Sample records for obtain potentially sensitive

  1. U-017: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in HP MFP Digital Sending Software. A local user can obtain potentially sensitive information.

  2. U-163: PHP Command Parameter Bug Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information and Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in PHP. A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system.

  3. U-006:Cisco Network Admission Control Manager Directory Traversal Flaw Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    An unauthenticated attacker could exploit this vulnerability to access sensitive information, including password files and system logs, that could be leveraged to launch subsequent attacks.

  4. T-651: Blue Coat ProxySG Discloses Potentially Sensitive Information in Core Files

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in Blue Coat ProxySG. A local user can obtain potentially sensitive information

  5. U-053: Linux kexec Bugs Let Local and Remote Users Obtain Potentially...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    A remote user on the local network with the ability to conduct a man-in-the-middle attack can impersonate the kdump SSH server to potentially access information in vmcore dumps...

  6. A dipole polarizable potential for reduced and doped CeO obtained from first principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Bilge

    applications in several technologically relevant areas such as catalysis [1] and solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs potential (DIPPIM: the dipole polarizable ion model) and optimize its parameters by fitting them to a series

  7. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis Results Obtained in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bean, J.E.; Berglund, J.W.; Davis, F.J.; Economy, K.; Garner, J.W.; Helton, J.C.; Johnson, J.D.; MacKinnon, R.J.; Miller, J.; O'Brien, D.G.; Ramsey, J.L.; Schreiber, J.D.; Shinta, A.; Smith, L.N.; Stockman, C.; Stoelzel, D.M.; Vaughn, P.

    1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WPP) is located in southeastern New Mexico and is being developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for the geologic (deep underground) disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste. A detailed performance assessment (PA) for the WIPP was carried out in 1996 and supports an application by the DOE to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for the certification of the WIPP for the disposal of TRU waste. The 1996 WIPP PA uses a computational structure that maintains a separation between stochastic (i.e., aleatory) and subjective (i.e., epistemic) uncertainty, with stochastic uncertainty arising from the many possible disruptions that could occur over the 10,000 yr regulatory period that applies to the WIPP and subjective uncertainty arising from the imprecision with which many of the quantities required in the PA are known. Important parts of this structure are (1) the use of Latin hypercube sampling to incorporate the effects of subjective uncertainty, (2) the use of Monte Carlo (i.e., random) sampling to incorporate the effects of stochastic uncertainty, and (3) the efficient use of the necessarily limited number of mechanistic calculations that can be performed to support the analysis. The use of Latin hypercube sampling generates a mapping from imprecisely known analysis inputs to analysis outcomes of interest that provides both a display of the uncertainty in analysis outcomes (i.e., uncertainty analysis) and a basis for investigating the effects of individual inputs on these outcomes (i.e., sensitivity analysis). The sensitivity analysis procedures used in the PA include examination of scatterplots, stepwise regression analysis, and partial correlation analysis. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis results obtained as part of the 1996 WIPP PA are presented and discussed. Specific topics considered include two phase flow in the vicinity of the repository, radionuclide release from the repository, fluid flow and radionuclide transport in formations overlying the repository, and complementary cumulative distribution functions used in comparisons with regulatory standards (i.e., 40 CFR 191, Subpart B).

  8. A Simple Approach for Obtaining High Resolution, High Sensitivity ¹H NMR Metabolite Spectra of Biofluids with Limited Mass Supply

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Wind, Robert A.; Minard, Kevin R.; Sears, Jesse A.

    2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple approach is reported that yields high resolution, high sensitivity ¹H NMR spectra of biofluids with limited mass supply. This is achieved by spinning a capillary sample tube containing a biofluid at the magic angle at a frequency of about 80Hz. A 2D pulse sequence called ¹H PASS is then used to produce a high-resolution ¹H NMR spectrum that is free from magnetic susceptibility induced line broadening. With this new approach a high resolution ¹H NMR spectrum of biofluids with a volume less than 1.0 µl can be easily achieved at a magnetic field strength as low as 7.05T. Furthermore, the methodology facilitates easy sample handling, i.e., the samples can be directly collected into inexpensive and disposable capillary tubes at the site of collection and subsequently used for NMR measurements. In addition, slow magic angle spinning improves magnetic field shimming and is especially suitable for high throughput investigations. In this paper first results are shown obtained in a magnetic field of 7.05T on urine samples collected from mice using a modified commercial NMR probe.

  9. Sensitivity and Discovery Potential of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Alessandria; R. Ardito; D. R. Artusa; F. T. Avignone III; O. Azzolini; M. Balata; T. I. Banks; G. Bari; J. Beeman; F. Bellini; A. Bersani; M. Biassoni; T. Bloxham; C. Brofferio; C. Bucci; X. Z. Cai; L. Canonica; X. Cao; S. Capelli; L. Carbone; L. Cardani; M. Carrettoni; N. Casali; D. Chiesa; N. Chott; M. Clemenza; C. Cosmelli; O. Cremonesi; R. J. Creswick; I. Dafinei; A. Dally; V. Datskov; A. De Biasi; M. M. Deninno; S. Di Domizio; M. L. di Vacri; L. Ejzak; R. Faccini; D. Q. Fang; H. A. Farach; M. Faverzani; G. Fernandes; E. Ferri; F. Ferroni; E. Fiorini; M. A. Franceschi; S. J. Freedman; B. K. Fujikawa; A. Giachero; L. Gironi; A. Giuliani; J. Goett; P. Gorla; C. Gotti; E. Guardincerri; T. D. Gutierrez; E. E. Haller; K. Han; K. M. Heeger; H. Z. Huang; R. Kadel; K. Kazkaz; G. Keppel; L. Kogler; Yu. G. Kolomensky; D. Lenz; Y. L. Li; C. Ligi; X. Liu; Y. G. Ma; C. Maiano; M. Maino; M. Martinez; R. H. Maruyama; Y. Mei; N. Moggi; S. Morganti; T. Napolitano; S. Newman; S. Nisi; C. Nones; E. B. Norman; A. Nucciotti; T. O'Donnell; F. Orio; D. Orlandi; J. L. Ouellet; M. Pallavicini; V. Palmieri; L. Pattavina; M. Pavan; M. Pedretti; G. Pessina; G. Piperno; S. Pirro; E. Previtali; V. Rampazzo; F. Rimondi; C. Rosenfeld; C. Rusconi; E. Sala; S. Sangiorgio; N. D. Scielzo; M. Sisti; A. R. Smith; F. Stivanello; L. Taffarello; M. Tenconi; W. D. Tian; C. Tomei; S. Trentalange; G. Ventura; M. Vignati; B. S. Wang; H. W. Wang; T. Wise; A. Woodcraft; L. Zanotti; C. Zarra; B. X. Zhu; S. Zucchelli

    2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the sensitivity and discovery potential of CUORE, a bolometric double-beta decay experiment under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. Two approaches to the computation of experimental sensitivity for various background scenarios are presented, and an extension of the sensitivity formulation to the discovery potential case is also discussed. Assuming a background rate of 10^-2 cts/(keV kg y), we find that, after 5 years of live time, CUORE has a 1 sigma sensitivity to the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of T_1/2(1 sigma) = 1.6 \\times 10^26 y and thus a potential to probe the effective Majorana neutrino mass down to 40-100 meV; the sensitivity at 1.64 sigma, which corresponds to 90% C.L., will be T_1/2(1.64 sigma) = 9.5 \\times 10^25 y. This range is compared with the claim of observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay in 76Ge and the preferred range of the neutrino mass parameter space from oscillation results.

  10. Sensitivity analysis of a directional potential drop sensor for creep monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nagy, Peter B.

    an accelerated 400-hour creep test are presented to demonstrate the feasibility of this technique to monitorSensitivity analysis of a directional potential drop sensor for creep monitoring Elhoucine Madhi Accepted 1 August 2011 Available online 9 August 2011 Keywords: ACPD Creep monitoring Resistivity

  11. Community-based and peace-sensitive tourism: fulfilling Nepal's potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richner, Heinz

    Community-based and peace-sensitive tourism: fulfilling Nepal's potential Tourism as a means of economic growth Tourism is one of the largest indus- tries in Nepal. According to the Nepal Tourism Board the insurgency was then largely confined to the western parts of Nepal. The Visit Nepal Year campaign in 1998

  12. A dipole polarizable potential for reduced and doped CeO[subscript 2] obtained from first principles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burbano, Mario

    In this paper we present the parameterization of a new interionic potential for stoichiometric, reduced and doped CeO[subscript 2]. We use a dipole polarizable potential (DIPPIM: the dipole polarizable ion model) and ...

  13. U-017: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TRACETRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-002: EMC NetWorker Module for Microsoft Applications Lets Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code...

  14. Commercial potential for thermal & magnetic sensitive polymer in drug delivery applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edward, Jonathan M. (Jonathan Mark)

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal and magnetically sensitive polymers are a new class of materials with unique properties suitable for applications in drug delivery. Specifically, these polymers can be combined with a drug reservoir to make a drug ...

  15. In vivo potentiation of 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea by the radiation sensitizer benznidazole

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemann, D.W.; Morrissey, S.; Wolf, K.

    1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies in mouse tumor systems have indicated a potential therapeutic advantage in combining the radiosensitizer misonidazole (MISO) with cancer chemotherapy drugs. One agent the antitumor activity of which has been enhanced to a greater extent than its hematological or gastrointestinal toxicities is the nitrosourea, 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). Recently, sensitizers more lipophylic than MISO have been reported to give greater tumor response enhancement when combined with CCNU. The present studies compared the potential therapeutic benefit of combining MISO (partition coefficient, 0.43) or benznidazole (BENZO) (partition coefficient, 8.5) in KHT sarcoma or RIF-1 tumor-bearing C3H mice. Both sensitizers were administered i.p. and given either 30 min before (BENZO) or simultaneously with (MISO) the chemotherapeutic agent. Survival of clonogenic tumor cells assessed 22 to 24 hr after treatment or in situ tumor growth delay were used as assays of tumor response. Normal tissue toxicity was determined using the drug dose yielding 50% animal lethality in 30 days end point. When combined with CCNU, doses of MISO (5.0 mmol/kg) or BENZO (0.3 mmol/kg) were found to yield approximately equivalent increases in both the tumor effect (enhancement ratio, approximately 1.8 to 2.0) and normal tissue toxicity (enhancement ratio approximately 1.3 to 1.4). Both sensitizers therefore led to a therapeutic benefit. However, although a approximately 10-fold lower dose of the more lipophylic sensitizer BENZO proved to be as effective as MISO at enhancing the tumoricidal effects of CCNU, this dose reduction did not result in a greater therapeutic gain for BENZO.

  16. Evaluation of the sensitizing potential of antibiotics in vitro using the human cell lines THP-1 and MUTZ-LC and primary monocyte?derived dendritic cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sebastian, Katrin, E-mail: ksebastian@ukaachen.de [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Ott, Hagen [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Zwadlo-Klarwasser, Gabriele [IZKF (BIOMAT), RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [IZKF (BIOMAT), RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Skazik-Voogt, Claudia; Marquardt, Yvonne; Czaja, Katharina; Merk, Hans F.; Baron, Jens Malte [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)] [Department of Dermatology and Allergology, RWTH Aachen University Hospital, D-52074 Aachen (Germany)

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the 7th amendment to the EU cosmetics directive foresees a complete ban on animal testing, alternative in vitro methods have been established to evaluate the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight compounds. To find out whether these novel in vitro assays are also capable to predict the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs, model compounds such as beta-lactams and sulfonamides – which are the most frequent cause of adverse drug reactions – were co-incubated with THP-1, MUTZ-LC, or primary monocyte?derived dendritic cells for 48 h and subsequent expression of selected marker genes (IL-8, IL-1?, CES1, NQO1, GCLM, PIR and TRIM16) was studied by real time PCR. Benzylpenicillin and phenoxymethylpenicillin were recognized as sensitizing compounds because they are capable to induce the mRNA expression of these genes in moDCs and, except for IL-8, in THP-1 cells but not in MUTZ-LC. Ampicillin stimulated the expression of some marker genes in moDCs and THP-1 cells. SMX did not affect the expression of these genes in THP-1, however, in moDCs, at least PIR was enhanced and there was an increase of the release of IL-8. These data reveal that novel in vitro DC based assays might play a role in the evaluation of the allergenic potential of novel drug compounds, but these systems seem to lack the ability to detect the sensitizing potential of prohaptens that require metabolic activation prior to sensitization and moDCs seem to be superior with regard to the sensitivity compared with THP-1 and MUTZ-3 cell lines. -- Highlights: ? We tested the sensitizing potential of small molecular weight drugs in vitro. ? In vitro assays were performed with moDCs and THP-1 cells. ? Beta-lactam antibiotics can be recognized as sensitizing compounds. ? They affect the expression of metabolic enzymes, cytokines and transcription factors. ? Sulfamethoxazole has no measurable effect on THP-1 cells and moDCs.

  17. Synthesis of CdSe quantum dots for quantum dot sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Neetu, E-mail: singh.neetu1985@gmail.com; Kapoor, Avinashi [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi-110 021 (India); Kumar, Vinod [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ZA9300 (South Africa); Mehra, R. M. [School of Engineering and Technology, Sharda University, Greater Noida-201 306, U.P. (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    CdSe Quantum Dots (QDs) of size 0.85 nm were synthesized using chemical route. ZnO based Quantum Dot Sensitized Solar Cell (QDSSC) was fabricated using CdSe QDs as sensitizer. The Pre-synthesized QDs were found to be successfully adsorbed on front ZnO electrode and had potential to replace organic dyes in Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSCs). The efficiency of QDSSC was obtained to be 2.06 % at AM 1.5.

  18. Field project to obtain pressure core, wireline log, and production test data for evaluation of CO/sub 2/ flooding potential, Conoco MCA unit well No. 358, Maljamar Field, Lea County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, T.E.; Marlow, R.E.; Wilhelm, M.H.; Goodrich, J.H.; Kumar, R.M.

    1981-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes part of the work done to fulfill a contract awarded to Gruy Federal, Inc., by the Department of Energy (DOE) on Feburary 12, 1979. The work includes pressure-coring and associated logging and testing programs to provide data on in-situ oil saturation, porosity and permeability distribution, and other data needed for resource characterization of fields and reservoirs in which CO/sub 2/ injection might have a high probability of success. This report details the second such project. Core porosities agreed well with computed log porosities. Core water saturation and computed log porosities agree fairly well from 3692 to 3712 feet, poorly from 3712 to 3820 feet and in a general way from 4035 to 4107 feet. Computer log analysis techniques incorporating the a, m, and n values obtained from Core Laboratories analysis did not improve the agreement of log versus core derived water saturations. However, both core and log analysis indicated the ninth zone had the highest residual hydrocarbon saturations and production data confirmed the validity of oil saturation determinations. Residual oil saturation, for the perforated and tested intervals were 259 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 4035 to 4055 feet, and 150 STB/acre-ft for the interval from 3692 to 3718 feet. Nine BOPD was produced from the interval 4035 to 4055 feet and no oil was produced from interval 3692 to 3718 feet, qualitatively confirming the relative oil saturations as calculated. The low oil production in the zone from 4022 to 4055 and the lack of production from 3692 to 3718 feet indicated the zone to be at or near residual waterflood conditions as determined by log analysis. This project demonstrates the usefulness of integrating pressure core, log, and production data to realistically evaluate a reservoir for carbon dioxide flood.

  19. Probing the membrane potential of living cells by dielectric spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corina Bot; Camelia Prodan

    2008-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we demonstrate a quantitative way to measure the membrane potential of live cells by dielectric spectroscopy. We also show that the values of the membrane potential obtained using our technique are in good agreement with those obtained using traditional methods-voltage sensitive dyes. The membrane potential is determined by fitting the experimental dielectric dispersion curves with the dispersion curves obtain from a theoretical model. Variations in the membrane potential were induced by modifying the concentration of potassium chloride in the solution of the cell suspension in the presence of valinomycin. For exemplification of the method, E. coli were chosen for our experiments.

  20. BUSINESS SENSITIVE

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    that this action supports), is as follows: (State the following in bullet format BUSINESS SENSITIVE Funding is being provided for Notice Number (fill-in), entitled ("provide...

  1. BUSINESS SENSITIVE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    for sample table.) Provide a short description of financial assistance effort. BUSINESS SENSITIVE The grant number is (fill-in). The selectee is (name of the selectee), located...

  2. BUSINESS SENSITIVE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    appropriated funds dollar value of this award is ( dollar amount to the nearest BUSINESS SENSITIVE dollar to include cost share if it applies; list cost share separately) from...

  3. BUSINESS SENSITIVE

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    that this action supports), is as follows: (State the following in bullet format BUSINESS SENSITIVE Funding is being provided for Notice Number (fill-in), entitled "provide...

  4. BUSINESS SENSITIVE

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    short description of financial assistance effort. The grant number is (fill-in). BUSINESS SENSITIVE The selectee is (name of the selectee), located in (name city and state). Note:...

  5. Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Hydrologically Sensitive Areas: Variable Source Area Hydrology Implications for Water Quality Risk hydrology was developed and applied to the New York City (NYC) water supply watersheds. According and are therefore hydrologically sensitive with respect to their potential to transport contaminants to perennial

  6. Near-barrier quasielastic scattering as a sensitive tool to derive nuclear matter diffuseness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crema, E.; Simoes, R. F.; Barioni, A. [Departamento de Fisica Nuclear, Instituto de Fisica da Universidade de Sao Paulo, Travessa R da Rua do Matao, 187, 05508-090, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil); Otomar, D. R.; Monteiro, D. S.; Lubian, J.; Gomes, P. R. S. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal Fluminense, Avenida Litoranea s/n, Gragoata, Niteroi, Rio de Janeiro, 24210-340 (Brazil); Ono, L. K. [Physics Department, University of Central Florida, 4000 Central Florida Boulevard, Orlando, Florida 32816 (United States); Shorto, J. M. B. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, IPEN/CNEN, Avenida Lineu Prestes, 2242, 05508-000, Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo (Brazil)

    2011-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasielastic excitation functions for the {sup 16,18}O + {sup 60}Ni systems were measured at energies near and below the Coulomb barrier, at the backward angle {theta}{sub LAB} = 161 deg. The corresponding quasielastic barrier distributions were derived. The data were compared with predictions from coupled channel calculations using a double-folding potential as a bare potential. For the {sup 16}O-induced scattering, good agreement was obtained for the barrier distribution by using the projectile default nuclear matter diffuseness obtained from the Sao Paulo potential systematic, that is, 0.56 fm. However, for the {sup 18}O-induced scattering, good agreement was obtained only when the projectile nuclear matter diffuseness was changed to 0.62 fm. Therefore, in this paper we show how near-barrier quasielastic scattering can be used as a sensitive tool to derive nuclear matter diffuseness.

  7. Dye Sensitized Tandem Photovoltaic Cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barber, Greg D.

    2009-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    This work provided a new way to look at photoelectrochemical cells and their performance. Although thought of as low efficiency, a the internal efficiency of a 9% global efficiency dye sensitized solar cell is approximately equal to an 18% efficient silicon cell when each is compared to their useful spectral range. Other work undertaken with this contract also reported the first growth oriented titania and perovskite columns on a transparent conducting oxide. Other work has shown than significant performance enhancement in the performance of dye sensitized solar cells can be obtained through the use of coupling inverse opal photonic crystals to the nanocrystalline dye sensitized solar cell. Lastly, a quick efficient method was developed to bond titanium foils to transparent conducting oxide substrates for anodization.

  8. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis of Damage Identification Results Obtained Using Finite Element Model Updating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak; Conte, Joel P; Hemez, François M

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    modeling error). A full factorial design of experiments iserror) (E). A full factorial design of experiments isnumerical). A full-factorial design of experiments is used

  9. Focus Sensitive Coordination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsey, Sarah McNearney

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the role of the Focus Sensitive Operators (FSOs) even and also when found inside of a coordination. Coordinations of this form are called Focus Sensitive Coordinations (FSC) and include or even, ...

  10. Singlet-Fission Sensitizers for Ultra-High Efficiency Excitonic Solar Cells: 15 August 2005 - 14 October 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Michl, J.

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have considered the potential benefits offered by using singlet fission sensitizers in photovoltaic cells and identified two key issues involved in the search for such sensitizers.

  11. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2Conversion by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. InorganicConversion by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic

  12. Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

    2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  13. 70Ge(p,gamma)71As and 76Ge(p,n)76As cross sections for the astrophysical p process: sensitivity of the optical proton potential at low energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Kiss; Gy. Gyurky; Z. Elekes; Zs. Fulop; E. Somorjai; T. Rauscher; M. Wiescher

    2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The cross sections of the 70Ge(p,gamma)71As and 76Ge(p,n)76As reactions have been measured with the activation method in the Gamow window for the astrophysical p process. The experiments were carried out at the Van de Graaff and cyclotron accelerators of ATOMKI. The cross sections have been derived by measuring the decay gamma-radiation of the reaction products. The results are compared to the predictions of Hauser-Feshbach statistical model calculations using the code NON-SMOKER. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental S factors is found. Based on the new data, modifications of the optical potential used for low-energy protons are discussed.

  14. Tuned cavity magnetometer sensitivity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a high sensitivity (sensitivity levels.

  15. The LISA Optimal Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas A. Prince; Massimo Tinto; Shane L. Larson; J. W. Armstrong

    2003-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The multiple Doppler readouts available on the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) permit simultaneous formation of several interferometric observables. All these observables are independent of laser frequency fluctuations and have different couplings to gravitational waves and to the various LISA instrumental noises. Within the functional space of interferometric combinations LISA will be able to synthesize, we have identified a triplet of interferometric combinations that show optimally combined sensitivity. As an application of the method, we computed the sensitivity improvement for sinusoidal sources in the nominal, equal-arm LISA configuration. In the part of the Fourier band where the period of the wave is longer than the typical light travel-time across LISA, the sensitivity gain over a single Michelson interferometer is equal to $\\sqrt{2}$. In the mid-band region, where the LISA Michelson combination has its best sensitivity, the improvement over the Michelson sensitivity is slightly better than $\\sqrt{2}$, and the frequency band of best sensitivity is broadened. For frequencies greater than the reciprocal of the light travel-time, the sensitivity improvement is oscillatory and $\\sim \\sqrt{3}$, but can be greater than $\\sqrt{3}$ near frequencies that are integer multiples of the inverse of the one-way light travel-time in the LISA arm.

  16. Extended Forward Sensitivity Analysis for Uncertainty Quantification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Verification and validation (V&V) are playing more important roles to quantify uncertainties and realize high fidelity simulations in engineering system analyses, such as transients happened in a complex nuclear reactor system. Traditional V&V in the reactor system analysis focused more on the validation part or did not differentiate verification and validation. The traditional approach to uncertainty quantification is based on a 'black box' approach. The simulation tool is treated as an unknown signal generator, a distribution of inputs according to assumed probability density functions is sent in and the distribution of the outputs is measured and correlated back to the original input distribution. The 'black box' method mixes numerical errors with all other uncertainties. It is also not efficient to perform sensitivity analysis. Contrary to the 'black box' method, a more efficient sensitivity approach can take advantage of intimate knowledge of the simulation code. In these types of approaches equations for the propagation of uncertainty are constructed and the sensitivities are directly solved for as variables in the simulation. This paper presents the forward sensitivity analysis as a method to help uncertainty qualification. By including time step and potentially spatial step as special sensitivity parameters, the forward sensitivity method is extended as one method to quantify numerical errors. Note that by integrating local truncation errors over the whole system through the forward sensitivity analysis process, the generated time step and spatial step sensitivity information reflect global numerical errors. The discretization errors can be systematically compared against uncertainties due to other physical parameters. This extension makes the forward sensitivity method a much more powerful tool to help uncertainty qualification. By knowing the relative sensitivity of time and space steps with other interested physical parameters, the simulation is allowed to run at optimized time and space steps without affecting the confidence of the physical parameter sensitivity results. The time and space steps forward sensitivity analysis method can also replace the traditional time step and grid convergence study with much less computational cost. Several well defined benchmark problems with manufactured solutions are utilized to demonstrate the extended forward sensitivity analysis method. All the physical solutions, parameter sensitivity solutions, even the time step sensitivity in one case, have analytical forms, which allows the verification to be performed in the strictest sense.

  17. X-ray survival characteristics and genetic analysis for nine saccharomyces deletion mutants that show altered radiation sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Game, John C.; Williamson, Marsha S.; Baccari, Clelia

    2004-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The availability of a genome-wide set of Saccharomyces deletion mutants provides a chance to identify all the yeast genes involved in DNA repair. Using X-rays, we are screening these mutants to identify additional genes that show increased sensitivity to the lethal effects of ionizing radiation. For each mutant identified as sensitive, we are confirming that the sensitivity phenotype co-segregates with the deletion allele and are obtaining multipoint survival-versus-dose assays in at least two haploid and one homozygous diploid strains. We present data for deletion mutants involving the genes DOT1, MDM20, NAT3, SPT7, SPT20, GCN5, HFI1, DCC1 and VID21/EAF1, and discuss their potential roles in repair. Eight of these genes have a clear radiation-sensitive phenotype when deleted, but the ninth, GCN5, has at most a borderline phenotype. None of the deletions confer substantial sensitivity to ultra-violet radiation, although one or two may confer marginal sensitivity. The DOT1 gene is of interest because its only known function is to methylate one lysine residue in the core of the histone H3 protein. We find that histone H3 mutants (supplied by K. Struhl) in which this residue is replaced by other amino-acids are also X-ray sensitive, seeming to confirm that methylation of the lysine-79 residue is required for effective repair of radiation damage.

  18. Collective Phase Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yoji Kawamura; Hiroya Nakao; Kensuke Arai; Hiroshi Kori; Yoshiki Kuramoto

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The collective phase response to a macroscopic external perturbation of a population of interacting nonlinear elements exhibiting collective oscillations is formulated for the case of globally-coupled oscillators. The macroscopic phase sensitivity is derived from the microscopic phase sensitivity of the constituent oscillators by a two-step phase reduction. We apply this result to quantify the stability of the macroscopic common-noise induced synchronization of two uncoupled populations of oscillators undergoing coherent collective oscillations.

  19. Multiple predictor smoothing methods for sensitivity analysis.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Helton, Jon Craig; Storlie, Curtis B.

    2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The use of multiple predictor smoothing methods in sampling-based sensitivity analyses of complex models is investigated. Specifically, sensitivity analysis procedures based on smoothing methods employing the stepwise application of the following nonparametric regression techniques are described: (1) locally weighted regression (LOESS), (2) additive models, (3) projection pursuit regression, and (4) recursive partitioning regression. The indicated procedures are illustrated with both simple test problems and results from a performance assessment for a radioactive waste disposal facility (i.e., the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant). As shown by the example illustrations, the use of smoothing procedures based on nonparametric regression techniques can yield more informative sensitivity analysis results than can be obtained with more traditional sensitivity analysis procedures based on linear regression, rank regression or quadratic regression when nonlinear relationships between model inputs and model predictions are present.

  20. HOW TO OBTAIN EIA PRODUCTS AND SERVICES

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40CoalLease(Billion2,12803 Table A1.GasYearperHOW TO OBTAIN EIA PRODUCTS AND

  1. Climate Sensitivity Estimated From Earth's Climate History James E. Hansen and Makiko Sato

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Climate Sensitivity Estimated From Earth's Climate History James E. Hansen and Makiko Sato NASA's climate history potentially can yield accurate assessment of climate sensitivity. Imprecise knowledge of the fast-feedback climate sensitivity, which is the sensitivity that most immediately affects humanity. Our

  2. Commercialization potential of dye-sensitized mesoscopic solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Kwan Wee

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The price of oil has continued to rise, from a high of US$100 per barrel at the beginning 2008 to a new record of above US$140 in the recent weeks (of July). Coupled with increasing insidious greenhouse gas emissions, the ...

  3. U-053: Linux kexec Bugs Let Local and Remote Users Obtain Potentially

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergyTransportation WorkDecemberInjury at FY 20113:

  4. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic cells. Inorganic Chemistry,by Dye-Sensitized Photovoltaic Cells. Inorganic ChemistryThe characteristics of a photovoltaic cell. Generally,

  5. Visual Sensitivity of River Recreation to Power Plants1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Standiford, Richard B.

    the sensitivity of river-related recreational activities to visual intrusion by large coal-fired power plants activities. Each potential activity is assigned to one of three classes of importance and sensitivity The State of Minnesota anticipates the construction of a considerable number of large new coal-fired power

  6. Sensitive hydrogen leak detector

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao (Yorktown, VA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitive hydrogen leak detector system using passivation of a stainless steel vacuum chamber for low hydrogen outgassing, a high compression ratio vacuum system, a getter operating at 77.5 K and a residual gas analyzer as a quantitative hydrogen sensor.

  7. Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from of work done by the field, W*= -W. Bring q1 from , W *= 0 since no electric F yet #12;Potential Energy Total electric potential energy, U, of a system of charges is obtained from the work done by an external

  8. Surveillance Metrics Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bierbaum, R; Hamada, M; Robertson, A

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  9. Surveillance metrics sensitivity study.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamada, Michael S. (Los Alamos National Laboratory); Bierbaum, Rene Lynn; Robertson, Alix A. (Lawrence Livermore Laboratory)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In September of 2009, a Tri-Lab team was formed to develop a set of metrics relating to the NNSA nuclear weapon surveillance program. The purpose of the metrics was to develop a more quantitative and/or qualitative metric(s) describing the results of realized or non-realized surveillance activities on our confidence in reporting reliability and assessing the stockpile. As a part of this effort, a statistical sub-team investigated various techniques and developed a complementary set of statistical metrics that could serve as a foundation for characterizing aspects of meeting the surveillance program objectives. The metrics are a combination of tolerance limit calculations and power calculations, intending to answer level-of-confidence type questions with respect to the ability to detect certain undesirable behaviors (catastrophic defects, margin insufficiency defects, and deviations from a model). Note that the metrics are not intended to gauge product performance but instead the adequacy of surveillance. This report gives a short description of four metrics types that were explored and the results of a sensitivity study conducted to investigate their behavior for various inputs. The results of the sensitivity study can be used to set the risk parameters that specify the level of stockpile problem that the surveillance program should be addressing.

  10. Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's...

  11. activated carbons obtained: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Graphene Nanoribbons Obtained by Electrically Unwrapping Carbon Materials Science Websites Summary: Graphene Nanoribbons Obtained by Electrically Unwrapping...

  12. activated carbon obtained: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page Topic Index 1 Graphene Nanoribbons Obtained by Electrically Unwrapping Carbon Materials Science Websites Summary: Graphene Nanoribbons Obtained by Electrically Unwrapping...

  13. Quantum brachistochrone curves as geodesics: obtaining accurate control protocols for time-optimal quantum gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiaoting Wang; Michele Allegra; Kurt Jacobs; Seth Lloyd; Cosmo Lupo; Masoud Mohseni

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Most methods of optimal control cannot obtain accurate time-optimal protocols. The quantum brachistochrone equation is an exception, and has the potential to provide accurate time-optimal protocols for essentially any quantum control problem. So far this potential has not been realized, however, due to the inadequacy of conventional numerical methods to solve it. Here, using differential geometry, we reformulate the quantum brachistochrone curves as geodesics on the unitary group. With this identification we are able to obtain a numerical method that efficiently solves the brachistochrone problem. We apply it to two examples demonstrating its power.

  14. Sources of symmetric potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John W. Barrett

    1997-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory experiments on gravitation are usually performed with objects of constant density, so that the analysis of the forces concerns only the geometry of their shape. In an ideal experiment, the shapes of the constituent parts will be optimised to meet certain mathematical criteria, which ensure that the experiment has maximal sensitivity. Using this idea, the author suggested an experiment to determine the departure of the gravitational force from Newton's force law [1]. The geometrical problem which has to be solved is to find two shapes which differ significantly, but have the same Newtonian potential. Essentially, the experiment determines whether the two objects are distinguishable by their gravitational force. Here, we consider the case when one of them is a round ball. The result, Theorem 1, establishes a fact which appeared in numerical simulations, that the second object has to have a hole in it.

  15. Resonance self-shielding effects on Eigenvalue sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dion, M.; Marleau, G. [Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, Institut de Genie Nucleaire, C.P. 6079, suce. Centre-ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3A7 (Canada)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quick and accurate way to compute the eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in multigroup lattice cell calculations. We look at both the explicit and implicit sensitivities, the latter resulting from the resonance self-shielding process. A self-shielding model is presented, and we show how to obtain cross section sensitivities to a variation on a light isotope density. As an example, we look at how a perturbation on the hydrogen density affects the multigroup cross sections for resonant reactions such as U'capture and U'fission, in two uranium spheres with different enrichments. Explicit sensitivities are also computed, and we discuss the relative importance of the implicit sensitivities. (authors)

  16. Noninvasive determination of optical lever sensitivity in atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Higgins, M.J.; Proksch, R.; Sader, J.E.; Polcik, M.; Mc Endoo, S.; Cleveland, J.P.; Jarvis, S.P. [Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanodevices and Nanostructures (CRANN), University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Asylum Research, 6310 Hollister Ave, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne Victoria, 3010 (Australia); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanodevices and Nanostructures (CRANN), University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland); Asylum Research, 6310 Hollister Ave, Santa Barbara, California 93117 (United States); Centre for Research on Adaptive Nanodevices and Nanostructures (CRANN), University of Dublin, Trinity College, Dublin 2 (Ireland)

    2006-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Atomic force microscopes typically require knowledge of the cantilever spring constant and optical lever sensitivity in order to accurately determine the force from the cantilever deflection. In this study, we investigate a technique to calibrate the optical lever sensitivity of rectangular cantilevers that does not require contact to be made with a surface. This noncontact approach utilizes the method of Sader et al. [Rev. Sci. Instrum. 70, 3967 (1999)] to calibrate the spring constant of the cantilever in combination with the equipartition theorem [J. L. Hutter and J. Bechhoefer, Rev. Sci. Instrum. 64, 1868 (1993)] to determine the optical lever sensitivity. A comparison is presented between sensitivity values obtained from conventional static mode force curves and those derived using this noncontact approach for a range of different cantilevers in air and liquid. These measurements indicate that the method offers a quick, alternative approach for the calibration of the optical lever sensitivity.

  17. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gap NIR – Near Infrared DSSC – Dye Sensitized Solar Cell TiOinterplay among various DSSC components. DSSCs consist of ainvestigated. In a conventional DSSC, a thick semiconducting

  18. ERCOT's Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carter, T.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ERCOT’s Weather Sensitive Demand Response Pilot CATEE 12-17-13 ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Disclaimer The information contained in this report has been obtained from... services along with other information about our business is available online at constellation.com. ESL-KT-13-12-21 CATEE 2013: Clean Air Through Energy Efficiency Conference, San Antonio, Texas Dec. 16-18 Demand Response in ERCOT CATEE 121313 - Tim Carter...

  19. STRATEGIESEMPLOYERS Obtain summer internship in an area of the publishing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaminsky, Werner

    STRATEGIESEMPLOYERS Obtain summer internship in an area of the publishing industry. Participate. Complete an internship in a market research firm or advertisingagency. Supplement curriculum with courses in business, art, or graphicdesign. Obtain internship or other relevant work experience. Develop strong

  20. Infrared-sensitive photocathode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mariella, R.P. Jr.; Cooper, G.A.

    1995-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A single-crystal, multi-layer device is described incorporating an IR absorbing layer that is compositionally different from the Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb layer which acts as the electron emitter. Many different IR absorbing layers can be envisioned for use in this embodiment, limited only by the ability to grow quality material on a chosen substrate. A non-exclusive list of possible IR absorbing layers would include GaSb, InAs and InAs/Ga{sub w}In{sub y}Al{sub 1{minus}y{minus}w}Sb superlattices. The absorption of the IR photon excites an electron into the conduction band of the IR absorber. An externally applied electric field then transports electrons from the conduction band of the absorber into the conduction band of the Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb, from which they are ejected into vacuum. Because the band alignments of Ga{sub x}Al{sub 1{minus}x}Sb can be made the same as that of GaAs, emitting efficiencies comparable to GaAs photocathodes are obtainable. The present invention provides a photocathode that is responsive to wavelengths within the range of 0.9 {mu}m to at least 10 {mu}m. 9 figures.

  1. An epidermal equivalent assay for identification and ranking potency of contact sensitizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibbs, Susan, E-mail: S.Gibbs@VUMC.nl [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Centre, Dept of Oral Cell Biology, ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Corsini, Emanuela [Laboratory of Toxicology, DiSFeB, Università degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Spiekstra, Sander W. [Department of Dermatology, VU University Medical Centre, Dept of Oral Cell Biology, ACTA, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Galbiati, Valentina [Laboratory of Toxicology, DiSFeB, Università degli Studi di Milano (Italy); Fuchs, Horst W. [CellSystems GmbH, Troisdorf (Germany); DeGeorge, George; Troese, Matthew [MB Research Labs, Spinnerstown, PA (United States); Hayden, Patrick; Deng, Wei [MatTek Corporation, Ashland, MA (United States); Roggen, Erwin [3Rs Management and Consultancy (Denmark)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study was to explore the possibility of combining the epidermal equivalent (EE) potency assay with the assay which assesses release of interleukin-18 (IL-18) to provide a single test for identification and classification of skin sensitizing chemicals, including chemicals of low water solubility or stability. A protocol was developed using different 3D-epidermal models including in house VUMC model, epiCS® (previously EST1000™), MatTek EpiDerm™ and SkinEthic™ RHE and also the impact of different vehicles (acetone:olive oil 4:1, 1% DMSO, ethanol, water) was investigated. Following topical exposure for 24 h to 17 contact allergens and 13 non-sensitizers a robust increase in IL-18 release was observed only after exposure to contact allergens. A putative prediction model is proposed from data obtained from two laboratories yielding 95% accuracy. Correlating the in vitro EE sensitizer potency data, which assesses the chemical concentration which results in 50% cytotoxicity (EE-EC{sub 50}) with human and animal data showed a superior correlation with human DSA{sub 05} (?g/cm{sup 2}) data (Spearman r = 0.8500; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0061) compared to LLNA data (Spearman r = 0.5968; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0542). DSA{sub 05} = induction dose per skin area that produces a positive response in 5% of the tested population Also a good correlation was observed for release of IL-18 (SI-2) into culture supernatants with human DSA{sub 05} data (Spearman r = 0.8333; P value (two-tailed) = 0.0154). This easily transferable human in vitro assay appears to be very promising, but additional testing of a larger chemical set with the different EE models is required to fully evaluate the utility of this assay and to establish a definitive prediction model. - Highlights: • A potential epidermal equivalent assay to label and classify sensitizers • Il-18 release distinguishes sensitizers from non sensitizers • IL-18 release can rank sensitizer potency • EC50 (chemical concentration causing 50% decrease in cell viability) ranks potency • In vitro: human DSA{sub 05} correlation is better than in vitro: LLNA correlation.

  2. Quantum Brachistochrone Curves as Geodesics: Obtaining Accurate Minimum-Time Protocols for the Control of Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Xiaoting

    Most methods of optimal control cannot obtain accurate time-optimal protocols. The quantum brachistochrone equation is an exception, and has the potential to provide accurate time-optimal protocols for a wide range of ...

  3. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. In this reporting period we revised all of the economic calculations, participated in technology transfer of project results, and began working on project closeout tasks in anticipation of the project ending December 31, 2005. In this research, we conducted five separate simulation investigations, or cases. These cases are (1) CO{sub 2} sequestration base case scenarios for 4,000-ft and 6,200-ft depth coal beds in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation of east-central Texas, (2) sensitivity study of the effects of well spacing on sequestration, (3) sensitivity study of the effects of injection gas composition, (4) sensitivity study of the effects of injection rate, and (5) sensitivity study of the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection/sequestration. Results show that, in most cases, revenue from coalbed methane production does not completely offset the costs of CO{sub 2} sequestration in Texas low-rank coals, indicating that CO{sub 2} injection is not economically feasible for the ranges of gas prices and carbon credits investigated. The best economic performance is obtained with flue gas (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) injection, as compared to injection of 100% CO{sub 2} and a mixture of 50% CO{sub 2} and 50% N{sub 2}. As part of technology transfer for this project, we presented results at the West Texas Geological Society Fall Symposium in October 2005 and at the COAL-SEQ Forum in November 2005.

