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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

8. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" 8. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Total Floorspace (million square feet)" ,"All Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings" ,,"Nongov- ernment- Owned Buildings","Owner Occupied","Nonowner Occupied","Unocc- upied","Govern- ment- Owned Buildings","Federal","State","Local" "All Buildings* ...............",64783,49421,23591,23914,1916,15363,1956,3808,9599 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",6789,6043,2682,3162,199,746,"Q",206,498 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",6585,5827,2858,2791,"Q",758,"Q","Q",620

2

Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings for Non-Mall Buildings, 2003" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings*","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government-Owned Buildings" ,,"Nongov- ernment- Owned Buildings","Owner Occupied","Nonowner Occupied","Unocc- upied","Govern- ment- Owned Buildings","Federal","State","Local" "All Buildings* ...............",4645,4011,1841,2029,141,635,46,164,425 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2552,2272,980,1205,87,280,"Q",77,183 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",889,783,384,375,"Q",106,"Q","Q",87

3

CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS CONVERSION OF DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS TO NON-GOVERNMENT STANDARDS Purpose This procedure provides guidance on the...

4

,"All Buildings","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

"District Heat ...",5534,3072,2695,377,"N",2462,827,1102,534 "Boilers ...",19522,13132,11042,2041,"Q",6390,588,1561,4242 "Packaged...

5

,"All Buildings","Nongovernment-Owned Buildings",,,,"Government...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

76,211,"Q",99,16,14,69 "District Heat ...",96,53,44,"Q","N",43,"Q",13,18 "Boilers ...",581,444,380,63,"Q",137,8,27,102 "Packaged Heating Units...

6

DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with Non-Government Standards Bodies - July 1, 2009 DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with...

7

Using Non-Government Domain Names | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Using Non-Government Domain Names Using Non-Government Domain Names Using Non-Government Domain Names There may be occasion where it is necessary to utilize a non-government domain. The OMB Policies for Federal Agency Public Websites states: Your agency must use only .gov, .mil, or Fed.us domains unless the agency head explicitly determines another domain is necessary for the proper performance of an agency function. This requirement recognizes the proper performance of agency functions includes an obligation for clear and unambiguous public notification of the agency's involvement in or sponsorship of its information dissemination products including public websites. It also recognizes in certain limited circumstances other domains may be necessary for the proper performance of an agency function.

8

Tapping into social resources to address occupational health : a network analysis of Vietnamese-owned nail salons  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Social networks in the Vietnamese nail salon industry were studied for their utility in addressing occupational health risks. Major findings include heavy reliance on family networks for fundamental needs, an extensive ...

Doan, Tam Minh-Thi, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities  

SciTech Connect

This document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies.

NONE

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

August 1, 2000 DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards - August 1, 2000 Technical Standards Program Procedures (TSPP) This procedure provides...

11

DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with 3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with Non-Government Standards Bodies - July 1, 2009 DOE-TSPP-3, Use of Non-Government Standards and Interaction with Non-Government Standards Bodies - July 1, 2009 Technical Standards Program Procedures (TSPP) - August 26, 2009 This procedure identifies the process by which DOE adopts Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs) and provides guidance for the interaction of DOE and contractor employees with Standards Development Organizations (SDOs). This procedure applies to all DOE Headquarters and field organizations, management and operating contractors, and laboratories (hereafter referred to collectively as "DOE Components") working to the latest revision of DOE Order 252.1, "Technical Standards Program."

12

DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards - August 1, 2000 DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards - August 1, 2000 Technical Standards Program Procedures (TSPP) This procedure provides guidance on the conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs), also referred to as non-Government standards. This procedure applies to all DOE Headquarters and field organizations, management and operating contractors, and laboratories (hereafter referred to collectively as "DOE Components") working to the requirements of the latest revision of DOE Order 252.1, "Technical Standards Program." DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government

13

DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 1, 2009 DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards - July 1, 2009 Technical Standards Program Procedures (TSPP) - August 26, 2009 This...

14

DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

July 1, 2009 July 1, 2009 DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards - July 1, 2009 Technical Standards Program Procedures (TSPP) - August 26, 2009 This procedure provides guidance on the conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Voluntary Consensus Standards (VCSs), also referred to as non-Government standards. This procedure applies to all DOE Headquarters and field organizations, management and operating contractors, and laboratories (hereafter referred to collectively as "DOE Components") working to the requirements of the latest revision of DOE Order 252.1, "Technical Standards Program." DOE-TSPP-10, Conversion of DOE Technical Standards to Non-Government Standards - July 1, 2009 More Documents & Publications

15

DOE Technical Standards List. Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a periodic report on the level of agency participation in non-Government standards activities. This technical standards list is intended to assist US Department of Energy (DOE) management and other personnel involved in the DOE technical Standards Program by identifying those participating individuals. The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted a Record of Non-Government Standards Activity. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. Appendices to this document are provided to list the information by parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees.

NONE

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

DOE technical standards list: Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities  

SciTech Connect

The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity, which is attached to the end of this document. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. The committees or governing bodies in which the person participates is listed after each name. An asterisk preceding the committee notation indicates that the person has identified himself or herself as the DOE representative on that committee. Appendices to this document are also provided to sort the information by the parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees. DOE employees and contractors listed in this technical standards list are those recorded as of May 1, 1999.

NONE

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DOE technical standards list: Directory of DOE and contractor personnel involved in non-government standards activities  

SciTech Connect

The body of this document contains a listing of DOE employees and DOE contractors who have submitted form DOE F 1300.2, Record of Non-Government Standards Activity, which is attached to the end of this document and to DOE Order 1300.2A. Additional names were added from rosters supplied by non-Government standards bodies. The committees or governing bodies in which the person participates is listed after each name. An asterisk preceding the committee notation indicates that the person has identified himself or herself as the DOE representative on that committee. Appendices to this document are also provided to sort the information by the parent employment organization, by non-Government standards activity, and by the proper names of the non-Government standards organizations and committees. DOE employees and contractors listed in this TSL are those recorded as of July 1, 1996.

NONE

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Occupational Injuries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Injuries Injuries Jacqueline Agnew, PhD Burden of Occupational Injury and Illness in U.S. * Study by Leigh et al., 1997 * Estimated incidence, mortality, direct & indirect costs- occupational injury & illness * 1992 data- primary and secondary sources o Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries o National Traumatic Occupational Fatality Study o Annual Survey of Occ. Injuries & Illnesses o Bureau of Labor Statistics, Health Care Financing Administration, etc. Direct & Indirect Costs * Indirect * Lost earnings * Fringe benefits * Home production * Training, restaffing, disruption * Time delays Direct & Indirect Costs * Direct * Physicians, hospitals, nursing homes, rehabilitation, medication * Medical and indemnity insurance administration expenses

19

The policies and procedures for governance and administration that non-government schools in Queensland could use to achieve and maintain accreditation under the Education (Accreditation of Non-State Schools) Act 2001.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-government schools in Queensland must be accredited by the Non-State Schools Accreditation Board established by the Queensland Government under the Education(Accreditation of Non-State Schools) Act… (more)

Austen, Steven Roy

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Estimating Civilian Owned Firearms  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Most of the world’s firearms are privately owned. 1 They include improvised craft guns as well as handguns, rifles, shotguns, and machine guns. The legal definition of a civilian firearm varies; some states allow civilian ownership of certain firearms that are restricted to military use in other states. The word civilian is used here to refer to actual possession, not legality. In 2007, the Small Arms Survey estimated the number of civilian firearm ownership worldwide at approximately 650 million weapons out of some 875 then in existence (see Figures 1 and 2). National ownership rates range from a high of 90 firearms per every 100 people in the United States, to one firearm or less for every 100 residents in countries like South Korea and Ghana (see Table 1). With the world’s factories delivering millions of newly manufactured firearms annually, and with far fewer being destroyed, civilian ownership is growing (Small Arms Survey, 2007, p. 39). Poor record-keeping and the near absence of reporting requirements for detailed information complicate assessments of global stockpiles of small arms and light weapons. When it comes to estimating civilian firearm ownership, differences in national gun culture —each country’s unique combination of historic and current sources of supply, laws and attitudes toward firearms ownership—often have distinct effects on the classification, ownership and perception of firearms. In addition, categories of firearm holders may overlap, as some individuals may use their private firearms at work as security guards, in armed groups, or in gangs.

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

No Home Like Your Own.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??No Home Like Your Own is a journey through my childhood memories of pre?war Socialist Yugoslavia and the war in Bosnia and Herzegovina that followed… (more)

Alibaši?, Emir

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? Edward Holt, RyanME 04079 edholt@igc.org Renewable energy certificates (RECs)convey the attributes of a renewable energy generator and

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medical Services Contract Occupational Medical Services Contract DOE Awards Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services Contract June 8, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Cameron Hardy 509-308-4947 Cameron.hardy@rl.gov Cincinnati - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced today that HPM Corporation, of Kennewick, Washington has been awarded an estimated $99 million contract to provide Occupational Medical Services at the DOE Hanford Site. HPM is a certified minority-owned, women-owned small business. This is a two-year hybrid contract with four-one-year option periods that includes firm-fixed price with award fee, cost reimbursement, and Indefinite Delivery Indefinite Quantity (IDIQ) components. As the Occupational Medical Services Contractor, HPM Corporation will: Provide occupational medical services to approximately 8,000

24

Direct Hire Occupations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Critical Shortage Occupational Coverage: ... General Engineer; 0803 – Safety Engineer; 0804 ... Mechanical Engineer; 0840 – Nuclear Engineer; 0850 ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

25

CBECS Buildings Characteristics --Revised Tables  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Buildings Use Tables Buildings Use Tables (24 pages, 129 kb) CONTENTS PAGES Table 12. Employment Size Category, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 13. Employment Size Category, Floorspace, 1995 Table 14. Weekly Operating Hours, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 15. Weekly Operating Hours, Floorspace, 1995 Table 16. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Number of Buildings, 1995 Table 17. Occupancy of Nongovernment-Owned and Government-Owned Buildings, Floorspace, 1995 These data are from the 1995 Commercial Buildings Energy Consumption Survey (CBECS), a national probability sample survey of commercial buildings sponsored by the Energy Information Administration, that provides information on the use of energy in commercial buildings in the

26

Occupational Medicine - Occupational Medicine Guiding Principles  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

for the President's Fiscal Year 2011 Budget and Performance Plans" (June 11, 2009) DOE Human Capital Strategic Plan For additional information regarding the Occupational...

27

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

SciTech Connect

Renewable energy certificates (RECs) are tradable instruments that convey the attributes of a renewable energy generator and the right to make certain claims about energy purchases. RECs first appeared in US markets in the late 1990s and are particularly important in states that accept or require them as evidence of compliance with renewables portfolio standards (RPS). The emergence of RECs as a tradable commodity has made utilities, generators, and regulators increasingly aware of the need to specify who owns the RECs in energy transactions. In voluntary transactions, most agree that the question of REC ownership can and should be negotiated privately between the buyer and the seller, and should be clearly established by contract. Claims about purchasing or using renewable energy should only be made if REC ownership can be documented. In many other cases, however, renewable energy transactions are either mandated or encouraged through state or federal policy. Because of the recent appearance of RECs, legislation and regulation mandating the purchase of renewable energy has sometimes been silent on the disposition of the RECs associated with that generation. Furthermore, some renewable energy contracts pre-date the existence of RECs, and therefore do not address REC ownership. In both of these instances, the issue of REC ownership must often be answered by legislative or regulatory authorities. The resulting uncertainty in REC ownership has hindered the development of robust REC markets and has, in some cases, led to contention between buyers and sellers of renewable generation. This article, which is based on a longer Berkeley Lab report, reviews federal and state efforts to clarify the ownership of RECs from Qualifying Facilities (QFs) that sell their generation under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978. The full report also addresses state efforts to clarify REC ownership in two other situations, customer-owned generation that benefits from state net metering rules, and generation facilities that receive financial incentives from state or utility funds. The issue of REC ownership most often arises in states that have adopted an RPS. In such states, both parties to QF contracts have a lot at stake: either additional cost to a utility if RECs are awarded to the QF, or loss of value to the QF if RECs are awarded to the utility. As a rough estimate, QF RECs that are eligible for state RPS programs could have a value between $35 million and $175 million, so there is significant economic value riding on the ownership question.

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OCCUPATIONAL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICINE- INL OCCUPATIONAL MEDICAL SUVEILLANCE SYSTEM (OMSS) PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Dllte DepartmentAll Element~&Slte 06-16-2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building Number: WCB Building Name: WCB Name of Information System!«)r IT Project Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) ExhlbllProJect UIO 72 NewPIA D Update 0 DOE PIA - OMSS Finallxw.doc

29

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Safety Health Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Occupational Safety & Health - Occupational Injury & Illness System PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1 J Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date June 12, 2009 Departmental Idaho National Laboratory Element & Site Name of Infonnatlon Occupational Injury & Illness System (01&15) System or IT Project Exhibit Project UID 136 New PIA ~ Update D Name, Title Contact Information Phone, Email Anthony J. Kavran (208) 526-5826

30

Conducting Your Own Energy Audit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Why should you or anyone be interested in conducting a time intensive energy audit. What equipment is needed? When should you get started? Who should do it? The answer to Why is that energy costs are cutting into a company’s profit every minute of every day. Inefficient energy usage is like having money lost or stolen. Energy costs may account for up to 25% of a company’s expenses and hundreds of thousands of dollars a year. To answer What will be discussed later in this paper. The answer to When is that the energy audit needs to be done now! Every day and month of delay is throwing money away that could be put back into the business or distributed as profit. To answer Who should do the study depends on the complexity and size of the utility bill. Large utility bills, $100,000 or more, or a large facility, 100,000 square feet or more, may indicate the skills of a professional energy engineer are required to analyze the facility’s energy consumption and recommend the proper energy conservation measures needed. Smaller facilities usually can be energy analyzed by company personnel who have some energy training. This paper is written to assist those personnel in conducting their own energy audits. Even larger facilities may decide to do an in-house energy audit before they hire outside assistance in order to get an idea of the amount and cost of energy being used and possible savings. This can be compared to the cost of the outside energy audit.

Phillips, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Higgs Boson -- on Your Own  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the highlights of 2012 in physics is related to two papers, published by the ATLAS and the CMS Collaborations, that announced the discovery of at least one new particle in pp collisions at CERN LHC. At least one of the properties of this new particle is found to be similar to that of the Higgs boson, the last and most difficult to find building block from the Standard Model of particle physics. Physics teachers are frequently approached by their media-educated students, who inquire about the properties of the Higgs boson, but physics teachers are rarely trained to teach this elusive aspect of particle physics in elementary, middle or junior high schools. In this paper I describe a card-game, that can be considered as a hands-on and easily accessible tool that allows interested teachers, students and also motivated lay-persons to play with the properties of the newly found Higgs-like particle. This new particle was detected through its decays to directly observable, final state particles. Many of these final state particles are represented in a deck of cards, that represent elementary particles, originally invented to popularize the physics of quark matter in the so-called Quark Matter Card Games. The Higgs decay properties can be utilized, playfully, in a Higgs boson search card game. The rules of this game illustrate also the need for some luck, to complement knowledge and memory, useful skills that this game also helps to develop. The paper is organized as a handout or booklet, that directly describes how to play the Higgs boson on Your Own card game.

T. Csorgo

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

32

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational...

33

Occupational Medicine Clinic | BNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Hours Monday-Friday 8:15am-5pm. Emergency coverage during the lunchtime hour (12-1pm) is available. The clinic is closed after 5pm and on weekends & holidays. Resources DOE Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICPA) Laser History and Eye Exam Form (doc) Location The Occupational Medicine Clinic is located in Building 490, 30 Bell Avenue. location map Get Maps and Directions One of ten national laboratories overseen and primarily funded by the Office of Science of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Brookhaven National Laboratory conducts research in the physical, biomedical, and

34

Image Processing Occupancy Sensor  

Lighting controls offer significant potential for reducing that energy use, and new technologies that have emerged in recent years have enabled a wide range of innovative strategies, from room-level awareness of occupancy and daylight sensing to ...

35

Computer Science Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computer Science Sample Occupations COMPUTER OPERATIONS Computer Hardware/ Software Engineer Computer Operator Database Manager/ Administrator Data Entry Operator Operations Manager DESIGN & MANUFACTURING, ENGINEERING Coder CAD Computer Applications Engineers Computer Research Scientist Computer

Ronquist, Fredrik

36

OwnEnergy Inc | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OwnEnergy Inc OwnEnergy Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name OwnEnergy Inc. Place Brooklyn, New York Zip 11201 Sector Wind energy Product Brooklyn-based community wind project developer focusing on projects ranging in size from 10-80MW. Coordinates 42.852755°, -89.369069° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":42.852755,"lon":-89.369069,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

37

Community-Owned Projects | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Community-Owned Projects Community-Owned Projects Jump to: navigation, search Name Community-Owned Projects Facility Community-Owned Projects Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Dave Norgaard et al/John Deere Wind Energy Developer Dave Norgaard et al/John Deere Wind Energy Energy Purchaser Xcel Energy Location Buffalo Ridge MN Coordinates 44.0039°, -96.0526° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":44.0039,"lon":-96.0526,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

38

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

39

(1) Who owns energy consumption data  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Elster July 12, 2010 Reply to DOE Request for Information of May 11, 2010 Elster July 12, 2010 Reply to DOE Request for Information of May 11, 2010 regarding Data Privacy The DOE questions are restated followed by an answer. Please note that this matter is also related to the May 11, 2010 RFI on needs for utility communications. If data is provided to third parties there is a data processing and communications cost that depends on how many parties data is provided to and by how often data is communicated. These costs are minimized if an in-home display and/or smart thermostat are provided data directly from a smart meter. (1) Q. Who owns energy consumption data? A. Typically by state law the consumer owns the data. (2) Q. Who should be entitled to privacy protections relating to energy information? A. The consumer.

40

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Standards of Seismic Safety for Existing Federally Owned and ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Risks are mitigated in various ways including demolition of dangerous buildings, changes of occupancy, and retrofit ... Flooding, • Fire, • Wind, • Blast, ...

2012-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

42

Occupancy Simulation Schedule Appendix C -Occupancy Simulation Schedule  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

into the electrical panel for run times commensurate with identified use profiles. The profiles enabled sought Figure C.1 and Figure C.2 present the load simulation and occupancy schedules for the lab homes highly insulating windows demonstration. The bases for occupancy simulation were data and analysis developed

43

Contact Info | Occupational Medicine Clinic  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupational Medicine Clinic Occupational Medicine Clinic Promoting optimal physical and emotional health through quality care that is convenient, confidential & individualized. Home Health Promotion Program Employee Assistance Program Contact Contact Info Occupational Medicine Joseph Falco, M.D. 344-3666 OMC Manager/Supervising Physician Staff Physicians Carol Davis, D.O. 344-3667 Board Certified - Occupational Medicine Eva Erens, M.D. 344-3668 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Jaishree Subramani, M.D. MPH 344-3669 Board Certified - Internal Medicine Health Promotion Program Michael Thorn, RN, MBA 344-8612 Health Promotion/Disease Prevention Program Employee Assistance Program (EAP) Nancy Losinno, LCSW, CEAP 344-4567 EAP Manager Linda DiPierro 344-2733 Senior Occupational Medicine Assistant

44

Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business in Detroit Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business in Detroit May 22, 2012 - 10:37am...

45

Federal Energy Management Program: Create Your Own Energy Action...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Create Your Own Energy Action Campaign to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Create Your Own Energy Action Campaign on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy...

46

Financial statistics of major publicly owned electric utilities, 1991  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Financial Statistics of Major Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues.

Not Available

1993-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

47

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-59965 Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice Laboratory is an equal opportunity employer. #12;LBNL-59965 Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates) of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231. #12;#12;Who Owns Renewable Energy

48

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...

49

ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

here Home ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program(EEOICPA)PIA, Oak Ridge Operations Office ORO Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation...

50

Occupant Emergency Plans | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupant Emergency Plans Occupant Emergency Plans On this page is the collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the...

51

Human Resources & Occupational Medicine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Job Opportunities Benefits Office • Work-Life Balance Programs • International Services • Occupational Medicine • Salaries & Awards • Training & Qualifications The Human Resources and Occupational Medicine Division handles scientific and non-scientific employment, benefits, employee and labor relations, staff development, salaries and awards, employee records, and occupational medicine. For more information, click on the one of the services listed above. Brookhaven National Laboratory has a long-standing commitment to a policy of equal opportunity and diversity. Our goal is equality of opportunity in all aspects of employment, including placement, development programs, job assignments, transfers and promotions, without regard to race, color,

52

Environmental Occupational Health Protection Laws  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The manufacturing, processing, and use of chemicals and materials in industrial, workplaces are often accompanied by environmental, health, and safety hazards and risks. Occupational and environmental factors cause or ...

Ashford, Nicholas

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Medical Surveillance in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in Occupational in Occupational Health Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM The Johns Hopkins UniversHy Bloomberg School of Public Health + Compliance with legal requirements + Early detection (preclinical) and therapy - many established occupational diseases are not curable + Prevention of disease in co-worloccupational disease) * Suitable & acceptable test available + Early or latent stage to screen for

54

How much sense do room occupancy sensor controls make  

SciTech Connect

Hotel operators are faced with a confusing array of both remote and local guest room energy control devices. A wide variety of decentralized electronic room controllers, each with its own control logic and vendor claims are in competition with remote front desk microprocessor controls which are essentially ''blind'' to actual occupancy. This paper is a review of the characteristics of various controllers, their behaviour with different in-room environmental equipment, and guest reactions to the potpourri of available devices.

Becker, H.P.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

EETD Sustainability -- Keeping our own house in order  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

EETD Sustainability -- Keeping our own house in order NOTICE Due to the current lapse of federal funding, Berkeley Lab websites are accessible, but may not be updated until...

56

Tribal schools create their own biodiesel to win energy challenge...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Little, Danny McKinney. Not pictured: Charles Cook and Bradley Grandquist. Tribal schools create their own biodiesel to win energy challenge By Louise Lerner * July 22, 2011...

57

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1993  

SciTech Connect

The 1993 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents five years (1989 to 1993) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, the Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities, filed on a fiscal basis.

Not Available

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Build Your Own Pentium III PC, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:Build your own Pentium III PC and save a bundle!Why pay big bucks for a Pentium III system when legendary build-it-yourself guru Aubrey Pilgrim can help you construct one at home for a fraction of dealer prices? In Build Your Own Pentium ...

Aubrey Pilgrim

1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Green Energy Options for Consumer-Owned Business  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this project was to define, test, and prototype a replicable business model for consumer-owned cooperatives. The result is a replicable consumer-owned cooperative business model for the generation, interconnection, and distribution of renewable energy that incorporates energy conservation and efficiency improvements.

Co-opPlus of Western Massachusetts

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned 5: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia EA-1255: Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia SUMMARY This EA evaluates the environmental impacts for the proposal to transport 5.26 kilograms of enriched uranium-23 5 in the form of nuclear fuel, from the Republic of Georgia to the United Kingdom. PUBLIC COMMENT OPPORTUNITIES None available at this time. DOCUMENTS AVAILABLE FOR DOWNLOAD April 30, 1998 EA-1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from the Republic of Georgia April 30, 1998 EA- 1255: Finding of No Significant Impact Project Partnership Transportation of Foreign-Owned Enriched Uranium from

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

New Beryllium Reference Material for Occupational Safety ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The US National Nuclear Security Administration sponsored the development of ... Mich.; and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health ...

2012-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

62

Property:Incentive/OwnRenewEnrgyCrdts | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

OwnRenewEnrgyCrdts OwnRenewEnrgyCrdts Jump to: navigation, search Property Name Incentive/OwnRenewEnrgyCrdts Property Type Text Description Ownership of Renewable Energy Credits. Pages using the property "Incentive/OwnRenewEnrgyCrdts" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A AEP Ohio - Renewable Energy Technology Program (Ohio) + Customers must commit RECs to AEP Ohio for 15 years. AEP SWEPCO - SMART Source Solar PV Program (Texas) + Customer-generator AEP Texas Central Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program (Texas) + Customer-generator AEP Texas North Company - SMART Source Solar PV Rebate Program (Texas) + Customer-generator APS - Renewable Energy Incentive Program (Arizona) + APS Alameda Municipal Power - Solar Photovoltaics Rebate Program (California) + Alameda Power and Telecom

63

Faith Enterprises Inc. A Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Faith Enterprises Inc. A Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business Security When the Air Force asked Sandia to deliver complex security upgrades to a facility on Kirtland Air...

64

KPaul A Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

KPaul A Service Disabled Veteran-Owned Small Business Jennifer Muth's initial phone call put her in touch with Ann Riley, Sandia's Business Point of Contact. "I work with all new...

65

Women-Owned Small Business Webinar, June 20, 2013  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization hosted a webinar for women-owned small businesses on June 20, 2013, to provide overviews of major program offices in the Department of...

66

Worker owned cooperatives and the ecosystems that support them  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By emphasizing wealth creation, communities can not only cultivate streams of income, but also build wealth. Through collectively owned and democratically governed assets, communities can build wealth. Economic development ...

Tanner, Rachael A. (Rachael Ann)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Energy Analysis Department Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Analysis Department Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates: An Exploration of Policy Options about different approaches to clarifying the ownership of renewable energy certificates (RECs), focusing the output from certain Qualifying Facilities, including cogeneration and renewable energy generators · PURPA

68

Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance System (OMSS) PIA, Idaho National Laboratory Occupational Medical Surveillance...

69

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security Administration Pantex Site Office Pantex Occupational Health System (OHS), National Nuclear Security...

70

Managing information diffusion in Name-Your-Own-Price auctions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In Name-Your-Own-Price auctions (NYOP) prospective buyers bid against a secret reserve price set by the seller and only win the auction at the price of their bid if it is equal or higher than the seller's reserve price. Thus, bidders who want to win ... Keywords: Decision support system, Information diffusion, Name-Your-Own-Price, Social networks, eBay Best Offer

Oliver Hinz; Martin Spann

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Ethical Issues in Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ETillCAL ISSUES IN ETillCAL ISSUES IN OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Mary L. Doyle, MPH, RN, COHN-S/CM DOE Headquarters January 17, 2002 OH Ethical Issues * Autonomy * Confidentiality * Right to Know * Putcmalism * Informed Consent OH Ethical Issues * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others - Engineering controls - Exposure monitoring/ walk throughs - Health screening/ Health surveillance - Health promotion - Occupational Health Research Ethical Principles * Autonomy: The right to self-determination * Nonmaleficence: The duty to do no harm * Beneficence: Actions that contribute to the welfare of others * .Justice: Fairness or giving person what is due them OH Ethical Issues * Nonmale.ficence - High risk jobs - Second Party induced Hazards - Incompetent , wtethical, illegal practices

72

Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program More Documents & Publications LM Records Handling System (LMRHS01) - Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, Office of Legacy Management

73

GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM The Department of Energy has on a variety of occasions engaged in transactions under which it bartered uranium to which it has title for goods or services . This guidance memorializes the results of analyses previously directed to individual proposed transactions . For the reasons discussed below, we conclude that the Atomic Energy Act of 1954' , as amended, (AEA), authorizes such barter transactions. Background : DOE Barter Transactions In a number of instances, DOE has engaged in transactions involving the barter of DOE-owned uranium2 in exchange for various products or services. For example, DOE entered into a transaction with the United States Enrichment Corporation (USEC), under which USEC would

74

High School Students Build Their Own Supercomputer (Almost) | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

High School Students Build Their Own Supercomputer (Almost) High School Students Build Their Own Supercomputer (Almost) High School Students Build Their Own Supercomputer (Almost) September 10, 2010 - 9:47am Addthis Eric Gedenk What are the key facts? Students built a computer cluster -- a group of computers communicating with one another to operate as a single machine -- out of Mac mini CPUs. For the third straight year, students and teachers from around Appalachia gathered at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) this summer for an interactive training with some of the world's leading computing experts. The focal point of the training was a course called "Build a Supercomputer - Well Almost." And build they did. With guidance from ORNL staff, collaborators and interns, the high-school students went about building a

75

Minority-Owned Business Creating Career Opportunities | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Minority-Owned Business Creating Career Opportunities Minority-Owned Business Creating Career Opportunities Minority-Owned Business Creating Career Opportunities September 15, 2010 - 2:21pm Addthis Most Catalyst Management Group employees had no previous experience with weatherization. | Photo by CMG Most Catalyst Management Group employees had no previous experience with weatherization. | Photo by CMG Lindsay Gsell What are the key facts? This Pontiac, Michigan weatherization company sees growth through Recovery Act. Catalyst Management Group will add nearly 50% more staff in the coming months. Employees new to the trade get weatherization training and mentoring. Leon Brown, an engineer by trade, started his career as a manufacturing engineer in the automobile industry in Detroit. After earning his master in business administration, and with the decline of jobs in the automobile

76

First university owned district heating system using biomass heat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highlights · First university owned district heating system using biomass heat · Capacity: 15 MMBtu Main Campus District Heating Performance · Avoided: 3500 tonnes of CO2 · Particulate: less than 10 mg District Heating Goals To displace 85% of natural gas used for core campus heating. Fuel Bunker Sawmill

Northern British Columbia, University of

77

Save Money with Your Very Own Drapes | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

with Your Very Own Drapes with Your Very Own Drapes Save Money with Your Very Own Drapes June 11, 2012 - 2:47pm Addthis Elizabeth Spencer Communicator, National Renewable Energy Laboratory So, last winter I decided that I was going to get crafty and make my own blankets as an incentive to keep the thermostat low. It was a fun project, and it actually worked. I needed more blankets, so I made them. They were warm, so I used them all the time. And hey, I was proud of them! It feels good to make something you love. Now that it's summer, the blankets are folded up-though they're still out. I like the colors I chose, so I just hung them up in the study. So my simple project ended up being a huge success: Easy home décor, super warm winter blankets, and an easy way to save money! And now that it's summer, I want to make drapes.

78

Molecular motors interacting with their own tracks Max N. Artyomov  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular motors interacting with their own tracks Max N. Artyomov Department of Chemistry; published 17 April 2008 Dynamics of molecular motors that move along linear lattices and interact with them exactly solvable discrete-state "burnt- bridge" models. Molecular motors are viewed as diffusing particles

79

Occupational Safety Performance Trends | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety Trends More Documents & Publications Strategic Safety Goals EA-1954: Draft Environmental Assessment Development of the Nuclear Safety Information Dashboard...

80

WEB RESOURCE: Occupational Outlook Handbook (OOH ... - TMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 9, 2007 ... The Occupational Outlook Handbook gives information on the training and education needed to go into engineering, earnings, job prospects, ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

2011 DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Summary poster  

SciTech Connect

This poster graphically presents data pertaining to occupational radiation exposure in terms of total effective dose (TED), primarily, but also collective dose and average measureable dose.

ORAU

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

82

Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Criteria Review and Approach Document 1.0 PURPOSE Subject: Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inqu v Acting Di...

83

Occupant Behavior, Egress, and Emergency Communications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Forman Williams, Director, Center for Energy Research, University ... Total evacuation of a tower assuming a full occupant load without visitors (19,800 ...

84

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act...  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Integrated Support Center (ISC) ISC Home About Services Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Privacy Act...

85

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Home Outreach Event Calendar for DOE Nuclear Weapons Workers Covered Facilities Database Chronic Beryllium Disease Awareness...

86

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) and High Occupancy Toll (HOT) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High

87

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1992  

SciTech Connect

The 1992 edition of the Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 4 years (1989 through 1992) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Four years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, {open_quotes}Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.{close_quotes} Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year, rather than a calendar year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. In previous editions of this publication, data were aggregated by the two most commonly reported fiscal years, June 30 and December 31. This omitted approximately 20 percent of the respondents who operate on fiscal years ending in other months. Accordingly, the EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents.

Not Available

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Occupational Safety & Health Criteria & Review Approach Documents Documents Available for Download CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho MF-628 Drum Treatment Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory Waste Characterization, Reduction, and Repackaging Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR

89

Occupancy based demand response HVAC control strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, cooling and ventilation accounts for 30% energy usage and for 50% of the electricity usage in the United States. Currently, most modern buildings still condition rooms assuming maximum occupancy rather than actual usage. As a result, rooms are ... Keywords: HVAC, demand response, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Alberto E. Cerpa

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2006  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the seventh annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for EPRI's OHSD program.

2006-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

91

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2007  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and investigating occupational health and safety research. This is the eighth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected for the OHSD program.

