects are simulated by using Beck's values of (mR/h)/..mu..Ci/m/sup 2/) for a relaxation length of 0.16 g/cm/sup 2/. Fractionation effects, simulated by the removal of a fraction of the refractory nuclides from the calculation, were found for unfractionated debris and for debris with 0.5 and 0.1 of the refractory elements present. Each Appendix contains three sets of 11 pages of calculated results relating to one event in Table 1. Each set of 11 pages is marked page 2 through page 12. Page 2 of each set gives the external gamma-ray exposure rates and associated values of total microcuries per square meter at 30 decay intervals and at zero time. The value for each activation product at zero time is the result of a measurement. The measurements were performed on debris samples taken by aircraft approximately 1 to 4 h after detonation. When no measurement exists, the value appears as zero. Fission products were calculated from the fissioning nuclides and neutron energy spectra. Calculated values for each radionuclide at various decay intervals are given.

Hicks, H.G.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

154

RESRAD-RECYCLE : a computer model for analyzing radiation exposures resulting from recycling radioactively contaminated scrap metals or reusing ratioactively surface-contaminated materials and equipment.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

RESRAD-RECYCLE is a computer code designed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) to be used in making decisions about the disposition of radioactively contaminated materials and scrap metals. It implements a pathway analysis methodology to evaluate potential radiation exposures resulting from the recycling of contaminated scrap metals and the reuse of surface-contaminated materials and equipment. For modeling purposes, it divides the entire metal recycling process into six steps: (1) scrap delivery, (2) scrap melting, (3) ingot delivery, (4) product fabrication, (5) product distribution, and (6) use of finished product. RESRAD-RECYCLE considers the reuse of surface-contaminated materials in their original forms. It contains representative exposure scenarios for each recycling step and the reuse process; users can also specify scenarios if desired. The model calculates individual and collective population doses for workers involved in the recycling process and for the public using the finished products. The results are then used to derive clearance levels for the contaminated materials on the basis of input dose restrictions. The model accounts for radiological decay and ingrowth, dilution and partitioning during melting, and distribution of refined metal in the various finished products, as well as the varying densities and geometries of the radiation sources during the recycling process. A complete material balance in terms of mass and radioactivity during the recycling process can also be implemented. In an international validation study, the radiation doses calculated by RESRAD-RECYCLE were shown to agree fairly well with actual measurement data.

Cheng, J. J.; Kassas, B.; Yu, C.; Arnish, J. J.; LePoire, D.; Chen, S.-Y.; Williams, W. A.; Wallo, A.; Peterson, H.; Environmental Assessment; DOE; Univ. of Texas

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Technology, safety, and costs of decommissioning reference nuclear research and test reactors: sensitivity of decommissioning radiation exposure and costs to selected parameters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Additional analyses of decommissioning at the reference research and test (R and T) reactors and analyses of five recent reactor decommissionings are made that examine some parameters not covered in the initial study report (NUREG/CR-1756). The parameters examined for decommissioning are: (1) the effect on costs and radiation exposure of plant size and/or type; (2) the effects on costs of increasing disposal charges and of unavailability of waste disposal capacity at licensed waste disposal facilities; and (3) the costs of and the available alternatives for the disposal of nuclear R and T reactor fuel assemblies.

Konzek, G.J.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J. (Environmental Science Division); (USDOE)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

157

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from naturally occurring radioactive materials such as uranium, thorium, radon, and certain forms of potassium and carbon. The air we breathe contains radon, the food we eat contains uranium and thorium from the soil, and our bodies contain radioactive forms of potassium and carbon. Cosmic radiation from the sun also contributes to our natural radiation dose. We also receive radiation doses from man-made sources such as X-rays, nuclear medical procedures, power plants, smoke detectors and older television sets. Some people, such as nuclear plant operators, flight crews, and nuclear medicine staff may also receive an occupational radiation dose.

158

Alpha Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Basics of Radiation Basics of Radiation Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Basics of Radiation Characteristics of Alpha Radiation 1. Alpha radiation is not able to penetrate skin. 2. Alpha-emitting materials can be harmful to humans if the materials are inhaled, swallowed, or absorbed through open wounds. 3. A variety of instruments have been designed to measure alpha radiation. Special training in use of these instruments is essential for making accurate measurements. 4. A civil defense instrument (CD V-700) cannot detect the presence of radioactive materials that produce alpha radiation unless the radioactive materials also produce beta and/or gamma radiation.

159

Occupational Medicine Clinic | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Hours Monday-Friday 8:15am-5pm. Emergency coverage during the lunchtime hour (12-1pm) is available. The clinic is closed after 5pm and on weekends & holidays. Resources DOE Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICPA) Laser History and Eye Exam Form (doc) Location The Occupational Medicine Clinic is located in Building 490, 30 Bell Avenue. location map Get Maps and Directions One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and

160

Image Processing Occupancy Sensor  

Lighting controls offer significant potential for reducing that energy use, and new technologies that have emerged in recent years have enabled a wide range of innovative strategies, from room-level awareness of occupancy and daylight sensing to ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

162

Radiators  

SciTech Connect

A heat-exchange radiator is connected to a fluid flow circuit by a connector which provides one member of an interengageable spigot and socket pair for push-fit, fluid-tight, engagement between the connector and the radiator, with latching formations at least one of which is resilient. Preferably the connector carries the spigot which tapers and engages with a socket of corresponding shape, the spigot carrying an O-ring seal and either latching fingers or a resilient latching circlip.

Webster, D. M.

1985-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

163

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Evaluation of potential modifications to the SEER (Simplified Estimation of Exposure to Radiation) fallout code. Technical report, 1 August 1982-1 August 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents the methodology and results of an attempt to modify and improve the computer code SEER (Simplified Estimation of Exposure to Radiation). SEER, part of the large nuclear weapon damage-assessment code CIVIC, was developed in the early 1970s with the intent that it simulate the fallout exposure-rate contours of DELFIC (Defense Land Fallout Interpretive code) while using a minimal amount of computer time. A problem that surfaced with the development of SEER was the fact that the SEER methodology leads to an overprediction of the total activity deposited on the ground. In order to compensate for this characteristic, SAI has lowered the value of the K-factor in the SEER portion of CIVIC to approximately half of the original value. The K-factor is the amount of weapon fallout activity per unit yield, distributed over unit area. Its value is not precisely known, in part because the percentage of total radioactive debris that constitutes early fallout (as opposed to that which is lofted to high altitudes and carried off beyond local fallout distances) is not well known and varies with height of burst and other conditions. This work effort investigated the possibility of modifying the SEER methodology so that activity is conserved and a good approximation to DELFIC results could be obtained without resort to the adjustment of the K-factor.

Edwards, R.C.

1983-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Development and Validation of a Heart Atlas to Study Cardiac Exposure to Radiation Following Treatment for Breast Cancer  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: Cardiac toxicity is an important sequela of breast radiotherapy. However, the relationship between dose to cardiac structures and subsequent toxicity has not been well defined, partially due to variations in substructure delineation, which can lead to inconsistent dose reporting and the failure to detect potential correlations. Here we have developed a heart atlas and evaluated its effect on contour accuracy and concordance. Methods and Materials: A detailed cardiac computed tomography scan atlas was developed jointly by cardiology, cardiac radiology, and radiation oncology. Seven radiation oncologists were recruited to delineate the whole heart, left main and left anterior descending interventricular branches, and right coronary arteries on four cases before and after studying the atlas. Contour accuracy was assessed by percent overlap with gold standard atlas volumes. The concordance index was also calculated. Standard radiation fields were applied. Doses to observer-contoured cardiac structures were calculated and compared with gold standard contour doses. Pre- and post-atlas values were analyzed using a paired t test. Results: The cardiac atlas significantly improved contour accuracy and concordance. Percent overlap and concordance index of observer-contoured cardiac and gold standard volumes were 2.3-fold improved for all structures (p < 0.002). After application of the atlas, reported mean doses to the whole heart, left main artery, left anterior descending interventricular branch, and right coronary artery were within 0.1, 0.9, 2.6, and 0.6 Gy, respectively, of gold standard doses. Conclusions: This validated University of Michigan cardiac atlas may serve as a useful tool in future studies assessing cardiac toxicity and in clinical trials which include dose volume constraints to the heart.

Feng, Mary, E-mail: maryfeng@umich.ed [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Moran, Jean M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Koelling, Todd [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Cardiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chughtai, Aamer [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chan, June L.; Freedman, Laura; Hayman, James A.; Jagsi, Reshma; Jolly, Shruti; Larouere, Janice; Soriano, Julie; Marsh, Robin; Pierce, Lori J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Predicting the radiation exposure of terrestrial wildlife in the Chernobyl exclusion zone : an international comparison of approaches.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is now general acknowledgement that there is a requirement to demonstrate that species other than humans are protected from anthropogenic releases of radioactivity. A number of approaches have been developed for estimating the exposure of wildlife and some of these are being used to conduct regulatory assessments. There is a requirement to compare the outputs of such approaches against available data sets to ensure that they are robust and fit for purpose. In this paper we describe the application of seven approaches for predicting the whole-body ({sup 90}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, {sup 241}Am and Pu isotope) activity concentrations and absorbed dose rates for a range of terrestrial species within the Chernobyl exclusion zone. Predictions are compared against available measurement data, including estimates of external dose rate recorded by thermoluminescent dosimeters attached to rodent species. Potential reasons for differences between predictions between the various approaches and the available data are explored.

Beresford, N. A.; Barnett, C. L.; Brown, J. E.; Cheng, J.-J.; Copplestone, D.; Gaschak, S.; Hosseini, A.; Howard, B. J.; Kamboj, S.; Nedveckaite, T.; Olyslaegers, G.; Smith, J. T.; Vives i Batlle, J.; Vives-Lynch, S.; Yu, C.; Environmental Science Division; Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority; England and Wales Environment Agency; International Radioecology Lab.; Inst. of Physics, Radiation Protection,; Belgian Nuclear Research Centre; Univ. of Portsmouth; Westlakes Research Inst.

2010-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

167

Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inqu v Acting Di ector, Off'ke.-of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Date: '; 4 I &.- WJ Criteria Lead,...

168

Concentration of leucogenenol in the serum of dogs following their exposure to lethal $gamma$ radiation from cobalt-60  

SciTech Connect

>Three male and 3 female dogs were exposed in the AFRRI whole body irradiator to 350 rads of cobalt-60 gamma -radiation at approximately 39.5 rads/ min. Prior to and at intervals following irradiation, a sample of serum was obtained from each dog and assayed for its leucogenenol content. Before irradiation the average concentration of leucogenenol in the serum was 10.5 plus or minus 6 mu g/liter. The day after irradiation the average concentration in 5 dogs fell to 0.002 mu g/liter and in 1 dog to 1.5 mu g/liter. However, 2 days after irradiation the average concentration in all dogs was elevated to 41 plus or minus 10 mu g/liter. The concentration of leucogenenol in the serum then declined so that 7 days after irradiation it was 0.47 plus or minus 0.24 mu g/liter. Leucogenenol was not measureable (< 0.001 mu g/liter) in each dog's serum for approximately 4 days before the dog died. Individual dogs survived for from 1;3 to 20 days after irradiation. (auth)

Rice, F.A.; Chen, C.G.; Rene, A.A.

1973-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

170

Lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 after exposure to fractionated moderate-dose-rate ionizing radiation in the Canadian fluoroscopy cohort study and a comparison with lung cancer mortality in the atomic bomb survivors study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current lung cancer risk estimates after exposure to low-linear energy transfer radiation such as X rays are based on studies of people exposed to such radiation at high dose rates, for example the atomic bomb survivors. Radiobiology and animal experiments suggest that risks from exposure at low to moderate dose rates, for example medical diagnostic procedures, may be overestimated by such risk models, but data for humans to examine this issue are limited. In this paper we report on lung cancer mortality between 1950 and 1987 in a cohort of 64,172 Canadian tuberculosis patients, of whom 39% were exposed to highly fractionated multiple chest fluoroscopies leading to a mean lung radiation dose of 1.02 Sv received at moderate dose rates. These data have been used to estimate the excess relative risk per sievert of lung cancer mortality, and this is compared directly to estimates derived from 75,991 atomic bomb survivors. Based on 1,178 lung cancer deaths in the fluoroscopy study, there was no evidence of any positive association between risk and dose, with the relative risk at 1 Sv being 1.00 (95% confidence interval 0.94, 1.07), which contrasts with that based on the atomic bomb survivors, 1.60 (1.27, 1.99). The difference in effect between the two studies almost certainly did not arise by chance (P = 0.0001). This study provides strong support from data for humans for a substantial fractionation/dose-rate effect for low-linear energy transfer radiation and lung cancer risk. This implies that lung cancer risk from exposures to such radiation at present-day dose rates is likely to be lower than would be predicted by current radiation risk models based on studies of high-dose-rate exposures. 25 refs., 8 tabs.

Howe, G.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Radiation Field Control Manual  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The EPRI Radiation Management Program is dedicated to reducing nuclear power plant worker personnel exposure by developing practices and technologies to increase the radiation protection of the worker, and to implement methods to reduce radiation fields. The nuclear power industry has recently implemented the RP2020 Initiative to promote positive radiation protection trends. Control of radiation fields is crucial to one of the initiative goals of reducing exposure. This manual provides the current state ...

2004-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

172

Occupancy Simulation Schedule Appendix C -Occupancy Simulation Schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the electrical panel for run times commensurate with identified use profiles. The profiles enabled sought Figure C.1 and Figure C.2 present the load simulation and occupancy schedules for the lab homes highly insulating windows demonstration. The bases for occupancy simulation were data and analysis developed

173

Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

format. HEADLINES... 2012 Annual Report 2012 draft data available through the REMS query tool 2012 Submittal Notification REMS Reporting Guide, containing the required format...

174

Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences  

SciTech Connect

Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Contact Info | Occupational Medicine Clinic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Contact Info Occupational Medicine Joseph Falco, M.D. 344-3666 OMC Manager/Supervising Physician Staff Physicians Carol Davis, D.O. 344-3667 Board Certified - Occupational Medicine Eva Erens, M.D. 344-3668 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Jaishree Subramani, M.D. MPH 344-3669 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Health Promotion Program Michael Thorn, RN, MBA 344-8612 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Program Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Nancy Losinno, LCSW, CEAP 344-4567 EAP Manager Linda DiPierro 344-2733 Senior Occupational Medicine Assistant

176

Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013  

SciTech Connect

During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

Rocke, David M. [University of California Davis

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

date of death, internal radiation and exposure period, thedeath, death year, internal radiation, exposure period, andexposures (chemical and smoking), internal doses, and types of radiation.

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

WI Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This statute seeks to regulate radioactive materials, to encourage the constructive uses of radiation, and to prohibit and prevent exposure to radiation in amounts which are or may be detrimental...

179

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

180

ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Occupant Emergency Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupant Emergency Plans Occupant Emergency Plans On this page is the collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the...

182

Cancer and work in Canada with particular reference to occupational risk factors in breast cancer patients in one community and related selected research methods used to investigate those factors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cancer represents a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. There is no scientific consensus regarding cancer causality or prevention. Occupational exposure potentially remains a… (more)

Brophy, James Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Opportunities Benefits Office • Work-Life Balance Programs • International Services • Occupational Medicine • Salaries & Awards • Training & Qualifications The Human Resources and Occupational Medicine Division handles scientific and non-scientific employment, benefits, employee and labor relations, staff development, salaries and awards, employee records, and occupational medicine. For more information, click on the one of the services listed above. Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long-standing commitment to a policy of equal opportunity and diversity. Our goal is equality of opportunity in all aspects of employment, including placement, development programs, job assignments, transfers and promotions, without regard to race, color,

184

Introduction and Fundamentals: Course on Advances in Radiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to Ionizing Radiation - is it really necessary?"Sternglass, "Environmental Radiation and Human Health," op.on the Effects of Atomic Radiation Sources and Effects of

Thomas, Ralph H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

SETTING THE OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE LIMIT FOR CF3I ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... T3 and Tq [8]. Release of these hormones is controlled by a neuroendocrine feedback loop, involving the hypothalamus, pituitary gland, and the ...

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

187

ORAU: Occupational Exposure and Worker Health fact sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

more than 28,000 current and former employees from 21 U.S. Department of Energy sites. Research and Medical Database Management ORAU combines medical study expertise with...

188

RADIOISOTOPE AND RADIATION APPLICATIONS. Quarterly Progress Report  

SciTech Connect

An evaluation was given of the possible hazards to consumers from radioisotope residues in consumer products. A laboratory demonstration was given of the use of Mn/sup 54/ to facilitate removal of manganese from process feed water. lt was found in the hazards evaluation that the "worst case" of radiation exposure from residual radioisotopes in steel gives a radiation exposure somewhat less than the maximum allowable dose levels for occupational exposure. Initial study indicates that for actual cases, the radiation exposures to be expected from radioisotope residues in steel products would ordinarily be small compared to natural background. An exception to this generalization might be found when a longer lived isotope like Mn/sup 54/ was present. Preliminary results of the laboratory demonstnation of using Mn/sup 54/ to monitor the removal of manganese from feed water indicated that the method may allow a considerable improvement in accuracy of process control. The study of the mechanism of formation of free radicals in polymeric materials was continued. Emphasis was placed on examination of the effect of structural factors on the efficiency of free-radical site formation in acrylate polymers. The investigation was extended to include an examination of the effect on free-radical formation of the constituents on the carbon atom located alpha to the ester group. Polymethylacrylate, polymethylmethacrylate, and polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate were used in this study. Measurement of the volatile products from the irradiation of the polymethyl- alpha -chloroacrylate was completed. The data substantiated earlier findings which indicated that the point of attack in free-radical formation occurs on the ester side chain. (auth)

Sunderman, D.N., ed.