  4. Comparative DNA microarray analysis of human monocyte derived dendritic cells and MUTZ-3 cells exposed to the moderate skin sensitizer cinnamaldehyde

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Python, Francois [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland); Goebel, Carsten [Product Safety, Human Safety Assessment, Procter and Gamble Service GmbH, Darmstadt (Germany); Aeby, Pierre [Experimental Product Safety, Procter and Gamble Co., Cosmital SA, Marly (Switzerland)], E-mail: pierre_aeby@bluewin.ch

    2009-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The number of studies involved in the development of in vitro skin sensitization tests has increased since the adoption of the EU 7th amendment to the cosmetics directive proposing to ban animal testing for cosmetic ingredients by 2013. Several studies have recently demonstrated that sensitizers induce a relevant up-regulation of activation markers such as CD86, CD54, IL-8 or IL-1{beta} in human myeloid cell lines (e.g., U937, MUTZ-3, THP-1) or in human peripheral blood monocyte-derived dendritic cells (PBMDCs). The present study aimed at the identification of new dendritic cell activation markers in order to further improve the in vitro evaluation of the sensitizing potential of chemicals. We have compared the gene expression profiles of PBMDCs and the human cell line MUTZ-3 after a 24-h exposure to the moderate sensitizer cinnamaldehyde. A list of 80 genes modulated in both cell types was obtained and a set of candidate marker genes was selected for further analysis. Cells were exposed to selected sensitizers and non-sensitizers for 24 h and gene expression was analyzed by quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction. Results indicated that PIR, TRIM16 and two Nrf2-regulated genes, CES1 and NQO1, are modulated by most sensitizers. Up-regulation of these genes could also be observed in our recently published DC-activation test with U937 cells. Due to their role in DC activation, these new genes may help to further refine the in vitro approaches for the screening of the sensitizing properties of a chemical.

  5. Computational Methods for Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis in Criticality Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Rearden, B.T.

    1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in the sensitivity methods that were developed and widely used in the 1970s (the FORSS methodology at ORNL among others) has increased recently as a result of potential use in the area of criticality safety data validation procedures to define computational bias, uncertainties and area(s) of applicability. Functional forms of the resulting sensitivity coefficients can be used as formal parameters in the determination of applicability of benchmark experiments to their corresponding industrial application areas. In order for these techniques to be generally useful to the criticality safety practitioner, the procedures governing their use had to be updated and simplified. This paper will describe the resulting sensitivity analysis tools that have been generated for potential use by the criticality safety community.

  6. Classification of Protein Localization Patterns Obtained via Fluorescence Light Microscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    of the microscope. They should also be in- sensitive to the wide variability in cell morphology that is present in fluores- cence light microscope images of mammalian cells. Such images are generated on a regular basis by labeling one or more subcellular structures with fluorescent dyes and then collecting images

  7. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    551, 2005. 2. Graztel, M. Solar Energy Conversion by Dye-Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (efficiency in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2

  8. Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE supports research and development projects aimed at increasing the efficiency and lifetime of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Below are a list of current projects, summary of the benefits,...

  9. NANOCOMPOSITE ENABLED SENSITIZED SOLAR CELL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Phuyal, Dibya

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Y. , Warta, W. , Dunlop, E.D. Solar Cell efficiency tables (in dye-sensitized solar cells based on Tio2 nanocrystal/R. J. ; Nozik, A. J. Schottky Solar Cells Based on Colloidal

  10. Mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Adkins, Douglas R. (Albuquerque, NM); Lewis, Patrick R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-01-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator actively measures the mass of a sample on an acoustic microbalance during the collection process. The microbalance comprises a chemically sensitive interface for collecting the sample thereon and an acoustic-based physical transducer that provides an electrical output that is proportional to the mass of the collected sample. The acoustic microbalance preferably comprises a pivot plate resonator. A resistive heating element can be disposed on the chemically sensitive interface to rapidly heat and release the collected sample for further analysis. Therefore, the mass-sensitive chemical preconcentrator can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  11. Arene Trifluoromethylation: An Effective Strategy to Obtain Air...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Arene Trifluoromethylation: An Effective Strategy to Obtain Air-Stable nType Organic Semiconductors with Tunable Optoelectronic Arene Trifluoromethylation: An Effective Strategy to...

  12. Improved Performance of Energy Window Ratio Criteria Obtained Using Multiple Windows at Radiation Portal Monitoring Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weier, Dennis R.; Lopresti, Charles A.; Ely, James H.; Bates, Derrick J.; Kouzes, Richard T.

    2006-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation portal monitors are being used to detect radioactive target materials in vehicles transporting cargo. As vehicles pass through the portal monitors, they generate count profiles over time that can be compared to the average panel background counts obtained just prior to the time the vehicle entered the area of the monitors. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, in support of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) and U.S. Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO) under the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS), has accumulated considerable data regarding such background radiation and vehicle profiles from portal installations. Energy window criteria have been shown to increase sensitivity to certain types of target radioactive sources while also controlling to a manageable level the rate of false or nuisance alarms. First generation equipment had only two-window capability, and while energy windowing for such systems was shown to be useful for detecting certain types of sources, it was subsequently found that improved performance could be obtained with more windows. Second generation equipment instead has more windows and can thus support additional energy window criteria which can be shown to be sensitive to a wider set of target sources. Detection likelihoods are generated for various sources and energy window criteria, as well as for gross count decision criteria, based on computer simulated injections of sources into archived vehicle profiles. (PIET-43741-TM-534)

  13. Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analyses Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, J.C.; Ramsdell, J.V. Jr.

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project staff are developing mathematical models to be used to estimate the radiation dose that individuals may have received as a result of emissions since 1944 from the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. An uncertainty and sensitivity analyses plan is essential to understand and interpret the predictions from these mathematical models. This is especially true in the case of the HEDR models where the values of many parameters are unknown. This plan gives a thorough documentation of the uncertainty and hierarchical sensitivity analysis methods recommended for use on all HEDR mathematical models. The documentation includes both technical definitions and examples. In addition, an extensive demonstration of the uncertainty and sensitivity analysis process is provided using actual results from the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Integrated Codes (HEDRIC). This demonstration shows how the approaches used in the recommended plan can be adapted for all dose predictions in the HEDR Project.

  14. Treatment of biomass to obtain a target chemical

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

    2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Target chemicals were produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

  15. Terra-Gen Powers Coso Geothermal Facility Obtains Critical Federal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Obtains Critical Federal Permit to Increase Its Renewable Energy Generation Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Terra-Gen Powers Coso...

  16. An important challenge in magnetic fusion research is to obtain...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    control of edge transport barriers on Alcator C-Mod A crucial challenge in magnetic fusion is to obtain high energy confinement in a stationary plasma that is compatible with...

  17. Theoretical Analysis for Obtaining Physical Properties of Composite Electrodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weidner, John W.

    , 2003. Composite electrodes, composed of a mixture of electronically and ionically conducting materials and electronic conductivities of Nafion/ carbon composites. Shibuya et al.1 used an interdigitated arrayTheoretical Analysis for Obtaining Physical Properties of Composite Electrodes Parthasarathy M

  18. Soil organic matter stability and the temperature sensitivity of soil respiration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Nancy Rosalind

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Soil respiration is an important source of atmospheric CO2, with the potential for large positive feedbacks with global warming. The size of these feedbacks will depend on the relative sensitivity to temperature of very ...

  19. A sensitive enzyme electrode for phenol monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulys, J.; Schmid, R.D. (GBF-Gesellschaft fuer Biotechnologische Forschung mbH, Braunschweig (West Germany))

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tyrosinase (EC.1.14.18.1) was immobilized onto graphite electrodes, which had been modified with tetracyanoquinodimethane (TCNQ). The response time, 12 or 35 s, was dependent on the enzyme immobilization technique used. The electrodes showed a linear calibration function up to 25 or 65 {mu}M phenol, and a sensitivity of 0.36 or 2.2 A/M was achieved which was also dependent on the enzyme immobilization technique used. The detection limit for phenol was 0.23 {mu}M. The electrodes acted from potentials of {minus}200 to +180 mV (vs. a saturated Ag/AgCl electrode). The electrode signal was independent of pH within the pH range 4.5-6.0. The enzyme electrode responded to phenol (100%), p-cresol (93%) and catechol (330%), but not to o-cresol and L-tyrosine. The electrodes showed a stability for more than one week. The electrodes can be utilized for the sensitive assay of phenol in water.

  20. Sensitivity of piping seismic responses to input factors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the sensitivity of peak dynamic seismic responses to input parameters. The responses have been modeled and calculated for the Zion Unit 1 plant as part of a seismic probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) performed by the US NRC Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP). The SSMRP was supported by the US NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. Two sensitivity topics motivated the study. The first is the sensitivity of piping response to the mean value of piping damping. The second is the sensitivity of all the responses to the earthquake and model input parameters including soil, structure and piping parameters; this information is required for another study, the sensitivity of the plant system response (in terms of risk) to these dynamic input parameters and to other input factors. We evaluate the response sensitivities by performing a linear regression analysis (LRA) of the computer code SMACS. With SMACS we have a detailed model of the Zion plant and of the important dynamic processes in the soil, structures and piping systems. The qualitative results change with the location of the individual response. Different responses are in locations where the many potential influences have different effectiveness. The results give an overview of the complexity of the seismic dyanmic response of a plant. Within the diversity trends are evident in the influences of the input variables on the responses.

  1. Sensitivity analysis of coupled criticality calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Perko, Z.; Kloosterman, J. L.; Lathouwers, D. [Delft Univ. of Technology, Faculty of Applied Physics, Dept. of Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB, Delft (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Perturbation theory based sensitivity analysis is a vital part of todays' nuclear reactor design. This paper presents an extension of standard techniques to examine coupled criticality problems with mutual feedback between neutronics and an augmenting system (for example thermal-hydraulics). The proposed procedure uses a neutronic and an augmenting adjoint function to efficiently calculate the first order change in responses of interest due to variations of the parameters describing the coupled problem. The effect of the perturbations is considered in two different ways in our study: either a change is allowed in the power level while maintaining criticality (power perturbation) or a change is allowed in the eigenvalue while the power is constrained (eigenvalue perturbation). The calculated response can be the change in the power level, the reactivity worth of the perturbation, or the change in any functional of the flux, the augmenting dependent variables and the input parameters. To obtain power- and criticality-constrained sensitivities power- and k-reset procedures can be applied yielding identical results. Both the theoretical background and an application to a one dimensional slab problem are presented, along with an iterative procedure to compute the necessary adjoint functions using the neutronics and the augmenting codes separately, thus eliminating the need of developing new programs to solve the coupled adjoint problem. (authors)

  2. Solar energy conversion at dye sensitized nanostructured electrodes fabricated by sol-gel processing: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Searson, P.C.; Meyer, G.J.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The significant achievements accomplished in this program include: (1) the first demonstration of osmium polypyridyl compounds as sensitizers; (2) the first demonstration of donor-acceptor compounds as sensitizers; (3) the first utilization of alternative acac based sensitizer-semiconductor linkages; (4) the first demonstration of remote interfacial electron transfer; (5) the first application of bimetallic compounds as sensitizers; (6) the first correlation of the interfacial charge recombination rate constant with the open circuit photovoltage in sensitized materials; (7) the first demonstration of a solid state dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} cell; (8) an alternative band edge unpinning model for the nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2}/electrolyte interface at negative applied potentials; and (9) the first self-consistent model of electron transport in dye sensitized TiO{sub 2} films. In the following sections the authors summarize some of the results from this program and highlight the key findings.

  3. Separating respiratory influences from the tachogram: methods and their sensitivity to the type of respiratory signal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ECG- derived respiratory (EDR) signals. The sensitivity of both separation methods to the type signals. Even when an EDR signal obtained using kernel principal com- ponent analysis is used, OSP yields

  4. Monitoring of saline tracer movement with vertically distributed self-potential measurements at the HOBE agricultural test site, Voulund, Denmark

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jougnot, Damien; Haarder, Eline B; Looms, Majken C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The self-potential (SP) method is sensitive to water fluxes in saturated and partially saturated porous media, such as those associated with rainwater infiltration and groundwater recharge. We present a field-based study at the Voulund agricultural test site, Denmark, that is, to the best of our knowledge, the first to focus on the vertical self-potential distribution prior to and during a saline tracer test. A coupled hydrogeophysical modeling framework is used to simulate the SP response to precipitation and saline tracer infiltration. A layered hydrological model is first obtained by inverting dielectric and matric potential data. The resulting model that compares favorably with electrical resistance tomography models is subsequently used to predict the SP response. The electrokinetic contribution (caused by water fluxes in a charged porous soil) is modeled by an effective excess charge approach that considers both water saturation and pore water salinity. Our results suggest that the effective excess char...

  5. Brain Mapping Using Topology Graphs Obtained by Surface Segmentation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsen, Lars

    Brain Mapping Using Topology Graphs Obtained by Surface Segmentation Fabien Vivodtzev1 , Lars@ucdavis.edu Summary. Brain mapping is a technique used to alleviate the tedious and time- consuming process of annotating brains by mapping existing annotations from brain atlases to individual brains. We introduce

  6. Damping filter method for obtaining spatially localized solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toshiki Teramura; Sadayoshi Toh

    2014-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Spatially localized structures are key components of turbulence and other spatio-temporally chaotic systems. From a dynamical systems viewpoint, it is desirable to obtain corresponding exact solutions, though their existence is not guaranteed. A damping filter method is introduced to obtain variously localized solutions, and adopted into two typical cases. This method introduces a spatially selective damping effect to make a good guess at the exact solution, and we can obtain an exact solution through a continuation with the damping amplitude. First target is a steady solution to Swift-Hohenberg equation, which is a representative of bi-stable systems in which localized solutions coexist, and a model for span-wisely localized cases. Not only solutions belonging to the well-known snaking branches but also those belonging to an isolated branch known as "isolas" are found with a continuation paths between them in phase space extended with the damping amplitude. This indicates that this spatially selective excitation mechanism has an advantage in searching spatially localized solutions. Second target is a spatially localized traveling-wave solution to Kuramoto-Sivashinsky equation, which is a model for stream-wisely localized cases. Since the spatially selective damping effect breaks Galilean and translational invariances, the propagation velocity cannot be determined uniquely while the damping is active, and a singularity arises when these invariances are recovered. We demonstrate that this singularity can be avoided by imposing a simple condition, and a localized traveling-wave solution is obtained with a specific propagation speed.

  7. Ph.D. Thesis defended to obtain the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    traditional communication systems by more human oriented solutions based on virtual reality technology Facial animation has become an active research topic in telecommunications. This field aims at replacing from monocular video sequences. The obtained motion data are suitable to animate the realistic head

  8. Portal dosimetry for VMAT using integrated images obtained during treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bedford, James L., E-mail: James.Bedford@icr.ac.uk; Hanson, Ian M.; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark [Joint Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)] [Joint Department of Physics, The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, Downs Road, Sutton, Surrey SM2 5PT (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Portal dosimetry provides an accurate and convenient means of verifying dose delivered to the patient. A simple method for carrying out portal dosimetry for volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) is described, together with phantom measurements demonstrating the validity of the approach. Methods: Portal images were predicted by projecting dose in the isocentric plane through to the portal image plane, with exponential attenuation and convolution with a double-Gaussian scatter function. Appropriate parameters for the projection were selected by fitting the calculation model to portal images measured on an iViewGT portal imager (Elekta AB, Stockholm, Sweden) for a variety of phantom thicknesses and field sizes. This model was then used to predict the portal image resulting from each control point of a VMAT arc. Finally, all these control point images were summed to predict the overall integrated portal image for the whole arc. The calculated and measured integrated portal images were compared for three lung and three esophagus plans delivered to a thorax phantom, and three prostate plans delivered to a homogeneous phantom, using a gamma index for 3% and 3 mm. A 0.6 cm{sup 3} ionization chamber was used to verify the planned isocentric dose. The sensitivity of this method to errors in monitor units, field shaping, gantry angle, and phantom position was also evaluated by means of computer simulations. Results: The calculation model for portal dose prediction was able to accurately compute the portal images due to simple square fields delivered to solid water phantoms. The integrated images of VMAT treatments delivered to phantoms were also correctly predicted by the method. The proportion of the images with a gamma index of less than unity was 93.7% ± 3.0% (1SD) and the difference between isocenter dose calculated by the planning system and measured by the ionization chamber was 0.8% ± 1.0%. The method was highly sensitive to errors in monitor units and field shape, but less sensitive to errors in gantry angle or phantom position. Conclusions: This method of predicting integrated portal images provides a convenient means of verifying dose delivered using VMAT, with minimal image acquisition and data processing requirements.

  9. Surface Sensitive Microfluidic Optomechanical Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Kyu Hyun

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The microfluidic optomechanical resonator (uFOMR) based on a thin-walled glass capillary supports high Q-factor (>1000) mechanical modes in the presence of liquids. In this Letter, the sensitivity of the uFOMR to the surface change is studied by layer-by-layer removal of SiO2 molecules from the uFOMR inner surface using various concentrations of hydrofluoric acid solutions. A frequency downshift is observed with a sensitivity of 1.2 Hz/(pg/mm2), which translates to a surface density detection limit of 83 pg/mm2. This work opens a door to using the optomechanical mode for detection and characterization of molecules present near the resonator surface.

  10. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, Terje A. [Berkeley, CA

    1980-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent.

  11. Dye-sensitized solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skotheim, T.A.

    1980-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A low-cost dye-sensitized Schottky barrier solar cell is comprised of a substrate of semiconductor with an ohmic contact on one face, a sensitizing dye adsorbed onto the opposite face of the semiconductor, a transparent thin-film layer of a reducing agent over the dye, and a thin-film layer of metal over the reducing agent. The ohmic contact and metal layer constitute electrodes for connection to an external circuit and one or the other or both are made transparent to permit light to penetrate to the dye and be absorbed therein for generating electric current. The semiconductor material chosen to be the substrate is one having a wide bandgap and which therefore is transparent; the dye selected is one having a ground state within the bandgap of the semiconductor to generate carriers in the semiconductor, and a first excited state above the conduction band edge of the semiconductor to readily conduct electrons from the dye to the semiconductor; the reducing agent selected is one having a ground state above the ground state of the sensitizer to provide a plentiful source of electrons to the dye during current generation and thereby enhance the generation; and the metal for the thin-film layer of metal is selected to have a Fermi level in the vicinity of or above the ground state of the reducing agent to thereby amply supply electrons to the reducing agent. 3 figs.

  12. Sensitivity of Multi-gas Climate Policy to Emission Metrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, Steven J.; Karas, Joseph F.; Edmonds, James A.; Eom, Jiyong; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-gas greenhouse emission targets require that different emissions be combined into an aggregate total. The Global Warming Potential (GWP) index is currently used for this purpose, despite various criticisms of the underlying concept. It is not possible to uniquely define a single metric that perfectly captures the different impacts of emissions of substances with widely disparate atmospheric lifetimes, which leads to a wide range of possible index values. We examine the sensitivity of emissions and climate outcomes to the value of the index used to aggregate methane emissions using a technologically detailed integrated assessment model. We find that the sensitivity to index value is of order 4-14% in terms of methane emissions and 2% in terms of total radiative forcing, using index values between 4 and 70 for methane, with larger regional differences in some cases. The sensitivity to index value is much higher in economic terms, with total 2-gas mitigation cost decreasing 4-5% for a lower index and increasing 10-13% for a larger index, with even larger changes if the emissions reduction targets are small. The sensitivity to index value also depends on the assumed maximum amount of mitigation available in each sector. Evaluation of the maximum mitigation potential for major sources of non-CO2 greenhouse gases would greatly aid analysis

  13. Membrane potential and spike train statistics depend distinctly on input statistics Robert Rosenbaum1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azevedo, Ricardo

    - niques such as voltage sensitive dyes and local field po- tentials capture a mixture of subthreshold are most sensitive to modula- tions of a cell's input current when excitation is strong and firing rates. For example, the correlation between two signals obtained from voltage sensitive dyes or local field

  14. Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation catalysts obtained from coal mineral matter

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liu, Kindtoken H. D. (Newark, DE); Hamrin, Jr., Charles E. (Lexington, KY)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrotreating catalyst is prepared from coal mineral matter obtained by low temperature ashing coals of relatively low bassanite content by the steps of: (a) depositing on the low temperature ash 0.25-3 grams of an iron or nickel salt in water per gram of ash and drying a resulting slurry; (b) crushing and sizing a resulting solid; and (c) heating the thus-sized solid powder in hydrogen.

  15. Obtaining and Using USDA Market and Production Reports

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Smith, Jackie; O'Brien, Daniel

    2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining and Using USDA Market and Production Reports Risk Management E-490 RM2-11.0 09-08 *Professors and Extension Economists?Management, The Texas A&M System. It has been said that ?accurate and timely in- formation is the lubricant... organizations. Public information is commonly available from the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) and land grant universities. USDA is responsible for collecting and reporting to the public a vast array of information on virtually every...

  16. Obtaining anisotropic velocity data for proper depth seismic imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Egerev, Sergey; Yushin, Victor; Ovchinnikov, Oleg; Dubinsky, Vladimir; Patterson, Doug [Andreyev Acoustics Institute, Moscow, 117036 (Russian Federation); Baker Hughes, Inc, 2001 Rankin Road, Houston, TX, 77073 (United States)

    2012-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with the problem of obtaining anisotropic velocity data due to continuous acoustic impedance-based measurements while scanning in the axial direction along the walls of the borehole. Diagrams of full conductivity of the piezoceramic transducer were used to derive anisotropy parameters of the rock sample. The measurements are aimed to support accurate depth imaging of seismic data. Understanding these common anisotropy effects is important when interpreting data where it is present.

  17. Sensitivity of CUORE to Neutrinoless Double-Beta Decay

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CUORE; Alessandria, F.; Andreotti, E.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Avignone III, F. T.; Balata, M.; Bandac, I.; Banks, T. I.; Bari, G.; Beeman, J.; Bellini, F.; Bersani, A.; Biassoni, M.; Bloxham, T.; Brofferio, C.; Bryant, A.; Bucci, C.; Cai, X. Z.; Canonica, L.; Capelli, S.; Carbone, L.; Cardani, L.; Carrettoni, M.; Casali, N.; Chott, N.; Clemenza, M.; Cosmelli, C.; Cremonesi, O.; Creswick, R. J.; Dafinei, I.; Dally, A.; Biasi, A. De; Decowski, M. P.; Deninno, M. M.; Waard, A. de; Domizio, S. Di; Ejzak, L.; Faccini, R.; Fang, D. Q.; Farach, H. A.; Ferri, E.; Ferroni, F.; Fiorini, E.; Foggetta, L.; Franceschi, M. A.; Freedman, S. J.; Frossati, G.; Fujikawa, B. K.; Giachero, A.; Gironi, L.; Giuliani, A.; Gorla, P.; Gotti, C.; Guardincerri, E.; Gutierrez, T. D.; Haller, E. E.; Han, K.; Heeger, K. M.; Huang, H. Z.; Ichimura, K.; Kadel, R.; Kazkaz, K.; Keppel, G.; Kogler, L.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kraft, S.; Lenz, D.; Li, Y. L.; Liu, X.; Longo, E.; Ma, Y. G.; Maiano, C.; Maier, G.; Maino, M.; Mancini, C.; Martinez, C.; Martinez, M.; Maruyama, R. H.; Moggi, N.; Morganti, S.; Napolitano, T.; Newman, S.; Nisi, S.; Nones, C.; Norman, E. B.; Nucciotti, A.; Orio, F.; Orlandi, D.; Ouellet, J. L.; Pallavicini, M.; Palmieri, V.; Pattavina, L.; Pavan, M.; Pedretti, M.; Pessina, G.; Pirro, S.; Previtali, E.; Rampazzo, V.; Rimondi, F.; Rosenfeld, C.; Rusconi, C.; Salvioni, C.; Sangiorgio, S.; Schaeffer, D.; Scielzo, N. D.; Sisti, M.; Smith, A. R.; Stivanello, F.; Taffarello, L.; Terenziani, G.; Tian, W. D.; Tomei, C.; Trentalange, S.; Ventura, G.; Vignati, M.; Wang, B. S.; Wang, H. W.; Whitten Jr., C. A.; Wise, T.; Woodcraft, A.; Xu, N.; Zanotti, L.; Zarra, C.; Zhu, B. X.; Zucchelli, S.

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the sensitivity of CUORE, a bolometric double-beta decay experiment under construction at the Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso in Italy. Two approaches to the computation of experimental sensitivity are discussed and compared, and the formulas and parameters used in the sensitivity estimates are provided. Assuming a background rate of 10{sup -2} cts/(keV kg y), we find that, after 5 years of live time, CUORE will have a 1#27;{sigma} sensitivity to the neutrinoless double-beta decay half-life of {caret T{sup 0{nu}}{sub 1/2}}(1{sigma}#27;) = 1.6x#2;10{sup 26} y and thus a potential to probe the effective Majorana neutrino mass down to 41-95 meV; the sensitivity at 1.64{sigma}#27;, which corresponds to 90% C.L., will be {caret T{sup 0{nu}}{sub 1/2}(1.64{sigma}#27;}) = 9.5x10{sup 25} y. This range is compared with the claim of observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay in {sup 76}Ge and the preferred range in the neutrino mass parameter space from oscillation results.

  18. Performance and cost sensitivities associated with superconducting devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selcow, E.C.; Brown, T.G.; Flanagan, C.A.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the results of a study to explore the design space of superconducting ignition devices. Parametric studies were performed with the revised FEDC Tokamak Systems Code to determine the sensitivity of performance and cost variations in confinement model, aspect ratio, maximum field at the toroidal field (TF) coils, and plasma elongation. We discuss the methodology employed and the implication of the results obtained.

  19. Depletion GPT-free sensitivity analysis for reactor eigenvalue problems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, C.; Abdel-Khalik, H. [North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript introduces a novel approach to solving depletion perturbation theory problems without the need to set up or solve the generalized perturbation theory (GPT) equations. The approach, hereinafter denoted generalized perturbation theory free (GPT-Free), constructs a reduced order model (ROM) using methods based in perturbation theory and computes response sensitivity profiles in a manner that is independent of the number or type of responses, allowing for an efficient computation of sensitivities when many responses are required. Moreover, the reduction error from using the ROM is quantified in the GPT-Free approach by means of a Wilks' order statistics error metric denoted the K-metric. Traditional GPT has been recognized as the most computationally efficient approach for performing sensitivity analyses of models with many input parameters, e.g. when forward sensitivity analyses are computationally intractable. However, most neutronics codes that can solve the fundamental (homogenous) adjoint eigenvalue problem do not have GPT capabilities unless envisioned during code development. The GPT-Free approach addresses this limitation by requiring only the ability to compute the fundamental adjoint. This manuscript demonstrates the GPT-Free approach for depletion reactor calculations performed in SCALE6 using the 7x7 UAM assembly model. A ROM is developed for the assembly over a time horizon of 990 days. The approach both calculates the reduction error over the lifetime of the simulation using the K-metric and benchmarks the obtained sensitivities using sample calculations. (authors)

  20. Development of the two-dimensional cross-section sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code SENSIT-2D with applications to the FED

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Embrechts, M.J.; Dudziak, D.J.; Urban, W.T.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitivity and uncertainty analyses implement the information obtained from a transport code by providing a reasonable estimate for the uncertainty of a particular design parameter and a better understanding of the nucleonics involved. The toroidal geometry of many fusion devices motivates a two-dimensional calculation capability. A two-dimensional cross-section and secondary energy distribution (SED) sensitivity and uncertainty analysis code, SENSIT-2D, has been developed that allows modeling of a toroidal geometry. Two-dimensional and one-dimensional sensitivity analyses for the heating and the copper d.p.a. of the TF coil for a conceptual FED blanket/shield design were performed. The uncertainties from the two-dimensional analysis are of the same order of magnitude as those obtained from the one-dimensional study. The largest uncertainties were caused by the cross-section covariances for chromium.

  1. How to obtain the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Energy Modeling System (NEMS) NEMS is used by the modelers at the U. S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) who understand its structure and programming. NEMS has only been used by a few organizations outside of the EIA, because most people that requested NEMS found out that it was too difficult or rigid to use. NEMS is not typically used for state-level analysis and is poorly suited for application to other countries. However, many do obtain the model simply to use the data in its input files or to examine the source code.

  2. Isospectral partners for a complex PT-invariant potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anjana Sinha; Rajkumar Roychoudhury

    2002-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct isospectral partner potentials of a complex PT-invariant potential, viz., V(x) = V_1 sech ^2 x - i V_2 sech x tanh x using Darboux's method. Oneset of isospectral potentials are obatined which can be termed 'Satellite potentials', in the sense that they are pf the same form as the original potential. In a particular case, the supersymmetric partner potential has the same spectrum, including the zero energy ground state, a fact which cannot occur in conventional supersymmetric quantum mechanics with real potential. An explicit example of a non-trivial set of isospectral potential is also obtained.

  3. Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Miller, John V. (Munhall, PA); Carlson, William R. (Scott Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yarbrough, Michael B. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

  4. (Melanin-Sensitized Solar Cell) : 696220016

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the majority dye-sensitized solar cell research all uses the Ruthenium-complex as a light harvester. Dye-sensitized solar cell, DSSC 1991GrätzelDSSC[1] DSSCGrätzel cellDSSC polypyridyl complexes (Melanin-Sensitized Solar Cell) : : : 696220016 #12; #12;#12; #12;I PLD

  5. 4, 13771404, 2007 Sensitivity study of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BGD 4, 1377­1404, 2007 Sensitivity study of air-sea CO2 flux J. F. Tjiputra and A. M. E. Winguth Adjoint sensitivity of the air-sea CO2 flux to ecosystem parameterization in a three-dimensional global­1404, 2007 Sensitivity study of air-sea CO2 flux J. F. Tjiputra and A. M. E. Winguth Title Page Abstract

  6. Nanoemulsions obtained via bubble bursting at a compound interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Jie; Vigolo, Daniele; Arnaudov, Luben N; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Gurkov, Theodor D; Tsutsumanova, Gichka G; Stone, Howard A

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The bursting of bubbles at an air/liquid interface is a familiar occurrence important to foam stability, cell cultures in bioreactors and mass transfer between the sea and atmosphere. Here we document the hitherto unreported formation and dispersal into the water column of submicrometre oil droplets following bubble bursting at a compound air/oil/water-with-surfactant interface. We show that dispersal results from the detachment of an oil spray from the bottom of the bubble towards water during bubble collapse. We provide evidence that droplet size is selected by physicochemical interactions between oil molecules and the surfactants rather than by hydrodynamic effects. We illustrate the unrecognized role that this dispersal mechanism may play in the fate of the sea surface micro-layer and of pollutant spills by dispersing petroleum in the water column. Finally, our system provides an energy-efficient route, with potential upscalability and wide applicability, for applications in drug delivery, food production...

  7. Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hänggi, Peter; Talkner, Peter

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a free particle coupled with finite strength to a bath and investigate the evaluation of its specific heat. A harmonic oscillator bath of Drude type with cutoff frequency omega_D is employed to model an ohmic friction force with dissipation strength gamma. Two scenarios for obtaining specific heat are presented. The first one uses the measurement of the kinetic energy of the free particle while the second one is based on the reduced partition function. Both descriptions yield results which are consistent with the Third Law of thermodynamics. Nevertheless, the two methods produce different results that disagree even in their leading quantum corrections at high temperatures. We also consider the regime where the cutoff frequency is smaller than the friction strength, i.e. omega_D1.

  8. Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume,234 0% 0% #12;Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel;Absolute Biodiesel Potential Country Name Production Cost ($/liter) Potential Biodiesel Volume (liters

  9. Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaetzel, Michael

    2010-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping Biomass Distribution Potential Michael Schaetzel Undergraduate ? Environmental Studies ? University of Kansas L O C A T S I O N BIOMASS ENERGY POTENTIAL o According to DOE, Biomass has the potential to provide 14% of... the nation’s power o Currently 1% of national power supply o Carbon neutral? combustion of biomass is part of the natural carbon cycle o Improved crop residue management has potential to benefit environment, producers, and economy Biomass Btu...

  10. Finite quantum dissipation: the challenge of obtaining specific heat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Hänggi; Gert-Ludwig Ingold; Peter Talkner

    2008-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider a free particle coupled with finite strength to a bath and investigate the evaluation of its specific heat. A harmonic oscillator bath of Drude type with cutoff frequency omega_D is employed to model an ohmic friction force with dissipation strength gamma. Two scenarios for obtaining specific heat are presented. The first one uses the measurement of the kinetic energy of the free particle while the second one is based on the reduced partition function. Both descriptions yield results which are consistent with the Third Law of thermodynamics. Nevertheless, the two methods produce different results that disagree even in their leading quantum corrections at high temperatures. We also consider the regime where the cutoff frequency is smaller than the friction strength, i.e. omega_Dheat based on the thermodynamic prescription becomes negative. This anomaly is rooted in an ill-defined density of states of the damped free particle which assumes unphysical negative values when gamma/omega_D>1.

  11. Nucleon-nucleon potential from an effective chiral Lagrangian

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ordonez, C.; Ray, L.; van Kolck, U. (Theory Group, Department of Physics, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States) Medium Energy Group, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States) Department of Physics, FM-15, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States))

    1994-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The nucleon-nucleon potential obtained from the most general effective chiral Lagrangian involving low momentum pions, nonrelativistic nucleons, and [Delta] isobars was considered to third order in the chiral expansion. The parameters of the potential were adjusted to reproduce the low energy nucleon-nucleon scattering phase shifts as well as the properties of the deuteron. Reasonable fits are obtained in this first application of a nucleon-nucleon potential based on chiral symemtry.

  12. Noise correction of turbulent spectra obtained from Acoustic Doppler Velocimeters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durgesh, Vibhav; Thomson, Jim; Richmond, Marshall C.; Polagye, Brian

    2014-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Accurately estimated auto-spectral density functions are essential for characterization of turbulent flows, and they also have applications in computational fluid dynamics modeling, site and inflow characterization for hydrokinetic turbines, and inflow turbulence generation. The Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV) provides single-point temporally resolved data, that are used to characterize turbulent flows in rivers, seas, and oceans. However, ADV data are susceptible to contamination from various sources, including instrument noise, which is the intrinsic limit to the accuracy of acoustic velocity measurements. Due to the presence of instrument noise, the spectra obtained are altered at high frequencies. The focus of this study is to develop a robust and effective method for accurately estimating auto-spectral density functions from ADV data by reducing or removing the spectral contribution derived from instrument noise. For this purpose, the “Noise Auto-Correlation” (NAC) approach was developed, which exploits the correlation properties of instrument noise to identify and remove its contribution from spectra. The spectra estimated using the NAC approach exhibit increased fidelity and a slope of -5/3 in the inertial range, which is typically observed for turbulent flows. Finally, this study also compares the effectiveness of low-pass Gaussian filters in removing instrument noise with that of the NAC approach. For the data used in this study, both the NAC and Gaussian filter approaches are observed to be capable of removing instrument noise at higher frequencies from the spectra. However, the NAC results are closer to the expected frequency power of -5/3 in the inertial sub-range.

  13. An assessment of BWR (boiling water reactor) Mark-II containment challenges, failure modes, and potential improvements in performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kelly, D.L.; Jones, K.R.; Dallman, R.J. (EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (USA)); Wagner, K.C. (Science Applications International Corp., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report assesses challenges to BWR Mark II containment integrity that could potentially arise from severe accidents. Also assessed are some potential improvements that could prevent core damage or containment failure, or could mitigate the consequences of such failure by reducing the release of fission products to the environment. These challenges and improvements are analyzed via a limited quantitative risk/benefit analysis of a generic BWR/4 reactor with Mark II containment. Point estimate frequencies of the dominant core damage sequences are obtained and simple containment event trees are constructed to evaluate the response of the containment to these severe accident sequences. The resulting containment release modes are then binned into source term release categories, which provide inputs to the consequence analysis. The output of the consequences analysis is used to construct an overall base case risk profile. Potential improvements and sensitivities are evaluated by modifying the event tree spilt fractions, thus generating a revised risk profile. Several important sensitivity cases are examined to evaluate the impact of phenomenological uncertainties on the final results. 75 refs., 25 figs., 65 tabs.

  14. Sensitive glow discharge ion source for aerosol and gas analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Reilly, Peter T. A. (Knoxville, TN)

    2007-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A high sensitivity glow discharge ion source system for analyzing particles includes an aerodynamic lens having a plurality of constrictions for receiving an aerosol including at least one analyte particle in a carrier gas and focusing the analyte particles into a collimated particle beam. A separator separates the carrier gas from the analyte particle beam, wherein the analyte particle beam or vapors derived from the analyte particle beam are selectively transmitted out of from the separator. A glow discharge ionization source includes a discharge chamber having an entrance orifice for receiving the analyte particle beam or analyte vapors, and a target electrode and discharge electrode therein. An electric field applied between the target electrode and discharge electrode generates an analyte ion stream from the analyte vapors, which is directed out of the discharge chamber through an exit orifice, such as to a mass spectrometer. High analyte sensitivity is obtained by pumping the discharge chamber exclusively through the exit orifice and the entrance orifice.

  15. Sensitivity evaluation of dynamic speckle activity measurements using clustering methods

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Etchepareborda, Pablo; Federico, Alejandro; Kaufmann, Guillermo H.

    2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We evaluate and compare the use of competitive neural networks, self-organizing maps, the expectation-maximization algorithm, K-means, and fuzzy C-means techniques as partitional clustering methods, when the sensitivity of the activity measurement of dynamic speckle images needs to be improved. The temporal history of the acquired intensity generated by each pixel is analyzed in a wavelet decomposition framework, and it is shown that the mean energy of its corresponding wavelet coefficients provides a suited feature space for clustering purposes. The sensitivity obtained by using the evaluated clustering techniques is also compared with the well-known methods of Konishi-Fujii, weighted generalized differences, and wavelet entropy. The performance of the partitional clustering approach is evaluated using simulated dynamic speckle patterns and also experimental data.

  16. Sensitivity in risk analyses with uncertain numbers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tucker, W. Troy; Ferson, Scott

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensitivity analysis is a study of how changes in the inputs to a model influence the results of the model. Many techniques have recently been proposed for use when the model is probabilistic. This report considers the related problem of sensitivity analysis when the model includes uncertain numbers that can involve both aleatory and epistemic uncertainty and the method of calculation is Dempster-Shafer evidence theory or probability bounds analysis. Some traditional methods for sensitivity analysis generalize directly for use with uncertain numbers, but, in some respects, sensitivity analysis for these analyses differs from traditional deterministic or probabilistic sensitivity analyses. A case study of a dike reliability assessment illustrates several methods of sensitivity analysis, including traditional probabilistic assessment, local derivatives, and a ''pinching'' strategy that hypothetically reduces the epistemic uncertainty or aleatory uncertainty, or both, in an input variable to estimate the reduction of uncertainty in the outputs. The prospects for applying the methods to black box models are also considered.

  17. Generalized Fusion Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ofer Aharony

    1993-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, DiFrancesco and Zuber have characterized the RCFTs which have a description in terms of a fusion potential in one variable, and proposed a generalized potential to describe other theories. In this note we give a simple criterion to determine when such a generalized description is possible. We also determine which RCFTs can be described by a fusion potential in more than one variable, finding that in fact all RCFTs can be described in such a way, as conjectured by Gepner.

  18. Potential Release Sites

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators...

  19. Field matric potential sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of determining matric potential of a sample, the method comprising placing the sample in a container, the container having an opening; and contacting the sample with a tensiometer via the opening. An apparatus for determining matric potential of a sample, the apparatus comprising a housing configured to receive a sample; a portable matric potential sensing device extending into the housing and having a porous member; and a wall closing the housing to insulate the sample and at least a portion of the matric potential sensing device including the porous member.

  20. Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis for Numerical Weather Prediction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandru Cioaca

    2011-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Sep 2, 2011 ... Adjoint Sensitivity Analysis for Numerical Weather Prediction: Applications to Power Grid Optimization. Alexandru Cioaca(alexgc ***at*** vt.edu)

  1. Scattering amplitudes for multi-indexed extensions of solvable potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, C.-L. [Department of Physics, Tamkang University, Tamsui 251, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lee, J.-C., E-mail: jcclee@cc.nctu.edu.tw [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao-Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan, ROC (China); Sasaki, R. [Center for Theoretical Sciences, National Taiwan University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Department of Physics, Shinshu University, Matsumoto 390-8621 (Japan)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    New solvable one-dimensional quantum mechanical scattering problems are presented. They are obtained from known solvable potentials by multiple Darboux transformations in terms of virtual and pseudo virtual wavefunctions. The same method applied to confining potentials, e.g.  Pöschl–Teller and the radial oscillator potentials, has generated the multi-indexed Jacobi and Laguerre polynomials. Simple multi-indexed formulas are derived for the transmission and reflection amplitudes of several solvable potentials. -- Highlights: •Scattering amplitudes calculated for infinitely many new solvable potentials. •New scattering potentials obtained by deforming six known solvable potentials. •Multiple Darboux transformations in terms of (pseudo) virtual states employed. •Scattering amplitudes checked to obey the shape invariance relation. •Errors in scattering amplitudes of some undeformed potentials in the literature corrected.