2007-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

92

Frostbite Theater - Static Electricity Experiments - How to Make Your Own  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Does a Van de Graaff Generator Work? How Does a Van de Graaff Generator Work? Previous Video (How Does a Van de Graaff Generator Work?) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts?) Should a Person Touch 200,000 Volts? How to Make Your Own Electroscope! An electroscope is a simple device that you can use to do static electricity experiments. They are easy to make. Would you like to know how to build your own? We'll show you how! [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: An electroscope is a simple device that you can use to do static electricity experiments. Today, Steve and I are going to show you how to make one! Steve: The electroscope is fairly simple. Ours is just made from a binder

93

How to Add Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Adding Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage Adding Your Own Reading Comprehension Passage Please follow these instructions for submitting a reading comprehension passage: Use a text editor or word processor to create your reading comprehension passage. Since Jefferson Lab is a basic physics research facility, passages that incorporate some aspect of science are preferred over passages that do not. Make certain that your passage is accessible to a general audience. While you are creating this passage primarily for your classes' benefit, realize that anyone on the internet will be able to view it. The passage should make sense to anyone, not just to those in your class. Check your passage for: Factual accuracy Correct spelling Correct punctuation Proper grammar Once you have your passage, place brackets ([]) around the words you

94

Financial statistics of major US publicly owned electric utilities 1994  

SciTech Connect

This publication presents 5 years (1990--94) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented. Composite tables present: Aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, financial indicators, electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data.

NONE

1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Occupancy change detection system and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID); Few, Douglas A. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Financial statistics major US publicly owned electric utilities 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1996 edition of The Financial Statistics of Major US Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1992 through 1996) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator and nongenerator summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided. Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 2 figs., 32 tabs.

NONE

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and...

98

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations More Documents & Publications Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database, INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation

99

New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

HVAC Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: HVAC Occupancy Sensors October 4, 2013 - 4:20pm Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations...

100

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SITE-APPS-ACCRED-BOUNDRY.pdf WSRC-MEDGATE-OCCUPATIONAL-HEALTH-AND-SAFETY-MEDICAL-SYSTEM-SAVANNAH-RIVER-SI...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Occupational Electric Shocks, Electromagnetic Fields and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A. , Fatal occupational electrocutions in the United States.Narrative Review: Electrocution and Life-ThreateningFatal occupational electrocutions in the United States. Inj

Vergara, Ximena Patricia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Title Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors Publication Type Report LBNL...

103

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404 Audit...

104

Transportation capabilities study of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study evaluates current capabilities for transporting spent nuclear fuel owned by the US Department of Energy. Currently licensed irradiated fuel shipping packages that have the potential for shipping the spent nuclear fuel are identified and then matched against the various spent nuclear fuel types. Also included are the results of a limited investigation into other certified packages and new packages currently under development. This study is intended to support top-level planning for the disposition of the Department of Energy`s spent nuclear fuel inventory.

Clark, G.L.; Johnson, R.A.; Smith, R.W. [Packaging Technology, Inc., Tacoma, WA (United States); Abbott, D.G.; Tyacke, M.J. [Lockheed Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel strategic plan. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for safely and efficiently managing DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and SNF returned to the US from foreign research reactors (FRR). The fuel will be treated where necessary, packaged suitable for repository disposal where practicable, and placed in interim dry storage. These actions will remove remaining vulnerabilities, make as much spent fuel as possible ready for ultimate disposition, and substantially reduce the cost of continued storage. The goal is to complete these actions in 10 years. This SNF Strategic Plan updates the mission, vision, objectives, and strategies for the management of DOE-owned SNF articulated by the SNF Strategic Plan issued in December 1994. The plan describes the remaining issues facing the EM SNF Program, lays out strategies for addressing these issues, and identifies success criteria by which program progress is measured. The objectives and strategies in this plan are consistent with the following Em principles described by the Assistance Secretary in his June 1996 initiative to establish a 10-year time horizon for achieving most program objectives: eliminate and manage the most serious risks; reduce mortgage and support costs to free up funds for further risk reduction; protect worker health and safety; reduce generation of wastes; create a collaborative relationship between DOE and its regulators and stakeholders; focus technology development on cost and risk reduction; and strengthen management and financial control.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Headquarters Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics The Department of Energy recognizes the importance of maintaining a healthy and fit Federal workforce. To that end, our occupational health care professionals at the Headquarters Occupational Health Clinics in Forrestal and Germantown provide the following services: Walk-in care. Assessment, nursing care and follow-up for minor illnesses and injuries on a walk-in basis. First-response. Emergency treatment to any employee, contractor or visitor experiencing a life-threatening medical emergency. Wellness seminars. A variety of workshops designed to educate participants on a wide range of health-related topics. Physician directed services: For employees whose physician has directed medical care such as allergy injections, blood pressure

107

OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Standard Qualification Standard Reference Guide JULY 2011 Occupational Safety This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... iii TABLES ........................................................................................................................................ iv ACRONYMS ................................................................................................................................. v PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1

108

Window Signaling Systems: Control Strategies & Occupant Behavior  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and L.M Parkins. 1984. “Window-Opening Behavior in OfficeOccupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems," CBEDaly, A. 2002. “Operable windows and HVAC systems. ” HPAC

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

DOE 2010 Occupational Radiation Exposure November 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2010 occupational radiation dose data trended over the past 5 years, and includes instructions to submit successful ALARA projects.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Analysis

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

110

Hanford Site lighting occupancy sensor study  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in the US Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site office facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include specific application data for Hanford Site office building spaces that indicate where sensor technology could be applied for cost-effective energy savings.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the ninth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 13 years (1995 2007) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. These injury data a...

2008-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

112

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the eleventh annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 15 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system...

2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

113

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This twelfth annual report of illness and injury occurrence in the electric energy industry is based on data collected as part of the Electric Power Research Institute's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD integrates 16 years of personnel, injury, and claims data from eighteen companies into a single data system. The...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

114

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI's dynamic ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program enables the electric energy industry to monitor annual injury/illness trends, perform benchmarking, evaluate intervention programs, and investigate occupational health and safety research. This is the tenth annual report of illness and injury trends based on data collected for the OHSD program, integrating 14 years (1995 2008) of personnel, injury, and claims data from 17 companies into a single data system. The current OHSD da...

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

115

Occupational health physics at a fusion reactor  

SciTech Connect

Future generation of electrical power using controlled thermonuclear reactors will involve both traditional and new concerns for health protection. A review of the problems associated with exposures to tritium and magnetic fields is presented with emphasis on the occupational worker. The radiological aspects of tritium, inventories and loss rates of tritium for fusion reactors, and protection of the occupational worker are discussed. Magnetic fields in which workers may be exposed routinely and possible biological effects are also discussed. (auth)

Shank, K.E.; Easterly, C.E.; Shoup, R.L.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office Enenrgy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System, PIA, Savannah River Operations Office More Documents & Publications Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking System PIA, Office of Business Operations PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA)

117

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Authorization for High Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Authorization for High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on

118

Awards go to disadvantaged, veteran-owned and small businesses  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Three small businesses recognized by DOE Three small businesses recognized by DOE Awards go to disadvantaged, veteran-owned and small businesses Three business serving LANL are recognized by DOE. April 3, 2012 Workers sample contents of LANL's Material Disposal Area B (MDA-B) before excavation Workers took direct-push samples to characterize the contents of Material Disposal Area B prior to excavation. Contact Small Business Office (505) 667-4419 Email Small businesses serving LANL receive DOE awards Three businesses that provide services to LANL received Department of Energy small business awards for fiscal year 2011 were recognized by DOE at a ceremony in Washington, D.C. on June 17, 2012. Eberline Services of Santa Fe received DOE's Small Business of the Year award. Eberline conducted environmental drilling services at LANL. The work

119

CABLE AOORIs*. HICRONIZER. MOORLblOWN. NEW ,SRIEY  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NEW ALBANY ROAD . MOORESTOWN . NEW ]ERSEY NEW ALBANY ROAD . MOORESTOWN . NEW ]ERSEY CABLE AOORIs*. HICRONIZER. MOORLblOWN. NEW ,SRIEY be returned further obliga- may desire any patent protection, provi#ed; however, that the costa in connectSo& with the pregaration;~~fillrig nnd prosecution of the same shall be entirely: at ?SG,~~e~enS.e ,of our..company. This provision, how- ever, ls.' subJect:to eny.~prlor'arra~cmont between your Institu- tion and the government with respect to inventions and p?j,tents. ,.: 3,ri 'I :: .:v:ri :!:!p, +lo.~nl.~~! ( '.'I! &f :, > ,>,' :'It'r*i&: sltibr~!the understandfng that your Instttution will ca,rry such insurance as you'may deem ndvi~able~ln aonoec- tion with this m ill or its use ~lhile :kt the UnivsF@#b v' "t -' . ' - IN,TERNATI.ONAL PULVERIZING c0RP0RAi.1~

120

Who owns leaded fuel vehicles: impact of the phasedown  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The US Environmental Protection Agency has promulgated regulations lowering the allowable level of lead in gasoline from 1.1 g/gal to 0.1 g/gal on January 1, 1986. Impacts of this action on minority groups were assessed in this study, focusing on household ownership of leaded-fuel vehicles, and on the number of small children residing in the households. The number of vehicles requiring leaded gasoline is declining rapidly, from 67.4 million in 1981 to 28.1 million in 1986, and 18.6 million in 1988. The share of vehicle-miles traveled by these vehicles will fall from 40% in 1981 to less than 10% in 1988. Leaded-gasoline vehicles are held by all types of households; the ownership pattern for these older vehicles is very similar to the pattern for all vehicles owned by households grouped by race of householder or region.

LaBelle, S.

1985-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

122

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

123

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

124

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

125

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

126

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

127

Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

High Occupancy Vehicle High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption

128

When it comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 1978, pp. 42-47. FERC, "Final Rule, Order 719,comes to Demand Response, is FERC its Own Worst Enemy? Jamesit comes to demand response, is FERC its own worst enemy? By

Bushnell, James; Hobbs, Benjamin; Wolak, Frank A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

May 23 ChallengeHER Women Owned Small Business Event in Washington...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 23 ChallengeHER Women Owned Small Business Event in Washington, DC May 23 ChallengeHER Women Owned Small Business Event in Washington, DC May 6, 2013 - 4:48pm Addthis John Hale...

130

Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

1996 - Final issue. Presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities.

Information Center

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Minnesota Methane owns a landfill gas facility located infor example, that wind or landfill gas energy was conveyed,

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Chief Medical Officer: Occupational Medicine in Health and Safety  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Health and Safety Health and Safety Occupational health requirements provide for the medical support of employees through the prevention, management, and compensation of occupational injuries and illnesses. In addition, requirements for the medical assessment of employees working in the nuclear environment provide protection for those employees, their coworkers, and the public. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. A. General Occupational Health B. Hazard-Specific Occupational Health C. Hazardous Materials Occupational Health D. Nuclear Safety E. Medical Screening and Surveillance F. Former Worker Medical Screening and Compensation G. Epidemiology H. Injury and Illness Reporting and Recordkeeping A. General Occupational Health Federal Employees

133

CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012 December 4, 2012 Occupational Radiation Protection Program Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry (HSS CRAD 45-35, Rev. 1) This document provides an overview of the Criteria, Activities, and Lines of Inquiry that will be used to collect information to evaluate occupational radiation protection programs against DOE policy, standards, and regulatory requirements. The approach includes evaluation of essential programmatic elements of radiation protection programs with additional emphasis on implementation of the core functions of integrated safety management. CRAD, Occupational Radiation Protection Program - December 4, 2012

134

Financial statistics of selected publicly owned electric utilities 1989. [Contains glossary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Financial Statistics of Selected Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide the Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with data that can be used for policymaking and decision making purposes relating to publicly owned electric utility issues. 21 tabs.

Not Available

1991-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

135

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupancy- Based Energy Management Systems for Buildings:Occupancy-Based Energy Management System. The objective ofOccupancy-Based Energy Management System. The experiments to

Sohn, Michael D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Occupational hazards associated with geothermal energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Exposure to noise, H{sub 2}S, NH/sub 3/, hazardous chemicals and wastes, and heat are the major occupational health hazards associated with geothermal energy development - from drilling to power production. Exposures to these agents, although not unique to geothermal energy development, occur in situations peculiar to the industry. Reports show that occupational illnesses associated with geothermal energy development are increasing, while the corresponding rates from all power production are decreasing. Most of those related to geothermal energy result from the H{sub 2}S-abatement systems used in response to environmental pollution regulations.

Hahn, J.L.

1979-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

137

V-033: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload 3: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities V-033: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities November 26, 2012 - 2:00am Addthis PROBLEM: ownCloud Cross-Site Scripting and File Upload Vulnerabilities PLATFORM: ownCloud 4.5.2, 4.5.1, 4.0.9 ABSTRACT: Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in ownCloud REFERENCE LINKS: ownCloud Server Advisories Secunia Advisory SA51357 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: 1) Input passed via the filename to apps/files_versions/js/versions.js and apps/files/js/filelist.js and event title to 3rdparty/fullcalendar/js/fullcalendar.js is not properly sanitised before being returned to the user. This can be exploited to execute arbitrary HTML and script code in a user's browser session in context of an affected site.

138

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #694: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4: September 26, 4: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning a Vehicle by State to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #694: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning a Vehicle by State on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #694: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning a Vehicle by State on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #694: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning a Vehicle by State on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #694: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning a Vehicle by State on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #694: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning a Vehicle by State on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #694: September 26, 2011 Costs of Owning a Vehicle by State on AddThis.com...

139

Tell Us: Your Thoughts on a Bring Your Own Device Policy | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tell Us: Your Thoughts on a Bring Your Own Device Policy Tell Us: Your Thoughts on a Bring Your Own Device Policy Tell Us: Your Thoughts on a Bring Your Own Device Policy October 2, 2012 - 12:25pm Addthis The Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) effort will focus on how personally owned devices could be used for government work. The Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) effort will focus on how personally owned devices could be used for government work. Peter J. Tseronis Peter J. Tseronis Chief Technology Officer What does this mean for me? You will possess fewer devices. It will help you avoiding compatibility issues. You'll experience less downtime because of updates. In May, the Administration unveiled its Digital Government Strategy, intended to "build a 21st century digital Government that delivers better digital services to the American people." This vision recognizes that

140

Non-Intrusive Occupancy Monitoring using Smart Meters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed information about a home's occupancy is necessary to implement many advanced energy-efficiency optimizations. However, monitoring occupancy directly is intrusive, typically requiring the deployment of multiple environmental sensors, e.g., motion, ... Keywords: Electricity, Energy, Grid

Dong Chen, Sean Barker, Adarsh Subbaswamy, David Irwin, Prashant Shenoy

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: March 8, 2010 3: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates to someone by E-mail Share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Facebook Tweet about Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Twitter Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Google Bookmark Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Delicious Rank Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on Digg Find More places to share Vehicle Technologies Office: Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates on AddThis.com... Fact #613: March 8, 2010 Vehicle Occupancy Rates The average number of persons occupying a car is 1.59 and has not changed

142

Occupant Behavior: Impact on Energy Use of Private Offices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of occupant behavior on building energy use is significant, and even so at the energy end use levels such as lighting, space cooling and heating. For atypical single-occupancy...

143

Analyzing occupancy profiles from a lighting controls field study  

SciTech Connect

Despite a number of published studies on the effectiveness of lighting controls in buildings, only one US study examines the occupancy patterns of building occupants. Occupancy profiles allow one to determine, for example, the probability that an office is occupied for each hour of the workday. Occupancy profiles are useful for many purposes including: (1) predicting the effectiveness of occupancy sensors for reducing peak demand, (2) evaluating the impact of human activity on building lighting and other electric loads and (3) providing lighting equipment manufacturers with detailed lighting operation data to help evaluate the impact of advanced lighting controls on equipment life. In this paper, we examine the occupancy profiles for 35 single person offices at a large office building in San Francisco and analyze the data to obtain average occupancy as a function of time of day. In addition, we analyzed the data to identify how the use of occupancy sensors may affect switching cycles and lamp life.

Rubinstein, Francis; Colak, Nesrin; Jennings, Judith; Neils, Danielle

2003-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

144

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012...

145

Market survey: Lighting loggers and occupancy loggers  

SciTech Connect

Six companies in the United States market lighting loggers, a class of devices that includes runtime and time-of-use lighting loggers and occupancy loggers. Runtime loggers are the simplest and least expensive loggers, measuring how long lights remain off or on -- data useful for assessing energy savings of lighting efficiency upgrades. Time-of-use loggers, manufactured by only one company, are more sophisticated and versatile, as well as more expensive. They record when and for how long lights are turned off and on--data useful for energy savings assessments and billing impact studies for buildings with time-of-use rates. Occupancy loggers are marketed by three companies in the United States. These loggers measure how long lights remain on when no one is in the room. Such data is useful for determining potential savings from occupancy sensors. Lighting loggers are most cost-effective when information is needed on lighting usage in individual spaces. Other methods can be more economical when overall lighting usage for a building or an entire floor is all that is needed. The simplicity of the loggers makes them accessible to anyone interested in assessing lighting savings, including end users, utilities, ESCOs, and consultants. But lighting and occupancy loggers are not always the least expensive or best way to assess lighting retrofit savings, and can be misapplied if used without a clear objective and understanding of the loggers` limitations.

Gregerson, J.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the sixth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRIs Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2004 from sixteen participating companies.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

147

Evaluation of Occupational Magnetic Field Exposure Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As a first step in assessing potential effects of EMF exposure guidelines on utility operations, EPRI sponsored a technical evaluation of the major occupational EMF exposure guidelines and an analysis of existing magnetic-field exposure databases. The research reported herein is a comprehensive extension of that work, that includes studies by several research groups on diverse topics related to guidelines.

1998-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

148

Occupational Health Programs - Jacqueline Agnew, PhD  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Specific Knowledge Base -Hospital - Construction -Brewery -Garment -Printing - Research Facilities Essential Components of Occupational & Environmental Health Programs 1 . Health...

149

Security Plan for the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensati...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OFFICE OF HEALTH, SAFETY AND SECURITY SECURITY PLAN FOR THE ENERGY EMPLOYEES OCCUPATIONAL ILLNESS COMPENSATION PROGRAM S January 23, 2009 ...

150

Occupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

proposes an HVAC control strategy based on occupancy prediction and real time occupancy monitoring via simulation model. We dis- cuss the building parameters and the HVAC control strate- gies used for the energyOccupancy Based Demand Response HVAC Control Strategy Varick L. Erickson University of California

Cerpa, Alberto E.

151

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forecasting Hotel Arrivals and Occupancy Using Monte Carlo Simulation Athanasius Zakhary Faculty University, Giza, Egypt (n.elgayar@fci-cu.edu.eg) #12;Abstract Forecasting hotel arrivals and occupancy simulation approach for the arrivals and occupancy forecasting problem. In this approach we simulate

Atiya, Amir

152

FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Qualification Card - Occupational Safety Qualification Card - Occupational Safety FAQS Qualification Card - Occupational Safety A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-OccupationalSafety.docx Description Occupational Safety Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Qualification Card - Chemical Processing

153

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Occupational Medicine Workshops and Webinars Purpose The DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop & Webinar (OMWW) is a valuable training opportunity established by the Office of Health, Safety, and Security in support of hundreds of medical and allied health professionals located at over four dozen locations across the Department. Their vital work in the field of Occupational Medicine encompasses medical qualification examinations, injury and illness management, disability management, workers' compensation, and much more. This training will advance DOE's mission as follows: By providing medical and allied health professionals (eg, Industrial Hygiene) and their management with updates regarding medical services and

154

Presentations, Women-Owned Small Business Forum (May 2013) | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Presentations, Women-Owned Small Business Forum (May 2013) Presentations, Women-Owned Small Business Forum (May 2013) Presentations, Women-Owned Small Business Forum (May 2013) Below, download presentations from the Women-Owned Small Business Opportunity Forum, held in Washington DC on May 23, 2013. Presented in partnership with the U.S. Department of Energy, the Small Business Administration, Women Impacting Public Policy, and American Express OPEN, this event featured critical information for small business owners who want to do business with the Department of Energy. This event featured: Insight into potential procurements and women-owned small business set-asides in 2014. Talks from key agency procurement representatives An update on current procurement policy and the women-owned small business program. Opportunities to meet other female small business owners working

155

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Buying and Selling Pre-Owned Alternative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Vehicles Vehicles Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: Buying and Selling Pre-Owned Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicles to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Buying and Selling Pre-Owned Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicles on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Buying and Selling Pre-Owned Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicles on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Buying and Selling Pre-Owned Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicles on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Buying and Selling Pre-Owned Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicles on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Buying and Selling Pre-Owned Alternative Fuel and Advanced Vehicles on Digg

156

May 23 ChallengeHER Women Owned Small Business Event in Washington, DC |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 23 ChallengeHER Women Owned Small Business Event in Washington, May 23 ChallengeHER Women Owned Small Business Event in Washington, DC May 23 ChallengeHER Women Owned Small Business Event in Washington, DC May 6, 2013 - 4:48pm Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization This April, the Small Business Administration (SBA) announced the ChallengeHER Campaign. The campaign is an exciting new initiative that leverages the resources of SBA, Women Impacting Public Policy, and American Express OPEN to promote the Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program and bring more women-owned firms into the federal government's supply chain. Women owned small business are invited to join us on May 23 in Washington D.C. for a ChallengeHER summit. At this event, the federal government will

157

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system of contractually-based nuclear safety standards to regulatory based requirements. Code of Federal Regulations Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule More Documents & Publications Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION

158

New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors New and Underutilized Technology: Vending Machine Occupancy Sensors October 7, 2013 - 9:09am Addthis The following information outlines key deployment considerations for vending machine occupancy sensors within the Federal sector. Benefits Vending machine occupancy sensors detect when no people are in the vicinity and powers down beverage vending machines. These systems do not completely turn off compressor, but reduce their run times. Application Vending machine occupancy sensors are applicable in most building categories where vending machines are present. Key Factors for Deployment Occupancy sensors or similar features should be an integral part of new vending machine purchases. Ranking Criteria Federal energy savings, cost-effectiveness, and probability of success are

159

Financial statistics of major US investor-owned electric utilities 1994  

SciTech Connect

The Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State Governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for making policy and decisions relating to investor-owned electric utility issues.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Financial statistics of major U.S. investor-owned electric utilities 1993  

SciTech Connect

The Financial Statistics of Major US Investor-Owned Electric Utilities publication presents summary and detailed financial accounting data on the investor-owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to investor-owned electric utility issues.

Not Available

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Occupational Medicine Assistant PIA  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Medicine Medicine - Assistant PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance is provided in the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Deparlment of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT iDafe 'Depauwerltal El.ment& iSlte June 10, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Name :of,lnfonnation Systetnol"'ITiPtoJect Occupational Medicine - Assistant Exhlblt;ProJect UID Indirect funded Occupational Safety and Health NewPIA 0 Update D N T 'tl I Contact Information arne I e . , Phone, Email System Owner Local Privacy Act Offtcer

162

PRIVACY IMPACT ASSESSMENT: INL Energy Employees' Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

INL INL Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) Tracking Database PIA Template Version 3 - May, 2009 Department of Energy Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) Guidance Is provided In the template. See DOE Order 206.1, Department of Energy Privacy Program, Appendix A, Privacy Impact Assessments, for requirements and additional guidance for conducting a PIA: http://www.directives.doe.gov/pdfs/doe/doetextlneword/206/o2061.pdf Please complete electronically: no hand-written submissions will be accepted. This template may not be modified. MODULE 1- PRIVACY NEEDS ASSESSMENT Date Departmental Element &Site June 11, 2009 Idaho National Laboratory Building 616 Willow Creek Building Name of Information Energy Employees' Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) System or IT ProJect Tracking Database Exhibit Project

163

Achieving Sustainability, Energy Savings, and Occupant Comfort  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability, energy savings, and occupant comfort are not mutually exclusive objectives, as buildings can be designed that incorporate all of these features. Sustainability is often defined as meeting the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to do the same. Reducing the demand for energy produced from depletable resources and generating energy from renewable sources leaves more resources available for future use. Therefore, energy savings and sustainability go hand in hand. Occupant comfort can be maintained in conjunction with energy savings, and some sustainable practices enhance comfort. Properly planned and implemented construction programs can help ensure efficiently operating systems, reducing the consumption of valuable resources, while providing an acceptable indoor environment. The authors have more than 30 years combined experience working with Texas schools in mechanical, electrical, and plumbing engineering and design as well as energy management.

Fisher, D.; Bristow, G.

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

2000 - Final issue. Presents summary financial data for 1994 through 2000 and detailed financial data for 2000 on major publicly owned electric utilities.

Tom Leckey

2001-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Realities of Consumer-Owned Wind Power for Rural Electric Co-operatives (Presentation)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Presentation for WindPower 2006 held June 4-7, 2006, in Pittsburgh, PA, describing consumer-owned wind power for rural electric co-operatives.

Lindenberg, S.; Green, J.

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Emerging Markets for Renewable Energy Certificates:Challenges. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, January.less important. Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Emerging Markets for Renewable Energy Certificates:Challenges. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, January.law (Olson Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? On May

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2005. Emerging Markets for Renewable Energy Certificates:Challenges. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, January.state law (Olson Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? On

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Research priorities for occupational radiation protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Subpanel on Occupational Radiation Protection Research concludes that the most urgently needed research is that leading to the resolution of the potential effects of low-level ionizing radiation. This is the primary driving force in setting appropriate radiation protection standards and in directing the emphasis of radiation protection efforts. Much has already been done in collecting data that represents a compendium of knowledge that should be fully reviewed and understood. It is imperative that health physics researchers more effectively use that data and apply the findings to enhance understanding of the potential health effects of low-level ionizing radiation and improve the risk estimates upon which current occupational radiation protection procedures and requirements depend. Research must be focused to best serve needs in the immediate years ahead. Only then will we get the most out of what is accomplished. Beyond the above fundamental need, a number of applied research areas also have been identified as national priority issues. If effective governmental focus is achieved on several of the most important national priority issues, important occupational radiation protection research will be enhanced, more effectively coordinated, and more quickly applied to the work environment. Response in the near term will be enhanced and costs will be reduced by: developing microprocessor-aided {open_quotes}smart{close_quotes} instruments to simplify the use and processing of radiation data; developing more sensitive, energy-independent, and tissue-equivalent dosimeters to more accurately quantify personnel dose; and developing an improved risk assessment technology base. This can lead to savings of millions of dollars in current efforts needed to ensure personnel safety and to meet new, more stringent occupational guidelines.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in an Office Building through the Use of Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

171

Revealing Occupancy Patterns in Office Buildings Through the use of Annual Occupancy Sensor Data  

SciTech Connect

Energy simulation programs like DOE-2 and EnergyPlus are tools that have been proven to aid with energy calculations to predict energy use in buildings. Some inputs to energy simulation models are relatively easy to find, including building size, orientation, construction materials, and HVAC system size and type. Others vary with time (e.g. weather and occupancy) and some can be a challenge to estimate in order to create an accurate simulation. In this paper, the analysis of occupancy sensor data for a large commercial, multi-tenant office building is presented. It details occupancy diversity factors for private offices and summarizes the same for open offices, hallways, conference rooms, break rooms, and restrooms in order to better inform energy simulation parameters. Long-term data were collected allowing results to be presented to show variations of occupancy diversity factors in private offices for time of day, day of the week, holidays, and month of the year. The diversity factors presented differ as much as 46% from those currently published in ASHRAE 90.1 2004 energy cost method guidelines, a document referenced by energy modelers regarding occupancy diversity factors for simulations. This may result in misleading simulation results and may introduce inefficiencies in the final equipment and systems design.

Carlos Duarte; Kevin Van Den Wymelenberg; Craig Rieger

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NEW TERMS OF ACCOMMODATION: BENJAMIN ELMANS ON THEIR OWN TERMS AND EARLY MODERN GLOBAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NEW TERMS OF ACCOMMODATION: BENJAMIN ELMANS ON THEIR OWN TERMS AND EARLY MODERN GLOBAL NETWORK-1850, the subtitle of Benjamin Elmans On Their Terms, hardly captures the depth of the historiographic revision role to science, that the very idea that Chinese developed science ,,on their own terms

Elman, Benjamin

173

Improved taguchi method based contracted capacity optimization for power consumer with self-owned generating units  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper proposes an improved Taguchi method to determine the best capacity contracts and dispatch the power output of the self-owned generating units from almost infinite combinations. To be achieved are savings of total power expenses of the consumers ... Keywords: capacity contracts, improved Taguchi method, self-owned generating units

Hong-Tzer Yang; Pai-Chun Peng; Chung-His Huang

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

SBA Expands Access to Contracting Opportunities for Women-Owned Small  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SBA Expands Access to Contracting Opportunities for Women-Owned SBA Expands Access to Contracting Opportunities for Women-Owned Small Businesses SBA Expands Access to Contracting Opportunities for Women-Owned Small Businesses January 22, 2013 - 10:42am Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's note: This article was originally published on the Small Business Administration's website. Women-owned small businesses will have greater access to federal contracting opportunities as a result of changes included in the National Defense Authorization Act of 2013 (NDAA) to the U.S. Small Business Administration's Women-Owned Small Business Federal Contract Program. "This new law is a prime example of how the Obama Administration is embracing a more inclusive view of entrepreneurship, helping small

175

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's Note: This announcement was originally posted on the Office of Environmental Management's website. Today the Energyy Department awarded a $20 million contact (estimated value) to a Native American Tribally-Owned Section 8(a) company for administrative support services and information technology support at our Savannah River Operations Office. The company, NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona, is owned by the Navajo Nation. NOVA

176

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 5:16pm Addthis John Hale III John Hale III Director, Office of Small and Disadvantaged Business Utilization Editor's Note: This announcement was originally posted on the Office of Environmental Management's website. Today the Energyy Department awarded a $20 million contact (estimated value) to a Native American Tribally-Owned Section 8(a) company for administrative support services and information technology support at our Savannah River Operations Office. The company, NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona, is owned by the Navajo Nation. NOVA

177

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Hybrid Electric Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid Electric Vehicle (HEV) High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Hybrid

178

DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2013  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Analysis within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) publishes the annual DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report to provide an overview of the status of radiation protection practices at DOE (including the National Nuclear Security Administration [NNSA]). The DOE 2012 Occupational Radiation Exposure Report provides an evaluation of DOE-wide performance regarding compliance with Title 10, Code of Federal Regulations (C.F.R.), Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection dose limits and as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) process requirements. In addition, the report provides data to DOE organizations responsible for developing policies for protection of individuals from the adverse health effects of radiation. The report provides a summary and an analysis of occupational radiation exposure information from the monitoring of individuals involved in DOE activities. Over the past 5-year period, the occupational radiation exposure information is analyzed in terms of aggregate data, dose to individuals, and dose by site. As an indicator of the overall amount of radiation dose received during the conduct of operations at DOE, the report includes information on collective total effective dose (TED). The TED is comprised of the effective dose (ED) from external sources, which includes neutron and photon radiation, and the internal committed effective dose (CED), which results from the intake of radioactive material into the body. The collective ED from photon exposure decreased by 23% between 2011 and 2012, while the neutron dose increased by 5%. The internal dose components of the collective TED decreased by 7%. Over the past 5-year period, 99.99% of the individuals receiving measurable TED have received doses below the 2 roentgen equivalent in man (rems) (20 millisievert [mSv]) TED administrative control level (ACL), which is well below the DOE regulatory limit of 5 rems (50 mSv) TED annually. The occupational radiation exposure records show that in 2012, DOE facilities continued to comply with DOE dose limits and ACLs and worked to minimize exposure to individuals. The DOE collective TED decreased 17.1% from 2011 to 2012. The collective TED decreased at three of the five sites with the largest collective TED. u Idaho Site – Collective dose reductions were achieved as a result of continuing improvements at the Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP) through the planning of drum movements that reduced the number of times a container is handled; placement of waste containers that created highradiation areas in a centralized location; and increased worker awareness of high-dose rate areas. In addition, Idaho had the largest decrease in the total number of workers with measurable TED (1,143 fewer workers). u Hanford Site (Hanford) – An overall reduction of decontamination and decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and Transuranic (TRU) retrieval activities resulted in collective dose reductions. u Savannah River Site (SRS) – Reductions were achieved through ALARA initiatives employed site wide. The Solid Waste Management Facility used extended specialty tools, cameras and lead shield walls to facilitate removal of drums. These tools and techniques reduce exposure time through improved efficiency, increase distance from the source of radiation by remote monitoring, shield the workers to lower the dose rate, and reduce the potential for contamination and release of material through repacking of waste. Overall, from 2011 to 2012, there was a 19% decrease in the number of workers with measurable dose. Furthermore, due to a slight decrease in both the DOE workforce (7%) and monitored workers (10%), the ratio of workers with measurable doses to monitored workers decreased to 13%. Another primary indicator of the level of radiation exposure covered in this report is the average measurable dose, which normalizes the collective dose over the population of workers who actually received a measurable dose. The average measurable TED in

none,

2012-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

179

Occupational Safety Review of High Technology Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report contains reviews of operating experiences, selected accident events, and industrial safety performance indicators that document the performance of the major US DOE magnetic fusion experiments and particle accelerators. These data are useful to form a basis for the occupational safety level at matured research facilities with known sets of safety rules and regulations. Some of the issues discussed are radiation safety, electromagnetic energy exposure events, and some of the more widespread issues of working at height, equipment fires, confined space work, electrical work, and other industrial hazards. Nuclear power plant industrial safety data are also included for comparison.