1961-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

189

RICHARD WILLIAM HORNUNG. Modeling Occupational Mortality Data with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of Statistical methodology for application to survival data has expanded rapidly in the last two decades. Increasing interest in the field of occupational health demands that the current state-of-the-art in modeling exposure-risk relationships be utilized in assessing potential dangers to worker health. It is the aim of this research to investigate the more sophisticated survivorship models in producing a quantitative risk assessment of lung cancer in U.S. uranium miners. The Cox proportional hazards model was chosen for this purpose. A variety of risk functions are examined, with a power function model providing the best fit. A number of risk factors influence the exposure-response relationship. Among these are a strong independent multiplicative effect of cigarette smoking t a positive effect for age at initial exposure, and a negative effect for time since last exposure. The nature of the temporal effects suggest that

Richard W; Richard W; Michael J. Symons

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Potential Health Effects of Crystalline Silica Exposures from Coal Fly Ash: A Literature Review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The amount of crystalline silica in coal fly ash (CFA) depends on a variety of factors, including the amount of silica in the pre-combustion coal, the combustion process, and emission control technologies among others. Occupational exposures to crystalline silica in CFA are related to these factors as well as activities associated with exposures and durations of exposure. This review summarizes the occupational and environmental health literature relevant to the presence of crystalline silica in CFA from...

2006-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

191

Evaluation of 2 Rem per Year Occupational Dose Limit: Potential Effects on U.S. Nuclear Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report provides an evaluation of potential impacts on the U.S. nuclear power industry of a reduction in the occupational radiation dose limit from 5 rem per year to 2 rem per year.

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

192

Effective Daylighting: Evaluating Daylighting Performance in the San Francisco Federal Building from the Perspective of Building Occupants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that exposure to solar radiation (i.e. daylight), has aterm perceptions of solar radiation, and changes within afound that for direct solar radiation exceedng 60 W/m 2 (

Konis, Kyle Stas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Fundamentals of health physics for the radiation-protection officer  

SciTech Connect

The contents of this book on health physics include chapters on properties of radioactive materials, radiation instrumentation, radiation protection programs, radiation survey programs, internal exposure, external exposure, decontamination, selection and design of radiation facilities, transportation of radioactive materials, radioactive waste management, radiation accidents and emergency preparedness, training, record keeping, quality assurance, and appraisal of radiation protection programs. (ACR)

Murphy, B.L.; Traub, R.J.; Gilchrist, R.L.; Mann, J.C.; Munson, L.H.; Carbaugh, E.H.; Baer, J.L.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

New Beryllium Reference Material for Occupational Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The US National Nuclear Security Administration sponsored the development of ... Mich.; and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

195

"We will die and become science" : the production of invisibility and public knowledge about Chernobyl radiation effects in Belarus  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

external radiation exposure and internal accumulation ofinternal accumulation), or it might (incorrectly) refer to external radiation exposure.radiation exposure should not be forgotten. Patients, for example, can be checked for their internal

Kuchinskaya, Olga

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ESTIMATING HISTORICAL TRICHLOROETHYLENE EXPOSURE IN A URANIUM ENRICHMENT, GASEOUS DIFFUSION PLANT.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Previous studies at two uranium enrichment plants have looked at radiation exposures, but not an extensive list of chemical exposures, limiting evaluation of potential interactions.… (more)

MOSER, ADRIANE

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Low Dose Radiation Program: Radiation Biology and the Radiation Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Biology and the Radiation Research Program Biology and the Radiation Research Program The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor organizations, Energy Research and Development Agency (ERDA) and Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), always have been concerned about the health effects of ionizing radiation. Extensive research has been conducted under their sponsorship at all levels of biological organization from molecules to man. Over the past 60 years, studies using every type of radiation source have included exposure to both external radiation sources and to internally deposited radioactive materials. These exposures used different dose patterns and distributions delivered over a wide range of experimental times. This extensive research provided the basis for the new Low Dose Radiation Research Program, linking

198

Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance...

199

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

200

Gender differences in respiratory symptoms-Does occupation matter?  

SciTech Connect

Little attention has been given to gender differences in respiratory health, particularly in occupational settings. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate gender differences in respiratory morbidity based on surveys of hospitality workers, radiographers, and respiratory therapists. Data were available from mail surveys of 850 hospitality industry workers (participation rate 73.9%; 52.6% female), 586 radiographers (participation rate 63.6%; 85% female), and 275 respiratory therapists (participation rate 64.1%; 58.6% female). Cross-tabulations by gender were evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} analysis and logistic regression with adjustment for personal and work characteristics. Women consistently had greater respiratory morbidity for symptoms associated with shortness of breath, whereas men usually had a higher prevalence of phlegm. There were few differences in work exposures apart from perception of exposure to ETS among hospitality workers. Gender differences in symptoms were often reduced after adjustment for personal and work characteristics but for respiratory therapists there were even greater gender disparities for asthma attack and breathing trouble. Population health findings of elevated symptoms among women were only partially supported by these occupational respiratory health surveys. The influence of differential exposures and personal factors should be considered when interpreting gender differences in health outcomes.

Dimich-Ward, Helen [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada)]. E-mail: hward@interchange.ubc.ca; Camp, Patricia G. [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada); James Hogg iCapture Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6 (Canada); Kennedy, Susan M. [School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

The One Million U.S. Radiation Worker Study  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for chronic radiation exposure. Much knowledge has been gained from the study of atomic bomb survivors, but exposure was acute and 2 among a Japanese population living in...

202

Radiation doses for Marshall Islands Atolls Affected by U.S. Nuclear Testing:All Exposure Pathways, Remedial Measures, and Environmental Loss of 137Cs  

SciTech Connect

The United States conducted 24 nuclear tests at Bikini Atoll with a total yield of 76.8 Megatons (MT). The Castle series produced about 60% of this total and included the Bravo test that was the primary source of contamination of Bikini Island and Rongelap and Utrok Atolls. One of three aerial drops missed the atoll and the second test of the Crossroads series, the Baker test, was an underwater detonation. Of the rest, 17 were on barges on water and 3 were on platforms on an island; they produced most of the contamination of islands at the atoll. There were 42 tests conducted at Enewetak Atoll with a total yield of 31.7 MT (Simon and Robison, 1997; UNSCEAR, 2000). Of these tests, 18 were on a barge over wateror reef, 7 were surface shots, 2 aerial drops, 2 under water detonations, and 13 tower shots on either land or reef. All produced some contamination of various atoll islands. Rongelap Atoll received radioactive fallout as a result of the Bravo test on March 1, 1954 that was part of the Castle series of tests. This deposition was the result of the Bravo test producing a yield of 15 MT, about a factor of three to four greater than the predicted yield that resulted in vaporization of more coral reef and island than expected and in the debris-cloud reaching a much higher altitude than anticipated. High-altitude winds were to the east at the time of detonation and carried the debris-cloud toward Rongelap Atoll. Utrok Atoll also received fallout from the Bravo test but at much lower air and ground-level concentrations than at Rongelap atoll. Other atolls received Bravo fallout at levels below that of Utrok [other common spellings of this island and atoll (Simon, et al., 2009)]. To avoid confusion in reading other literature, this atoll and island are spelled in a variety of ways (Utrik, Utirik, Uterik or Utrok). Dose assessments for Bikini Island at Bikini Atoll (Robison et al., 1997), Enjebi Island at Enewetak Atoll (Robison et al., 1987), Rongelap Island at Rongelap Atoll (Robison et al., 1994; Simon et al., 1997), and Utrok Island at Utrok Atoll (Robison, et al., 1999) indicate that about 95-99% of the total estimated dose to people who may return to live at the atolls today (Utrok Island is populated) is the result of exposure to {sup 137}Cs. External gamma exposure from {sup 137}Cs in the soil accounts for about 10 to 15% of the total dose and {sup 137}Cs ingested during consumption of local food crops such as drinking coconut meat and fluid (Cocos nucifera L.), copra meat and milk, Pandanus fruit, and breadfruit accounts for about 85 to 90%. The other 1 to 2% of the estimated dose is from {sup 90}Sr, {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am. The {sup 90}Sr exposure is primarily through the food chain while the exposure to {sup 239+240}Pu, and {sup 241}Am is primarily via the inhalation pathway as a result of breathing re-suspended soil particles.

Robison, W L; Hamilton, T F

2009-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

203

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Radiation-Induced Bystander Effects and Relevance to Human Radiation Exposures Review of phenomenon appears in Radiation Research Pamela Sykes and Benjamin Blyth One concern of radiobiologists is the effect radiation exposure might have on nearby unirradiated cells. For example, when only a small fraction of cells are directly hit by radiation energy, are the surrounding unirradiated cells also at an increased risk of cancer? The term "radiation-induced bystander effect" is used to describe radiation-induced biological changes that occur in unirradiated cells within an irradiated cell population. Radiation-induced bystander effects have become established in the vernacular and are considered as an authentic radiation response. However, there is still no consensus on a precise definition of the term, which

204

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program More Documents & Publications LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management

205

Analysis of radiation exposure - service personnel on Rongerik Atoll: Operation Castle - Shot Bravo. Technical report, 12 March 1985-12 June 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

External and internal doses are reconstructed for the 28 American servicemen stationed on Rongerik Atoll, Marshall Islands, who were exposed to fallout on 1-2 March 1954 from Shot Bravo of Operation CASTLE. External doses are determined from limited radiation survey and film-badge information. Internal-dose commitments are derived from urinalysis data. The magnitude of the calculated activity intake suggests the principal pathways. Reconstructed film-badge doses are approximately 40 rem, with adjustments from individual activity scenarios, as available. Internal dose commitments to the thyroid and large intestine (nearly all first-year dose) provide the only significant increments to the external dose. Total doses are approximately 230 rem to the thyroid, 115 rem to the lower large intestine, 85 rem to the upper large intestine, and about 40 to 50 rem to all other organs.

Goetz, J.; Klemm, J.; Phillips, J.; Thomas, C.

1987-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

206

FINAL REPORT FORMER RADIATION WORKER MEDICAL SURVEILLANCE PROGRAM AT ROCKY FLATS For Department of Energy Programs  

SciTech Connect

The Former Radiation Worker Medical Surveillance Program at Rocky Flats was conducted in Arvada, CO, by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education under DOE Contract DE-AC05-00OR22750. Objectives of the program were to obtain information on the value of medical surveillance among at-risk former radiation workers and to provide long-term internal radiation dosimetry information to the scientific community. This program provided the former radiation workers of the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (formerly Rocky Flats Plant) an opportunity to receive follow-up medical monitoring and a re-evaluation of their internal radiation dose. The former Rocky Flats radiation worker population is distinctive because it was a reasonably stable work force that received occupational exposures, at times substantial, over several decades. This report reflects the summation of health outcomes, statistical analyses, and dose assessment information on former Rocky Flats radiation workers to the date of study termination as of March 2004.

Joe M. Aldrich

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

DNA damage produced by exposure of supercoiled plasmid DNA to high- and low-LET ionizing radiation: Effects of hydroxyl radical quenchers. DNA breakage, neutrons, OH radicals  

SciTech Connect

A supercoiled plasmid of 7300 base pairs was isolated and exposed in an aqueous environment to {sup 60}Co {gamma} rays and JANUS 0.85 MeV fission-spectrum neutrons. Dose responses for the production of single-strand breaks (SSBs), double-strand breaks (DSBs) and alkali-labile sites (ALSs) were compared with computations made from the conversion of the supercoil to its relaxed and linear forms. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) for production of SSBs and DSBs was similar to that previously measured in the cellular environment. The RBE for destruction of genetic transforming activity of M13 viral DNA followed that for DNA damage. This is in contrast to the situation for biological effects such as lethality, mutagenesis, and cellular transformation measured in mammalian cells, where the RBE values are reversed. The role of hydroxyl (OH) radical in DNA damage induction by neutrons was investigated by exposure of plasmid in the presence of known quenchers of this species. Of four quenchers tested, all were able to reduce the yields of both SSBs and DSBs. These findings are consistent with a model for SSB and DSB induction by high linear energy transfer that involves OH radical mediation.

Peak, J.G.; Ito, T.; Peak, M.J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Robb, F.T. [Univ. of Maryland, Baltimore, MD (United States). Center for Marine Biotechnology

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Beryllium Exposure Studies and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Energy Radiation Exposure Monitoring System (REMS) DOE IISP 10-Year Summary Report Resources Overview Reports Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles Human Subjects Resource Book...

209

Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivi...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Our research utilizes radiation cataract as a model system to study the effects of low-dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly differentiated tissue. We believe...

210

Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 - Ionizing Radiation 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation Lesson Three showed that unstable isotopes emit energy as they become more stable. This energy is known as radiation. This lesson explores forms of radiation, where radiation is found, how we detect and measure radiation, what sources of radiation people are exposed to, whether radiation is harmful, and how we can limit our exposure. Specific topics covered in this lesson include: Types of radiation Non-ionizing Ionizing Forms of ionizing radiation Alpha particles Beta particles Gamma rays Radiation Decay chain Half-life Dose Radiation measurements Sources of radiation Average annual exposure Lesson 4 - Ionizing Radiation.pptx More Documents & Publications DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2008 DOE-HDBK-1130-2007

211

RADIATION SAFETY POLICY Effective Date: April 4, 2012 Originating Office: Office of the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

radiation exposure "As Low as Reasonably Achievable" "Internal Radiation Permit" ("IRP") means and the general public from unnecessary or potentially harmful levels of radiation exposure. PURPOSE capable of generating X or Gamma radiation "Radiology" involves external exposure of humans to Radiation

Doedel, Eusebius

212

Optical Measurement Technologies for High Temperature, Radiation Exposure, and Corrosive Environments—Significant Activities and Findings: In-vessel Optical Measurements for Advanced SMRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Development of advanced Small Modular Reactors (aSMRs) is key to providing the United States with a sustainable, economically viable, and carbon-neutral energy source. The aSMR designs have attractive economic factors that should compensate for the economies of scale that have driven development of large commercial nuclear power plants to date. For example, aSMRs can be manufactured at reduced capital costs in a factory and potentially shorter lead times and then be shipped to a site to provide power away from large grid systems. The integral, self-contained nature of aSMR designs is fundamentally different than conventional reactor designs. Future aSMR deployment will require new instrumentation and control (I&C) architectures to accommodate the integral design and withstand the extreme in-vessel environmental conditions. Operators will depend on sophisticated sensing and machine vision technologies that provide efficient human-machine interface for in-vessel telepresence, telerobotic control, and remote process operations. The future viability of aSMRs is dependent on understanding and overcoming the significant technical challenges involving in-vessel reactor sensing and monitoring under extreme temperatures, pressures, corrosive environments, and radiation fluxes

Anheier, Norman C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Qiao, Hong (Amy); Suter, Jonathan D.

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Occupational Safety Performance Trends | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety Trends More Documents & Publications Strategic Safety Goals EA-1954: Draft Environmental Assessment Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard...

214

WEB RESOURCE: Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 9, 2007 ... The Occupational Outlook Handbook gives information on the training and education needed to go into engineering, earnings, job prospects, ...

215

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Home Outreach Event Calendar for DOE Nuclear Weapons Workers Covered Facilities Database Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness...

216

Occupant Behavior, Egress, and Emergency Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Forman Williams, Director, Center for Energy Research, University ... Total evacuation of a tower assuming a full occupant load without visitors (19,800 ...

217

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act...

218

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High

219

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

220

radiation.cdr  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Radiation-It's a Fact of Life Radiation-It's a Fact of Life It has been with us since the beginning of time. Everyone who has ever walked on this planet has been exposed to radiation. For the most part, nature is the largest source of exposure. It's in the air we breathe, the ground we walk on, and even the food we eat. The radiation we receive from all natural and some man-made sources is called "background radiation." The millirem (mrem) is a unit used for measuring radiation received by a person. The total average background for radiation received by people living in the United States is 360 millirem per year (mrem/yr), of which 300 mrem/yr is from natural sources, and 60 mrem/yr is man-made. Cosmic Radiation from the sun and stars Internal Radiation from naturally radioactive

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Safety Around Sources of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Keeping Exposure Low Keeping Exposure Low Working Safely Around Radioactive Contamination Types of Radiation Exposure Managing Radiation Emergencies Procedure Demonstration Is it safe to be around sources? Too much radiation exposure is harmful. The degree of radiation injury depends on the amount of radiation received and the time involved. In general, the higher the amount, the greater the severity of early effects (occurring within a few weeks) and the greater the possibility of late effects such as cancer. The BEIR V (Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation) Committee of the National Research Council estimates that among 100,000 people exposed to a one-time dose of 10 rem (10,000 mrem) and followed over their life span, about 790 more would die of cancer than the estimated 20,000 cancer deaths that would be expected among a non-exposed group of the same size. NOTE: 10 rem = 100 millisieverts (100 mSv).