  2. Regulon inference without arbitrary thresholds: three levels of sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dubchak, Pavel Novichkov, Elena Stavrovskaya, Dmitry Rodionov, Andrey Mironov, Inna; Rodionov, Dmitry; Mironov, Andrey; Dubchak, Inna; Novichkov, P.S.

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Reconstruction of transcriptional regulatory networks is one of the major challenges facing the bioinformatics community in view of constantly growing number of complete genomes. The comparative genomics approach has been successfully used for the analysis of the transcriptional regulation of many metabolic systems in various bacteria taxa. The key step in this approach is given a position weight matrix, find an optimal threshold for the search of potential binding sites in genomes. In our previous work we proposed an approach for automatic selection of TFBS score threshold coupled with inference of regulon content. In this study we developed two modifications of this approach providing two additional levels of sensitivity.

  3. SOLAR ENERGY POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loreta N. Gashi; Sabedin A. Meha; Besnik A. Duriqi; Fatos S. Haxhimusa

    In recent years solar energy has experienced phenomenal growth due to the technological improvements resulting in cost reductions and also governments policies supportive of renewable energy development and utilization. In this paper we will present possibilities for development and deployment of solar energy. We will use Kosovo to compare the existing power production potential and future possible potential by using solar energy.

  4. Hydropower Potential Screening Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hydropower Potential Screening Study Gillian Charles GRAC 5/28/14 #12;Latest Hydropower Potential Study Creating a Buzz 2014 DOE study on undeveloped stream reaches 84.7 GW undeveloped hydropower in undeveloped stream reaches hydropower in the PNW #12;Studies at both National

  5. On modeling hydraulic fracture in proper variables: stiffness, accuracy, sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mishuris, Gennady; Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The problem of hydraulic fracture propagation is considered by using its recently suggested modified formulation in terms of the particle velocity, the opening in the proper degree, appropriate spatial coordinates and $\\varepsilon$-regularization. We show that the formulation may serve for significant increasing the efficiency of numerical tracing the fracture propagation. Its advantages are illustrated by re-visiting the Nordgren problem. It is shown that the modified formulation facilitates (i) possibility to have various stiffness of differential equations resulting after spatial discretization, (ii) obtaining highly accurate and stable numerical results with moderate computational effort, and (iii) sensitivity analysis. The exposition is extensively illustrated by numerical examples.

  6. TECHNICAL REPORT: MODEL SENSITIVITY TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forget, François

    TECHNICAL REPORT: MODEL SENSITIVITY TO SURFACE TOPOGRAPHY ESTEC Contract 11369/95/NL/JG S. R. Lewis and Consortium Topography . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 3 Studies of Sensitivity to Surface Topography 9 3.1 Zonal with respect to the surface topography with particular emphasis on any differences which may be important

  7. Spectral sensitization of nanocrystalline solar cells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spitler, Mark T. (Concord, MA); Ehret, Anne (Malden, MA); Stuhl, Louis S. (Bedford, MA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention relates to dye sensitized polycrystalline photoelectrochemical solar cells for use in energy transduction from light to electricity. It concerns the utility of highly absorbing organic chromophores as sensitizers in such cells and the degree to which they may be utilized alone and in combination to produce an efficient photoelectrochemical cell, e.g., a regenerative solar cell.

  8. Investigation of Thermal Interface Materials Using Phase-Sensitive Transient Thermoreflectance Technique: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feng, X.; King, C.; DeVoto, D.; Mihalic, M.; Narumanchi, S.

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With increasing power density in electronics packages/modules, thermal resistances at multiple interfaces are a bottleneck to efficient heat removal from the package. In this work, the performance of thermal interface materials such as grease, thermoplastic adhesives and diffusion-bonded interfaces are characterized using the phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectance technique. A multi-layer heat conduction model was constructed and theoretical solutions were derived to obtain the relation between phase lag and the thermal/physical properties. This technique enables simultaneous extraction of the contact resistance and bulk thermal conductivity of the TIMs. With the measurements, the bulk thermal conductivity of Dow TC-5022 thermal grease (70 to 75 um bondline thickness) was 3 to 5 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 5 to 10 mm2-K/W. For the Btech thermoplastic material (45 to 80 ?m bondline thickness), the bulk thermal conductivity was 20 to 50 W/(m-K) and the contact resistance was 2 to 5 mm2-K/W. Measurements were also conducted to quantify the thermal performance of diffusion-bonded interface for power electronics applications. Results with the diffusion-bonded sample showed that the interfacial thermal resistance is more than one order of magnitude lower than those of traditional TIMs, suggesting potential pathways to efficient thermal management.

  9. Distributed Energy Resources at Naval Base Ventura County Building1512: A Sensitivity Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, Owen C.; Marnay, Chris

    2005-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the second of a two-part study by BerkeleyLab of a DER (distributed energy resources) system at Navy Base VenturaCounty (NBVC). First, a preliminary assessment ofthe cost effectivenessof distributed energy resources at Naval Base Ventura County (NBVC)Building 1512 was conducted in response to the base s request for designassistance to the Federal Energy Management Program (Bailey and Marnay,2004). That report contains a detailed description of the site and theDER-CAM (Consumer Adoption Model) parameters used. This second reportcontains sensitivity analyses of key parameters in the DER system modelof Building 1512 at NBVC and additionally considers the potential forabsorption-powered refrigeration.The prior analysis found that under thecurrent tariffs, and given assumptions about the performance andstructure of building energy loads and available generating technologycharacteristics, installing a 600 kW DER system with absorption coolingand recovery heat capabilities could deliver cost savings of about 14percent, worth $55,000 per year. However, under current conditions, thisstudy also suggested that significant savings could be obtained ifBuilding 1512 changed from its current direct access contract to a SCETOU-8 (Southern California Edison time of use tariff number 8) ratewithout installing a DER system. Evaluated on this tariff, the potentialsavings from installation of a DER system would be about 4 percent of thetotal bill, or $16,000 per year.

  10. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery Warren; Zevenbergen, Gary Allen

    2012-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising a first electrode, a second electrode, and a voltage attenuator. The first electrode and the second electrode are both electrically connected to the voltage attenuator. A means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential is connected to the voltage attenuator. The device and method further comprises a means for enabling one or more alarms upon the detection of the dangerous ground potential. Preferably, a first transmitter/receiver is connected to the means for enabling one or more alarms. Preferably, a second transmitter/receiver, comprising a button, is electromagnetically connected to the first transmitter/receiver. Preferably, the means for determining the presence of a dangerous ground potential comprises a means for determining the true RMS voltage at the output of the voltage attenuator, a transient detector connected to the output of the voltage attenuator, or a combination thereof.

  11. Potentiation of chlortetracycline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hesketh, Harold Robert

    1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    H of the crop, proventriculus, giszsrd and duodenum and the serum chlortetrscycline levels of chicks fed sulphuric acid, hydrochloric acid, acetic acid and oxalic acid sa- potentiating agents. 35 The pH of the crap, proventri. culus, gizzard and duodenum... snd the serum chlortetracycline levels of chicks fed ammonium sulphate and sodium oxalate as potentiating agents' 36 12 The effect of dienestrol diacetste on the level of chlortetracycline in serum from three week old chicks . ~ . ?~ ~ . . ~ . 49...

  12. Relative sensitivity and cost of amphipod bioassays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Word, J.Q.; Ward, J.A.; Brown, B.; Walls, B.D.; Lemlich, S.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies were conducted to compare the relative sensitivity of the amphipods Ampelisca abdita, Grandidierella japonica, and Rhepoxynius abronius; the differences in their sensitivity under flow-through and static testing protocols; and the relative cost of performing each type of test. These studies, sponsored by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), provided a way of assessing the most cost effective and sensitive way of evaluating sediments proposed for dredging. Sensitivity of R. abronius and A. abdita was evaluated at 51 sites during three separate experimental periods. G. japonica sensitivity was compared to R. abronius and A. abdita at five sites. During each of the three testing periods, flow-through and static testing protocols were evaluated for each species. R. abronius showed greater mortality, and thus higher sensitivity, over the 10-d testing periods than G. japonica or A. abdita. The highest mortality was in the flow-through protocol for R. abronius. We believe this increased sensitivity was due to additional contaminant exposure from the undisturbed air-water interface. The containment loads in the air-water interface of the static jar may not have been as concentrated because of disturbance from aeration. The static protocols were less expensive than flow-through. The testing protocols for R. abronius were less expensive than those for G. japonica. The A. abdita flow-through test was the most expensive at 2.3 times the cost of the least expensive static R. abronius test. 5 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  13. Physics Potential of Future Atmospheric Neutrino Searches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Schwetz

    2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The potential of future high statistics atmospheric neutrino experiments is considered, having in mind currently discussed huge detectors of various technologies (water Cerekov, magnetized iron, liquid Argon). I focus on the possibility to use atmospheric data to determine the octant of $\\theta_{23}$ and the neutrino mass hierarchy. The sensitivity to the $\\theta_{23}$-octant of atmospheric neutrinos is competitive (or even superior) to long-baseline experiments. I discuss the ideal properties of a fictitious atmospheric neutrino detector to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy.

  14. Structural Sensitivity of Dry Storage Canisters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klymyshyn, Nicholas A.; Karri, Naveen K.; Adkins, Harold E.; Hanson, Brady D.

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This LS-DYNA modeling study evaluated a generic used nuclear fuel vertical dry storage cask system under tip-over, handling drop, and seismic load cases to determine the sensitivity of the canister containment boundary to these loads. The goal was to quantify the expected failure margins to gain insight into what material changes over the extended long-term storage lifetime could have the most influence on the security of the containment boundary. It was determined that the tip-over case offers a strong challenge to the containment boundary, and identifies one significant material knowledge gap, the behavior of welded stainless steel joints under high-strain-rate conditions. High strain rates are expected to increase the material’s effective yield strength and ultimate strength, and may decrease its ductility. Determining and accounting for this behavior could potentially reverse the model prediction of a containment boundary failure at the canister lid weld. It must be emphasized that this predicted containment failure is an artifact of the generic system modeled. Vendor specific designs analyze for cask tip-over and these analyses are reviewed and approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Another location of sensitivity of the containment boundary is the weld between the base plate and the canister shell. Peak stresses at this location predict plastic strains through the whole thickness of the welded material. This makes the base plate weld an important location for material study. This location is also susceptible to high strain rates, and accurately accounting for the material behavior under these conditions could have a significant effect on the predicted performance of the containment boundary. The handling drop case was largely benign to the containment boundary, with just localized plastic strains predicted on the outer surfaces of wall sections. It would take unusual changes in the handling drop scenario to harm the containment boundary, such as raising the drop height or changing the impact angle. The seismic load case was derived from the August 23, 2011 earthquake that affected the North Anna power station. The source of the data was a monitoring station near Charlottesville, Virginia, so the ground motion is not an exact match. Stresses on the containment boundary were so low, even from a fatigue standpoint, that the seismic load case is generally not a concern. Based on this study, it is recommended that high strain rate testing of welded stainless steel test samples be pursued to define the currently unknown material behavior. Additional modeling is recommended to evaluate specific dry storage cask system designs subjected to tip-over loads using a high level of model detail. Additional modeling of the canister interior components (basket, fuel assemblies, etc.) is also recommended, to evaluate the feasibility of fuel retrievability after a tip-over incident. Finally, additional modeling to determine how much degradation a system could undergo and still maintain the integrity of the confinement barrier should be performed.

  15. Deriving effective mesoscale potentials from atomistic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dirk Reith; Mathias Puetz; Florian Mueller-Plathe

    2002-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate how an iterative method for potential inversion from distribution functions developed for simple liquid systems can be generalized to polymer systems. It uses the differences in the potentials of mean force between the distribution functions generated from a guessed potential and the true (simulated) distribution functions to improve the effective potential successively. The optimization algorithm is very powerful: convergence is reached for every trial function in few iterations. As an extensive test case we coarse-grained an atomistic all-atom model of poly (isoprene) (PI) using a 13:1 reduction of the degrees of freedom. This procedure was performed for PI solutions as well as for a PI melt. Comparisons of the obtained force fields are drawn. They prove that it is not possible to use a single force field for different concentration regimes.

  16. Applied Catalysis A: General 243 (2003) 1524 On the potential role of hydroxyl groups in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marks, Laurence D.

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Applied Catalysis A: General 243 (2003) 15­24 On the potential role of hydroxyl groups in CO.K. Costello et al. / Applied Catalysis A: General 243 (2003) 15­24 sensitivity may also account, in part

  17. Influence of the Sensitizer Adsorption Mode on the Open-Circuit Potential of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selloni, Annabella

    doubly protonated analogue (N719), see Figure 1, had a central role in significantly advancing the DSSC nanoparticle are essential. The overall conversion efficiency () of the DSSC is determined by the photocurrent

  18. Sensitivity of Watershed Runoff under Humid Conditions to Potential Climate Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szilagyi, Jozsef

    Szilagyi1 ; Marc B. Parlange2 ; Jonathan A. Patz3 ; and Thaddeus K. Graczyk4 Abstract: A semidistributed

  19. Sense and sensitivity of double beta decay experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gómez-Cadenas, J.J.; Martín-Albo, J.; Sorel, M.; Ferrario, P.; Monrabal, F.; Muñoz, J. [Instituto de Física Corpuscular (IFIC), CSIC and Universidad de Valencia, Calle Catedrático José Beltrán 2, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Novella, P. [Centro de Investigaciones Energéticas, Medioambientales y Tecnológicas (CIEMAT), Avda. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Poves, A., E-mail: gomez@mail.cern.ch, E-mail: justo.martin-albo@ific.uv.es, E-mail: sorel@ific.uv.es, E-mail: paola.ferrario@ific.uv.es, E-mail: francesc.monrabal@ific.uv.es, E-mail: jmunoz@ific.uv.es, E-mail: pau.novella@ciemat.es, E-mail: alfredo.poves@uam.es [Dpto. de de Física Teórica and IFT-UAM/CSIC, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Calle Nicolás Cabrera 13-15, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The search for neutrinoless double beta decay is a very active field in which the number of proposals for next-generation experiments has proliferated. In this paper we attempt to address both the sense and the sensitivity of such proposals. Sensitivity comes first, by means of proposing a simple and unambiguous statistical recipe to derive the sensitivity to a putative Majorana neutrino mass, m{sub ??}. In order to make sense of how the different experimental approaches compare, we apply this recipe to a selection of proposals, comparing the resulting sensitivities. We also propose a ''physics-motivated range'' (PMR) of the nuclear matrix elements as a unifying criterium between the different nuclear models. The expected performance of the proposals is parametrized in terms of only four numbers: energy resolution, background rate (per unit time, isotope mass and energy), detection efficiency, and ?? isotope mass. For each proposal, both a reference and an optimistic scenario for the experimental performance are studied. In the reference scenario we find that all the proposals will be able to partially explore the degenerate spectrum, without fully covering it, although four of them (KamLAND-Zen, CUORE, NEXT and EXO) will approach the 50 meV boundary. In the optimistic scenario, we find that CUORE and the xenon-based proposals (KamLAND-Zen, EXO and NEXT) will explore a significant fraction of the inverse hierarchy, with NEXT covering it almost fully. For the long term future, we argue that {sup 136}Xe-based experiments may provide the best case for a 1-ton scale experiment, given the potentially very low backgrounds achievable and the expected scalability to large isotope masses.

  20. Phase Shifting Prior to Spatial Filtering Enhances Optical Recordings of Cardiac Action Potential Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cosman, Pamela C.

    of electrical activity in the heart using a voltage-sensitive dye has proven to be a useful tool; accepted 7 July 2001) Abstract--Optical imaging of cardiac electrical activity using a voltage-sensitive dye provides high spatial resolution maps of action potential propagation and repolarization. Charge

  1. An Alternative Treatment for Yukawa-Type Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Gonul; K. Koksal; E. Bakir

    2005-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approximation scheme to obtain analytic expressions for the bound state energies and eigenfunctions of Yukawa like potentials. The predicted energies are in excellent agreement with the accurate numerical values reported in the literature.

  2. Potential of Evaporative Cooling Systems for Buildings in India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maiya, M. P.; Vijay, S.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Evaporative cooling potential for building in various climatic zones in India is investigated. Maintainable indoor conditions are obtained from the load - capacity analysis for the prevailing ambient conditions. For the assumed activity level...

  3. Reassessing Wind Potential Estimates for India: Economic and Policy Implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phadke, Amol; Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Khangura, Jagmeet

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We assess developable on-shore wind potential in India at three different hub-heights and under two sensitivity scenarios – one with no farmland included, the other with all farmland included. Under the “no farmland included” case, the total wind potential in India ranges from 748 GW at 80m hub-height to 976 GW at 120m hub-height. Under the “all farmland included” case, the potential with a minimum capacity factor of 20 percent ranges from 984 GW to 1,549 GW. High quality wind energy sites, at 80m hub-height with a minimum capacity factor of 25 percent, have a potential between 253 GW (no farmland included) and 306 GW (all farmland included). Our estimates are more than 15 times the current official estimate of wind energy potential in India (estimated at 50m hub height) and are about one tenth of the official estimate of the wind energy potential in the US.

  4. Modeling and simulation results on high sensitivity scattered gamma-ray emission imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nguyen-Verger, Maï K.

    Modeling and simulation results on high sensitivity scattered gamma-ray emission imaging C. Driol a simulations Numerical image reconstruction a b s t r a c t A new modality in gamma-ray emission imaging, based modality in gamma-ray emission imaging with potential applications in many fields such as bio

  5. Hyperspectral monitoring of chemically sensitive plant Danielle A. Simmons, John P. Kerekes and Nina G. Raqueno

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerekes, John

    . Harnessing plants as bio-sensors allows for distributed sensing without a power supply. Monitoring the bioHyperspectral monitoring of chemically sensitive plant sentinels Danielle A. Simmons, John P ABSTRACT Automated detection of chemical threats is essential for an early warning of a potential attack

  6. Risk-sensitive Policies for Sustainable Renewable Resource Allocation Stefano Ermon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keinan, Alon

    Risk-sensitive Policies for Sustainable Renewable Resource Allocation Stefano Ermon Computer renewable resources allocation problems. In many such problems, high stakes decisions with potentially for the management of a renewable resource. While the most common examples are probably living re- sources

  7. Species-specific residues calibrate SoxR sensitivity to redox-active molecules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dietrich, Lars

    to viologens, which have redox potentials below -350 mV. Using a mutagenic approach, we pin- pointed threeSpecies-specific residues calibrate SoxR sensitivity to redox-active molecules Rebecca Sheplock,1, the transcription factor SoxR triggers a global stress response by sensing a broad spectrum of redox

  8. Ultrahigh humidity sensitivity of graphene oxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi, Hengchang

    Humidity sensors have been extensively used in various fields, and numerous problems are encountered when using humidity sensors, including low sensitivity, long response and recovery times, and narrow humidity detection ...

  9. Sensitive electrochemical detection of horseradish peroxidase...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    devices and point-of-care (POC) diagnosis applications. Citation: Lee AC, G Liu, CK Heng, SN Tan, TM Lim, and Y Lin.2008."Sensitive electrochemical detection of horseradish...

  10. Exploiting level sensitive latches in wire pipelining 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seth, Vikram

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The present research presents procedures for exploitation of level sensitive latches in wire pipelining. The user gives a Steiner tree, having a signal source and set of destination or sinks, and the location in rectangular plane, capacitive load...

  11. Multi-step contrast sensitivity gauge

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana, Enrico C; Thompson, Kyle R; Moore, David G; Heister, Jack D; Poland, Richard W; Ellegood, John P; Hodges, George K; Prindville, James E

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An X-ray contrast sensitivity gauge is described herein. The contrast sensitivity gauge comprises a plurality of steps of varying thicknesses. Each step in the gauge includes a plurality of recesses of differing depths, wherein the depths are a function of the thickness of their respective step. An X-ray image of the gauge is analyzed to determine a contrast-to-noise ratio of a detector employed to generate the image.

  12. Quantum risk-sensitive estimation and robustness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naoki Yamamoto; Luc Bouten

    2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper studies a quantum risk-sensitive estimation problem and investigates robustness properties of the filter. This is a direct extension to the quantum case of analogous classical results. All investigations are based on a discrete approximation model of the quantum system under consideration. This allows us to study the problem in a simple mathematical setting. We close the paper with some examples that demonstrate the robustness of the risk-sensitive estimator.

  13. SHM BASED SYSTEM DESIGN OFA WIND TURBINE TOWER USING A MODAL SENSITIVITY BASED BAYES DETECTOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    SHM BASED SYSTEM DESIGN OFA WIND TURBINE TOWER USING A MODAL SENSITIVITY BASED BAYES DETECTOR Mads@ramboll.com ABSTRACT It is investigated if material based structural safety can be replaced with safety obtained from of the NREL 5MW wind turbine tower subjected to bending fatigue and horizontal circumferential cracking

  14. High-resolution interpretation of sonic logging measurements using stochastic inversion with spatial slowness sensitivity functions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torres-Verdín, Carlos

    modeling, which significantly reduces computation time. We apply the new method to a synthetic case to mud-filtrate invasion and other radial alterations (Sinha, 1997). We define and calculate sensitivity of successful application of the new approach including both synthetic and field cases. In all cases, we obtain

  15. Thermo-quantum diffusion in periodic potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Tsekov

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum Brownian motion in a periodic cosine potential is studied and a simple estimate of the tunneling effect is obtained in the frames of a quasi-equilibrium semiclassical approach. It is shown that the latter is applicable for heavy particles but electrons cannot be described properly since the quantum effects dominate over the thermal ones. The purely quantum electron diffusion is investigated at zero temperature and demonstrates that electrons do not obey the classical Einstein law of Brownian motion in the field of periodic potentials, since the dispersion of the wave packet increases logarithmically in time.

  16. LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    LABORATORY III POTENTIAL ENERGY Lab III - 1 In previous problems, you have been introduced to the concepts of kinetic energy, which is associated with the motion of an object, and internal energy, which is associated with the internal structure of a system. In this section, you work with another form of energy

  17. Proteases Potentiate Fibrocyte Differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galvis Carvajal, Elkin David

    2013-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

    by the presence of the plasma protein Serum Amyloid P (SAP). Tryptase and thrombin potentiate fibrocyte differentiation in the presence of SAP, suggesting that these proteases can be part of a triggering mechanism for scar tissue formation in both healing wounds...

  18. Fusion potentials I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Di Francesco; J. -B. Zuber

    1992-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We reconsider the conjecture by Gepner that the fusion ring of a rational conformal field theory is isomorphic to a ring of polynomials in $n$ variables quotiented by an ideal of constraints that derive from a potential. We show that in a variety of cases, this is indeed true with {\\it one-variable} polynomials.

  19. TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    INTERMODAL TRANSPORTATION: THE POTENTIAL AND THE CHALLENGE A Summary Report 2003 #12;June 2003 To the Reader This report summarizes the second James L. Oberstar Forum on Transportation Policy and Technology. Over two days, we explored the chal- lenges and opportunities in intermodal transportation, addressing

  20. Condition Number Estimates for Combined Potential Boundary Integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langdon, Stephen

    Condition Number Estimates for Combined Potential Boundary Integral Operators in Acoustic parameter. Of independent interest we also obtain upper and lower bounds on the norms of two oscillatory integral operators, namely the classical acoustic single- and double-layer potential operators. 1

  1. Condition Number Estimates for Combined Potential Boundary Integral

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langdon, Stephen

    Condition Number Estimates for Combined Potential Boundary Integral Operators in Acoustic parameter. Of independent interest we first obtain upper and lower bounds on the norms of two oscillatory integral operators, namely the classical acoustic single- and double-layer potential operators. 1

  2. On nonsingular potentials of Cox-Thompson inversion scheme

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tamas Palmai; Barnabas Apagyi

    2011-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    We establish a condition for obtaining nonsingular potentials using the Cox-Thompson inverse scattering method with one phase shift. The anomalous singularities of the potentials are avoided by maintaining unique solutions of the underlying Regge-Newton integral equation for the transformation kernel. As a by-product, new inequality sequences of zeros of Bessel functions are discovered.

  3. Schrödinger Operators with Dynamically Defined Potentials: A Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Damanik

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    In this survey we discuss spectral and quantum dynamical properties of discrete one-dimensional Schr\\"odinger operators whose potentials are obtained by real-valued sampling along the orbits of an ergodic invertible transformation. After an introductory part explaining basic spectral concepts and fundamental results, we present the general theory of such operators, and then provide an overview of known results for specific classes of potentials. Here we focus primarily on the cases of random and almost periodic potentials.

  4. Spectral statistics for weakly correlated random potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frédéric Klopp

    2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We study localization and derive stochastic estimates (in particular, Wegner and Minami estimates) for the eigenvalues of weakly correlated random discrete Schr\\"odinger operators in the localized phase. We apply these results to obtain spectral statistics for general discrete alloy type models where the single site perturbation is neither of finite rank nor of fixed sign. In particular, for the models under study, the random potential exhibits correlations at any range.

  5. Finite Temperature Phase Transition in $?^6$ potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hatem Widyan

    2008-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The temperature dependance of the action in the thin-wall and thick-wall limits is obtained analytically for the $\\phi^6$ scalar potential. The nature of the phase transition is investigated from the quantum tunnelling regime at low temperatures to the thermal hopping regime at high temperatures. It is first-order for the case of a thin wall while for the thick wall it is second- order.

  6. NiO-silica based nanostructured materials obtained by microemulsion assisted sol-gel procedure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mihaly, M.; Comanescu, A.F. [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)] [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania); Rogozea, A.E. [ILIE MURGULESCU Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania)] [ILIE MURGULESCU Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Romanian Academy, 202 Splaiul Independentei, 060021 Bucharest (Romania); Vasile, E. [METAV Research and Development, 31 C.A. Rosetti, 020011 Bucharest (Romania)] [METAV Research and Development, 31 C.A. Rosetti, 020011 Bucharest (Romania); Meghea, A., E-mail: a.meghea@gmail.com [University POLITEHNICA Bucharest, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, 1 Polizu, 011061 Bucharest (Romania)

    2011-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: TEM micrograph of NiO/SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles. Highlights: {yields} Microemulsion assisted sol-gel procedure for NiO silica nanomaterials synthesis. {yields} Controlling the size and shape of nanoparticles and avoiding their aggregation. {yields} Narrow band-gap semiconductors (energies <3 eV) absorbing VIS or near-UV light biologically and chemically inert semiconductors entrapping/coating in silica network. {yields} Low cost as the microemulsion is firstly used in water metallic cation extraction. -- Abstract: NiO-silica based materials have been synthesized by microemulsion assisted sol-gel procedure. The versatility of these soft nanotechnology techniques has been exploited in order to obtain different types of nanostructures, such as NiO nanoparticles, NiO silica coated nanoparticles and NiO embedded in silica matrix. These materials have been characterized by adequate structural and morphology techniques: DLS, HR-TEM/SAED, BET, AFM. Optical and semiconducting properties (band-gap values) of the synthesized materials have been quantified by means of VIS-NIR diffuse reflectance spectra, thus demonstrating their applicative potential in various electron transfer phenomena such as photocatalysis, electrochromic thin films, solid oxide fuel cells.

  7. Applying geologic sensitivity analysis to environmental risk management: The financial implications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, D.T.

    1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The financial risks associated with environmental contamination can be staggering and are often difficult to identify and accurately assess. Geologic sensitivity analysis is gaining recognition as a significant and useful tool that can empower the user with crucial information concerning environmental risk management and brownfield redevelopment. It is particularly useful when (1) evaluating the potential risks associated with redevelopment of historical industrial facilities (brownfields) and (2) planning for future development, especially in areas of rapid development because the number of potential contaminating sources often increases with an increase in economic development. An examination of the financial implications relating to geologic sensitivity analysis in southeastern Michigan from numerous case studies indicate that the environmental cost of contamination may be 100 to 1,000 times greater at a geologically sensitive location compared to the least sensitive location. Geologic sensitivity analysis has demonstrated that near-surface geology may influence the environmental impact of a contaminated site to a greater extent than the amount and type of industrial development.

  8. On quantum potential dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheldon Goldstein; Ward Struyve

    2014-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-relativistic de Broglie-Bohm theory describes particles moving under the guidance of the wave function. In de Broglie's original formulation, the particle dynamics is given by a first-order differential equation. In Bohm's reformulation, it is given by Newton's law of motion with an extra potential that depends on the wave function--the quantum potential--together with a constraint on the possible velocities. It was recently argued, mainly by numerical simulations, that relaxing this velocity constraint leads to a physically untenable theory. We provide further evidence for this by showing that for various wave functions the particles tend to escape the wave packet. In particular, we show that for a central classical potential and bound energy eigenstates the particle motion is often unbounded. This work seems particularly relevant for ways of simulating wave function evolution based on Bohm's formulation of the de Broglie-Bohm theory. Namely, the simulations may become unstable due to deviations from the velocity constraint.

  9. Chemically sensitive interfaces on SAW devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ricco, A.J.; Martin, S.J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Crooks, R.M.; Xu, Chuanjing [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States); Allred, R.E. [Adherent Technologies, Inc., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, three approaches to the effective use of chemically sensitive interfaces that are not highly chemically selective have been examined: (1) molecular identification from time-resolved permeation transients; (2) using multifrequency SAW devices to determine the frequency dependence of analyte/film interactions; (3) use of an array of SAW devices bearing diverse chemically sensitive interfaces to produce a distinct response pattern for each analyte. In addition to their well-known sensitivity to mass changes (0.0035 monolayer of N{sub 2} can be measured), SAW devices respond to the mechanical and electronic properties of thin films, enhancing response information content but making a thorough understanding of the perturbation critical. Simultaneous measurement of changes in frequency and attenuation, which can provide the information necessary to determine the type of perturbation, are used as part of the above discrimination schemes.

  10. Sensitive Chemical Compass Assisted by Quantum Criticality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Y. Cai; Qing Ai; H. T. Quan; C. P. Sun

    2011-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The radical-pair-based chemical reaction could be used by birds for the navigation via the geomagnetic direction. An inherent physical mechanism is that the quantum coherent transition from a singlet state to triplet states of the radical pair could response to the weak magnetic field and be sensitive to the direction of such a field and then results in different photopigments in the avian eyes to be sensed. Here, we propose a quantum bionic setup for the ultra-sensitive probe of a weak magnetic field based on the quantum phase transition of the environments of the two electrons in the radical pair. We prove that the yield of the chemical products via the recombination from the singlet state is determined by the Loschmidt echo of the environments with interacting nuclear spins. Thus quantum criticality of environments could enhance the sensitivity of the detection of the weak magnetic field.

  11. Sensitivity of the Properties of Ruthenium Blue Dimer”...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensitivity of the Properties of Ruthenium Blue Dimer” to Method, Basis Set, and Continuum Model. Sensitivity of the Properties of Ruthenium Blue Dimer” to Method,...

  12. A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . Abstract: An...

  13. Low-dose radiation impacts skin sensitivity | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Low-dose radiation impacts skin sensitivity Low-dose radiation impacts skin sensitivity Released: April 06, 2015 Systems approach suggests alterations in stability of cells and...

  14. Maternal Contributions to the Development of Contamination Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beebe, Heidi

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The development of contamination sensitivity to "disgusting"of conservation and contamination: Invisible particles as areference to disgust and contamination sensitivity. Child

  15. ambient pressure sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SENSITIVITY OF ATLANTIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS L., LARVAE1 Environmental Sciences and Ecology Websites Summary: PRESSURE SENSITIVITY OF ATLANTIC HERRING, CLUPEA HARENGUS L.,...

  16. A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . Abstract: An...

  17. BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BUSINESS SENSITIVE 1 Tri-Cities Research District Speaker Series: Advancing Research Parks from National Developers · Strategies for Pro-active Outreach Marketing #12;BUSINESS SENSITIVE 5

  18. The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state solar...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state solar cell Home > Research > ANSER Research Highlights > The Kanatzidis - Chang Cell: dye sensitized all solid state...

  19. Stirling engine sensitivity to fuel characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evers, L.W.; Fleming, R.D.

    1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Stirling engine was tested to determine the influence of fuel properties on various aspects of engine performance. In order to evaluate the sensitivity of the various operating parameters to the influence of fuel, three different distillation ranges of fuel were selected. Generally, the results indicated that the Stirling engine efficiency was not sensitive to the type of fuel. The emissions, though low, were influenced by the fuel type. The carbon monoxide emissions were lowest for gasoline. Gasoline also produced the lowest hydrocarbon emissions, while diesel fuel produced the greatest.

  20. WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials Biomass production potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 1 Biomass production potentials in Central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios Final report of WP3 of the VIEWLS project, funded by DG-Tren #12;WP 3 Report: Biomass Potentials 2 Report Biomass production potentials in central and Eastern Europe under different scenarios

  1. Phototransistor Behavior Based on Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, X Q; Wang, Y F; Zhou, W Q; Lu, Y M; Liu, Z Y

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work, a light-controlled device cell is established based on the dye-sensitized solar cell using nanocrystalline TiO2 films. Voltage-current curves are characterized by three types of transport behaviors: linear increase, saturated plateau and breakdown-like increase, which are actually of the typical performances for a photo-gated transistor. Moreover, an asymmetric behavior is observed in the voltage-current loops, which is believed to arise from the difference in the effective photo-conducting areas. The photovoltaic voltage between the shared counter electrode and drain (VCE-D) is investigated as well, clarifying that the predominant dark process in source and the predominant photovoltaic process in drain are series connected, modifying the electric potential levels and thus resulting in the characteristic phototransistor behaviors.

  2. Clinical perspectives for the use of new hypoxic cell sensitizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, J.M.

    1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experience with high pressure oxygen in combination with radiotherapy has shown that, for some tumors at least, the presence of hypoxic cells is a limiting factor in the ability to cure these tumors even with conventional daily fractionation. This suggests that hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, of which misonidazole (MISO) is the prototype drug, may play a role in improving the cure-rate of some tumors when combined with daily fractionation. Even for those tumors for which no improvement is seen when combined with daily fractionation, it is likely that there will be an important role for these sensitizers by using them in combination with regimens of only a few dose fractions. Because of the limiting side effects of neuropathy, a less toxic radiosensitizer than MISO is required to gain the full clinical benefit of these drugs. A possible way of achieving this is to reduce the lipid solubility (lipophilicity) of the compounds while still retaining their electron-affinity. This reduces the concentration of drug in the neural tissues (brain, peripheral nerves) without affecting the tumor concentration. However, if the lipophilicity is too low, the drugs are unable to enter the hypoxic cells and hence lose their radiosensitivity efficiency. It would appear that a lipophilicity given by an octanol:water partition coefficient of approximately 0.04 is optimum (cf. MISO = 0.43) with the 2-nitroimidazole amide SR-2508 the best in this series. Tumor levels of this drug of at least 7-8 times those obtained with MISO should be attainable clinically for no increase in neurotoxicity. Another property of electron-affinic sensitizers shows clinical promise. This is their ability to preferentially sensitize tumors compared to normal tissues to the cytotoxic action of several chemotherapeutic agents.

  3. Sensitivity studies for the main r process: ?-decay rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumpower, M.; Cass, J.; Passucci, G.; Aprahamian, A. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, Indiana 46556 (United States); Surman, R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Union College, Schenectady, New York 12308 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Union College, Schenectady, New York 12308 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The pattern of isotopic abundances produced in rapid neutron capture, or r-process, nucleosynthesis is sensitive to the nuclear physics properties of thousands of unstable neutron-rich nuclear species that participate in the process. It has long been recognized that the some of the most influential pieces of nuclear data for r-process simulations are ?-decay lifetimes. In light of experimental advances that have pushed measurement capabilities closer to the classic r-process path, we revisit the role of individual ?-decay rates in the r process. We perform ?-decay rate sensitivity studies for a main (A > 120) r process in a range of potential astrophysical scenarios. We study the influence of individual rates during (n, ?)-(?, n) equilibrium and during the post-equilibrium phase where material moves back toward stability. We confirm the widely accepted view that the most important lifetimes are those of nuclei along the r-process path for each astrophysical scenario considered. However, we find in addition that individual ?-decay rates continue to shape the final abundance pattern through the post-equilibrium phase, for as long as neutron capture competes with ? decay. Many of the lifetimes important for this phase of the r process are within current or near future experimental reach.

  4. Multichromophoric energy sensitization of C{sub 60} for organic photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bartynski, Andrew N. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Trinh, Cong; Kirlikovali, Kent O. [Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Thompson, Mark E., E-mail: met@usc.edu [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089 (United States)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In organic photovoltaics (OPVs), photocurrent generation is limited by absorption and exciton diffusion in the active layer. In this work, we describe the energy sensitization of C{sub 60} simultaneously by two chromophores at high volume concentrations (50%). This sensitization strategy takes advantage of the intense absorption of the sensitizers and the exceptional electron conduction and exciton diffusion length of C{sub 60} resulting in a 30% increase in photoresponse of the C{sub 60}-based sensitized acceptor layer between ??=?450?nm and 670?nm and power conversion efficiency under simulated AM 1.5?G illumination. In (2,4-bis[4-(N,N-diphenylamino)-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl] squaraine)/C{sub 60} devices, sensitization results in an increase in J{sub SC} from 6.5?±?0.2?mA/cm{sup 2} to 8.6?±?0.2?mA/cm{sup 2} without compromising V{sub OC} or FF. These results demonstrate the robust nature of this sensitization scheme and its broad potential for application in OPVs.

  5. Physics Potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ICAL Collaboration; Shakeel Ahmed; M. Sajjad Athar; Rashid Hasan; Mohammad Salim; S. K. Singh; S. S. R. Inbanathan; Venktesh Singh; V. S. Subrahmanyam; Shiba Prasad Behera; Vinay B. Chandratre; Nitali Dash; Vivek M. Datar; V. K. S. Kashyap; Ajit K. Mohanty; Lalit M. Pant; Animesh Chatterjee; Sandhya Choubey; Raj Gandhi; Anushree Ghosh; Deepak Tiwari; Ali Ajmi; S. Uma Sankar; Prafulla Behera; Aleena Chacko; Sadiq Jafer; James Libby; K. Raveendrababu; K. R. Rebin; D. Indumathi; K. Meghna; S. M. Lakshmi; M. V. N. Murthy; Sumanta Pal; G. Rajasekaran; Nita Sinha; Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla; Amina Khatun; Poonam Mehta; Vipin Bhatnagar; R. Kanishka; A. Kumar; J. S. Shahi; J. B. Singh; Monojit Ghosh; Pomita Ghoshal; Srubabati Goswami; Chandan Gupta; Sushant Raut; Sudeb Bhattacharya; Suvendu Bose; Ambar Ghosal; Abhik Jash; Kamalesh Kar; Debasish Majumdar; Nayana Majumdar; Supratik Mukhopadhyay; Satyajit Saha; B. S. Acharya; Sudeshna Banerjee; Kolahal Bhattacharya; Sudeshna Dasgupta; Moon Moon Devi; Amol Dighe; Gobinda Majumder; Naba K. Mondal; Asmita Redij; Deepak Samuel; B. Satyanarayana; Tarak Thakore; C. D. Ravikumar; A. M. Vinodkumar; Gautam Gangopadhyay; Amitava Raychaudhuri; Brajesh C. Choudhary; Ankit Gaur; Daljeet Kaur; Ashok Kumar; Sanjeev Kumar; Md. Naimuddin; Waseem Bari; Manzoor A. Malik; Jyotsna Singh; S. Krishnaveni; H. B. Ravikumar; C. Ranganathaiah; Swapna Mahapatra; Saikat Biswas; Subhasis Chattopadhyay; Rajesh Ganai; Tapasi Ghosh; Y. P. Viyogi

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.

  6. Membrane potential detection with second-harmonic generation and two-photon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the performance of TPEF and SHG microscopy for membrane potential imaging. We argue that electrochromic TPEF sensitivities in the case of both electrochromic and orientational response mechanisms. Despite their similar.elsevier.com/locate/optcom #12;the phenomenon of electrochromism, which is rou- tinely used for membrane potential detection

  7. Sub Shot-Noise interferometric phase sensitivity with Beryllium ions Schroedinger Cat States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luca Pezzé; Augusto Smerzi

    2007-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Interferometry with NOON quantum states can provide unbiased phase estimation with a sensitivity scaling as $\\Delta \\theta \\sim 1/N_T$ given a prior knowledge that the true phase shift $\\theta$ lies in the interval $-\\pi \\leq \\theta \\leq \\pi$. The protocol requires a total of $N_T = 2^{p}-1$ particles (unequally) distributed among $p$ independent measurements and overcomes basic difficulties present in previously proposed approaches. We demonstrate the possibility to obtain a phase sensitivity beating the classical shot-noise limit using published probabilities retrieved experimentally for the creation of Schr\\"odinger cat quantum states containing up to N=6 beryllium ions.