Lee Cadwallader

2005-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

180

DOE 2008 Occupational Radiation Exposure October 2009  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A major priority of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is to ensure the health, safety, and security of DOE employees, contractors, and subcontractors. The Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS) provides the corporate-level leadership and strategic vision necessary to better coordinate and integrate health, safety, environment, security, enforcement, and independent oversight programs. One function that supports this mission is the DOE Corporate Operating Experience Program that provides collection, analysis, and dissemination of performance indicators, such as occupational radiation exposure information. This analysis supports corporate decision-making and synthesizes operational information to support continuous environment, safety, and health improvement across the DOE complex.

U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

EPRI Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2004: Occupational Health and Safety Trends 1995-2003  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fifth annual report of illness and injury trends in the electric energy industry based on data collected as part of EPRI's Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program. The report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2003 from fourteen participating companies.

2004-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

182

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

in the United States and explores policy alternatives and effects related to conversion of existing HOV lanes to high occupancy toll lane operations. References Retrieved...

183

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate...

184

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of...

185

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office Buildings: An Evaluation of Sampled Data from Five European Countries Speaker(s): John Stoops Date: January 3,...

186

Part 835-Occupational Radiation Protection Authority: 42 U.S...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

''Development of the 1996 Proposed Amendment to 10 CFR part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection,'' (regulatory development document, November 1996) which may be viewed...

187

A Basic Overview of the Occupational Radiation Exposure Monitoring...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing...

188

Occupant satisfaction with indoor environmental quality in green buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Environmental Quality in Green Buildings S. Abbaszadeh 1 ,quality survey in office buildings, comparing green withnon-green buildings. On average, occupants in green

Abbaszadeh, S.; Zagreus, Leah; Lehrer, D.; Huizenga, C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Model Policies Glossary Related Links ACE Learning Series Utility Savings Estimators Is a building with multiple occupancies considered residential or commercial? The IECC...

190

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency...

191

Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Subpart A - General Provisions Code of Federal Regulations PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Subpart A - General Provisions The rules in this part establish radiation...

192

Window signalling systems: control strategies and occupant behaviour  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant response to window control signaling systems (CBEDaly, A. (2002). Operable windows and HVAC systems. HPACK. (2008). The use of windows as controls for indoor

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Evaluating the performance robustness of fixed and movable shading devices against diverse occupant behaviors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the diverse operating conditions, weather conditions, space users, and occupant preferences of buildings, it is commonplace to provide occupants with multiple means to adapt their immediate indoor environment. However, numerous studies have shown ... Keywords: building performance simulation, occupant behaviour, occupant comfort, robust building design, stochastic occupant modelling

William O'Brien

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Denver - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider Greenprint Denver Executive Order 123, signed in October 2007, established the Greenprint Denver Office and the Sustainability Policy for the city. The Sustainability Policy includes several goals and requirements meant to increase the sustainability of Denver by having the city government lead by

195

Occupancy Simulation in Three Residential Research Houses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three houses of similar floor plan are being compared for energy consumption. The first house is a typical builder house of 2400 ft2 (223 m2) in east Tennessee. The second house contains retrofits available to a home owner such as energy efficient appliances, windows and HVAC, as well as an insulated attic which contains HVAC duct work. The third house was built using optimum-value framing construction with photovoltaic modules and solar water heating. To consume energy researchers have set up appliances, lights, and plug loads to turn on and off automatically according to a schedule based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition. As energy efficiency continues to be a focus for protecting the environment and conserving resources, experiments involving whole house energy consumption will be done. In these cases it is important to understand how to simulate occupancy so that data represents only house performance and not human behavior. The process for achieving automated occupancy simulation will be discussed. Data comparing the energy use of each house will be presented and it will be shown that the third house used 66% less and the second house used 36% less energy than the control house in 2010. The authors will discuss how energy prudent living habits can further reduce energy use in the third house by 23% over the average American family living in the same house.

Boudreaux, Philip R [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL; Christian, Jeffrey E [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Occupational safety and health law handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book reviews the regulations and standards governing the protection of employees in the workplace and provides insight into dealing with pertinent regulations and regulatory authorities. Written for safety professionals, industrial hygienists, human resource professionals, attorneys, and students, this companion to Government Institutes' best-selling ``Environmental Law Handbook'' offers the legal fundamentals behind occupational safety and health laws in one concise and authoritative volume. In 19 chapters, the authoring law firm of Keller and Heckman cover the OSHAct and its development; OSHA, NIOSH, and OSHRC; the roles played by other regulatory agencies; the OSHA rulemaking process; OSHA Standards and the General Duty Clause; record keeping and reporting; employers' and employees' rights; inspections; violations, penalties, and how to contest them; criminal prosecutions; state plans; industry-specific issues; OSHA reform; and international regulations and standards. This book references approximately 400 seminal OSHA legal decisions from the approximately 1,300 cases on record and includes coverage of Canadian and European Community regulations, making it the first comprehensive global overview of occupational safety and health law.

Sarvadi, D.G. [ed.; Keller; Heckman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

DOE occupational radiation exposure 1996 report  

SciTech Connect

The goal of the US Department of Energy (DOE) is to conduct its radiological operations to ensure the health and safety of all DOE employees including contractors and subcontractors. The DOE strives to maintain radiation exposures to its workers below administrative control levels and DOE limits and to further reduce these exposures and releases to levels that are ``As Low As Reasonably Achievable`` (ALARA). The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1996 provides summary and analysis of the occupational radiation exposure received by individuals associated with DOE activities. The DOE mission includes stewardship of the nuclear weapons stockpile and the associated facilities, environmental restoration of DOE and precursor agency sites, and energy research. Collective exposure at DOE has declined by 80% over the past decade due to a cessation in opportunities for exposure during the transition in DOE mission from weapons production to cleanup, deactivation and decommissioning, and changes in reporting requirements and dose calculation methodology. In 1996, the collective dose decreased by 10% from the 1995 value due to decreased doses at five of the seven highest-dose DOE sites. For 1996, these sites attributed the reduction in collective dose to the completion of several decontamination and decommissioning projects, reduced spent fuel storage activities, and effective ALARA practices. This report is intended to be a valuable tool for managers in their management of radiological safety programs and commitment of resources.

NONE

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

198

Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro Jump to: navigation, search Name Hammerfest Strom UK co owned by StatoilHydro Address The Innovation Centre 1 Ainslie Road Hillington Business Park Place Glasgow Zip G52 4RU Sector Marine and Hydrokinetic Phone number +44 141 585 6447 Website http://www.hammerfeststrom.com Region United Kingdom LinkedIn Connections CrunchBase Profile No CrunchBase profile. Create one now! This company is listed in the Marine and Hydrokinetic Technology Database. This company is involved in the following MHK Projects: Hammerfest Strom UK Tidal Stream Kvalsundet This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Hammerfest_Strom_UK_co_owned_by_StatoilHydro&oldid=678328"

199

Office of River Protection Women-Owned Small Business Contractor Receives  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

River Protection Women-Owned Small Business Contractor River Protection Women-Owned Small Business Contractor Receives One-Year Extension Office of River Protection Women-Owned Small Business Contractor Receives One-Year Extension December 19, 2012 - 10:33am Addthis Richland - - The Energy Department's Office of River Protection announced the contract for Advanced Technologies and Laboratories International Inc. (ATL) has been extended for a second one-year option. ATL, a women-owned small business, will continue to provide analytical services and testing work at the Hanford Site 222-S Laboratory through January 2, 2014. "ORP values ATL's performance and commitment to safety," said Ellen Mattlin, Tank Farm Programs Division Director. "DOE appreciates the technical and management capabilities demonstrated by the ATL workforce."

200

Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings Family-Owned Restaurant Serves Up Huge Energy Savings May 8, 2013 - 2:27pm Addthis Energy efficiency upgrades helped the Athenian Corner reduce its operating costs and improved the restaurant's bottom line. | Photo courtesy of BetterBuildings Lowell Energy Upgrade program. Energy efficiency upgrades helped the Athenian Corner reduce its operating costs and improved the restaurant's bottom line. | Photo courtesy of BetterBuildings Lowell Energy Upgrade program. Rebecca Matulka Rebecca Matulka Digital Communications Specialist, Office of Public Affairs What are the key facts? The Athenian Corner, a family-owned restaurant in Lowell, Massachusetts, made energy efficiency upgrades that are saving it more than

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan, which calls for steady, responsible steps to reduce carbon pollution, the Energy Department today broke ground on the nation's largest federally-owned wind project at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. Once completed, this five-turbine 11.5 megawatt project will power more than 60 percent of the plant with clean, renewable wind energy and reduce carbon emissions by over 35,000 metric tons per year - equivalent to taking 7,200 cars off the road. The Pantex Plant is the primary site for the assembly, disassembly,

202

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility Largest Federally-Owned Wind Farm Breaks Ground at U.S. Weapons Facility August 13, 2013 - 10:54am Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on President Obama's Climate Action Plan, which calls for steady, responsible steps to reduce carbon pollution, the Energy Department today broke ground on the nation's largest federally-owned wind project at the Pantex Plant in Amarillo, Texas. Once completed, this five-turbine 11.5 megawatt project will power more than 60 percent of the plant with clean, renewable wind energy and reduce carbon emissions by over 35,000 metric tons per year - equivalent to taking 7,200 cars off the road. The Pantex Plant is the primary site for the assembly, disassembly,

203

GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM | Department  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM The Department of Energy has on a variety of occasions engaged in transactions under which it bartered uranium to which it has title for goods or services . This guidance memorializes the results of analyses previously directed to individual proposed transactions . For the reasons discussed below, we conclude that the Atomic Energy Act of 1954' , as amended, (AEA), authorizes such barter transactions. GC GUIDANCE ON BARTER TRANSACTIONS INVOLVING DOE-OWNED URANIUM More Documents & Publications Leasing of Department of Energy Property Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Subcommittee on Energy EIS-0468: Final Environmental Impact Statement

204

City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings City of Fort Collins - Green Building Requirement for City-Owned Buildings < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Bioenergy Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Water Heating Wind Program Info State Colorado Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider The City of Fort Collins The City Council of Fort Collins passed a resolution in September 2006, establishing green building goals for new city-owned buildings of 5,000 square feet or more. New buildings must be designed and constructed to

205

Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities  

Reports and Publications (EIA)

This report provides an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities.

Information Center

1994-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

A new life for plazas : reimagining privately owned public spaces in New York City  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since 1961 the City of New York has allowed buildings to receive added floor area in exchange for privately owned public spaces. These spaces, typically in the form of small outdoor plazas, are spatially clustered in the ...

Suarez, Richard Anthony

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Electricity privatization : should South Korea privatize its state-owned electric utility?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The state-owned electric utility, Korea Electricity Power Cooperation (KEPCO), privatization has been a key word in South Korea since 1997, when the government received $55 billion from the International Monetary Fund in ...

Lim, Sungmin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office DOE Awards Native American, Tribally-Owned Small Business Contract for Support Services to Savannah River Operations Office September 21, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Bill Taylor, DOE bill.taylor@srs.gov 803-952-8564 Aiken, SC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded a set- aside contract to the NOVA Corp. of Window Rock, Arizona. NOVA will provide administrative support services and information technology support to the Savannah River Operations Office. The firm fixed-price Indefinite Delivery/Indefinite Quantity contract with an estimated value of $20 million with a two-year performance period. NOVA Corp. is a Native American Tribally-Owned (Navajo) Section 8(a)

209

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of Policy Options and Practice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company of New Mexico’s (PNM) Solar Energy Program thatMexico..40 vii Who Owns Renewable EnergyNew Mexico’s Solar PV Program, 101 and We Energies’ Energy

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Occupancy-driven energy management for smart building automation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings are among the largest consumers of electricity in the US. A significant portion of this energy use in buildings can be attributed to HVAC systems used to maintain comfort for occupants. In most cases these building HVAC systems run on fixed ... Keywords: HVAC control system, occupancy detection system, wireless sensor network

Yuvraj Agarwal; Bharathan Balaji; Rajesh Gupta; Jacob Lyles; Michael Wei; Thomas Weng

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

POEM: Power-efficient Occupancy-based Energy Management System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for optimally controlling HVAC systems in buildings based on actual occupancy levels. POEM is comprised for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based are then fused with an occupancy prediction model us- ing a particle filter in order to determine the most

Cerpa, Alberto E.

212

Estimation of building occupancy levels through environmental signals deconvolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We address the problem of estimating the occupancy levels in rooms using the information available in standard HVAC systems. Instead of employing dedicated devices, we exploit the significant statistical correlations between the occupancy levels and ... Keywords: Inference, Parametric and Nonparametric methods, System Identification

Afrooz Ebadat, Giulio Bottegal, Damiano Varagnolo, Bo Wahlberg, Karl H. Johansson

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

PreHeat: controlling home heating using occupancy prediction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Home heating is a major factor in worldwide energy use. Our system, PreHeat, aims to more efficiently heat homes by using occupancy sensing and occupancy prediction to automatically control home heating. We deployed PreHeat in five homes, three in the ... Keywords: energy, environment, home heating, prediction, sensing

James Scott; A.J. Bernheim Brush; John Krumm; Brian Meyers; Michael Hazas; Stephen Hodges; Nicolas Villar

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupational Health and Safety Program Laboratory Animal Resources Binghamton University State University of New York P.O. Box 6000 Health Services, IN-204 (607) 777-4610, Fax: (607) 777-2881 Health is strictly for the use of the Occupational Health and Safety Program for Laboratory Animal Resources and may

Suzuki, Masatsugu

215

STATE OF CALIFORNIA HOTEL / MOTEL TRANSIENT OCCUPANCY TAX WAIVER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FOR STATE AGENCIES) HOTEL MOTEL OPERATORS: RETAIN THIS WAIVER FOR YOUR FILES TO SUBSTANTIATE YOUR REPORTS of the State Agency indicated below; that the charge for the occupancy at the above establishment on the dates of California. $ OCCUPANCY DATES AMOUNT PAID California State University, Fullerton STATE AGENCY NAME 800 North

de Lijser, Peter

216

Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Free Space Computation Using Stochastic Occupancy Grids and Dynamic Programming Hern´an Badino1Chrysler AG, Stuttgart Abstract. The computation of free space available in an environment is an essential, which builds a stochastic occupancy grid to address the free space problem as a dynamic pro- gramming

Mester, Rudolf

217

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Order Module--NNSA OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION The familiar level of this module is designed to provide the basic information to meet the requirements that are related to 10 CFR 835, "Occupational Radiation Protection," in the following DOE Functional Area Qualification Standards: DOE-STD-1177-2004, Emergency Management DOE-STD-1151-2002, Facility Representative DOE-STD-1146-2007, General Technical Base DOE-STD-1138-2007, Industrial Hygiene DOE-STD-1183-2007, Nuclear Safety Specialist DOE-STD-1174-2003, Radiation Protection DOE-STD-1175-2006, Senior Technical Safety Manager DOE-STD-1178-2004, Technical Program Manager DOE-STD-1155-2002, Transportation and Traffic Management DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection

218

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers Deputy Secretary Memo Regarding Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers February 1, 2010 Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well-being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening

219

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW) March 17-18, 2014 DOE Annual Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar (OMWW): Registration, Directions, Lodging, and Access REGISTRATION AND CONFERENCE SYSTEM The 2014 DOE Occupational Medicine Workshop and Webinar will be held March 17-18 in Room 4A-104 of the DOE Forrestal Building in Washington, DC. Register for the 2014 OMWW at http://hsspublic.energy.gov/Workshops/CMO/2014/Registration.aspx. The deadline for registration will be January 17, 2014 in order to comply with conference system requirements. Upon completing the registration, you will immediately receive a confirmatory email. An additional confirmatory email will be sent to registrants shortly after January 17th (once all

220

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program July 2009 A Basic Overview of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program This pamphlet is developed by the Department of Energy (DOE) as an outreach and awareness tool to assist former and current DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees to become familiar with and utilize the services and benefits authorized under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOIPCA). There are several Federal entities that support implementation of EEOICPA. Each of these entities serves a critical and unique role in this process. Briefly, the Department of Labor's (DOL) Office of Workers'

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Occupational Injury Rate Estimates in Magnetic Fusion Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In nuclear facilities, there are two primary aspects of occupational safety. The first aspect is radiological safety, which has rightly been treated in detail in nuclear facilities. Radiological exposure data have been collected from the existing tokamaks to serve as forecasts for ITER radiation safety. The second aspect of occupational safety, “traditional” industrial safety, must also be considered for a complete occupational safety program. Industrial safety data on occupational injury rates from the JET and TFTR tokamaks, three accelerators, and U.S. nuclear fission plants have been collected to set industrial safety goals for the ITER operations staff. The results of this occupational safety data collection and analysis activity are presented here. The data show that an annual lost workday case rate of 0.3 incidents per 100 workers is a conceivable goal for ITER operations.

cadwallader, lee

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Human Behavior Meets Building Intelligence: How Occupants Respond to “Open Window” Signals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupant Response to Window Control Signaling Systems,"Occupants Respond to “Open Window” Signals Katie Ackerly andincorporate operable windows for the benefits of personal

Ackerly, Katie; Brager, Gail

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Property:HPBD/DateOfOccupancy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

DateOfOccupancy DateOfOccupancy Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type Date. Subproperties This property has the following 10 subproperties: H High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database H cont. High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database High Performance Buildings Database Pages using the property "HPBD/DateOfOccupancy" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) H High Performance Buildings Database + January 4 + High Performance Buildings Database + January 6 + High Performance Buildings Database + October 2 +

224

City of Berkeley - Green Building Standards for City Owned and Operated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Green Building Standards for City Owned and Green Building Standards for City Owned and Operated Projects City of Berkeley - Green Building Standards for City Owned and Operated Projects < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Solar Lighting Windows, Doors, & Skylights Heating Buying & Making Electricity Water Heating Wind Program Info State California Program Type Energy Standards for Public Buildings Provider City of Berkeley The Berkeley City Council adopted Resolution 62284 on November 18, 2003 requiring that all city-sponsored building projects receive LEED certification. Its incorporation occurred in two phases, first requiring city-sponsored projects entering design and construction after January 1,

225

Do You Have Your Own Tips for Saving Fuel? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Have Your Own Tips for Saving Fuel? Have Your Own Tips for Saving Fuel? Do You Have Your Own Tips for Saving Fuel? May 11, 2012 - 1:37pm Addthis Earlier this week, Amanda shared a checklist on Fueleconomy.gov that helps you keep your car well maintained. Keeping your car well maintained is one way to make sure that it's not using more gas than it needs to. Do you have any other ideas for saving gas this summer? You have the chance to share your thoughts on a question about energy efficiency or renewable energy for consumers. E-mail your responses to the Energy Saver team at consumer.webmaster@nrel.gov. Addthis Related Articles How Does Your Fuel Economy Compare to the Test Ratings on Fueleconomy.gov? How Will You Save Fuel and Energy this 4th of July? How Did You Celebrate Valentine's Day Efficiently

226

Pantex receives Perkins Award in recognition of its work with women-owned  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Perkins Award in recognition of its work with women-owned Perkins Award in recognition of its work with women-owned small businesses | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Pantex receives Perkins Award in recognition of ... Pantex receives Perkins Award in recognition of its work with women-owned small businesses

227

Beating Nature at her Own Game? | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Beating Nature at her Own Game? Beating Nature at her Own Game? Discovery & Innovation Stories of Discovery & Innovation Brief Science Highlights SBIR/STTR Highlights Contact Information Office of Science U.S. Department of Energy 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (202) 586-5430 08.24.11 Beating Nature at her Own Game? New catalyst speeds conversion of electricity to hydrogen fuel. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page Click to enlarge photo. Enlarge Photo Systemic view of how catalyst might fit into a renewable energy production and storage system Image courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Systemic view of how catalyst might fit into a renewable energy production and storage system. Major improvements in our ability to store electrical energy will be

228

Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Resources » Make Resources » Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School High School Students High School Coaches High School Regionals High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer Materials List National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer Schematic Sample Questions Middle School Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov High School Rules, Forms, and Resources Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer

229

Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of Sunscreen | U.S. DOE Office of  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of "Sunscreen" Energy Frontier Research Centers (EFRCs) EFRCs Home Centers Research Science Highlights Highlight Archives News & Events Publications Contact BES Home 05.03.12 Purple Bacteria Develops Its Own Form of "Sunscreen" Print Text Size: A A A RSS Feeds FeedbackShare Page Scientific Achievement Found that specific pigments in the light harvesting complex of a photosynthetic bacterium act primarily to protect the cell from damage by excess sunlight Significance and Impact May aid the design of both natural and artificial light harvesting systems to minimize deleterious effects of exposure to too much light energy Research Details In photosynthetic organisms, carotenoids typically act as supplementary

230

Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer | U.S. DOE Office  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer National Science Bowl® (NSB) NSB Home About High School Middle School Middle School Students Middle School Coaches Middle School Regionals Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources Academic Question Resources Make Your Own National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer Materials List National Science Bowl® Competition Buzzer Schematic Sample Questions Attending National Event Volunteers 2013 Competition Results News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl® U.S. Department of Energy SC-27/ Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: 202-586-6702 E: National.Science.Bowl@science.doe.gov Middle School Rules, Forms, and Resources

231

Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business in Detroit Energy Deputy Secretary Poneman Tours Minority-Owned Small Business in Detroit May 22, 2012 - 10:37am Addthis Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman meets with owners and workers at Diversified Chemical Technologies, a small business in Detroit, MI. | Energy Department photo Deputy Secretary of Energy Daniel Poneman meets with owners and workers at Diversified Chemical Technologies, a small business in Detroit, MI. | Energy Department photo Bill Gibbons Deputy Press Secretary, Office of Public Affairs What does this mean for me? During National Small Business Week, Energy Department leaders are visiting small businesses across the country as a renewed promise to help their businesses grow, hire and succeed.

232

Financial statistics of major U.S. publicly owned electric utilities 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 1997 edition of the ``Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities`` publication presents 5 years (1993 through 1997) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator (Tables 3 through 11) and nongenerator (Tables 12 through 20) summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided (Tables 5 through 11 and 14 through 20). Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided in Appendix C. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, operating revenue, and electric energy account data. The primary source of publicly owned financial data is the Form EIA-412, ``Annual Report of Public Electric Utilities.`` Public electric utilities file this survey on a fiscal year basis, in conformance with their recordkeeping practices. The EIA undertook a review of the Form EIA-412 submissions to determine if alternative classifications of publicly owned electric utilities would permit the inclusion of all respondents. The review indicated that financial indicators differ most according to whether or not a publicly owned electric utility generates electricity. Therefore, the main body of the report provides summary information in generator/nongenerator classifications. 2 figs., 101 tabs.

NONE

1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Employees Occupational Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program The Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) was enacted to provide compensation and medical benefits to employees who worked at certain Department of Energy (DOE) facilities, including contractors and subcontractors at those locations, and certain of its vendors. Adjudication of issues pertaining to all claims for benefits under the EEOICPA is the responsibility of the Department of Labor (DOL). The DOL is supported in its role by the DOE, the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), and the Department of Justice (DOJ). If you would like more information about the benefits available under the EEOICPA, please visit DOL's web page or see the EEOICPA pamphlet.

234

Evaluating post-occupancy performance : Daylighting The New York Times  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluating post-occupancy performance Evaluating post-occupancy performance Overview The architectural approach The owner's approach Daylighting field study Daylighting control systems Automated roller shades Procurement specifications Shades and Shade Controls Lighting Controls Visualizing daylight Commissioning/ verification Demand response Mainstream solutions Post-occupancy evaluation Publications Sponsors Project team Evaluating post-occupancy performance "We aggressively pursued innovative designs to improve the quality of the workplace for our employees and to reduce energy use and other operating costs of our facility. The outcomes of this study confirm that we were successful. More importantly, our hope is that the energy efficient measures and designs documented in this independent study may inspire other companies' workplace designs." - Angelo Salvatore, Executive Director of Building Operations, The Times Company.

235

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building How Design Efficiency, Operation and Occupant Behavior Impact Building Energy Use Speaker(s): Hung-Wen (Richard) Lin Date: January 17, 2012 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Tianzhen Hong Measured energy use of buildings demonstrates large discrepancies even between buildings with the same function and located in similar climates. Among various factors contributing to the discrepancies, occupant behavior is found to be a key factor. How occupants set the comfort criteria, interact with building components and systems, and respond to environmental discomfort directly affects the operation of buildings and thus their energy use. On the other hand, it is also important to find out what sort of design methods can reduce building consumption in new and existing

236

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Industrial Safety and Hygiene Program in preparation for restart of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

237

Density Functional Theory Based Calculations of Site Occupancy in ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A comparison is made between the site occupancy behavior based on two .... First Principles Modeling of Shape Memory Alloy Magnetic Refrigeration Materials ... Forming-Crush Simulation Optimization Using Internal State Variable Model.

238

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

How Post-occupancy Evaluation (POE) can help commissioning Speaker(s): Ryota Shirai Date: August 31, 2004 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 Seminar HostPoint of Contact: Naoya Motegi...

239

PROCEEDINGS Open Access Occupational cancer in developed countries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies of occupational exposures have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. About one third of the factors identified as definite or probable human carcinogens were first investigated in the workplace and these exposures exact a considerable toll on working populations. There are many additional workplace exposures that are suspect carcinogens that require further evaluation to ensure a safe work environment. Information from occupational investigations is also relevant to the general population because many occupational exposures can be found outside the workplace. Much of our understanding about occupational cancer has been obtained from studies largely composed of white men in developed countries. The movement of industry from developed to developing countries underscores the need for future investigations to include more diverse populations. What do we know? Studies of exposures in the workplace have made major contributions to our understanding of human carcinogenesis. The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) Monographs on the Evaluation of

Aaron Blair; Loraine Marrett; Laura Beane Freeman

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate Change for the Built Environment and Occupant Feedback Speaker(s): Geoff Levermore Date: June 28, 2002 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 This presentation will describe some of...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Occupancy sensors for HVAC gaining in hotel industry  

SciTech Connect

The hotel industry is overcoming its skepticism as occupancy sensors with built-in thermistors to control heating, ventilating, and air conditioning (HVAC) units demonstrate their ability to cut energy costs as much as 30%. Despite the successful demonstrations and acceptance by Holiday Inn, some hotel managers of other chains continue to resist. Occupancy sensors have either ultrasonic or infrared signals, but differ from lighting control devices by also having internal thermistors and remote door switches. This allows the rooms to reach comfort levels only when the guest is present since occupants are only minimally affected if temperatures are modified during unoccupied periods. The system works best for roadside-type motels rather than convention hotels, where occupants are in and out of their rooms.

Ladd, C.

1985-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

242

DOE occupational radiation exposure. Report 1992--1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The DOE Occupational Radiation Exposure Report, 1992-1994 reports occupational radiation exposures incurred by individuals at US Department of Energy (DOE) facilities from 1992 through 1994. This report includes occupational radiation exposure information for all DOE employees, contractors, subcontractors, and visitors. This information is analyzed and trended over time to provide a measure of the DOE`s performance in protecting its workers from radiation. Occupational radiation exposure at DOE has been decreasing over the past 5 years. In particular, doses in the higher dose ranges are decreasing, including the number of doses in excess of the DOE limits and doses in excess of the 2 rem Administrative Control Level (ACL). This is an indication of greater attention being given to protecting these individuals from radiation in the workplace.

NONE

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Occupation-number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to 2049 nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of =1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, Michael G. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Papenbrock, Thomas F [ORNL; Wild, S. M. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

Bertolli, M; Wild, S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

245

Occupation number-based energy functional for nuclear masses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We develop an energy functional with shell-model occupations as the relevant degrees of freedom and compute nuclear masses across the nuclear chart. The functional is based on Hohenberg-Kohn theory with phenomenologically motivated terms. A global fit of the 17-parameter functional to nuclear masses yields a root-mean-square deviation of \\chi = 1.31 MeV. Nuclear radii are computed within a model that employs the resulting occupation numbers.

M. Bertolli; T. Papenbrock; S. Wild

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

246

Indoor Chemistry: Materials, Ventilation Systems, and Occupant Activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Chemical processes taking place in indoor environments can significantly alter the nature and concentrations of pollutants. Exposure to secondary contaminants generated in these reactions needs to be evaluated in association with many aspects of buildings to minimize their impact on occupant health and well-being. Focusing on indoor ozone chemistry, we describe alternatives for improving indoor air quality by controlling chemical changes related to building materials, ventilation systems, and occupant activities.

Morrison, G.C.; Corsi, R.L.; Destaillats, H.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Wells, J.R.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Building-level occupancy data to improve ARIMA-based electricity use forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy use of an office building is likely to correlate with the number of occupants, and thus knowing occupancy levels should improve energy use forecasts. To gather data related to total building occupancy, wireless sensors were installed in a ... Keywords: energy forecast, occupancy, office buildings, sensors

Guy R. Newsham; Benjamin J. Birt

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

May 8, 2013 Each of us facing similar challenges on our own  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

May 8, 2013 #12;2 Each of us facing similar challenges on our own #12;3 DIY SaaS -e-commerce Video: the DIY (do it yourself) user experience Sample e-Commerce use cases Catalogs, Pricing, Product, enrich, apply The economics of DIY semantic SaaS Automate, instant ROI, DIY personalize & maintain k

Shamir, Ron

249

Publish Your Own Magazine, Guidebk...: How to Start, Manage, and Profit from a Homebased Publishing Company  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From the Publisher:A dynamic step-by-step guide to creating everything from tourism books and niche market magazines to specialty tabloids, using a home computer. Having built his own publishing business from scratch, Williams is uniquely qualified to ...

Thomas A. Williams

2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Making Google Maps A comprehensive user guide for creating and using your own online Google Maps  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Making Google Maps A comprehensive user guide for creating and using your own online Google Maps By Devlin Hughes and Brett Jackson Trinity College May 2007 edition #12;2 Chapter 1: Introduction to Google, and are accessible to the public. You can also chose to display a mashup on your website. Mashups use Google Map

Wright, Dawn Jeannine

251

Audit of the transfer of government-owned property at the Mound and Pinellas Plants  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses the audit of the transfer of government-owned property at the Mound and Pinellas Plants. The end of the Cold War brought many changes to the Department of Energy (Department), including the reconfiguration of defense program activities and the closure of some operations. Public Law 103-160 allows the Department to transfer or lease, under specified conditions, Department-owned personal property to economic development initiatives. By encouraging economic development, the Department hopes to mitigate adverse impacts that plant closures would have on local economies. The objective of the audit was to determine whether the Department's interests were properly protected with regard to the transfer of equipment from weapons production use to economic development initiatives. The Mound Plant (Mound) and the Pinellas Plant (Pinellas) did not have property disposition plans that would properly protect Departmental interests. Specifically, Mound planned to make about $13.2 million of Government-owned property available to private businesses even through the property was needed by Defense Programs at other facilities and would cost less than $1 million to relocate. In addition, Mound and Pinellas planned to make available to economic development initiatives several hundred million dollars of Government-owned property without first determining whether it was needed by other Departmental elements. These conditions existed because neither Headquarters nor the Albuquerque Operations Office provided Mound and Pinellas adequate guidance, and Mound and Pinellas management believed that economic development initiatives could take precedence over some Departmental programs.