222

Activities of the National Academy of Sciences in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The activities of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), in relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF), has a long history and the specific time period supported by this contract is but a small piece of the long-term continuing program. As a background, in August 1945, atomic bombs were dropped on Hiroshima (6 August) and Nagasaki (9 August). Shortly after the bombings, US medical teams joined forces with their Japanese counterparts to form a Joint Commission for the Investigation of the Effects of the Atomic Bombs. As a result of the Joint Commission's investigations, it was determined that consideration should be given to the establishment of a long-term study of the potential late health effects of exposure of the survivors to radiation from the bombs. The results obtained from RERF studies contribute the vast majority of information that provides a better understanding of radiation effects on humans. This information has been used extensively by national organizations and international committees for estimating risks associated with radiation exposures. The estimated risks developed by these independent organizations are used by government agencies around the world to establish standards for protection of individuals exposed in the occupational, medical, and general environment. Some of these results are described briefly in this report.

Edington, C.W.

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Estimated effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences within Los Alamos county in New Mexico  

SciTech Connect

Many millions of office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the workplace are lacking. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were then used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about nine times greater exposure at home than while in the office (691 mrem yr{sup -1} versus 78 mrem yr{sup -1}). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was 896 mrem yr{sup -1}. These effective dose rates are contrasted against the 100 mrem yr{sup -1} threshold for regulation of a 'radiological worker' defined in the Department of Energy regulations occupational exposure and the 10 mrem yr{sup -1} air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the seventh annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for EPRI's OHSD program.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

225

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the eighth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for the OHSD program.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

226

Occupancy based demand response HVAC control strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 30% energy usage and for 50% of the electricity usage in the United States. Currently, most modern buildings still condition rooms assuming maximum occupancy rather than actual usage. As a result, rooms are ... Keywords: HVAC, demand response, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Alberto E. Cerpa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Effects of atomic radiation  

SciTech Connect

This book focuses on the lifelong effects of atomic radiation exposure in language understandable by the concerned layperson or the specialist in another field. The base of knowledge used is the work of the Atomic Bomb Casualty Commission and its successor since 1975 the Radiation Effects Research Foundation. Within the range of Chronic effects on human health the book provides a thorough review, although effects of nonionizing radiation, effects on structures, effects on other living species, and acute effects are not discussed.

Schull, W.J.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

228

Air Distribution Effectiveness for Residential Mechanical Ventilation: Simulation and Comparison of Normalized Exposures  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of ventilation is to dilute indoor contaminants that an occupant is exposed to. Even when providing the same nominal rate of outdoor air, different ventilation systems may distribute air in different ways, affecting occupants' exposure to household contaminants. Exposure ultimately depends on the home being considered, on source disposition and strength, on occupants' behavior, on the ventilation strategy, and on operation of forced air heating and cooling systems. In any multi-zone environment dilution rates and source strengths may be different in every zone and change in time, resulting in exposure being tied to occupancy patterns.This paper will report on simulations that compare ventilation systems by assessing their impact on exposure by examining common house geometries, contaminant generation profiles, and occupancy scenarios. These simulations take into account the unsteady, occupancy-tied aspect of ventilation such as bathroom and kitchen exhaust fans. As most US homes have central HVAC systems, the simulation results will be used to make appropriate recommendations and adjustments for distribution and mixing to residential ventilation standards such as ASHRAE Standard 62.2.This paper will report on work being done to model multizone airflow systems that are unsteady and elaborate the concept of distribution matrix. It will examine several metrics for evaluating the effect of air distribution on exposure to pollutants, based on previous work by Sherman et al. (2006).

Petithuguenin, T.D.P.; Sherman, M.H.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Occupancy change detection system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Perspectives of Decision-Making and Estimation of Risk in Populations Exposed to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exposure to radioactive fallout in radiation-associatedheight of the radioactive fallout deliberations in the early

Fabrikant, J.I.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Contribution of maternal radionuclide burdens to prenatal radiation doses  

SciTech Connect

This report describes approaches to calculating and expressing radiation doses to the embryo/fetus from internal radionuclides. Information was obtained for selected, occupationally significant radioelements that provide a spectrum of metabolic and dosimetric characteristics. Evaluations are also presented for inhaled inert gases and for selected radiopharmaceuticals. Fractional placental transfer and/or ratios of concentration in the embryo/fetus to that in the woman were calculated for these materials. The ratios were integrated with data from biokinetic transfer models to estimate radioactivity levels in the embryo/fetus as a function of stage of pregnancy and time after entry into the transfer compartment or blood of the pregnant woman. These results are given as tables of deposition and retention in the embryo/fetus as a function of gestational age at exposure and elapsed time following exposure. Methodologies described by MIRD were extended to formalize and describe details for calculating radiation absorbed doses to the embryo/fetus. Calculations were performed using a model situation that assumed a single injection of 1 {mu}Ci into a woman`s blood; independent calculations were performed for administration at successive months of pregnancy. Gestational -stage-dependent dosimetric tabulations are given together with tables of correlations and relationships. Generalized surrogate dose factors and categorizations are provided in the report to provide for use in operational radiological protection situations. These approaches to calculation yield radiation absorbed doses that can be converted to dose equivalent by multiplication by quality factor. Dose equivalent is the most common quantity for stating prenatal dose limits in the United States and is appropriate for the types of effect that are usually associated with prenatal exposure. If it is desired to obtain alternatives for other purposes, this value can be multiplied by appropriate weighting factors.

Sikov, M.R.; Hui, T.E.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations More Documents & Publications Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation

233

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and...

234

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SITE-APPS-ACCRED-BOUNDRY.pdf WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SI...

235

Occupational Electric Shocks, Electromagnetic Fields and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. , Fatal occupational electrocutions in the United States.Narrative Review: Electrocution and Life-ThreateningFatal occupational electrocutions in the United States. Inj

Vergara, Ximena Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Title Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Publication Type Report LBNL...

237

New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors October 4, 2013 - 4:20pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations...

238

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit...

239

Environment/Health/Safety (EHS): Radiation Protection Group: Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Who To Call Who To Call Rad Training Dosimetry Telemetry Laser Safety Radiation Safety Committee Pub-3000 Ch. 21 Forms RPG Procedures RPG Internal Radiation Safety Committee Charter Purpose The Berkeley Lab Radiation Safety Committee (RSC) is appointed by, and reports to, the Laboratory Director and is responsible for advising LBNL Management on all matters related to occupational and environmental radiation safety. The Radiation Safety Committee reviews and recommends approval of radiation safety policies and guides the Environment, Health and Safety Division and radiation user divisions in carrying out these programs. The scope of its actions will generally be in issues of broad institutional concern and impact, or areas of potential high consequence either in terms of safety or institutional needs.

240

Radiation Machines and Radioactive Materials (Iowa)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

These chapters describe general provisions and regulatory requirements; registration, licensure, and transportation of radioactive materials; and exposure standards for radiation protection.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Aloke Chatterjee  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chatterjee, A. and Holley, W.R. 1999 Workshop: Biological Effects of Low-Dose and Low-Dose-Rate Radiation Exposures: An Integrated Theoretical and Experimental Approach....

242

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mohan Natarajan  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Survival Advantage, Bystander Effect, and Genomic Instability after Low-LET Low Dose Radiation Exposure Funded Project Real-Time Molecular Study of Bystander Effect Using...

243

ORISE Resources: Population Monitoring in Radiation Emergencies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

into the body Removal of external or internal contamination (decontamination) Radiation dose received and the resulting health risk from the exposure Long-term health...

244

Low Dose Radiation Research Program Publications  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for medical exposures. Environmental and Molecular Mutagenesis 53(4): 247259 Lynn Hlatky ( 2012) Double-Strand Break Motions Shift Radiation Risk Notions?. PNAS...

245

Method and Apparatus for Measuring Radiation Quantities  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent application describes a compact dosimeter for measuring X-ray and gamma radiation by the use of solutions which undergo a visible color change upon exposure to a predetermined quantity of radiation.

Roberts, N.O.

1950-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

246

Occupational Hygiene Aspects of Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition By-Products: Workshop Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is an inert gas that is present in many different types of electrical utility equipment. While the environmental concerns about this gas have been widely addressed, worker exposure aspects of SF6 decomposition by-products have not been fully explored. To address this knowledge gap, EPRI conducted a workshop on March 12, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. This workshop was designed to 1) address the perspectives of occupational hygiene and engineering ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

247

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard Qualification Standard Reference Guide JULY 2011 Occupational Safety This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... iii TABLES ........................................................................................................................................ iv ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. v PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

248

Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Headquarters Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics The Department of Energy recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy and fit Federal workforce. To that end, our occupational health care professionals at the Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics in Forrestal and Germantown provide the following services: Walk-in care. Assessment, nursing care and follow-up for minor illnesses and injuries on a walk-in basis. First-response. Emergency treatment to any employee, contractor or visitor experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency. Wellness seminars. A variety of workshops designed to educate participants on a wide range of health-related topics. Physician directed services: For employees whose physician has directed medical care such as allergy injections, blood pressure

249

Window Signaling Systems: Control Strategies & Occupant Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and L.M Parkins. 1984. “Window-Opening Behavior in OfficeOccupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems," CBEDaly, A. 2002. “Operable windows and HVAC systems. ” HPAC

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the ninth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 13 years (1995 2007) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. These injury data a...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

251

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eleventh annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 15 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

252

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This twelfth annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry is based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 16 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system. The...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

253

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the tenth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 14 years (1995 2008) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. The current OHSD da...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

254

Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Exposure chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A chamber for exposing animals, plants, or materials to air containing gases or aerosols is so constructed that catch pans for animal excrement, for example, serve to aid the uniform distribution of air throughout the chamber instead of constituting obstacles as has been the case in prior animal exposure chambers. The chamber comprises the usual imperforate top, bottom and side walls. Within the chamber, cages and their associated pans are arranged in two columns. The pans are spaced horizontally from the walls of the chamber in all directions. Corresponding pans of the two columns are also spaced horizontally from each other. Preferably the pans of one column are also spaced vertically from corresponding pans of the other column. Air is introduced into the top of the chamber and withdrawn from the bottom. The general flow of air is therefore vertical. The effect of the horizontal pans is based on the fact that a gas flowing past the edge of a flat plate that is perpendicular to the flow forms a wave on the upstream side of the plate. Air flows downwardly between the chamber walls and the outer edges of the pan. It also flows downwardly between the inner edges of the pans of the two columns. It has been found that when the air carries aerosol particles, these particles are substantially uniformly distributed throughout the chamber.

Moss, Owen R. (Kennewick, WA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Viewpoint on occupational health in the oil-shale industry  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the potential health and safety hazards which may be expected in a large-scale oil shale industry, the types of operations that will be utilized to extract oil from oil shale are examined. These are broadly characterized as mining, raw shale processing and handling, retorting and refining, and spent shale disposal. With few exceptions, these operations in shale oil production are similar to operations in existing industries. Health and safety risks and occupational health controls are also expected to be similar. To date medical studies on workers in the oil shale industry who have been exposed to shale dusts and oil products have indicated that the chief problem areas are pneumoconiosis and skin cancers. A broad viewpoint of the prospective occupational health problems in the oil shale industry can be obtained by reviewing similar activities and exposures in other industrial operations. This viewpoint would suggest that the prospective problems can be controlled adequately by conventional methods of worker protection. Several unique situations do exist in this industry. The mining and material handling of tonnages of oil shale exceeds any experience in other mining activities. This is a problem of scale. It seems unlikely that it will produce new safety problems. The in situ mining offers the unique situation of burning and abandoned underground retorts in near proximity to work forces preparing future in situ retorts. The potential of exposures to dusts, gases and vapors will simply have to be measured as such operations come on stream. Measurements made to date have not shown unique hazards to exist, although existing data are limited to demonstration-scale retorts burning one-at-a-time under normal conditions.

Voelz, G.L.; Grier, R.S.; Hargis, K.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office More Documents & Publications Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

258

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Authorization for High Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on

259

Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

Silbergeld, Ellen K. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Nyland, Jennifer F. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Accounting for uncertainty in systematic bias in exposure estimates used in relative risk regression  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In many epidemiologic studies addressing exposure-response relationships, sources of error that lead to systematic bias in exposure measurements are known to be present, but there is uncertainty in the magnitude and nature of the bias. Two approaches that allow this uncertainty to be reflected in confidence limits and other statistical inferences were developed, and are applicable to both cohort and case-control studies. The first approach is based on a numerical approximation to the likelihood ratio statistic, and the second uses computer simulations based on the score statistic. These approaches were applied to data from a cohort study of workers at the Hanford site (1944-86) exposed occupationally to external radiation; to combined data on workers exposed at Hanford, Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and Rocky Flats Weapons plant; and to artificial data sets created to examine the effects of varying sample size and the magnitude of the risk estimate. For the worker data, sampling uncertainty dominated and accounting for uncertainty in systematic bias did not greatly modify confidence limits. However, with increased sample size, accounting for these uncertainties became more important, and is recommended when there is interest in comparing or combining results from different studies.

Gilbert, E.S.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Exposure Reduction Through Optimized Planning and Scheduling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry is challenged with increasing material inspections and complex maintenance work in areas with high radiation fields. Compounding this problem is the drive to reduce worker exposure. Efficient job planning and monitoring of worker exposure becomes more important in light of these challenges. An essential component of the ALARA program is centered on accurate and detailed work control. Drawing on industry experience, best practices, and the experience of the EPRI ALARA assessment team, EPRI de...

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

262

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

263

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

264

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

265

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

266

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

267

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

268

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

269

Comparison of electric field exposure monitoring instrumentation. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Electric field exposure monitoring instrumentation was compared and evaluated during three days of tests performed in 60-Hz electric fields. A conducting vest exposure meter and a small electric field exposure meter (EFEM) located in a shirt pocket, arm band or hard hat were compared in a series of static and dynamic tests. In some tests, the devices were worn simultaneously without interference to provide separate measures of identical exposure. Tests with stationary subjects wearing the instruments were used to measure the effects of grounding, and to establish the meter response in a standard posture for each subject. Dynamic occupational exposure simulations were used to compare accumulated measurements of exposure between instruments and to compare measurements with predicted exposures. The simulations were based on analysis of the work-related behavior of substation electricians and operators. Electrician's tasks at ground level and in a bucket truck were simulated near an energized test line. A simulated substation inspection was performed in a 230 kV substation. The exposure measurements demonstrated an overall consistency between the meters. The vest demonstrated less intersubject variability and less detailed exposure characterization. Measurements with the shirt pocket EFEM were below those made with the vest and with the EFEM in other locations. Insulation provided by shoe soles appeared to be the largest factor in reducing measured exposures during the substation inspection below those predicted from the unperturbed field. Improvements in meter design and additional measurements are suggested. 11 refs., 20 figs., 28 tabs.

Bracken, T.D.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Chief Medical Officer: Occupational Medicine in Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Health and Safety Occupational health requirements provide for the medical support of employees through the prevention, management, and compensation of occupational injuries and illnesses. In addition, requirements for the medical assessment of employees working in the nuclear environment provide protection for those employees, their coworkers, and the public. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. A. General Occupational Health B. Hazard-Specific Occupational Health C. Hazardous Materials Occupational Health D. Nuclear Safety E. Medical Screening and Surveillance F. Former Worker Medical Screening and Compensation G. Epidemiology H. Injury and Illness Reporting and Recordkeeping A. General Occupational Health Federal Employees

271

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:Occupancy-Based Energy Management System. The objective ofOccupancy-Based Energy Management System. The experiments to

Sohn, Michael D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM).  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DREAM tool increases space weather DREAM tool increases space weather predictions April 13, 2012 Predicting space weather improved by new DREAM modeling tool Earth's radiation belts can now be studied with a new modeling tool called Dynamic Radiation Environment Assimilation Model (DREAM). Researchers in LANL's Space Science and Applications (ISR-1) group are developing DREAM and described its current capabilities and applications in an article published in Space Weather, a journal of the American Geophysical Union. - 2 - Space environment and its hazards The space environment poses a number of radiation hazards to space systems and their occupants. Relativistic electrons, the dominant source of the radiation dose to spacecraft traveling in the outer radiation belts (3-7 Earth radii), have an electron flux

273

Miniaturized radiation chirper  

SciTech Connect

The disclosure relates to a miniaturized radiation chirper for use with a small battery supplying on the order of 5 volts. A poor quality CdTe crystal which is not necessarily suitable for high resolution gamma ray spectroscopy is incorporated with appropriate electronics so that the chirper emits an audible noise at a rate that is proportional to radiation exposure level. The chirper is intended to serve as a personnel radiation warning device that utilizes new and novel electronics with a novel detector, a CdTe crystal. The resultant device is much smaller and has much longer battery life than existing chirpers.