  8. WINDExchange: Potential Wind Capacity

    Wind Powering America (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells, Wisconsin: EnergyWyandanch,EagaAbout Printable VersionNews ThisPotential

  9. Fabrication Procedures and Process Sensitivities for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with an AM1.5 eciency of 15.4% as verified by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. SOLAR CELL Avenue, Toledo, OH 43607, U.S.A. Contract/grant sponsor: U.S. Department of Energy; Contract/grant numberFabrication Procedures and Process Sensitivities for CdS/CdTe Solar Cells Doug H. Rose*, Falah S

  10. Bayesian Environmetrics: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Draper, David

    (joint work with Bruno Mendes) Department of Applied Mathematics and Statistics University of California and analysis of variance tools provide sensitivity analysis insight. -- Model uncertainty audit shows, as an energy source, has been employed in the United States and Europe for more than 50 years, and yet

  11. Spatial Vision Sensitivity to Color Variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Majumder, Aditi

    ;Sensitivity to Color Variations · Why is sunlit sky blue? · Why is sunrise/sunset red? 2 #12;Color vision with luminance contrast 6 #12;Pure Color Gratings · Differences in the cone responses to the same patterns a pattern which varies in chromaticity but which is constant in luminance across its extent · Inphase

  12. Termination of (Canonical) ContextSensitive Rewriting ?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Salvador

    Termination of (Canonical) Context­Sensitive Rewriting ? Salvador Lucas DSIC, Universidad Polit. Termination of such canonical CSR is desirable when using CSR for these purposes. Existing transformations for prov­ ing termination of CSR fulfill a number of new properties when used for proving termination

  13. MARGIN AND SENSITIVITY METHODS SECURITY ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARGIN AND SENSITIVITY METHODS FOR SECURITY ANALYSIS OF ELECTRIC POWER SYSTEMS by Scott Greene the amount by which system loads or power transfers can change before a security violation, such as an overloaded transmission line, is encountered. This thesis shows how to efficiently compute security margins

  14. Development of high sensitivity techniques for characterizing outgassing of polymeric construction materials for microenvironments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McIntyre, D.C.; Thornberg, S.M.; Liang, A.Y.; Bender, S.F.A.; Lujan, R.D.

    1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Further reductions in particulate contamination in semiconductor device manufacturing environments will be required to meet the future challenges of producing devices with decreased dimensions. Using pods (microenvironments) to provide very clean environments on a local (wafer level) scale is an alternative that may reduce the technological demands and cost of providing comparable contamination levels in an entire clean-room manufacturing facility. It has been demonstrated that pods can provide wafer environments that have lower and less variable levels of particulate contamination than conventional clean-room manufacturing environments. However, there have also been indications that outgassed constituents from polymeric pod materials can condense on wafers during storage. A standard technique to evaluate outgassing of polymers is needed so that: (1) manufacturers can make reliable comparisons of the outgassing potential of materials being considered for use and (2) microenvironment users can make judgments on the relative outgassing threats from different manufacturers` products. The goal of the work that is summarized below has been to develop standard high sensitivity (10--100 ppb) testing techniques for evaluation of outgassing from polymeric pod materials in a temperature range from 30 C--75 C. This paper will briefly review outgassing data from polycarbonate materials that was obtained using thermal desorption combined with detection using gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy wit volatile pre-concentration or using a flame ionization detector (FID). Although the focus of this program has been on developing techniques to evaluate pod materials of construction, the techniques that have been evaluated may be useful for characterizing outgassing from other polymeric materials found in cleanrooms.

  15. Sensitivity of transitions in internal rotor molecules to a possible variation of the proton-to-electron mass ratio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jansen, Paul; Ubachs, Wim; Bethlem, Hendrick L. [Institute for Lasers, Life and Biophotonics, VU University Amsterdam, De Boelelaan 1081, NL-1081 HV Amsterdam (Netherlands); Kleiner, Isabelle [Laboratoire Interuniversitaire des Systemes Atmospheriques (LISA), CNRS UMR 7583 et Universites Paris 7 et Paris Est, 61 avenue du General de Gaulle, FR-94010 Creteil Cedex (France); Xu, Li-Hong [Department of Physics and Centre for Laser, Atomic, and Molecular Sciences, University of New Brunswick, Saint John, New Brunswick, Canada E2L 4L5 (Canada)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recently, methanol was identified as a sensitive target system to probe variations of the proton-to-electron mass ratio {mu}[Jansen et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 100801 (2011)]. The high sensitivity of methanol originates from the interplay between overall rotation and hindered internal rotation of the molecule; that is, transitions that convert internal rotation energy into overall rotation energy, or vice versa, have an enhanced sensitivity coefficient, K{sub {mu}}. As internal rotation is a common phenomenon in polyatomic molecules, it is likely that other molecules display similar or even larger effects. In this paper we generalize the concepts that form the foundation of the high sensitivity in methanol and use this to construct an approximate model which makes it possible to estimate the sensitivities of transitions in internal rotor molecules with C{sub 3v} symmetry, without performing a full calculation of energy levels. We find that a reliable estimate of transition sensitivities can be obtained from the three rotational constants (A, B, and C) and three torsional constants (F, V{sub 3}, and {rho}). This model is verified by comparing obtained sensitivities for methanol, acetaldehyde, acetamide, methyl formate, and acetic acid with a full analysis of the molecular Hamiltonian. Of the molecules considered, methanol is by far the most suitable candidate for laboratory and cosmological tests searching for a possible variation of {mu}.

  16. How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    How to Obtain Authorization to Import andor Export Natural Gas and LNG How to Obtain Authorization to Import andor Export Natural Gas and LNG LNG Exports | Long Terms | Blanket...

  17. Ground potential rise monitor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Allen, Zachery W. (Mandan, ND); Zevenbergen, Gary A. (Arvada, CO)

    2012-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A device and method for detecting ground potential rise (GPR) comprising positioning a first electrode and a second electrode at a distance from each other into the earth. The voltage of the first electrode and second electrode is attenuated by an attenuation factor creating an attenuated voltage. The true RMS voltage of the attenuated voltage is determined creating an attenuated true RMS voltage. The attenuated true RMS voltage is then multiplied by the attenuation factor creating a calculated true RMS voltage. If the calculated true RMS voltage is greater than a first predetermined voltage threshold, a first alarm is enabled at a local location. If user input is received at a remote location acknowledging the first alarm, a first alarm acknowledgment signal is transmitted. The first alarm acknowledgment signal is then received at which time the first alarm is disabled.

  18. Evaluation of Global Onshore Wind Energy Potential and Generation Costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Yuyu; Luckow, Patrick; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.

    2012-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we develop an updated global estimate of onshore wind energy potential using reanalysis wind speed data, along with updated wind turbine technology performance and cost assumptions as well as explicit consideration of transmission distance in the calculation of transmission costs. We find that wind has the potential to supply a significant portion of world energy needs, although this potential varies substantially by region as well as with assumptions such as on what types of land can be used to site wind farms. Total global wind potential under central assumptions is estimated to be approximately 89 petawatt hours per year at less than 9 cents/kWh with substantial regional variations. One limitation of global wind analyses is that the resolution of current global wind speed reanalysis data can result in an underestimate of high wind areas. A sensitivity analysis of eight key parameters is presented. Wind potential is sensitive to a number of input parameters, particularly those related to land suitability and turbine density as well as cost and financing assumptions which have important policy implications. Transmission cost has a relatively small impact on total wind costs, changing the potential at a given cost by 20-30%. As a result of sensitivities studied here we suggest that further research intended to inform wind supply curve development focus not purely on physical science, such as better resolved wind maps, but also on these less well-defined factors, such as land-suitability, that will also have an impact on the long-term role of wind power.

  19. Organic photovoltaic cells with controlled polarization sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awartani, Omar; O'Connor, Brendan T., E-mail: btoconno@ncsu.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Kudenov, Michael W. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this study, we demonstrate linearly polarized organic photovoltaic cells with a well-controlled level of polarization sensitivity. The polarized devices were created through the application of a large uniaxial strain to the bulk heterojunction poly(3-hexylthiophene):Phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) film and printing the plastically deformed active layer onto a PEDOT:PSS and indium tin oxide coated glass substrate. The P3HT:PCBM layer is processed such that it is able to accommodate high strains (over 100%) without fracture. After printing the strained films, thermal annealing is used to optimize solar cell performance while maintaining polarization sensitivity. A dichroic ratio and short circuit current ratio of ?6.1 and ?1.6 were achieved, respectively.

  20. Phase-sensitive X-ray imager

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Kevin Louis

    2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray phase sensitive wave-front sensor techniques are detailed that are capable of measuring the entire two-dimensional x-ray electric field, both the amplitude and phase, with a single measurement. These Hartmann sensing and 2-D Shear interferometry wave-front sensors do not require a temporally coherent source and are therefore compatible with x-ray tubes and also with laser-produced or x-pinch x-ray sources.

  1. Sensitivity of mRNA Translation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilad Poker; Michael Margaliot; Tamir Tuller

    2014-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the dynamic mean-field approximation of the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP), we investigate the effect of small changes in the initiation, exit, and elongation rates along the mRNA strand on the steady state protein translation rate. We focus on two special cases where exact closed-form expressions for the translation rate sensitivity can be derived. We discuss the ramifications of our results in the context of functional genomics, molecular evolution, and synthetic biology.

  2. Robust phase sensitive inversion recovery imaging

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garach, Ravindra Mahendrakumar

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    - echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real image; (b) Magnitude reconstruction; (c) PSIR image. : : : : : : : : : : : : : : 60 33 Phase sensitive reconstruction of data acquired using a fast spin- echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real... of data acquired using a fast spin- echo sequence on a 15 Tesla MR scanner (a) Real image; (b) Magnitude reconstruction; (c) PSIR image reconstructed with in- verted polarity. This example demonstrates the problem of global polarity determination...

  3. UMTRA project disposal cell cover biointrusion sensitivity assessment, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides an analysis of potential changes that may take place in a Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project disposal cell cover system as a result of plant biointrusion. Potential changes are evaluated by performing a sensitivity analysis of the relative impact of root penetrations on radon flux out of the cell cover and/or water infiltration into the cell cover. Data used in this analysis consist of existing information on vegetation growth on selected cell cover systems and information available from published studies and/or other available project research. Consistent with the scope of this paper, no new site-specific data were collected from UMTRA Project sites. Further, this paper does not focus on the issue of plant transport of radon gas or other contaminants out of the disposal cell cover though it is acknowledged that such transport has the potential to be a significant pathway for contaminants to reach the environment during portions of the design life of a disposal cell where plant growth occurs. Rather, this study was performed to evaluate the effects of physical penetration and soil drying caused by plant roots that have and are expected to continue to grow in UMTRA Project disposal cell covers. An understanding of the biological and related physical processes that take place within the cover systems of the UMTRA Project disposal cells helps the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) determine if the presence of a plant community on these cells is detrimental, beneficial, or of mixed value in terms of the cover system`s designed function. Results of this investigation provide information relevant to the formulation of a vegetation control policy.

  4. WORK PROGRAMME 2010 RESEARCH POTENTIAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milano-Bicocca, Università

    the research potential of research entities established in the Western Balkan Countries' regions equivalent and developing the research potential of research entities established in the Western Balkan Countries' regions

  5. THE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    and Environmental Policy University of Delaware April 2005 #12;THE POTENTIAL FOR SOLAR ELECTRIC APPLICATIONSTHE POTENTIAL OF SOLAR ELECTRIC APPLICATIONS FOR DELAWARE'S POULTRY FARMS FINAL REPORT Delaware Energy Office University of Delaware Center for Energy and Environmental Policy University

  6. Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Council's Regional Hydropower Potential Scoping Study Generating Resources Advisory Committee 11 to determine potential, and draw conclusions Determine if realistic, reasonable assumption for hydropower at existing non-powered dams, and upgrades at existing hydropower facilities #12;Questions Asked Can

  7. Colorado Potential Geothermal Pathways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Publication Date: 2012 Title: Colorado PRS Cool Fairways Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Earth Science & Observation Center, Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Science (CIRES), University of Colorado, Boulder Publisher: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Description: This layer contains the weakened basement rocks. Isostatic gravity was utilized to identify structural basin areas, characterized by gravity low values reflecting weakened basement rocks. Together interpreted regional fault zones and basin outlines define geothermal "exploration fairways", where the potential exists for deep, superheated fluid flow in the absence of Pliocene or younger volcanic units Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4544698.569273 m Left: 144918.141004 m Right: 763728.391299 m Bottom: 4094070.397932 m Contact Information: Contact Organization: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Contact Person: Khalid Hussein Address: CIRES, Ekeley Building Earth Science & Observation Center (ESOC) 216 UCB City: Boulder State: CO Postal Code: 80309-0216 Country: USA Contact Telephone: 303-492-6782 Spatial Reference Information: Coordinate System: Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) WGS’1984 Zone 13N False Easting: 500000.00000000 False Northing: 0.00000000 Central Meridian: -105.00000000 Scale Factor: 0.99960000 Latitude of Origin: 0.00000000 Linear Unit: Meter Datum: World Geodetic System ’1984 (WGS ’1984) Prime Meridian: Greenwich Angular Unit: Degree Digital Form: Format Name: Shape file

  8. Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

    2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

  9. Nucleus-nucleus potential with shell-correction contribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. Yu. Denisov

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The full relaxed-density potential between spherical nuclei is considered as a sum of the macroscopic and shell-correction contributions. The macroscopic part of the potential is related to a nucleus-nucleus potential obtained in the framework of the extended Thomas-Fermi approach with the Skyrme and Coulomb forces and the relaxed-density ansatz for evaluation of proton and neutron densities of interacting nuclei. A simple prescription for the shell-correction part of the total potential is discussed. The parameters of the shell-correction and macroscopic parts of the relaxed-density potential are found by fitting the empirical barrier heights of the 89 nucleus-nucleus systems as well as macroscopic potentials evaluated for 1485 nucleus-nucleus systems at 12 distances around touching points.

  10. The helium trimer with soft-core potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Kievsky; E. Garrido; C. Romero-Redondo; P. Barletta

    2011-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The helium trimer is studied using two- and three-body soft-core potentials. Realistic helium-helium potentials present an extremely strong short-range repulsion and support a single, very shallow, bound state. The description of systems with more than two helium atoms is difficult due to the very large cancellation between kinetic and potential energy. We analyze the possibility of describing the three helium system in the ultracold regime using a gaussian representation of a widely used realistic potential, the LM2M2 interaction. However, in order to describe correctly the trimer ground state a three-body force has to be added to the gaussian interaction. With this potential model the two bound states of the trimer and the low energy scattering helium-dimer phase shifts obtained with the LM2M2 potential are well reproduced.

  11. Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) sensitivity analysis of computer codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doctor, P.G.; Miley, T.B.; Cowan, C.E.

    1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Multimedia Environmental Pollutant Assessment System (MEPAS) is a computer-based methodology developed by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to estimate health impacts from the release of hazardous chemicals and radioactive materials. The health impacts are estimated from the environmental inventory and release or emission rate, constituent transport, constituent uptake and toxicity, and exposure route parameters. As part of MEPAS development and evaluation, PNL performed a formal parametric sensitivity analysis to determine the sensitivity of the model output to the input parameters, and to provide a systematic and objective method for determining the relative importance of the input parameters. The sensitivity analysis determined the sensitivity of the Hazard Potential Index (HPI) values to combinations of transport pathway and exposure routes important to evaluating environmental problems at DOE sites. Two combinations of transport pathways and exposure routes were evaluated. The sensitivity analysis focused on evaluating the effect of variation in user-specified parameters, such as constituent inventory, release and emission rates, and parameters describing the transport and exposure routes. The constituents used were strontium-90, yttrium-90, tritium, arsenic, mercury, polychlorinated biphenyls, toluene, and perchloroethylene. 28 refs., 3 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. A new method of energy calibration of position-sensitive silicon detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Mingdao; Liu, Zhong; Ding, Bing; Yang, Huabin; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Jianguo; Ma, Long; Yu, Lin; Wang, Yongsheng; Gan, Zaiguo; Zhou, Xiaohong

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method of energy calibration of position-sensitive silicon detector is introduced. Compared with the traditional method, simpler procedure is used in the new method while the energy resolution obtained is better. Different functions, which are not limited to the parabolic function in the traditional method, can be applied to correct the results of linear calibration in this new method. The new method is more robust and can be applied more universally to detectors with various performances.

  13. RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

    2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

  14. Harmonic potential and hadron spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rafael Tumanyan

    2009-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The quark-gluon sea in the hadrons is considered as periodically correlated. Energy levels of Shrodinger equation with harmonic potential is used for describing of the spectrum of hadron masses. In the considered cases the effective potential operating on each particle of ensemble, under certain conditions becomes square-law on displacement from a equilibrium point. It can become an explanation of popularity of oscillator potential for the description of a spectrum of masses of elementary particles. The analysis shows that levels of periodic potential better agreed to the spectrum of hadron masses, than levels of other potentials used for an explanation of a spectrum of masses.

  15. Uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for photovoltaic system modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Clifford W.; Pohl, Andrew Phillip; Jordan, Dirk [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO] [National Center for Photovoltaics, National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report an uncertainty and sensitivity analysis for modeling DC energy from photovoltaic systems. We consider two systems, each comprised of a single module using either crystalline silicon or CdTe cells, and located either at Albuquerque, NM, or Golden, CO. Output from a PV system is predicted by a sequence of models. Uncertainty in the output of each model is quantified by empirical distributions of each model's residuals. We sample these distributions to propagate uncertainty through the sequence of models to obtain an empirical distribution for each PV system's output. We considered models that: (1) translate measured global horizontal, direct and global diffuse irradiance to plane-of-array irradiance; (2) estimate effective irradiance from plane-of-array irradiance; (3) predict cell temperature; and (4) estimate DC voltage, current and power. We found that the uncertainty in PV system output to be relatively small, on the order of 1% for daily energy. Four alternative models were considered for the POA irradiance modeling step; we did not find the choice of one of these models to be of great significance. However, we observed that the POA irradiance model introduced a bias of upwards of 5% of daily energy which translates directly to a systematic difference in predicted energy. Sensitivity analyses relate uncertainty in the PV system output to uncertainty arising from each model. We found that the residuals arising from the POA irradiance and the effective irradiance models to be the dominant contributors to residuals for daily energy, for either technology or location considered. This analysis indicates that efforts to reduce the uncertainty in PV system output should focus on improvements to the POA and effective irradiance models.

  16. Neutrino factories: realization and physics potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geer, S.; /Fermilab; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrino Factories offer an exciting option for the long-term neutrino physics program. This new type of neutrino facility will provide beams with unique properties. Low systematic uncertainties at a Neutrino Factory, together with a unique and precisely known neutrino flavor content, will enable neutrino oscillation measurements to be made with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Over recent years, the resulting neutrino factory physics potential has been discussed extensively in the literature. In addition, over the last six years the R&D necessary to realize a Neutrino Factory has been progressing, and has developed into a significant international activity. It is expected that, within about five more years, the initial phase of this R&D program will be complete and, if the community chooses to build this new type of neutrino source within the following decade, neutrino factory technology will be ready for the final R&D phase prior to construction. In this paper (1) an overview is given of the technical ingredients needed for a Neutrino Factory, (2) beam properties are described, (3) the resulting neutrino oscillation physics potential is summarized, (4) a more detailed description is given for one representative Neutrino Factory design, and (5) the ongoing R&D program is summarized, and future plans briefly described.

  17. Audit Report on "Protection of the Department of Energy's Unclassified Sensitive Electronic Information"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy and its contractors store and process massive quantities of sensitive information to accomplish national security, energy, science, and environmental missions. Sensitive unclassified data, such as personally identifiable information (PII), official use only, and unclassified controlled nuclear information require special handling and protection to prevent misuse of the information for inappropriate purposes. Industry experts have reported that more than 203 million personal privacy records have been lost or stolen over the past three years, including information maintained by corporations, educational institutions, and Federal agencies. The loss of personal and other sensitive information can result in substantial financial harm, embarrassment, and inconvenience to individuals and organizations. Therefore, strong protective measures, including data encryption, help protect against the unauthorized disclosure of sensitive information. Prior reports involving the loss of sensitive information have highlighted weaknesses in the Department's ability to protect sensitive data. Our report on Security Over Personally Identifiable Information (DOE/IG-0771, July 2007) disclosed that the Department had not fully implemented all measures recommended by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and required by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) to protect PII, including failures to identify and encrypt PII maintained on information systems. Similarly, the Government Accountability Office recently reported that the Department had not yet installed encryption technology to protect sensitive data on the vast majority of laptop computers and handheld devices. Because of the potential for harm, we initiated this audit to determine whether the Department and its contractors adequately safeguarded sensitive electronic information. The Department had taken a number of steps to improve protection of PII. Our review, however, identified opportunities to strengthen the protection of all types of sensitive unclassified electronic information and reduce the risk that such data could fall into the hands of individuals with malicious intent. In particular, for the seven sites we reviewed: (1) Four sites had either not ensured that sensitive information maintained on mobile devices was encrypted. Or, they had improperly permitted sensitive unclassified information to be transmitted unencrypted through email or to offsite backup storage facilities; (2) One site had not ensured that laptops taken on foreign travel, including travel to sensitive countries, were protected against security threats; and, (3) Although required by the OMB since 2003, we learned that programs and sites were still working to complete Privacy Impact Assessments - analyses designed to examine the risks and ramifications of using information systems to collect, maintain, and disseminate personal information. Our testing revealed that the weaknesses identified were attributable, at least in part, to Headquarters programs and field sites that had not implemented existing policies and procedures requiring protection of sensitive electronic information. In addition, a lack of performance monitoring contributed to the inability of the Department and the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) to ensure that measures were in place to fully protect sensitive information. As demonstrated by previous computer intrusion-related data losses throughout the Department, without improvements, the risk or vulnerability for future losses remains unacceptably high. In conducting this audit, we recognized that data encryption and related techniques do not provide absolute assurance that sensitive data is fully protected. For example, encryption will not necessarily protect data in circumstances where organizational access controls are weak or are circumvented through phishing or other malicious techniques. However, as noted by NIST, when used appropriately, encryption is an effective tool that can, as part of an overall risk-management strat

  18. Tropospheric water vapor and climate sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schneider, E.K.; Kirtman, B.P.; Lindzen, R.S. [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)] [Center for Ocean-Land-Atmosphere Studies, Calverton, MD (United States)

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Estimates are made of the effect of changes in tropospheric water vapor on the climate sensitivity to doubled carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) using a coarse resolution atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a slab mixed layer ocean. The sensitivity of the model to doubled CO{sub 2} is found as the difference between the equilibrium responses for control and doubled CO{sub 2} cases. Clouds are specified to isolate the water vapor feedback. Experiments in which the water vapor distribution is specified rather than internally calculated are used to find the contribution of water vapor in various layers and latitude belts to the sensitivity. The contribution of water vapor in layers of equal mass to the climate sensitivity varies by about a factor of 2 with height, with the largest contribution coming from layers between 450 and 750 mb, and the smallest from layers above 230 mb. The positive feedback on the global mean surface temperature response to doubled CO{sub 2} from water vapor above 750 mb is about 2.6 times as large as that from water vapor below 750 mb. The feedback on global mean surface temperature due to water vapor in the extratropical free troposphere is about 50% larger than the feedback due to the lower-latitude free troposphere water vapor. Several important sources of nonlinearity of the radiative heating rates were identified in the process of constructing the specified cloud and water vapor fields. These are (1) the interaction of clouds and solar radiation, which produces much more reflection of solar radiation for time mean clouds than for the instantaneous clouds; (2) the correlation of clouds and water vapor, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground for correlated clouds and water vapor than when these fields are independent; and (3) the interaction of water vapor with long wave radiation, which produces less downward longwave radiation at the ground of the average over instantaneous water vapor distributions than of the time mean water vapor distribution.

  19. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, G.R.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1 [times] 10[sup [minus]18] atm cc sec[sup [minus]1]. 2 figs.

  20. High sensitivity leak detection method and apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ganapatic R. (Grafton, VA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved leak detection method is provided that utilizes the cyclic adsorption and desorption of accumulated helium on a non-porous metallic surface. The method provides reliable leak detection at superfluid helium temperatures. The zero drift that is associated with residual gas analyzers in common leak detectors is virtually eliminated by utilizing a time integration technique. The sensitivity of the apparatus of this disclosure is capable of detecting leaks as small as 1.times.10.sup.-18 atm cc sec.sup.-1.

  1. Sensitive Property RO 23_120213.xlsx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our Instagram Secretary Moniz is TakingDepartment ofDepartmentSeminars11,Sensitive

  2. PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 1999, VOL. 79, NO. 8, 1953 1961 Interatomic potential tted for lead

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Xingao

    PHILOSOPHICAL MAGAZINE A, 1999, VOL. 79, NO. 8, 1953± 1961 Interatomic potential ® tted for lead D dynamics method, we numerically ® t an interatomic potential for lead. The potential obtained can correctly reproduce many physical properties of lead in crystalline and non-crystalline phases. The surface energy

  3. Chapter 20: Electric Potential and Electric Potential Energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kioussis, Nicholas

    1 Chapter 20: Electric Potential and Electric Potential Energy 2. A 4.5 µC charge moves in a uniform electric field ( )5 ^4.1 10 N/C= ×E x . The change in electric potential energy of a charge that moves against an electric field is given by equation 20-1, 0U q Ed = . If the charge moves in the same

  4. TOWARDS AN ER-DOPED SI NANOCRYSTAL SENSITIZED WAVEGUIDE LASER THE THIN LINE BETWEEN GAIN AND LOSS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kik, Pieter

    and waveguide. If the pump laser could somehow be eliminated from this scheme, the fabrication of low-cost SiTOWARDS AN ER-DOPED SI NANOCRYSTAL SENSITIZED WAVEGUIDE LASER ­ THE THIN LINE BETWEEN GAIN AND LOSS-doped SiO2, a composite material that can potentially be fabricated using a VLSI compatible process

  5. Towards an Er-doped Si nanocrystal sensitized waveguide laser the thin line between gain and loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polman, Albert

    somehow be eliminated from this scheme, the fabrication of low-cost Si based Er doped optical amplifiers1 Towards an Er-doped Si nanocrystal sensitized waveguide laser ­ the thin line between gain-doped Si nanocrystal co-doped SiO2, a composite material that can potentially be fabricated using a VLSI

  6. Persistent sensitivity of Asian aerosol to emissions of nitrogen oxides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kharol, S. K.

    We use a chemical transport model and its adjoint to examine the sensitivity of secondary inorganic aerosol formation to emissions of precursor trace gases from Asia. Sensitivity simulations indicate that secondary inorganic ...

  7. On the Correlation between Forcing and Climate Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolov, Andrei

    The possible correlation between climate sensitivity and radiative forcing is studied using versions of the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model (CAM) model with different climate sensitivities. No such correlation was found ...

  8. SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High Precision...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High Precision Instrument for In-Situ Characterization of the Size and SPLAT II: An Aircraft Compatible, Ultra-Sensitive, High...

  9. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Kennewick, WA)

    2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

  10. Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tonkovich, Anna Lee; Wang, Yong; Wegeng, Robert S.; Gao, Yufei

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

  11. The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

    The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale Awni Y. Al was performed on the spent oil shale (oil shale ash) obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale process, minimal fragmentation was encountered since Jordanian oil shale contains large proportions of ash

  12. Instructions to obtain apostille certification of the FBI background check (Valencia Year-Long Students)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hull, Elaine

    Instructions to obtain apostille certification of the FBI background check (Valencia Year-Long Students) Once you have received the FBI background check. You will need to proceed with step two, obtain not waste time submitting your FBI Background Check for certification. 1.) Complete the DS-4194 Request

  13. Relative sensitivity of formability to anisotropy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, R.W.; Maker, B.N.

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work compares the relative importance of material anisotropy in sheet forming as compared to other material and process variables. The comparison is made quantitative by the use of normalized dependencies of depth to failure (forming limit is reached) on various measures of anisotropy, as well as strain and rate sensitivity, friction, and tooling. Comparisons are made for a variety of forming processes examined previously in the literature as well as two examples of complex stampings in this work. 7 The examples rover a range from nearly pure draw to nearly pure stretch situations, and show that for materials following a quadratic yield criterion, anisotropy is among the most sensitive parameters influencing formability. For materials following higher-exponent yield criteria, the dependency is milder but is still of the order of most other process parameters. However, depending on the particular forming operation, it is shown that in some cases anisotropy may be ignored, whereas in others its consideration is crucial to a good quality analysis.

  14. Global sensitivity analysis using sparse grid interpolation and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Factorial sampling plans for preliminary computational experiments. ... [22] Campolongo F, Cariboni J, Saltelli A. An effective screening design for sensitivity

  15. Test-Cost Sensitive Classification on Data with Missing Values

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Qiang

    Test-Cost Sensitive Classification on Data with Missing Values Qiang Yang, Senior Member, IEEE values on several data sets. Index Terms--Cost-sensitive learning, decision trees, naive Bayes. æ 1, Charles Ling, Xiaoyong Chai, and Rong Pan Abstract--In the area of cost-sensitive learning, inductive

  16. ZnO Nanotube Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ZnO Nanotube Based Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Alex B. F. Martinson,, Jeffrey W. Elam, Joseph T templated by anodic aluminum oxide for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Atomic layer deposition of the best dye- sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is the product of a dye with moderate extinction

  17. Hierarchically structured photoelectrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    Hierarchically structured photoelectrodes for dye-sensitized solar cells Qifeng Zhang and Guozhong or one-dimensional assemblies. Introduction Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) are a category Cao* DOI: 10.1039/c0jm04345a This paper highlights several significant achievements in dye-sensitized

  18. Photocurrent Enhancement by Multilayered Porphyrin Sensitizers in a Photoelectrochemical Cell

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinolfo, Peter H.

    be useful in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). We report on the photoelectrochemical responses scheme for use in photoelectrochemical cells. KEYWORDS: porphyrin, light harvesting, dye-sensitized solar nanocrystalline titania and I- / I3 - redox shuttle electrolyte, dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have become

  19. Dynamic tuning of chemiresistor sensitivity using mechanical strain

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, James E; Read, Douglas H

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The sensitivity of a chemiresistor sensor can be dynamically tuned using mechanical strain. The increase in sensitivity is a smooth, continuous function of the applied strain, and the effect can be reversible. Sensitivity tuning enables the response curve of the sensor to be dynamically optimized for sensing analytes, such as volatile organic compounds, over a wide concentration range.

  20. Orbits in a logarithmic potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hooverman, R.H.

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The characteristics of charged particle orbits in the logarithmic electrostatic potential field surrounding a straight conducting wire at a fixed potential are investigated. The equations of motion of an electron in a logarithmic potential are derived, the limiting cases are considered, and the results of numerical integration of the equations of motion are presented along with sketches of a few representative orbits. (C.E.S.)

  1. Target Space Duality III: Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orlando Alvarez; Blazej Ruszczycki

    2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We generalize previous results on target space duality to the case where there are background fields and the sigma model lagrangian has a potential function.

  2. Powertrain Trends and Future Potential

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    parties. Automotive Technology 12 Evolution in Clean Diesel & Gasoline Technology 1) turbo-charged with downsizing and var. valve timing (VVT); 2) max. potential w downsizing,...

  3. Sorption of redox-sensitive elements: critical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strickert, R.G.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The redox-sensitive elements (Tc, U, Np, Pu) discussed in this report are of interest to nuclear waste management due to their long-lived isotopes which have a potential radiotoxic effect on man. In their lower oxidation states these elements have been shown to be highly adsorbed by geologic materials occurring under reducing conditions. Experimental research conducted in recent years, especially through the Waste Isolation Safety Assessment Program (WISAP) and Waste/Rock Interaction Technology (WRIT) program, has provided extensive information on the mechanisms of retardation. In general, ion-exchange probably plays a minor role in the sorption behavior of cations of the above three actinide elements. Formation of anionic complexes of the oxidized states with common ligands (OH/sup -/, CO/sup - -//sub 3/) is expected to reduce adsorption by ion exchange further. Pertechnetate also exhibits little ion-exchange sorption by geologic media. In the reduced (IV) state, all of the elements are highly charged and it appears that they form a very insoluble compound (oxide, hydroxide, etc.) or undergo coprecipitation or are incorporated into minerals. The exact nature of the insoluble compounds and the effect of temperature, pH, pe, other chemical species, and other parameters are currently being investigated. Oxidation states other than Tc (IV,VII), U(IV,VI), Np(IV,V), and Pu(IV,V) are probably not important for the geologic repository environment expected, but should be considered especially when extreme conditions exist (radiation, temperature, etc.). Various experimental techniques such as oxidation-state analysis of tracer-level isotopes, redox potential measurement and control, pH measurement, and solid phase identification have been used to categorize the behavior of the various valence states.

  4. Evaluation of the Gas Production Potential of Marine HydrateDeposits in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moridis, George J.; Reagan, Matthew T.; Kim, Se-Joon; Seol,Yongkoo; Zhang, Keni

    2007-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Although significant hydrate deposits are known to exist in the Ulleung Basin of the Korean East Sea, their survey and evaluation as a possible energy resource has not yet been completed. However, it is possible to develop preliminary estimates of their production potential based on the limited data that are currently available. These include the elevation and thickness of the Hydrate-Bearing Layer (HBL), the water depth, and the water temperature at the sea floor. Based on this information, we developed estimates of the local geothermal gradient that bracket its true value. Reasonable estimates of the initial pressure distribution in the HBL can be obtained because it follows closely the hydrostatic. Other critical information needs include the hydrate saturation, and the intrinsic permeabilities of the system formations. These are treated as variables, and sensitivity analysis provides an estimate of their effect on production. Based on the geology of similar deposits, it is unlikely that Ulleung Basin accumulations belong to Class 1 (involving a HBL underlain by a mobile gas zone). If Class 4 (disperse, low saturation accumulations) deposits are involved, they are not likely to have production potential. The most likely scenarios include Class 2 (HBL underlain by a zone of mobile water) or Class 3 (involving only an HBL) accumulations. Assuming nearly impermeable confining boundaries, this numerical study indicates that large production rates (several MMSCFD) are attainable from both Class 2 and Class 3 deposits using conventional technology. The sensitivity analysis demonstrates the dependence of production on the well design, the production rate, the intrinsic permeability of the HBL, the initial pressure, temperature and hydrate saturation, as well as on the thickness of the water zone (Class 2). The study also demonstrates that the presence of confining boundaries is indispensable for the commercially viable production of gas from these deposits.

  5. Future cosmological sensitivity for hot dark matter axions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hamann, Jan; Hannestad, Steen; Raffelt, Georg; Wong, Yvonne Y Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the potential of a future, large-volume photometric survey to constrain the axion mass $m_a$ in the hot dark matter limit. Future surveys such as Euclid will have significantly more constraining power than current observations for hot dark matter. Nonetheless, the lowest accessible axion masses are limited by the fact that axions lighter than $\\sim 0.15$ eV decouple before the QCD epoch, assumed here to occur at a temperature $T_{\\rm QCD} \\sim 170$ MeV; this leaves an axion population of such low density that its late-time cosmological impact is negligible. For larger axion masses, $m_a \\gtrsim 0.15$ eV, where axions remain in equilibrium until after the QCD phase transition, we find that a Euclid-like survey combined with Planck CMB data can detect $m_a$ at very high significance. Our conclusions are robust against assumptions about prior knowledge of the neutrino mass. Given that the proposed IAXO solar axion search is sensitive to $m_a\\lesssim 0.2$ eV, the axion mass range probed by cosmology is n...

  6. Radiation-induced Genomic Instability and Radiation Sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varnum, Susan M.; Sowa, Marianne B.; Kim, Grace J.; Morgan, William F.

    2013-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The obvious relationships between reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, mitochondrial dysfunction, inflammatory type responses and reactive chemokines and cytokines suggests a general stress response induced by ionizing radiation most likely leads to the non-targeted effects described after radiation exposure. We argue that true bystander effects do not occur in the radiation therapy clinic. But there is no question that effects outside the target volume do occur. These “out of field effects” are considered very low dose effects in the context of therapy. So what are the implications of non-targeted effects on radiation sensitivity? The primary goal of therapy is to eradicate the tumor. Given the genetic diversity of the human population, lifestyle and environment factors it is likely some combination of these will influence patient outcome. Non-targeted effects may contribute to a greater or lesser extent. But consider the potential situation involving a partial body exposure due to a radiation accident or radiological terrorism. Non-targeted effects suggest that the tissue at risk for demonstrating possible detrimental effects of radiation exposure might be greater than the volume actually irradiated.

  7. Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

    2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

  8. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, John T. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wave length shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event.

  9. Ramp Compression Experiments - a Sensitivity Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bastea, M; Reisman, D

    2007-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first sensitivity study of the material isentropes extracted from ramp compression experiments. We perform hydrodynamic simulations of representative experimental geometries associated with ramp compression experiments and discuss the major factors determining the accuracy of the equation of state information extracted from such data. In conclusion, we analyzed both qualitatively and quantitatively the major experimental factors that determine the accuracy of equations of state extracted from ramp compression experiments. Since in actual experiments essentially all the effects discussed here will compound, factoring out individual signatures and magnitudes, as done in the present work, is especially important. This study should provide some guidance for the effective design and analysis of ramp compression experiments, as well as for further improvements of ramp generators performance.

  10. Two-dimensional position sensitive radiation detectors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihalczo, J.T.

    1994-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear reaction detectors capable of position sensitivity with submillimeter resolution in two dimensions are each provided by placing arrays of scintillation or wavelength shifting optical fibers formed of a plurality of such optical fibers in a side-by-side relationship in X and Y directions with a layer of nuclear reactive material operatively associated with surface regions of the optical fiber arrays. Each nuclear reaction occurring in the layer of nuclear reactive material produces energetic particles for simultaneously providing a light pulse in a single optical fiber in the X oriented array and in a single optical fiber in the Y oriented array. These pulses of light are transmitted to a signal producing circuit for providing signals indicative of the X-Y coordinates of each nuclear event. 6 figures.

  11. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Multiphase'' atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  12. Precipitation scavenging models: Sensitivities, tests, and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hales, J.M.

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ``Multiphase`` atmospheric-chemistry models can be described as atmospheric-pollutant simulations that explicitly differentiate between physical phases in the atmosphere (.e.g., gas, cloud water, rain water, snow,...), and directly compute chemical transport and transformation behavior between and within each of these individual phases. Initially formulated for specific application to precipitation-scavenging analysis, many attributes of these models have become incorporated into the more general atmospheric-chemisty codes as well. During the past few years, several of these multiphase precipitation-scavenging models have been developed to the point where they can be applied, in a moderately straightforward fashion, by members of the extended atmospheric sciences community. This presentation provides a brief overview of several aspects of a number of these models, including their structure, their application, their sensitivities and uncertainty levels, their evaluation against field measurements, and their availability.

  13. Polymer escape from a confining potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harri Mökkönen; Timo Ikonen; Tapio Ala-Nissila; Hannes Jónsson

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of escape of polymers from a two-dimensionally confining potential well has been evaluated using self-avoiding as well as ideal chain representations of varying length, up to 80 beads. Long timescale Langevin trajectories were calculated using the path integral hyperdynamics method to evaluate the escape rate. A minimum is found in the rate for self-avoiding polymers of intermediate length while the escape rate decreases monotonically with polymer length for ideal polymers. The increase in the rate for long, self-avoiding polymers is ascribed to crowding in the potential well which reduces the free energy escape barrier. An effective potential curve obtained using the centroid as an independent variable was evaluated by thermodynamic averaging and Kramers rate theory then applied to estimate the escape rate. While the qualitative features are well reproduced by this approach, it significantly overestimates the rate, especially for the longer polymers. The reason for this is illustrated by constructing a two-dimensional effective energy surface using the radius of gyration as well as the centroid as controlled variables. This shows that the description of a transition state dividing surface using only the centroid fails to confine the system to the region corresponding to the free energy barrier and this problem becomes more pronounced the longer the polymer is. A proper definition of a transition state for polymer escape needs to take into account the shape as well as the location of the polymer.

  14. The earth's absolute gravitation potential function in the prospect 'gravitational potential metering' of geological objects and earthquake centers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aleksandr Fridrikson; Marina Kasatochkina

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The direct problem of the detection of the Earth's absolute gravitation potential maximum value (MGP) was solved. The inverse problem finding of the Earth maximum gravitation (where there is a maximum of gravitation field intensity and a potential function has a 'bending point') with the help of MGP was solved as well. The obtained results show that the revealed Earth maximum gravitation coincides quite strictly with the cseismic D" layer on the border of the inner and outer (liquid) core. The validity of the method of an absolute gravitation potential detection by the equal- potential velocity was proved as 'gravitation potential measurement' or 'Vs-gravity method'. The prospects of this method for detecting of low-power or distant geological objects with abnormal density and the possible earthquakes with low density was shown.