Not Available

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

The United States and Gun Violence Americans owned between 220 and 280 million guns in  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

rifles for sale, Dayton, Ohio. 11 #12;Inside Gun Shows for less than 5% of the worlds population but 351 Gun Shows in Context The United States and Gun Violence Americans owned between 220 and 280 million guns in 2004, including at least 86 million handguns.1 Millions of guns are added to that total

Leistikow, Bruce N.

253

How to Live Well Without Owning a Car: Save Money, Breathe Easier, and Get More Mileage Out of Life By Chris Balish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Without Owning a Car: Save Money, Breathe Easier, and GetWithout Owning a Car: Save Money, Breathe Easier, an Getyou can save a ton of money by not owning. One assumption he

Wong, Carleton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

How to Live Well Without Owning a Car: Save Money, Breathe Easier, and Get More Mileage Out of Life By Chris Balish  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Live Well Without Owning a Car: Save Money, Breathe Easier,Live Well Without Owning a Car: Save Money, Breathe Easier,mere thought of not owning a car in the United States today

Wong, Carleton

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Wind Generators and Market Power: Does it matter who owns them?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity production from wind generators holds significant importance in European Union’s 20 % renewable energy target by 2020. In this paper, I show that ownership of wind generators affects market outcomes by using both a Cournot oligopoly model and a real options model. In the Cournot oligopoly model, ownership of the wind generators by owners of fossil-fueled (peakload) generators decreases total peakload production and increases the market price. These effects increase with total wind generation and aggregate wind generator ownership. In the real options model, start up and shut down price thresholds are significantly higher when the monopolist at the peakload level owns both types of generators. Furthermore, when producing electricity with the peakload generator, the monopolist can avoid facing prices below marginal cost by owning a certain share of the wind generators.

Nihat Misir

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Evaluating Utility Owned Electric ESS - Dhruv Bhatnagar, SNL  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluating Utility Owned Evaluating Utility Owned Electric Energy Storage Systems: A Perspective for State Electric Utility Regulators DOE Energy Storage Program Peer Review 2012 September 28, 2012 Dhruv Bhatnagar & Verne Loose Sandia National Laboratories Motivation for this Work  Many state utility regulatory bodies are unfamiliar with electric energy storage systems  The technology  The functional uses  The value of these uses to the grid  This leads to a handicap in their proper evaluation for rate base  May prevent the best (economic) technologies from system integration 2 Source: GE What we are doing  Developing a guidebook:  Inform regulators about the system benefits of energy storage  Identify regulatory challenges to increased

257

Unpacking the opportunities for change within a family owned manufacturing sme : a design led innovation case study.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis explored how an Australian, family owned, manufacturing firm responded to a design led innovation approach as conducted by the action researcher. Specifically, it… (more)

Pozzey, Erica C.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

A comparative analysis of business structures suitable for farmer-owned wind power projects in the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

own challenges. 9 The Internal Revenue Service will considerlimited For example, the Internal Revenue Code requires thatPower Price Revenue Shortfall After-Tax Internal Rate of

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Case Study on Remote Dispatch of Customer-Owned Resources:Consolidated Edison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This case study from the Consolidated Edison Smart Grid Demonstration Initiative addresses the implementa­tion of a key component of a “virtual power plant,” an automated demand response (AutoDR) application for the remote dispatch of distributed customer-owned resources.The Consolidated Edison demonstration is focused on develop­ing the technology necessary to integrate distributed resources into the utility’s distribution system and distribution control ...

2012-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

260

Evaluation and Design of Utility Co-Owned Cogeneration Systems for Industrial Parks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute, EPRI, is currently evaluating the potential of utility co-owned cogeneration facilities in industrial parks. This paper describes part of the work performed by one of EPRI's contractors, Impell Corporation, chosen by EPRI to support the industrial parks study. Cogeneration benefits for park owners, tenants and the local utilities are presented. A method developed for selecting industrial park sites for cogeneration facilities and design and financing options are also discussed.

Hu, D. S.; Tamaro, R. F.; Schiller, S. R.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Financial statistics of major U.S. publicly owned electric utilities 1995  

SciTech Connect

The 1995 Edition of the Financial Statistics of Major U.S. Publicly Owned Electric Utilities publication presents 5 years (1991 through 1995) of summary financial data and current year detailed financial data on the major publicly owned electric utilities. The objective of the publication is to provide Federal and State governments, industry, and the general public with current and historical data that can be used for policymaking and decisionmaking purposes related to publicly owned electric utility issues. Generator (Tables 3 through 11) and nongenerator (Tables 12 through 20) summaries are presented in this publication. Five years of summary financial data are provided (Tables 5 through 11 and 14 through 20). Summaries of generators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, nongenerators for fiscal years ending June 30 and December 31, and summaries of all respondents are provided in Appendix C. The composite tables present aggregates of income statement and balance sheet data, as well as financial indicators. Composite tables also display electric operation and maintenance expenses, electric utility plant, number of consumers, sales of electricity, and operating revenue, and electric energy account data. 9 figs., 87 tabs.

NONE

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Financial impacts of nonutility power purchases on investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

To assist in its these responsibilities in the area of electric power, EIA has prepared this report, Financial Impacts of Nonutility Power Purchases on Investor-Owned Electric Utilities. The primary purpose of this report is to provide an overview of the issues surrounding the financial impacts of nonutility generation contracts (since the passage of the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978) on investor-owned utilities. The existing concern in this area is manifest in the provisions of Section 712 of the Energy Policy Act of 1992, which required State regulatory commissions to evaluate various aspects of long-term power purchase contracts, including their impact on investor-owned utilities` cost of capital and rates charged to customers. The EIA does not take positions on policy questions. The EIA`s responsibility is to provide timely, high quality information and to perform objective, credible analyses in support of the deliberations by both public and private decision-makers. Accordingly, this report does not purport to represent the policy positions of the US Department of Energy or the Administration.

Not Available

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor Contractor ORR February 2007 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2007 assessment of the Occupational Safety and Health Program portion of an Operational Readiness Review of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Oak Ridge National Laboratory High

264

Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Jump to: navigation, search Name Hawaii Department of Labor and Industrial Relations Occupational Safety and Health Division Address 830 Punchbowl Street #425 Place Honolulu, HI Zip 96813 Phone number 808586-9100 Website http://hawaii.gov/labor/hiosh Coordinates 21.3036793°, -157.8607676° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":21.3036793,"lon":-157.8607676,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

265

DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce DOE Issues Draft Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services - Agency Solicits Input from Industry, Stakeholders, and Workforce July 19, 2011 - 12:00pm Addthis Media Contact Geoff Tyree, DOE Geoffrey.Tyree@rl..doe.gov 509-376-4171 The Department of Energy today issued a Draft Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Occupational Medical Services acquisition at the Hanford Site in southeastern Washington State. The Draft RFP is one step in the process toward awarding a contract and provides an opportunity for companies, Hanford stakeholders, and the site's workforce to provide input on the Draft RFP. DOE will provide

266

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office The Physical Environment and Occupant Thermal Perceptions in Office Buildings: An Evaluation of Sampled Data from Five European Countries Speaker(s): John Stoops Date: January 3, 2001 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg 90 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Diana Morris The results from a large field study of thermal comfort in European office buildings are reported. Measurements of physical environmental conditions and occupant perceptions were collected over sixteen months from twenty-six different office buildings located in France, Greece, Portugal, Sweden and the UK. The work attempts to show relationships and produce useful information from the data set using graphical methods, especially lowess, a locally weighted regression based scatter plot smoothing technique. The

267

Solid-state lamp with integral occupancy sensor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Previous work demonstrated a retrofit proximity detector for fluorescent lamps using the lamp's own stray electric fields. This paper extends the retrofit sensor system to a solid-state (LED) lamp. The design and implementation ...

Cooley, John J.

268

Implementation process of management control systems in the municipally owned hospitals: in the case of Nagasaki prefectural hospitals in Japan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to describe and explore management reforms in the municipally owned hospitals in Nagasaki prefecture, Japan, based on 'levers of control' framework (Simons, 1995). The hospitals are changing their strategy ... Keywords: Japan, Local Public Enterprise Law, healthcare, levers of control, management control systems, management reform, municipally owned hospitals

Takahito Kondo; Hiromasa Okada

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. -  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

A" 917 A" 917 RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF A PORTION OF PROPERTY OWNED BY MODERN LANDFILL, INC. - FORMER LOOW SITE Summary Report Work performed by the Health and Safety Research Division Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37830 March 1981 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY operated by UNION. CARBIDE CORPORATION for the DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY as part of the Formerly Utilized Sites-- Remedial Action Program CONTENTS Page LIST OF FIGURES .. .. . .. . . . . . . . ......... iii LIST OF TABLES ......... .. iv INTRODUCTION .. ......... 1 OBJECTIVE .................... 1 SURVEY TECHNIQUES . . ............. ...... 1 RESULTS ..... 2 Gamma-Ray Exposure Rates . . . . . . 2 Beta-Gamma Dose Rate ............. 2 226Ra in Soil ............ 3 CONCLUSIONS .. . . . . . . . . . . . .. .. . .. .. 3 REFERENCES . . . . . . . . .

270

Own Your Power! A Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity for the Home (Brochure)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity for the Home Consumer Guide to Solar Electricity for the Home Own Your Power! Contents Benefits of Solar Electricity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Solar Electricity Basics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Types of Solar Panels . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Types of Solar Electric Systems . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Power Produced by a Solar Electric System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 How To Choose a System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Roof Requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Installation and Maintenance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Costs and Financial Incentives . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Purchasing Considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Financing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 About this guide: The U .S . Department of Energy (DOE) receives numerous inquiries each year

271

Cost Containment Through Energy Efficiency in Texas State-Owned Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

"The Energy Cost Containment Through Energy Efficiency" in Texas State-owned buildings project was begun in the spring of 1984 as a part of a multipronged effort to reduce rising energy costs in State operations. Energy audits of 21 million square feet (22% of total conditioned space) were conducted by three energy engineering firms and Texas Engineering Extension Service personnel under contract to the Public Utility Commission of Texas. Retrofits totaling $15.6 million with annual savings of $9.2 million were identified (59% ROI). This paper will detail the objectives of the project, summarize audit results, and outline financing options for individual projects.

Ponder, W. M.; Verdict, M. E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Microsoft PowerPoint - FTCP Presentation-Occupational Competency Models_September 18, 2012.pptx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency DOE Occupational Competency Models Models A R h GAO R NNSA M d i i A Response to the GAO Report to NNSA - Modernizing the Nuclear Security Enterprise Eric Coleman Acting Director, g , Learning & Workforce Development L&D Innovation, Technology & Performance Improvement GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA - - Findings Findings GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA Findings Findings  NNSA workforce ◦ 34,000 M&O contractor employees ◦ 2,400 federal employees , p y GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA - - Findings Findings GAO Report to NNSA GAO Report to NNSA Findings Findings * * NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce NNSA Workforce o Workers possess skills not readily available in the job

273

Growing a green job : essays on social movements and the emergence of a new occupation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Professions and occupations play a central role in shaping institutional arrangements, organizational forms, and individual organizations. I argue the emergence and development of new occupations should be among the central ...

Hammond, Ryan Alan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Using unlabeled Wi-Fi scan data to discover occupancy patterns of private households  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This poster presents the homeset algorithm, a lightweight approach to estimate occupancy schedules of private households. The algorithm relies on the mobile phones of households' occupants to collect Wi-Fi scans. The scans are then used to determine ...

Wilhelm Kleiminger, Christian Beckel, Anind Dey, Silvia Santini

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

COPOLAN: non-invasive occupancy profiling for preliminary assessment of HVAC fixed timing strategies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nowadays, control of heating, cooling and ventilation equipment operation is mainly achieved via timers with fixed setback schedules, configured using experience and standard models of space occupancy. Applying generic timing strategies is however rarely ... Keywords: electricity, local area network, occupancy

Anthony Schoofs; Declan T. Delaney; Gregory M. P. O'Hare; Antonio G. Ruzzelli

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Zoning and occupancy-moderation for residential space-conditioning under demand-driven electricity pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Occupancy-moderated zonal space-conditioning (OZS) refers to the partitioning of a residence into different zones and independently operating the space-conditioning equipment of each zone based on its occupancy. OZS remains ...

Leow, Woei Ling, 1977-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Los Alamos Lab: Radiation Protection: Annual Occupational Radiation  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report Print information on Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report (pdf). This webpage provides information to help you understand the dose quantities being reported to you on your Annual Occupational Radiation Dosimetry Report. If you would like general information about radiation exposure, please refer to www.radiationanswers.org. Title 10 Code of Federal Regulation Part 835, Occupational Radiation Protection (10 CFR 835), requires assessment, recording and reporting of radiation doses to individuals who are exposed to sources of radiation or radioactive contamination. This includes assessing external exposure from a variety of radiation types, such as, beta, photon, and neutron radiation. External exposures may be uniform over the whole body or occur in a non-uniform (i.e., limited body location) fashion. Internal doses occur when radioactive material is taken into the body through ingestion, inhalation, absorption or wounds. The requirements include assessing doses to the whole body, skin, lens of the eyes, extremities and various organs and tissues.

278

Editorial: Occupation inference through detection and classification of biographical activities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dealing with biographical information (e.g., biography generation, answering biography-related questions, etc.) requires the identification of important activities in the life of the individual in question. While there are activities that can be used ... Keywords: Biography information, Occupation classification

Elena Filatova; John Prager

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Learning user preferences to maximise occupant comfort in office buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is desirable to ensure that the thermal comfort conditions in offices are in line with the preferences of occupants. Controlling their offices correctly therefore requires the correct prediction of their thermal sensation which is often determined ... Keywords: decision support systems, intelligent systems, thermal comfort

Anika Schumann; Nic Wilson; Mateo Burillo

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

DOE Basic Overview of Occupational Radiation Exposure_2011 pamphlet  

SciTech Connect

This pamphlet focusses on two HSS activities that help ensure radiation exposures are accurately assessed and recorded, namely: 1) the quality and accuracy of occupational radiation exposure monitoring, and 2) the recording, reporting, analysis, and dissemination of the monitoring results. It is intended to provide a short summary of two specific HSS programs that aid in the oversight of radiation protection activities at DOE. The Department of Energy Laboratory Accreditation Program (DOELAP) is in place to ensure that radiation exposure monitoring at all DOE sites is precise and accurate, and conforms to national and international performance and quality assurance standards. The DOE Radiation Exposure Monitoring Systems (REMS) program provides for the collection, analysis, and dissemination of occupational radiation exposure information. The annual REMS report is a valuable tool for managing radiological safety programs and for developing policies to protect individuals from occupational exposure to radiation. In tandem, these programs provide DOE management and workers an assurance that occupational radiation exposures are accurately measured, analyzed, and reported.

ORAU

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

POEM: power-efficient occupancy-based energy management system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Buildings account for 40% of US primary energy consumption and 72% of electricity. Of this total, 50% of the energy consumed in buildings is used for Heating Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) systems. Current HVAC systems only condition based on ... Keywords: HVAC, energy savings, occupancy, ventilation

Varick L. Erickson; Stefan Achleitner; Alberto E. Cerpa

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health- Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Occupational Safety and Industrial Hygiene Program at the Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II.

283

A social demographic study of the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality resulting in death  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis explores occupational fatalities to American males for the years 1998 and 1999. The focus is on predicting the likelihood that the individual will sustain an occupational injury resulting in death based on an occupational status score. Demographic variables measuring Southern residence, race, ethnicity, marital status, education and age were also included in analyses. Research questions include whether or not individuals in higher status occupations are at a decreased risk of sustaining an occupational fatality, and how the demographic variables included effect occupational fatalities. Using data from death certificates allowed me to measure the individual’s occupational status based on their “usual occupation” and find out whether or not differences exist. The thesis involves two analyses, one with the sample comprised of only males between the ages of 25 and 55 and one including only married males between the ages of 25 and 55. Logistic regression is employed as the method of analysis to model the odds of the risk of sustaining an occupational fatality that results in death. The results of the first model found only marital status to be positively and significantly related to occupational fatalities. Black, Hispanic, South and education were found to be negatively related to occupational fatalities. The main hypothesis of this thesis was not supported, however because the regression shows that with each increase on the occupational status index, no significant increase or decrease occurred in sustaining an occupational injury that resulted in death. In the second regression that included only married males, many of the relationships no longer existed. Hispanic and the education variable both lost statistical significance. The only variables to maintain significance were black and South, which were both associated with a decreased risk of sustaining an occupational injury that resulted in death. Problems with the occupational status index as a predictor for the likelihood of sustaining an occupational fatality and restrictions of the data may be the main issue that resulted in a lack of findings.

Traut, Rachel Lynn

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Energy Savings for Occupancy-Based Control (OBC) of Variable-Air-Volume (VAV) Systems  

SciTech Connect

This study evaluates the savings potential of occupancy based control (OBC) for large office buildings with VAV terminal boxes installed.

Zhang, Jian; Lutes, Robert G.; Liu, Guopeng; Brambley, Michael R.

2013-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

285

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators. Revision 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The current report is an update of NUREG/CR-5975, Incentive Regulation of Investor-Owned Nuclear Power Plants by Public Utility Regulators, published in January 1993. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Seely, H.E.; Merritt, C.R.; Baker, D.C. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Privately owned public space attached to office buildings in Manhattan : economic and urban perspectives of incentive zoning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines the Incentive Zoning Policy of New York City from economic and urban perspectives. In the first part, it evaluates empirically the economic contribution of privately owned public space to the value of ...

Cai, Hongyu.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand : a survey of literature using meta-regression analysis.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Maria Wist Langmoen Own-price and income elasticities for household electricity demand -A Literature survey using meta-regression analysis Economists have been modelling the electricity demand for… (more)

Langmoen, Maria Wist

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Realt-Time Building Occupancy Sensing for Supporting Demand Driven HVAC Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Accurate knowledge of localised and real-time occupancy numbers can have compelling control applications for Heating, Ventilation and Air-conditioning (HVAC) systems. However, a precise and reliable measurement of occupancy still remains difficult. Existing technologies are plagued with a number of issues ranging from unreliable data, maintaining privacy and sensor drift. More effective control of HVAC systems may be possible using a smart sensing network for occupancy detection. A low-cost and non-intrusive sensor network is deployed in an open-plan office, combining information such as sound level and motion, to estimate occupancy numbers, while an infrared camera is implemented to establish ground truth occupancy levels. Symmetrical uncertainty analysis is used for feature selection, and selected multi-sensory features are fused using a neuralnetwork model, with occupancy estimation accuracy reaching up to 84.59%. The proposed system offers promising opportunities for reliable occupancy sensing, capable of supporting demand driven HVAC operations.

Ekwevugbe, T.; Brown, N.; Pakka, V.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

CleanFleet. Final report: Volume 6, occupational hygiene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The CleanFleet project was a 24-month demonstration of FedEx delivery vans operating on each of four gaseous or liquid alternative fuels: compressed natural gas (CNG), propane gas, methanol M-85, and California Phase 2 reformulated gasoline (RFG). Two electric vans were also demonstrated. Each alternative fuel fleet was operated from a different FedEx station site in the Los Angeles area. Gasoline-fueled control vans located at each site allowed for comparisons between fleets. The alternative fuels used in the CleanFleet project differ from conventional fuels both in their physical properties and in their potential health effects. These differences can result in occupational health implications for fleet users of these fuels. Therefore, as part of the CleanFleet project a limited occupational hygiene survey was performed.

NONE

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

EPRI EMF Exposure Database: EMDEX Occupational Study Data Set  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Researchers from the EMDEX Occupational Study (WO2966-01) provided data from this study for inclusion in the EPRI EMF Exposure Database. This data set contains fourteen data products related to measurements of electric and magnetic field personal exposure: binary and ASCII time-series files of individual measurements, summaries of occupied environment by partition (continuous period in environment), by day and by entire measurement session, summaries of occupied environment for work status (work/non-work...

1996-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

291

Occupational Noise Exposure and its Potential Health Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This issue brief provides the electric power industry with a snapshot of the current scientific knowledge on worker health and safety risks associated with noise exposure. Noise exposure types are varied and include continuous, intermittent and/or impulse noise. Prolonged occupational exposure to continuous noise or acoustic trauma can cause noise-induced hearing loss. Recent scientific data from the aluminum industry suggest that those exposed below levels requiring hearing protective devices may ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

292

Optimization of Occupancy Based Demand Controlled Ventilation in Residences  

SciTech Connect

Although it has been used for many years in commercial buildings, the application of demand controlled ventilation in residences is limited. In this study we used occupant exposure to pollutants integrated over time (referred to as 'dose') as the metric to evaluate the effectiveness and air quality implications of demand controlled ventilation in residences. We looked at air quality for two situations. The first is that typically used in ventilation standards: the exposure over a long term. The second is to look at peak exposures that are associated with time variations in ventilation rates and pollutant generation. The pollutant generation had two components: a background rate associated with the building materials and furnishings and a second component related to occupants. The demand controlled ventilation system operated at a low airflow rate when the residence was unoccupied and at a high airflow rate when occupied. We used analytical solutions to the continuity equation to determine the ventilation effectiveness and the long-term chronic dose and peak acute exposure for a representative range of occupancy periods, pollutant generation rates and airflow rates. The results of the study showed that we can optimize the demand controlled airflow rates to reduce the quantity of air used for ventilation without introducing problematic acute conditions.

Mortensen, Dorthe K.; Walker, Iain S.; Sherman, Max H.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Potential single-occupancy vehicle demand for the Katy Freeway and Northwest Freeway high-occupancy vehicle lanes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Since the 1960�s, high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lanes have been successfully used as a travel demand management technique. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in the use of high-occupancy toll (HOT) lanes as an alternative to HOV lanes to help manage the increasing demand for travel. HOT lanes combine pricing and vehicle occupancy restrictions to optimize the demand for HOV lanes. As two of the four HOT lanes in the world, the HOT lane facilities in Houston, Texas received relatively low patronage after operating for over 6 years on the Katy Freeway and over 4 years on the Northwest Freeway. There existed an opportunity to increase the usage of these HOT lanes by allowing single-occupancy vehicle (SOV) travelers to use the lanes, for an appropriate toll. The potential SOV demand for HOV lane use during the off-peak periods from the Katy Freeway and Northwest Freeway general-purpose lane (GPL) travelers was estimated in this study by using the data collected from a 2003 survey of travelers on the Katy and Northwest Freeway GPLs who were not enrolled in QuickRide. Based on survey results, more travelers would choose to drive on the HOT lanes as SOV travelers during the off-peak periods when the facilities provided higher travel time savings and charged lower tolls. Two important factors influencing travelers� use of the HOV lanes were their value of travel time savings (VTTS) and penalty for changing travel schedule (VPCS). It was found that respondents had VTTS approximately 43 percent of their hourly wage rate and VPCS approximately 3 percent of their hourly wage rate. Combining this information with current travel time savings and available capacity on the HOV lanes, it was found that approximately 2000 SOV travelers per day would pay an average toll of $2.25 to use the HOV lanes during the off-peak periods.

Xu, Lei

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of PolicyOptions and Practice  

SciTech Connect

Renewable energy certificates (RECs) represent the bundle of information that describes the characteristics of renewable electricity generation, and may be (and increasingly are) sold separately from the underlying electricity itself. RECs are a relatively new phenomenon, emerging as a tradable commodity in voluntary markets in the late 1990s, and gaining strength as a means of compliance with various state policy requirements affecting renewable generation in the early 2000s (Holt and Bird 2005). Twenty states and Washington, D.C. now have mandatory renewables portfolio standard (RPS) obligations, and most of these may be satisfied by owning and retiring RECs. Many states also have fuel source and emissions disclosure requirements, for which RECs are useful. Even where state policy does not allow unbundled and fully tradable RECs to meet these requirements, RECs may still be used as an accounting and verification tool (REC tracking systems are in place or under development in many regions of the U.S.). These applications, plus REC trading activity in support of voluntary green claims, give rise to potential ''double counting'' to the extent that the purchaser of the RECs and the purchaser of the underlying electricity both make claims to the renewable energy attributes of the facility in question (Hamrin and Wingate 2003). When renewable electricity is sold and purchased, an important question therefore arises: ''Who owns the RECs created by the generation of renewable energy?'' In voluntary transactions, most agree that the question of REC ownership can and should be negotiated between the buyer and the seller privately, and should be clearly established by contract. Claims about purchasing renewable energy should only be made if REC ownership can be documented. In many other cases, however, renewable energy transactions are either mandated or encouraged through state or federal policy. In these cases, the issue of REC ownership must often be answered by legislative or regulatory authorities. Some renewable energy contracts pre-date the existence of RECs, however, and in these cases the disposition of RECs is often unclear. Similarly, because of the recent appearance of RECs, legislation and regulation mandating the purchase of renewable energy has sometimes been silent on the disposition of the RECs associated with that generation. The resulting uncertainty in REC ownership has hindered the development of robust REC markets and has, in some cases, led to contention between buyers and sellers of renewable generation. The purpose of this report is to provide information and insight to state policy-makers, utility regulators, and others about different approaches to clarifying the ownership of RECs. We focus exclusively on three distinct areas in which REC ownership issues have arisen: (1) Qualifying Facilities (QFs) that sell their generation under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978; (2) Customer-owned generation that benefits from state net metering rules; and (3) Generation facilities that receive financial incentives from state or utility funds. This is a survey report. It reviews how both the federal government and states have addressed these issues to date, and highlights the arguments that have been raised for different REC ownership dispositions. Our aim is to describe the arguments on each side, and the context for the debates that are occurring. We do not, in this report, provide a list of policy recommendations for how policymakers should be addressing these issues.

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

295

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates? An Exploration of PolicyOptions and Practice  

SciTech Connect

Renewable energy certificates (RECs) represent the bundle of information that describes the characteristics of renewable electricity generation, and may be (and increasingly are) sold separately from the underlying electricity itself. RECs are a relatively new phenomenon, emerging as a tradable commodity in voluntary markets in the late 1990s, and gaining strength as a means of compliance with various state policy requirements affecting renewable generation in the early 2000s (Holt and Bird 2005). Twenty states and Washington, D.C. now have mandatory renewables portfolio standard (RPS) obligations, and most of these may be satisfied by owning and retiring RECs. Many states also have fuel source and emissions disclosure requirements, for which RECs are useful. Even where state policy does not allow unbundled and fully tradable RECs to meet these requirements, RECs may still be used as an accounting and verification tool (REC tracking systems are in place or under development in many regions of the U.S.). These applications, plus REC trading activity in support of voluntary green claims, give rise to potential ''double counting'' to the extent that the purchaser of the RECs and the purchaser of the underlying electricity both make claims to the renewable energy attributes of the facility in question (Hamrin and Wingate 2003). When renewable electricity is sold and purchased, an important question therefore arises: ''Who owns the RECs created by the generation of renewable energy?'' In voluntary transactions, most agree that the question of REC ownership can and should be negotiated between the buyer and the seller privately, and should be clearly established by contract. Claims about purchasing renewable energy should only be made if REC ownership can be documented. In many other cases, however, renewable energy transactions are either mandated or encouraged through state or federal policy. In these cases, the issue of REC ownership must often be answered by legislative or regulatory authorities. Some renewable energy contracts pre-date the existence of RECs, however, and in these cases the disposition of RECs is often unclear. Similarly, because of the recent appearance of RECs, legislation and regulation mandating the purchase of renewable energy has sometimes been silent on the disposition of the RECs associated with that generation. The resulting uncertainty in REC ownership has hindered the development of robust REC markets and has, in some cases, led to contention between buyers and sellers of renewable generation. The purpose of this report is to provide information and insight to state policy-makers, utility regulators, and others about different approaches to clarifying the ownership of RECs. We focus exclusively on three distinct areas in which REC ownership issues have arisen: (1) Qualifying Facilities (QFs) that sell their generation under the Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act (PURPA) of 1978; (2) Customer-owned generation that benefits from state net metering rules; and (3) Generation facilities that receive financial incentives from state or utility funds. This is a survey report. It reviews how both the federal government and states have addressed these issues to date, and highlights the arguments that have been raised for different REC ownership dispositions. Our aim is to describe the arguments on each side, and the context for the debates that are occurring. We do not, in this report, provide a list of policy recommendations for how policymakers should be addressing these issues.

Holt, Edward A.; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

296

Buildings Energy Data Book: 3.1 Commercial Sector Energy Consumption  

Buildings Energy Data Book (EERE)

1 2003 Commercial Delivered Energy Consumption Intensities, by Ownership of Unit (1) Ownership Nongovernment Owned 85.1 72% Owner-Occupied 87.3 35% Nonowner-Occupied 88.4 36%...

297

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

298

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' decision for publicly owned utilities in California considering wind and geothermal resources  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, non-utility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Specific debates have revolved around the relative advantages of, the types of risk created by, and the regulatory incentives favoring each approach. Very little of this discussion has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, however, perhaps due to the belief that public power's tax-free financing status leaves little space in which NUGs can compete. With few exceptions (Wiser and Kahn 1996), renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention in the buy versus build debate. In this report, we revive the ''buy versus build'' debate and apply it to the two sectors of the industry traditionally underrepresented in the discussion: publicly owned utilities and renewable energy. Contrary to historical treatment, this debate is quite relevant to public utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This report looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind or geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we modified and updated a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

White Paper: Multi-purpose canister (MPC) for DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper examines the issue, What are the advantages, disadvantages, and other considerations for using the MPC concept as part of the strategy for interim storage and disposal of DOE-owned SNF? The paper is based in part on the results of an evaluation made for the DOE National Spent Fuel Program by the Waste Form Barrier/Canister Team, which is composed of knowledgeable DOE and DOE-contractor personnel. The paper reviews the MPC and DOE SNF status, provides criteria and other considerations applicable to the issue, and presents an evaluation, conclusions, and recommendations. The primary conclusion is that while most of DOE SNF is not currently sufficiently characterized to be sealed into an MPC, the advantages of standardized packages in handling, reduced radiation exposure, and improved human factors should be considered in DOE SNF program planning. While the design of MPCs for DOE SNF are likely premature at this time, the use of canisters should be considered which are consistent with interim storage options and the MPC design envelope.

Knecht, D.A.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Estimating potential stranded commitments for U.S. investor-owned electric utilities  

SciTech Connect

New technologies, low natural gas prices, and federal and state utility regions are restructuring the electricity industry. Yesterday`s vertically integrated utility with a retail monopoly franchise may be a very different organization in a few years. Conferences, regulatory-commission hearings, and other industry fora are dominated by debates over the extent and form of utility deintegration, wholesale competition, and retail wheeling. A key obstacle to restructuring the electricity industry is stranded commitments. Past investments, power-purchase contracts, and public-policy-driven programs that made sense in an era of cost-of-service regulation may not be cost-effective in a competitive power market. Regulators, utilities, and other parties face tough decisions concerning the mitigation and allocation of these stranded commitments. The authors developed and applied a simple method to calculate the amount of stranded commitments facing US investor-owned electric utilities. The results obtained with this method depend strongly on a few key assumptions: (1) the fraction of utility sales that is at risk with respect to competition, (2) the market price of electric generation, and (3) the number of years during which the utility would lose money because of differences between its embedded cost of production and the market price.

Baxter, L.; Hirst, E.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Incentive regulation of investor-owned nuclear power plants by public utility regulators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) periodically surveys the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) and state regulatory commissions that regulate utility owners of nuclear power plants. The NRC is interested in identifying states that have established economic or performance incentive programs applicable to nuclear power plants, including states with new programs, how the programs are being implemented, and in determining the financial impact of the programs on the utilities. The NRC interest stems from the fact that such programs have the potential to adversely affect the safety of nuclear power plants. The information in this report was obtained from interviews conducted with each state regulatory agency that administers an incentive program and each utility that owns at least 10% of an affected nuclear power plant. The agreements, orders, and settlements that form the basis for each incentive program were reviewed as required. The interviews and supporting documentation form the basis for the individual state reports describing the structure and financial impact of each incentive program.