Umbarger, C. John (Los Alamos, NM); Wolf, Michael A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

RADIATION SAFETY MANUAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RADIATION SAFETY is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students who are directly or indirectly involved in the use of radioisotopes or radiation-producing machines. In July 1963, the State of Texas granted The University of Texas at Austin a broad radioactive materials license for research, development and instruction. While this means a minimum of controls by the state, it requires that The University establish and pursue an effective Radiation Safety Program. The Radiation Safety Committee is responsible for The University's radiation control program outlined in this manual. The use of radiation in a university, where a large number of people may be unaware of their exposure to radiation hazards, makes strict adherence to procedures established by federal and state authorities of paramount importance for the protection of The University and the safety of its faculty, staff and students. It is the responsibility of all faculty, staff and students involved in radiation work to familiarize themselves thoroughly with The University's radiation control program and to comply with its requirements and all applicable federal and state regulations. I hope you will always keep in mind that radiation safety depends on a continuous awareness of potential hazards and on the acceptance

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

New study sees greater low-level radiation threat  

SciTech Connect

A new analysis of Energy Department medical records has found higher than expected cancer rates among workers at DOE's Hanford nuclear weapons plant, suggesting occupational exposure to low-level radiation may be more dangerous than previously thought. The study, released Tuesday by the Philadelphia-based Three Mile Island Public Health Fund, is important not only because of its controversial conclusions, but also because it represents the first independent review of DOE's long-secret worker medical records. The new study done by Stewart and Kneale looked at Hanford worker health records dating up to 1986 - part of a huge trove of data withheld by DOE from independent researchers until two years ago. In their re-analysis of the Hanford worker records, Stewart and Kneale found increased cancer rates among older workers who were over 40 years of age when exposed. And they said that increased susceptibility of older people to radiation-induced cancer was not reflected in the highly influential Japanese atomic bomb studies because people over 50 years of age were [open quotes]grossly under-represented[close quotes] in the A-bomb analyses, possibly because many bomb victims suffered early deaths from high doses.

Lobsenz, G.

1992-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

276

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRIs Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2004 from sixteen participating companies.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

277

Market survey: Lighting loggers and occupancy loggers  

SciTech Connect

Six companies in the United States market lighting loggers, a class of devices that includes runtime and time-of-use lighting loggers and occupancy loggers. Runtime loggers are the simplest and least expensive loggers, measuring how long lights remain off or on -- data useful for assessing energy savings of lighting efficiency upgrades. Time-of-use loggers, manufactured by only one company, are more sophisticated and versatile, as well as more expensive. They record when and for how long lights are turned off and on--data useful for energy savings assessments and billing impact studies for buildings with time-of-use rates. Occupancy loggers are marketed by three companies in the United States. These loggers measure how long lights remain on when no one is in the room. Such data is useful for determining potential savings from occupancy sensors. Lighting loggers are most cost-effective when information is needed on lighting usage in individual spaces. Other methods can be more economical when overall lighting usage for a building or an entire floor is all that is needed. The simplicity of the loggers makes them accessible to anyone interested in assessing lighting savings, including end users, utilities, ESCOs, and consultants. But lighting and occupancy loggers are not always the least expensive or best way to assess lighting retrofit savings, and can be misapplied if used without a clear objective and understanding of the loggers` limitations.

Gregerson, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

278

Mechanisms of Low Dose Radiation-induced T helper Cell Function  

SciTech Connect

Exposure to radiation above levels normally encountered on Earth can occur during wartime, accidents such as those at Three Mile Island and Chernobyl, and detonation of “dirty bombs” by terrorists. Relatively high levels of radiation exposure can also occur in certain occupations (low-level waste sites, nuclear power plants, nuclear medicine facilities, airline industry, and space agencies). Depression or dysfunction of the highly radiosensitive cells of the immune system can lead to serious consequences, including increased risk for infections, cancer, hypersensitivity reactions, poor wound healing, and other pathologies. The focus of this research was on the T helper (Th) subset of lymphocytes that secrete cytokines (proteins), and thus control many actions and interactions of other cell types that make up what is collectively known as the immune system. The Department of Energy (DOE) Low Dose Radiation Program is concerned with mechanisms altered by exposure to high energy photons (x- and gamma-rays), protons and electrons. This study compared, for the first time, the low-dose effects of two of these radiation forms, photons and protons, on the response of Th cells, as well as other cell types with which they communicate. The research provided insights regarding gene expression patterns and capacity to secrete potent immunostimulatory and immunosuppressive cytokines, some of which are implicated in pathophysiological processes. Furthermore, the photon versus proton comparison was important not only to healthy individuals who may be exposed, but also to patients undergoing radiotherapy, since many medical centers in the United States, as well as worldwide, are now building proton accelerators. The overall hypothesis of this study was that whole-body exposure to low-dose photons (gamma-rays) will alter CD4+ Th cell function. We further proposed that exposure to low-dose proton radiation will induce a different pattern of gene and functional changes compared to photons. Over the course of this research, tissues other than spleens were archived and with funding obtained from other sources, including the Department of Radiation Medicine at the Loma Linda University Medical Center, some additional assays were performed. Furthermore, groups of additional mice were included that were pre-exposed to low-dose photons before irradiating with acute photons, protons, and simulated solar particle event (SPE) protons. Hence, the original support together with the additional funding for our research led to generation of much valuable information that was originally not anticipated. Some of the data has already resulted in published articles, manuscripts in review, and a number of presentations at scientific conferences and workshops. Difficulties in reliable and reproducible quantification of secreted cytokines using multi-plex technology delayed completion of this study for a period of time. However, final analyses of the remaining data are currently being performed and should result in additional publications and presentations in the near future. Some of the most notable conclusions, thus far, are briefly summarized below: - Distribution of leukocytes were dependent upon cell type, radiation quality, body compartment analyzed, and time after exposure. Low-dose protons tended to have less effect on numbers of major leukocyte populations and T cell subsets compared to low-dose photons. - The patterns of gene and cytokine expression in CD4+ T cells after protracted low-dose irradiation were significantly modified and highly dependent upon the total dose and time after exposure. - Patterns of gene and cytokine expression differed substantially among groups exposed to low-dose photons versus low-dose protons; differences were also noted among groups exposed to much higher doses of photons, protons, and simulated SPE protons. - Some measurements indicated that exposure to low-dose photon radiation, especially 0.01 Gy, significantly “normalized” at least some adverse effects of simulated SPE protons, thereby suggesting that this l

Gridley, Daila S.

2008-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

279

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: March 8, 2010 3: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on AddThis.com... Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates The average number of persons occupying a car is 1.59 and has not changed

280

Non-Intrusive Occupancy Monitoring using Smart Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed information about a home's occupancy is necessary to implement many advanced energy-efficiency optimizations. However, monitoring occupancy directly is intrusive, typically requiring the deployment of multiple environmental sensors, e.g., motion, ... Keywords: Electricity, Energy, Grid

Dong Chen, Sean Barker, Adarsh Subbaswamy, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Occupant Behavior: Impact on Energy Use of Private Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of occupant behavior on building energy use is significant, and even so at the energy end use levels such as lighting, space cooling and heating. For atypical single-occupancy...

282

Analyzing occupancy profiles from a lighting controls field study  

SciTech Connect

Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings, only one US study examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow one to determine, for example, the probability that an office is occupied for each hour of the workday. Occupancy profiles are useful for many purposes including: (1) predicting the effectiveness of occupancy sensors for reducing peak demand, (2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting and other electric loads and (3) providing lighting equipment manufacturers with detailed lighting operation data to help evaluate the impact of advanced lighting controls on equipment life. In this paper, we examine the occupancy profiles for 35 single person offices at a large office building in San Francisco and analyze the data to obtain average occupancy as a function of time of day. In addition, we analyzed the data to identify how the use of occupancy sensors may affect switching cycles and lamp life.

Rubinstein, Francis; Colak, Nesrin; Jennings, Judith; Neils, Danielle

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012...

284

Chapter 15: Radiation Safety and Shielding 15-1 NSLS-II Conceptual Design Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

controls will only be employed as supplemental to control radiation exposure. An internal control level in the BNL Standards Based Management System. The maximum annual exposure to radiation workers and members 835.1001, measures will be taken to maintain radiation exposure as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA

Ohta, Shigemi

285

Nevada Test Site Radiation Protection Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Title 10 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 835, 'Occupational Radiation Protection', establishes radiation protection standards, limits, and program requirements for protecting individuals from ionizing radiation resulting from the conduct of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) activities. 10 CFR 835.101(a) mandates that DOE activities be conducted in compliance with a documented Radiation Protection Program (RPP) as approved by DOE. This document promulgates the RPP for the Nevada Test Site (NTS), related (onsite or offsite) DOE National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO) operations, and environmental restoration offsite projects.

Radiological Control Managers' Council, Nevada Test Site

2007-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

286

Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SECURITY PLAN FOR THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM S January 23, 2009 ...

287

Occupational Health Programs - Jacqueline Agnew, PhD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Knowledge Base -Hospital - Construction -Brewery -Garment -Printing - Research Facilities Essential Components of Occupational & Environmental Health Programs 1 . Health...

288

Fundamentals of Radiation Dosimetry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The basic concepts of radiation dosimetry are reviewed on basis of ICRU reports and text books. The radiation field is described with, among others, the particle fluence. Cross sections for indirectly ionizing radiation are defined and indicated is how they are related to the mass energy transfer and mass energy absorption coefficients. Definitions of total and restricted mass stopping powers of directly ionizing radiation are given. The dosimetric quantities, kerma, absorbed dose and exposure together with the relations between them are discussed in depth. Finally it is indicated how the absorbed dose can be measured with a calorimeter by measuring the temperature increase and with an ionisation chamber measuring the charge produced by the ionizing radiation and making use of the Bragg-Gray relation.

Bos, Adrie J. J. [Delft University of Technology, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Mekelweg 15, 2629JB Delft (Netherlands)

2011-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

Population exposure from the fuel cycle: Review and future direction  

SciTech Connect

The legacy of radiation exposures confronting man arises from two historical sources of energy, the sun and radioactive decay. Contemporary man continues to be dependent on these two energy sources, which include the nuclear fuel cycle. Radiation exposures from all energy sources should be examined, with particular emphasis on the nuclear fuel cycle, incidents such as Chernobyl and Three Mile Island. In addition to risk estimation, concepts such as de minimis, life shortening as a measure of risk, and competing risks as projected into the future must be considered in placing radiation exposures in perspective. The utility of these concepts is in characterizing population exposures for decision makers in a manner that the public may judge acceptable. All these viewpoints are essential in the evaluation of population exposure from the nuclear fuel cycle.

Richmond, C.R.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Exposure to airborne asbestos in buildings  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of airborne asbestos in buildings and its implication for the health of building occupants is a major public health issue. A total of 2892 air samples from 315 public, commercial, residential, school, and university buildings has been analyzed by transmission electron microscopy. The buildings that were surveyed were the subject of litigation related to suits alleging the general building occupants were exposed to a potential health hazard as a result of exposure to the presence of asbestos containing materials (ACM). The average concentration of all asbestos structures was 0.02 structures/ml (s/ml) and the average concentration of asbestos greater than or equal to 5 microns long was 0.00013 fibers/ml (f/ml). The concentration of asbestos was higher in schools than in other buildings. In 48% of indoor samples and 75% of outdoor samples, no asbestos fibers were detected. The observed airborne concentration in 74% of the indoor samples and 96% of the outdoor samples is below the Asbestos Hazard Emergency Response Act clearance level of 0.01 s/ml. Finally, using those fibers which could be seen optically, all indoor samples and all outdoor samples are below the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure level of 0.1 f/ml for fibers greater than or equal to 5 microns in length. These results provide substantive verification of the findings of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency public building study which found very low ambient concentrations of asbestos fibers in buildings with ACM, irrespective of the condition of the material in the buildings.

Lee, R.J.; Van Orden, D.R.; Corn, M.; Crump, K.S. (RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States))

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation Athanasius Zakhary Faculty University, Giza, Egypt (n.elgayar@fci-cu.edu.eg) #12;Abstract Forecasting hotel arrivals and occupancy simulation approach for the arrivals and occupancy forecasting problem. In this approach we simulate

Atiya, Amir

292

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposes an HVAC control strategy based on occupancy prediction and real time occupancy monitoring via simulation model. We dis- cuss the building parameters and the HVAC control strate- gies used for the energyOccupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California

Cerpa, Alberto E.

293

Radiation effects on humans  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation effects on humans Radiation effects on humans Name: Joe Kemna Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: I am trying to find information on radiation. I need the effects on humans, the damage it causes to the environment, and any extra information you might have on the subject. Thank you for your time. Replies: Your library should be a good place to start, but first you need to narrow your question a bit. "Radiation" means radio waves, heat, light (including the ultraviolet light that causes suntan and sunburn), and what's called "ionizing radiation." By far the major source of the first three is the Sun, while the last I believe comes principally from cosmic rays and various naturally radioactive elements like uranium and radon. The most significant manmade sources of exposure would --- I think --- be household wiring and appliances (radio), engines and heating devices (heat), lamps (light), and X-ray machines, flying at high altitude in airplanes, and living in well-insulated homes built over radon sources (ionizing radiation). Heat, light and ionizing radiation play vital roles in the ecology of the Earth. Radio, light (in particular "tanning" ultraviolet), and ionizing radiation have all been widely assumed at different times to be particularly good or particularly bad for human health. Some recent issues of public concern have been the effect of radio waves from electric transmission lines, the effect on skin cancer incidence from tanning and sunburns, the depletion of the ultraviolet-light-produced ozone in the upper atmosphere by chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), "global warming" from the increased absorption of heat radiation from the surface by atmospheric carbon dioxide and methane, and the effect of a long exposure to low levels of ionizing radiation as for example the people of Eastern Europe are experiencing from the Chernobyl nuclear power plant accident.

294

Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation  

SciTech Connect

FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Supported by the Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy Grant No. DE-FG02-07ER64345 Project ID: 0012965 Award Register#: ER64345 Project Manager: Noelle F. Metting, Sc.D. Phone: 301-903-8309 Division SC-23.2 noelle.metting@science.doe.gov Submitted March 2012 To: https://www.osti.gov/elink/241.3.jsp Title: Th Cell Gene Expression and Function in Response to Low Dose and Acute Radiation PI: Daila S. Gridley, Ph.D. Human low dose radiation data have been derived primarily from studies of space and airline flight personnel, nuclear plant workers and others exposed occupationally, as well as victims in the vicinity of atomic bomb explosions. The findings remain inconclusive due to population inconsistencies and complex interactions among total dose, dose rate, radiation quality and age at exposure. Thus, safe limits for low dose occupational irradiation are currently based on data obtained with doses far exceeding the levels expected for the general population and health risks have been largely extrapolated using the linear-nonthreshold dose-response model. The overall working hypothesis of the present study is that priming with low dose, low-linear energy transfer (LET) radiation can ameliorate the response to acute high-dose radiation exposure. We also propose that the efficacy of low-dose induced protection will be dependent upon the form and regimen of the high-dose exposure: photons versus protons versus simulated solar particle event protons (sSPE). The emphasis has been on gene expression and function of CD4+ T helper (Th) lymphocytes harvested from spleens of whole-body irradiated C57BL/6 mice, a strain that provides the genetic background for many genetically engineered strains. Evaluations of the responses of other selected cells, tissues such as skin, and organs such as lung, liver and brain were also initiated (partially funded by other sources). The long-term goal is to provide information that will be useful in estimating human health risks due to radiation that may occur during exposures in the work environment, nuclear/radiological catastrophes, as well as radiotherapy. Several papers have been published, accepted for publication or are in preparation. A number of poster and oral presentations have been made at scientific conferences and workshops. Archived tissues of various types will continue to be evaluated via funding from other sources (the DoE Low Dose Radiation Research Program, Office of Science and this specific grant will be appropriately included in the Acknowledgements of all subsequent publications/presentations). A post-doc and several students have participated in this study. More detailed description of the accomplishments is described in attached file.

Daila S. Gridley, PhD

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

295

An Assessment of Aquatic Radiation Pathways in Northern Ireland  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.1 The fishing industry 11 3.2 Fishing areas 11 4. INTERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURE PATHWAYS 12 4.1 Fish 12 4. ANALYSIS OF DATA 19 7.1 Internal radiation exposure 19 7.1.1 Fish consumption 19 7.1.2 Crustacean and clams 14 4.3.4 Razor fish and squid 15 5. EXTERNAL RADIATION EXPOSURE PATHWAYS 15 5.1 Beach and coastal

296

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

etc. * Medical screenings include a physical exam, hearing test, blood and urine tests, and other special tests depending on the individual's work and exposure history. * An...

297

About Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation What is radiation? Radiation is a form of energy that is a part of our everyday lives. All of us receive a "dose" of radiation each day. Most of the dose comes from...

298

FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Card - Occupational Safety Qualification Card - Occupational Safety FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-OccupationalSafety.docx Description Occupational Safety Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Chemical Processing

299

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Purpose The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers' compensation, and much more. This training will advance DOE's mission as follows: By providing medical and allied health professionals (eg, Industrial Hygiene) and their management with updates regarding medical services and

300

Radiation and viral DNA  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation and viral DNA Radiation and viral DNA Name: Loretta L Lamb Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: N/A Question: Can viral DNA be changed through exposure to radiation? If so, what type of radiation will do this? Can these irradiated viruses cause changes in the genome of any human cells they may infect? Can these (or any) viruses actually cause cancer, or do they merely act as triggering devices for cancer? Replies: In theory, any nucleic acid (viral or otherwise) can be changed by exposure to many kinds of radiation. Depending on the type of virus, these may then change the human cells that they infect. Although there are many different things that are being implicated in causing cancers, it looks like a fairly common model involves the sequential "knockout" of several human genes. Viruses may be one cause of such gene changes, radiation and other environmental causes may also contribute. Some of these changes may be inherited through families, so it becomes more likely that the environmental factors may happen to "hit" the right places in cells to cause cancers in these families. If you ask something more specific, perhaps I can focus my response a bit more

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

The Association between Cancers and Low Level Radiation: an evaluation of the epidemiological evidence at the Hanford Nuclear Weapons Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

indiv. indiv. Gilbertetal. (Hanford & Combined) Gilbertetal.on both radiation and the Hanford facility. The data used toG. Radiation exposures of Hanford workers dying from cancer

Britton, Julie

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

A Review of the European Union's Directive on Limiting Exposure of Workers to Electromagnetic Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European Union’s Directive on Limiting Exposure of Workers to Electromagnetic Fields (EMF) adopts exposure limits based on guidance from the International Commission on Non-Ionizing Radiation Protection (ICNIRP). This report presents a summary of the draft Directive concerning workplace exposure limits and compliance issues. The summary explains quantitative EMF exposure limits in general and clarifies the Directive’s use of the terms exposure limit values (ELV) and action ...