  15. THE LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS FOR SCHRODINGER OPERATORS WITH SLOWLY OSCILLATING POTENTIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarov, Nikolai

    THE LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS FOR SCHR¨ODINGER OPERATORS WITH SLOWLY OSCILLATING POTENTIALS Barry Simon Abstract. By studying the integrated density of states, we prove the existence of Lyapunov exponents an explicit formula for these Lyapunov exponents. By applying rank one perturbation theory, we also obtain

  16. Process for the removal of tritium from the product solutions obtained by the Purex process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bossche, A.V.; Olinger, R.

    1983-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for the removal of tritium from the product solutions obtained in the reprocessing of irradiated nuclear fuels by the Purex process comprising a plurality of series-connected extraction cycles having an organic solvent.

  17. 7 Colloquium Chemiometricum Mediterraneun (CCM VII 2010 -Granada) OBTAINING INFORMATION FROM A BIOSYNTHETIC PATHWAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Márcia M. C.

    7º Colloquium Chemiometricum Mediterraneun (CCM VII 2010 - Granada) OBTAINING INFORMATION FROM SPECTROSCOPY AND CHEMOMETRIC TOOLS #12;7º Colloquium Chemiometricum Mediterraneun (CCM VII 2010 - Granada) PO1

  18. Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain significant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    206 Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain significant leadership roles at Rice and beyond. We provide leadership development opportunities capacity and strongest ambition for significant leadership. We seek to accomplish our mission through

  19. Obtaining two attosecond pulses pulses for x-ray stimulated Raman spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zholents, Alexander

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    delay between two ultra-short laser pulses obtained from theto the timing of the ultra-short laser pulse and can easilybunch interacting with ultra-short laser pulses. Here, we

  20. Obtaining and Ensuring Persistence of O&M Savings Through Resource Conservation Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, W.

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBTAINING AND ENSURING PERSISTENCE OF O&M SAVINGS THROUGH RESOURCE CONSERVATION MANAGEMENT WILL MILLER ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR ? TECHNICAL SERVICES PORTLAND ENERGY CONSERVATION, INC. (PECI) PORTLAND, OREGON ABSTRACT Resource conservation management is a...

  1. General inflaton potentials in supergravity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei; Rube, Tomas [Department of Physics, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a way to construct supergravity models with an arbitrary inflaton potential V({phi}) and show that all other scalar fields in this class of models can be stabilized at the inflationary trajectory by a proper choice of the Kaehler potential.

  2. Studies on the immunosuppressive effects of alpha globulins obtained from guinea pig serum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cowart, Richard Elmer

    1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    STUDIES ON THE IMMUNOSUPP1KSSIVE EFFECTS OF ALPHA GLOBULINS OBTAINED FROM GUINEA PIG SERUM A Thesis by RICHARD ELMER COWART, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1976 Ma)or Subject: Microbiology STUDIES ON THE IFLMUNOSUPPRESSIUE EFFECTS OF ALPHA GLOBULINS OBTAINED FROM GUINEA PIG SERUM A Thesis by RICHARD ELMER COWART, JR. Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman...

  3. Sensitivity of Battery Electric Vehicle Economics to Drive Patterns, Vehicle Range, and Charge Strategies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neubauer, J.; Brooker, A.; Wood, E.

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battery electric vehicles (BEVs) offer the potential to reduce both oil imports and greenhouse gas emissions, but high upfront costs discourage many potential purchasers. Making an economic comparison with conventional alternatives is complicated in part by strong sensitivity to drive patterns, vehicle range, and charge strategies that affect vehicle utilization and battery wear. Identifying justifiable battery replacement schedules and sufficiently accounting for the limited range of a BEV add further complexity to the issue. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory developed the Battery Ownership Model to address these and related questions. The Battery Ownership Model is applied here to examine the sensitivity of BEV economics to drive patterns, vehicle range, and charge strategies when a high-fidelity battery degradation model, financially justified battery replacement schedules, and two different means of accounting for a BEV's unachievable vehicle miles traveled (VMT) are employed. We find that the value of unachievable VMT with a BEV has a strong impact on the cost-optimal range, charge strategy, and battery replacement schedule; that the overall cost competitiveness of a BEV is highly sensitive to vehicle-specific drive patterns; and that common cross-sectional drive patterns do not provide consistent representation of the relative cost of a BEV.

  4. Sensitivity of blackbody effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature: By genetic algorithm

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ejigu, E. K.; Liedberg, H. G. [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)] [National Metrology Institute of South Africa (NMISA), Private Bag X34, Lynnwood Ridge, Pretoria, 0040 (South Africa)

    2013-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A variable-temperature blackbody (VTBB) is used to calibrate an infrared radiation thermometer (pyrometer). The effective emissivity (?{sub eff}) of a VTBB is dependent on temperature and wavelength other than the geometry of the VTBB. In the calibration process the effective emissivity is often assumed to be constant within the wavelength and temperature range. There are practical situations where the sensitivity of the effective emissivity needs to be known and correction has to be applied. We present a method using a genetic algorithm to investigate the sensitivity of the effective emissivity to wavelength and temperature variation. Two matlab® programs are generated: the first to model the radiance temperature calculation and the second to connect the model to the genetic algorithm optimization toolbox. The effective emissivity parameter is taken as a chromosome and optimized at each wavelength and temperature point. The difference between the contact temperature (reading from a platinum resistance thermometer or liquid in glass thermometer) and radiance temperature (calculated from the ?{sub eff} values) is used as an objective function where merit values are calculated and best fit ?{sub eff} values selected. The best fit ?{sub eff} values obtained as a solution show how sensitive they are to temperature and wavelength parameter variation. Uncertainty components that arise from wavelength and temperature variation are determined based on the sensitivity analysis. Numerical examples are considered for illustration.

  5. Completeness for sparse potential scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Zhongwei, E-mail: zzs0004@auburn.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)] [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama 36849 (United States)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present paper is devoted to the scattering theory of a class of continuum Schrödinger operators with deterministic sparse potentials. We first establish the limiting absorption principle for both modified free resolvents and modified perturbed resolvents. This actually is a weak form of the classical limiting absorption principle. We then prove the existence and completeness of local wave operators, which, in particular, imply the existence of wave operators. Under additional assumptions on the sparse potential, we prove the completeness of wave operators. In the context of continuum Schrödinger operators with sparse potentials, this paper gives the first proof of the completeness of wave operators.

  6. Sensitivity analysis of a nonlinear Newton-Krylov solver for heat transfer with phase change.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henninger, Rudolph J.; Knoll, D. A. (Dana A.); Kothe, D. B. (Douglas B.); Lally, B. R. (Bryan R.)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of a complex metal-casting computer model requires information about how varying the problem parameters affects the results (metal flow and solidification). For example, we would like to know how the last point to solidify or the cooling rate at a given location changes when the physical properties of the metal, boundary conditions, or mold geometry are changed. As a preliminary step towards a complete sensitivity analysis of a three-dimensional casting simulation, we examine a one-dimensional version of a metal-alloy phase-change conductive-heat-transfer model by means of Automatic Differentiation (AD). This non-linear 'Jacobian-free' method is a combination of an outer Newton-based iteration and an inner conjugate gradient-like (Krylov) iteration. The implicit solution algorithm has enthalpy as the dependent variable from which temperatures are determined. We examine the sensitivities of the difference between an exact analytical solution for the final temperature and that produced by this algorithm to the problem parameters. In all there are 17 parameters (12 physical constants such as liquid density, heat capacity, and thermal conductivity, 2 initial and boundary condition parameters, the final solution time, and 2 algorithm tolerances). We apply AD in the forward and reverse mode and verify the sensitivities by means of finite differences. In general, the finite-difference method requires at least N+1 computer runs to determine sensitivities for N problem parameters. By forward and reverse, we mean the direction through the solution and in time and space in which the derivative values are obtained. The forward mode is typically more efficient for determining the sensitivity of many responses to one or a few parameters, while the reverse mode is better suited for sensitivities of one or a few responses with respect to many parameters. The sensitivities produced by all the methods agreed to at least three significant figures. The forward and reverse AD code run times were similar and were approximately 34% faster than those of the finite-difference sensitivities. Real problems in three dimensions will certainly have many more parameters describing mold geometry and pouring conditions. If the trend seen here holds true reverse mode AD is favored since the computational time increases only slightly for additional parameters.

  7. Effects of cell area on the performance of dye sensitized solar cell

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khatani, Mehboob, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Mohamed, Norani Muti, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Hamid, Nor Hisham, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Sahmer, Ahmad Zahrin, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com; Samsudin, Adel, E-mail: mkhatani@hotmail.com, E-mail: noranimuti-mohamed@petronas.com.my, E-mail: hishmid@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azclement@yahoo.com, E-mail: aeska07@gmail.com [Centre of Innovative Nanostructures and Nanodevices (COINN), UTP (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs) have significant advantage over the current silicon cells by having low manufacturing cost and potentially high conversion efficiency. Therefore, DSCs are expected to be used as the next generation solar cell device that covers wide range of new applications. In order to achieve highly efficient DSCs for practical application, study on the effect of increasing the cell’s area on the performance of dye sensitized solar need to be carried out. Three different DSC cell areas namely, 1, 12.96 and 93.5 cm{sup 2} respectively were fabricated and analyzed through solar simulator and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). From the analysis of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), it was observed that the cell’s electron lifetime was influenced significantly by the cell’s area. Although the collection efficiency of all cells recorded to be approximately 100% but higher recombination rate with increased cell area reduced the performance of the cell.

  8. Potential

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah Project Office PressPostdoctoraldecadal7 Estimated Award6,

  9. Quantitative comparison of fuel spray images obtained using ultrafast coherent and incoherent double-pulsed illumination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Purwar, Harsh; Idlahcen, Saïd; Rozé, Claude; Blaisot, Jean-Bernard; Ménard, Thibault

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a quantitative comparison between the high-pressure fuel spray images obtained experimentally using classical imaging with coherent and incoherent ultrafast illuminations recorded using a compatible CMOS camera. The ultrafast, incoherent illumination source was extracted from the supercontinuum generated by tightly focusing the femtosecond laser pulses in water. The average velocity maps computed using time-correlated image-pairs and spray edge complexity computed using the average curvature scale space maps are compared for the spray images obtained with the two illumination techniques and also for the numerically simulated spray using the coupled volume of fluid and level set method for interface tracking (direct numerical simulation or DNS). The spray images obtained with supercontinuum-derived, incoherent, ultrafast illumination are clearer, since the artifacts arising due to laser speckles and multiple diffraction effects are largely reduced and show a better correlation with the DNS results.

  10. Hertz Potentials and Differential Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouas, Jeffrey David

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    , and I present techniques for introducing gauge terms of arbitrary order. Finally, I give a treatment of one application of Hertz potentials, namely calculating electromagnetic Casimir interactions for a couple of systems....

  11. Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, Shirley E.

    1 Groundwater Contamination Potential from Stormwater Infiltration Robert Pitt, University (CSOs). Introduction (cont.) · Scattered information is available addressing groundwater impacts cities · EPA 1983 NURP work on groundwater beneath Fresno and Long Island infiltration basins · NRC 1994

  12. High sensitive formaldehyde graphene gas sensor modified by atomic layer deposition zinc oxide films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mu, Haichuan; Zhang, Zhiqiang; Wang, Keke; Xie, Haifen, E-mail: hfxie@ecust.edu.cn [Department of Physics, School of Science, East China University of Science and Technology, 130 Meilong Road, Shanghai 200237 (China); Zhao, Xiaojing; Liu, Feng [Department of Physics, Shanghai Normal University, 100 Guilin Road, Shanghai 200234 (China)

    2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films with various thicknesses were fabricated by Atomic Layer Deposition on Chemical Vapor Deposition grown graphene films and their response to formaldehyde has been investigated. It was found that 0.5?nm ZnO films modified graphene sensors showed high response to formaldehyde with the resistance change up to 52% at the concentration of 9 parts-per-million (ppm) at room temperature. Meanwhile, the detection limit could reach 180 parts-per-billion (ppb) and fast response of 36?s was also obtained. The high sensitivity could be attributed to the combining effect from the highly reactive, top mounted ZnO thin films, and high conductive graphene base network. The dependence of ZnO films surface morphology and its sensitivity on the ZnO films thickness was also investigated.

  13. A sensitive search for CO emission from faint blue galaxies at z~0.5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. D. Wilson; F. Combes

    1997-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We have obtained sensitive upper limits on the CO J=2-1 and CO J=3-2 emission lines for five faint blue galaxies with redshifts $z\\sim 0.5$ using the IRAM 30~m telescope. These observations would have been able to detect the luminous infrared galaxy IRAS F10214+4724 if it were located at this redshift and unlensed. However, they are not sensitive enough to detect the prototype starburst galaxy M82 or the HII galaxy UM448 if they were located at this redshift. Our upper limits for the CO emission are consistent with between 19% and 66% of the total galactic mass being in the form of molecular hydrogen, and thus shed little light on the ultimate fate of these galaxies.

  14. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew C. R. (Gaithersburg, MD); Hudgens, Jeffrey W. (Rockville, MD)

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  15. Intra-Cavity Total Reflection For High Sensitivity Measurement Of Optical Properties

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pipino, Andrew Charles Rule (Gaithersburg, MD)

    1999-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical cavity resonator device is provided for conducting sensitive murement of optical absorption by matter in any state with diffraction-limited spatial resolution through utilization of total internal reflection within a high-Q (high quality, low loss) optical cavity. Intracavity total reflection generates an evanescent wave that decays exponentially in space at a point external to the cavity, thereby providing a localized region where absorbing materials can be sensitively probed through alteration of the Q-factor of the otherwise isolated cavity. When a laser pulse is injected into the cavity and passes through the evanescent state, an amplitude loss resulting from absorption is incurred that reduces the lifetime of the pulse in the cavity. By monitoring the decay of the injected pulse, the absorption coefficient of manner within the evanescent wave region is accurately obtained from the decay time measurement.

  16. Predicting the sensitivity of the beryllium/scintillator layer neutron detector using Monte Carlo and experimental response functions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Styron, J. D., E-mail: jdstyro@sandia.gov; Cooper, G. W.; Carpenter, Ken; Bonura, M. A. [Department of Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Ruiz, C. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Chandler, G. A.; Nelson, A. J.; Torres, J. A.; McWatters, B. R. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A methodology for obtaining empirical curves relating absolute measured scintillation light output to beta energy deposited is presented. Output signals were measured from thin plastic scintillator using NIST traceable beta and gamma sources and MCNP5 was used to model the energy deposition from each source. Combining the experimental and calculated results gives the desired empirical relationships. To validate, the sensitivity of a beryllium/scintillator-layer neutron activation detector was predicted and then exposed to a known neutron fluence from a Deuterium-Deuterium fusion plasma (DD). The predicted and the measured sensitivity were in statistical agreement.

  17. Random laser from engineered nanostructures obtained by surface tension driven lithography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghofraniha, N; Di Maria, F; Barbarella, G; Gigli, G; Conti, C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The random laser emission from the functionalized thienyl-S,S-dioxide quinquethiophene (T5OCx) in confined patterns with different shapes is demonstrated. Functional patterning of the light emitter organic material in well defined features is obtained by spontaneous molecular self-assembly guided by surface tension driven (STD) lithography. Such controlled supramolecular nano-aggregates act as scattering centers allowing the fabrication of one-component organic lasers with no external resonator and with desired shape and efficiency. Atomic force microscopy shows that different geometric pattern with different supramolecular organization obtained by the lithographic process tailors the coherent emission properties by controlling the distribution and the size of the random scatterers.

  18. Process For Cutting Polymers Electrolyte Multi-Layer Batteries And Batteries Obtained Thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gauthier, Michel (La Prairie, CA); Lessard, Ginette (Longueuil, CA); Dussault, Gaston (St-Benoit-de-Mirabel, CA); Rouillard, Roger (Beloeil, CA); Simoneau, Martin (Montreal, CA); Miller, Alan Paul (Woodbury, MN)

    2003-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A stacking of battery laminate is prepared, each battery consisting of anode, polymer electrolyte, cathode films and possibly an insulating film, under conditions suitable to constitute a rigid monoblock assembly, in which the films are unitary with one another. The assembly obtained is thereafter cut in predetermined shape by using a mechanical device without macroscopic deformation of the films constituting the assembly and without inducing permanent short circuits. The battery which is obtained after cutting includes at least one end which appears as a uniform cut, the various films constituting the assembly having undergone no macroscopic deformation, the edges of the films of the anode including an electronically insulating passivation film.

  19. Japanese Computing Center Discusses Potential Collaborations...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Japanese Computing Center Discusses Potential Collaborations Japanese Computing Center Discusses Potential Collaborations February 26, 2011 Representatives from Japan's Tsukuba...

  20. SMALL-SCALE IMPACT SENSITIVITY TESTING ON EDC37

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    HSU, P C; HUST, G; MAIENSCHEIN, J L

    2008-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    EDC37 was tested at LLNL to determine its impact sensitivity in the LLNL's drop hammer system. The results showed that impact sensitivities of the samples were between 86 cm and 156 cm, depending on test methods. EDC37 is a plastic bonded explosive consisting of 90% HMX, 1% nitrocellulose and binder. We recently conducted impact sensitivity testing in our drop hammer system and the results are presented in this report.

  1. Calculation of sensitivity coefficients for a neutron well logging tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Chien-Hsiang

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OF SCIENCE August 1993 Major Subject: Nuclear Engineering CALCULATION OF SENSITIVITY COEFFICIENTS FOR A NEUTRON WELL LOGGING TOOL A Thesis by CHIEN-HSIANG CHEN Approved as to style and content by: Theodore A. Parish (Chair of Committee) Ron R. Hart... to calculate sensitivity coefficients. A benchmark problem for a neutron porosity logging tool was set up to test the methodology mentioned above. Through several tests and calculations of sensitivity coefficients, it was found that the response...

  2. Neutrino Oscillation Physics Potential of the T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abe, K; Aihara, H; Akiri, T; Andreopoulos, C; Aoki, S; Ariga, A; Assylbekov, S; Autiero, D; Barbi, M; Barker, G J; Barr, G; Bass, M; Batkiewicz, M; Bay, F; Berardi, V; Berger, B E; Berkman, S; Bhadra, S; Blaszczyk, F d M; Blondel, A; Bojechko, C; Bordoni, S; Boyd, S B; Brailsford, D; Bravar, A; Bronner, C; Buchanan, N; Calland, R G; Rodr'iguez, J Caravaca; Cartwright, S L; Castillo, R; Catanesi, M G; Cervera, A; Cherdack, D; Christodoulou, G; Clifton, A; Coleman, J; Coleman, S J; Collazuol, G; Connolly, K; Cremonesi, L; Dabrowska, A; Danko, I; Das, R; Davis, S; de Perio, P; De Rosa, G; Dealtry, T; Dennis, S R; Densham, C; Dewhurst, D; Di Lodovico, F; Di Luise, S; Drapier, O; Duboyski, T; Duffy, K; Dumarchez, J; Dytman, S; Dziewiecki, M; Emery-Schrenk, S; Ereditato, A; Escudero, L; Finch, A J; Friend, M; Fujii, Y; Fukuda, Y; Furmanski, A P; Galymov, V; Giffin, S; Giganti, C; Gilje, K; Goeldi, D; Golan, T; Gonin, M; Grant, N; Gudin, D; Hadley, D R; Haesler, A; Haigh, M D; Hamilton, P; Hansen, D; Hara, T; Hartz, M; Hasegawa, T; Hastings, N C; Hayato, Y; Hearty, C; Helmer, R L; Hierholzer, M; Hignight, J; Hillairet, A; Himmel, A; Hiraki, T; Hirota, S; Holeczek, J; Horikawa, S; Huang, K; Ichikawa, A K; Ieki, K; Ieva, M; Ikeda, M; Imber, J; Insler, J; Irvine, T J; Ishida, T; Ishii, T; Iwai, E; Iwamoto, K; Iyogi, K; Izmaylov, A; Jacob, A; Jamieson, B; Johnson, R A; Johnson, S; Jo, J H; Jonsson, P; Jung, C K; Kabirnezhad, M; Kaboth, A C; Kajita, T; Kakuno, H; Kameda, J; Kanazawa, Y; Karlen, D; Karpikov, I; Katori, T; Kearns, E; Khabibullin, M; Khotjantsev, A; Kielczewska, D; Kikawa, T; Kilinski, A; Kim, J; King, S; Kisiel, J; Kitching, P; Kobayashi, T; Koch, L; Kolaceke, A; Konaka, A; Kormos, L L; Korzenev, A; Koseki, K; Koshio, Y; Kropp, W; Kubo, H; Kudenko, Y; Kurjata, R; Kutter, T; Lagoda, J; Laihem, K; Lamont, I; Larkin, E; Laveder, M; Lawe, M; Lazos, M; Lindner, T; Lister, C; Litchfield, R P; Longhin, A; Ludovici, L; Magaletti, L; Mahn, K; Malek, M; Manly, S; Marino, A D; Marteau, J; Martin, J F; Martynenko, S; Maruyama, T; Matveev, V; Mavrokoridis, K; Mazzucato, E; McCarthy, M; McCauley, N; McFarland, K S; McGrew, C; Mefodiev, A; Metelko, C; Mezzetto, M; Mijakowski, P; Miller, C A; Minamino, A; Mineev, O; Missert, A; Miura, M; Moriyama, S; Mueller, Th A; Murakami, A; Murdoch, M; Murphy, S; Myslik, J; Nakadaira, T; Nakahata, M; Nakamura, K; Nakayama, S; Nakaya, T; Nakayoshi, K; Nielsen, C; Nirkko, M; Nishikawa, K; Nishimura, Y; O'Keeffe, H M; Ohta, R; Okumura, K; Okusawa, T; Oryszczak, W; Oser, S M; Ovsyannikova, T; Owen, R A; Oyama, Y; Palladino, V; Palomino, J L; Paolone, V; Payne, D; Perevozchikov, O; Perkin, J D; Petrov, Y; Pickard, L; Guerra, E S Pinzon; Pistillo, C; Plonski, P; Poplawska, E; Popov, B; Posiadala-Zezula, M; Poutissou, J -M; Poutissou, R; Przewlocki, P; Quilain, B; Radicioni, E; Ratoff, P N; Ravonel, M; Rayner, M A M; Redij, A; Reeves, M; Reinherz-Aronis, E; Riccio, C; Rodrigues, P A; Rojas, P; Rondio, E; Roth, S; Rubbia, A; Ruterbories, D; Sacco, R; Sakashita, K; S'anchez, F; Sato, F; Scantamburlo, E; Scholberg, K; Schoppmann, S; Schwehr, J; Scott, M; Seiya, Y; Sekiguchi, T; Sekiya, H; Sgalaberna, D; Shaker, F; Shiozawa, M; Short, S; Shustrov, Y; Sinclair, P; Smith, B; Smy, M; Sobczyk, J T; Sobel, H; Sorel, M; Southwell, L; Stamoulis, P; Steinmann, J; Still, B; Suda, Y; Suzuki, A; Suzuki, K; Suzuki, S Y; Suzuki, Y; Tacik, R; Tada, M; Takahashi, S; Takeda, A; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, H K; Tanaka, H A; Tanaka, M M; Terhorst, D; Terri, R; Thompson, L F; Thorley, A; Tobayama, S; Toki, W; Tomura, T; Totsuka, Y; Touramanis, C; Tsukamoto, T; Tzanov, M; Uchida, Y; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Vasseur, G; Wachala, T; Waldron, A V; Walter, C W; Wark, D; Wascko, M O; Weber, A; Wendell, R; Wilkes, R J; Wilking, M J; Wilkinson, C; Williamson, Z; Wilson, J R; Wilson, R J; Wongjirad, T; Yamada, Y; Yamamoto, K; Yanagisawa, C; Yano, T; Yen, S; Yershov, N; Yokoyama, M; Yuan, T; Yu, M; Zalewska, A; Zalipska, J; Zambelli, L; Zaremba, K; Ziembicki, M; Zimmerman, E D; Zito, M; Zmuda, J

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal $\\sin^22\\theta_{23}$, the octant of $\\theta_{23}$, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of $\\delta_{CP}$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$, and $\\Delta m^2_{32}$, for various combinations of $\

  3. Neutrino Oscillation Physics Potential of the T2K Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Abe; J. Adam; H. Aihara; T. Akiri; C. Andreopoulos; S. Aoki; A. Ariga; S. Assylbekov; D. Autiero; M. Barbi; G. J. Barker; G. Barr; P. Bartet-Friburg; M. Bass; M. Batkiewicz; F. Bay; V. Berardi; B. E. Berger; S. Berkman; S. Bhadra; F. d. M. Blaszczyk; A. Blondel; C. Bojechko; S. Bordoni; S. B. Boyd; D. Brailsford; A. Bravar; C. Bronner; N. Buchanan; R. G. Calland; J. Caravaca Rodr'iguez; S. L. Cartwright; R. Castillo; M. G. Catanesi; A. Cervera; D. Cherdack; G. Christodoulou; A. Clifton; J. Coleman; S. J. Coleman; G. Collazuol; K. Connolly; L. Cremonesi; A. Dabrowska; I. Danko; R. Das; S. Davis; P. de Perio; G. De Rosa; T. Dealtry; S. R. Dennis; C. Densham; D. Dewhurst; F. Di Lodovico; S. Di Luise; O. Drapier; T. Duboyski; K. Duffy; J. Dumarchez; S. Dytman; M. Dziewiecki; S. Emery-Schrenk; A. Ereditato; L. Escudero; T. Feusels; A. J. Finch; G. A. Fiorentini; M. Friend; Y. Fujii; Y. Fukuda; A. P. Furmanski; V. Galymov; A. Garcia; S. Giffin; C. Giganti; K. Gilje; D. Goeldi; T. Golan; M. Gonin; N. Grant; D. Gudin; D. R. Hadley; L. Haegel; A. Haesler; M. D. Haigh; P. Hamilton; D. Hansen; T. Hara; M. Hartz; T. Hasegawa; N. C. Hastings; T. Hayashino; Y. Hayato; C. Hearty; R. L. Helmer; M. Hierholzer; J. Hignight; A. Hillairet; A. Himmel; T. Hiraki; S. Hirota; J. Holeczek; S. Horikawa; K. Huang; A. K. Ichikawa; K. Ieki; M. Ieva; M. Ikeda; J. Imber; J. Insler; T. J. Irvine; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; E. Iwai; K. Iwamoto; K. Iyogi; A. Izmaylov; A. Jacob; B. Jamieson; R. A. Johnson; S. Johnson; J. H. Jo; P. Jonsson; C. K. Jung; M. Kabirnezhad; A. C. Kaboth; T. Kajita; H. Kakuno; J. Kameda; Y. Kanazawa; D. Karlen; I. Karpikov; T. Katori; E. Kearns; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; D. Kielczewska; T. Kikawa; A. Kilinski; J. Kim; S. King; J. Kisiel; P. Kitching; T. Kobayashi; L. Koch; T. Koga; A. Kolaceke; A. Konaka; L. L. Kormos; A. Korzenev; Y. Koshio; W. Kropp; H. Kubo; Y. Kudenko; R. Kurjata; T. Kutter; J. Lagoda; K. Laihem; I. Lamont; E. Larkin; M. Laveder; M. Lawe; M. Lazos; T. Lindner; C. Lister; R. P. Litchfield; A. Longhin; J. P. Lopez; L. Ludovici; L. Magaletti; K. Mahn; M. Malek; S. Manly; A. D. Marino; J. Marteau; J. F. Martin; P. Martins; S. Martynenko; T. Maruyama; V. Matveev; K. Mavrokoridis; E. Mazzucato; M. McCarthy; N. McCauley; K. S. McFarland; C. McGrew; A. Mefodiev; C. Metelko; M. Mezzetto; P. Mijakowski; C. A. Miller; A. Minamino; O. Mineev; A. Missert; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; Th. A. Mueller; A. Murakami; M. Murdoch; S. Murphy; J. Myslik; T. Nakadaira; M. Nakahata; K. G. Nakamura; K. Nakamura; S. Nakayama; T. Nakaya; K. Nakayoshi; C. Nantais; C. Nielsen; M. Nirkko; K. Nishikawa; Y. Nishimura; J. Nowak; H. M. O'Keeffe; R. Ohta; K. Okumura; T. Okusawa; W. Oryszczak; S. M. Oser; T. Ovsyannikova; R. A. Owen; Y. Oyama; V. Palladino; J. L. Palomino; V. Paolone; D. Payne; O. Perevozchikov; J. D. Perkin; Y. Petrov; L. Pickard; E. S. Pinzon Guerra; C. Pistillo; P. Plonski; E. Poplawska; B. Popov; M. Posiadala-Zezula; J. -M. Poutissou; R. Poutissou; P. Przewlocki; B. Quilain; E. Radicioni; P. N. Ratoff; M. Ravonel; M. A. M. Rayner; A. Redij; M. Reeves; E. Reinherz-Aronis; C. Riccio; P. A. Rodrigues; P. Rojas; E. Rondio; S. Roth; A. Rubbia; D. Ruterbories; R. Sacco; K. Sakashita; F. S'anchez; F. Sato; E. Scantamburlo; K. Scholberg; S. Schoppmann; J. Schwehr; M. Scott; Y. Seiya; T. Sekiguchi; H. Sekiya; D. Sgalaberna; R. Shah; F. Shaker; M. Shiozawa; S. Short; Y. Shustrov; P. Sinclair; B. Smith; M. Smy; J. T. Sobczyk; H. Sobel; M. Sorel; L. Southwell; P. Stamoulis; J. Steinmann; B. Still; Y. Suda; A. Suzuki; K. Suzuki; S. Y. Suzuki; Y. Suzuki; R. Tacik; M. Tada; S. Takahashi; A. Takeda; Y. Takeuchi; H. K. Tanaka; H. A. Tanaka; M. M. Tanaka; D. Terhorst; R. Terri; L. F. Thompson; A. Thorley; S. Tobayama; W. Toki; T. Tomura; Y. Totsuka; C. Touramanis; T. Tsukamoto; M. Tzanov; Y. Uchida; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; G. Vasseur; T. Wachala; A. V. Waldron; K. Wakamatsu; C. W. Walter; D. Wark; W. Warzycha; M. O. Wascko; A. Weber; R. Wendell; R. J. Wilkes; M. J. Wilking; C. Wilkinson; Z. Williamson; J. R. Wilson; R. J. Wilson; T. Wongjirad; Y. Yamada; K. Yamamoto; C. Yanagisawa; T. Yano; S. Yen; N. Yershov; M. Yokoyama; K. Yoshida; T. Yuan; M. Yu; A. Zalewska; J. Zalipska; L. Zambelli; K. Zaremba; M. Ziembicki; E. D. Zimmerman; M. Zito; J. Zmuda

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The observation of the recent electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam and the high-precision measurement of the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ have led to a re-evaluation of the physics potential of the T2K long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. Sensitivities are explored for CP violation in neutrinos, non-maximal $\\sin^22\\theta_{23}$, the octant of $\\theta_{23}$, and the mass hierarchy, in addition to the measurements of $\\delta_{CP}$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{23}$, and $\\Delta m^2_{32}$, for various combinations of $\

  4. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  5. Constituent gluons and the static quark potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greensite, Jeff

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that Hamiltonian matrix elements between physical states in QCD might be approximated, in Coulomb gauge, by "lattice-improved" tree diagrams; i.e. tree diagram contributions with dressed ghost, transverse gluon, and Coulomb propagators obtained from lattice simulations. Such matrix elements can be applied to a variational treatment of hadronic states which include constituent gluons. As an illustration and first application of this hybrid approach, we derive a variational estimate of the heavy quark potential for distances up to 2.5 fm. The Coulomb string tension in SU(3) gauge theory is about a factor of four times greater than the asymptotic string tension. In our variational approach, using for simplicity a single variational parameter, we can reduce this overshoot by nearly the factor required. The building blocks of our approach are Coulomb gauge propagators, and in this connection we present new lattice results for the ghost and transverse gluon propagators in position space.

  6. Constituent gluons and the static quark potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeff Greensite; Adam P. Szczepaniak

    2015-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest that Hamiltonian matrix elements between physical states in QCD might be approximated, in Coulomb gauge, by "lattice-improved" tree diagrams; i.e. tree diagram contributions with dressed ghost, transverse gluon, and Coulomb propagators obtained from lattice simulations. Such matrix elements can be applied to a variational treatment of hadronic states which include constituent gluons. As an illustration and first application of this hybrid approach, we derive a variational estimate of the heavy quark potential for distances up to 2.5 fm. The Coulomb string tension in SU(3) gauge theory is about a factor of four times greater than the asymptotic string tension. In our variational approach, using for simplicity a single variational parameter, we can reduce this overshoot by nearly the factor required. The building blocks of our approach are Coulomb gauge propagators, and in this connection we present new lattice results for the ghost and transverse gluon propagators in position space.

  7. TO EVALUATE BATH-TUB POTENTIAL SUMMARY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Estes Gulch. Disposal Cell; Morrison Knudsen Corporation

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses additional field testing that is considered necessary to confirm the permeabilities of the bedrock at the Estes Gulch Disposal site. The proposed field efforts also provide for follow-up monitoring during and immediately following construction. This will ensure that the effects of remaining uncertainties regarding foundation permeabilities and other geohydrologic factors will not violate the integrity of the Disposal Cell or can be remedied during the latter stages of construction to preclude potential problems. Furthermore, the results obtained by the proposed testing and monitoring may allow us to relax the stringency of the radon cover permeability requirement and achieve lower cost in constructing the radon barrier. concepts and field program presented here supplement the information-presented in the recently completed report: "Evaluation of Surficial Soil-and Rock

  8. Dynamics of O,,3 Pj...Rg collisions on ab initio and scattering potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krems, Roman

    ) Department of Chemistry, Physical Chemistry, Go¨teborg University, SE-412 96, Go¨teborg, Sweden A. A. The sensitivity of the dynamical results to the nature of Rg atoms and interaction potentials is analyzed transfer kinetics and spectral properties of gas mixtures, discharges, plasmas, atmospheric

  9. Detecting non-relativistic cosmic neutrinos by capture on tritium: phenomenology and physics potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Long; Cecilia Lunardini; Eray Sabancilar

    2014-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the physics potential of the detection of the Cosmic Neutrino Background via neutrino capture on tritium, taking the proposed PTOLEMY experiment as a case study. With the projected energy resolution of $\\Delta \\sim$ 0.15 eV, the experiment will be sensitive to neutrino masses with degenerate spectrum, $m_1 \\simeq m_2 \\simeq m_3 = m_\

  10. An effective all-atom potential for proteins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anders Irbäck; Simon Mitternacht; Sandipan Mohanty

    2009-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe and test an implicit solvent all-atom potential for simulations of protein folding and aggregation. The potential is developed through studies of structural and thermodynamic properties of 17 peptides with diverse secondary structure. Results obtained using the final form of the potential are presented for all these peptides. The same model, with unchanged parameters, is furthermore applied to a heterodimeric coiled-coil system, a mixed alpha/beta protein and a three-helix-bundle protein, with very good results. The computational efficiency of the potential makes it possible to investigate the free-energy landscape of these 49--67-residue systems with high statistical accuracy, using only modest computational resources by today's standards.

  11. affect insulin sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Zion, Todd C. 8 Deregulation of Hepatic Insulin Sensitivity Induced by Central Lipid Infusion in Rats Is Mediated by Nitric Oxide Biology and Medicine Websites Summary:...

  12. High Sensitivity Combined with Extended Structural Coverage of...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    in producing ions with high efficiency and transmitting them to low pressures for high sensitivity mass spectrometry (MS) analysis. Here we present evidence that not only...

  13. Sensitivity analysis of semidefinite programs without strong duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yuen-Lam Cheung

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 30, 2014 ... Sensitivity analysis of semidefinite programs without strong duality. Yuen-Lam Cheung(yl2cheun ***at*** uwaterloo.ca)

  14. applied sensitivity analysis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    in this paper attains almost the same performance as global optimization but with faster speed. Furthermore, sensitivities of optimal operation parameters with respect to external...

  15. Sensitive Immunosensor for Cancer Biomarker Based on Dual Signal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Immunosensor for Cancer Biomarker Based on Dual Signal Amplification Strategy of Graphene Sheets and Multi-Enzyme Sensitive Immunosensor for Cancer Biomarker Based on Dual Signal...

  16. alters cell sensitivity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Solar Cells Pei Dong1 and Jun Lou1 1 sensitized solar cells (DSCs), the third generation of solar cells, have attracted more and more attention VACNTsgraphene over...

  17. Security of Foreign Intelligence Information and Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1993-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The order establishes responsibilities and authorities for protecting Foreign Intelligence Information (FII) and Sensitive Compartmented Information Facilities (SCIFs) within DOE. Cancels DOE 5639.8.

  18. Sensitivity analysis of semidefinite programs without strong duality

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 30, 2014 ... There is a large volume of results on sensitivity analysis for ..... In this section we review some concepts regarding the failure of the Slater ...

  19. TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Analysis of Processes Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste TSPA Model Development and Sensitivity Analysis of Processes...

  20. Which Models Matter: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Models Matter: Uncertainty and Sensitivity Analysis for Photovoltaic Power Systems Clifford W. Hansen and Andrew Pohl Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, 87185-1033, USA...

  1. Sandia National Laboratories: dye-sensitized solar cell

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    dye-sensitized solar cell Combining 'Tinkertoy' Materials with Solar Cells for Increased Photovoltaic Efficiency On December 4, 2014, in Energy, Materials Science, News, News &...

  2. certificates of optimality and sensitivity analysis using generalized ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 9, 2014 ... Page 1 ... Sensitivity analysis is another important topic in MILP studies. It has been studied in the work of Wolsey. [19] using Chvátal functions ...

  3. Sensitive Multi-Species Emissions Monitoring: Infrared Laser-Based Detection of Trace-Level Contaminants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steill, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes our development of spectroscopic chemical analysis techniques and spectral modeling for trace-gas measurements of highly-regulated low-concentration species present in flue gas emissions from utility coal boilers such as HCl under conditions of high humidity. Detailed spectral modeling of the spectroscopy of HCl and other important combustion and atmospheric species such as H 2 O, CO 2 , N 2 O, NO 2 , SO 2 , and CH 4 demonstrates that IR-laser spectroscopy is a sensitive multi-component analysis strategy. Experimental measurements from techniques based on IR laser spectroscopy are presented that demonstrate sub-ppm sensitivity levels to these species. Photoacoustic infrared spectroscopy is used to detect and quantify HCl at ppm levels with extremely high signal-to-noise even under conditions of high relative humidity. Additionally, cavity ring-down IR spectroscopy is used to achieve an extremely high sensitivity to combustion trace gases in this spectral region; ppm level CH 4 is one demonstrated example. The importance of spectral resolution in the sensitivity of a trace-gas measurement is examined by spectral modeling in the mid- and near-IR, and efforts to improve measurement resolution through novel instrument development are described. While previous project reports focused on benefits and complexities of the dual-etalon cavity ring-down infrared spectrometer, here details on steps taken to implement this unique and potentially revolutionary instrument are described. This report also illustrates and critiques the general strategy of IR- laser photodetection of trace gases leading to the conclusion that mid-IR laser spectroscopy techniques provide a promising basis for further instrument development and implementation that will enable cost-effective sensitive detection of multiple key contaminant species simultaneously.

  4. Impact of sludge mechanical behaviour on spatial distribution parameters obtained with centrifugal spreader

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Impact of sludge mechanical behaviour on spatial distribution parameters obtained to analyse organic spreading and opens the way to more developments. Keywords: sludge rheological behaviour a large amount of residues which are spread on agricultural fields. This process of sludge reuse is mainly

  5. PROPERTIES OF RELATIVELY-DILUTEPLASMAS IN PULSED-POWER SYSTEMS OBTAINED FROM HIGH-ACCURACY LASER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doron, Ramy

    Transmission Lines, Plasma Switches, Ion and Electron Diodes, and Plasma Sources. I.INTRODUCTION Atomic physicsPROPERTIES OF RELATIVELY-DILUTEPLASMAS IN PULSED-POWER SYSTEMS OBTAINED FROM HIGH-ACCURACY LASER application of laser-spectroscopy to investigate the electric fields and the properties of relatively dilute

  6. Internship Guidelines All students seeking to obtain internship credit through the Center for International Studies should

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hutcheon, James M.