McKinney, M.D.; Elliot, D.B. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

GRR/Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

GRR/Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit GRR/Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit < GRR Jump to: navigation, search GRR-logo.png GEOTHERMAL REGULATORY ROADMAP Roadmap Home Roadmap Help List of Sections Section 3-HI-d - Use and Occupancy Permit 03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Click to View Fullscreen Contact Agencies Hawaii Department of Transportation Highways Division Regulations & Policies Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 102 Hawaii Administrative Rules Title 19, Chapter 105 Triggers None specified Click "Edit With Form" above to add content 03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Flowchart Narrative A developer needs a Use and Occupancy Permit from the Hawaii Department of

303

Occupational dose estimates for a monitored retrievable storage facility  

SciTech Connect

Occupational doses were estimated for radiation workers at the monitored retrievable storage (MRS) facility. This study provides an estimate of the occupational dose based on the current MRS facility design, examines the extent that various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates, and identifies the areas and activities where exposures can be reduced most effectively. Occupational doses were estimated for both the primary storage concept and the alternate storage concept. The dose estimates indicate the annual dose to all radiation workers will be below the 5 rem/yr federal dose equivalent limit. However, the estimated dose to most of the receiving and storage crew (the workers responsible for the receipt, storage, and surveillance of the spent fuel and its subsequent retrieval), to the crane maintenance technicians, and to the cold and remote maintenance technicians is above the design objective of 1 rem/yr. The highest annual dose is received by the riggers (4.7 rem) in the receiving and storage crew. An indication of the extent to which various design parameters and assumptions affect the dose estimates was obtained by changing various design-based assumptions such as work procedures, background dose rates in radiation zones, and the amount of fuel received and stored annually. The study indicated that a combination of remote operations, increased shielding, and additional personnel (for specific jobs) or changes in operating procedures will be necessary to reduce worker doses below 1.0 rem/yr. Operations that could be made at least partially remote include the removal and replacement of the tiedowns, impact limiters, and personnel barriers from the shipping casks and the removal or installation of the inner closure bolts. Reductions of the background dose rates in the receiving/shipping and the transfer/discharge areas may be accomplished with additional shielding.

Harty, R.; Stoetzel, G.A.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Unique challenges for storage and disposal of DOE-owned SNF at the INEEL  

SciTech Connect

Non-commercial Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) owned by the Department of Energy presents some unique challenges for interim storage as well as ultimate disposal in a repository. There is an important link between Yucca Mountain Repository work and the future needs of the DOE SNF program. Close coordination and early definition of acceptance criteria are essential. Much of the Yucca Mountain Repository work has focused on commercial SNF which has very high structural integrity and a well documented set of characteristics and burn-up histories. In contrast, DOE non-commercial SNF at the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL) represents over two hundred fifty fuel types, much of which is degraded. Fuel designs by DOE were centered around various test objectives in experimental reactors. The result was a proliferation of fuel types. Interest in enhanced heat transfer led to use of sodium as a bond between the fuel and cladding. The desire for smaller more compact reactors with higher power densities led to a variety of enrichments from less than 20% to greater than 90%. INEEL has most of the US U-233 spent nuclear fuel, which came from breeder reactor concepts and consideration of a thorium fuel cycle. These various fuel types now must be placed in safe, stable interim dry storage. Emphasis is being placed on the use of commercially available dry storage designs and independent spent fuel storage installations licensed under NRC criteria. A lot of technological development is being done to characterize fuels that do not have the documented fabrication and operational histories of commercial LWR fuels. Program objectives are safe interim storage and least cost transition to geological repository storage.

Mathews, T.A.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Visualizing Energy Information in Commercial Buildings: A Study of Tools, Expert Users, and Building Occupants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of LEED-Certified Commercial Buildings. ” Proceedings,on Energy Efficiency in Buildings, ACEEE, Washington DC,System User Interface for Building Occupants. ” ASHRAE

Lehrer, David; Vasudev, Janani

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

What School Buildings Can Teach Us: Post-Occupancy Evaluation Surveys in K-12 Learning Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

45   Figure 4.3.c Thermal Comfort Satisfaction: Cooling4.3.c Thermal Comfort Satisfaction: Cooling ThermostatThermal  Comfort  Satisfaction   Occupants  with  cooling  

Baker, L.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Occupational well-being: the development of a theory and a measure.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Research on occupational well-being, commonly conceptualized as job satisfaction or the opposite of burnout, is criticized for its lack of theoretical basis. Danna and Griffin… (more)

Schultz, Monica L.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Hyperendemic malaria transmission in areas of occupation-related travel in the Peruvian Amazon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hyperendemic malaria transmission in areas of occupation-mathematically model malaria transmission [25] and confirmedE: Clustered local transmission and asymptomatic Plasmodium

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Occupant Control of Windows: Accounting for Human Behavior in Building Simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2007) User behaviour of window control in offices duringPage 13 Occupant Control of Windows: Accounting for Humanfor the modeling of window opening and closing behaviour,

Borgeson, Sam; Brager, Gail

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Occupancy Rates and Emergency Department Work Index Scores Correlate with Leaving Without Being Seen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The left-without-being-seen rate: an imperfect measure ofdepartment occupancy rate: a simple measure of emergencytimes, lengths of stay, and rate of left without being seen.

Kulstad, Erik B; Hart, K. Michael; Waghchoure, Simon

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Gender differences in respiratory symptoms-Does occupation matter?  

SciTech Connect

Little attention has been given to gender differences in respiratory health, particularly in occupational settings. The purpose of this paper was to evaluate gender differences in respiratory morbidity based on surveys of hospitality workers, radiographers, and respiratory therapists. Data were available from mail surveys of 850 hospitality industry workers (participation rate 73.9%; 52.6% female), 586 radiographers (participation rate 63.6%; 85% female), and 275 respiratory therapists (participation rate 64.1%; 58.6% female). Cross-tabulations by gender were evaluated by {chi}{sup 2} analysis and logistic regression with adjustment for personal and work characteristics. Women consistently had greater respiratory morbidity for symptoms associated with shortness of breath, whereas men usually had a higher prevalence of phlegm. There were few differences in work exposures apart from perception of exposure to ETS among hospitality workers. Gender differences in symptoms were often reduced after adjustment for personal and work characteristics but for respiratory therapists there were even greater gender disparities for asthma attack and breathing trouble. Population health findings of elevated symptoms among women were only partially supported by these occupational respiratory health surveys. The influence of differential exposures and personal factors should be considered when interpreting gender differences in health outcomes.

Dimich-Ward, Helen [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada)]. E-mail: hward@interchange.ubc.ca; Camp, Patricia G. [Department of Medicine, Respiratory Division, University of British Columbia, VGH Research Pavilion, 390-828 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, BC, V5Z 1L8 (Canada); James Hogg iCapture Center for Cardiovascular and Pulmonary Research, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6Z 1Y6 (Canada); Kennedy, Susan M. [School of Occupational and Environmental Hygiene, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

2006-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

312

The multiple market-exposure of waste management companies: A case study of two Swedish municipally owned companies  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Swedish municipally owned waste management companies are active on political, material, technical, and commercial markets. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These markets differ in kind and their demands follow different logics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer These markets affect the public service, processing, and marketing of Swedish waste management. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Articulating these markets is a strategic challenge for Swedish municipally owned waste management. - Abstract: This paper describes how the business model of two leading Swedish municipally owned solid waste management companies exposes them to four different but related markets: a political market in which their legitimacy as an organization is determined; a waste-as-material market that determines their access to waste as a process input; a technical market in which these companies choose what waste processing technique to use; and a commercial market in which they market their products. Each of these markets has a logic of its own. Managing these logics and articulating the interrelationships between these markets is a key strategic challenge for these companies.

Corvellec, Herve, E-mail: herve.corvellec@ism.lu.se [Department of Service Management, Lund University, Campus Helsingborg, PO Box 882, SE-251 08 Helsingborg (Sweden); Bramryd, Torleif [Department of Environmental Strategy, Lund University, Campus Helsingborg, PO Box 882, SE-251 08 Helsingborg (Sweden)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

313

Characteristics of Social Networks and Employee Behavior and Performance A Chinese Case Study of a State-Owned Enterprise  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the social networks at a Chinese state-owned enterprise, the authors examine the factors that are correlated with employee performance. They delineate two types of performance: task and contextual. The factors in their study are the characteristics ... Keywords: China, Employee Performance, Information Technology Capability, Knowledge Sharing, Social Network Analysis SNA

Jianping Peng; Jing Quan

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

A multi-sensor based occupancy estimation model for supporting demand driven HVAC operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) is a major energy consumer in buildings, and implementing demand driven HVAC operations is a way to reduce HVAC related energy consumption. This relies on the availability of occupancy information, which ... Keywords: HVAC, building energy consumption, demand driven, non-intrusive sensor, occupancy estimation

Zheng Yang; Nan Li; Burcin Becerik-Gerber; Michael Orosz

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectral Properties of -Plutonium: Sensitivity to 5f Occupancy Jian-Xin Zhu,1 A. K. McMahan,2 M. D a systematic analysis of the spectral properties of -plutonium with varying 5f occupancy. The LDA Hamiltonian properties, crystal structure, and metallurgy, plutonium is probably the most complicated element

316

OBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

control conditioning strategies. Using strategies based on sensor network occupancy model predictions, weOBSERVE: Occupancy-Based System for Efficient Reduction of HVAC Energy Varick L. Erickson, Miguel Á Descriptors I.6.5 [Simulation and Modeling]: Model Development; J.7 [Computers In Other Systems]: Command

Cerpa, Alberto E.

317

Using Monte-Carlo simulation for risk assessment: application to occupational exposure during remediation works  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to apply the Monte-Carlo techniques to develop a probabilistic risk assessment. The risk resulting from the occupational exposure during the remediation activities of a uranium tailings disposal, in an abandoned uranium mining ... Keywords: Monte Carlo simulation, occupational exposure, risk and dose assessment, uranium tailings disposal

M. L. Dinis; A. Fiúza

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Occupational radiation Exposure at Agreement State-Licensed Materials Facilities, 1997-2010  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to examine occupational radiation exposures received under Agreement State licensees. As such, this report reflects the occupational radiation exposure data contained in the Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS) database, for 1997 through 2010, from Agreement State-licensed materials facilities.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2012-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

DOE Issues Request for Proposals for Hanford Site Occupational Medical Services  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

RICHLAND, Wash. – The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Request for Proposals (RFP) for an Occupational Medical Services contract at the Hanford Site. The solicitation is for a small-business contractor to perform occupational medical services for the DOE Richland Operations Office and Office of River Protection.

320

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: A Review of High Occupancy Vehicle (HOV) Lane Performance and Policy Options in the United States: Final Report Focus Area: Vehicle Distance Traveled Reduction Topics: Best Practices Website: ops.fhwa.dot.gov/publications/fhwahop09029/index.htm Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/review-high-occupancy-vehicle-hov-lan Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation This report provides an assessment of performance of existing high occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane facilities in the United States and explores policy alternatives and effects related to conversion of existing HOV lanes

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MedGate Occupational MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) MedGate Occupational Health and Safety Medical System (OHS) (Includes the Drug and Alcohol Testing System (Assistant)) More Documents & Publications PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solution (SRNS) Procurement Cycle System (PCS) PIA - Savannah River Nuclear Solutions (SRNS) Human Resource Management

322

Occupational Medicine in Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Employee Assistance and Substance Abuse Programs Departmental requirements provide for support of both Federal and contractor employees with respect to crisis intervention, assessment, short-term counseling, case management, management consultation, education, and training (and the promotion thereof), and prevention. These include services for all behavioral problems, ensuring that medical evaluations are obtained before or as part of psychiatric evaluations to determine whether behavioral problems are caused by medical conditions. The following policy, guidance, and additional resources may apply. 1. Employee Assistance Programs 2. Substance Abuse Programs 1. Employee Assistance Programs Federal Employees Federal Employee Health Services: Occupational Medicine, Employee Assistance, and Workers' Compensation Programs (DOE O 341.1A, 2007)

323

{sup 125}I Measurements for Occupational Exposure Assessment  

SciTech Connect

Whenever there is a risk of occupational exposure to dispersible radioactive material, it is necessary to have a monitoring program to assess the effective dose arising from the intake of radionuclides by workers. In this paper we present our experience in bioassay measurements of {sup 125}I in urine samples of workers using high resolution gamma spectrometry. For a 24-hour excretion period, we found activity values of the order of one Bq and estimated the committed effective doses to be less than one {mu}Sv. Although very small, these values led to a re-evaluation and improvement of the laboratory safety conditions. We discuss the calibration procedure followed for the activity measurements, the estimation of the uncertainty in the excreted activity, the calculation of detection and quantification limits and estimation of performance indicators. Aspects regarding the spectral analysis, true coincidence summing and matrix effects are also considered.

Silva, L.; Pinhao, N. R. [Department of Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety, ITN-Nuclear and Technological Institute, Estrada Nacional N 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal)

2008-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

324

RICHARD WILLIAM HORNUNG. Modeling Occupational Mortality Data with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The development of Statistical methodology for application to survival data has expanded rapidly in the last two decades. Increasing interest in the field of occupational health demands that the current state-of-the-art in modeling exposure-risk relationships be utilized in assessing potential dangers to worker health. It is the aim of this research to investigate the more sophisticated survivorship models in producing a quantitative risk assessment of lung cancer in U.S. uranium miners. The Cox proportional hazards model was chosen for this purpose. A variety of risk functions are examined, with a power function model providing the best fit. A number of risk factors influence the exposure-response relationship. Among these are a strong independent multiplicative effect of cigarette smoking t a positive effect for age at initial exposure, and a negative effect for time since last exposure. The nature of the temporal effects suggest that

Richard W; Richard W; Michael J. Symons

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Occupational Radiation Exposure Analysis of US ITER DCLL TBM  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents an Occupational Radiation Exposure (ORE) analysis that was performed for the US International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) Dual Coolant Lead Lithium (DCLL) Test Blanket Module (TBM). This analysis was performed with the QADMOD dose code for anticipated maintenance activities for this TBM concept and its ancillary systems. The QADMOD code was used to model the PbLi cooling loop of this TBM concept by specifying gamma ray source terms that simulated radioactive material within the piping, valves, heat exchanger, permeator, pump, drain tank, and cold trap of this cooling system. Estimates of the maintenance tasks that will have to be performed and the time required to perform these tasks where developed based on either expert opinion or on industrial maintenance experience for similar technologies. This report details the modeling activity and the calculated doses for the maintenance activities envisioned for the US DCLL TBM.

Merrill, Brad J; Cadwallader, Lee C; Dagher, Mohamad

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Viewpoint on occupational health in the oil-shale industry  

SciTech Connect

In assessing the potential health and safety hazards which may be expected in a large-scale oil shale industry, the types of operations that will be utilized to extract oil from oil shale are examined. These are broadly characterized as mining, raw shale processing and handling, retorting and refining, and spent shale disposal. With few exceptions, these operations in shale oil production are similar to operations in existing industries. Health and safety risks and occupational health controls are also expected to be similar. To date medical studies on workers in the oil shale industry who have been exposed to shale dusts and oil products have indicated that the chief problem areas are pneumoconiosis and skin cancers. A broad viewpoint of the prospective occupational health problems in the oil shale industry can be obtained by reviewing similar activities and exposures in other industrial operations. This viewpoint would suggest that the prospective problems can be controlled adequately by conventional methods of worker protection. Several unique situations do exist in this industry. The mining and material handling of tonnages of oil shale exceeds any experience in other mining activities. This is a problem of scale. It seems unlikely that it will produce new safety problems. The in situ mining offers the unique situation of burning and abandoned underground retorts in near proximity to work forces preparing future in situ retorts. The potential of exposures to dusts, gases and vapors will simply have to be measured as such operations come on stream. Measurements made to date have not shown unique hazards to exist, although existing data are limited to demonstration-scale retorts burning one-at-a-time under normal conditions.

Voelz, G.L.; Grier, R.S.; Hargis, K.M.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

A comparative analysis of business structures suitable forfarmer-owned wind power projects in the United States  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts' ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned wind power development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for wind power. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus ''cooperative'' ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan

2004-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

328

Energy efficient building environment control strategies using real-time occupancy measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current climate control systems often rely on building regulation maximum occupancy numbers for maintaining proper temperatures. However, in many situations, there are rooms that are used infrequently, and may be heated or cooled needlessly. Having knowledge ...

Varick L. Erickson; Yiqing Lin; Ankur Kamthe; Rohini Brahme; Amit Surana; Alberto E. Cerpa; Michael D. Sohn; Satish Narayanan

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Energy Edge, Post-Occupancy Evaluation Project: The Eastgate Corporate Center Bellevue, Washington  

SciTech Connect

The Workspace Satisfaction Survey measures occupant satisfaction with the thermal, lighting, acoustical, and air quality aspects of the work environment. In addition to ratings of these ambient environmental features, occupants also rate their satisfaction with a number of functional and aesthetic features of the office environment as well as their satisfaction with specific kinds of workspaces (e.g. computer rooms, the lobby, employee lounge, etc.) Each section on ambient conditions includes questions on the frequency with which people experience particular kinds of discomforts or problems, how much the discomfort bothers them, and how much it interferes with their work. Occupants are also asked to identify how they cope with discomfort or environmental problems, and to what extent these behaviors enable them to achieve more satisfactory conditions. This report documents the results of this survey of the occupants of the Eastgate Corporate Center, Bellevue, Washington. 21 figs., 7 tabs.

1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

10 C.F.R. PART 835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION, Subpart...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

835-OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION Authority: 42 U.S.C. 2201; 7191. Source: 58 FR 65485, Dec. 14, 1993, unless otherwise noted. Subpart A-General Provisions 835.1 Scope. (a)...

331

START: an automated tool for serial analysis of chromatin occupancy data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summary: The serial analysis of chromatin occupancy technique (SACO) promises to become a widely used method for the unbiased genome-wide experimental identification of loci bound by a transcription factor of interest. We describe the first web-based ...

Voichita D. Marinescu; Isaac S. Kohane; Tae-Kyung Kim; David A. Harmin; Michael E. Greenberg; Alberto Riva

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

A field study of the actual lighting savings achievable from occupancy sensor use was performed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. The study involved two seperate field assessments. The objective of the first test was to assess and effectively quantify the potential ``wasted-light`` hours associated with different occupant and space types associated with occupancy sensor control installations. These quantities are the primary factor in determining actual lighting energy savings associated with occupancy lighting control. The second test was conducted to explore the potential additional savings from more sensitive sensor equipment or better equipment adjustment that might reduce the need for delay timers. This information provides quantitative insight into the energy savings lost because of the limitations of current sensing equipment.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Occupational Health and Safety Database, 1995-2011: Injury Surveillance Highlights 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Descriptive highlights are presented from the 2012 data reporting year of the Electric Power Research Institute’s Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) program as a preliminary assessment of this long-term injury and illness surveillance program for the electric sector. OHSD provides the capability for monitoring trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and conducting research on occupational health and safety issues. OHSD currently integrates 17 years of personnel, ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

334

Development of Occupational Exposure Limits for the Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect

Production of plutonium for the United States’ nuclear weapons program from the 1940’s to the 1980’s generated 53 million gallons of radioactive chemical waste, which is storedin 177 underground tanks at the Hanford Site in southeastern W 18 ashington State. Recent 19 attempts to begin the retrieval and treatment of these wastes require moving the waste to 20 more modern tanks results in potential exposure of the workers to unfamiliar odors 21 emanating from headspace in the tanks. Given the unknown risks involved, workers 22 were placed on supplied air respiratory protection. CH2M HILL, the managers of the 23 Hanford Site Tank Farms, asked an Independent Toxicology Panel (ITP) to assist them in issues relating to an Industrial Hygiene and risk assessment problem. The ITP was called upon to help determine the risk of exposure to vapors from the tanks, and in general develop a strategy for solution of the problem. This paper presents the methods used to determine the chemicals of potential concern (COPC) and the resultant development of screening values and Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for these COPCs. A total of 1,826 chemicals were inventoried and evaluated. Over 1,500 chemicals were identified in the waste tanks headspaces and more than 600 of these were assigned screening values; 72 of these compounds were recommended for AOEL development. Included in this list of 72 were 57 COPCs identified by the ITP and of these 47 were subsequently assigned AOELs. An exhaustive exposure assessment strategy was developed by the CH2M HILL industrial hygiene department to evaluate these COPCs.

Still, Kenneth; Gardner, Donald; Snyder, Robert; Anderson, Thomas; Honeyman, James; Timchalk, Charles

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Mercury and autoimmunity: implications for occupational and environmental health  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has long been recognized as a neurotoxicant; however, recent work in animal models has implicated Hg as an immunotoxicant. In particular, Hg has been shown to induce autoimmune disease in susceptible animals with effects including overproduction of specific autoantibodies and pathophysiologic signs of lupus-like disease. However, these effects are only observed at high doses of Hg that are above the levels to which humans would be exposed through contaminated fish consumption. While there is presently no evidence to suggest that Hg induces frank autoimmune disease in humans, a recent epidemiological study has demonstrated a link between occupational Hg exposure and lupus. In our studies, we have tested the hypothesis that Hg does not cause autoimmune disease directly, but rather that it may interact with triggering events, such as genetic predisposition, exposure to antigens, or infection, to exacerbate disease. Treatment of mice that are not susceptible to Hg-induced autoimmune disease with very low doses and short term exposures of inorganic Hg (20-200 {mu}g/kg) exacerbates disease and accelerates mortality in the graft versus host disease model of chronic lupus in C57Bl/6 x DBA/2 mice. Furthermore, low dose Hg exposure increases the severity and prevalence of experimental autoimmune myocarditis (induced by immunization with cardiac myosin peptide in adjuvant) in A/J mice. To test our hypothesis further, we examined sera from Amazonian populations exposed to Hg through small-scale gold mining, with and without current or past malaria infection. We found significantly increased prevalence of antinuclear and antinucleolar antibodies and a positive interaction between Hg and malaria. These results suggest a new model for Hg immunotoxicity, as a co-factor in autoimmune disease, increasing the risks and severity of clinical disease in the presence of other triggering events, either genetic or acquired.

Silbergeld, Ellen K. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)]. E-mail: esilberg@jhsph.edu; Silva, Ines A. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States); Nyland, Jennifer F. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, Johns Hopkins University Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205 (United States)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Who Owns Copyrighted Work?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This does not always hold true, and under these facts the business owner's assumption is wrong. (Although this scenario focuses on computer software, any  ...

337

ZIP-Code-Level Distributions of Real-Estate-Owned (REO) Properties during the U.S. Mortgage Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During the mortgage crisis, community developers, policymakers, and others have become increasingly concerned about the extent to which lender-owned homes, often called real-estate-owned or “REO” properties, have accumulated in their neighborhoods and communities. REO properties are usually vacant and, especially when geographically concentrated, can have destabilizing impacts on neighborhoods and communities. However, due to data challenges, little systematic research has been done on the intrametropolitan distributions of such properties, especially across different metropolitan regions. This paper describes the accumulation of REO within different parts of metropolitan areas as of November 2008. First, the urban-versus-suburban distribution of REO is found to vary significantly across metropolitan areas. In general, in traditionally weak-market metros—many of which had substantial REO levels before the advent of the national mortgage crisis—REO tend to be relatively concentrated in central cities. Conversely, in regions where REO accumulated more recently and in those with high central-city housing prices, REO tend to be somewhat more suburbanized. Second, while ZIP codes with high REO densities are disproportionately located in central cities, this pattern varies significantly across metropolitan areas. In particular, in the formerly “hot-market ” regions where home values have declined rapidly, a large majority of ZIP codes with “severe ” REO levels are suburban. Finally, among suburban ZIP codes, those with long commute times experienced larger increases in REO over the November 2006 to 2008 period than those with shorter commute times. The paper concludes with some broad implications for community development policy and planning. About the Author Dan Immergluck is a visiting scholar in community affairs at the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta and an

Foreclosed Homes; Dan Immergluck

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

ANCCA, an estrogen-regulated AAA+ ATPase coactivator for ER alpha, is required for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for coregulator occupancy and chromatin modification June X.at the ER target chromatin. Moreover, mutations at the ATPco-regulator complexes at chromatin is a process facilitated

Zou, June X; Revenko, Alexey S; Li, Li B; Gemo, Abigael T; Chen, Hong-Wu

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations for high-field electron transport  

SciTech Connect

It is pointed out that in the framework of balance-equation approach, the coupled force-balance and particle-occupation rate equations can be used as a complete set of equations to determine the high-field transport of semiconductors in both strong and weak electron-electron interaction limits. We call to attention that the occupation rate equation conserves the total particle number and maintains the energy balance of the relative electron system, and there is no need to introduce any other term in it. The addition of an energy-drift term in the particle-occupation rate equation [Phys. Rev. B 71, 195205 (2005)] is physically inadequate for the violation of the total particle-number conservation and the energy balance. It may lead to a substantial unphysical increase of the total particle number by the application of a dc electric field.

Lei, X. L. [Department of Physics, Shanghai Jiaotong University, 1954 Huashan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China)

2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

340

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOT MEASUREMENT NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE DOE-STD-1136-2009 July 2009 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities i This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities iii Foreword This Technical Standard (TS) discusses, but does not establish any, requirements for DOE uranium

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

1136-2009 1136-2009 July 2009 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities i This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/ns/techstds/ DOE-STD-1136-2009 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities iii Foreword This Technical Standard (TS) discusses, but does not establish any, requirements for DOE uranium

342

Proposed Occupational Exposure Limits for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals  

SciTech Connect

A large number of volatile chemicals have been identified in the headspaces of tanks used to store mixed chemical and radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford Site, and there is concern that vapor releases from the tanks may be hazardous to workers. Contractually established occupational exposure limits (OELs) established by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) do not exist for all chemicals of interest. To address the need for worker exposure guidelines for those chemicals that lack OSHA or ACGIH OELs, a procedure for assigning Acceptable Occupational Exposure Limits (AOELs) for Hanford Site tank farm workers has been developed and applied to a selected group of 57 headspace chemicals.

Poet, Torka S.; Timchalk, Chuck

2006-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

343

The Potential for Wind Induced Ventilation to Meet Occupant Comfort Conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes a simple graphic tool that enables a building designer to evaluate the potential for wind induced ventilation cooling in several climate zones. Long term weather data were analyzed to determine the conditions for which available wind speed can be used to meet occupant comfort conditions. By calculating the change in enthalpy produced by a typical residential air conditioner during those hours when an occupant is uncomfortable, we were able to estimate the impact of natural ventilation on building cooling load. The graphic presentation of the results allows a designer to determine the potential energy savings of increasing the ventilation air flow rate as well as the orientation of building openings that will maximize ventilation cooling of the building occupants.

Byrne, S. J.; Huang, Y. J.; Ritschard, R. L.; Foley, D. M.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences  

SciTech Connect

Occupancy sensor systems are gaining traction as an effective technological approach to reducing energy use in exterior commercial lighting applications. Done correctly, occupancy sensors can substantially enhance the savings from an already efficient lighting system. However, this technology is confronted by several potential challenges and pitfalls that can leave a significant amount of the prospective savings on the table. This report describes anecdotal experiences from field installations of occupancy sensor controlled light-emitting diode (LED) lighting at two parking structures and two parking lots. The relative levels of success at these installations reflect a marked range of potential outcomes: from an additional 76% in energy savings to virtually no additional savings. Several issues that influenced savings were encountered in these early stage installations and are detailed in the report. Ultimately, care must be taken in the design, selection, and commissioning of a sensor-controlled lighting installation, else the only guaranteed result may be its cost.

Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael; Royer, Michael P.; Sullivan, Greg P.

2012-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

345

Part 835-Occupational Radiation Protection Authority: 42 U.S.C. 2201; 7191  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wednesday Wednesday November 4, 1998 Part III Department of Energy 10 CFR Part 835 Occupational Radiation Protection; Final Rule 59662 Federal Register / Vol. 63, No. 213 / Wednesday, November 4, 1998 / Rules and Regulations DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 10 CFR Part 835 [Docket No.: EH-RM-96-835] RIN 1901-AA59 Occupational Radiation Protection AGENCY: Department of Energy. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of Energy (DOE) is amending its primary standards for occupational radiation protection. This final rule is the culmination of a systematic analysis to identify the elements of a comprehensive radiation protection program and determine those elements of such a program that should be codified as DOE continues its transition from a system of contractually-based nuclear safety standards to regulatory-

346

Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices, IG-0404  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 7, 1997 May 7, 1997 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: John C. Layton Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Report on "Audit of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Injury and Illness Reporting Practices" BACKGROUND: The Department and its contractors are responsible for ensuring that a safe and healthy work environment is provided to Department and contractor employees at its operating facilities. Contractors are responsible for establishing a comprehensive occupational safety and health program, which includes reporting of significant work- related employee injuries. The Department is responsible

347

Mapping multiple gas/odor sources in an uncontrolled indoor environment using a Bayesian occupancy grid mapping based method  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we address the problem of autonomously localizing multiple gas/odor sources in an indoor environment without a strong airflow. To do this, a robot iteratively creates an occupancy grid map. The produced map shows the probability each discrete ... Keywords: Gas source localization, Gas source mapping, Indoor monitoring, Occupancy grid mapping

Gabriele Ferri; Michael V. Jakuba; Alessio Mondini; Virgilio Mattoli; Barbara Mazzolai; Dana R. Yoerger; Paolo Dario

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

11 Jul 2007 (updated 3 Feb 2009) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-005-R003 1 of 1 Authorization to Release Occupational Exposure Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information concerning the internal and external occupational radiation dose I received while at SLAC. (Please Occupational Exposure Information To obtain this authorization, print this form, fill it in, sign it

Wechsler, Risa H.

349

Conservation analysis predicts in vivo occupancy of glucocorticoid receptor-binding sequences  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conservation analysis predicts in vivo occupancy of glucocorticoid receptor-binding sequences an individual GRE is highly conserved. In this study, we examined whether sequence conservation of sites re, we found that the level of conservation of these sites at genes up-regulated by glucocorticoids

Yamamoto, Keith

350

ZonePAC: Zonal Power Estimation and Control via HVAC Metering and Occupant Feedback  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating Ventillation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) systems account for nearly 40% of primary energy consumption by commercial buildings. Yet, these systems by and large operate in an open-loop with the building occupants. While the monitoring and feedback ... Keywords: Energy Estimation, HVAC, Thermostat, User Interface, Variable Air Volume

Bharathan Balaji, Hidetoshi Teraoka, Rajesh Gupta, Yuvraj Agarwal

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The smart thermostat: using occupancy sensors to save energy in homes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heating, ventilation and cooling (HVAC) is the largest source of residential energy consumption. In this paper, we demonstrate how to use cheap and simple sensing technology to automatically sense occupancy and sleep patterns in a home, and how to use ... Keywords: building energy, home monitoring, programmable thermostats, wireless sensor networks

Jiakang Lu; Tamim Sookoor; Vijay Srinivasan; Ge Gao; Brian Holben; John Stankovic; Eric Field; Kamin Whitehouse

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

When Callings Are Calling: Crafting Work and Leisure in Pursuit of Unanswered Occupational Callings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scholars have identified benefits of viewing work as a calling, but little research has explored the notion that people are frequently unable to work in occupations that answer their callings. To develop propositions on how individuals experience and ... Keywords: calling, job crafting, psychological well-being, regulatory focus, self-regulation, work orientation

Justin M. Berg; Adam M. Grant; Victoria Johnson

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Student manual, Book 2: Orientation to occupational safety compliance in DOE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is a student hand-book an Occupational Safety Compliance in DOE. Topics include the following: Electrical; materials handling & storage; inspection responsibilities & procedures; general environmental controls; confined space entry; lockout/tagout; office safety, ergonomics & human factors; medical & first aid, access to records; construction safety; injury/illness reporting system; and accident investigation procedures.

Colley, D.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Varick L. Erickson, University of California, Merced  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response HVAC control strategy," in proceedings of the 2nd ACM Workshop on Embedded Sensing SystemsA Occupancy Modeling and Prediction for Building Energy Management Varick L. Erickson, University into building conditioning system for usage based demand control conditioning strategies. Using strategies based

Cerpa, Alberto E.