2013-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

303

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Medicine Assistant PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medicine Medicine - Assistant PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Deparlment of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT iDafe 'Depauwerltal El.ment& iSlte June 10, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name :of,lnfonnation Systetnol"'ITiPtoJect Occupational Medicine - Assistant Exhlblt;ProJect UID Indirect funded Occupational Safety and Health NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email System Owner Local Privacy Act Offtcer

304

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Energy Employees' Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided In the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) System or IT ProJect Tracking Database Exhibit Project

305

Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to do the same. Reducing the demand for energy produced from depletable resources and generating energy from renewable sources leaves more resources available for future use. Therefore, energy savings and sustainability go hand in hand. Occupant comfort can be maintained in conjunction with energy savings, and some sustainable practices enhance comfort. Properly planned and implemented construction programs can help ensure efficiently operating systems, reducing the consumption of valuable resources, while providing an acceptable indoor environment. The authors have more than 30 years combined experience working with Texas schools in mechanical, electrical, and plumbing engineering and design as well as energy management.

Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors October 7, 2013 - 9:09am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for vending machine occupancy sensors within the Federal sector. Benefits Vending machine occupancy sensors detect when no people are in the vicinity and powers down beverage vending machines. These systems do not completely turn off compressor, but reduce their run times. Application Vending machine occupancy sensors are applicable in most building categories where vending machines are present. Key Factors for Deployment Occupancy sensors or similar features should be an integral part of new vending machine purchases. Ranking Criteria Federal energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success are

307

Radiation of Hiroshima and Nagasaki builds foundation for risk estimates  

SciTech Connect

A discussion of the international cooperation between Japan and the United States in documenting radiation exposure and its medical effects on atomic bomb survivors is present.

Ketchum, L.E.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

NIST Ionizing Radiat. Div. - 2004: Strategic Focus 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... and to determine exposure or dose-rate values ... to maximize the energy absorption of the ionizing radiation. ... the calibration of an 55 Fe low-energy x ...

309

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Human radiation studies: Remembering the early years: Oral history of biochemist William D. Moss, conducted November 30, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This report is a transcript of an interview with William D. Moss by representatives of the US DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments. Mr. Moss was selected for this interview because of his work at Los Alamos National Laboratory concerning analytical methods in the chemical determination of plutonium in biological materials. After a brief biographical sketch, Mr. Moss relates his understanding of how occupational exposure limits were determined for the Manhattan Project, how data from those workers who were exposed to plutonium was collected and analyzed, how the experiments were planned and data was gathered from plutonium or polonium injections in man, how problems with analytical procedures compounded health physics aspects of the project, and problems remaining in the interpretation of these data.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Gamma-Ray Exposure Rate Distribution in a Steam Generator  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gamma-ray exposure rate measurements were made with thermoluminescent dosimeters to determine the relative contribution of various surface areas in a steam generator to the overall radiation levels. The measurements were compared with analytic predictions based on discrete ordinates and point kernel techniques, and assessments of the radiation source inventory of the various surfaces were developed.

1983-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 1, 301-302 Human Exploration of the Moon and Mars: Space Radiation Data,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and development of instrumentation to guide NASA in managing the radiation exposure of the crew during the manned to carefully manage the radiation exposure of the crew in real time because of the variability of the radiation occurs. This is especially true if it occurs during a lunar excursion. A substantial radiation exposure

Lin, Zi-wei

314

Integrating Human Indoor Air Pollutant Exposure within Life Cycle Impact Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Neglecting health effects from indoor pollutant emissions and exposure, as currently done in Life Cycle Assessment (LCA), may result in product or process optimizations at the expense of workers? or consumers? health. To close this gap, methods for considering indoor exposure to chemicals are needed to complement the methods for outdoor human exposure assessment already in use. This paper summarizes the work of an international expert group on the integration of human indoor and outdoor exposure in LCA, within the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative. A new methodological framework is proposed for a general procedure to include human-health effects from indoor exposure in LCA. Exposure models from occupational hygiene and household indoor air quality studies and practices are critically reviewed and recommendations are provided on the appropriateness of various model alternatives in the context of LCA. A single-compartment box model is recommended for use as a default in LCA, enabling one to screen occupational and household exposures consistent with the existing models to assess outdoor emission in a multimedia environment. An initial set of model parameter values was collected. The comparison between indoor and outdoor human exposure per unit of emission shows that for many pollutants, intake per unit of indoor emission may be several orders of magnitude higher than for outdoor emissions. It is concluded that indoor exposure should be routinely addressed within LCA.

Hellweg, Stefanie; Demou, Evangelia; Bruzzi, Raffaella; Meijer, Arjen; Rosenbaum, Ralph K.; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; McKone, Thomas E.

2008-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

315

Characterization of the Neutron Fields in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Radiation Calibration Laboratory Low Scatter Calibration Facility  

SciTech Connect

In June 2007, the Department of Energy (DOE) revised its rule on Occupational Radiation Protection, Part 10 CFR 835. A significant aspect of the revision was the adoption of the recommendations outlined in International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) Report 60 (ICRP-60), including new radiation weighting factors for neutrons, updated internal dosimetric models, and dose terms consistent with the newer ICRP recommendations. ICRP-60 uses the quantities defined by the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) for personnel and area monitoring including the ambient dose equivalent H*(d). A Joint Task Group of ICRU and ICRP has developed various fluence-to-dose conversion coefficients which are published in ICRP-74 for both protection and operational quantities. In February 2008, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) replaced its old pneumatic transport neutron irradiation system in the Radiation Calibration Laboratory (RCL) Low Scatter Calibration Facility (B255, Room 183A) with a Hopewell Designs irradiator model N40. The exposure tube for the Hopewell system is located close to, but not in exactly the same position as the exposure tube for the pneumatic system. Additionally, the sources for the Hopewell system are stored in Room 183A where, prior to the change, they were stored in a separate room (Room 183C). The new source configuration and revision of the 10 CFR 835 radiation weighting factors necessitate a re-evaluation of the neutron dose rates in B255 Room 183A. This report deals only with the changes in the operational quantities ambient dose equivalent and ambient dose rate equivalent for neutrons as a result of the implementation of the revised 10 CFR 835. In the report, the terms 'neutron dose' and 'neutron dose rate' will be used for convenience for ambient neutron dose equivalent and ambient neutron dose rate equivalent unless otherwise stated.

Radev, R

2009-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

316

Low Dose Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ancient Salt Beds Ancient Salt Beds Repository Science Renewable Energy The WIPP Underground may be ideal to study effects of Very Low Dose Rates on Biological Systems Low Background Radiation Experiment We're all bathing in it. It's in the food we eat, the water we drink, the soil we tread and even the air we breathe. It's background radiation, it's everywhere and we can't get away from it. But what would happen if you somehow "pulled the plug" on natural background radiation? Would organisms suffer or thrive if they grew up without their constant exposure to background radiation? That's what a consortium of scientists conducting an experiment at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant aim to find out. Despite being an underground repository for transuranic radioactive waste,

317

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is disclosed of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation. The dose is in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue. No Drawings

Slatkin, D.N.; Dilmanian, F.A.; Spanne, P.O.

1994-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

318

Method for microbeam radiation therapy  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of performing radiation therapy on a patient, involving exposing a target, usually a tumor, to a therapeutic dose of high energy electromagnetic radiation, preferably X-ray radiation, in the form of at least two non-overlapping microbeams of radiation, each microbeam having a width of less than about 1 millimeter. Target tissue exposed to the microbeams receives a radiation dose during the exposure that exceeds the maximum dose that such tissue can survive. Non-target tissue between the microbeams receives a dose of radiation below the threshold amount of radiation that can be survived by the tissue, and thereby permits the non-target tissue to regenerate. The microbeams may be directed at the target from one direction, or from more than one direction in which case the microbeams overlap within the target tissue enhancing the lethal effect of the irradiation while sparing the surrounding healthy tissue.

Slatkin, Daniel N. (Sound Beach, NY); Dilmanian, F. Avraham (Yaphank, NY); Spanne, Per O. (Shoreham, NY)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Radiation control standards and procedures  

SciTech Connect

This manual contains the Radiation Control Standards'' and Radiation Control Procedures'' at Hanford Operations which have been established to provide the necessary control radiation exposures within Irradiation Processing Department. Provision is also made for including, in the form of Bulletins'', other radiological information of general interest to IPD personnel. The purpose of the standards is to establish firm radiological limits within which the Irradiation Processing Department will operate, and to outline our radiation control program in sufficient detail to insure uniform and consistent application throughout all IPD facilities. Radiation Control Procedures are intended to prescribe the best method of accomplishing an objective within the limitations of the Radiation Control Standards. A procedure may be changed at any time provided the suggested changes is generally agreeable to management involved, and is consistent with department policies and the Radiation Control Standards.

1956-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

320

Health Risks Associated with Low Doses of Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Despite a wealth of information, there remains uncertainty concerning human radiation effects at low dose levels. This report provides background information and a literature review of research on the potential health hazards associated with exposure to low-level ionizing radiation. Topics include radiation characteristics, protection standards, epidemiologic data and risk models, the nature of human health exposure-related effects, important radiation health studies to date, and the scientific method fo...

1994-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

The ionizing radiation environment in space and its effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ionizing radiation environment in space poses a hazard for spacecraft and space crews. The hazardous components of this environment are reviewed and those which contribute to radiation hazards and effects identified. Avoiding the adverse effects of space radiation requires design, planning, monitoring and management. Radiation effects on spacecraft are avoided largely though spacecraft design. Managing radiation exposures of space crews involves not only protective spacecraft design and careful mission planning. Exposures must be managed in real time. The now-casting and forecasting needed to effectively manage crew exposures is presented. The techniques used and the space environment modeling needed to implement these techniques are discussed.

Adams, Jim; Falconer, David; Fry, Dan [Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research (CSPAR), UA Huntsville (United States); Space Radiation Analysis Group, NASA Johnson Space Center (United States)

2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

322

Radiation: Radiation Control (Indiana)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

It is the policy of the state to encourage the constructive uses of radiation and to control its harmful effects. This section contains regulations pertaining to the manufacture, use,...

323

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Radiation-absorbed doses were estimated by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose scheme. Results After injecting 18 F-SP203, the two organs with highest radiation exposure were urinary bladder wallORIGINAL ARTICLE Biodistribution and radiation dosimetry of a positron emission tomographic ligand

Shen, Jun

324

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protection Against Ionizing Radiation in Extreme Radiation-resistant Microorganisms. ... Elucidated radiation protection by intracellular halides. ...

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Spatiotemporal and spatial threshold models for relating UV exposures and skin cancer in the central United States  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The exact mechanisms relating exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation and elevated risk of skin cancer remain the subject of debate. For example, there is disagreement on whether the main risk factor is duration of the exposure, its intensity, or some ...

Laura A. Hatfield; Richard W. Hoffbeck; Bruce H. Alexander; Bradley P. Carlin

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medical Services Contract Occupational Medical Services Contract DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract June 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that HPM Corporation, of Kennewick, Washington has been awarded an estimated $99 million contract to provide Occupational Medical Services at the DOE Hanford Site. HPM is a certified minority-owned, women-owned small business. This is a two-year hybrid contract with four-one-year option periods that includes firm-fixed price with award fee, cost reimbursement, and Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) components. As the Occupational Medical Services Contractor, HPM Corporation will: Provide occupational medical services to approximately 8,000

327

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid

328

EXPERIENCE MONITORING FOR LOW LEVEL NEUTRON RADIATION AT THE H-CANYON AT THE SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Department of Energy contractors are required to monitor external occupational radiation exposure of an individual likely to receive an effective dose equivalent to the whole body of 0.1 rem (0.001sievert) or more in a year. For a working year of 2000 hours, this translates to a dose rate of 0.05 mrem/hr (0.5 {micro}Sv/hr). This can be a challenging requirement for neutron exposure because traditional surveys with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters are difficult to conduct, particularly at low dose rates. A modified survey method was used at the Savannah River Site to find low dose rates in excess of 0.05 mrem/hr. An unshielded He{sup 3} detector was used to find elevated gross slow neutron counts. Areas with high count rates on the unshielded He{sup 3} detector were further investigated with shielded BF{sub 3} proportional counters and thermoluminescent neutron dosimeters were placed in the area of interest. An office area was investigated with this method. The data initially suggested that whole body neutron dose rates to office workers could be occurring at levels significantly higher than 0.1 rem (0.001sievert). The final evaluation, however, showed that the office workers were exposed to less than 0.1 rem/yr (0.001sievert/yr) of neutron radiation.

HOGUE, MARK

2005-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

329

Beta Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Beta Radiation 1. Beta radiation may travel meters in air and is moderately penetrating. 2. Beta radiation can penetrate human skin to the "germinal layer," where new skin cells...

330

RADIATION MONITORING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Monitoring for Radiation Protection of Workers" in ICRPNo. 9, in "Advances in Radiation Protection and Dosimetry inDosimetry f o r Stray Radiation Monitoring on the CERN S i t

Thomas, R.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

EPRI Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2004: Occupational Health and Safety Trends 1995-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fifth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2003 from fourteen participating companies.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

332

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office Buildings: An Evaluation of Sampled Data from Five European Countries Speaker(s): John Stoops Date: January 3,...

333

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

334

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the United States and explores policy alternatives and effects related to conversion of existing HOV lanes to high occupancy toll lane operations. References Retrieved...

335

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

336

Window signalling systems: control strategies and occupant behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant response to window control signaling systems (CBEDaly, A. (2002). Operable windows and HVAC systems. HPACK. (2008). The use of windows as controls for indoor

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,quality survey in office buildings, comparing green withnon-green buildings. On average, occupants in green

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential or commercial? The IECC...

339

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity Chronic Low Dose Radiation Effects on Radiation Sensitivity and Chromosome Instability Induction in TK6 Cells Schwartz J.L. 1 , Jordan R. 1 , Slovic J. 1 , Moruzzi A. 1 , Kimmel R. 2 , and Liber, H.L. 3 1 University of Washington, Seattle, WA; 2 Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, Seattle, WA; 3 Colorado State University, Fort Collins, Colorado There are a number of cell responses that can be detected after low dose radiation exposures including the adaptive response, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability. The relationship between these different phenomena is unknown. In this study, we measured adaptive responses, low dose hypersensitivity, and induced genomic instability in a human B-lymphoblastoid cell model, TK6, where we could genetically modify radiation responses by either over-expression of BCL-2 or deletion of TP53. TK6

340

Occupational safety and health law handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

Sarvadi, D.G. [ed.; Keller; Heckman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Evaluating the performance robustness of fixed and movable shading devices against diverse occupant behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the diverse operating conditions, weather conditions, space users, and occupant preferences of buildings, it is commonplace to provide occupants with multiple means to adapt their immediate indoor environment. However, numerous studies have shown ... Keywords: building performance simulation, occupant behaviour, occupant comfort, robust building design, stochastic occupant modelling

William O'Brien

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Title Pollutant exposures from unvented gas cooking burners: A simulation-based assessment for Southern California Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Logue, Jennifer M., Neil E. Klepeis, Agnes B. Lobscheid, and Brett C. Singer Journal Environmental Health Perspectives Date Published 11/2013 Abstract Background: Residential natural gas cooking burners (NGCBs) can emit substantial quantities of pollutants and they are typically used without venting. Objective: Quantify pollutant concentrations and occupant exposures resulting from NGCB use in California homes. Methods: A mass balance model was applied to estimate time-dependent pollutant concentrations throughout homes and the "exposure concentrations" experienced by individual occupants. The model was applied to estimate nitrogen dioxide (NO2), carbon monoxide (CO), and formaldehyde (HCHO) concentrations for one week each in summer and winter for a representative sample of Southern California homes. The model simulated pollutant emissions from NGCBs, NO2 and CO entry from outdoors, dilution throughout the home, and removal by ventilation and deposition. Residence characteristics and outdoor concentrations of CO and NO2 were obtained from available databases. Ventilation rates, occupancy patterns, and burner use were inferred from household characteristics. Proximity to the burner(s) and the benefits of using venting range hoods were also explored. Replicate model executions using independently generated sets of stochastic variable values yielded estimated pollutant concentration distributions with geometric means varying less than 10%.