    Internship Guidelines All students seeking to obtain internship credit through the Center in pursuing an International Studies internship should begin making plans and searching for an internship well securing an internship at least six months in advance. For example, should you plan to complete

  7. Interfacial and colloidal behavior of asphaltenes obtained from Brazilian crude oils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Watson

    Interfacial and colloidal behavior of asphaltenes obtained from Brazilian crude oils Anto and crude oils and discuss the implications of these data on the aggregation, adsorption on solid surfaces Brazilian crude oils. Surface tension measurements in solutions formed by any of these two types

  8. Cooling energy demand evaluation by means of regression models obtained from dynamic simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Cooling energy demand evaluation by means of regression models obtained from dynamic simulations Ph, Université Lyon1, FRANCE ABSTRACT The forecast of the energy heating/cooling demand would be a good indicator between simple and complex methods of evaluating the cooling energy demand we have proposed to use energy

  9. Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richards-Kortum, Rebecca

    Leadership Rice Leadership Rice exists to encourage and equip Rice students to obtain leadership roles at Rice and beyond. We provide leadership development opportunities to undergraduates from every ambition for leadership. We seek to accomplish our mission through a blend of curricular and co

  10. Encapsulation of Nickel Nanoparticles in Carbon Obtained by the Sonochemical Decomposition of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prozorov, Ruslan

    Encapsulation of Nickel Nanoparticles in Carbon Obtained by the Sonochemical Decomposition of Ni(C8 A new precursor for the sonochemical preparation of amorphous nickel, Ni(cyclooctadiene)2, yielded relatively large (200 nm) amorphous nanoparticles composed of nickel and carbon atoms. Small nickel particles

  11. ORNL/CDIAC-128 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .S.A. Prepared by Alexander Kozyr1 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center 1 Energy, Environment of Biological and Environmental Research U.S. Department of Energy Budget Activity Numbers KP 12 04 01 0 and KP#12;ORNL/CDIAC-128 NDP-075 CARBON DIOXIDE, HYDROGRAPHIC, AND CHEMICAL DATA OBTAINED DURING THE R

  12. PublishedbyManeyPublishing(c)IOMCommunicationsLtd Nanostructured bainitic steel obtained by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cambridge, University of

    . In the second step, spark plasma sintering is used as a rapid consolidation process to retain a very fine of the powder, spark plasma sintering and final heat treatment are reported. Bainitic and super-bainitic steels and nanostructuring, spark plasma sintering and heat treatment. The goal was to obtain a fine and stable

  13. Vol. 36 (2005) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 4 NUCLEAR SHELL ENERGY OBTAINED

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pomorski, Krzysztof

    , not over the single- particle energies. The new prescription for ~E is the following: · one definesVol. 36 (2005) ACTA PHYSICA POLONICA B No 4 NUCLEAR SHELL ENERGY OBTAINED BY AVERAGING IN PARTICLE (Received December 13, 2004) A revised version of the shell-correction method, based on a new way

  14. Evaluation of extraction and purification methods for obtaining PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Jr., Frederick C.

    Evaluation of extraction and purification methods for obtaining PCR-amplifiable DNA from compost complicate the isolation of PCR- amplifiable DNA from compost and other organic-rich samples. In this study from compost decreased with increasing salt concentration in the lysis buffer. DNA purified by gel

  15. Obtaining super resolution light spot using surface plasmon assisted sharp ridge nanoaperture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Xianfan

    -field collimation of ridge aperture is found completely destroyed. On the other hand, using a bowtie-shaped aperture excitation localized at the tips of bowtie. Much higher field enhancement is also obtained compared to the bowtie aperture made in chromium. © 2005 American Institute of Physics. DOI: 10.1063/1.1875747 Recently

  16. Benzene Increases Aneuploidy in the Lymphocytes of Exposed Workers: A Comparison of Data Obtained by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Benzene Increases Aneuploidy in the Lymphocytes of Exposed Workers: A Comparison of Data Obtained Benzene is an established human leukemogen that increases the level of chromosome aberrations in lym and 8 in healthy benzene-exposed human subjects. Metaphase and interphase cells from the peripheral

  17. Administrative Procedures for Obtaining Unescorted Access to Radioactive Materials of Concern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Songtao

    -related need". These mandates include fingerprint submission and a Federal Bureau of Investigation ("FBI to the FBI. The information received back from the FBI will be reviewed and confidentially considered that individual obtained from the FBI for the purpose of assuring correct and complete information. Columbia

  18. Goal-oriented sensitivity analysis for lattice kinetic Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arampatzis, Georgios, E-mail: garab@math.uoc.gr [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Crete (Greece) [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Crete (Greece); Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States); Katsoulakis, Markos A., E-mail: markos@math.umass.edu [Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, Massachusetts 01003 (United States)

    2014-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we propose a new class of coupling methods for the sensitivity analysis of high dimensional stochastic systems and in particular for lattice Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC). Sensitivity analysis for stochastic systems is typically based on approximating continuous derivatives with respect to model parameters by the mean value of samples from a finite difference scheme. Instead of using independent samples the proposed algorithm reduces the variance of the estimator by developing a strongly correlated-“coupled”- stochastic process for both the perturbed and unperturbed stochastic processes, defined in a common state space. The novelty of our construction is that the new coupled process depends on the targeted observables, e.g., coverage, Hamiltonian, spatial correlations, surface roughness, etc., hence we refer to the proposed method as goal-oriented sensitivity analysis. In particular, the rates of the coupled Continuous Time Markov Chain are obtained as solutions to a goal-oriented optimization problem, depending on the observable of interest, by considering the minimization functional of the corresponding variance. We show that this functional can be used as a diagnostic tool for the design and evaluation of different classes of couplings. Furthermore, the resulting KMC sensitivity algorithm has an easy implementation that is based on the Bortz–Kalos–Lebowitz algorithm's philosophy, where events are divided in classes depending on level sets of the observable of interest. Finally, we demonstrate in several examples including adsorption, desorption, and diffusion Kinetic Monte Carlo that for the same confidence interval and observable, the proposed goal-oriented algorithm can be two orders of magnitude faster than existing coupling algorithms for spatial KMC such as the Common Random Number approach. We also provide a complete implementation of the proposed sensitivity analysis algorithms, including various spatial KMC examples, in a supplementary MATLAB source code.

  19. The cation inversion and magnetization in nanopowder zinc ferrite obtained by soft mechanochemical processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milutinovi?, A. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia); Lazarevi?, Z., E-mail: lzorica@yahoo.com [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia); Jovaleki?, ?. [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Kuryliszyn-Kudelska, I. [Institute of Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Al. Lotników 32/46, 02-668 Warsaw (Poland); Rom?evi?, M.; Kosti?, S.; Rom?evi?, N. [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, Zemun, Belgrade (Serbia)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nano powder of ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} prepared by a soft mechanochemical route after 18 h milling. • Phase formation controlled by XRD, Raman spectroscopy and magnetic measurements. • Size, strain and cation inversion degree determined by Rietveld refinement. • We were able to estimate the degree of inversion at most 0.348 and 0.4. • Obtained extremely high values of saturation magnetizations at T = 4.5 K. - Abstract: Two zinc ferrite nanoparticle materials were prepared by the same method – soft mechanochemical synthesis, but starting from different powder mixtures: (1) Zn(OH){sub 2}/?-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} and (2) Zn(OH){sub 2}/Fe(OH){sub 3}. In both cases a single phase system was obtained after 18 h of milling. The progress of the synthesis was controlled by X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, TEM and magnetic measurements. Analysis of the XRD patterns by Rietveld refinement allowed determination of the cation inversion degree for both obtained single phase ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} samples. The sample obtained from mixture (1) has the cation inversion degree 0.3482 and the sample obtained from mixture (2) 0.400. Magnetization measurements were confirmed that the degrees of the inversion were well estimated. Comparison with published data shows that used method of synthesis gives nano powder samples with extremely high values of saturation magnetizations: sample (1) 78.3 emu g{sup ?1} and sample (2) 91.5 emu g{sup ?1} at T = 4.5 K.

  20. Sensitivity of Rooftop PV Projections in the SunShot Vision Study to Market Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drury, E.; Denholm, P.; Margolis, R.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SunShot Vision Study explored the potential growth of solar markets if solar prices decreased by about 75% from 2010 to 2020. The SolarDS model was used to simulate rooftop PV demand for this study, based on several PV market assumptions--future electricity rates, customer access to financing, and others--in addition to the SunShot PV price projections. This paper finds that modeled PV demand is highly sensitive to several non-price market assumptions, particularly PV financing parameters.

  1. Accepted Manuscript Studying the sensitivity of the pollutants concentrations caused by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    -based sensitivity analysis, Sobol' bal sensitivity indices, Air pollution modeling, Multidimensional numericalAccepted Manuscript Studying the sensitivity of the pollutants concentrations caused by variations. Georgieva, S. Ivanovska, T. Ostromsky, Z. Zlatev, Studying the sensitivity of the pollutants concentrations

  2. Statistical Error analysis of Nucleon-Nucleon phenomenological potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Navarro Perez; J. E. Amaro; E. Ruiz Arriola

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Nucleon-Nucleon potentials are commonplace in nuclear physics and are determined from a finite number of experimental data with limited precision sampling the scattering process. We study the statistical assumptions implicit in the standard least squares fitting procedure and apply, along with more conventional tests, a tail sensitive quantile-quantile test as a simple and confident tool to verify the normality of residuals. We show that the fulfilment of normality tests is linked to a judicious and consistent selection of a nucleon-nucleon database. These considerations prove crucial to a proper statistical error analysis and uncertainty propagation. We illustrate these issues by analyzing about 8000 proton-proton and neutron-proton scattering published data. This enables the construction of potentials meeting all statistical requirements necessary for statistical uncertainty estimates in nuclear structure calculations.

  3. Side-payment profitability and interacting eyeball ISPs under convex demand-response modeling congestion-sensitive applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kesidis, George

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with the issue of side payments between content providers (CPs) and Internet service (access bandwidth) providers (ISPs) in an Internet that is potentially not neutral. We herein generalize past results modeling the ISP and CP interaction as a noncooperative game in two directions. We consider different demand response models (price sensitivities) for different provider types in order to explore when side payments are profitable to the ISP. Also, we consider convex (non-linear) demand response to model demand triggered by traffic which is sensitive to access bandwidth congestion, particularly delay-sensitive interactive real-time applications. Finally, we consider a model with two competing "eyeball" ISPs with transit pricing of net traffic at their peering point to study the effects of caching remote content.

  4. HOLMES - The Electron Capture Decay of 163Ho to Measure the Electron Neutrino Mass with sub-eV sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alpert; M. Balata; D. Bennett; M. Biasotti; C. Boragno; C. Brofferio; V. Ceriale; D. Corsini; P. K. Day; M. De Gerone; R. Dressler; M. Faverzani; E. Ferri; J. Fowler; F. Gatti; A. Giachero; J. Hays-Wehle; S. Heinitz; G. Hilton; U. Koester; M. Lusignoli; M. Maino; J. Mates; S. Nisi; R. Nizzolo; A. Nucciotti; G. Pessina; G. Pizzigoni; A. Puiu; S. Ragazzi; C. Reintsema; M. Ribeiro Gomes; D. Schmidt; D. Schumann; M. Sisti; D. Swetz; F. Terranova; J. Ullom

    2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the decay of 163Ho. The calorimetric measurement eliminates systematic uncertainties arising from the use of external beta sources, as in experiments with beta spectrometers. This measurement was proposed in 1982 by A. De Rujula and M. Lusignoli, but only recently the detector technological progress allowed to design a sensitive experiment. HOLMES will deploy a large array of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted 163Ho nuclei. The resulting mass sensitivity will be as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES will be an important step forward in the direct neutrino mass measurement with a calorimetric approach as an alternative to spectrometry. It will also establish the potential of this approach to extend the sensitivity down to 0.1 eV. We outline here the project with its technical challenges and perspectives.

  5. HOLMES - The Electron Capture Decay of 163Ho to Measure the Electron Neutrino Mass with sub-eV sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Alpert; M. Balata; D. Bennett; M. Biasotti; C. Boragno; C. Brofferio; V. Ceriale; D. Corsini; M. De Gerone; R. Dressler; M. Faverzani; E. Ferri; J. Fowler; F. Gatti; A. Giachero; J. Hays-Wehle; S. Heinitz; G. Hilton; U. Koester; M. Lusignoli; M. Maino; J. Mates; S. Nisi; R. Nizzolo; A. Nucciotti; G. Pessina; G. Pizzigoni; A. Puiu; S. Ragazzi; C. Reintsema; M. Ribeiro Gomes; D. Schmidt; D. Schumann; M. Sisti; D. Swetz; F. Terranova; J. Ullom

    2015-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The European Research Council has recently funded HOLMES, a new experiment to directly measure the neutrino mass. HOLMES will perform a calorimetric measurement of the energy released in the decay of 163Ho. The calorimetric measurement eliminates systematic uncertainties arising from the use of external beta sources, as in experiments with beta spectrometers. This measurement was proposed in 1982 by A. De Rujula and M. Lusignoli, but only recently the detector technological progress allowed to design a sensitive experiment. HOLMES will deploy a large array of low temperature microcalorimeters with implanted 163Ho nuclei. The resulting mass sensitivity will be as low as 0.4 eV. HOLMES will be an important step forward in the direct neutrino mass measurement with a calorimetric approach as an alternative to spectrometry. It will also establish the potential of this approach to extend the sensitivity down to 0.1 eV. We outline here the project with its technical challenges and perspectives.

  6. Eddy Fluxes and Sensitivity of the Water Cycle to Spatial Resolution in Idealized Regional Aquaplanet Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagos, Samson M.; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Gustafson, William I.; Singh, Balwinder

    2014-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A multi-scale moisture budget analysis is used to identify the mechanisms responsible for the sensitivity of the water cycle to spatial resolution using idealized regional aquaplanet simulations. In the higher resolution simulations, moisture transport by eddies fluxes dry the boundary layer enhancing evaporation and precipitation. This effect of eddies, which is underestimated by the physics parameterizations in the low-resolution simulations, is found to be responsible for the sensitivity of the water cycle both directly, and through its upscale effect, on the mean circulation. Correlations among moisture transport by eddies at adjacent ranges of scales provides the potential for reducing this sensitivity by representing the unresolved eddies by their marginally resolved counterparts.

  7. Vehicle potential measurements during electron emission in the ionosphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, N.B.

    1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CHARGE-2 was a sounding rocket experiment to study the interaction of an electron beam with the environment. Additionally, experiments on the interaction of a vehicle at high potential (up to 1 kV) with the ionosphere were performed. The payload consisted of two parts that were separated during the flight. A 1 -kV electron gun was flown on the mother vehicle along with numerous diagnostic Instruments. The daughter vehicle was deployed on a conducting, insulated tether to a distance of up to 426 m perpendicular to the geomagnetic field. The high potential was obtained by electron emission from the mother vehicle, and by voltage biasing of the daughter vehicle. Measurements of transient vehicle potential were obtained with a sample interval of 100 ns. Measurements of the steady-state vehicle potential were typically limited to about half of the lkV accelerating potential of the electron gun. The daughter vehicle collected current consistent with magnetically limited models of current collection.

  8. Second-order adjoint sensitivity analysis procedure (SO-ASAP) for computing exactly and efficiently first- and second-order sensitivities in large-scale linear systems: I. Computational methodology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan G. Cacuci

    2014-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    This work presents the second-order forward and adjoint sensitivity analysis procedures (SO-FSAP and SO-ASAP) for computing exactly and efficiently the second-order functional derivatives of physical (engineering, biological, etc.) system responses to the system's model parameters.The definition of system parameters used in this work includes all computational input data, correlations, initial and/or boundary conditions, etc. For a physical system comprising N parameters and M responses, we note that the SO-FSAP requires a total of 0.5*N**2+1.5*N large-scale computations for obtaining all of the first- and second-order sensitivities, for all M system responses. On the other hand, the SO-ASAP requires a total of 2*N+1 large-scale computations for obtaining all of the first- and second-order sensitivities, for one functional-type system responses. Therefore, the SO-ASAP should be used when M is much larger than N, while the SO-ASAP should be used when N is much larger than M. The original SO-ASAP presented in this work should enable the hitherto very difficult, if not intractable, exact computation of all of the second-order response sensitivities (i.e., functional Gateaux-derivatives) for large-systems involving many parameters, as usually encountered in practice. Very importantly, the implementation of the SO-ASAP requires very little additional effort beyond the construction of the adjoint sensitivity system needed for computing the first-order sensitivities.

  9. USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    USING COMMERCIAL FORESTRY FOR ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION IN SENSITIVE BADGER HABITAT by Melissa Hogg BSc of Thesis: Using commercial forestry for ecosystem restoration in sensitive badger habitat Project Number prescribed fire. Commercial forestry can subsidize restoration work, but machinery may damage important

  10. Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Sensitivity of Optimal Operation of an Activated Sludge Process Model Antonio Araujo, Simone sensitivity analysis of optimal operation conducted on an activated sludge process model based on the test.[7] applied a systematic procedure for control structure design of an activated sludge process

  11. Sensitization of fullerenes by covalent attachment of a diketopyrrolopyrrole chromophore

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Candea, George

    donating unit.14,15 There are a few examples of dye molecules used as sensitizers in BHJ solar cells (theSensitization of fullerenes by covalent attachment of a diketopyrrolopyrrole chromophore Natalie for organic solar cell applications, we have synthesized triads of 3,6-dithien-2-yl-2,5-dialkylpyrrolo[3,4-c

  12. Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: II. Model Parametric Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ARTICLE Modeling of a Foamed Emulsion Bioreactor: II. Model Parametric Sensitivity Eunsung Kan: The sensitivity of a conceptual model of a foam emulsion bioreactor (FEBR) used for the control of toluene vapors mass transfer and kinetic limitations can coexist in the bioreactor system. These results will help

  13. Global sensitivity analysis of computer models with functional inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    -based sensitivity analysis techniques, based on the so-called Sobol's indices, when some input variables computer codes which need a preliminary metamodeling step before performing the sensitivity analysis. We). The "mean model" allows to estimate the sensi- tivity indices of each scalar input variables, while

  14. Hot climates, high sensitivity R. T. Pierrehumbert1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierrehumbert, Raymond

    the energy bud- get back into balance. Climate sensitivity is determined by the relative slopes of the two Humidity Clear State Energyfluxintooroutofplanet Surface Temperature Solar energy in Infrared out, low CO2. Schematic of the way the Earth's energy budget introduces state-dependent climate sensitivity in ref. 2

  15. Radial Electron Collection in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Radial Electron Collection in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Alex B. F. Martinson,, Jeffrey W. Elam photoelectrode architecture consisting of concentric conducting and semiconducting nanotubes for use in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). Atomic layer deposition is employed to grow indium tin oxide (ITO) within a porous

  16. Broadband dye-sensitized upconversion of near-infrared light

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Broadband dye-sensitized upconversion of near-infrared light Wenqiang Zou1 , Cindy Visser1-junction solar cell. However, the practical applicability of the most efficient known upconversion materials by the dye-sensitized nanoparticles is dramatically enhanced (by a factor of 3,300) as a result of increased

  17. Sensitivity Analysis for a Pyrotechnically Actuated Pin Puller Model*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    chemical reaction producing both condensed phase and gas phase products. The high pressure productsSensitivity Analysis for a Pyrotechnically Actuated Pin Puller Model* Joseph M. Powerst and Keith A 46556-5637 USA Abstract This paper gives an analysis which determines the parametric sensitivity

  18. Experimentally Attainable Optimal Pulse Shapes Obtained with the Aid of Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruben D. Guerrero; Carlos A. Arango; Andres Reyes

    2015-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a methodology to design optimal pulses for achieving quantum optimal control on molecular systems. Our approach constrains pulse shapes to linear combinations of a fixed number of experimentally relevant pulse functions. Quantum optimal control is obtained by maximizing a multi-target fitness function with genetic algorithms. As a first application of the methodology we generated an optimal pulse that successfully maximized the yield on a selected dissociation channel of a diatomic molecule. Our pulse is obtained as a linear combination of linearly chirped pulse functions. Data recorded along the evolution of the genetic algorithm contained important information regarding the interplay between radiative and diabatic processes. We performed a principal component analysis on these data to retrieve the most relevant processes along the optimal path. Our proposed methodology could be useful for performing quantum optimal control on more complex systems by employing a wider variety of pulse shape functions.

  19. The Frame Potential, on Average

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingemar Bengtsson; Helena Granstrom

    2008-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A SIC consists of N^2 equiangular unit vectors in an N dimensional Hilbert space. The frame potential is a function of N^2 unit vectors. It has a unique global minimum if the vectors form a SIC, and this property has been made use of in numerical searches for SICs. When the vectors form an orbit of the Heisenberg group the frame potential becomes a function of a single fiducial vector. We analytically compute the average of this function over Hilbert space. We also compute averages when the fiducial vector is placed in certain special subspaces defined by the Clifford group.

  20. Interaction potentials and thermodynamic properties of two component semiclassical plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Moldabekov, Zh. A.; Ismagambetova, T. N. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)] [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, IETP, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan); Gabdullin, M. T. [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)] [Al-Farabi Kazakh National University, NNLOT, 71 al-Farabi Av., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, the effective interaction potential in two component semiclassical plasma, taking into account the long-range screening and the quantum-mechanical diffraction effects at short distances, is obtained on the basis of dielectric response function method. The structural properties of the semiclassical plasma are considered. The thermodynamic characteristics (the internal energy and the equation of state) are calculated using two methods: the method of effective potentials and the method of micropotentials with screening effect taken into account by the Ornstein-Zernike equation in the HNC approximation.

  1. Effective Interaction Potentials and Physical Properties of Complex Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ramazanov, T. S.; Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Gabdullin, M. T.; Omarbakiyeva, Y. A. [Institute of Experimental and Theoretical Physics, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 96a Tole Bi, Almaty 050012 (Kazakhstan)

    2009-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic, thermodynamic and transport properties of complex plasmas are investigated on the basis of effective potentials of interparticle interaction. These potentials take into account correlation effects and quantum-mechanical diffraction. Plasma composition, thermodynamic functions of hydrogen and helium plasmas are obtained for a wide region of coupling parameter. Collision processes in partially ionized plasma are considered; some kinetic characteristics such as phase shift, scattering cross section, bremsstrahlung cross section and absorption coefficient are investigated. Dynamic and transport properties of dusty plasma are studied by computer simulation method of the Langevin dynamics.

  2. Confining potential from interacting magnetic and torsion fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patricio Gaete; José A. Helaÿel-Neto

    2009-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Adopting the gauge-invariant but path-dependent variables formalism, we study the coupling of torsion fields with photons in the presence of an external background electromagnetic. We explicitly show that, in the case of a constant electric field strength expectation value, the static potential remains Coulombic, while in the case of a constant magnetic field strength expectation value a confining potential is obtained. This result displays a marked qualitative departure from the usual coupling of axionlike particles with photons in the presence of an external magnetic field.

  3. Hydrodynamic equations for electrons in graphene obtained from the maximum entropy principle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barletti, Luigi, E-mail: luigi.barletti@unifi.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Informatica “Ulisse Dini”, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Viale Morgagni 67/A, 50134 Firenze (Italy)

    2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The maximum entropy principle is applied to the formal derivation of isothermal, Euler-like equations for semiclassical fermions (electrons and holes) in graphene. After proving general mathematical properties of the equations so obtained, their asymptotic form corresponding to significant physical regimes is investigated. In particular, the diffusive regime, the Maxwell-Boltzmann regime (high temperature), the collimation regime and the degenerate gas limit (vanishing temperature) are considered.

  4. Method for making graded I-III-VI.sub.2 semiconductors and solar cell obtained thereby

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Devaney, Walter E. (Seattle, WA)

    1987-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Improved cell photovoltaic conversion efficiencies are obtained by the simultaneous elemental reactive evaporation process of Mickelsen and Chen for making semiconductors by closer control of the evaporation rates and substrate temperature during formation of the near contact, bulk, and near junction regions of a graded I-III-VI.sub.2, thin film, semiconductor, such as CuInSe.sub.2 /(Zn,Cd)S or another I-III-VI.sub.2 /II-VI heterojunction.

  5. Ecological and Molecular Characterization of Avian Influenza Viruses Obtained from Waterfowl on the Texas Coast

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferro, Pamela Joyce

    2011-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    -Chairs of Committee, Blanca Lupiani Markus J. Peterson Committee Members, John El-Attrache Thomas L. Lester Head of Department, John August August 2010 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology iii ABSTRACT Ecological and Molecular... Characterization of Avian Influenza Viruses Obtained from Waterfowl on the Texas Coast. (August 2010) Pamela Joyce Bloomer Ferro B.S.; M.S., Texas A&M University; Co-Chairs of Committee: Dr. Blanca Lupiani Dr. Markus J. Peterson We collected 6...

  6. Rigidity-dependent cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region obtained with the GAMMA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Garyaka; R. M. Martirosov; S. V. Ter-Antonyan; N. Nikolskaya; Y. A. Gallant; L. Jones; J. Procureur

    2007-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the extensive air shower (EAS) data obtained by the GAMMA experiment, the energy spectra and elemental composition of the primary cosmic rays are derived in the 1-100 PeV energy range. The reconstruction of the primary energy spectra is carried out using an EAS inverse approach in the framework of the SIBYLL2.1 and QGSJET01 interaction models and the hypothesis of power-law primary energy spectra with rigidity-dependent knees. The energy spectra of primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei obtained with the SIBYLL interaction model agree with corresponding extrapolations of the balloon and satellite data to ~1 PeV energies. The energy spectra obtained from the QGSJET model show a predominantly proton composition in the knee region. The rigidity-dependent knee feature of the primary energy spectra for each interaction model is displayed at the following rigidities: ~2.5+/-0.2 PV (SIBYLL) and ~3.1-4.2 PV (QGSJET). All the results presented are derived taking into account the detector response, the reconstruction uncertainties of the EAS parameters, and fluctuations in the EAS development.

  7. Rigidity-dependent cosmic ray energy spectra in the knee region obtained with the GAMMA experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garyaka, A P; Ter-Antonian, S V; Nikolskaya, N; Gallant, Y A; Jones, L; Procureur, J

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On the basis of the extensive air shower (EAS) data obtained by the GAMMA experiment, the energy spectra and elemental composition of the primary cosmic rays are derived in the 1-100 PeV energy range. The reconstruction of the primary energy spectra is carried out using an EAS inverse approach in the framework of the SIBYLL2.1 and QGSJET01 interaction models and the hypothesis of power-law primary energy spectra with rigidity-dependent knees. The energy spectra of primary H, He, O-like and Fe-like nuclei obtained with the SIBYLL interaction model agree with corresponding extrapolations of the balloon and satellite data to ~1 PeV energies. The energy spectra obtained from the QGSJET model show a predominantly proton composition in the knee region. The rigidity-dependent knee feature of the primary energy spectra for each interaction model is displayed at the following rigidities: ~2.5+/-0.2 PV (SIBYLL) and ~3.1-4.2 PV (QGSJET). All the results presented are derived taking into account the detector response, th...

  8. Dual sensitivity mode system for monitoring processes and sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilks, Alan D. (Mount Prospect, IL); Wegerich, Stephan W. (Glendale Heights, IL); Gross, Kenneth C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and system for analyzing a source of data. The system and method involves initially training a system using a selected data signal, calculating at least two levels of sensitivity using a pattern recognition methodology, activating a first mode of alarm sensitivity to monitor the data source, activating a second mode of alarm sensitivity to monitor the data source and generating a first alarm signal upon the first mode of sensitivity detecting an alarm condition and a second alarm signal upon the second mode of sensitivity detecting an associated alarm condition. The first alarm condition and second alarm condition can be acted upon by an operator and/or analyzed by a specialist or computer program.

  9. Mechanisms of hypoxic cell radiosensitization and the development of new sensitizers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stratford, I.J.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Some of the mechanisms by which drugs can potentiate the radiation response of tumors and cells in culture are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the action of nitroaromatic and heterocyclic compounds as hypoxic cell radiosensitizers, and some potential successors to misonidazole (MISO) are described. These include desmethylmisonidazole and SR 2508, selected because of their low toxicity in experimental systems. Groups of compounds, more efficient sensitizers than would be predicted from electron affinity correlations, have been examined and the use of Ro-03-8799 or RSU 1047 is proposed. Finally, ortho-substituted nitroimidazoles and electron-affinic compounds with alkylating groups are described. The latter group, in particular, holds promise for the development of compounds much superior to MISO.

  10. A knowledge of the potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sali, Andrej

    is as important for understanding protein folding as is the potential surface for the H H2 reaction. estimated to protein folding, in which thousands of atoms take part. The under- standing of a reaction is based of experimental developments and theoretical advances.[1] By contrast, protein folding is so complex that even

  11. Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schweik, Charles M.

    Biomass Energy Crops: Massachusetts' Potential Prepared for: Massachusetts Division of Energy;#12;Executive Summary In Massachusetts, biomass energy has typically meant wood chips derived from the region's extensive forest cover. Yet nationally, biomass energy from dedicated energy crops and from crop residues

  12. BoseEinstein condensates in spatially periodic potentials Kirstine BergSrensen 1 and Klaus Mlmer 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berg-Sørensen, Kirstine

    Bose­Einstein condensates in spatially periodic potentials Kirstine Berg­Sørensen 1 and Klaus theoretically the properties of a Bose­Einstein condensate located in a spatially periodic potential. The excitations of the condensate are obtained from linear equations involving the periodic potential

  13. Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP 1 Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using CRiSP 1 Gas Saturation and Sensitivity Analysis Using of Engineers began the Gas Abatement Study in order to address the problem of gas and its effects on the Snake and Columbia Rivers. One important question is how much gas reductions caused by structural changes at a few

  14. Pre-launch Estimates for GLAST Sensitivity to Dark Matter Annihilation Signals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baltz, E.A.; Berenji, B.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bertone, G.; /Paris, Inst. Astrophys.; Bergstrom, L.; /Stockholm U.; Bloom, E.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Bringmann, T.; /Stockholm U.; Chiang, J.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Conrad, J.; /Stockholm U.; Edmonds, Y.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Edsjo, J.; /Stockholm U.; Godfrey, G.; /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Hughes, R.E.; /Ohio State U.; Johnson, R.P.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Lionetto, A.; /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome2; Moiseev, A.A.; /CRESST; Morselli, A.; /Rome U.,Tor Vergata /INFN, Rome2; Moskalenko, I.V.; /Stanford U., HEPL /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Nuss, E.; /Montpellier U.; Ormes, J.F.; /Denver U.; Rando, R.; /INFN, Padua /Ohio State U. /Stockholm U. /Ohio State U. /Garching, Max Planck Inst., MPE /SLAC /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Ohio State U.

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the sensitivity of the Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) to indirectly detect weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) through the {gamma}-ray signal that their pair annihilation produces. WIMPs are among the favorite candidates to explain the compelling evidence that about 80% of the mass in the Universe is non-baryonic dark matter (DM). They are serendipitously motivated by various extensions of the standard model of particle physics such as Supersymmetry and Universal Extra Dimensions (UED). With its unprecedented sensitivity and its very large energy range (20 MeV to more than 300 GeV) the main instrument on board the GLAST satellite, the Large Area Telescope (LAT), will open a new window of discovery. As our estimates show, the LAT will be able to detect an indirect DM signature for a large class of WIMP models given a cuspy profile for the DM distribution. Using the current state of the art Monte Carlo and event reconstruction software developed within the LAT collaboration, we present preliminary sensitivity studies for several possible sources inside and outside the Galaxy. We also discuss the potential of the LAT to detect UED via the electron/positron channel. Diffuse background modeling and other background issues that will be important in setting limits or seeing a signal are presented.

  15. Thermal performance sensitivity studies in support of material modeling for extended storage of used nuclear fuel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cuta, Judith M.; Suffield, Sarah R.; Fort, James A.; Adkins, Harold E.

    2013-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The work reported here is an investigation of the sensitivity of component temperatures of a storage system, including fuel cladding temperatures, in response to age-related changes that could degrade the design-basis thermal behavior of the system. Three specific areas of interest were identified for this study. • degradation of the canister backfill gas from pure helium to a mixture of air and helium, resulting from postulated leakage due to stress corrosion cracking (SCC) of canister welds • changes in surface emissivity of system components, resulting from corrosion or other aging mechanisms, which could cause potentially significant changes in temperatures and temperature distributions, due to the effect on thermal radiation exchange between components • changes in fuel and basket temperatures due to changes in fuel assembly position within the basket cells in the canister The purpose of these sensitivity studies is to provide a realistic example of how changes in the physical properties or configuration of the storage system components can affect temperatures and temperature distributions. The magnitudes of these sensitivities can provide guidance for identifying appropriate modeling assumptions for thermal evaluations extending long term storage out beyond 50, 100, 200, and 300 years.

  16. Statistics of Stationary Points of Random Finite Polynomial Potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehta, Dhagash; Sun, Chuang

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stationary points (SPs) of the potential energy landscapes (PELs) of multivariate random potentials (RPs) have found many applications in many areas of Physics, Chemistry and Mathematical Biology. However, there are few reliable methods available which can find all the SPs accurately. Hence, one has to rely on indirect methods such as Random Matrix theory. With a combination of the numerical polynomial homotopy continuation method and a certification method, we obtain all the certified SPs of the most general polynomial RP for each sample chosen from the Gaussian distribution with mean 0 and variance 1. While obtaining many novel results for the finite size case of the RP, we also discuss the implications of our results on mathematics of random systems and string theory landscapes.

  17. V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy China 2015ofDepartment of Energy Microsoft Security Bulletin AdvanceServicePotentially

  18. Low noise charge sensitive preamplifier DC stabilized without a physical resistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertuccio, Giuseppe (Brianza, IT); Rehak, Pavel (Patchogue, NY); Xi, Deming (Beijing, CN)

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a novel charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP) which has no resistor in parallel with the feedback capacitor. No resetting circuit is required to discharge the feedback capacitor. The DC stabilization of the preamplifier is obtained by means of a second feedback loop between the preamplifier output and the common base transistor of the input cascode. The input transistor of the preamplifier is a Junction Field Transistor (JFET) with the gate-source junction forward biased. The detector leakage current flows into this junction. This invention is concerned with a new circuit configuration for a charge sensitive preamplifier and a novel use of the input Field Effect Transistor of the CSP itself. In particular this invention, in addition to eliminating the feedback resistor, eliminates the need for external devices between the detector and the preamplifier, and it eliminates the need for external circuitry to sense the output voltage and reset the CSP. Furthermore, the noise level of the novel CSP is very low, comparable with the performance achieved with other solutions. Experimental tests prove that this configuration for the charge sensitive preamplifier permits an excellent noise performance at temperatures including room temperature. An equivalent noise charge of less than 20 electrons r.m.s. has been measured at room temperature by using a commercial JFET as input device of the preamplifier.

  19. Low noise charge sensitive preamplifier DC stabilized without a physical resistor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bertuccio, G.; Rehak, P.; Xi, D.

    1994-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a novel charge sensitive preamplifier (CSP) which has no resistor in parallel with the feedback capacitor. No resetting circuit is required to discharge the feedback capacitor. The DC stabilization of the preamplifier is obtained by means of a second feedback loop between the preamplifier output and the common base transistor of the input cascode. The input transistor of the preamplifier is a Junction Field Transistor (JFET) with the gate-source junction forward biased. The detector leakage current flows into this junction. This invention is concerned with a new circuit configuration for a charge sensitive preamplifier and a novel use of the input Field Effect Transistor of the CSP itself. In particular this invention, in addition to eliminating the feedback resistor, eliminates the need for external devices between the detector and the preamplifier, and it eliminates the need for external circuitry to sense the output voltage and reset the CSP. Furthermore, the noise level of the novel CSP is very low, comparable with the performance achieved with other solutions. Experimental tests prove that this configuration for the charge sensitive preamplifier permits an excellent noise performance at temperatures including room temperature. An equivalent noise charge of less than 20 electrons r.m.s. has been measured at room temperature by using a commercial JFET as input device of the preamplifier. 6 figs.

  20. Bi-harmonic cantilever design for improved measurement sensitivity in tapping-mode atomic force microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loganathan, Muthukumaran; Bristow, Douglas A., E-mail: dbristow@mst.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65401 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a method and cantilever design for improving the mechanical measurement sensitivity in the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tapping mode. The method uses two harmonics in the drive signal to generate a bi-harmonic tapping trajectory. Mathematical analysis demonstrates that the wide-valley bi-harmonic tapping trajectory is as much as 70% more sensitive to changes in the sample topography than the standard single-harmonic trajectory typically used. Although standard AFM cantilevers can be driven in the bi-harmonic tapping trajectory, they require large forcing at the second harmonic. A design is presented for a bi-harmonic cantilever that has a second resonant mode at twice its first resonant mode, thereby capable of generating bi-harmonic trajectories with small forcing signals. Bi-harmonic cantilevers are fabricated by milling a small cantilever on the interior of a standard cantilever probe using a focused ion beam. Bi-harmonic drive signals are derived for standard cantilevers and bi-harmonic cantilevers. Experimental results demonstrate better than 30% improvement in measurement sensitivity using the bi-harmonic cantilever. Images obtained through bi-harmonic tapping exhibit improved sharpness and surface tracking, especially at high scan speeds and low force fields.

  1. The use of particle tracking to obtain planar velocity measurements in an unsteady laminar diffusion flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, G.S.; Cantwell, B.J.; Lecuona, A.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An investigation of the flame-flow interaction in an unsteady laminar co-flowing jet diffusion flame is underway. The flame is made periodic by acoustic excitation of the fuel stream. The objective of the research is to develop a better understanding of the relationship between the flowfield and combustion process by superimposing measurements of the vector velocity field on planar measurements of reactive and passive scalars. In this connection a technique is being developed to obtain instantaneous two-dimensional velocity measurements from multiply-exposed photographic images of scattered light from speed particles in the flow. The technique involves simple photographic images taken at a right angle to a thin laser sheet on the diametric center of the jet. The illumination source is pulsed Cu vapor laser. The important issues considered have included the particle type and size as they relate to the particle's ability to follow the flow and to withstand combustion temperatures. Also of concern is the effect of thermophoretic forces on the measurement accuracy. Both Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ and TiO/sub 2/ have been used successfully and detailed information about the size and geometry of TiO/sub 2/ particles has been obtained through scanning electron microscope photographs. The TiO/sub 2/ particles have been produced from the reaction of TiCl/sub 4/ and water. The technique has been successfully demonstrated by measuring a cold laminar jet exit velocity profile. Also, good particle images have been obtained in a pulsed diffusion flame.

  2. Methodologies used by Warsaw Pact countries (except USSR) in obtaining US technologies. Student report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheeseman, R.J.

    1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Warsaw Pact countries obtain U.S. technologies by legal and illegal means. Methods of collection include espionage, overt collection, acquisition by scientific and educational exchange participants, and illegal trade activities. Examples of methods used by the Warsaw Pact countries (except the USSR) are provided. The US faces barriers to preventing loss of its technologies. Among these are resistance from US business interests, insufficient cooperation between US government agencies and overseas allies, lack of US counterintelligence personnel, and the openess of American society. The study concludes that the Warsaw Pact's countries have narrowed NATO's qualitative lead in weaponry as a result of the Warsaw Pact's acquisition effort.

  3. Idaho How to Obtain EPA ID Number Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas:ITC TransmissionIdaho DEQ StorageObtain EPA ID

  4. Multipole decomposition of potentials in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Isar

    2006-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In relativistic heavy ion collisions an exact multipole decomposition of the Lorentz transformed time dependent Coulomb potentials in a coordinate system with equal constant, but opposite velocities of the ions, is obtained for both zero and different from zero impact parameter. The case of large values of $\\gamma$ and the gauge transformation of the interaction removing both the $\\gamma$ dependence and the $\\ln b$ dependence are also considered.

  5. Bound states of a more general exponential screened Coulomb potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sameer M. Ikhdair; Ramazan Sever

    2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    An alternative approximation scheme has been used in solving the Schrodinger equation to the more general case of exponential screened Coulomb potential, V(r)=-(a/r)\\[1+(1+br)e^{-2br}]. The bound state energies of the 1s, $2s, and 3s-states, together with the ground state wave function are obtained analytically upto the second perturbation term.

  6. Potential applications of nanostructured materials in nuclear waste management.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Braterman, Paul S. (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Phol, Phillip Isabio; Xu, Zhi-Ping (The University of North Texas, Denton, TX); Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Yang, Yi (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Bryan, Charles R.; Yu, Kui; Xu, Huifang (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Wang, Yifeng; Gao, Huizhen

    2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the results obtained from a Laboratory Directed Research & Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Investigation of Potential Applications of Self-Assembled Nanostructured Materials in Nuclear Waste Management'. The objectives of this project are to (1) provide a mechanistic understanding of the control of nanometer-scale structures on the ion sorption capability of materials and (2) develop appropriate engineering approaches to improving material properties based on such an understanding.