355

Domain experts' knowledge-based intelligent decision support system in occupational shoulder and neck pain therapy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research develops a fuzzy knowledge-based decision support system (FKBDSS) that measures and predicts the degree of severity of the work-related risk associated with shoulder and neck pain (SNP) that is a prevalent pain complaint in an occupational ... Keywords: Analytic hierarchy processing, Domain expert, Fuzzy knowledge-based decision support system, Fuzzy set theory, Musculoskeletal disorder, Shoulder and neck pain

T. Padma; P. Balasubramanie

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

BOFAR: buffer occupancy factor based adaptive router for mesh NoCs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

If the route computation operation in an adaptive router returns more than one output channels, the selection strategy chooses one from them based on the congestion metric used. The effectiveness of a selection strategy depends on what metric is used ... Keywords: adaptive routers, buffer occupancy, network-on-chip

John Jose; J. Shiva Shankar; K. V. Mahathi; Damarla Kranthi Kumar; Madhu Mutyam

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Iran cannot have claimed to be building a thermonuclear reactor -To build a thermonuclear reactor by its own efforts is a task absolutely beyond Iran's  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Iran cannot have claimed to be building a thermonuclear reactor - expert To build a thermonuclear reactor by its own efforts is a task absolutely beyond Iran's strength, and reports that Iran has made such claims must be a misunderstanding, a nuclear specialist said._Georgy Yeliseyev, chief specialist

358

Participatory Pricing in Sport: An Examination of Name-Your-Own-Price and Pay-What-You-Want Pricing  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to better understand the effects participatory pricing strategies have on consumer perceptions and behaviors in a sport event pricing scenario. Participatory pricing strategies are those that include the consumer in setting the final price of a good or service. These mechanisms include name-your-own-price (NYOP) and pay-what-you-want (PWYW). These pricing strategies are now being introduced into the sport industry. With the increased use of these strategies, and the lack of research in sport management pertaining to consumers’ perceptions of price, specifically consumer voice in price setting, there is a gap in the literature that needs to be filled. This study investigates the consumer’s perceptions of price fairness, perceived value, as well as consumer behavior (i.e. purchase intentions and willingness-to-pay), when encountering participatory pricing strategies. The following dissertation presents a quantitative experimental design, asking subjects to participate in a simulated ticket purchase experience. Difference between experimental groups was assessed based on price fairness, perceived value, willingness-to-pay, and purchase intentions. Results indicate there is a significant difference between participatory pricing groups and traditional fixed price groups when examining price fairness, perceived value, willingness-to-pay, and final average prices paid. Specifically, price fairness evaluations were significantly higher for the PWYW and fixed price groups, and lower for the NYOP group. In addition to the price fairness differences, the groups differed on their evaluations of perceived value (PWYW and fixed are the same, both higher than NYOP). Furthermore, the results reveal that consumers involved in the NYOP mechanism evoked higher levels of willingness-to-pay than PWYW and fixed. Furthermore, the study also found that the final average price paid following the experiment differed based on the mechanism. The PWYW and fixed price mechanisms paid similar amounts, while both of them were significantly higher than the NYOP mechanism. This suggests that while one of the biggest concerns for the PWYW treatment is a low final average price (even $0); this may not be an issue in a sport ticket pricing scenario. Study limitations and future research are included in the following dissertation.

Reese, Jason 1985-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

DOE Order Self Study Modules - 10 CFR 835 Occupational Radiation Protection  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

10 CFR 835 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION LEARNING AND CAREER DEVELOPMENT DEPARTMENT Change No: 1 10 CFR 835 Level: Familiar Date:11/1/08 1 10/1/08 10 CFR 835 OCCUPATIONAL RADIATION PROTECTION FAMILIAR LEVEL ___________________________________________________________________________ OBJECTIVES Given the familiar level of this module and the resources, you will be able to perform the following: 1. State the scope of 10 CFR 835. 2. Define the following terms. annual limit on intake bioassay contamination area derived air concentration high contamination area radiation weighting factor 3. State the requirements of the general rule. 4. State the radiation protection program requirements. 5. State the requirements of the internal audit.

360

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Industrial Hygiene program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Conduct of Operations - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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361

FEDERAL OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Attachment E: Physician Treatment Orders - FOH-24 Form (formerly 229-B)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FOH-24 (formerly 229-B) rev. 7/01 FOH-24 (formerly 229-B) rev. 7/01 FEDERAL OCCUPATIONAL HEALTH Attachment E: Physician Treatment Orders - FOH-24 Form (formerly 229-B) ALL INFORMATION WILL BE CONSIDERED CONFIDENTIAL Dear Doctor: If you are using this form for allergen immunotherapy, you must provide the information requested in blocks #1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 10, 11, and 12. TO: FOH Occupational Health Center Patient Name:_________________________________________ Diagnosis:______________________________________ Physician's Orders (may attach additional page): 1) Exact Name of Medication 2) Dosage 3) Interval of Administration 4) Method of Administration: ____ SQ ____ IM 5) Expiration Date of Order: (if less than 6 months) 6) First dose of each new multi-dose vial or box of single dose

362

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 2 December 2006 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN PLUTONIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. ii This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1128-98 iii Change Notice 1: DOE-STD-1128-98, Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities

363

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of River Protection K Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System May 2004 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a May 2004 assessment of the Environment, Safety and Health program at the Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System More Documents & Publications CRAD, Management - Office of River Protection K Basin Sludge Waste System

364

CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Y-12 Enriched Uranium Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of Industrial Safety and Industrial Health programs at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Occupational Safety & Health - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications

365

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

February 1, 2010 February 1, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR DISTRIBUTION "" ( "· FROM: DANIEL B. PONE~ SUBJECT: Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act Interviews of Current and Former Workers The Department embraces its responsibility for and commitment to the health and well- being of the Department of Energy's (DOE) current and former workers, both Federal and contractor employees. Two key programs that advance DO E's commitment to its former and current workers are the Department of Labor (DOL) managed Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program (EEOICP) and the Former Worker Medical Screening Program. In the context of support to EEOICP, DOE's role is to work on behalf of the program claimants to make sure that all available worker and

366

Waste collection in developing countries - Tackling occupational safety and health hazards at their source  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Waste management procedures in developing countries are associated with occupational safety and health risks. Gastro-intestinal infections, respiratory and skin diseases as well as muscular-skeletal problems and cutting injuries are commonly found among waste workers around the globe. In order to find efficient, sustainable solutions to reduce occupational risks of waste workers, a methodological risk assessment has to be performed and counteractive measures have to be developed according to an internationally acknowledged hierarchy. From a case study in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia suggestions for the transferral of collected household waste into roadside containers are given. With construction of ramps to dump collected household waste straight into roadside containers and an adaptation of pushcarts and collection procedures, the risk is tackled at the source.

Bleck, Daniela, E-mail: bleck.daniela@baua.bund.de [Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Germany (BAuA), Friedrich Henkel Weg 1-25, 44149 Dortmund (Germany); Wettberg, Wieland, E-mail: wettberg.wieland@baua.bund.de [Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, Germany (BAuA), Friedrich Henkel Weg 1-25, 44149 Dortmund (Germany)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Occupation number and fluctuations in the finite-temperature Bose-Hubbard model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study the occupation numbers and number fluctuations of ultra-cold atoms in deep optical lattices for finite temperatures within the Bose-Hubbard model. Simple analytical expressions for the mean occupation number and number fluctuations are obtained in the weak-hopping regime using an interpolation between results from different perturbation approaches in the Mott-insulator and superfluid phases. These analytical results are compared to exact one dimensional numerical calculations using a finite temperature variant of the Density-Matrix Renormalisation Group (DMRG) method and found to have a high degree of accuracy. We also find very good agreement in the crossover ``thermal'' region. With the present approach the magnitude of number fluctuations under realistic experimental conditions can be estimated and the properties of the finite temperature phase diagram can be studied.

L. I. Plimak; M. Fleischhauer; M. K. Olsen

2003-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

368

Revisiting the 'Buy versus Build' Decision for Publicly Owned Utilities in California Considering Wind and Geothermal Resources  

SciTech Connect

The last two decades have seen a dramatic increase in the market share of independent, nonutility generators (NUGs) relative to traditional, utility-owned generation assets. Accordingly, the ''buy versus build'' decision facing utilities--i.e., whether a utility should sign a power purchase agreement (PPA) with a NUG, or develop and own the generation capacity itself--has gained prominence in the industry. Very little of this debate, however, has focused specifically on publicly owned electric utilities, and with few exceptions, renewable sources of supply have received similarly scant attention. Contrary to historical treatment, however, the buy versus build debate is quite relevant to publicly owned utilities and renewables because publicly owned utilities are able to take advantage of some renewable energy incentives only in a ''buy'' situation, while others accrue only in a ''build'' situation. In particular, possible economic advantages of public utility ownership include: (1) the tax-free status of publicly owned utilities and the availability of low-cost debt, and (2) the renewable energy production incentive (REPI) available only to publicly owned utilities. Possible economic advantages to entering into a PPA with a NUG include: (1) the availability of federal tax credits and accelerated depreciation schedules for certain forms of NUG-owned renewable energy, and (2) the California state production incentives available to NUGs but not utilities. This article looks at a publicly owned utility's decision to buy or build new renewable energy capacity--specifically wind and geothermal power--in California. To examine the economic aspects of this decision, we used a 20-year financial cash-flow model to assess the levelized cost of electricity under four supply options: (1) public utility ownership of new geothermal capacity, (2) public utility ownership of new wind capacity, (3) a PPA for new geothermal capacity, and (4) a PPA for new wind capacity. We focus on wind and geothermal because both resources are abundant and, in some cases, potentially economic in California. Our analysis is not intended to provide precise estimates of the levelized cost of electricity from wind projects and geothermal plants; nor is our intent to compare the levelized costs of wind and geothermal power to one another. Instead, our intent is simply to compare the costs of buying wind or geothermal power to the costs of building and operating wind or geothermal capacity under various scenarios. Of course, the ultimate decision to buy or build cannot and should not rest solely on a comparison of the levelized cost of electricity. Thus, in addition to quantitative analysis, we also include a qualitative discussion of several important features of the ''buy versus build'' decision not reflected in the economic analysis.

Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Golove, William

2001-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

369

Mine safety: Occupational health -- general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning occupational hazards in the metals and fossil fuel mining environment. Topics include the detection, control and effects of respirable dust, safety aspects of various mining methods, gas detection, and field surveys of specific operations. Some attention is given to legislative aspects of mine safety and benefits to the disabled.(Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

NONE

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Mine safety: Occupational health -- general studies. (Latest citations from the NTIS Bibliographic database). Published Search  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The bibliography contains citations concerning occupational hazards in the metals and fossil fuel mining environment. Topics include the detection, control and effects of respirable dust, safety aspects of various mining methods, gas detection, and field surveys of specific operations. Some attention is given to legislative aspects of mine safety and benefits to the disabled. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

Not Available

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Occupational Health and Safety Database 2012: Annual Data Reporting Years, 1995-2011  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Electric Power Research Institute’s Occupational Health and Safety Database (OHSD) provides the capability for monitoring annual injury/illness trends, benchmarking, evaluating intervention programs, and identifying research targets for health and safety research in the electric power sector.Results and FindingsThe OHSD integrates 17-years (1995-2011) of personnel, injury, and medical claims data from 18 companies into a single data system. This ...

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Occupational Health & Safety Annual Report 2000: Injury & Illness in the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-1999  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an ongoing health and safety database that is designed to provide more precise and detailed information about workplace injury and illness occurrence. Electric energy company health and safety professionals can use this information for establishing and evaluating injury prevention programs. The database provides the capability for epidemiological monitoring, annual injury/illness reporting, program evaluation, and occupational health and injury research. This report presents the firs...

2000-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

373

Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Status: Submitted Citation: Lewis, A; Long, CM; Peterson, MK; Weatherstone, S; Quick, W; Campleman, S; Potential Occupational Exposures and Health Risks Associated with Biomass-Based Power. Submitted to INT J ENVIRON RES PUBLIC HEALTH. Biomass power plants will increasingly contribute to reaching international energy targets for renewable production of electricity and greenhouse gas emission reductions. Biomass combustors, common in small scale, industrial boiler applications, are being developed for ap...

2011-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

374

Occupational Hygiene Aspects of Sulfur Hexafluoride Decomposition By-Products: Workshop Summary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sulfur hexafluoride (SF6) is an inert gas that is present in many different types of electrical utility equipment. While the environmental concerns about this gas have been widely addressed, worker exposure aspects of SF6 decomposition by-products have not been fully explored. To address this knowledge gap, EPRI conducted a workshop on March 12, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. This workshop was designed to 1) address the perspectives of occupational hygiene and engineering ...

2013-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

375

Field analysis of occupancy sensor operation: Parameters affecting lighting energy savings  

SciTech Connect

This study was designed to assess the potential energy savings from the use of lighting occupancy sensor control in Hanford Site facilities. The final results of the study provide useful information for assessing the cost-effective use of occupancy sensor lighting control. The results also include an assessment of the total potential savings from the application of sensors across the entire site. The study involved placing sensor test equipment in multiple office spaces in eight buildings that are part of the Hanford contractor facilities. Further testing was conducted to assess the effects of timer sensitivity adjustments on potential lighting energy savings. The results of this test indicated that up to 100% additional wasted-light energy can be saved by using timer sensitivity settings as low as 2.5 min, which is less than standard factory settings of usually 10 to 20 min. The analysis indicates that savings from lighting operations are affected by the work function and number of occupants in occupied spaces. The availability of daylight in a building space does not appear to have any noticeable aggregate effect on the quantity of wasted-light hours in occupied or unoccupied spaces. An assessment of the total potential savings for the entire Hanford Site included life-cycle costing that followed the federally accepted methodology. The life-cycle cost analysis was performed for a set of possible lighting wattages across the building spaces and occupant types identified from the initial analysis. Under current conditions, the potential savings is estimated to be $525,812/yr at an initial cost of $976,824. The total Net Present Value for the site is estimated at $3,539,926 with a simple payback period of 1.85 years.

Richman, E.E.; Dittmer, A.L.; Keller, J.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluation of 2 Rem per Year Occupational Dose Limit: Potential Effects on U.S. Nuclear Utilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This interim report provides an evaluation of potential impacts on the U.S. nuclear power industry of a reduction in the occupational radiation dose limit from 5 rem per year to 2 rem per year.

2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

377

EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 EM Occupational Injury and Illness Rates Continued to Decline in Fiscal Year 2011 February 1, 2012 - 12:00pm Addthis This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This figure shows the downward trends of EM TRC and DART case rates for the last three fiscal years. These three years correspond to the time of substantial increase in work activities in support of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. EM’s TRC and DART case cumulative rate trend lines over the past 15 quarters remain well below comparable industries’ TRC and DART Case rates. For benchmark comparison, the Construction Industry and the Waste Management & Remediation Service Industry numbers are selected to best approximate the complex-wide decontamination and decommissioning (D&D), remediation, waste management and facility construction activities contracted by EM

378

File:03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage File:03HIDUseAndOccupancyPermit.pdf Size of this preview: 463 × 599 pixels. Other resolution: 464 × 600 pixels. Full resolution ‎(1,275 × 1,650 pixels, file size: 23 KB, MIME type: application/pdf) File history Click on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. Date/Time Thumbnail Dimensions User Comment current 11:54, 12 November 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:54, 12 November 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (23 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs) 11:55, 23 October 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 11:55, 23 October 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (33 KB) Dklein2012 (Talk | contribs) 12:57, 24 July 2012 Thumbnail for version as of 12:57, 24 July 2012 1,275 × 1,650 (31 KB) Alevine (Talk | contribs)

379

Occupant Evaluation of Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certified Health Centers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Globally, concern for natural resource depletion is growing. The healthcare industry is looking to improve healthcare environments by improving design and using better resources. The U.S. Green Building Council has created the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) standard that gives suggestions on how to best use energy, water, land, materials and provide a comfortable indoor environment. Many health centers have used this standard to build new health facilities. It is important that the LEED standards benefit the environment as well as healthcare staff. This study presents four case studies of LEED health centers whose medical staff and administrators evaluate the perceivable green building features applied to their facility. All facilities were given the Occupant Evaluation of LEED Certified Health Centers Survey. The Patrick Dollard Discovery Health Center, the Richard J. Lacks Cancer Center, the Angel Harvey Infant Welfare of Chicago, and the Pearland Pediatric centers received overall satisfactory scores from the occupants. Within the case studies variations in satisfaction occurred where LEED points were not received. There is no evidence that perceivable features used in the design and construction of LEED certified health centers decrease occupant satisfaction.

Hill, Anorea M.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Occupancy-Based Energy Management in Buildings: Final Report to Sponsors  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), the University of California Merced (UCM), and the United Technologies Research Center (UTRC) conducted field studies and modeling analyses in the Classroom and Office Building (COB) and the Science and Engineering Building (S&E) at the University of California, Merced. In the first year, of a planned multiyear project, our goal was to study the feasibility and efficacy of occupancy-based energy management. The first-year research goals were twofold. The first was to explore the likely energy savings if we know the number and location of building occupants in a typical commercial building. The second was to model and estimate people movement in a building. Our findings suggest that a 10-14percent reduction in HVAC energy consumption is possible over typical HVAC operating conditions when we know occupancy throughout the building. With the conclusion of the first-year tasks, we plan to review these results further before this group pursues follow-on funding.

Sohn, Michael D.; Black, Douglas R.; Price, Phillip N.; Lin, Yiqing; Brahme, Rohini; Surana, Amit; Narayanan, Satish; Cerpa, Alberto; Ericson, Varick; Kamthe, Ankur

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency: Preprint  

SciTech Connect

Many studies have reported energy savings after installing a dashboard, but dashboards provide neither individual feedback to the occupant nor the ability to report individual comfort. The Building Agent (BA) provides an interface to engage the occupant in a conversation with the building control system and the building engineer. Preliminary outcomes of the BA-enabled feedback loop are presented, and the effectiveness of the three display modes will be compared to other dashboard studies to baseline energy savings in future research.

Schott, M.; Scheib, J.; Long, N.; Fleming, K.; Benne, K.; Brackney, L.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2002: Injury and Illness Trends in the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-2001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although injury rates among sectors of the electric energy workforce are higher than in many industries, there are no comprehensive, nationwide surveillance systems for reporting and monitoring occupational injury/illness data for the electric energy industry. EPRI has established an ongoing Occupational Health and Safety Surveillance Database designed to provide more detailed, precise information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce than is available from other sources....

2002-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

383

EPRI Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2003: Injury and Illness Among the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995-2002  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although injury rates among some sectors of the electric energy workforce are higher than in many other industries, there is no comprehensive, nationwide surveillance system for reporting and monitoring occupational injury/illness data for the electric energy industry. EPRI has established an ongoing Occupational Health Surveillance Database to provide detailed information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce. The database facilitates epidemiological monitoring, ongoing ...

2004-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

384

Procedural Level Generation Using Occupancy-Regulated Extension Peter Mawhorter, Michael Mateas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Spelunky are split into sixteen 10x8 rooms arranged in a four by four grid. Each room is randomly selected, but there is no interaction between geometric components that could produce truly novel architecture. On the other hand algorithm on its own. Although ORE is agnostic to chunk content, it relies on smart chunk selection and post

California at Santa Cruz, University of

385

DOE Technical Standards List: Directory of DOE and Contractor Personnel Involved in Non-Government Standards Activities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-99 4-99 May 1999 Superseding DOE-TSL-4-98 May 1998 DOE TECHNICAL STANDARDS LIST DIRECTORY OF DOE AND CONTRACTOR PERSONNEL INVOLVED IN NON- GOVERNMENT STANDARDS ACTIVITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SDMP Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-TSL-4-99 iii 1. GENERAL GUIDANCE 1.1 Purpose. Public Law (PL) 104-113 [15 USC 272(b), March 7, 1996], The

386

The Role of Occupant Behavior in Achieving Net Zero Energy: A Demonstration Project at Fort Carson  

SciTech Connect

This study, sponsored by the U.S. General Services Administration’s Office of Federal High-Performance Green Buildings, aimed to understand the potential for institutional and behavioral change to enhance the performance of buildings, through a demonstration project with the Department of Defense in five green buildings on the Fort Carson, Colorado, Army base. To approach this study, the research team identified specific occupant behaviors that had the potential to save energy in each building, defined strategies that might effectively support behavior change, and implemented a coordinated set of actions during a three-month intervention.

Judd, Kathleen S.; Sanquist, Thomas F.; Zalesny, Mary D.; Fernandez, Nicholas

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Monitoring of Occupational Exposures in Albania Using TLD-100 cards (2003-2007)  

SciTech Connect

In our paper is described the monitoring of occupational staff that works in ionising radiation field of the diagnostic centres in Albania for 2003-2007, and is analysed and discussed the mean annual dose rate recorded for above-mentioned period. The monitoring was based in TLD-100 dosimetric cards and the control was performed all over the country on bimonthly basis covering main and important cities like: Tirana, Durresi, Shkodra, Fieri, Vlora, Korca etj. The Department of Human and Environment Protection, at the Centre of Applied Nuclear Physics, through the dosimetric service carried out the monitoring for around 350 radiation workers.

Qafmolla, Luan [Centre of Applied nuclear Physics, Tirana (Albania); Hoxhaj, Enver [University 'Luigj GURAKUQI' Shkoder (Albania)

2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

388

Investigation of Advanced Power Plants and Multiple Use Applications for Single Occupancy Vehicles  

SciTech Connect

Modeling of advanced and conventional drivetrains in a single occupancy vehicle has been undertaken utilizing numerical modeling. The vehicle modeling code Advisor, developed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, has shown that high efficiency, low power output hybrid vehicle drivetrains can almost double the economy relative to conventional powertrains. Experimental verification of the high efficiency potential of a free piston based electrical generator at 2 kilowatts output has been accomplished. For the purpose of introducing this class of transportation, however, the low cost and robust construction of the conventional drivetrain may be the logical first choice.

Peter Van Blarigan

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

A Formaldehyde Exposure Assessment Tool for Occupants of FEMA Temporary Housing Units  

SciTech Connect

The report outlines the methodology used to develop a web-based tool to assess the formaldehyde exposure of the occupants of Federal Emergency Management Administration (FEMA) temporary housing units (THUs) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita in 2005. Linear regression models were built using available data to retrospectively estimate the indoor temperature and relative humidity, formaldehyde emission factors and concentration, and hence the formaldehyde exposures. The interactive web-tool allows the user to define the inputs to the model to evaluate formaldehyde exposures for different scenarios.

Parthasarathy, Srinandini; Spears, Michael; Maddalena, Randy L.; Russell, Marion L; Apte, Michael G.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

GAO-11-520T Federal Real Property: Progress Made on Planning and Data, but Unneeded Owned and Leased Facilities Remain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Economic Economic Development, Public Buildings and Emergency Management, Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of Representatives FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY Progress Made on Planning and Data, but Unneeded Owned and Leased Facilities Remain Statement of David J. Wise, Director Physical Infrastructure Issues Brian J. Lepore, Director Defense Capabilities and Management Issues For Release on Delivery Expected at 10:00 a.m. EDT Wednesday, April 6, 2011 GAO-11-520T Accountability * Integrity * Reliability Highlights of GAO-11-520T, a testimony before the Subcommittee on Economic Development, Public Buildings, and Emergency Management, Committee on Transportation and Infrastructure, House of Representatives. April 6, 2011 FEDERAL REAL PROPERTY

391

Cage occupancies in the high pressure structure H methane hydrate: A neutron diffraction study  

SciTech Connect

A neutron diffraction study was performed on the CD{sub 4}: D{sub 2}O structure H clathrate hydrate to refine its CD{sub 4} fractional cage occupancies. Samples of ice VII and hexagonal (sH) methane hydrate were produced in a Paris-Edinburgh press and in situ neutron diffraction data collected. The data were analyzed with the Rietveld method and yielded average cage occupancies of 3.1 CD{sub 4} molecules in the large 20-hedron (5{sup 12}6{sup 8}) cages of the hydrate unit cell. Each of the pentagonal dodecahedron (5{sup 12}) and 12-hedron (4{sup 3}5{sup 6}6{sup 3}) cages in the sH unit cell are occupied with on average 0.89 and 0.90 CD{sub 4} molecules, respectively. This experiment avoided the co-formation of Ice VI and sH hydrate, this mixture is more difficult to analyze due to the proclivity of ice VI to form highly textured crystals, and overlapping Bragg peaks of the two phases. These results provide essential information for the refinement of intermolecular potential parameters for the water methane hydrophobic interaction in clathrate hydrates and related dense structures.

Tulk, Christopher A [ORNL; Klug, Dennis D [National Research Council of Canada; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio F [ORNL; Karotsis, Georgios [ORNL; Guthrie, Malcolm [Carnegie Institution of Washington; Molaison, Jamie J [ORNL; Pradhan, Neelam [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Review of Literature on Terminal Box Control, Occupancy Sensing Technology and Multi-zone Demand Control Ventilation (DCV)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents an overall review of the standard requirement, the terminal box control, occupancy sensing technology and DCV. There is system-specific guidance for single-zone systems, but DCV application guidance for multi-zone variable air volume (VAV) systems is not available. No real-world implementation case studies have been found using the CO2-based DCV. The review results also show that the constant minimum air flow set point causes excessive fan power consumption and potential simultaneous heating and cooling. Occupancy-based control (OBC) is needed for the terminal box in order to achieve deep energy savings. Key to OBC is a technology for sensing the actual occupancy of the zone served in real time. Several technologies show promise, but none currently fully meets the need with adequate accuracy and sufficiently low cost.

Liu, Guopeng; Dasu, Aravind R.; Zhang, Jian

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Appendices of an appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings in Colorado. Section E. Glenwood Springs  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The State Highway Department Buildings in Glenwood Springs have been evaluated in this appraisal for the use of geothermal energy in state-owned buildings. Glenwood Springs is the location of surface hot springs and has been assessed by various parties for several geothermal applications. The Glenwood Highway Department Buildings consist of an office building and a maintenance garage. These two building140 gpm. currently use an array of natural gas forced air furnaces and electric heaters for space/heating purpose; a propane unit is used for one water heater. Retrofit engineering for geothermal heating is based upon a central plate-in-frame heat exchanger coupled to several fan coil heaters and unit heaters. Design heating can be accomplished with 150/sup 0/F geothermal water at 140 gpm. The geothermal energy economics are evaluated for a single deep well, with and without a proration of the total production well cost for the required 140 gpm out of the 1000 gpm production capacity. Only the prorated well cost option provides an economically feasible geothermal system. The feasibility, therefore, depends on the use of the excess geothermal water by private or municipal facilities. The principal institutional/environmental issue for a geothermal heating sytem for the Highway Department Buildings is the question of whether or not the states owns the geothermal rights on the state property.

Meyer, R.T.; Coe, B.A.; Dick, J.D.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

National spent fuel program preliminary report RCRA characteristics of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel DOE-SNF-REP-002. Revision 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report presents information on the preliminary process knowledge to be used in characterizing all Department of Energy (DOE)-owned Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) types that potentially exhibit a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) characteristic. This report also includes the process knowledge, analyses, and rationale used to preliminarily exclude certain SNF types from RCRA regulation under 40 CFR {section}261.4(a)(4), ``Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste,`` as special nuclear and byproduct material. The evaluations and analyses detailed herein have been undertaken as a proactive approach. In the event that DOE-owned SNF is determined to be a RCRA solid waste, this report provides general direction for each site regarding further characterization efforts. The intent of this report is also to define the path forward to be taken for further evaluation of specific SNF types and a recommended position to be negotiated and established with regional and state regulators throughout the DOE Complex regarding the RCRA-related policy issues.

NONE

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

DOE-STD-1160-2003; Occupational Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

03 03 March 2003 DOE STANDARD OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Defense Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE This document has been reproduced directly from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1160-2003 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy managers

396

Occupational Safety and Health Program at the West Valley Demonstration Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The West Valley Nuclear Services Co. LLC (WVNS) is committed to provide a safe, clean, working environment for employees, and to implement U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements affecting worker safety. The West Valley Demonstration Project (WVDP) Occupational Safety and Health Program is designed to protect the safety, health, and well-being of WVDP employees by identifying, evaluating, and controlling biological, chemical, and physical hazards in the work place. Hazards are controlled within the requirements set forth in the reference section at the end of this report. It is the intent of the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program to assure that each employee is provided with a safe and healthy work environment. This report shows the logical path toward ensuring employee safety in planning work at the WVDP. In general, planning work to be performed safely includes: combining requirements from specific programs such as occupational safety, industrial hygiene, radiological control, nuclear safety, fire safety, environmental protection, etc.; including WVDP employees in the safety decision-making processes; pre-planning using safety support re-sources; and integrating the safety processes into the work instructions. Safety management principles help to define the path forward for the WVDP Occupational Safety and Health Program. Roles, responsibilities, and authority of personnel stem from these ideals. WVNS and its subcontractors are guided by the following fundamental safety management principles: ''Protection of the environment, workers, and the public is the highest priority. The safety and well-being of our employees, the public, and the environment must never be compromised in the aggressive pursuit of results and accomplishment of work product. A graded approach to environment, safety, and health in design, construction, operation, maintenance, and deactivation is incorporated to ensure the protection of the workers, the public, and the environment.'' These principles are demonstrated through: Conducting all activities in an atmosphere of trust and confidence based on open, honest, and responsive communication. Using innovative and effective approaches to risk identification and management. Applying a systematic approach to planning and execution of all activities that affect the environment, safety, and health through use of the Integrated Environment, Safety, and Health Management System. Holding line management fully accountable to effectively plan and integrate environment, safety, and health activities into field activities. Providing clear policy and direction on environment, safety, and health issues to guide field work. Encouraging and promoting the sharing of environment, safety, and health information and resources. Empowering employees through training, information, tools, and program involvement to effectively protect themselves and the environment. Ensuring it is every employees' responsibility to identify and report potential safety and health hazards and environmental noncompliance. Together, as a team, we accomplish our mission while protecting the environment and preserving the safety and health of each employee and the public.

L. M. Calderon

1999-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

397

Potential dose distributions at proposed surface radioactvity clearance levels resulting from occupational scenarios.  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this report is to evaluate the potential dose distribution resulting from surface radioactivity, using occupational radiation exposure scenarios. The surface radioactivity clearance values considered in this analysis may ultimately replace those currently specified in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) requirements and guidance for radiological protection of workers, the public and the environment. The surface contamination values apply to radioactive contamination deposited on a surface (i.e., not incorporated into the interior of the material). For these calculations, the dose coefficients for intake of radionuclides were taken from ICRP Publication 68 (ICRP 1994), and external exposure dose coefficients were taken from the compact disc (CD) that accompanied Federal Guidance Report (FGR) 13 (Eckerman et al. 1999). The ICRP Publication 68 dose coefficients were based on ICRP Publication 60 (ICRP 1990) and were used specifically for worker dose calculations. The calculated dose in this analysis is the 'effective dose' (ED), rather than the 'effective dose equivalent' (EDE).

Kamboj, S.; Yu, C.; Rabovsky, J. (Environmental Science Division); (USDOE)

2011-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

398

Occupational Radiation Exposure at Commercial Nuclear Power Reactors and Other Facilities 2008  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 2008 annual reports submitted by five of the seven categories1 of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. The annual reports submitted by these licensees consist of radiation exposure records for each monitored individual. These records are analyzed for trends and presented in this report in terms of collective dose and the distribution of dose among the monitored individuals. Because there are no geologic repositories for high-level waste currently licensed and no low-level waste disposal facilities in operation, only five categories will be considered in this report.

U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Assessing risks from occupational exposure to low-level radiation: The statistician's role  

SciTech Connect

Currently, several epidemiological studies of workers who have been exposed occupationally to radiation are being conducted. These include workers in the United States, Great Britain, and Canada, involved in the production of both defense materials and nuclear power. A major reason for conducting these studies is to evaluate possible adverse health effects that may have resulted because of the radiation exposure received. The general subject of health effects resulting from low levels of radiation, including these worker studies, has attracted the attention of various news media, and has been the subject of considerable controversy. These studies provide a good illustration of certain other aspects of the statistician's role; namely, communication and adequate subject matter knowledge. A competent technical job is not sufficient if these other aspects are not fulfilled.

Gilbert, E.S.

1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

28-2008 28-2008 December 2008 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN PLUTONIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-STD-1128-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1128-2008 iii Foreword This Technical Standard does not contain any new requirements. Its purpose is to provide a guide to good practice, update existing reference material, and discuss practical lessons learned relevant to the safe handling of plutonium. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) health physicists may adapt

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

STD-1128-2008 STD-1128-2008 December 2008 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN PLUTONIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Not Measurement Sensitive DOE-STD-1128-2008 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Site at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1128-2008 iii Foreword This Technical Standard does not contain any new requirements. Its purpose is to provide a guide to good practice, update existing reference material, and discuss practical lessons learned relevant to the safe handling of plutonium. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) health physicists may adapt

402

Peace and Conflict Studies (PACS) Essay Contest --$500 Scholarship to the Winner! Inspired by her own survival of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, BGSU alumnus Ms.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

own survival of the dropping of an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, BGSU alumnus Ms. Hiroko Nakamoto has threat of nuclear weapons in our world in a lecture entitled: "Nuclear Alarmism from Hiroshima to Al

Moore, Paul A.