344

Development of Radio Frequency Exposure Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While unconfirmed claims of adverse human health effects from electromagnetic radiation date to the 1930s, development of modern safety standards did not begin until the 1952 Hirsch study of eye damage at a microwave power density of 100 mW/cm2. Early work on standards focused on microwave frequencies due to rapid development of radar and microwave communications links. In the years since 1952, radio frequency (RF) exposure standards have kept pace with those technological advancements. While refinements...

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

types with respect to Pilgrim International THUs, byCavalier; KS = Keystone; PI = Pilgrim Temp = Temperature; RHbedroom and bunk area of Pilgrim 1 on 5/21/2009. The average

Parthasarathy, Srinandini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Number Number Table 6 – Air conditioning usage. Statisticsn=3559).   Do you use air-conditioning? Yes No Don’t knowCDC Survey Table 6 – Air conditioning usage. Statistics from

Parthasarathy, Srinandini

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Impact of Genetic Factors on the  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Genetic Factors on the Heritable Effects of Paternal Exposure to Low-Dose Radiation Janet E. Baulch University of California, Davis Why This Project? There is concern about the possible genetic effects of low dose radiation exposure. As a result, much effort has gone towards understanding mutation of cells due to radiation exposure. While recognition of the potential for mutation from exposure to ionizing radiation has led to extensive research, less effort has been given to the possible delayed risk of radiation exposure transmitted to the offspring of the exposed parent. Data from animal models show that parental exposures to DNA-damaging agents, such as ionizing radiation, predispose the offspring to serious health effects, including cancer offspring. Additionally, data from both humans and animal

348

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exposure system is designed for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder. 2 figs.

Briant, J.K.; Driver, C.J.

1992-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

349

Avian inhalation exposure chamber  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An exposure system for delivering gaseous material ranging in particle size from 0.4 micrometers to 20.0 micrometers uniformly to the heads of experimental animals, primarily birds. The system includes a vertical outer cylinder and a central chimney with animal holding bottles connected to exposure ports on the vertical outer cylinder.

Briant, James K. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352); Driver, Crystal J. (P.O. Box 999, Richland, WA 99352)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low Dose, Ionizing Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low Dose, Ionizing Radiation Oxidative Stress and Skeletal Health with Low Dose, Ionizing Radiation Globus Ruth NASA Ames Research Center Abstract Osteoporosis profoundly affects the aging U.S. population and exposure to high doses of radiation causes bone loss similar to age-related osteoporosis, although the influence of low dose radiation exposures is not known. The central hypothesis of our DOE project (NASA supplement) is that low doses of radiation modulate subsequent skeletal degeneration via oxidative pathways. Our working hypothesis is that a prior exposure to low dose radiation regulates oxidative metabolism within bone and contributes to bone loss caused either by subsequent high, challenge doses of radiation or by aging. HZE source: Because astronauts are exposed to radiation from GCR and solar

351

Optical Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Optical Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ionizing Radiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

*. Bookmark and Share. Ionizing Radiation Measurements. Fees for services are located directly below the technical contacts ...

2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

353

Occupancy-driven energy management for smart building automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings are among the largest consumers of electricity in the US. A significant portion of this energy use in buildings can be attributed to HVAC systems used to maintain comfort for occupants. In most cases these building HVAC systems run on fixed ... Keywords: HVAC control system, occupancy detection system, wireless sensor network

Yuvraj Agarwal; Bharathan Balaji; Rajesh Gupta; Jacob Lyles; Michael Wei; Thomas Weng

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming Hern´an Badino1Chrysler AG, Stuttgart Abstract. The computation of free space available in an environment is an essential, which builds a stochastic occupancy grid to address the free space problem as a dynamic pro- gramming

Mester, Rudolf

355

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources Binghamton University State University of New York P.O. Box 6000 Health Services, IN-204 (607) 777-4610, Fax: (607) 777-2881 Health is strictly for the use of the Occupational Health and Safety Program for Laboratory Animal Resources and may

Suzuki, Masatsugu

356

STATE OF CALIFORNIA HOTEL / MOTEL TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX WAIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR STATE AGENCIES) HOTEL MOTEL OPERATORS: RETAIN THIS WAIVER FOR YOUR FILES TO SUBSTANTIATE YOUR REPORTS of the State Agency indicated below; that the charge for the occupancy at the above establishment on the dates of California. $ OCCUPANCY DATES AMOUNT PAID California State University, Fullerton STATE AGENCY NAME 800 North

de Lijser, Peter

357

POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for optimally controlling HVAC systems in buildings based on actual occupancy levels. POEM is comprised for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based are then fused with an occupancy prediction model us- ing a particle filter in order to determine the most

Cerpa, Alberto E.

358

Estimation of building occupancy levels through environmental signals deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of estimating the occupancy levels in rooms using the information available in standard HVAC systems. Instead of employing dedicated devices, we exploit the significant statistical correlations between the occupancy levels and ... Keywords: Inference, Parametric and Nonparametric methods, System Identification

Afrooz Ebadat, Giulio Bottegal, Damiano Varagnolo, Bo Wahlberg, Karl H. Johansson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

PreHeat: controlling home heating using occupancy prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home heating is a major factor in worldwide energy use. Our system, PreHeat, aims to more efficiently heat homes by using occupancy sensing and occupancy prediction to automatically control home heating. We deployed PreHeat in five homes, three in the ... Keywords: energy, environment, home heating, prediction, sensing

James Scott; A.J. Bernheim Brush; John Krumm; Brian Meyers; Michael Hazas; Stephen Hodges; Nicolas Villar

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Female Breast Cancer Feasibility Study: A Comparision of Magnetic Field Exposures in a Garment Manufacturing Facility and Electric U tility Work Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes research activities from the first phase of a proposed study of occupational magnetic field exposures and female breast cancer. Due to the small number of female employees in the utility industry with high magnetic field exposures, this project focused on the garment industry. Key activities included magnetic field measurement surveys at an electric utility and garment manufacturing facility, and a comparison of the exposures in these two industries. Additional activities evaluated...

2000-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program July 2009 A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to become familiar with and utilize the services and benefits authorized under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOIPCA). There are several Federal entities that support implementation of EEOICPA. Each of these entities serves a critical and unique role in this process. Briefly, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers'

362

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers February 1, 2010 Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well-being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening

363

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) March 17-18, 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW): Registration, Directions, Lodging, and Access REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE SYSTEM The 2014 DOE Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar will be held March 17-18 in Room 4A-104 of the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, DC. Register for the 2014 OMWW at http://hsspublic.energy.gov/Workshops/CMO/2014/Registration.aspx. The deadline for registration will be January 17, 2014 in order to comply with conference system requirements. Upon completing the registration, you will immediately receive a confirmatory email. An additional confirmatory email will be sent to registrants shortly after January 17th (once all

364

Updated Mortality Analysis of Radiation Workers at Rocketdyne (Atomics International), 1948-2008  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Updated analyses of mortality data are presented on 46,970 workers employed 1948-1999 at Rocketdyne (Atomics International). Overall, 5,801 workers were involved in radiation activities, including 2,232 who were monitored for intakes of radionuclides, and 41,169 workers were engaged in rocket testing or other non-radiation activities. The worker population is unique in that lifetime occupational doses from all places of employment were sought, updated and incorporated into the analyses. Further, radiation doses from intakes of 14 different radionuclides were calculated for 16 organs or tissues using biokinetic models of the International Commission on Radiation Protection (ICRP). Because only negligible exposures were received by the 247 workers monitored for radiation activities after 1999, the mean dose from external radiation remained essentially the same at 13.5 mSv (maximum 1 Sv) as reported previously, as did the mean lung dose from external and internal radiation combined at 19.0 mSv (maximum 3.6 Sv). An additional 9 years of follow-up, from December 31,1999 through 2008, increased the person-years of observation for the radiation workers by 21.7% to 196,674 (mean 33.9 years) and the number of cancer deaths by 50% to 684. Analyses included external comparisons with the general population and the computation of standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) and internal comparisons using proportional hazards models and the computation of relative risks (RRs). A low SMR for all causes of death (SMR 0.82; 95% CI 0.78-0.85) continued to indicate that the Rocketdyne radiation workers were healthier than the general population and were less likely to die. The SMRs for all cancers taken together (SMR 0.88; 95% CI 0.81-0.95), lung cancer (SMR 0.87; 95% CI 0.76-1.00) and leukemia other than chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) (SMR 1.04; 95% 0.67-1.53) were not significantly elevated. Cox regression analyses revealed no significant dose-response trends for any cancer. For all cancers excluding leukemia, the RR at 100 mSv was estimated as 0.98 (95% CI 0.82-1.17), and for all leukemia other than CLL it was 1.06 (95% CI 0.50-2.23). Uranium was the primary radionuclide contributing to internal exposures, but no significant increases in lung and kidney disease were seen. The extended follow-up reinforces the findings in the previous study in failing to observe a detectable increase in cancer deaths associated with radiation, but strong conclusions still cannot be drawn because of small numbers and relatively low career doses. Larger combined studies of early workers in the United States using similar methodologies are warranted to refine and clarify radiation risks after protracted exposures.

Boice Jr JD, Colen SS, Mumma MT, Ellis ED, Eckerman DF, Leggett RW, Boecker BB, Brill B, Henderson BE

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Declared a national user facility in 1993, NREL's Concentrated Solar Radiation User Facility (CSR) allows industry, government, and university researchers to examine the effects and applications of as much as 50,000 suns of concentrated solar radiation using a High-Flux Solar Furnace and long-term exposure using an ultraviolet (UV) concentrator.

Lewandowski, A.

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Responses of Cell Renewal Systems to Long-term Low-Level Radiation Exposure: A Feasibility Study Applying Advanced Molecular Biology Techniques on Available Histological and Cytological Material of Exposed Animals and Men  

SciTech Connect

First results of this feasibility study showed that evaluation of the stored material of the chronically irradiated dogs with modern molecular biological techniques proved to be successful and extremely promising. Therefore an in deep analysis of at least part of the huge amount of remaining material is of outmost interest. The methods applied in this feasibility study were pathological evaluation with different staining methods, protein analysis by means of immunohistochemistry, strand break analysis with the TdT-assay, DNA- and RNA-analysis as well as genomic examination by gene array. Overall more than 50% of the investigated material could be used. In particular the results of an increased stimulation of the immune system within the dogs of the 3mSv group as both compared to the control and higher dose groups gives implications for the in depth study of the cellular events occurring in context with low dose radiation. Based on the findings of this study a further evaluation and statistically analysis of more material can help to identify promising biomarkers for low dose radiation. A systematic evaluation of a correlation of dose rates and strand breaks within the dog tissue might moreover help to explain mechanisms of tolerance to IR. One central problem is that most sequences for dog specific primers are not known yet. The discovery of the dog genome is still under progress. In this study the isolation of RNA within the dog tissue was successful. But up to now there are no gene arrays or gene chips commercially available, tested and adapted for canine tissue. The uncritical use of untested genomic test systems for canine tissue seems to be ineffective at the moment, time consuming and ineffective. Next steps in the investigation of genomic changes after IR within the stored dog tissue should be limited to quantitative RT-PCR of tested primer sequences for the dog. A collaboration with institutions working in the field of the discovery of the dog genome could have synergistic effects.

Fliedner Theodor M.; Feinendegen Ludwig E.; Meineke Viktor; Fritz Thomas E.

2005-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

367

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: About  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

About About Background. Extensive research on the health effects of radiation using standard epidemiological and toxicological approaches has been done for decades to characterize responses of populations and individuals to high radiation doses, and to set exposure standards to protect both the public and the workforce. These standards were set using models that extrapolated from the cancers observed following exposure to high doses of radiation to predicted, but not measurable, changes in cancer frequency at low radiation doses. The use of models was necessary because of our inability to detect changes in cancer incidence following low doses of radiation. Historically, the predominant approach has been the Linear-no-Threshold model (see Wikipedia entry) and collective dose concept that assumes each unit of radiation, no

368

Human Behavior Meets Building Intelligence: How Occupants Respond to “Open Window” Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems,"Occupants Respond to “Open Window” Signals Katie Ackerly andincorporate operable windows for the benefits of personal

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

VOC Exposure Metrics  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6 6 VOC Exposure Metrics ... and "Sick Building Syndrome" Figure1: The elevated odds ratios (above unity) in this figure suggest that exposures to VOCs from water-based points and solvents are associated with a variety of sick building symptions (* indicates the OR is significant at p < 0.05; ** for p < 0.01). The indoors is often regarded as safe haven from problems associated with outdoor air pollution, but a growing number of reports have suggested that exposures in indoor environments may lead to health problems. One area in which evidence has been accumulating is the relationship between working in office buildings (as opposed to industrial exposure conditions) and a variety of health effects, such as eye, nose, and throat irritation and

370

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Microenvironmental Exposures to VOCs Speaker(s): Miranda Loh Date: February 1, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 The Boston Exposure Assessment in Microenvironments (BEAM) study was designed to examine the concentration distributions of VOCs in various microenvironments in and around Boston with the main objective of reducing the uncertainties in predicting exposure levels. A suite of VOC's with potential health effects including benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylenes, several chlorinated compounds and aldehydes were collected in all microenvironments. Phase I. BEAM examined common non-residential microenvironments that have not been extensively studied, in particular, dining, shopping, and transportation microenvironments. Sampling using scripted activities in these microenvironments. For some compounds,

371

Radiation Physics Portal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Radiation Physics Portal. Radiation Physics Portal. ... more. >> see all Radiation Physics programs and projects ... ...

2013-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

372

SCINTILLATION EXPOSURE RATE DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector for gamma and x rays is described. The detector comprises a scintillation crystal disposed between a tantalum shield and the input of a photomultiplier tube, the crystal and the shield cooperating so that their combined response to a given quantity of radiation at various energy levels is substantially constant.

Spears, W.G.

1960-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Thermal Infrared Exposure of Cryogenic Indirect Drive ICF Targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets at the National Ignition Facility and the Laser Megajoule will be protected from thermal infrared radiation by a cold shroud. As the shroud is removed just before the laser pulse, infrared radiation will heat and possibly degrade the symmetry of the solid hydrogen fuel layer. A lumped component mathematical model has been constructed to calculate how long an indirect drive target can be exposed to thermal radiation before the fuel layer degrades. The allowed exposure time sets the maximum shroud removal time and therefore has important implications for the design of the cryogenic shroud systems. The model predicts that the maximum exposure time is approximately 0.18 s for plastic capsules inside hohlraums with transparent laser entrance holes. By covering the laser entrance holes with a partially reflective coating, the exposure time can be increased to approximately 1 s. The exposure time can be increased to about 2 s by using beryllium capsules. Several other design concepts could increase the exposure time even further. Lengthening of the allowed exposure time to 1 s or longer could allow a significant cost savings for the shroud system.

London, R A; Moody, J D; Sanchez, J J; Sater, J D; Haid, B J; Bittner, D N

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

374

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission.

Braunlich, Peter F. (Pullman, WA); Tetzlaff, Wolfgang (Pullman, WA); Hegland, Joel E. (Pullman, WA); Jones, Scott C. (Pullman, WA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Remote radiation dosimetry  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are methods and apparatus for remotely measuring radiation levels. Such are particularly useful for measuring relatively high levels or dosages of radiation being administered in radiation therapy. They are also useful for more general radiation level measurements where remote sensing from the remaining portions of the apparatus is desirable. The apparatus uses a beam generator, such as a laser beam, to provide a stimulating beam. The stimulating beam is preferably of wavelengths shorter than 6 microns, or more advantageously less than 2 microns. The stimulating beam is used to stimulate a remote luminescent sensor mounted in a probe which emits stored luminescent energy resulting from exposure of the sensor to ionizing radiation. The stimulating beam is communicated to the remote luminescent sensor via a transmissive fiber which also preferably serves to return the emission from the luminescent sensor. The stimulating beam is advantageously split by a beam splitter to create a detector beam which is measured for power during a reading period during which the luminescent phosphor is read. The detected power is preferably used to control the beam generator to thus produce desired beam power during the reading period. The luminescent emission from the remote sensor is communicated to a suitable emission detector, preferably after filtering or other selective treatment to better isolate the luminescent emission. 8 figures.

Braunlich, P.F.; Tetzlaff, W.; Hegland, J.E.; Jones, S.C.

1991-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

376

Property:HPBD/DateOfOccupancy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DateOfOccupancy DateOfOccupancy Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: H High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database Pages using the property "HPBD/DateOfOccupancy" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) H High Performance Buildings Database + January 4 + High Performance Buildings Database + January 6 + High Performance Buildings Database + October 2 +

377

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Genetic Factors Affecting  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project The short-term effects of high doses of ionizing radiation on cellular responses are relatively well understood. Less clear are the long-term consequences of exposure to low dose/low dose-rate radiation and the effects of radiation exposure on the progeny of surviving cells. If a cell survives radiation, it is generally thought to have repaired all the radiation-induced insults and be capable of a "normal healthy life". At a certain frequency, however, we have found that some cells surviving radiation grow normally, but will rearrange their genetic material during time in culture. We call this radiation-induced genomic instability. Many

378

Black Hole Radiation and Volume Statistical Entropy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The simplest possible equation for Hawking radiation, and other black hole radiated power is derived in terms of black hole density. Black hole density also leads to the simplest possible model of a gas of elementary constituents confined inside a gravitational bottle of Schwarzchild radius at tremendous pressure, which yields identically the same functional dependence as the traditional black hole entropy. Variations of Sbh can be obtained which depend on the occupancy of phase space cells. A relation is derived between the constituent momenta and the black hole radius which is similar to the Compton wavelength relation.