  7. Iso-spectral potential and inflationary quantum cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Garcia; W. Guzman; M. Sabido; J. Socorro

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the factorization approach of quantum mechanics, we obtain a family of isospectral scalar potentials for power law inflationary cosmology. The construction is based on a scattering Wheeler-DeWitt solution. These iso-spectrals have new features, they give a mechanism to end inflation, as well as the possibility to have new inflationary epochs. The procedure can be extended to other cosmological models.

  8. Optimization of closed ion source for a high-sensitivity residual gas analyzer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Han, Cheolsu; Rok Ahn, Jong; Jung Ahn, Sang; Joon Park, Chang, E-mail: cjpark@kriss.re.kr [Korea Research of Institute Standards and Science, Daejeon 305-340 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A closed ion source (CIS) has been optimized by investigating the effect of electron entrance slit size and the effect of mesh in the slit. A stainless steel mesh was placed on the electron entrance slits for a uniform potential distribution inside the CIS anode. Sensitivity of the closed ion sources having four different slit sizes with and without the mesh was compared using mass spectra of SF{sub 6} gas (97% He gas base) introduced into the CIS anode through a needle valve. For each CIS, isolation of anode potential with a mesh in the slit exhibited a significant sensitivity enhancement, but ion current measured directly behind each CIS showed negligible mesh effect. In order to elucidate the mesh effect, electron trajectories were simulated inside the anode. The computer simulation shows that, with mesh in the slit, more electrons are focused to a central region of the anode. This suggests ions generated in the CIS with mesh should have higher probability of passing through the quadrupole mass filter.

  9. Studies of NO-char reaction kinetics obtained from drop-tube furnace and thermogravimetric experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaozeng Sun; Juwei Zhang; Xidong Hu; Shaohua Wu; Jiancheng Yang; Yang Wang; Yukun Qin [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China). Combustion Engineering Research Institute

    2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Four coal chars were prepared in a flat flame flow reactor (FFR), which can simulate the temperature and gas composition of a real pulverized coal combustion environment. The pore structure of chars was measured by mercury porosimetry and nitrogen adsorption, and the Hg and Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface areas were obtained. The kinetics of NO-char was studied in a drop-tube furnace (DTF) and thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA). In the TGA experiments, the random pore model (RPM) was applied to describe the NO-char reactions and obtain the intrinsic kinetics. By presenting the data of DTF and TGA experiments on the same Arrhenius plot, it can be concluded that TGA is an available tool to study the kinetics of a high-temperature NO-char reaction. With respect to the DTF experiments, in comparison to the BET surface area, the Hg surface area is a better basis for normalizing the reactivity of different coal chars because of less scatter in the measured values, better agreement with TGA experimental data, and more stable values during the process of reaction. Moreover, by comparing the Hg surface area of chars before and after reactions, it is believed that the Hg surface area basis is more appropriate for high-rank coal chars. The determined kinetic rate constants are in good agreement with other data in the literature, and a new rate constant expression is proposed. 30 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. Robust emergent climate phenomena associated with the high-sensitivity tail.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Backus, George A.; Levy, Michael Nathan; Boslough, Mark Bruce Elrick

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because the potential effects of climate change are more severe than had previously been thought, increasing focus on uncertainty quantification is required for risk assessment needed by policy makers. Current scientific efforts focus almost exclusively on establishing best estimates of future climate change. However, the greatest consequences occur in the extreme tail of the probability density functions for climate sensitivity (the 'high-sensitivity tail'). To this end, we are exploring the impacts of newly postulated, highly uncertain, but high-consequence physical mechanisms to better establish the climate change risk. We define consequence in terms of dramatic change in physical conditions and in the resulting socioeconomic impact (hence, risk) on populations. Although we are developing generally applicable risk assessment methods, we have focused our initial efforts on uncertainty and risk analyses for the Arctic region. Instead of focusing on best estimates, requiring many years of model parameterization development and evaluation, we are focusing on robust emergent phenomena (those that are not necessarily intuitive and are insensitive to assumptions, subgrid-parameterizations, and tunings). For many physical systems, under-resolved models fail to generate such phenomena, which only develop when model resolution is sufficiently high. Our ultimate goal is to discover the patterns of emergent climate precursors (those that cannot be predicted with lower-resolution models) that can be used as a 'sensitivity fingerprint' and make recommendations for a climate early warning system that would use satellites and sensor arrays to look for the various predicted high-sensitivity signatures. Our initial simulations are focused on the Arctic region, where underpredicted phenomena such as rapid loss of sea ice are already emerging, and because of major geopolitical implications associated with increasing Arctic accessibility to natural resources, shipping routes, and strategic locations. We anticipate that regional climate will be strongly influenced by feedbacks associated with a seasonally ice-free Arctic, but with unknown emergent phenomena.

  11. Enhanced sensitivity to dark matter self-annihilations in the Sun using neutrino spectral information

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rott, C. [Dept. of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Tanaka, T.; Itow, Y., E-mail: carott@mps.ohio-state.edu, E-mail: ttanaka@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp, E-mail: itow@stelab.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, 464-8601 (Japan)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Self-annihilating dark matter gravitationally captured by the Sun could yield observable neutrino signals at current and next generation neutrino detectors. By exploiting such signals, neutrino detectors can probe the spin-dependent scattering of weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs) with nucleons in the Sun. We describe a method how to convert constraints on neutrino fluxes to a limit on the WIMP-nucleon scattering cross section. In this method all neutrino flavors can be treated in a very similar way. We study the sensitivity of neutrino telescopes for Solar WIMP signals using vertex contained events and find that this detection channel is of particular importance in the search for low mass WIMPs. We obtain highly competitive sensitivities with all neutrino flavor channels for a Megaton sized detector through the application of basic spectral selection criteria. Best results are obtained with the electron neutrino channel. We discuss associated uncertainties and provide a procedure how to treat them for analyses in a consistent way.

  12. Modeling of autoignition and NO sensitization for the oxidation of IC engine surrogate fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderlohr, J.M. [IFP, 1 et 4, Ave. Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil Malmaison Cedex (France)]|[Departement de Chimie-Physique des Reactions, UMR No. 7630 CNRS, INPL-ENSIC, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Bounaceur, R.; Battin-Leclerc, F. [Departement de Chimie-Physique des Reactions, UMR No. 7630 CNRS, INPL-ENSIC, 1 rue Grandville, BP 20451, 54001 Nancy Cedex (France); Pires Da Cruz, A. [IFP, 1 et 4, Ave. Bois Preau, 92852 Rueil Malmaison Cedex (France)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an approach for modeling with one single kinetic mechanism the chemistry of the autoignition and combustion processes inside an internal combustion engine, as well as the chemical kinetics governing the postoxidation of unburned hydrocarbons in engine exhaust gases. Therefore a new kinetic model was developed, valid over a wide range of temperatures including the negative temperature coefficient regime. The model simulates the autoignition and the oxidation of engine surrogate fuels composed of n-heptane, iso-octane, and toluene, which are sensitized by the presence of nitric oxides. The new model was obtained from previously published mechanisms for the oxidation of alkanes and toluene where the coupling reactions describing interactions between hydrocarbons and NO{sub x} were added. The mechanism was validated against a wide range of experimental data obtained in jet-stirred reactors, rapid compression machines, shock tubes, and homogeneous charge compression ignition engines. Flow rate and sensitivity analysis were performed in order to explain the low temperature chemical kinetics, especially the impact of NO{sub x} on hydrocarbon oxidation. (author)

  13. Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) Fuel Displacement Potential using...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    (TEG) Fuel Displacement Potential using Engine-in-the-Loop and Simulation Thermoelectric Generator (TEG) Fuel Displacement Potential using Engine-in-the-Loop and Simulation...

  14. Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jansson, C.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cassava, a potential biofuel crop in China Christer Janssoncassava; bioethanol; biofuel; metabolic engineering; Chinathe potentials of cassava in the biofuel sector and point to

  15. Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential Cellulases in Bacteria

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berlemont, R.; Martiny, A. C

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential Cellulases incontent/79/5/1545 Phylogenetic Distribution of Potential3, 4). Thus, the phylogenetic distribution of en- zyme genes

  16. Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment Clot Busting Simulations Test Potential Stroke Treatment September 24, 2013 | Tags: Biological and Environmental Research...

  17. Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine....

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine. Therapeutic potential of nanoceria in regenerative medicine. Abstract: Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine aim...

  18. Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development Mitigating Potential Environmental Impacts of Energy Development April 15, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Partnering with...

  19. Electrochemical study of Aluminum-Fly Ash composites obtained by powder metallurgy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marin, E. [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100, Udine (Italy); Lekka, M., E-mail: maria.lekka@uniud.it [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100, Udine (Italy); Andreatta, F.; Fedrizzi, L. [Department of Chemistry, Physics and Environment, University of Udine, Via Cotonificio 108, 33100, Udine (Italy); Itskos, G. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechneiou 9, Zografou 15780, Athens (Greece); Centre for Research and Technology Hellas/Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Avenue 357-359, Halandri 15231, Athens (Greece); Moutsatsou, A. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechneiou 9, Zografou 15780, Athens (Greece); Koukouzas, N. [Centre for Research and Technology Hellas/Institute for Solid Fuels Technology and Applications, Mesogeion Avenue 357-359, Halandri 15231, Athens (Greece); Kouloumbi, N. [School of Chemical Engineering, National Technical University of Athens, Iroon Polytechneiou 9, Zografou 15780, Athens (Greece)

    2012-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, two different ASTM C 618 Class C fly ashes (FA) were used for the production of aluminum metal matrix composites (MMCs) using powder metallurgy (PM) technology. Calcareous FAs were sampled from the electrostatic precipitators of two different lignite-fired power stations: from Megalopolis, Southern Greece (MFA) and from Kardia, Northen Greece (KFA), under maximum electricity load. FAs were milled in order to reduce the mean particle diameter and Aluminum-FA composites containing 10% and 20% of FA were then prepared and compacted. The green products were sintered for 2 h at 600 Degree-Sign C. Sintered Al-FA MMCs showed increased hardness and wear resistance suggesting their possible use in industrial applications for example in covers, casings, brake rotors or engine blocks. As most possible industrial applications of MMCs not only require wear resistance, but also corrosion resistance in different mild aggressive medias, this paper aims to study the electrochemical behavior of FA MMCs in order to evaluate their corrosion resistance. The morphology and chemical composition of the phases in the Aluminum-FA composite samples were investigated using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy (EDXS). Moreover, topographic and Volta potential maps were acquired by Scanning Kelvin Probe Force Microscopy (SKP-FM). Volta potential maps provide information about the electrochemical behavior of the different phases in absence of electrolyte. The electrochemical behavior was investigated by Open Circuit Potential measurements and potentiodynamic polarization, while the corrosion mechanisms were studied by SEM observations after different times of immersion in a mild corrosive medium. In all cases it could be stated that the addition of the FA particles into the Al matrix might cause an increase of the hardness and mechanical properties of the pure aluminum but deteriorates the corrosion resistance. The degradation phenomena occurring on the FA containing samples might be related to the following mechanisms: 1) Partial detachment or dissolution of the FA soluble phases, in particular based on Si, Fe and Ca; 2) dissolution of the Al matrix surrounding the FA particles due to crevice corrosion; 3) Al localized dissolution due to galvanic coupling between the Fe-rich intermetallics and the matrix. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Aluminum metal matrix composites containing two types of fly ashes have been characterized. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The microstructure and the electrochemical behavior have been studied using different techniques. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The addition of FA deteriorates the corrosion resistance of the aluminum. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Degradation mechanisms: galvanic coupling, crevice corrosion, detachment of FA particles.

  20. Manipulating surface diffusion and elastic interactions to obtain quantum dot multilayer arrangements over different length scales

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placidi, E., E-mail: ernesto.placidi@ism.cnr.it; Arciprete, F. [Istituto di Struttura della Materia, CNR, Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Latini, V.; Latini, S.; Patella, F. [Università di Roma “Tor Vergata”, Dipartimento di Fisica, via della Ricerca Scientifica 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Magri, R. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Informatiche e Matematiche (FIM), Università di Modena e Reggio Emilia, and Centro S3 CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, Via Campi 213/A, 4100 Modena (Italy); Scuderi, M.; Nicotra, G. [CNR-IMM, Strada VIII, 5, 95121 Catania (Italy)

    2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative multilayer growth of InAs quantum dots on GaAs(100) is demonstrated to lead to self-aggregation of correlated quantum dot chains over mesoscopic distances. The fundamental idea is that at critical growth conditions is possible to drive the dot nucleation only at precise locations corresponding to the local minima of the Indium chemical potential. Differently from the known dot multilayers, where nucleation of new dots on top of the buried ones is driven by the surface strain originating from the dots below, here the spatial correlations and nucleation of additional dots are mostly dictated by a self-engineering of the surface occurring during the growth, close to the critical conditions for dot formation under the fixed oblique direction of the incoming As flux, that drives the In surface diffusion.

  1. Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response in stratified systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin

    Large-scale impact of CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers: A sensitivity study on pressure response storage potential of all the geological CO2 storage options and are widely distributed throughout the globe in all sedimentary basins.ForCO2 storage tohaveasignificantimpact on atmospheric levels

  2. Thermal-Hydrological Sensitivity Analysis of Underground Coal Gasification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buscheck, T A; Hao, Y; Morris, J P; Burton, E A

    2009-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents recent work from an ongoing project at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) to develop a set of predictive tools for cavity/combustion-zone growth and to gain quantitative understanding of the processes and conditions (natural and engineered) affecting underground coal gasification (UCG). We discuss the application of coupled thermal-hydrologic simulation capabilities required for predicting UCG cavity growth, as well as for predicting potential environmental consequences of UCG operations. Simulation of UCG cavity evolution involves coupled thermal-hydrological-chemical-mechanical (THCM) processes in the host coal and adjoining rockmass (cap and bedrock). To represent these processes, the NUFT (Nonisothermal Unsaturated-saturated Flow and Transport) code is being customized to address the influence of coal combustion on the heating of the host coal and adjoining rock mass, and the resulting thermal-hydrological response in the host coal/rock. As described in a companion paper (Morris et al. 2009), the ability to model the influence of mechanical processes (spallation and cavity collapse) on UCG cavity evolution is being developed at LLNL with the use of the LDEC (Livermore Distinct Element Code) code. A methodology is also being developed (Morris et al. 2009) to interface the results of the NUFT and LDEC codes to simulate the interaction of mechanical and thermal-hydrological behavior in the host coal/rock, which influences UCG cavity growth. Conditions in the UCG cavity and combustion zone are strongly influenced by water influx, which is controlled by permeability of the host coal/rock and the difference between hydrostatic and cavity pressure. In this paper, we focus on thermal-hydrological processes, examining the relationship between combustion-driven heat generation, convective and conductive heat flow, and water influx, and examine how the thermal and hydrologic properties of the host coal/rock influence those relationships. Specifically, we conducted a parameter sensitivity analysis of the influence of thermal and hydrological properties of the host coal, caprock, and bedrock on cavity temperature and steam production.

  3. Contributions of the center vortices and vacuum domain in potentials between static sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seyed Mohsen Hosseini Nejad; Sedigheh Deldar

    2015-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we study the role of the domain structure of the Yang Mills vacuum. The Casimir scaling and $N$-ality are investigated in the potentials between static sources in various representations for $SU(2)$ and $SU(3)$ gauge groups based on the domain structure model using square ansatz for angle $\\alpha_{C}(x)$. We also discuss about the contributions of the vacuum domain and center vortices in the static potentials. As a result, the potentials obtained from vacuum domains agree with Casimir scaling better than the ones obtained from center vortices. The reasons of these observations are investigated by studying the behavior of the potentials obtained from vacuum domains and center vortices and the properties of the group factors. Then, the vacuum domains in $SU(N)$ and $G(2)$ gauge groups are compared and we argue that the $G(2)$ vacuum is filled with center vortices of its subgroups.

  4. Subtask 4.24 - Field Evaluation of Novel Approach for Obtaining Metal Emission Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pavlish, John; Laudal, Dennis; Thompson, Jeffrey

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, emissions of mercury, nonmercury metals, and acid gases from energy generation and chemical production have increasingly become an environmental concern. On February 16, 2012, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) promulgated the Mercury and Air Toxics Standards (MATS) to reduce mercury, nonmercury metals, and HCl emissions from coal-fired power plants. The current reference methods for trace metals and halogens are wet-chemistry methods, EPA Method (M) 29 and M26A, respectively. As a possible alternative to EPA M29 and M26A, the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) has developed a novel multielement sorbent trap (ME-ST) method to be used to sample for trace elements and/or halogens. Testing was conducted at three different power plants, and the results show that for halogens, the ME-ST halogen (ME-ST-H) method did not show any significant bias compared to EPA M26A and appears to be a potential candidate to serve as an alternative to the reference method. For metals, the ME-ST metals (ME-ST-M) method offers a lower detection limit compared to EPA M29 and generally produced comparable data for Sb, As, Be, Cd, Co, Hg, and Se. Both the ME-ST-M and M29 had problems associated with high blanks for Ni, Pb, Cr, and Mn. Although this problem has been greatly reduced through improved trap design and material selection, additional research is still needed to explore possible longer sampling durations and/or selection of lower background materials before the ME-ST-M can be considered as a potential alternative method for all the trace metals listed in MATS.

  5. Linear analysis of surface temperature dynamics and climate sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral properties of global surface temperature and uncertainties of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature data. In part I, a complete...

  6. Design Sensitivity Analysis: Overview and Review Daniel A. Tortorelli

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michaleris, Panagiotis

    mechanic and [2] for nuclear reactor design applications). Thus, the sensitivities offer an efficient means to structural optimization. For example see the books [3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9], the journal [10] and the NATO ASI

  7. Directionally Sensitive Neutron Detector For Homeland Security Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Grant

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Radiation Portal Monitor SNM Special Nuclear Material US United States vii TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT ................................................................................................................. iii ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS... of Existing Radiation Portal Monitors............................ 7 II.B. Previous Work in the Field of Directionally Sensitive Detectors ...... 11 III THEORY...

  8. Risk-Sensitive Optimal Control of Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. James

    2003-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of feedback control is being increasingly appreciated in quantum physics and applications. This paper describes the use of optimal control methods in the design of quantum feedback control systems, and in particular the paper formulates and solves a risk-sensitive optimal control problem. The resulting risk-sensitive optimal control is given in terms of a new unnormalized conditional state, whose dynamics include the cost function used to specify the performance objective. The risk-sensitive conditional dynamic equation describes the evolution of our {\\em knowledge} of the quantum system tempered by our {\\em purpose} for the controlled quantum system. Robustness properties of risk-sensitive controllers are discussed, and an example is provided.

  9. Linear analysis of surface temperature dynamics and climate sensitivity 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Wei

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectral properties of global surface temperature and uncertainties of global climate sensitivity are explored in this work through the medium of Energy Balance Climate Models (EBCMs) and observational surface temperature data. In part I, a complete...

  10. Sensitivity Methods Applied to Orbital Pursuit-Evasion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hafer, William Thomas

    2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, sensitivity methods are examined as a means to solve and analyze the problem of orbital pursuit-evasion (PE). Orbital PE is a two-sided spacecraft trajectory optimization problem characterized by high dimensionality and nonlinearity...

  11. New sensitivity analysis subordinated to a Jean-Claude Fort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Thierry

    (e.g. see [8]): geophysics and oil reservoir, safety in nuclear industry, soil pollution, and more of interest (thermal, acoustic, electromagnetic study...). Such sensitivity analysis may be done for instance

  12. Enhanced Sensitivity for Selected Reaction Monitoring-MassSpectrometr...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    quantification of low-abundance proteins (e.g., present at 10 ngmL or lower levels in blood plasma). Here we report enhanced detection sensitivity and reproducibility for...

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of the Economic Lot-Sizing Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Hoesel, Stan

    In this paper we study sensitivity analysis of the uncapacitated single level economic lot-sizing problem, which was introduced by Wagner and Whitin about thirty years ago. In particular we are concerned with the computation ...

  14. Temperature sensitive surfaces and methods of making same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Liang, Liang [Richland, WA; Rieke, Peter C [Pasco, WA; Alford, Kentin L [Pasco, WA

    2002-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Poly-n-isopropylacrylamide surface coatings demonstrate the useful property of being able to switch charateristics depending upon temperature. More specifically, these coatings switch from being hydrophilic at low temperature to hydrophobic at high temperature. Research has been conducted for many years to better characterize and control the properties of temperature sensitive coatings. The present invention provides novel temperature sensitive coatings on articles and novel methods of making temperature sensitive coatings that are disposed on the surfaces of various articles. These novel coatings contain the reaction products of n-isopropylacrylamide and are characterized by their properties such as advancing contact angles. Numerous other characteristics such as coating thickness, surface roughness, and hydrophilic-to-hydrophobic transition temperatures are also described. The present invention includes articles having temperature-sensitve coatings with improved properties as well as improved methods for forming temperature sensitive coatings.

  15. Silane Modification of Glass and Silica Surfaces to Obtain Equally Oil-Wet Surfaces in Glass-Covered Silicon Micromodel Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Warner, Marvin G.; Pittman, Jonathan W.; Dehoff, Karl J.; Wietsma, Thomas W.; Zhang, Changyong; Oostrom, Martinus

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The wettability of silicon and glass surfaces can be modified by silanization. However, similar treatments of glass and silica surfaces using the same silane do not necessarily yield the same wettability as determined by the oil-water contact angle. In this technical note, surface cleaning pretreatments were investigated to determine conditions that would yield oil-wet surfaces on glass with similar wettability to silica surfaces treated with the same silane, and both air-water and oil-water contact angles were determined. Air-water contact angles were less sensitive to differences between silanized silica and glass surfaces, often yielding similar values while the oil-water contact angles were quite different. Borosilicate glass surfaces cleaned with standard cleaning solution 1 (SC1) yield intermediate-wet surfaces when silanized with hexamethyldisilazane, while the same cleaning and silanization yields oil-wet surfaces on silica. However, cleaning glass in boiling concentrated nitric acid creates a surface that can be silanized to obtain oil-wet surfaces using HDMS. Moreover, this method is effective on glass with prior thermal treatment at an elevated temperature of 400oC. In this way, silica and glass can be silanized to obtain equally oil-wet surfaces using HMDS. It is demonstrated that pretreatment and silanization is feasible in silicon-silica/glass micromodels previously assembled by anodic bonding, and that the change in wettability has a significant observable effect on immiscisble fluid displacements in the pore network.

  16. Characterization of measurement uncertainties using the correlations between local outcomes obtained from maximally entangled pairs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shota Kino; Taiki Nii; Holger F. Hofmann

    2015-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Joint measurements of non-commuting observables are characterized by unavoidable measurement uncertainties that can be described in terms of the error statistics for input states with well-defined values for the target observables. However, a complete characterization of measurement errors must include the correlations between the errors of the two observables. Here, we show that these correlations appear in the experimentally observable measurement statistics obtained by performing the joint measurement on maximally entangled pairs. For two-level systems, the results indicate that quantum theory requires imaginary correlations between the measurement errors of X and Y since these correlations are represented by the operator product XY=iZ in the measurement operators. Our analysis thus reveals a directly observable consequence of non-commutativity in the statistics of quantum measurements.

  17. Towards obtaining Green functions for a Casimir cavity in de Sitter spacetime

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giampiero Esposito; George M. Napolitano

    2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent work in the literature has studied rigid Casimir cavities in a weak gravitational field, or in de Sitter spacetime, or yet other spacetime models. The present review paper studies the difficult problem of direct evaluation of scalar Green functions for a Casimir-type apparatus in de Sitter spacetime. Working to first order in the small parameter of the problem, i.e. twice the gravity acceleration times the plates' separation divided by the speed of light in vacuum, suitable coordinates are considered for which the differential equations obeyed by the zeroth- and first-order Green functions can be solved in terms of special functions. This result can be used, in turn, to obtain, via the point-split method, the regularized and renormalized energy-momentum tensor both in the scalar case and in the physically more relevant electromagnetic case.

  18. Optical properties of ITO films obtained by high-frequency magnetron sputtering with accompanying ion treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krylov, P. N., E-mail: ftt@uni.udm.ru; Zakirova, R. M.; Fedotova, I. V. [Udmurt State University (Russian Federation)] [Udmurt State University (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A variation in the properties of indium-tin-oxide (ITO) films obtained by the method of reactive magnetron sputtering with simultaneous ion treatment is reported. The ITO films feature the following parameters in the optical range of 450-1100 nm: a transmission coefficient of 80%, band gap of 3.50-3.60 eV, and a refractive index of 1.97-2.06. All characteristics of the films depend on the ion-treatment current. The latter, during the course of deposition, reduces the resistivity of the ITO films with the smallest value of the resistivity being equal to 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} {Omega} cm. The degradation of films with a high resistivity when kept in air is observed.

  19. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, J.; May, C.P.; Pemberton, B.E.; Shinn, J.; Sprague, K.

    1999-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus. 8 figs.

  20. Quantum correlations in bulk properties of solids obtained from neutron scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ben-Qiong Liu; Lian-Ao Wu; Guo-Mo Zeng; Jian-Ming Song; Wei Luo; Yang Lei; Guang-Ai Sun; Bo Chen; Shu-Ming Peng

    2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that inelastic neutron scattering technique can be used to indirectly detect and measure the macroscopic quantum correlations quantified by both entanglement and discord in a quantum magnetic material, VODPO4 . 1D2O. The amount of quantum correlations is obtained 2 by analyzing the neutron scattering data of magnetic excitations in isolated V4+ spin dimers. Our quantitative analysis shows that the critical temperature of this material can reach as high as Tc = 82.5 K, where quantum entanglement drops to zero. Significantly, quantum discord can even survive at Tc = 300 K and may be used in room temperature quantum devices. Taking into account the spin-orbit (SO) coupling, we also predict theoretically that entanglement can be significantly enhanced and the critical temperature Tc increases with the strength of spin-orbit coupling.

  1. Characterization of new corrosion resistant nickel-zinc-phosphorus alloys obtained by electrodeposition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swathirajan, S.; Mikhail, Y.M. (Physical Chemistry Dept., General Motors Research Labs., Warren, MI (US))

    1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors discuss the electrodeposition of a family of NiZnP coatings studied at a rotating cylinder electrode by varying the temperature (45{sup 0}-80{sup 0}C) and the applied current density (0.03-0.95 A/cm/sup 2/). Two of the coatings were nickel-rich, two were zinc-rich, and a fifth coating had approximately equal amounts of Ni and Zn. The coatings were characterized using SEM/EDX and Auger depth profile techniques. A Ni-rich alloy with a supersaturated amount of zinc and the approximate composition 59Ni-39Zn-2P was obtained at all temperatures in the high speed electrodeposition current density range 0.6-1.0 A/cm/sup 2/. The supersaturated alloy could be deposited at current efficiencies higher than 80% at all temperatures. The corrosion rate of this coating was the lowest among the various NiZnP coatings.

  2. Process and apparatus for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rossabi, Joseph (105 Michael Ct., Aiken, SC 29801); May, Christopher P. (5002 Hesperus Dr., Columbia, MD 21044); Pemberton, Bradley E. (131 Glencarin Dr., Aiken, SC 29803); Shinn, Jim (Box 65, RFD. #1, South Royalton, VT 05068); Sprague, Keith (Box 234 Rte. 14, Brookfield, VT 05036)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and process for obtaining samples of liquid and gas from subsurface soil is provided having filter zone adjacent an external expander ring. The expander ring creates a void within the soil substrate which encourages the accumulation of soil-borne fluids. The fluids migrate along a pressure gradient through a plurality of filters before entering a first chamber. A one-way valve regulates the flow of fluid into a second chamber in further communication with a collection tube through which samples are collected at the surface. A second one-way valve having a reverse flow provides additional communication between the chambers for the pressurized cleaning and back-flushing of the apparatus.

  3. Appendix 14 CSKT Sensitive Species and Heritage Program Ranks for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goshawk G5 S3S4 SENSITIVE SPECIAL STATUS Acorus americanus Sweetflag G5 S1 Allium columbianum Columbia Onion G3 S1 Aloina brevirostris G3G5 S1 Amblyodon dealbatus G3G5 SH Amerorchis rotundifolia Round-leaved Orchis G5 S2S3 SENSITIVE WATCH Ammodramus leconteii Le Conte's Sparrow G4 S1S2B SPECIAL STATUS Arabis

  4. A sensitivity investigation of mathematical models for thermal effluent analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez, Frank

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . It was found that the model was most sensitive to errors in the power plant input calcu- lations, depth determinations, and air temperature; it was moderately sensitive to solar radiation and relative humidity parameters; and it was somewhat insensitive...-SITE DATA COLLECTION Site Descrir&tion The Monitorinz Station THE ENERGy BUDGET CALCULATION Mechanisms of Heat Exchange Solar Radiation Atmospheric Radiation Evaporation Conduction Power Plant Input The Heat Balance Equation The Numerical Solution...

  5. Essays on Consumers' Goal Orientation and Price Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, Woo Jin

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ESSAYS ON CONSUMERS? GOAL ORIENTATION AND PRICE SENSITIVITY A Dissertation by WOO JIN CHOI Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY May 2012 Major Subject: Marketing Essays on Consumers? Goal Orientation and Price Sensitivity Copyright 2012 Woo Jin Choi ESSAYS ON CONSUMERS? GOAL ORIENTATION AND PRICE...

  6. Sensitivity Analysis of the Gap Heat Transfer Model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Schmidt, Rodney C.; Williamson, Richard (INL); Perez, Danielle (INL)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of the heat transfer model in the gap between the fuel rod and the cladding used in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the gap heat transfer models in BISON, the sensitivity of the modeling parameters and the associated responses is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of various parameters in the analysis of gap heat transfer in nuclear fuel.

  7. Forward and adjoint sensitivity computation of chaotic dynamical systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiqi, E-mail: qiqi@mit.edu [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, MIT, 77 Mass Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)] [Department of Aeronautics and Astronautics, MIT, 77 Mass Ave., Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a forward algorithm and an adjoint algorithm for computing sensitivity derivatives in chaotic dynamical systems, such as the Lorenz attractor. The algorithms compute the derivative of long time averaged “statistical” quantities to infinitesimal perturbations of the system parameters. The algorithms are demonstrated on the Lorenz attractor. We show that sensitivity derivatives of statistical quantities can be accurately estimated using a single, short trajectory (over a time interval of 20) on the Lorenz attractor.

  8. Sandia National Laboratories: Potential Partners

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSSStrategicSynthetic AperturePotential

  9. Sandia National Laboratories: Potential Sponsors

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of ScienceandMesa del Sol HomeFacebook Twitter YouTube Flickr RSSStrategicSynthetic AperturePotential

  10. Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noble, Donald T. (Ames, IA); Braymen, Steven D. (Ames, IA); Anderson, Marvin S. (Ames, IA)

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point mad a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained.

  11. Casingless down-hole for sealing an ablation volume and obtaining a sample for analysis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Noble, D.T.; Braymen, S.D.; Anderson, M.S.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A casing-less down hole sampling system for acquiring a subsurface sample for analysis using an inductively coupled plasma system is disclosed. The system includes a probe which is pushed into the formation to be analyzed using a hydraulic ram system. The probe includes a detachable tip member which has a soil point and a barb, with the soil point aiding the penetration of the earth, and the barb causing the tip member to disengage from the probe and remain in the formation when the probe is pulled up. The probe is forced into the formation to be tested, and then pulled up slightly, to disengage the tip member and expose a column of the subsurface formation to be tested. An instrumentation tube mounted in the probe is then extended outward from the probe to longitudinally extend into the exposed column. A balloon seal mounted on the end of the instrumentation tube allows the bottom of the column to be sealed. A source of laser radiation is emitted from the instrumentation tube to ablate a sample from the exposed column. The instrumentation tube can be rotated in the probe to sweep the laser source across the surface of the exposed column. An aerosol transport system carries the ablated sample from the probe to the surface for testing in an inductively coupled plasma system. By testing at various levels in the down-hole as the probe is extracted from the soil, a profile of the subsurface formation may be obtained. 9 figs.

  12. Porous acicular mullite obtained by controlled oxidation of waste molybdenum disilicide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bu?evac, Dušan, E-mail: bucevac@vinca.rs [Vin?a Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia); Dap?evi?, Aleksandra [Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, University of Belgrade, Karnegijeva 4, Belgrade 11120 (Serbia); Maksimovi?, Vesna [Vin?a Institute of Nuclear Sciences, University of Belgrade, Belgrade 11001 (Serbia)

    2014-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: • Waste MoSi{sub 2} heating elements were used as starting material for fabrication of porous acicular mullite. • Calcined MoSi{sub 2} powder was source of SiO{sub 2} and pore former at the same time. • Porous acicular mullite is promising material for filtration of diesel engine exhaust. • Samples with decent mechanical integrity and porosity of more than 60% were fabricated. - Abstract: Porous acicular mullite was fabricated by using waste MoSi{sub 2} heating element and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Careful calcination of the pulverized heating element led to the formation of a mixture of MoO{sub 3} and amorphous SiO{sub 2}. This mixture was employed as both SiO{sub 2} precursor and pore former. The oxidation of MoSi{sub 2} and mullite formation were studied. The effect of fabrication temperature on phase composition, porosity, grain morphology, and compressive strength of sintered mullite was examined. Pure mullite with porosity of more than 60% and compressive strength of ?20 MPa was obtained at temperature as low as 1300 °C. The microstructure consisted of elongated, rectangular, prism-like grains which are known to be effective in filtration of diesel engine exhaust. The increase in sintering temperature caused the change of grain morphology and reduction in compressive strength.

  13. The component groups structure of DPPC bilayers obtained by specular neutron reflectometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Beli?ka; Yuri Gerelli; Norbert Ku?erka; Giovanna Fragneto

    2014-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Specular neutron reflectometry (SNR) was measured on a system of a floating bilayer consisting of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-d62-\\textit{sn}-glycero-3-phosphocholine (d62-diC16:0PC) deposited over a 1,2-dibehenoyl-\\textit{sn}-glycero-3-phosphocholine (diC22:0PC) bilayer at 25 and 55 {\\deg}C. The internal structure of lipid bilayers was described by a one dimensional scattering length density profile (SLDP) model, originally developed for the evaluation of small angle scattering data. The corresponding model reflectivity curves successfully describe the experimental reflectivity curves of a supported bilayer in the gel phase and a system of a floating bilayer in the liquid crystalline phase. The reflectivity data from the supported bilayer were evaluated individually and served further as an input by the data treatment of floating bilayer reflectivity curves. The results yield internal structure of a deposited and floating bilayer on the level of component groups of lipid molecules. The obtained structure of the floating d62-diC16:0PC bilayer displays high resemblance to the bilayer structure in the form of unilamellar vesicles, however, simultaneously it shows rate of fluctuations in comparison to unilamellar vesicle bilayers.

  14. Approximate Analytical Solutions of a Two-Term Diatomic Molecular Potential with Centrifugal Barrier

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Altug Arda; Ramazan Sever

    2012-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Approximate analytical bound state solutions of the radial Schr\\"odinger equation are studied for a two-term diatomic molecular potential in terms of the hypergeometric functions for the cases where $q\\geq1$ and $q=0$. The energy eigenvalues and the corresponding normalized wave functions of the Manning-Rosen potential, the 'standard' Hulth\\'{e}n potential and the generalized Morse potential are briefly studied as special cases. It is observed that our analytical results are the same with the ones obtained before.

  15. Use of Forward Sensitivity Analysis Method to Improve Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Vincent A. Mousseau; Nam T. Dinh

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Code Scaling, Applicability, and Uncertainty (CSAU) methodology was developed in late 1980s by US NRC to systematically quantify reactor simulation uncertainty. Basing on CSAU methodology, Best Estimate Plus Uncertainty (BEPU) methods have been developed and widely used for new reactor designs and existing LWRs power uprate. In spite of these successes, several aspects of CSAU have been criticized for further improvement: i.e., (1) subjective judgement in PIRT process; (2) high cost due to heavily relying large experimental database, needing many experts man-years work, and very high computational overhead; (3) mixing numerical errors with other uncertainties; (4) grid dependence and same numerical grids for both scaled experiments and real plants applications; (5) user effects; Although large amount of efforts have been used to improve CSAU methodology, the above issues still exist. With the effort to develop next generation safety analysis codes, new opportunities appear to take advantage of new numerical methods, better physical models, and modern uncertainty qualification methods. Forward sensitivity analysis (FSA) directly solves the PDEs for parameter sensitivities (defined as the differential of physical solution with respective to any constant parameter). When the parameter sensitivities are available in a new advanced system analysis code, CSAU could be significantly improved: (1) Quantifying numerical errors: New codes which are totally implicit and with higher order accuracy can run much faster with numerical errors quantified by FSA. (2) Quantitative PIRT (Q-PIRT) to reduce subjective judgement and improving efficiency: treat numerical errors as special sensitivities against other physical uncertainties; only parameters having large uncertainty effects on design criterions are considered. (3) Greatly reducing computational costs for uncertainty qualification by (a) choosing optimized time steps and spatial sizes; (b) using gradient information (sensitivity result) to reduce sampling number. (4) Allowing grid independence for scaled integral effect test (IET) simulation and real plant applications: (a) eliminate numerical uncertainty on scaling; (b) reduce experimental cost by allowing smaller scaled IET; (c) eliminate user effects. This paper will review the issues related to the current CSAU, introduce FSA, discuss a potential Q-PIRT process, and show simple examples to perform FSA. Finally, the general research direction and requirements to use FSA in a system analysis code will be discussed.

  16. CO2 Sequestration Potential of Texas Low-Rank Coals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duane A. McVay; Walter B. Ayers Jr; Jerry L. Jensen

    2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to evaluate the feasibility of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration in Texas low-rank coals and to determine the potential for enhanced coalbed methane (ECBM) recovery as an added benefit of sequestration. The main objectives for this reporting period were to perform reservoir simulation and economic sensitivity studies to (1) determine the effects of injection gas composition, (2) determine the effects of injection rate, and (3) determine the effects of coal dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection on CO{sub 2} sequestration in the Lower Calvert Bluff Formation (LCB) of the Wilcox Group coals in east-central Texas. To predict CO{sub 2} sequestration and ECBM in LCB coal beds for these three sensitivity studies, we constructed a 5-spot pattern reservoir simulation model and selected reservoir parameters representative of a typical depth, approximately 6,200-ft, of potential LCB coalbed reservoirs in the focus area of East-Central Texas. Simulation results of flue gas injection (13% CO{sub 2} - 87% N{sub 2}) in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern (40-ac well spacing) indicate that LCB coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 0.46 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft, with a median ECBM recovery of 0.94 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 4,270 days (11.7 years). Simulation of 100% CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern indicated that these same coals with average net thickness of 20 ft can store a median value of 1.75 Bcf of CO{sub 2} at depths of 6,200 ft with a median ECBM recovery of 0.67 Bcf and median CO{sub 2} breakthrough time of 1,650 days (4.5 years). Breakthrough was defined as the point when CO{sub 2} comprised 5% of the production stream for all cases. The injection rate sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to injection rate. The main difference is in timing, with longer breakthrough times resulting as injection rate decreases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 670 days (1.8 years) to 7,240 days (19.8 years) for the reservoir parameters and well operating conditions investigated. The dewatering sensitivity study for pure CO{sub 2} injection in an 80-acre 5-spot pattern at 6,200-ft depth shows that total volumes of CO{sub 2} sequestered and methane produced do not have significant sensitivity to dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection. As time to start CO{sub 2} injection increases, the time to reach breakthrough also increases. Breakthrough times for 80-acre patterns (40-acre well spacing) ranged from 850 days (2.3 years) to 5,380 days (14.7 years) for the reservoir parameters and well injection/production schedules investigated. Preliminary economic modeling results using a gas price of $7-$8 per Mscf and CO{sub 2} credits of $1.33 per ton CO{sub 2} indicate that injection of flue gas (87% N{sub 2}-13% CO{sub 2}) and 50% N{sub 2}-50% CO{sub 2} are more economically viable than injecting 100% CO{sub 2}. Results also indicate that injection rate and duration and timing of dewatering prior to CO{sub 2} injection have no significant effect on the economic viability of the project(s).