403

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ownership question. FERC Decides…Or Does It? In 2003,utilities led to a petition to FERC to issue a declaratoryto Section 210 of PURPA. FERC declared that avoided cost

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

A Wholly Owned Subsidiary of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This Environmental Report (ER) constitutes one portion of an application being submitted by International Isotopes Fluorine Products (IIFP) to construct and operate a facility that will utilize depleted DUF6 to produce high purity inorganic fluorides, uranium oxides, and anhydrous hydrofluoric acid. The proposed IIFP facility will be located near Hobbs, New Mexico. IIFP has prepared the ER to meet the requirements specified in 10 CFR 51, Subpart A, particularly those requirements set forth in 10 CFR 51.45(b)-(e). The organization of this ER is generally consistent with NUREG-1748, “Environmental Review Guidance for Licensing Actions Associated with NMSS Programs, Final Report.” The Environmental Report for this proposed facility provides information that is specifically required by the NRC to assist it in meeting its obligations under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and the agency’s NEPA-implementing regulations. This ER demonstrates that the environmental protection measures proposed by IIFP are adequate to protect both the environment and the health and safety of the public. This Environmental Report evaluates the potential environmental impacts of the Proposed Action and its reasonable alternatives. This ER also describes the environment potentially affected by IIEF’s proposal,

Revision A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy and capacity. Utilities also argue that they and their ratepayers are already paying above-market pricesenergy. QFs answer that although many QF contracts have turned out to be expensive relative to market prices,

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Who Owns Renewable Energy Certificates?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from fossil-fuel fired cogeneration is priced the same asFERC noted that “…cogeneration facilities, to receive QFis a pre-requisite to a cogeneration facility’s achieving QF

Holt, Edward; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A field demonstration of energy conservation using occupancy sensor lighting control in equipment rooms  

SciTech Connect

The Pacific Northwest Laboratory identified energy savings potential of automatic equipment-room lighting controls, which was demonstrated by the field experiment described in this report. Occupancy sensor applications have gained popularity in recent years due to improved technology that enhances reliability and reduces cost. Automatic lighting control using occupancy sensors has been accepted as an energy-conservation measure because it reduces wasted lighting. This study focused on lighting control for equipment rooms, which have inherent conditions ideal for automatic lighting control, i.e., an area which is seldom occupied, multiple users of the area who would not know if others are in the room when they leave, and high lighting energy intensity in the area. Two rooms were selected for this study: a small equipment room in the basement of the 337 Building, and a large equipment area in the upper level of the 329 Building. The rooms were selected to demonstrate the various degrees of complexity which may be encountered in equipment rooms throughout the Hanford Site. The 337 Building equipment-room test case demonstrated a 97% reduction in lighting energy consumption, with an annual energy savings of $184. Including lamp-replacement savings, a total savings of $306 per year is offset by an initial installation cost of $1,100. The installation demonstrates a positive net present value of $2,858 when the lamp-replacement costs are included in a life-cycle analysis. This also corresponds to a 4.0-year payback period. The 329 Building equipment-room installation resulted in a 92% reduction in lighting energy consumption. This corresponds to annual energy savings of $1,372, and a total annual savings of $2,104 per year including lamp-replacement savings. The life-cycle cost analysis shows a net present value of $15,855, with a 5.8-year payback period.

Dagle, J.E.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Dose received by occupationally exposed workers at a nuclear medicine department  

SciTech Connect

Personal Dose Equivalent (PDE) values were determined for occupational exposed workers (OEW) at the Nuclear Medicine Department (NMD) of 'Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia' (INCan), Mexico, using TLD-100 thermoluminescent dosemeters. OEW at NMD, INCan make use of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Radionuclides associated to a pharmaceutical compound used at this Department are {sup 131}I, {sup 18}F, {sup 68}Ga, {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 111}In and {sup 11}C with main gamma emission energies between 140 and 511 keV. Dosemeter calibration was performed at the metrology department of 'Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares' (ININ), Mexico. Every occupational worker used dark containers with three dosimeters which were replaced monthly for a total of 5 periods. Additionally, control dosemeters were also placed at a site free of radioactive sources in order to determine the background radiation. Results were adjusted to find PDE/day and estimating annual PDE values in the range between 2 mSv (background) and 9 mSv. The mean annual value is 3.51 mSv and the standard deviation SD is 0.78 mSv. Four of the 16 OEW received annual doses higher than the average +1 SD (4.29 mSv). Results depend on OEW daily activities and were consistent for each OEW for the 5 studied periods as well as with PDE values reported by the firm that performs the monthly service. All obtained values are well within the established annual OEW dose limit stated in the {sup R}eglamento General de Seguridad Radiologica{sup ,} Mexico (50 mSv), as well as within the lower limit recommended by the 'International Commission on Radiation Protection' (ICRP), report no.60 (20 mSv). These results verify the adequate compliance of the NMD at INCan, Mexico with the norms given by the national regulatory commission.

Avila, O.; Sanchez-Uribe, N. A.; Rodriguez-Laguna, A.; Medina, L. A.; Estrada, E.; Buenfil, A. E.; Brandan, M. E. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, AP 18-1027, 11801, DF (Mexico) and Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 70-542, 04510, DF (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico) and Unidad de Investigacion Biomedica en Cancer INCan-UNAM, Av. San Fernando No.22 C.P. 4080 (Mexico); Instituto Nacional de Cancerologia (INCan), Av. San Fernando No.22, C.P. 14080 (Mexico); Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, AP 20-364, 01000 DF (Mexico)

2012-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

409

Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedure 24.01.01.X1.10 Fire Safety for State-Owned Residences Page 1 of 2 Texas AgriLife Extension Service Procedures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is tested by Plant Engineering in accordance with NFPA 110. Appendix A: Lightning Protection Calculations stroke frequency from NFPA 780 2006 appendix L. These calculations are included in Appendix A of this FHA of the occupants during egress, the stairways are required to be 1-hour fire rated enclosures by the NFPA Life

410

Independent Oversight Review of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Medicine Programs from June 1998 to December 1999  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Executive Summary Executive Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Oversight performed a two-phased review of eight Departmental contractor occupational medicine programs. The first phase of the review was completed in September 1998 and the second phase in December 1999. To conduct the review, Oversight teamed with the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), a non-profit accreditation organization for health-care facilities. The Office of Oversight's interim report on the three sites covered in the initial phase revealed that some contractor occupational medicine programs were not implementing several important DOE policies and requirements. The most significant issue concerned the comprehensiveness of medical surveillance programs. Other issues included poorly defined and marginally implemented quality management and

411

DOE-STD-1136-2004; Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1136-2004 December 2004 DOE STANDARD GUIDE OF GOOD PRACTICES FOR OCCUPATIONAL RADIOLOGICAL PROTECTION IN URANIUM FACILITIES U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U. S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4373, fax (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U. S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-600 DOE-STD-1136-2004 Guide of Good Practices for Occupational Radiological Protection in Uranium Facilities

412

Screening values for Non-Carcinogenic Hanford Waste Tank Vapor Chemicals that Lack Established Occupational Exposure Limits  

SciTech Connect

Over 1,500 different volatile chemicals have been reported in the headspaces of tanks used to store high-level radioactive waste at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Site. Concern about potential exposure of tank farm workers to these chemicals has prompted efforts to evaluate their toxicity, identify chemicals that pose the greatest risk, and incorporate that information into the tank farms industrial hygiene worker protection program. Established occupation exposure limits for individual chemicals and petroleum hydrocarbon mixtures have been used elsewhere to evaluate about 900 of the chemicals. In this report headspace concentration screening values were established for the remaining 600 chemicals using available industrial hygiene and toxicological data. Screening values were intended to be more than an order of magnitude below concentrations that may cause adverse health effects in workers, assuming a 40-hour/week occupational exposure. Screening values were compared to the maximum reported headspace concentrations.

Poet, Torka S.; Mast, Terryl J.; Huckaby, James L.

2006-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

413

Independent Oversight Review of Department of Energy Contractor Occupational Medicine Programs from June 1998 to December 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Summary The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Oversight performed a two-phased review of eight Departmental contractor occupational medicine programs. The first phase of the review was completed in September 1998 and the second phase in December 1999. To conduct the review, Oversight teamed with the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC), a non-profit accreditation organization for health-care facilities. The Office of Oversight's interim report on the three sites covered in the initial phase revealed that some contractor occupational medicine programs were not implementing several important DOE policies and requirements. The most significant issue concerned the comprehensiveness of medical surveillance programs. Other issues included poorly defined and marginally implemented quality management and

414

Dopamine transporter occupancy by RTI-55, inhibition of dopamine transport and stimulation of locomotor activity  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cocaine analogs such as RTI-55 (or {beta}CIT) with a higher affinity for the DAT are potentially useful as therapeutic drugs in cocaine abuse as well as for radiopharmaceutical use. Previously we showed that in mice RTI-55 (2 mg/Kg, i/p) reduced H-3 cocaine striatum-to-cerebellum ratios (St/Cb, {lg_bullet}) from 1.6 to 1.2 at 3 h after administration, with recovery by 12 h. In the present study we demonstrate a very similar time-course for transport {triangle} measured in striatal homo within 2 min of sacrifice. The maximum inhibition of uptake at about 1 h corresponded to about 80% of the control uptake rate, similar to the percent reduction in St/Cb. The time-course of the effect of this dose of RTI-55 on locomotor activity ({sq_bullet}) was complex, with a drop in the activity measure at 7 h, after a further injection of RTI-55, but activity remained higher than in saline controls. In spite of this complexity, which may be associated with stereotypies and/or exhaustion, the duration of increased activity is consistent with the duration of transporter blockade. These experiments support the notion that PET/SPECT measures of transporter occupancy accurately reflect transporter inhibition.

Gatley, S.J.; Gifford, A.N.; Volkow, N.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)] [and others

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Occupational radiation exposure history of Idaho Field Office Operations at the INEL  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An extensive review has been made of the occupational radiation exposure records of workers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) over the period of 1951 through 1990. The focus has been on workers employed by contractors and employees of the Idaho Field Operations Office (ID) of the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) and does not include the Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), or other operations field offices at the INEL. The radiation protection guides have decreased from 15 rem/year to 5 rem/year in 1990 for whole body penetrating radiation exposure. During these 40 years of nuclear operations (in excess of 200,000 man-years of work), a total of twelve individuals involved in four accidents exceeded the annual guidelines for exposure; nine of these exposures were received during life saving efforts on January 3, 1961 following the SL-1 reactor accident which killed three military personnel. These exposures ranged from 8 to 27 rem. Only one individual has exceeded the annual whole body penetrating radiation protection guidelines in the last 29 years.

Horan, J.R.; Braun, J.B.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Occupational health and environment research 1983: Health, Safety, and Environment Division. Progress report  

SciTech Connect

The primary responsibility of the Health, Safety, and Environment (HSE) Division at the Los Alamos National Laboratory is to provide comprehensive occupational health and safety programs, waste processing, and environmental protection. These activities are designed to protect the workers, the public, and the environment. Evaluation of respiratory protective equipment included the XM-30 and M17A1 military masks, use of MAG-1 spectacles in respirators, and eight self-contained units. The latter units were used in an evaluation of test procedures used for Bureau of Mines approval of breathing apparatuses. Analyses of air samples from field studies of a modified in situ oil shale retorting facility were performed for total cyclohexane extractables and selected polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. Aerosols generation and characterization of effluents from oil shale processing were continued as part of an inhalation toxicology study. Additional data on plutonium excretion in urine are presented and point up problems in using the Langham equation to predict plutonium deposition in the body from long-term excretion data. Environmental surveillance at Los Alamos during 1983 showed the highest estimated radiation dose from Laboratory operations to be about 26% of the natural background radiation dose. Several studies on radionuclides and their transport in the Los Alamos environment are described. The chemical quality of surface and ground water near the geothermal hot dry rock facility is described. Short- and long-term consequences to man from releases of radionuclides into the environment can be simulated by the BIOTRAN computer model, which is discussed brirfly.

Voelz, G.L. (comp.)

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory, September 2011  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Review of the Review of the Occupational Radiation Protection Program as Implemented and Recently Enhanced at the Idaho National Laboratory May 2011 September 2011 Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Office of Health, Safety and Security U.S. Department of Energy Table of Contents 1.0 Purpose ........................................................................................................................1 2.0 Background .................................................................................................................1 3.0 Scope ...........................................................................................................................2 4.0 Results .........................................................................................................................2

418

Occupational Health and Safety Annual Report 2001: Injury and Illness Among the Electric Energy Workforce, 1995 - 2000  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has established an ongoing health and safety database designed to provide more precise and detailed information about workplace injury and illness among the electric energy workforce than is available from other sources. This health and safety database provides the capability for epidemiologic monitoring, ongoing injury/illness reporting, occupational health and safety research, and program evaluation. This report summarizes injury/illness trends over the period 1995-2000 from eight participating co...

2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

419

DOE 2011 Occupational Radiation Exposure report, _Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security. December 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses radiation protection and dose reporting requirements, presents the 2011 occupational radiation dose data along with trends over the past 5 years, and provides instructions to submit successful as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) projects.

Derek Hagemeyer, Yolanda McCormick

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

420

Occupant-in-Place Energy Efficiency Retrofit in a Group Home for 30% Energy Savings in Climate Zone 4  

SciTech Connect

Energy efficiency retrofits (EERs) face many challenges on the path to scalability. Limited budgets, cost effectiveness, risk factors, and accessibility impact the type and the extent of measures that can be implemented feasibly to achieve energy savings goals. Group home retrofits can face additional challenges than those in single family homes - such as reduced access (occupant-in-place restrictions) and lack of incentives for occupant behavioral change. This project studies the specification, implementation, and energy savings from an EER in a group home, with an energy savings goal of 30%. This short term test report chronicles the retrofit measures specified, their projected cost-effectiveness using building energy simulations, and the short term test results that were used to characterize pre-retrofit and post-retrofit conditions. Additionally, the final report for the project will include analysis of pre- and post-retrofit performance data on whole building energy use, and an assessment of the energy impact of occupant interface with the building (i.e., window operation). Ultimately, the study's results will be used to identify cost effective EER measures that can be implemented in group homes, given constraints that are characteristic of these buildings. Results will also point towards opportunities for future energy savings.

Moore, M.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

doi:10.1155/2012/597306 Review Article Occupational Asthma: New Low-Molecular-Weight Causal Agents, 2000–2010  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 2012 J. A. Pralong et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. Background. More than 400 agents have been documented as causing occupational asthma (OA). The list of low-molecular-weight (LMW) agents that have been identified as potential causes of OA is constantly expanding, emphasizing the need to continually update our knowledge by reviewing the literature. Objective. The objective of this paper was to identify all new LMW agents causing occupational asthma reported during the period 2000–2010. Methods. A Medline search was performed using the keywords occupational asthma, new allergens, new causes, and low-molecular-weight agents. Results. We found 39 publications describing 41 new LMW causal agents, which belonged to the following categories: drugs (n = 12), wood dust (n = 11), chemicals (n = 8), metals (n = 4), biocides (n = 3), and miscellaneous (n = 3). The diagnosis of OA was confirmed through SIC for 35 of 41 agents, peak expiratory flow monitoring for three (3) agents, and the clinical history alone for three (3) agents. Immunological tests provided evidence supporting an IgE-mediated mechanism for eight (8) (20%) of the newly described agents. Conclusion. This paper highlights the importance of being alert to the occurrence of new LMW sensitizers, which can elicit OA. The immunological mechanism is explained by a type I hypersensitivity reaction in 20 % of all newly described LMW agents. 1.

J. A. Pralong; A. Cartier; M. Labrecque

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Occupational Risk Consequences of the Department of Energy's Approach to Repository Design, Performance Assessment, and Operation in the Yucca Mountain License Application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

EPRI has discovered several aspects of the U.S Department of Energy (DOE) proposed design and operation of the Yucca Mountain repository thatif implemented as described in the license application (LA)could result in unnecessary occupational health and safety risk to workers involved with repository-related activities. This report identifies key DOE conservatisms and focuses on the occupational risk consequences of the DOE's approach to the repository design, performance assessment, and operation.

2008-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

423

Community-Owned wind power development: The challenge of applying the European model in the United States, and how states are addressing that challenge  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Local farmers, towns, schools, and individual investors are, however, beginning to invest in wind power. With the help of state policy and clean energy fund support, new federal incentives, and creative local wind developers who have devised ownership structures that maximize the value of both state and federal support, community wind power is beginning to take a foothold in parts of the US, in particular the upper Midwest. The purpose of this report is to describe that foothold, as well as the state support that helped to create it. There are a number of reasons why states are becoming increasingly interested in community wind power. In rural Midwestern states such as Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois, community wind is seen as a way to help supplement and stabilize farmer income, and thereby contribute to the preservation of farming communities and the rural landscapes and values they create. In the Northeast, densely populated states such as Massachusetts are turning to community-scale wind development to increase not only the amount of wind power on the grid, but also the public's knowledge, perception, and acceptance of wind power. In still other areas--such as the Pacific Northwest, which is already home to several large wind farms--states are simply responding to strong interest from local constituents who see community wind power as a way to take responsibility for, and mitigate the environmental impact of, electricity generation. But what exactly is ''community wind power''? Definitions vary widely, ranging from behind-the-meter installations to the Danish wind ''cooperatives'' to wind projects owned by municipal utilities. Possible defining criteria include: project size (small vs. large projects); purpose (to offset end-use power consumption vs. to sell power to the grid); ownership (single local vs. multiple local vs. municipal utility vs. commercial owners); and interconnection (behind the meter vs. to the distribution grid vs. to the transmission grid). For the purposes of this report, ''community wind'' is defined as locally owned utility-scale wind development, on either the customer or utility side of the meter. This definition accommodates projects of various sizes (e.g., ranging from single utility-scale turbine installations at Iowa schools all the way up to the 100 MW Trimont project in Minnesota), single or multiple local owners, and perhaps even municipal utilities. In this report, however, municipal utility projects will only be mentioned if specifically funded by a state clean energy fund. Within the confines of this definition, this report first describes state support for, and the status of, community wind in the upper Midwest, including Minnesota, Wisconsin, Iowa, and Illinois. The focus then shifts to the Northeast, where Massachusetts and, to a lesser extent, New York have recently funded community wind initiatives. The report concludes in the western US by briefly describing community wind-related work just getting underway in Oregon and Washington, as well as a few isolated projects in California, Idaho, and on tribal lands.

Bolinger, Mark

2004-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

424

Update to Assessment of Direct Disposal in Unsaturated Tuff of Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Owned by U.S. Department of Energy  

SciTech Connect

The overall purpose of this study is to provide information and guidance to the Office of Environmental Management of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) about the level of characterization necessary to dispose of DOE-owned spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The disposal option modeled was codisposal of DOE SNF with defense high-level waste (DHLW). A specific goal was to demonstrate the influence of DOE SNF, expected to be minor, in a predominately commercial repository using modeling conditions similar to those currently assumed by the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). A performance assessment (PA) was chosen as the method of analysis. The performance metric for this analysis (referred to as the 1997 PA) was dose to an individual; the time period of interest was 100,000 yr. Results indicated that cumulative releases of 99Tc and 237Np (primary contributors to human dose) from commercial SNF exceed those of DOE SNF both on a per MTHM and per package basis. Thus, if commercial SNF can meet regulatory performance criteria for dose to an individual, then the DOE SNF can also meet the criteria. This result is due in large part to lower burnup of the DOE SNF (less time for irradiation) and to the DOE SNF's small percentage of the total activity (1.5%) and mass (3.8%) of waste in the potential repository. Consistent with the analyses performed for the YMP, the 1997 PA assumed all cladding as failed, which also contributed to the relatively poor performance of commercial SNF compared to DOE SNF.

P. D. Wheatley (INEEL POC); R. P. Rechard (SNL)

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Cost-effectiveness of freeway median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facility conversion to rail guideway transit  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many freeways in the United States contain median high occupancy vehicle (HOV) facilities. These facilities have been envisioned by some as reserved space for future rail guideway transit. This thesis examines the cost-effectiveness of converting a freeway median HOV lane into a guideway transit line. A full-cost model was developed to determine the cost effectiveness of converting an HOV lane into a rail transit line. The measure of cost-effectiveness used was the benefit-to-cost ratio. The full-cost model contained two cost categories (capital and operating costs) and two benefit categories (travel time and externality benefits). This fullcost model was adopted to conditions on the Katy Freeway in Houston Texas which served as a case study for this thesis. It was found that 29 percent of the person-miles of travel on the Katy Freeway under given conditions must utilize guideway transit for conversion to be cost-effective. It was also found that the model is sensitive to assumptions of the value of time, project soft costs (administrative, planning, and design costs) and the operating cost of the rail transit system. The model is also sensitive to assumptions regarding latent demand. It was concluded that conversion to rail guideway transit in the case study example is not cost-effective. It was reconunended that further investigation be taken into full-cost model components to allow more certain estimates of cost components. Also recommended was further consideration of the effects of latent demand on HOV to rail guideway transit conversions.

Best, Matthew Evans

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Controlling intake of uranium in the workplace: Applications of biokinetic modeling and occupational monitoring data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides methods for interpreting and applying occupational uranium monitoring data. The methods are based on current international radiation protection guidance, current information on the chemical toxicity of uranium, and best available biokinetic models for uranium. Emphasis is on air monitoring data and three types of bioassay data: the concentration of uranium in urine; the concentration of uranium in feces; and the externally measured content of uranium in the chest. Primary Reference guidance levels for prevention of chemical effects and limitation of radiation effects are selected based on a review of current scientific data and regulatory principles for setting standards. Generic investigation levels and immediate action levels are then defined in terms of these primary guidance levels. The generic investigation and immediate actions levels are stated in terms of radiation dose and concentration of uranium in the kidneys. These are not directly measurable quantities, but models can be used to relate the generic levels to the concentration of uranium in air, urine, or feces, or the total uranium activity in the chest. Default investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest are recommended for situations in which there is little information on the form of uranium taken into the body. Methods are prescribed also for deriving case-specific investigation and immediate action levels for uranium in air, urine, feces, and chest when there is sufficient information on the form of uranium to narrow the range of predictions of accumulation of uranium in the main target organs for uranium: kidneys for chemical effects and lungs for radiological effects. In addition, methods for using the information herein for alternative guidance levels, different from the ones selected for this report, are described.

Leggett, Richard Wayne [ORNL; Eckerman, Keith F [ORNL; McGinn, Wilson [ORNL; Meck, Dr. Robert A. [U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Dose Modeling Evaluations and Technical Support Document For the Authorized Limits Request for the DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area, Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Paducah, Kentucky  

SciTech Connect

Environmental assessments and remediation activities are being conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) at the Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant (PGDP), Paducah, Kentucky. The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), a DOE prime contractor, was contracted by the DOE Portsmouth/Paducah Project Office (DOE-PPPO) to conduct radiation dose modeling analyses and derive single radionuclide soil guidelines (soil guidelines) in support of the derivation of Authorized Limits (ALs) for 'DOE-Owned Property Outside the Limited Area' ('Property') at the PGDP. The ORISE evaluation specifically included the area identified by DOE restricted area postings (public use access restrictions) and areas licensed by DOE to the West Kentucky Wildlife Management Area (WKWMA). The licensed areas are available without restriction to the general public for a variety of (primarily) recreational uses. Relevant receptors impacting current and reasonably anticipated future use activities were evaluated. In support of soil guideline derivation, a Conceptual Site Model (CSM) was developed. The CSM listed radiation and contamination sources, release mechanisms, transport media, representative exposure pathways from residual radioactivity, and a total of three receptors (under present and future use scenarios). Plausible receptors included a Resident Farmer, Recreational User, and Wildlife Worker. single radionuclide soil guidelines (outputs specified by the software modeling code) were generated for three receptors and thirteen targeted radionuclides. These soil guidelines were based on satisfying the project dose constraints. For comparison, soil guidelines applicable to the basic radiation public dose limit of 100 mrem/yr were generated. Single radionuclide soil guidelines from the most limiting (restrictive) receptor based on a target dose constraint of 25 mrem/yr were then rounded and identified as the derived soil guidelines. An additional evaluation using the derived soil guidelines as inputs into the code was also performed to determine the maximum (peak) dose for all receptors. This report contains the technical basis in support of the DOE?s derivation of ALs for the 'Property.' A complete description of the methodology, including an assessment of the input parameters, model inputs, and results is provided in this report. This report also provides initial recommendations on applying the derived soil guidelines.

Boerner, A. J. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Maldonado, D. G. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program; Hansen, Tom [Ameriphysics, LLC (United States)

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

THE HALO OCCUPATION DISTRIBUTION OF X-RAY-BRIGHT ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: A COMPARISON WITH LUMINOUS QUASARS  

SciTech Connect

We perform halo occupation distribution (HOD) modeling of the projected two-point correlation function (2PCF) of high-redshift (z {approx} 1.2) X-ray-bright active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the XMM-COSMOS field measured by Allevato et al. The HOD parameterization is based on low-luminosity AGNs in cosmological simulations. At the median redshift of z {approx} 1.2, we derive a median mass of 1.02{sub -0.23}{sup +0.21} Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 13} h{sup -1} M{sub sun} for halos hosting central AGNs and an upper limit of {approx}10% on the AGN satellite fraction. Our modeling results indicate (at the 2.5{sigma} level) that X-ray AGNs reside in more massive halos compared to more bolometrically luminous, optically selected quasars at similar redshift. The modeling also yields constraints on the duty cycle of the X-ray AGN, and we find that at z {approx} 1.2 the average duration of the X-ray AGN phase is two orders of magnitude longer than that of the quasar phase. Our inferred mean occupation function of X-ray AGNs is similar to recent empirical measurements with a group catalog and suggests that AGN halo occupancy increases with increasing halo mass. We project the XMM-COSMOS 2PCF measurements to forecast the required survey parameters needed in future AGN clustering studies to enable higher precision HOD constraints and determinations of key physical parameters like the satellite fraction and duty cycle. We find that N {sup 2}/A {approx} 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 6} deg{sup -2} (with N the number of AGNs in a survey area of A deg{sup 2}) is sufficient to constrain the HOD parameters at the 10% level, which is easily achievable by upcoming and proposed X-ray surveys.

Richardson, Jonathan [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60605 (United States); Chatterjee, Suchetana; Myers, Adam D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82072 (United States); Zheng Zheng [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Hickox, Ryan, E-mail: jonathan.richardson@uchicago.edu, E-mail: schatte1@uwyo.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

429

Re-Assessing Green Building Performance: A Post Occupancy Evaluation of 22 GSA Buildings  

SciTech Connect

2nd report on the performance of GSA's sustainably designed buildings. The purpose of this study was to provide an overview of measured whole building performance as it compares to GSA and industry baselines. The PNNL research team found the data analysis illuminated strengths and weaknesses of individual buildings as well as the portfolio of buildings. This section includes summary data, observations that cross multiple performance metrics, discussion of lessons learned from this research, and opportunities for future research. The summary of annual data for each of the performance metrics is provided in Table 25. The data represent 1 year of measurements and are not associated with any specific design features or strategies. Where available, multiple years of data were examined and there were minimal significant differences between the years. Individually focused post occupancy evaluation (POEs) would allow for more detailed analysis of the buildings. Examining building performance over multiple years could potentially offer a useful diagnostic tool for identifying building operations that are in need of operational changes. Investigating what the connection is between the building performance and the design intent would offer potential design guidance and possible insight into building operation strategies. The 'aggregate operating cost' metric used in this study represents the costs that were available for developing a comparative industry baseline for office buildings. The costs include water utilities, energy utilities, general maintenance, grounds maintenance, waste and recycling, and janitorial costs. Three of the buildings that cost more than the baseline in Figure 45 have higher maintenance costs than the baseline, and one has higher energy costs. Given the volume of data collected and analyzed for this study, the inevitable request is for a simple answer with respect to sustainably designed building performance. As previously stated, compiling the individual building values into single metrics is not statistically valid given the small number of buildings, but it has been done to provide a cursory view of this portfolio of sustainably designed buildings. For all metrics except recycling cost per rentable square foot and CBE survey response rate, the averaged building performance was better than the baseline for the GSA buildings in this study.

Fowler, Kimberly M.; Rauch, Emily M.; Henderson, Jordan W.; Kora, Angela R.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Iron site occupancies in magnetite-ulvospinel solid solution: A new approach using XMCD  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordering of Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 2+} between octahedral (Oh) and tetrahedral (Td) sites in synthetic members of the magnetite (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}) - ulvoespinel (Fe{sub 2}TiO{sub 4}) solid-solution series was determined using Fe L{sub 2,3}-edge X-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD) coupled with electron microprobe and chemical analysis, Ti L-edge spectroscopy, Fe K-edge EXAFS and XANES, Fe{sub 57} Moessbauer spectroscopy, and unit cell parameters. Microprobe analysis, cell edges and chemical FeO determinations showed that the bulk compositions of the samples were stoichiometric magnetite-ulvoespinel solid-solutions. Surface sensitive XMCD showed that the surfaces of these oxide minerals were more sensitive to redox conditions and some samples required re-equilibration with suitable solid-solid buffers. Detailed site-occupancy analysis of these samples gave XMCD-Fe{sup 2+}/Fe{sup 3+} ratios very close to stoichiometric values. L{sub 2,3}-edge spectroscopy showed that Ti{sup 4+} was restricted to Oh sites. XMCD results showed that significant Fe{sup 2+} only entered Td when the Ti content was > 0.40 apfu while Fe{sup 2+} in Oh increased from 1 a.p.f.u in magnetite to a maximum of {approx}1.4 apfu in USP45. As the Ti content increased from this point, the steady increase in Fe{sup 2+} in Td sites was clearly observable in the XMCD spectra, concurrent with a slow decrease in Fe{sup 2+} in Oh sites. Calculated magnetic moments showed a steady decrease from magnetite (4.06 {mu}{sub B}) to USP45 (1.5 {mu}{sub B}) and then a slower decrease towards the value for ulvoespinel (0 {mu}{sub B}). Two of the synthesized samples were also partially maghemitized by re-equilibrating with an oxidizing Ni-NiO buffer and XMCD showed that Fe{sup 2+} oxidation only occurred at Oh sites, with concomitant vacancy formation restricted to this site. This study shows the advantage of using XMCD as a direct measurement of Fe oxidation state in these complex magnetic spinels. These results can be used to rationalize the magnetic properties of titanomagnetites, and their oxidized titanomaghemitized analogues, in Earth's crustal rocks.

Pearce, C. I.; Henderson, C. M. B.; Telling, N. D.; Pattrick, R. A.D.; Vaughan, D. J.; Charnock, J. M.; Arenholz, E.; Tuna, F.; Coker, V.S.; Laan, G. van der

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cancer and work in Canada with particular reference to occupational risk factors in breast cancer patients in one community and related selected research methods used to investigate those factors.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Cancer represents a major cause of human morbidity and mortality. There is no scientific consensus regarding cancer causality or prevention. Occupational exposure potentially remains a… (more)

Brophy, James Thomas

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Comparative pharmacokinetic study of the role of gender and developmental differences in occupational and environmental exposure to benzene. Master's thesis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is two-fold. First, it shows that physiological differences between men and women result in gender-specific exposures with respect to benzene. Second, it assesses the potential for a lactating woman's occupational and personal benzene exposure to impact a nursing infant's exposure, highlighting the possibility of subjecting an infant to the effects of industrial chemicals via breast feeding. This study employs physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to investigate the influence of physiological parameters and to evaluate the ability of inhaled benzene to transfer from mother to infant through breastmilk. The models are run through scenarios that simulate occupational, smoking, and background exposures. The gender comparison is facilitated by a sensitivity analysis. The blood/air partition coefficient and maximum velocity of metabolism were found to substantially impact model output. These values were both higher in women and caused an increase in the percentage of benzene metabolized in all of the exposure scenarios. The study of lactating women and infants is essentially theoretical. There is evidence that over 65% of an infant's benzene exposure can be attributed to contaminated breastmilk. A large portion of the ingested exposure can be eliminated by adjusting the mother's working or nursing schedule. Benzene, Physiologically based pharmacokinetics, PBPK.