Mario Rabinowitz

2005-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

379

Radiation Cataract  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radiation including patients undergoing diagnostic CT scans or radiotherapy, atomic bomb survivors, residents of radioactively contaminated buildings, victims of the...

380

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Linking Molecular Events to Cellular  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Linking Molecular Events to Cellular Responses at Low Dose Exposures Thomas Weber Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Why This Project It currently costs billions of dollars to protect workers and the public from exposure to man-made radiation, despite exposure levels lower than the natural background levels of radiation. If it could be demonstrated that there is no increased cancer risk associated with these low dose exposures, these resources could be directed toward more critical societal issues. Defining low dose radiation cancer risks is limited by our ability to measure and directly correlate relevant cellular and molecular responses occurring at the low radiation dose and dose rate with tumor formation. This deficiency has led to conservative risk assessments based on low dose

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE / NASA Joint Funded Projects  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects DOE/NASA Joint Funded Projects NASA Source Photo Space explorers are subject to exposure to low dose ionizing radiation. Research that helps determine health risks from this exposure is funded by NASA and DOE. Source: NASA DOE's Low Dose Program and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) jointly fund new research to develop a better scientific basis for understanding risks to humans from exposures to low doses or low fluences of ionizing radiation. Research must focus on elucidating molecular mechanisms and pathways involved in normal radiobiological responses to low dose exposure, and must have the potential to ultimately increase understanding of health outcomes from radiation exposures that are at or near current workplace exposure

382

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Employees Occupational Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the EEOICPA is the responsibility of the Department of Labor (DOL). The DOL is supported in its role by the DOE, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Justice (DOJ). If you would like more information about the benefits available under the EEOICPA, please visit DOL's web page or see the EEOICPA pamphlet.

383

Evaluating post-occupancy performance : Daylighting The New York Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating post-occupancy performance Evaluating post-occupancy performance Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Evaluating post-occupancy performance "We aggressively pursued innovative designs to improve the quality of the workplace for our employees and to reduce energy use and other operating costs of our facility. The outcomes of this study confirm that we were successful. More importantly, our hope is that the energy efficient measures and designs documented in this independent study may inspire other companies' workplace designs." - Angelo Salvatore, Executive Director of Building Operations, The Times Company.

384

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building Energy Use Speaker(s): Hung-Wen (Richard) Lin Date: January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Tianzhen Hong Measured energy use of buildings demonstrates large discrepancies even between buildings with the same function and located in similar climates. Among various factors contributing to the discrepancies, occupant behavior is found to be a key factor. How occupants set the comfort criteria, interact with building components and systems, and respond to environmental discomfort directly affects the operation of buildings and thus their energy use. On the other hand, it is also important to find out what sort of design methods can reduce building consumption in new and existing

385

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

386

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning Speaker(s): Ryota Shirai Date: August 31, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Naoya Motegi...

387

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback Speaker(s): Geoff Levermore Date: June 28, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This presentation will describe some of...

388

Density Functional Theory Based Calculations of Site Occupancy in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the site occupancy behavior based on two .... First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials ... Forming-Crush Simulation Optimization Using Internal State Variable Model.

389

Occupancy sensors for HVAC gaining in hotel industry  

SciTech Connect

The hotel industry is overcoming its skepticism as occupancy sensors with built-in thermistors to control heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) units demonstrate their ability to cut energy costs as much as 30%. Despite the successful demonstrations and acceptance by Holiday Inn, some hotel managers of other chains continue to resist. Occupancy sensors have either ultrasonic or infrared signals, but differ from lighting control devices by also having internal thermistors and remote door switches. This allows the rooms to reach comfort levels only when the guest is present since occupants are only minimally affected if temperatures are modified during unoccupied periods. The system works best for roadside-type motels rather than convention hotels, where occupants are in and out of their rooms.

Ladd, C.

1985-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

Guidelines for Exposure Assessment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Z-92/001 Z-92/001 May 1992 Guidelines for Exposure Assessment Published on May 29, 1992, Federal Register 57(104):22888-22938 These guidelines replace the previously issued final Guidelines for Estimating Exposures (September 24, 1986), Federal Register 51(185):34042-34054, and the Proposed Guidelines for Exposure-Related Measurements (December 2, 1988), Federal Register 53(232):48830- 48853. Risk Assessment Forum U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Washington, DC DISCLAIMER This document has been reviewed in accordance with U.S. Environmental Protection Agency policy and approved for publication. Mention of trade names or commercial products does not constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. Note: This document represents the final guidelines. A number of editorial corrections have

391

Occupation-number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to 2049 nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of =1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, Michael G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Papenbrock, Thomas F [ORNL; Wild, S. M. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, M; Wild, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

394

Historical Exposures to Chemicals at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant: A Pilot Retrospective Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect

In a mortality study of white males who had worked at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant between 1952 and 1979, an increased number of deaths from benign and unspecified intracranial neoplasms was found. A case-control study nested within this cohort investigated the hypothesis that an association existed between brain tumor death and exposure to either internally deposited plutonium or external ionizing radiation. There was no statistically significant association found between estimated radiation exposure from internally deposited plutonium and the development of brain tumors. Exposure by job or work area showed no significant difference between the cohort and the control groups. An update of the study found elevated risk estimates for (1) all lymphopoietic neoplasms, and (2) all causes of death in employees with body burdens greater than or equal to two nanocuries of plutonium. There was an excess of brain tumors for the entire cohort. Similar cohort studies conducted on worker populations from other plutonium handling facilities have not yet shown any elevated risks for brain tumors. Historically, the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant used large quantities of chemicals in their production operations. The use of solvents, particularly carbon tetrachloride, was unique to Rocky Flats. No investigation of the possible confounding effects of chemical exposures was done in the initial studies. The objectives of the present study are to (1) investigate the history of chemical use at the Rocky Flats facility; (2) locate and analyze chemical monitoring information in order to assess employee exposure to the chemicals that were used in the highest volume; and (3) determine the feasibility of establishing a chemical exposure assessment model that could be used in future epidemiology studies.

Janeen Denise Robertson

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Building-level occupancy data to improve ARIMA-based electricity use forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of an office building is likely to correlate with the number of occupants, and thus knowing occupancy levels should improve energy use forecasts. To gather data related to total building occupancy, wireless sensors were installed in a ... Keywords: energy forecast, occupancy, office buildings, sensors

Guy R. Newsham; Benjamin J. Birt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Alternative Exposure Metrics and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure assessments are critical components of human health studies. These assessments may be geared toward defining where an environmental agent might be present, its levels or concentrations, the conditions under which exposure occurs, those exposed, and additional details of possible exposure scenarios. The assessments may also be used by epidemiologists to address potential linkages between the exposure and health outcomes.Electromagnetic field (EMF) exposure science has evolved due ...

2013-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

397

National Ambient Radiation Database  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) recently developed a searchable database and website for the Environmental Radiation Ambient Monitoring System (ERAMS) data. This site contains nationwide radiation monitoring data for air particulates, precipitation, drinking water, surface water and pasteurized milk. This site provides location-specific as well as national information on environmental radioactivity across several media. It provides high quality data for assessing public exposure and environmental impacts resulting from nuclear emergencies and provides baseline data during routine conditions. The database and website are accessible at www.epa.gov/enviro/. This site contains (1) a query for the general public which is easy to use--limits the amount of information provided, but includes the ability to graph the data with risk benchmarks and (2) a query for a more technical user which allows access to all of the data in the database, (3) background information on ER AMS.

Dziuban, J.; Sears, R.

2003-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

398

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Low Dose Radiation Effects in  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells Radiation Effects in Differentiating Human Lens Cells E.A. Blakely1, M.P. McNamara1, P.Y. Chang1, K.A. Bjornstad1, D. Sudar1, and A.C. Thompson2 1Life Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California; 2Advanced Light Source Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California. Introduction The human lens is one of the most radiosensitive organs of the body. Cataract, the opacification of the lens, is a late-appearing response to radiation damage. There are few data available on the late radiation effects of exposure in space flight to charged particle beams, the most prevalent of which are protons. Basic research in this area is needed to integrate the responses of both critical and other representative tissues

399

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: DOE Lowdose Radiation Program Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Using a Low LET Electron Microbeam to Investigate Non-Targeted Effects of Low Dose Radiation. Authors: William F. Morgan1 and Marianne B. Sowa2 Institutions: 1Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland, Baltimore MD 21201 2 Chemical Structure and Dynamics, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 We have recently installed a low LET electron microbeam that generates energetic electrons to mimic radiation damage from gamma and x-ray sources. It has been designed such that high-energy electrons deposit energy in a pre-selected subset of cells leaving neighboring cells unirradiated (Figure 1). In this way it is possible to examine non-targeted effects associated with low dose radiation exposure including induced genomic instability and

400

Radiation Leukemogenesis at Low Dose Rates  

SciTech Connect

The major goals of this program were to study the efficacy of low dose rate radiation exposures for the induction of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and to characterize the leukemias that are caused by radiation exposures at low dose rate. An irradiator facility was designed and constructed that allows large numbers of mice to be irradiated at low dose rates for protracted periods (up to their life span). To the best of our knowledge this facility is unique in the US and it was subsequently used to study radioprotectors being developed for radiological defense (PLoS One. 7(3), e33044, 2012) and is currently being used to study the role of genetic background in susceptibility to radiation-induced lung cancer. One result of the irradiation was expected; low dose rate exposures are ineffective in inducing AML. However, another result was completely unexpected; the irradiated mice had a very high incidence of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), approximately 50%. It was unexpected because acute exposures are ineffective in increasing HCC incidence above background. This is a potential important finding for setting exposure limits because it supports the concept of an ?inverse dose rate effect? for some tumor types. That is, for the development of some tumor types low dose rate exposures carry greater risks than acute exposures.

Weil, Michael; Ullrich, Robert

2013-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Human equivalent antenna model for HF exposures: analytical versus numerical approach  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the human exposure to HF radiation is analyzed using the simplified human equivalent antenna model featuring analytical and numerical approach, respectively. Namely, the human body is represented by an equivalent receiving straight thin ...

Dragan Poljak; Silvestar Sesnic; Ivana Zulim

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Causal Analysis of the Unanticipated Extremity Exposure at HFEF  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the unintended extremity exposure to an operator while handling a metallurgical mount sample of irradiated fuel following an off-scale high beta radiation reading of the sample. The decision was made to continue working after the meter indicated high off-scale by the HPT Supervisor, which resulted in the operator at the next operation being exposed.

David E. James; Charles R. Posegate; Thomas P. Zahn; Alan G. Wagner

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiator Labs Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

404

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition » Radiator Labs Competition » Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

405

Radiation Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Leukaemongenesis at Low Doses Simon Bouffler Health Protection Agency Abstract Myeloid leukaemias feature prominently among the cancers associated with human exposures to ionising radiation. The CBA mouse model of radiation-induced acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been used extensively for both quantitative and mechanistic studies. Loss of genetic material from chromosome 2 (chr2) is known to be associated with most radiation-induced AMLs. AML develops in CBA mice exposed to X- or γ-radiation, after a mean latency period of 18 months, with a maximal incidence of approximately 25% at 3Gy. A strong candidate AML-suppressor gene located within the commonly deleted region of chr2 has been identified, Sƒpil/PU.1. This gene suffers hemizygous loss and specific

406

Radiator Labs | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Competition » Radiator Labs Competition » Radiator Labs National Clean Energy Business Plan Competition Radiator Labs Columbia University More than 14 million housing units, or 10 percent of the national housing stock, is heated by steam and hot water. Steam heating, which represents the majority of this market, is particularly inefficient, and is characterized by a central source of steam generation with a convective distribution system via a network of pipes and radiators. There is no way to control heat transfer through this network, so building managers configure boiler systems to treat a building as a single zone keeping the coldest apartment above a minimum statutory temperature. This results in overheating of the other spaces in the building due to differences in exposure, level of insulation, distribution system heating,

407

Low Dose Radiation Program: Links - Online Literature  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Online Literature Online Literature Journals, Books and other Publications Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute Chornobyl Center for Nuclear Safety Radioactive Waste and Radioecology "Insight" Magazine Central Research Institute of the Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) News: Aiming at an information center on low dose radiation research Health Physics International Journal of Radiation Biology Iranian Journal of Radiation Research Journal of Radiological Protection National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements Radiation Research U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge Reports Animal Cancer Tests and Human Cancer Risk Assessment: A Broad Perspective Effects of Ionizing Radiation: Atomic Bomb Survivors and Their Children (1945-1995) Health Effects of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation: BEIR

408

Computer-controlled radiation monitoring system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A computer-controlled radiation monitoring system was designed and installed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Multiuser Tandem Laboratory (10 MV tandem accelerator from High Voltage Engineering Corporation). The system continuously monitors the photon and neutron radiation environment associated with the facility and automatically suspends accelerator operation if preset radiation levels are exceeded. The system has proved reliable real-time radiation monitoring over the past five years, and has been a valuable tool for maintaining personnel exposure as low as reasonably achievable.

Homann, S.G.

1994-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

409

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

410

Handbook of Anatomical Models for Radiation Dosimetry (To be published in 2009 in "Series in Medical Physics and Biomedical Engineering")  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Exposures Nina Petoussi-Henss and Kimiaki Saito Chapter 18 External Radiation Exposures in Nuclear Power Plants W. Dan Reece, Chan Hyeong Kim, and X. George Xu Chapter 19 Bioassay for Internal RadiationHandbook of Anatomical Models for Radiation Dosimetry (To be published in 2009 in "Series

Linhardt, Robert J.

411

Fading in CaF/sub 2/(Tm/Dy) TL phosphors used in environmental radiation monitoring  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermoluminescence dosimetry technique is currently used for occupational dosimetry and monitoring of supervised areas in the medical and industrial use of ionizing radiation. Recently, the problems about the potential effects of low dose levels, as those due to natural radiation or in the proximity of nuclear facilities, has produced a continuing interest in the study of thermoluminescent dosemeters for the measurement of environmental exposure. Undoubtedly, TLDs offer a number of advantages over other devices available for these purposes: they are small, relatively inexpensive, stable integrating detectors, which can be used in large number, placed everywhere, and assembled in a variety of arrangements. The aim of this paper is to report the fading observed for two different kind of calcium fluoride submitted to different climate conditions over storage time. CaF/sub 2/ (Dy/Tm) have been chosen because of their high sensitivity which makes them very useful in environmental dosimetry. On the other hand, the lower limit of the absorbed dose for CaF/sub 2/ is about 10/sup -6/Gy while for LiF is about 5x10/sup -5/Gy. Because the environmental absorbed dose in Italy is about 7x10/sup -5/Gy/month it is evident the usefulness of CaF/sub 2/ with respect to LiF.

Bacci, C.; Draghi, V.; Furetta, C.; Rispoli, B.

1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

1993 Radiation Protection Workshop: Proceedings  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 DOE Radiation Protection Workshop was conducted from April 13 through 15, 1993 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Over 400 Department of Energy Headquarters and Field personnel and contractors from the DOE radiological protection community attended the Workshop. Forty-nine papers were presented in eleven separate sessions: Radiological Control Manual Implementation, New Approaches to Instrumentation and Calibration, Radiological Training Programs and Initiatives, External Dosimetry, Internal Dosimetry, Radiation Exposure Reporting and Recordkeeping, Air Sampling and Monitoring Issues, Decontamination and Decommissioning of Sites, Contamination Monitoring and Control, ALARA/Radiological Engineering, and Current and Future Health Physics Research. Individual papers are indexed separately on the database.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

413

Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department  

SciTech Connect

Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico) and Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico) and Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando No.22 C.P. 4080 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

414

Concerns with low-level ionizing radiation  

SciTech Connect

Populations have been studied in geographic areas of increased natural radiation, in radiation-exposed workers, in patients medically exposed, and in accidental exposures. No reproducible evidence exists of harmful effects from increases in background radiation three to ten times the usual levels. There is no increase in leukemia or other cancers among American military participants in nuclear testing, no increase in leukemia or thyroid cancer among medical patients receiving {sup 131}I for diagnosis or treatment of hypothyroidism, and no increase in lung cancer among nonsmokers exposed to increased radon in the home. The association of radiation with the atomic bomb and with excessive regulatory and health physics as-low-as-reasonably-achievable (ALARA) radiation levels practices has created a climate of fear about the dangers of radiation at any level. However, there is no evidence that radiation exposures at the levels equivalent to medical usage are harmful. The unjustified excessive concern with radiation at any level, however, precludes beneficial uses of radiation and radioactivity in medicine, science, and industry.

Yalow, R.S.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

415

CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 December 7, 2009 Environmental Radiation Protection, Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 64-36, Rev. 0) Rvisions to the Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry for internal use and also we are making them available for use by DOE line and contractor assessment personnel in developing and implementing effective DOE oversight and contractor self-assessment and corrective action processes. CRAD, Environmental Radiation Protection - December 7, 2009 More Documents & Publications CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 CRAD, Radioactive Waste Management - June 22, 2009 CRAD, Radiological Controls - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

416

Electrothermal controlled-exposure technology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A technology is presented for exposing the contents of microfabricated cavities in a substrate. These contents are hermetically sealed until exposure is triggered by an electronic signal. The exposure mechanism uses ...