Brown, E.A.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency: Preprint  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Progress on Enabling an Progress on Enabling an Interactive Conversation Between Commercial Building Occupants and Their Building To Improve Comfort and Energy Efficiency Preprint M. Schott, N. Long, J. Scheib, K. Fleming, K. Benne, and L. Brackney National Renewable Energy Laboratory To be presented at ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Pacific Grove, California August 12-17, 2012 Conference Paper NREL/CP-5500-55197 June 2012 NOTICE The submitted manuscript has been offered by an employee of the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC (Alliance), a contractor of the US Government under Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308. Accordingly, the US Government and Alliance retain a nonexclusive royalty-free license to publish or reproduce the published form of this contribution, or allow others to do so, for US Government purposes.

434

Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort (Brochure), Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility Integrated PEV Charging Solutions and Reduced Energy for Occupant Comfort Plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) offer the opportunity to shift transportation energy demands from petroleum to electricity, but broad adoption will require integration with other systems. While automotive experts work to reduce the cost of PEVs, fossil- fueled cars and trucks continue to burn hundreds of billions of gallons of petroleum each year-not only to get from point A to point B, but also to keep passengers comfortable with air condi- tioning and heat. At the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), three instal- lations form a research laboratory known as the Vehicle Testing and Integration Facility (VTIF). At the VTIF, engineers are develop-

435

Portsmouth DUF6 Conversion Final EIS - Chapter 6: Environmental and Occupational Safety and Health Permits and Compliance Requirements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Portsmouth DUF Portsmouth DUF 6 Conversion Final EIS 6 ENVIRONMENTAL AND OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH PERMITS AND COMPLIANCE REQUIREMENTS 6.1 DUF 6 CYLINDER MANAGEMENT AND CONSTRUCTION AND OPERATION OF A DUF 6 CONVERSION FACILITY DUF 6 cylinder management as well as construction and operation of the proposed DUF 6 conversion facility would be subject to many federal, state, and local requirements. In accordance with such legal requirements, a variety of permits, licenses, and other consents must be obtained. Table 6.1 at the end of this chapter lists those that may be needed. The status of each is indicated on the basis of currently available information. However, because the DUF 6 project is still at an early stage, the information in Table 6.1 should not be considered comprehensive or

436

Perceived and reported occupational stressors and coping strategies of selected community college business faculty members in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two primary purposes of this study were to explore and to identify the sources of occupational stressors and coping strategies perceived and reported by selected Texas community college faculty members and to generate current demographics about these faculty members that would be useful in understanding such stress. Another purpose of this study was to measure and to compare for possible relationships among stressors, coping strategies, and selected demographic characteristics. Participants who received a three-part survey questionnaire consisted of 90 community college faculty members who were members of either Texas Business and Technology Educators Association or the Accounting Section of the Texas Community College Teachers Association. Each participant was sent a survey questionnaire consisting of three sections. Sections I and II were used to gather data pertaining to the sources of occupational stressors and the coping strategies used by the participants. Section III was designed to request information concerning personal and professional demographic characteristics of each research participant. An analysis of the data was completed on all three sections. The major findings for the study indicated the following: 1. Community business teachers experienced high levels of stress from issues involving reward and recognition, time constraints, college/departmental influence, professional identity, and student interaction. 2. Community college business faculty members responded by identifying additional stressors, such as teaching inadequately prepared students to experiencing too heavy a teaching load. To relieve these stressors, these faculty members use coping strategies, such as talking to other persons about problems to experiencing nature. Based on the findings of this study, this researcher's recommendations include the following: 1. Community college districts should provide stress management training to their faculty, especially the new faculty, along with some clerical assistance for all faculty members, especially during the beginning and ending of a semester. 2. Community college administrators should encourage the establishment of wellness programs. 3. Community college faculty members should be encouraged to develop and to utilize effective coping strategies to reduce the negative effects of their stress.

Allison, Genevieve J.

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Vicious and Virtuous Cycles and the Role of External Non-government Actors in Community Forestry in Oaxaca and Michoacán, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National de Ecologia, Mexico City. Wade, R. (1988). VillageCambridge. World Bank (1995). Mexico Resource ConservationYates, P. L. (1981). Mexico’s Agricultural Dilemma.

Barsimantov, James A.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

DOE-STD-1128-98; Changes to DOE-STD-1128-98, "Guide for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Changes to DOE-STD-1128-98, "Guide for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Changes to DOE-STD-1128-98, "Guide for Occupational Radiological Protection in Plutonium Facilities Section/Page Change Cover Change "Metric" to "Not Measurement Sensitive". Throughout the document Change "the DOE Radiological Control Manual (RCM)" to "the DOE standard DOE- STD-1098-99, Radiological Control (RCS)". Change "RCM" to "RCS". Replace (DOE, 1993c) with (DOE, 1998a). Replace (DOE, 19941) with (DOE, 1999b). Delete reference to DOE Order 5700C, Quality Assurance. Replace ANSI N13.6-1989 (ANSI, 1996) with ANSI/HPS N13.6 (ANSI, 1999a). Change "ANSI N323-1993 (ANSI, 1993)" to "ANSI N323a (ANSI, 1997b)". Change "DOE Order 420.1 (DOE, 1995c)" to "Order 420.1A (DOE, 2002a)".

439

Radiation dose reconstruction US occupation forces in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan, 1945-1946. Final report 1 March-6 August 80  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Upper limit dose estimates (internal and external) are determined for those units of the U.S. occupation forces assigned to Hiroshima or Nagasaki following the detonations of atomic weapons in those two cities. In the absence of specific maneuver and patrol data, these dose estimates are based on the maximum recorded activity levels with exposure over the entire stay period for each unit. The upper limit external dose is .03 rem for Hiroshima and .08 rem for Nagasaki. For the Nishiyama area, the upper limit is 0.63 rem. The dose from internal emitters (inhalation and ingestion) is considerably less. There is no basis for assuming that any individual in the occupation units received these upper limit doses.

McRaney, W.; McGahan, J.

1980-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

440

Report on the EH special review of occupational safety and health programs for the Hanford high-level waste tanks  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report documents a review of the occupational safety and health programs currently in effect at the tank farms located at the Hanford Reservation in Washington State. The review was undertaken by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health (EH) at the request of the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) to determine whether issues important to worker safety and health have been properly identified, prioritized, and resolved. To carry out this task, four categories of safety and health activities were reviewed. The first category involved examination of management issues associated with the toxicity, flammability, and explosivity of gases and vapors generated by wastes. The second focused on waste tank characterization and technology programs that have been initiated at Hanford to identify, characterize and mitigate hazards associated with tanks generating hydrogen or containing ferrocyanides or organic compounds. The third evaluated worker safety and health programs necessary to support hazardous waste site operations it the tank farms. The fourth dealt with interim corrective actions currently in place, pending full implementation of site-specific safety and health programs to address waste vapor toxicity, flammability, and explosivity hazards.

Not Available

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Occupational Exposure Evaluation of Complex Vapor Mixtures at the Hanford Nuclear Waste Site, Washington Work-site Vapor Characterization  

SciTech Connect

Extensive sampling and analysis has been done over the years to characterize the radioactive and chemical properties of hazardous waste stored in 177 underground tanks at the Hanford site in eastern Washington State. The purpose of these analyses was to evaluate safety and environmental concerns related to tank stability. More recently, characterization studies have broadened to evaluate potential health hazards of chemical vapors at the ground surface, where workers perform maintenance and waste transfer activities. Chemical vapor emissions from underground hazardous waste storage tanks on the Hanford site are a potential concern because workers enter the tank farms on a regular basis for waste retrievals, equipment maintenance, and surveillance. The extensive sampling done during this campaign evaluated vapor concentrations of more than 100 different chemical at 70 sites in and around one section of the tank farms. Sampling identified only four vapors (ammonia, nitrous oxide, nitrosodimethylamine, and nitrosomethylethylamine) that were present above occupational exposure limits. These elevated concentrations were detected only at exhaust stacks and passive breather filter outlets. Beyond five feet from the sources, vapors disperse rapidly. No vapors were measured above 10% of their OELs more than five feet from the source. This suggests that vapor controls can be focused on limited hazard zones around sources. (authors)

Anderson, T. J. [CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc. / Environmental Health, P.O. Box 1000, S7-70, Richland, WA 99352 (United States)

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

Exergy and Energy analysis of a ground-source heat pump for domestic water heating under simulated occupancy conditions  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents detailed analysis of a water to water ground source heat pump (WW-GSHP) to provide all the hot water needs in a 345 m2 house located in DOE climate zone 4 (mixed-humid). The protocol for hot water use is based on the Building America Research Benchmark Definition (Hendron 2008; Hendron and Engebrecht 2010) which aims to capture the living habits of the average American household and its impact on energy consumption. The entire house was operated under simulated occupancy conditions. Detailed energy and exergy analysis provides a complete set of information on system efficiency and sources of irreversibility, the main cause of wasted energy. The WW-GSHP was sized at 5.275 kW (1.5-ton) for this house and supplied hot water to a 303 L (80 gal) water storage tank. The WW-GSHP shared the same ground loop with a 7.56 kW (2.1-ton) water to air ground source heat pump (WA-GSHP) which provided space conditioning needs to the entire house. Data, analyses, and measures of performance for the WW-GSHP in this paper complements the results of the WA-GSHP published in this journal (Ally, Munk et al. 2012). Understanding the performance of GSHPs is vital if the ground is to be used as a viable renewable energy resource.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Design, Construction, Transportation, Operation and Post-Occupancy Analysis for the Texas A&M Solar Decathlon House  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the design, construction, transportation, operation and post occupancy analysis of the 2007 Texas A&M Solar Decathlon House (TAMU SD house). The TAMU SD house was developed to be a modular house that could grow into varying configurations, yet be completely powered from the solar radiation that falls on the footprint of the structure. To accomplish this, the Texas A&M team designed and simulated varying designs using building energy simulation (DOE-2), solar thermal analysis (F-CHART), photovoltaic analysis (PV F-CHART), lighting analysis (Ecotect, RADIANCE, DAYSIM), and other engineering analysis procedures. After approval from the USDOE, the construction of the house then took place on the Texas A&M campus and the house was transported to Washington, D.C., where the construction was completed and the house was prepared for the competition. After the competition the house is now on display on-campus at the George Bush Presidential Library in College Station, TX.

Malhotra, M.; Ramirez, E.; Im, P.; Cho, S.; Canez, J.; Haberl, J.; Schaider, N.; Fisk, P.; Feigenbaum, L.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

The relative variational model - A topological view of matter and its properties: Space occupancy by the atoms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Formal definitions of convergence, connected-ness and continuity were established to characterize and describe the crystalline solid and its properties as a unified notion in the topological space. In this unified notion, physical and material properties are modeled by means of an intrinsic and invariable form function: the Relative Variational Model. The crystalline solid is assumed an empty space that has been filled with atoms and phonons, i.e., the crystal is built with packages of matter and energy in a regular and orderly repetitive pattern along three orthogonal dimensions of the space. The spatial occupation of the atom in the crystalline structure is determined by its mean vibrational volume, which also defines the lattice parameter or interatomic distance. However, as packages of vibrational energy, phonons can only exist as vibrations of atoms. Any variation of internal energy is in fact the discretized variations of phonon's population. These variations occur in the quantized modes of vibration, and therefore the balance between the frequency and amplitude of vibrations also is a dynamic variable. In this paper, the Relative Variational Model was applied to de-convolutions of frequency spectra of the inelastic neutron scatterings. Some dynamic aspects of atom vibration were presented and evaluated in support to the model's fundamentals. (authors)

Dias, M. S. [Center for Development of the Nuclear Technology - CDTN, National Commission for the Nuclear Energy - CNEN, PO Box: 941, 30.161-970, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); De Vasconcelos, V.; Mattos, J. R. L. [Center for Development of the Nuclear Technology - CDTN, National Commission for the Nuclear Energy - CNEN (Brazil); Jordao, E. [Chemistry Engineering Dept., Campinas State Univ., FEQ/ UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein, 500, 13083-852, Campinas, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Interplay between promoter occupancy and chromatin remodeling requirements in transactivation of the S.cerevisiae PHO5 gene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In higher eukaryotes, DNA is packaged with histones and other proteins into chromatin. While this is important in the control of unwanted gene expression, chromatin also serves as a barrier to many vital functions in the cell. Therefore, cells have evolved many different types of chromatin remodeling enzymes to contend with this inhibitory structure and enable gene expression and other functions. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PHO5 gene is triggered in response to phosphate starvation. In this study, I evaluate the chromatin remodeling requirements of this gene with respect to the multisubunit complexes SWI/SNF and SAGA. I show, for the first time, physical recruitment of SWI/SNF to the PHO5 promoter. I also demonstrate the role of promoter occupancy in influencing requirements for chromatin remodeling enzymes. Further, I describe various interactions between these two complexes at the PHO5 promoter. This study presents evidence for the first instance of excess recruitment of an ATP-dependent remodeler potentially compensating for the lack of a histone acetyltransferase.

Dhasarathy, Archana

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1992; Twenty-fifth annual report, Volume 14  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational radiation exposure information that has been reported to the NRC`s Radiation Exposure Information Reporting System (REIRS) by nuclear power facilities and certain other categories of NRC licensees during the years 1969 through 1992. The bulk of the data presented in the report was obtained from annual radiation exposure reports submitted in accordance with the requirements of 10CFR20.407 and the technical specifications of nuclear power plants. Data on workers terminating their employment at certain NRC licensed facilities were obtained from reports submitted pursuant to 10CFR20.408. The 1992 annual reports submitted by about 364 licensees indicated that approximately 204,365 individuals were monitored, 183,927 of whom were monitored by nuclear power facilities. They incurred an average individual dose of 0.16 rem (cSv) and an average measurable dose of about 0.30 (cSv). Termination radiation exposure reports were analyzed to reveal that about 74,566 individuals completed their employment with one or more of the 364 covered licensees during 1992. Some 71,846 of these individuals terminated from power reactor facilities, and about 9,724 of them were considered to be transient workers who received an average dose of 0.50 rem (cSv).

Raddatz, C.T. [US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Division of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act (EEOICPA) and Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) - Agency Roles/Programs for Assisting DOE Covered Workers, January 2014  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FWP FWP FWP UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Department of Energy (DOE) - Former Worker Medical Screening Program and Responsibilities under EEOICPA * Former Worker Medical Screening Program (FWP) FWP provides no-cost medical screenings to all former DOE Federal, contractor, and subcontractor employees. The screening focuses on the early detection of health conditions that may be related to occupational exposures such as beryllium, asbestos, radiation, silica, etc. * Medical screenings include a physical exam, hearing test,

448

This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) Occupational Outlook Handbook - http://www.bls.gov/oco (type in general term for career of interest) Alberta of NEGA Georgia Baptist Healthcare Southern Pipe and Supply Renda Broadcasting Teach for America

Arnold, Jonathan

449

This information describes typical occupations and employment settings associated with this major. Understand some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited to these options when choosing a possible career path.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems and construction; lighting design; analysis, specification and estimation of materials Designer Occupancy Planner Office Manager Project Designer Project Manager Residential Designer Sales. Understand some of these options may require additional training. Moreover, you are not limited

Arnold, Jonathan

450

How to Start Your Own Business  

enough money to get going. In this ar-ticle, the sixth in our Business Engineer-ing series, I’ll try to answer some of your questions about raising money for

451

Luminant restores pre-owned draglines  

SciTech Connect

Luminant, a Texas-based coal producer, brings two draglines back to life by moving and refurbishing them. 10 photos.

Donovan, A.

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

452

Own Use of Fuel - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

The process energy factors, Pi, are estimated from primary data on process energy use and fuel or feedstock output, at each stage. The conversion/loss factors, Ki ...

453

How to Start Your Own Business  

essential if you want a greater Say in how companies manage product de- ... and willing to make their facilities and their people available. The ...

454

Sun Microsystems: Integrating its Own Enterprise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rev. Rev. Gr. Units Rev. Rev. Gr. Sun HP IBM Compaq* 4 n.a.Computergram International, Sun Says Server Growth RemainsSun Microsystems case 8-10-99 Sun Microsystems: Integrating

Kraemer, Kenneth L.; Dedrick, Jason

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

How to build your own teaching apparatus  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Do?it?yourself apparatus for better physics teaching is now within the reach of many small departments. Developed at a dozen leading colleges and universities

456

Bring Your Own Device | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in the workplace. Beyond that, it's anyone's guess. Six months ago, during Hurricane Sandy, the Department of Energy, the Department of Homeland Security, and the Federal...

457

Occupational radiation exposure at commercial nuclear power reactors and other facilities 1996: Twenty-ninth annual report. Volume 18  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the occupational exposure data that are maintained in the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission`s (NRC) Radiation Exposure Information and Reporting System (REIRS). The bulk of the information contained in the report was compiled from the 1996 annual reports submitted by six of the seven categories of NRC licensees subject to the reporting requirements of 10 CFR 20.2206. Since there are no geologic repositories for high level waste currently licensed, only six categories will be considered in this report. Annual reports for 1996 were received from a total of 300 NRC licensees, of which 109 were operators of nuclear power reactors in commercial operation. Compilations of the reports submitted by the 300 licensees indicated that 138,310 individuals were monitored, 75,139 of whom received a measurable dose. The collective dose incurred by these individuals was 21,755 person-cSv (person-rem){sup 2} which represents a 13% decrease from the 1995 value. The number of workers receiving a measurable dose also decreased, resulting in the average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem) for 1996. The average measurable dose is defined to be the total collective dose (TEDE) divided by the number of workers receiving a measurable dose. These figures have been adjusted to account for transient reactor workers. Analyses of transient worker data indicate that 22,348 individuals completed work assignments at two or more licensees during the monitoring year. The dose distributions are adjusted each year to account for the duplicate reporting of transient workers by multiple licensees. In 1996, the average measurable dose calculated from reported was 0.24 cSv (rem). The corrected dose distribution resulted in an average measurable dose of 0.29 cSv (rem).

Thomas, M.L. [Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC (United States). Div. of Regulatory Applications; Hagemeyer, D. [Science Applications International Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

OCCUPATIONAL COOLING TOWERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HEALTH SCIENCES LIBRARY COOLING TOWERS EMPLOYEE HEALTH B C D F E CHILDREN'S ELEVATORS MEDICAL SCHOOL

Crews, Stephen

459

Occupant Emergency Plans  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

On this page is the collection of Emergency Procedures documents for the Department of Energy, Headquarters buildings, in the Washington, DC, metropolitan area.

460

Occupational Medicine Variance Request  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

it may not add value for a subcontractor medical provider to "review medical emergency response procedures included in site emergency and disaster preparedness plans." (Appendix...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "occupancy nongovernment owned" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

SRO : single room occupancy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

During August of 1996, I stayed in a series of SRO hotels in New York City leaving a book and diary behind when I checked out of each room. The books that were left in the rooms differ from one room to the other but all ...

Shimada, Taketo

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Occupational and Environmental History  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Management * Union * Toxicologist o Counselors - EAP, psychologistpsychiatr ist * Health educa1Drs o Ergonomist 1 Assessment of the * Formal structure and function -...

463

Interior Design Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Companies Historic Preservation Agencies Hospitals Interior Design Firms/Studios Hotel Chains Cost Estimator Architect Manufacturer's Representative Schools Television and Motion Picture Studios Theatres Utilities

Ronquist, Fredrik

464

Safety of Building Occupants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... systems have evolved in response to specific ... behavior, needs of emergency responders, or ... behavior during building emergencies, the Building ...

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

465

Criminology Sample Occupations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration Office Of inspectOr General I Semiannual RepoRt I;OFFICe OF InSpeCtOr GenerAl I SemIAnnuAl repOrt #12; I AprIl 1--September 30, 2006 From the Inspector General a key strategic goal of the office of Inspector General (oIG) is to maximize value to the national

Ronquist, Fredrik

466

Building Occupant Safety Publications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... after the Iroquois Theater Fire (1906), the Rhoades Opera House Fire (1908 ... the use of refuge areas, and other active and passive fire protection ...

2013-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

467

Evaluation of S-101 course Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'' taught in Idaho Falls, Idaho, January 19--22, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, Supervisors' Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE'', (S-101) which was conducted January 19--22, 1993 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 covers examination results, and Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees' written comments, and Appendix B provides the evaluation form.

Wright, T.S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Evaluation of S-101 course ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE`` taught in Idaho Falls, Idaho, January 19--22, 1993  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes trainee evaluations for the Safety Training Section course, ``Supervisors` Orientation to Occupational Safety in DOE``, (S-101) which was conducted January 19--22, 1993 at Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, in Idaho Falls, Idaho. Sections 1.1 and 1.2 of this report summarize the quantitative course evaluations that trainees provided upon completion of the course. Section 2.0 covers examination results, and Section 3.0 presents recommendations for course improvement. Appendix A provides a transcript of the trainees` written comments, and Appendix B provides the evaluation form.

Wright, T.S.

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Program desk manual for occupational safety and health -- U.S. Department of Energy Richland Operations, Office of Environment Safety and Health  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The format of this manual is designed to make this valuable information easily accessible to the user as well as enjoyable to read. Each chapter contains common information such as Purpose, Scope, Policy and References, as well as information unique to the topic at hand. This manual can also be provided on a CD or Hanford Internet. Major topics include: Organization and program for operational safety; Occupational medicine; Construction and demolition; Material handling and storage; Hoisting and rigging; Explosives; Chemical hazards; Gas cylinders; Electrical; Boiler and pressure vessels; Industrial fire protection; Industrial hygiene; and Safety inspection checklist.

Musen, L.G.

1998-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

470

Systematic study of the effect of short range correlations on the occupation numbers of the shell model orbits in light nuclei  

SciTech Connect

The role of short range correlations on the depletion of the Fermi sea is studied in light nuclei. The short range correlations are considered in an approximate treatment allowing a systematic study of nuclei in the region 4{le}{ital A}{le}40. The natural orbital'' representation is used for the determination of the occupation probabilities of the shell model orbits of the ground-state wave function. The depletion of the nuclear Fermi sea appears to be, on the average, about 32%.

Lalazissis, G.A.; Massen, S.E.; Panos, C.P. (Department of Theoretical Physics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54006 Thessaloniki (Greece))

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

471

“Both Mom and Dad Should Go to Work so the Family Would Have More Money”: Children’s Attitudes Towards Occupational Gender Roles in the Village of Metztitlán, Mexico  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so the Family W oul d Have More Money”: Children’s Villagetheir dissatisfaction to the lack of money or boredom. Thewho wanted to “ make her own money and be self- sufficient”.

Milicevic, Zorana

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

List of certified energy auditors for the Federal Grant Program for schools and hospitals and for buildings owned by units of local government and public care institutions, and the Energy Conservation Assistance Act of 1979, a state loan program. [About 1500 persons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A list of approximately 1500 persons who are certified energy auditors for the Federal Grant Program for schools and hospitals and for buildings owned by units of local government and public care institutions and the Energy Conservation Assistance Act of 1979, a state loan program, is presented. Information on the auditors' employer type and experience is included.

Not Available

1980-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

473

A post-occupancy monitored evaluation of the dimmable lighting, automated shading, and underfloor air distribution system in The New York Times Building  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

23E 23E A Post-Occupancy Monitored Evaluation of the Dimmable Lighting, Automated Shading, and Underfloor Air Distribution System in The New York Times Building E.S. Lee, L.L. Fernandes, B. Coffey, A. McNeil, R. Clear Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory T. Webster, F. Bauman, D. Dickerhoff, D. Heinzerling, T. Hoyt University of California Berkeley Windows and Envelope Materials Group Building Technology and Urban Systems Department Environmental Energy Technologies Division January 2013 ! 2 Disclaimer This document was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. While this document is believed to contain correct information, neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor The Regents of the University of California, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty,

474

A strategic analysis study-based approach to integrated risk assessment: Occupational health risks from environmental restoration and waste management activities at Hanford  

SciTech Connect

The goal of environmental restoration and waste management activities is to reduce public health risks or to delay risks to the future when new technology will be available for improved cleanup solutions. Actions to remediate the wastes on the Hanford Site will entail risks to workers, the public, and the environment that do not currently exist. In some circumstances, remediation activities will create new exposure pathways that are not present without cleanup activities. In addition, cleanup actions will redistribute existing health risks over time and space, and will likely shift health risks to cleanup workers in the short term. This report describes an approach to occupational risk assessment based on the Hanford Strategic Analysis Study and illustrates the approach by comparing worker risks for two options for remediation of N/K fuels, a subcategory of unprocessed irradiated fuels at Hanford.

Mahaffey, J.A.; Doctor, P.G.; Buschbom, R.L.; Glantz, C.S.; Daling, P.M.; Sever, L.E.; Vargo, G.J. Jr.; Strachan, D.M. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Pajunen, A.L.; Hoyt, R.C.; Ludowise, J.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States))

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

8 Kerr Administration Building (541) 737-4085 www.oregonstate.edu/career One of the best sources for gathering information about what's happening in an occupation or an industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. What do you think of the experience I've had so far in terms of entering this field? 16. From your of the interview. NOTE: Always analyze the information you've gathered. Adjust your job search, resume, and career in this occupation? 11. What special advice would you give a person entering this field? 12. What types of training

Escher, Christine

476

A significantly joint effect between arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of urothelial carcinoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cigarette smoking, arsenic and occupational exposures are well-known risk factors for the development of urothelial carcinoma (UC). Therefore, the aim of this study is to investigate whether the effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures on risk of UC could be modified by genetic polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 2E1 and glutathione S-transferase omega. A hospital-based case-control study consisted of 520 histologically confirmed UC cases, and 520 age- and gender-matched cancer-free controls were carried out from September 1998 to December 2007. Genotyping of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 was determined by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Subjects with both of cigarette smoking and alcohol consumption have a significantly increased UC risk (odds ratio [OR] = 2.9; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.9-4.4). Significantly increased UC risks of 1.5 and 1.9 were found for study subjects with high arsenic exposure and those who have been exposed to two or more occupational exposures, respectively. A significantly increased UC risk of 3.9 was observed in study subjects with H2-H2 diplotype of GSTO1 and GSTO2. The significantly highest UC risk of 9.0 was found for those with all environmental risk factors of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and two or more risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2. Our findings suggest that a significantly joint effect of cigarette smoking, alcohol consumption, arsenic and occupational exposures and risk genotypes/diplotypes of CYP2E1, GSTO1 and GSTO2 on risk of UC was found.

Wang, Y.-H. [School of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Department of Urology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Yeh, S.-D. [Department of Urology, Taipei Medical University Hospital, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Shen, K.-H. [Department of Urology, Chi-Mei Medical Center, Tainan 710, Taiwan (China); Shen, Cheng-Huang [Department of Urology, Chiayi Christian Hospital, Chia-Yi 600, Taiwan (China); Juang, G.-D. [Division of Urology, Department of Surgery, Shin-Kong Wu Ho-Su Memorial Hospital, Taipei 111, Taiwan (China); Hsu, L.-I [Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Chiou, H.-Y., E-mail: hychiou@tmu.edu.t [School of Public Health, Taipei Medical University, Taipei 110, Taiwan (China); Chen, C.-J. [The Genomics Research Center, Academia Sinica, Taipei 115, Taiwan (China); Graduate Institute of Epidemiology, College of Public Health, National Taiwan University, Taipei 100, Taiwan (China)

2009-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

477

Work to save dose: contrasting effective dose rates from radon exposure in workplaces and residences against the backdrop of public and occupational limits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Office workers are exposed to radon while at work and at home. Though there has been a multitude of studies reporting the measurements of radon concentrations and potential lung and effective doses associated with radon and progeny exposure in homes, similar studies on the concentrations and subsequent effective dose rates in the non-mine workplaces are lacking. Additionally, there are few, if any, comparative analyses of radon exposures at more 'typical' workplace with residential exposures within the same county. The purposes of this study were to measure radon concentrations in office and residential spaces in the same county and explore the radiation dose implications. Sixty-five track-etch detectors were deployed in office spaces and 47 were deployed in residences, all within Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA. The sampling periods for these measurements were generally about three months. The measured concentrations were used to calculate and compare effective dose rates resulting from exposure while at work and at home. Results showed that full-time office workers receive on average about 8 times greater exposure at home than while in the office (2.3 mSv yr-! versus 0.3 mSv yr-!). The estimated effective dose rate for a more homebound person was about 3 mSv yr-!. Estimating effective doses from background radon exposure in the same county as Los Alamos National Laboratory, with thousands of'radiological workers,' highlights interesting contrasts in radiation protection standards that span public and occupational settings. For example, the effective dose rate from background radon exposure in unregulated office spaces ranged up to 1.1 mSv yr-!, which is similar to the 1 mSv yr-! threshold for regulation ofa 'radiological worker,' as defined in the Department of Energy regulations for occupational exposure. Additionally, the estimated average effective dose total of> 3 mSv yf! from radon background exposure in homes stands in contrast to the 0.1 mSv yr-! air pathway effective public dose limit regulated by the Environmental Protection Agency for radioactive air emissions.

Whicker, Jeffrey J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mcnaughton, Michael W [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Measured Performance and Analysis of Ground Source Heat Pumps for Space Conditioning and for Water Heating in a Low-Energy Test House Operated under Simulated Occupancy Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we present measured performance and efficiency metrics of Ground Source Heat Pumps (GSHPs) for space conditioning and for water heating connected to a horizontal ground heat exchanger (GHX) loop. The units were installed in a 345m2 (3700ft2) high-efficiency test house built with structural insulated panels (SIPs), operated under simulated occupancy conditions, and located in Oak Ridge, Tennessee (USA) in US Climate Zone 4 . The paper describes distinctive features of the building envelope, ground loop, and equipment, and provides detailed monthly performance of the GSHP system. Space conditioning needs of the house were completely satisfied by a nominal 2-ton (7.0 kW) water-to-air GSHP (WA-GSHP) unit with almost no auxiliary heat usage. Recommendations for further improvement through engineering design changes are identified. The comprehensive set of data and analyses demonstrate the feasibility and practicality of GSHPs in residential applications and their potential to help achieve source energy and greenhouse gas emission reduction targets set under the IECC 2012 Standard.

Ally, Moonis Raza [ORNL; Munk, Jeffrey D [ORNL; Baxter, Van D [ORNL; Gehl, Anthony C [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Go Green Fund (Saskatchewan, Canada) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Go Green Fund (Saskatchewan, Canada) Go Green Fund (Saskatchewan, Canada) Go Green Fund (Saskatchewan, Canada) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Developer Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Municipal/Public Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Utility Savings Category Alternative Fuel Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Buying & Making Electricity Water Home Weatherization Solar Wind Program Info State Saskatchewan Program Type Grant Program Provider Saskatchewan Ministry of the Environment The Go Green Fund is a financial commitment from the Government of Saskatchewan to assist Saskatchewan's people, communities, non-government organizations and businesses address the province's most important environmental issues. The Go Green Fund supports practical, cost-effective solutions delivered

480

Contaminants in Buildings and Occupied Spaces as Risk Factors forOccupant Symptoms in U.S. Office Buildings: Findings from the U.S. EPABASE Study  

SciTech Connect

Nonspecific building-related symptoms among occupants of modern office buildings worldwide are common and may be associated with important reductions in work performance, but their etiology remains uncertain. Most reported research into environmental risk factors for these symptoms has focused on ventilation system-related factors, dampness, and particle removal through filtration and cleaning, with relatively few studies of other potential sources of indoor contaminants. We analyzed data collected by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) from a representative sample of 100 large U.S. office buildings--the Building Assessment and Survey Evaluation (BASE) study--using multivariate-adjusted logistic regression models with generalized estimating equations. We estimated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between seven building-related symptom outcomes and a diverse set of potential indoor and outdoor sources for indoor pollutants. Although most of the investigated risk factors showed no apparent association with building-related symptoms, some interesting associations resulted. Increased prevalence of symptoms was associated with carpets older than one year (lower respiratory symptoms), non-carpeted floors (upper and lower respiratory symptoms), older furniture (eye and skin symptoms), infrequent vacuuming (upper respiratory, eye, and skin symptoms and headache), and masonry exterior walls (cough, eye symptoms, and fatigue/concentration difficulty). For the many potential risk factors assessed, almost none had been investigated previously, and many associations found here may have been by chance. Additional confirmatory research focused on risk factors initially identified here is needed, using more objective measures of health outcomes and risk factors or exposures.

Mendell, M.J.; Mirer, A.; Lei-Gomez, Q.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z