Maloney, John Mapes

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Definition of Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gamma Radiation and X-Rays Beta Radiation Alpha Radiation Irradiation Radioactive Contamination Definitions Detection Measurement Safety Around Radiation Sources Types of...

418

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Mechanisms of Tissue Response...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

whole body exposure to doses of 0.1 Gy to 5 Gy 60Co-g radiation in liver and mammary gland, which indicate that remodeling is a general and rapid consequence of irradiation but...

419

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Suresh H. Moolgavkar  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cohort with low-LET low-dose radiation exposure, and comparison with Japanese atomic bomb survivors. Hazelton, W.D., Krewski, D., Moolgavkar, S.H. 2001 Workshop:...

420

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: James D. Tucker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Role of the Adaptive Response in determining health risks from in vivo exposures to low dose of ionizing radiation Tucker, J. Publications Christian, A.T., Patte, M.S., Attix,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

422

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Address 830 Punchbowl Street #425 Place Honolulu, HI Zip 96813 Phone number 808586-9100 Website http://hawaii.gov/labor/hiosh Coordinates 21.3036793°, -157.8607676° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.3036793,"lon":-157.8607676,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

423

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office Buildings: An Evaluation of Sampled Data from Five European Countries Speaker(s): John Stoops Date: January 3, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diana Morris The results from a large field study of thermal comfort in European office buildings are reported. Measurements of physical environmental conditions and occupant perceptions were collected over sixteen months from twenty-six different office buildings located in France, Greece, Portugal, Sweden and the UK. The work attempts to show relationships and produce useful information from the data set using graphical methods, especially lowess, a locally weighted regression based scatter plot smoothing technique. The

424

DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce July 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl..doe.gov 509-376-4171 The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Occupational Medical Services acquisition at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Draft RFP is one step in the process toward awarding a contract and provides an opportunity for companies, Hanford stakeholders, and the site's workforce to provide input on the Draft RFP. DOE will provide

425

Transcriptomic and Secretomic Profiling of Isolated Leukocytes Exposed to Alpha-Particle and Photon Radiation - Applications in Biodosimetry .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The general public is at risk of ionising-radiation exposure. The development of high-throughput methods to triage exposures is warranted. Current biodosimetry techniques are low-throughput and… (more)

Howland, Matthew

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Acute radiation syndrones and their management  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation syndromes produced by large doses of ionizing radiation are divided into three general groups depending on dose of radiation and time after exposure. The CNS syndrome requires many thousands of rad, appears in minutes to hours, and kills within hours to days. The GIS appears after doses of a few hundred to 2000 rad. It is characterized by nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and disturbances of water and electrolyte metabolism. It has a high mortality in the first week after exposure. Survivors will then experience the HS as a result of marrow aplasia. Depending on dose, survival is possible with antibiotic and transfusion therapy. The relationship of granulocyte depression to mortality in dogs and human beings is illustrated. The role of depth dose pattern of mortality of radiation exposure is described and used as an indication of why air exposure doses may be misleading. The therapy of radiation injury is described based on antibiotics, transfusion therapy, and use of molecular regulators. The limited role of matched allogenic bone marrow transplants is discussed. 52 refs., 13 figs.

Cronkite, E.P.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Low Dose Radiation Research Program: Research Program Workshop I Abstracts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation Genetic Factors Affecting Susceptibility to Low-Dose Radiation William F. Morgan and John H.J. Petrini Radiation Oncology Research Laboratory, University of Maryland at Baltimore, Baltimore, MD Summary: The goal of our application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure based on potential genetic differences that may modulate an individual's sensitivity to low doses of radiation. Abstract: The goal of this application is to improve the scientific basis for understanding potential risks to the population from low dose radiation exposure. We propose to address specific genetic factors that affect individual susceptibility to low dose radiation and ask the question do genetic differences exist that make some individuals more sensitive to

428

Nuclear Maintenance Applications Center: Radiation Stability of Modern Turbine Oils  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As oil companies continue to consolidate and improve product lines, utilities are faced with oil formulation changes. The new-generation oils contain new additives and more highly refined base stocks, which raises concerns over performance in unusual conditions that are not normally tested for by oil companies, such as exposure to radiation. Previously qualified oils that performed satisfactorily after exposure to radiation were largely composed of Group I base oils that contained large amounts of aromat...

2009-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

429

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even though the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, Richard J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Radiation dosimeter  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector readout circuit is provided which produces a radiation dose-rate readout from a detector even through the detector output may be highly energy dependent. A linear charge amplifier including an output charge pump circuit amplifies the charge signal pulses from the detector and pumps the charge into a charge storage capacitor. The discharge rate of the capacitor through a resistor is controlled to provide a time-dependent voltage which when integrated provides an output proportional to the dose-rate of radiation detected by the detector. This output may be converted to digital form for readout on a digital display.

Fox, R.J.

1981-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Travel for the 2004 American Statistical Association Biannual Radiation Meeting: "Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Factors  

SciTech Connect

The 16th ASA Conference on Radiation and Health, held June 27-30, 2004 in Beaver Creek, CO, offered a unique forum for discussing research related to the effects of radiation exposures on human health in a multidisciplinary setting. The Conference furnishes investigators in health related disciplines the opportunity to learn about new quantitative approaches to their problems and furnishes statisticians the opportunity to learn about new applications for their discipline. The Conference was attended by about 60 scientists including statisticians, epidemiologists, biologists and physicists interested in radiation research. For the first time, ten recipients of Young Investigator Awards participated in the conference. The Conference began with a debate on the question: “Do radiation doses below 1 cGy increase cancer risks?” The keynote speaker was Dr. Martin Lavin, who gave a banquet presentation on the timely topic “How important is ATM?” The focus of the 2004 Conference on Radiation and Health was Radiation in Realistic Environments: Interactions Between Radiation and Other Risk Modifiers. The sessions of the conference included: Radiation, Smoking, and Lung Cancer Interactions of Radiation with Genetic Factors: ATM Radiation, Genetics, and Epigenetics Radiotherapeutic Interactions The Conference on Radiation and Health is held bi-annually, and participants are looking forward to the 17th conference to be held in 2006.

Brenner, David J.

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

432

Radiation Hydrodynamics  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The discipline of radiation hydrodynamics is the branch of hydrodynamics in which the moving fluid absorbs and emits electromagnetic radiation, and in so doing modifies its dynamical behavior. That is, the net gain or loss of energy by parcels of the fluid material through absorption or emission of radiation are sufficient to change the pressure of the material, and therefore change its motion; alternatively, the net momentum exchange between radiation and matter may alter the motion of the matter directly. Ignoring the radiation contributions to energy and momentum will give a wrong prediction of the hydrodynamic motion when the correct description is radiation hydrodynamics. Of course, there are circumstances when a large quantity of radiation is present, yet can be ignored without causing the model to be in error. This happens when radiation from an exterior source streams through the problem, but the latter is so transparent that the energy and momentum coupling is negligible. Everything we say about radiation hydrodynamics applies equally well to neutrinos and photons (apart from the Einstein relations, specific to bosons), but in almost every area of astrophysics neutrino hydrodynamics is ignored, simply because the systems are exceedingly transparent to neutrinos, even though the energy flux in neutrinos may be substantial. Another place where we can do ''radiation hydrodynamics'' without using any sophisticated theory is deep within stars or other bodies, where the material is so opaque to the radiation that the mean free path of photons is entirely negligible compared with the size of the system, the distance over which any fluid quantity varies, and so on. In this case we can suppose that the radiation is in equilibrium with the matter locally, and its energy, pressure and momentum can be lumped in with those of the rest of the fluid. That is, it is no more necessary to distinguish photons from atoms, nuclei and electrons, than it is to distinguish hydrogen atoms from helium atoms, for instance. There are all just components of a mixed fluid in this case. So why do we have a special subject called ''radiation hydrodynamics'', when photons are just one of the many kinds of particles that comprise our fluid? The reason is that photons couple rather weakly to the atoms, ions and electrons, much more weakly than those particles couple with each other. Nor is the matter-radiation coupling negligible in many problems, since the star or nebula may be millions of mean free paths in extent. Radiation hydrodynamics exists as a discipline to treat those problems for which the energy and momentum coupling terms between matter and radiation are important, and for which, since the photon mean free path is neither extremely large nor extremely small compared with the size of the system, the radiation field is not very easy to calculate. In the theoretical development of this subject, many of the relations are presented in a form that is described as approximate, and perhaps accurate only to order of {nu}/c. This makes the discussion cumbersome. Why are we required to do this? It is because we are using Newtonian mechanics to treat our fluid, yet its photon component is intrinsically relativistic; the particles travel at the speed of light. There is a perfectly consistent relativistic kinetic theory, and a corresponding relativistic theory of fluid mechanics, which is perfectly suited to describing the photon gas. But it is cumbersome to use this for the fluid in general, and we prefer to avoid it for cases in which the flow velocity satisfies {nu} << c. The price we pay is to spend extra effort making sure that the source-sink terms relating to our relativistic gas component are included in the equations of motion in a form that preserves overall conservation of energy and momentum, something that would be automatic if the relativistic equations were used throughout.

Castor, J I

2003-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

433

Global methylation responses to low dose radiation exposure  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

comprises a very large proportion of the mouse and human genomes. Using bisulphite modification and quantitative real-time PCR, the method can be used to analyse a very large pool...

434

Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) Update, 2012  

SciTech Connect

A series of graphs gives data through the year 2012 for annual collective doses, collective dose per reactor, number of individuals with measurable doses both in total and per reactor, number of reactors, electricity generated, measurable doses per individual and per megawatt-year, and collective outage hours. Reactors considered include BWR, PWR, and LWR. Also, the total effective dose equivalent for the period 2010-2012 is tabulated for each nuclear power plant considered, and the change over 2009-2011.

none,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Proceedings: 2009 ISOE North American ALARA Symposium / EPRI Radiation Protection Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize personnel exposure. The 2009 ISOE North American ALARA Symposium/EPRI Radiation Protection Conference offered valuable insights into this effort by presenting papers covering new or improved ALARA technologies and experiences developed worldwide for personnel exposure management, radiation source term reduction, and regulation.

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

436

An update on standards for radiation in the environment and associated estimates of risk  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This presentation reviews current and proposed standards, recommendations, and guidances for limiting routine radiation exposures of the public, and estimates the risk corresponding to standards, recommendations, and guidances. These estimates provide a common basis for comparing different criteria for limiting public exposures to radiation, as well as hazardous chemicals.

Kocher, D.C.

1989-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Proceedings: 2006 EPRI Radiation Protection Conference/ISOE North American ALARA Symposium  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize personnel exposure. The 2006 EPRI Radiation Protection Conference/ISOE North American ALARA Symposium offered valuable insights into this effort by presenting papers covering new or improved ALARA technologies and experiences developed worldwide for personnel exposure management, radiation source term reduction, and regulation.

2006-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

438

Review of US and Japanese Methods to Reduce Personnel Dose and Control Radiation Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes aspects of U.S. nuclear industry's performance in several areas related to radiation exposure management. The document supports efforts of the Japan Nuclear Energy Safety Organization (JNES) to find ways to reduce radiation exposure in Japanese plants.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

439

Proceedings: 2008 ISOE International ALARA Symposium/EPRI Radiation Protection Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize personnel exposure. The 2008 ISOE North American ALARA Symposium/EPRI Radiation Protection Conference offered valuable insights into this effort by presenting papers covering new or improved ALARA technologies and experiences developed worldwide for personnel exposure management, radiation source term reduction, and regulation.

2008-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

440

Proceedings: 2011 ISOE North American ALARA Symposium/EPRI Radiation Protection Conference  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nuclear utilities are continually evaluating methods to improve operations and minimize personnel exposure. The 2011 ISOE North American ALARA Symposium/EPRI Radiation Protection Conference offered valuable insights into this effort by presenting papers covering new or improved ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) technologies and experiences developed worldwide for personnel exposure management, radiation source term reduction, and regulation.

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupational radiation exposure" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Radiation Measurements 42 (2007) 10291032 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for internalized DU exposure. The purpose of the current study was to measure the induction of mutagenic damageRadiation Measurements 42 (2007) 1029­1032 www.elsevier.com/locate/radmeas Observation of radiation demonstrated that DU exposure in vitro to immortalized human osteoblast cells (HOS) is both neoplastically

442

RADIATION DETECTOR  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

1960-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

443

Mind-sets, low-level exposures, and research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of our environmental policy is based on the notion that carcinogenic agents are harmful at even minuscule doses. From where does this thinking come What is the scientific evidence that supports such policy Moreover, why is the public willing to buy into this Or is it the other way around: Has the scientific community bought into a paradigm that has its origins in public imagery Or, most likely, are there interactions between the two It is essential that we find out whether or not there are risks associated with low-level exposures to radiation. The author can see three obvious areas where the future depends on better information: The increasing radiation exposures resulting from the use of medical diagnostic and therapeutic practices need to be properly evaluated for safety; Environmental policies, which direct enormous resources to the reduction of small radiation exposures, needs to be put on a firmer scientific basis; The future of nuclear energy, dependent as it is on public acceptance, may well rely upon a better understanding of low-dose effects. Nuclear energy could provide an important solution of global warming and other possible environmental hazards, but will probably not be implemented as long as fear of low-dose radiation persists. Although an established paradigm has great resilience, it cannot resist the onslaught of inconsistent scientific observations or of the social value system that supports it. Only new research will enable us to determine if a paradigm shift is in order here.

Sagan, L.A. (Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States). Environment Division)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Diffracted light from latent images in photoresist for exposure control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In microelectronics manufacturing, an arrangement for monitoring and control of exposure of an undeveloped photosensitive layer on a structure susceptible to variations in optical properties in order to attain the desired critical dimension for the pattern to be developed in the photosensitive layer. This is done by ascertaining the intensities for one or more respective orders of diffracted power for an incident beam of radiation corresponding to the desired critical dimension for the photosensitive layer as a function of exposure time and optical properties of the structure, illuminating the photosensitive layer with a beam of radiation of one or more frequencies to which the photosensitive layer is not exposure-sensitive, and monitoring the intensities of the orders of diffracted radiation due to said illumination including at least the first order of diffracted radiation thereof, such that when said predetermined intensities for the diffracted orders are reached during said illumination of photosensitive layer, it is known that a pattern having at least approximately the desired critical dimension can be developed on the photosensitive layer.

Bishop, Kenneth P. (Rio Rancho, NM); Brueck, Steven R. J. (Albuquerque, NM); Gaspar, Susan M. (Albuquerque, NM); Hickman, Kirt C. (Albuquerque, NM); McNeil, John R. (Albuquerque, NM); Naqvi, S. Sohail H. (Albuquerque, NM); Stallard, Brian R. (Albuquerque, NM); Tipton, Gary D. (Albuquerque, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

NIST Radiation thermometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiation thermometry. Summary: ... Description: Radiation thermometers are calibrated using a range of variable-temperature blackbodies. ...

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

446

NIST Optical Radiation Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical Radiation Group. Welcome. The Optical Radiation Group maintains, improves, and disseminates the national scales ...

2013-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

447

Editorial: Occupation inference through detection and classification of biographical activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dealing with biographical information (e.g., biography generation, answering biography-related questions, etc.) requires the identification of important activities in the life of the individual in question. While there are activities that can be used ... Keywords: Biography information, Occupation classification

Elena Filatova; John Prager

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

449

Learning user preferences to maximise occupant comfort in office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is desirable to ensure that the thermal comfort conditions in offices are in line with the preferences of occupants. Controlling their offices correctly therefore requires the correct prediction of their thermal sensation which is often determined ... Keywords: decision support systems, intelligent systems, thermal comfort

Anika Schumann; Nic Wilson; Mateo Burillo

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

POEM: power-efficient occupancy-based energy management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings account for 40% of US primary energy consumption and 72% of electricity. Of this total, 50% of the energy consumed in buildings is used for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based on ... Keywords: HVAC, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Stefan Achleitner; Alberto E. Cerpa

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Microsoft PowerPoint - FTCP Presentation-Occupational Competency Models_September 18, 2012.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency Models Models A R h GAO R NNSA M d i i A Response to the GAO Report to NNSA - Modernizing the Nuclear Security Enterprise Eric Coleman Acting Director, g , Learning & Workforce Development L&D Innovation, Technology & Performance Improvement GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA - - Findings Findings GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA Findings Findings ï‚— NNSA workforce â—¦ 34,000 M&O contractor employees â—¦ 2,400 federal employees , p y GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA - - Findings Findings GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA Findings Findings * * NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce o Workers possess skills not readily available in the job

452

Using unlabeled Wi-Fi scan data to discover occupancy patterns of private households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster presents the homeset algorithm, a lightweight approach to estimate occupancy schedules of private households. The algorithm relies on the mobile phones of households' occupants to collect Wi-Fi scans. The scans are then used to determine ...

Wilhelm Kleiminger, Christian Beckel, Anind Dey, Silvia Santini

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

COPOLAN: non-invasive occupancy profiling for preliminary assessment of HVAC fixed timing strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, control of heating, cooling and ventilation equipment operation is mainly achieved via timers with fixed setback schedules, configured using experience and standard models of space occupancy. Applying generic timing str