  17. Acquisition and reduction of data obtained from tank 101-SY in-situ ball rheometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shepard, C.L.; Chieda, M.A.; Kirihara, L.J.; Phillips, J.R.; Shekarriz, A.; Terrones, G. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Abbott, J.; Unal, C.; Pasamehmetoglu, K.O.; Graham, A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of the ball rheometer to measure rheological properties and density of the waste in Hanford Tank 241-SY-101 will be completed around September 1994. This instrument is expected to provide the first-of-its-kind in-situ measurements of the fluid properties of the waste contained within this tank. A mixer pump has been installed in this tank, and this pump has been very successful at mitigating the flammable gas problem associated with Tank 101-SY. The ball rheometer will serve as a diagnostic tool for judging the effectiveness of mixing in Tank 101-SY and others and will be one of few in-situ probes available for diagnostic measurements. Based on experiments performed at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Pacific Northwest Laboratory, it is believed that a generalized Bingham fluid model (Herschel-Bulkley fluid model) may be useful for describing at least some of the waste contained in Tank 101-SY, and data obtained in the tank will initially be reduced using this fluid model. The single largest uncertainty in the determination of the drag force on the ball is the drag force which will be experienced by the cable attached to the ball. This drag can be a substantial fraction of the total drag when the ball is deep within the tank. It is expected that the fluid properties may be history dependent, thus rheological properties of the undisturbed fluid may be different from the same properties after the fluid has been disturbed by passage of the ball. The data collection strategy allows the determination of the waste fluid rheology both in the undisturbed state and after it has been disturbed by the ball. Unlike the rheological parameters, measurement of density requires no model for its interpretation; however, the effects of yield stress may need to be accounted for. This measurement can be made with fairly good accuracy and may provide the most useful data in determination of mixer pump effectiveness.

  18. Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

  19. Diminishing sensitivity for other-regarding preferences for university undergraduate research fellows 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hill, Sarah Anne

    2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the pervasiveness of diminishing sensitivity in economics, and because diminishing sensitivity has played such a crucial role in examining behavior toward risk, diminishing sensitivity for other-regarding ...

  20. Effective Panchromatic Sensitization of Electrochemical Solar Cells: Strategy and Organizational Rules for Spatial Separation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -neutral sources. Dye- sensitized solar cells (DSCs), comprising chromophores, redox shuttles, and nanoporousEffective Panchromatic Sensitization of Electrochemical Solar Cells: Strategy and Organizational National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, United States *S Supporting Information ABSTRACT: Dye-sensitized

  1. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowart, C.G.; Notz, K.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a fully documented peer review of DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, Characteristics of Potential Repository Wastes''. The peer review was chaired and administered by oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) and was conducted in accordance with OCRWM QA procedure QAAP 3.3 Peer Review'' for the purpose of quailing the document for use in OCRWM quality-affecting work. The peer reviewers selected represent a wide range of experience and knowledge particularly suitable for evaluating the subject matter. A total of 596 formal comments were documented by the seven peer review panels, and all were successfully resolved. The peers reached the conclusion that DOE/RW-0184, Rev. 1, is quality determined and suitable for use in quality-affecting work.

  2. Gas flow in barred potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sormani, Mattia C; Magorrian, John

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a Cartesian grid to simulate the flow of gas in a barred Galactic potential and investigate the effects of varying the sound speed in the gas and the resolution of the grid. For all sound speeds and resolutions, streamlines closely follow closed orbits at large and small radii. At intermediate radii shocks arise and the streamlines shift between two families of closed orbits. The point at which the shocks appear and the streamlines shift between orbit families depends strongly on sound speed and resolution. For sufficiently large values of these two parameters, the transfer happens at the cusped orbit as hypothesised by Binney et al. over two decades ago. For sufficiently high resolutions the flow downstream of the shocks becomes unsteady. If this unsteadiness is physical, as appears to be the case, it provides a promising explanation for the asymmetry in the observed distribution of CO.

  3. Increasing the applicability of density functional theory. IV. Consequences of ionization-potential improved exchange-correlation potentials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verma, Prakash; Bartlett, Rodney J., E-mail: bartlett@ufl.edu [Quantum Theory Project, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida 32611 (United States)

    2014-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper's objective is to create a “consistent” mean-field based Kohn-Sham (KS) density functional theory (DFT) meaning the functional should not only provide good total energy properties, but also the corresponding KS eigenvalues should be accurate approximations to the vertical ionization potentials (VIPs) of the molecule, as the latter condition attests to the viability of the exchange-correlation potential (V{sub XC}). None of the prominently used DFT approaches show these properties: the optimized effective potential V{sub XC} based ab initio dft does. A local, range-separated hybrid potential cam-QTP-00 is introduced as the basis for a “consistent” KS DFT approach. The computed VIPs as the negative of KS eigenvalue have a mean absolute error of 0.8 eV for an extensive set of molecule's electron ionizations, including the core. Barrier heights, equilibrium geometries, and magnetic properties obtained from the potential are in good agreement with experiment. A similar accuracy with less computational efforts can be achieved by using a non-variational global hybrid variant of the QTP-00 approach.

  4. Importance and sensitivity of parameters affecting the Zion Seismic Risk

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George, L.L.; O'Connell, W.J.

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents the results of a study on the importance and sensitivity of structures, systems, equipment, components and design parameters used in the Zion Seismic Risk Calculations. This study is part of the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) supported by the NRC Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. The objective of this study is to provide the NRC with results on the importance and sensitivity of parameters used to evaluate seismic risk. These results can assist the NRC in making decisions dealing with the allocation of research resources on seismic issues. This study uses marginal analysis in addition to importance and sensitivity analysis to identify subject areas (input parameter areas) for improvements that reduce risk, estimate how much the improvement dfforts reduce risk, and rank the subject areas for improvements. Importance analysis identifies the systems, components, and parameters that are important to risk. Sensitivity analysis estimates the change in risk per unit improvement. Marginal analysis indicates the reduction in risk or uncertainty for improvement effort made in each subject area. The results described in this study were generated using the SEISIM (Systematic Evaluation of Important Safety Improvement Measures) and CHAIN computer codes. Part 1 of the SEISIM computer code generated the failure probabilities and risk values. Part 2 of SEISIM, along with the CHAIN computer code, generated the importance and sensitivity measures.

  5. Elastic alpha scattering experiments and the alpha-nucleus optical potential at low energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Mohr; G. G. Kiss; Zs. Fülöp; D. Galaviz; Gy. Gyürky; E. Somorjai

    2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    High precision angular distribution data of ($\\alpha$,$\\alpha$) elastic scattering are presented for the nuclei $^{89}$Y, $^{92}$Mo, $^{106,110,116}$Cd, $^{112,124}$Sn, and $^{144}$Sm at energies around the Coulomb barrier. Such data with small experimental uncertainties over the full angular range (20-170 degrees) are the indispensable prerequisite for the extraction of local optical potentials and for the determination of the total reaction cross section $\\sigma_{\\rm{reac}}$. A systematic fitting procedure was applied to the presented experimental scattering data to obtain comprehensive local potential parameter sets which are composed of a real folding potential and an imaginary potential of Woods-Saxon surface type. The obtained potential parameters were used in turn to construct a new systematic $\\alpha$-nucleus potential with very few parameters. Although this new potential cannot reproduce the angular distributions with the same small deviations as the local potential, the new potential is able to predict the total reaction cross sections for all cases under study.

  6. Basic issues associated with four potential EUV resist schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wheeler, D.R. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Kubiak, G.; Ray-Chaudhuri, A.; Henderson, C. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Four of the better developed resist schemes that are outgrowths of DUV (248 and 193 nm) resist development are considered as candidates for EUV. They are as follows: trilayer, a thin imaging layer on top of a refractor masking/pattern transfer layer on top of a planarizing and processing layer (PPL); solution developed, organometallic bilayer where the imaging and masking layer have been combined into one material on top of a PPL; and finally silylated resists. They are examined in a very general form without regard to the specifics of chemistry of the variations within each group, but rather to what is common to each group and how that affects their effectiveness as candidates for a near term EUV resist. In particular they are examined with respect to sensitivity, potential resolution, optical density, etching selectivity during pattern transfer, and any issues associated with pattern fidelity such as swelling.

  7. Diagnostic potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; /Valencia U.; Mena Requejo, Olga; Quigg, Chris; /Fermilab

    2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Annihilation of extremely energetic cosmic neutrinos on the relic-neutrino background can give rise to absorption lines at energies corresponding to formation of the electroweak gauge boson Z{sup 0}. The positions of the absorption dips are set by the masses of the relic neutrinos. Suitably intense sources of extremely energetic (10{sup 21} - 10{sup 25}-eV) cosmic neutrinos might therefore enable the determination of the absolute neutrino masses and the flavor composition of the mass eigenstates. Several factors--other than neutrino mass and composition--distort the absorption lines, however. We analyze the influence of the time-evolution of the relic-neutrino density and the consequences of neutrino decay. We consider the sensitivity of the lineshape to the age and character of extremely energetic neutrino sources, and to the thermal history of the Universe, reflected in the expansion rate. We take into account Fermi motion arising from the thermal distribution of the relic-neutrino gas. We also note the implications of Dirac vs. Majorana relics, and briefly consider unconventional neutrino histories. We ask what kinds of external information would enhance the potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy, and estimate the sensitivity required to make the technique a reality.

  8. Diagnostic potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barenboim, Gabriela; Requejo, Olga Mena; Quigg, Chris [Departament de Fisica Teorica, Universitat de Valencia, Carrer Dr. Moliner 50, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Theoretical Physics Department, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, Illinois 60510 (United States)

    2005-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Annihilation of extremely energetic cosmic neutrinos on the relic-neutrino background can give rise to absorption lines at energies corresponding to formation of the electroweak gauge boson Z{sup 0}. The positions of the absorption dips are set by the masses of the relic neutrinos. Suitably intense sources of extremely energetic (10{sup 21}-10{sup 25}-eV) cosmic neutrinos might therefore enable the determination of the absolute neutrino masses and the flavor composition of the mass eigenstates. Several factors--other than neutrino mass and composition--distort the absorption lines, however. We analyze the influence of the time evolution of the relic-neutrino density and the consequences of neutrino decay. We consider the sensitivity of the line shape to the age and character of extremely energetic neutrino sources, and to the thermal history of the Universe, reflected in the expansion rate. We take into account Fermi motion arising from the thermal distribution of the relic-neutrino gas. We also note the implications of Dirac vs. Majorana relics, and briefly consider unconventional neutrino histories. We ask what kinds of external information would enhance the potential of cosmic-neutrino absorption spectroscopy, and estimate the sensitivity required to make the technique a reality.

  9. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO2 nanocrystals doped with In2O3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  10. Gas sensitive materials for gas detection and methods of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Trakhtenberg, Leonid Israilevich; Gerasimov, Genrikh Nikolaevich; Gromov, Vladimir Fedorovich; Rozenberg, Valeriya Isaakovna

    2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensitive material comprising SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals doped with In.sub.2O.sub.3 and an oxide of a platinum group metal, and a method of making the same. The platinum group metal is preferably Pd, but also may include Pt, Ru, Ir, and combinations thereof. The SnO.sub.2 nanocrystals have a specific surface of 7 or greater, preferably about 20 m2/g, and a mean particle size of between about 10 nm and about 100 nm, preferably about 40 nm. A gas detection device made from the gas sensitive material deposited on a substrate, the gas sensitive material configured as a part of a current measuring circuit in communication with a heat source.

  11. Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

  12. Instrumented Water Tanks can Improve Air Shower Detector Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Previous works have shown that water Cherenkov detectors have superior sensitivity to those of scintillation counters as applied to detecting extensive air showers (EAS). This is in large part due to their much higher sensitivity to EAS photons which are more than five times more numerous than EAS electrons. Large area water Cherenkov detectors can be constructed relatively cheaply and operated reliably. A sparse detector array has been designed which uses these types of detectors to substantially increase the area over which the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory collects EAS information. Improvements to the Milagro detector's performance characteristics and sensitivity derived from this array and preliminary results from a prototype array currently installed near the Milagro detector will be presented.

  13. PROPERTIES OF MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC WAVES IN THE SOLAR PHOTOSPHERE OBTAINED WITH HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimura, D. [Department of Earth and Planetary Science, School of Science, University of Tokyo, Bunkyoku, 113-0033 Tokyo (Japan); Tsuneta, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1, Osawa, Mitaka, 181-8588 Tokyo (Japan)], E-mail: daisuke.fujimura@nao.ac.jp

    2009-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observations of the magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) waves propagating along magnetic flux tubes in the solar photosphere. We identified 20 isolated strong peaks (8 peaks for pores and 12 peaks for intergranular magnetic structure) in the power spectra of the line-of-sight (LOS) magnetic flux, the LOS velocity, and the intensity for 14 different magnetic concentrations. The observation is performed with the spectro-polarimeter of the Solar Optical Telescope aboard the Hinode satellite. The oscillation periods are located in 3-6 minutes for the pores and in 4-9 minutes for the intergranular magnetic elements. These peaks correspond to the magnetic, the velocity, and the intensity fluctuation in time domain with root-mean-square amplitudes of 4-17 G (0.3%-1.2%), 0.03-0.12 km s{sup -1}, and 0.1%-1%, respectively. Phase differences between the LOS magnetic flux ({phi}{sub B}), the LOS velocity ({phi} {sub v}), the intensities of the line core ({phi}{sub I,core}), and the continuum intensity ({phi}{sub I,}c{sub ont}) have striking concentrations at around -90 deg. for {phi}{sub B} - {phi} {sub v} and {phi}{sub v} - {phi}{sub I,core}, around 180 deg. for {phi}{sub I,core} - {phi}{sub B}, and around 10 deg. for {phi} {sub I,core} - {phi}{sub I,cont}. Here, for example, {phi}{sub B} - {phi}{sub v} {approx} -90 deg. means that the velocity leads the magnetic field by a quarter of cycle. The observed phase relation between the magnetic and the photometric intensity fluctuations would not be consistent with that caused by the opacity effect, if the magnetic field strength decreases with height along the oblique LOS. We suggest that the observed fluctuations are due to longitudinal (sausage-mode) and/or transverse (kink-mode) MHD waves. The observed phase relation between the fluctuations in the magnetic flux and the velocity is consistent with the superposition of the ascending wave and the descending wave reflected at chromosphere/corona boundary (standing wave). Even with such reflected waves, the residual upward Poynting flux is estimated to be 2.7 x 10{sup 6} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for a case of the kink wave. Seismology of the magnetic flux tubes is possible to obtain various physical parameters from the observed period and amplitude of the oscillations.

  14. E-Print Network 3.0 - anisotropic finite-frequency sensitivity...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to study the finite-frequency sensitivity to anisotropic parameters... will see later. Smith et al. (2004) introduce 2-D anisotropic sensitivity kernels for finite-frequency......

  15. Stochastic Simulations and Sensitivity Analysis of Plasma Flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lin, Guang; Karniadakis, George E.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For complex physical systems with large number of random inputs, it will be very expensive to perform stochastic simulations for all of the random inputs. Stochastic sensitivity analysis is introduced in this paper to rank the significance of random inputs, provide information on which random input has more influence on the system outputs and the coupling or interaction effect among different random inputs. There are two types of numerical methods in stochastic sensitivity analysis: local and global methods. The local approach, which relies on a partial derivative of output with respect to parameters, is used to measure the sensitivity around a local operating point. When the system has strong nonlinearities and parameters fluctuate within a wide range from their nominal values, the local sensitivity does not provide full information to the system operators. On the other side, the global approach examines the sensitivity from the entire range of the parameter variations. The global screening methods, based on One-At-a-Time (OAT) perturbation of parameters, rank the significant parameters and identify their interaction among a large number of parameters. Several screening methods have been proposed in literature, i.e., the Morris method, Cotter's method, factorial experimentation, and iterated fractional factorial design. In this paper, the Morris method, Monte Carlo sampling method, Quasi-Monte Carlo method and collocation method based on sparse grids are studied. Additionally, two MHD examples are presented to demonstrate the capability and efficiency of the stochastic sensitivity analysis, which can be used as a pre-screening technique for reducing the dimensionality and hence the cost in stochastic simulations.

  16. Aquifer sensitivity assessment modeling at a large scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berg, R.C.; Abert, C.C. (Illinois State Geological Survey, Champaign, IL (United States))

    1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A 480 square-mile region within Will County, northeastern Illinois was used as a test region for an evaluation of the sensitivity of aquifers to contamination. An aquifer sensitivity model was developed using a Geographic Information System (GIS) with ARC/INFO software to overlay and combine several data layers. Many of the input data layers were developed using 2-dimensional surface modeling (Interactive Surface Modeling (ISM)) and 3-dimensional volume modeling (Geologic Modeling Program (GMP)) computer software. Most of the input data layers (drift thickness, thickness of sand and gravel, depth to first aquifer) were derived from interpolation of descriptive logs for water wells and engineering borings from their study area. A total of 2,984 logs were used to produce these maps. The components used for the authors' model are (1) depth to sand and gravel or bedrock, (2) thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer, (3) drift thickness, and (4) absence or presence of uppermost bedrock aquifer. The model is an improvement over many aquifer sensitivity models because it combines specific information on depth to the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer with information on the thickness of the uppermost sand and gravel aquifer. The manipulation of the source maps according to rules-based assumptions results in a colored aquifer sensitivity map for the Will County study area. This colored map differentiates 42 aquifer sensitivity map areas by using line patterns within colors. The county-scale model results in an aquifer sensitivity map that can be a useful tool for making land-use planning decisions regarding aquifer protection and management of groundwater resources.

  17. Pomegranate leaves and mulberry fruit as natural sensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, Ho; Lo, Yu-Jen [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology (China)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This study employs chlorophyll extract from pomegranate leaf and anthocyanin extract from mulberry fruit as the natural dyes for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC). A self-developed nanofluid synthesis system is employed to prepare TiO{sub 2} nanofluid with an average particle size of 25 nm. Electrophoresis deposition was performed to deposit TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles on the indium tin oxide (ITO) conductive glass, forming a TiO{sub 2} thin film with the thickness of 11 {mu}m. Furthermore, this TiO{sub 2} thin film was sintered at 450 C to enhance the thin film compactness. Sputtering was used to prepare counter electrode by depositing Pt thin film on FTO glass at a thickness of 20 nm. The electrodes, electrolyte (I{sub 3}{sup -}), and dyes were assembled into a cell module and illuminated by a light source simulating AM 1.5 with a light strength of 100 mW/cm{sup 2} to measure the photoelectric conversion efficiency of the prepared DSSCs. According to experimental results, the conversion efficiency of the DSSCs prepared by chlorophyll dyes from pomegranate leaf extract is 0.597%, with open-circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of 0.56 V, short-circuit current density (J{sub SC}) of 2.05 mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor (FF) of 0.52. The conversion efficiency of the DSSCs prepared by anthocyanin dyes from mulberry extract is 0.548%, with V{sub OC} of 0.555 V and J{sub SC} of 1.89 mA/cm{sup 2} and FF of 0.53. The conversion efficiency is 0.722% for chlorophyll and anthocyanin as the dye mixture, with V{sub OC} of 0.53 V, J{sub SC} of 2.8 mA/cm{sup 2}, and FF of 0.49. (author)

  18. Porous silicon ring resonator for compact, high sensitivity biosensing applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rodriguez, Gilberto A.; Hu, Shuren; Weiss, Sharon M.

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A ring resonator is patterned on a porous silicon slab waveguide to produce a compact, high quality factor biosensor with a large internal surface area available for enhanced recognition of biological and chemical molecules. The porous nature of the ring resonator allows molecules to directly interact with the guided mode. Quality factors near 10,000 were measured for porous silicon ring resonators with a radius of 25 ?m. A bulk detection sensitivity of 380 nm/RIU was measured upon exposure to salt water solutions. Specific detection of nucleic acid molecules was demonstrated with a surface detection sensitivity of 4 pm/nM.

  19. Sensitivity analysis of the fission gas behavior model in BISON.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Pastore, Giovanni [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID; Perez, Danielle [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID; Williamson, Richard [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the result of a NEAMS project focused on sensitivity analysis of a new model for the fission gas behavior (release and swelling) in the BISON fuel performance code of Idaho National Laboratory. Using the new model in BISON, the sensitivity of the calculated fission gas release and swelling to the involved parameters and the associated uncertainties is investigated. The study results in a quantitative assessment of the role of intrinsic uncertainties in the analysis of fission gas behavior in nuclear fuel.

  20. A high-sensitivity push-pull magnetometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breschi, E.; Gruji?, Z. D.; Knowles, P.; Weis, A. [Department of Physics, University of Fribourg, Fribourg 1700 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe our approach to atomic magnetometry based on the push-pull optical pumping technique. Cesium vapor is pumped and probed by a resonant laser beam whose circular polarization is modulated synchronously with the spin evolution dynamics induced by a static magnetic field. The magnetometer is operated in a phase-locked loop, and it has an intrinsic sensitivity below 20fT/?(Hz), using a room temperature paraffin-coated cell. We use the magnetometer to monitor magnetic field fluctuations with a sensitivity of 300fT/?(Hz)

  1. Effect of Reducing Groundwater on the Retardation of Redox-Sensitive Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Q; Zavarin, M; Rose, T P

    2008-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Laboratory batch sorption experiments were used to investigate variations in the retardation behavior of redox-sensitive radionuclides. Water-rock compositions used during these experiments were designed to simulate subsurface conditions at the Nevada Test Site (NTS), where a suite of radionuclides were deposited as a result of underground nuclear testing. Experimental redox conditions were controlled by varying the oxygen content inside an enclosed glove box and by adding reductants into the testing solutions. Under atmospheric (oxidizing) conditions, the radionuclide distribution coefficients varied with the mineralogical composition of the sorbent and the water chemistry. Under reducing conditions, distribution coefficients showed marked increases for {sup 99}Tc and {sup 237}Np in devitrified tuff, but much smaller variations in alluvium, carbonate rock, and zeolitic tuff. This effect was particularly important for {sup 99}Tc, which tends to be mobile under oxidizing conditions. Unlike other redox-sensitive radionuclides, iodine sorption may decrease under reducing conditions when I{sup -} is the predominant species. Overall, sorption of U to alluvium, devitrified tuff, and zeolitic tuff under atmospheric conditions was less than in the glove-box tests. However, the mildly reducing conditions achieved here were not likely to result in substantial U(VI) reduction to U(IV). Sorption of Pu was not affected by the decreasing redox conditions achieved in this study, as the predominant sorbed Pu species in all conditions was expected to be the low-solubility and strongly sorbing Pu(OH){sub 4}. Depending on the aquifer lithology, the occurrence of reducing conditions along a groundwater flowpath could potentially contribute to the retardation of redox-sensitive radionuclides {sup 99}Tc and {sup 237}Np, which are commonly identified as long-term dose contributors in the risk assessment in various nuclear facilities.

  2. Potentiation of melphalan activity in the KHT sarcoma by the radiosensitizer RSU 1069

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Siemann, D.W.; Maddison, K.; Wolf, K.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) has been shown to potentiate the cytotoxic action of a variety of anti-cancer agents. Even larger enhancement ratios than those observed with MISO have been found with certain other nitroimidazoles. One agent reported to be particularly effective in combination with the chemotherapeutic agent melphalan is the sensitizer RSU 1069. The present studies therefore were designed to evaluate the effect of combining these two agents in the treatment of intramuscularly growing KHT sarcomas. Tumor response was assessed using an in vivo to in vitro clonogenic cell survival assay. When given at times ranging from 60 min before to 30 min after melphalan exposure, RSU 1069 was found to increase the tumoricidal activity of the chemotherapeutic agent. Complete dose response curves combining RSU 1069 and a range of melphalan doses then were determined. For comparison the effects of combining MISO or benznidazole (BENZO) with melphalan also were evaluated. When combined with melphalan, doses of RSU 1069, BENZO and MISO were found to yield dose modifying factors of 1.6, 1.5, and 1.4, respectively. These results indicate that potentiation of melphalan activity occurs at RSU 1069 doses which are approximately 10-fold lower than those of MISO, making this sensitizer as effective a potentiator of melphalan as so far tested in the KHT sarcoma.

  3. Analysis of Alternate Methods to Obtain Stabilized Power Performance of CdTe and CIGS PV Modules (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    del Cueto, J. A.; Deline, C. A.; Rummel, S.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines an analysis of alternate methods to obtain stabilized power performance of CdTe and CIGS PV modules.

  4. The potential use of thiabendazole and propiconazole for oak wilt control in live oak

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roberts, Paul Edwin

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    separate dates (June, July, September, and December 1986) for a total of 32 treated trees. All trees were reinjected at the same rate in June 1987. A bioassay of twigs, using a fungicide-sensitive Penicillium expansum Link isolate, showed the best... distribution of fungicide within the canopy was obtained 1 month following the June injections. Sixty two percent of the healthy trees contained detectable amounts of TBz in their canopies at this time. December injections yielded the poorest distribution...

  5. Wave Functions and Energy Terms of the SCHRÖdinger Equation with Two-Center Coulomb Plus Harmonic Oscillator Potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Matrasulov

    1998-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Schr\\"odinger equation for two center Coulomb plus harmonic oscillator potential is solved by the method of ethalon equation at large intercenter separations. Asymptotical expansions for energy term and wave function are obtained in the analytical form.

  6. Grid Parity for Residential Photovoltaics in the United States: Key Drivers and Sensitivities; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, S.; Denholm, P.; Clark, N.

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report, we analyze PV break-even costs for U.S. residential customers. We evaluate some key drivers of grid parity both regionally and over time. We also examine the impact of moving from flat to time-of-use (TOU) rates, and we evaluate individual components of the break-even cost, including effect of rate structure and various incentives. Finally, we examine how PV markets might evolve on a regional basis considering the sensitivity of the break-even cost to four major drivers: technical performance, financing parameters, electricity prices and rates, and policies. We find that electricity price rather than technical parameters are in general the key drivers of the break-even cost of PV. Additionally, this analysis provides insight about the potential viability of PV markets.

  7. Prospects for the CERN Axion Solar Telescope Sensitivity to 14.4 keV Axions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kresimir Jakovcic; for the CAST Collaboration

    2006-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST) is searching for solar axions using the 9.0 T strong and 9.26 m long transverse magnetic field of a twin aperture LHC test magnet, where axions could be converted into X-rays via reverse Primakoff process. Here we explore the potential of CAST to search for 14.4 keV axions that could be emitted from the Sun in M1 nuclear transition between the first, thermally excited state, and the ground state of 57Fe nuclide. Calculations of the expected signals, with respect to the axion-photon coupling, axion-nucleon coupling and axion mass, are presented in comparison with the experimental sensitivity.

  8. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Park, Byoung Yoon

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes for strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  9. Theoretical Estimate of the Sensitivity of the CUORE Detector to Solar Axions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Dawei; Avignone, F T; Wang, Yuanxu

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we calculate the potential sensitivity of the CUORE detector to axions produced in the Sun through the Primakoff process and detected by coherent Bragg conversion by the inverse Primakoff process. The conversion rate is calculated using density functional theory for the electron density and realistic expectations for the energy resolution and background of CUORE. Monte Carlo calculations for $5~$y$\\times741~$kg=$3705~$kg y of exposure are analyzed using time correlation of individual events with the theoretical time-dependent counting rate and lead to an expected limit on the axion-photon coupling $g_{a\\gamma\\gamma}<3.83\\times 10^{-10}~GeV^{-1}$ for axion masses less than several eV.

  10. Efficiency and Sensitivity Analysis of Observation Networks for Atmospheric Inverse Modelling with Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xueran; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The controllability of advection-diffusion systems, subject to uncertain initial values and emission rates, is estimated, given sparse and error affected observations of prognostic state variables. In predictive geophysical model systems, like atmospheric chemistry simulations, different parameter families influence the temporal evolution of the system.This renders initial-value-only optimisation by traditional data assimilation methods as insufficient. In this paper, a quantitative assessment method on validation of measurement configurations to optimize initial values and emission rates, and how to balance them, is introduced. In this theoretical approach, Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble based versions are combined with a singular value decomposition, to evaluate the potential improvement associated with specific observational network configurations. Further, with the same singular vector analysis for the efficiency of observations, their sensitivity to model control can be identified by deter...

  11. Sensitivity of storage field performance to geologic and cavern design parameters in salt domes.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ehgartner, Brian L.; Park, Byoung Yoon; Herrick, Courtney Grant

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensitivity study was performed utilizing a three dimensional finite element model to assess allowable cavern field sizes in strategic petroleum reserve salt domes. A potential exists for tensile fracturing and dilatancy damage to salt that can compromise the integrity of a cavern field in situations where high extraction ratios exist. The effects of salt creep rate, depth of salt dome top, dome size, caprock thickness, elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, lateral stress ratio of surrounding rock, cavern size, depth of cavern, and number of caverns are examined numerically. As a result, a correlation table between the parameters and the impact on the performance of a storage field was established. In general, slower salt creep rates, deeper depth of salt dome top, larger elastic moduli of caprock and surrounding rock, and a smaller radius of cavern are better for structural performance of the salt dome.

  12. Sensitivity analysis of Monju using ERANOS with JENDL-4.0

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tamagno, P. [Institut National des Sciences et Techniques Nucleaires, INSTN - Point Courrier no 35, Centre CEA de Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Van Rooijen, W. F. G.; Takeda, T. [Research Inst. of Nuclear Engineering, Univ. of Fukui, Kanawa-cho 1-2-4, T914-0055 Fukui-ken, Tsuruga-shi (Japan); Konomura, M. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, FBR Plant Engineering Center, Shiraki 1, 919-1279 Fukui-ken, Tsuruga-shi (Japan)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper deals with sensitivity analysis using JENDL-4.0 nuclear data applied to the Monju reactor. In 2010 the Japan Atomic Energy Agency - JAEA - released a new set of nuclear data: JENDL-4.0. This new evaluation is expected to contain improved data on actinides and covariance matrices. Covariance matrices are a key point in quantification of uncertainties due to basic nuclear data. For sensitivity analysis, the well-established ERANOS [1] code was chosen because of its integrated modules that allow users to perform a sensitivity analysis of complex reactor geometries. A JENDL-4.0 cross-section library is not available for ERANOS. Therefore a cross-section library had to be made from the original nuclear data set, available as ENDF formatted files. This is achieved by using the following codes: NJOY, CALENDF, MERGE and GECCO in order to create a library for the ECCO cell code (part of ERANOS). In order to make sure of the accuracy of the new ECCO library, two benchmark experiments have been analyzed: the MZA and MZB cores of the MOZART program measured at the ZEBRA facility in the UK. These were chosen due to their similarity to the Monju core. Using the JENDL-4.0 ECCO library we have analyzed the criticality of Monju during the restart in 2010. We have obtained good agreement with the measured criticality. Perturbation calculations have been performed between JENDL-3.3 and JENDL-4.0 based models. The isotopes {sup 239}Pu, {sup 238}U, {sup 241}Am and {sup 241}Pu account for a major part of observed differences. (authors)

  13. A microwave resonator for limiting depth sensitivity for electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy of surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sidabras, Jason W.; Varanasi, Shiv K.; Hyde, James S. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Mett, Richard R. [Department of Biophysics, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53211 (United States); Department of Physics and Chemistry, Milwaukee School of Engineering, Milwaukee, Wisconsin 53202 (United States); Swarts, Steven G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Florida, Gainesville, Florida, 32610 (United States); Swartz, Harold M. [Department of Radiology, Geisel Medical School at Dartmouth, Hanover, New Hampshire 03755 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A microwave Surface Resonator Array (SRA) structure is described for use in Electron Paramagnetic Resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. The SRA has a series of anti-parallel transmission line modes that provides a region of sensitivity equal to the cross-sectional area times its depth sensitivity, which is approximately half the distance between the transmission line centers. It is shown that the quarter-wave twin-lead transmission line can be a useful element for design of microwave resonators at frequencies as high as 10 GHz. The SRA geometry is presented as a novel resonator for use in surface spectroscopy where the region of interest is either surrounded by lossy material, or the spectroscopist wishes to minimize signal from surrounding materials. One such application is in vivo spectroscopy of human finger-nails at X-band (9.5 GHz) to measure ionizing radiation dosages. In order to reduce losses associated with tissues beneath the nail that yield no EPR signal, the SRA structure is designed to limit depth sensitivity to the thickness of the fingernail. Another application, due to the resonator geometry and limited depth penetration, is surface spectroscopy in coating or material science. To test this application, a spectrum of 1.44 ?M of Mg{sup 2+} doped polystyrene 1.1 mm thick on an aluminum surface is obtained. Modeling, design, and simulations were performed using Wolfram Mathematica (Champaign, IL; v. 9.0) and Ansys High Frequency Structure Simulator (HFSS; Canonsburg, PA; v. 15.0). A micro-strip coupling circuit is designed to suppress unwanted modes and provide a balanced impedance transformation to a 50 ? coaxial input. Agreement between simulated and experimental results is shown.

  14. Development, sensitivity analysis, and uncertainty quantification of high-fidelity arctic sea ice models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana S.

    2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and due to feedback effects the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice to model physical parameters. A new sea ice model that has the potential to improve sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code and the MPM sea ice code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness, and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  15. Measurement of laser heating in spin exchange optical pumping by NMR diffusion sensitization gradients

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parnell, Steven R.; Deppe, Martin H.; Ajraoui, Salma; Parra-Robles, Juan; Wild, Jim M. [Unit of Academic Radiology, University of Sheffield, Royal Hallamshire Hospital, Glossop Road, Sheffield, S10 2JF (United Kingdom); Boag, Stephen [ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Didcot, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper details pulsed gradient NMR measurements of the {sup 3}He diffusion coefficient in sealed cells during spin exchange optical pumping. The potential of ultra low field magnetic resonance imgaing (MRI) and NMR for noninvasive measurement of cell pressure is demonstrated. Diffusion sensitization gradients allow measurement of the {sup 3}He diffusion coefficient from which the pressure and/or temperature of the gas can be determined during optical pumping. The pressure measurements were compared with neutron time of flight transmission measurements. Good agreement was observed between the temperature/pressure measurements and predictions based on Chapman-Enskog theory. The technique had sufficient sensitivity to observe the diffusion coefficient increasing with temperature in a sealed cell. With this method, evidence for laser heating of the {sup 3}He during optical pumping was found. The results show that NMR diffusion measurements allow noninvasive measurement of the cell temperature and/or pressure in an optical pumping setup. The method can be expanded using MRI to probe the spatial distribution of the diffusion coefficient. These techniques can be applied to the further investigation of polarization limiting effects such as laser heating.

  16. Drawing driver's attention to potentially dangerous objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurugöl, Orc?un

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Drivers often have difficulties noticing potentially dangerous objects due to weather or lighting conditions or when their field of view is restricted. This thesis presents a display method for potentially dangerous objects ...

  17. POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    POTENTIAL IMPACTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE ON FLOODING IN WISCONSIN Ken Potter and Zach Schuster flood scenarios in Wisconsin · Potential impact of climate change on Wisconsin flooding · Ongoing #12;WISCONSIN INITIATIVE ON CLIMATE CHANGE IMPACTS · Partnership between the University of Wisconsin

  18. STATEWIDE ENERGY EFFICIENCY POTENTIAL ESTIMATES AND TARGETS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    rates of forecasted natural gas consumption, electricity consumption and peak electricity demand potential for electric consumption savings, 85 percent of the economic potential for peak demand savings Energy efficiency, energy savings, demand reduction, electricity consumption, natural gas consumption

  19. Sensitivity and open-loop control of stochastic response in a noise amplifier flow: the backward-facing step

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boujo, Edouard

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The two-dimensional backward-facing step flow is a canonical example of noise amplifier flow: global linear stability analysis predicts that it is stable, but perturbations can undergo large amplification in space and time as a result of non-normal effects. This amplification potential is best captured by optimal transient growth analysis, optimal harmonic forcing, or the response to sustained noise. In view of reducing disturbance amplification in these globally stable open flows, a variational technique is proposed to evaluate the sensitivity of stochastic amplification to steady control. Existing sensitivity methods are extended in two ways to achieve a realistic representation of incoming noise: (i) perturbations are time-stochastic rather than time-harmonic, (ii) perturbations are localised at the inlet rather than distributed in space. This allows for the identification of regions where small-amplitude control is the most effective, without actually computing any controlled flows. In particular, passive...

  20. The potential of renewable energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    On June 27 and 28, 1989, the US Department of Energy (DOE) national laboratories were convened to discuss plans for the development of a National Energy Strategy (NES) and, in particular, the analytic needs in support of NES that could be addressed by the laboratories. As a result of that meeting, interlaboratory teams were formed to produce analytic white papers on key topics, and a lead laboratory was designated for each core laboratory team. The broad-ranging renewables assignment is summarized by the following issue statement from the Office of Policy, Planning and Analysis: to what extent can renewable energy technologies contribute to diversifying sources of energy supply What are the major barriers to greater renewable energy use and what is the potential timing of widespread commercialization for various categories of applications This report presents the results of the intensive activity initiated by the June 1989 meeting to produce a white paper on renewable energy. Scores of scientists, analysts, and engineers in the five core laboratories gave generously of their time over the past eight months to produce this document. Their generous, constructive efforts are hereby gratefully acknowledged. 126 refs., 44 figs., 32 tabs.

  1. Levy flights in confining potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piotr Garbaczewski; Vladimir Stephanovich

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze confining mechanisms for L\\'{e}vy flights. When they evolve in suitable external potentials their variance may exist and show signatures of a superdiffusive transport. Two classes of stochastic jump - type processes are considered: those driven by Langevin equation with L\\'{e}vy noise and those, named by us topological L\\'{e}vy processes (occurring in systems with topological complexity like folded polymers or complex networks and generically in inhomogeneous media), whose Langevin representation is unknown and possibly nonexistent. Our major finding is that both above classes of processes stay in affinity and may share common stationary (eventually asymptotic) probability density, even if their detailed dynamical behavior look different. That generalizes and offers new solutions to a reverse engineering (e.g. targeted stochasticity) problem due to I. Eliazar and J. Klafter [J. Stat. Phys. 111, 739, (2003)]: design a L\\'{e}vy process whose target pdf equals a priori preselected one. Our observations extend to a broad class of L\\'{e}vy noise driven processes, like e.g. superdiffusion on folded polymers, geophysical flows and even climatic changes.

  2. Characteristics of potential repository wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Notz, K.J.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) is responsible for the spent fuels and other wastes that will be disposed of in a geologic repository. The two major sources of these materials are commercial light-water reactor (LWR) spent fuel and immobilized high-level waste (HLW). Other wastes that may require long-term isolation include non-LWR spent fuels and miscellaneous sources such as activated metals. Detailed characterizations are required for all of these potential repository wastes. These characterizations include physical, chemical, and radiological properties. The latter must take into account decay as a function of time. This information has been extracted from primary data sources, evaluated, and assembled in a Characteristics Data Base which provides data in four formats: hard copy standard reports, menu-driven personal computer (PC) data bases, program-level PC data bases, and mainframe computer files. The Characteristics Data Base provides a standard set of self-consistent data to the various areas of responsibility including systems integration and waste stream analysis, storage, transportation, and geologic disposal. The data will be used for design studies, evaluation of alternatives, and system optimization by OCRWM and supporting contractors. 7 refs., 5 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Shifted one-parameter supersymmetric family of quartic asymmetric double-well potentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Rosu; S. C. Mancas; P. Chen

    2014-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Extending our previous work (Rosu, Mancas, Chen, Ann.Phys. 343 (2014) 87-102), we define supersymmetric partner potentials through a particular Riccati solution of the form F(x)=(x-c)^2-1, where c is a real shift parameter, and work out the quartic double-well family of one-parameter isospectral potentials obtained by using the corresponding general Riccati solution. For these parametric double well potentials, we study how the localization properties of the two wells depend on the parameter of the potentials for various values of the shifting parameter. We also consider the supersymmetric parametric family of the first double-well potential in the Razavy chain of double well potentials corresponding to F(x)=(1/2)sinh 2x-2(1+sqrt 2)sinh 2x/[(1+sqrt 2) cosh 2x+1], both unshifted and shifted, to test and compare the localization properties

  4. Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Partners and Stakeholders: Roles and Potential Impact, Chapter 6 from the Clean Energy Finance Guide, Third Edition

  5. Solid State Solar Cells Based On Tio2 Sensitized With Natural Pigment Extracted From the Anthurium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. R. A. Kumara

    Abstract: The purpose of this experiment was to create functional dye-sensitized solid state solar cells using natural pigments extracted from the blood red Anthurium as the electron donating species. Natural dye was extracted and adsorbed onto a nano-porous titania substrate. Platinum coated glass was used as the counter electrode. The cells were prepared using drop coating method to get a thickness around 10?m using 25 nm size TiO2 particles. Using the extracted natural dye we have been able to obtain high efficiencies with CuSCN over CuI hole conductor. The prepared cells show open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.46 V and 0.43 of fill factor (FF) with an overall efficiency (?) of 0.34 % for CuSCN over the CuI hole conductor. Nevertheless short circuit current density (Jsc) was 2.37 mA cm-2 for CuI, it was 1.73 mA cm-2 for CuSCN. Key words: Dye Sensitized Solid State Solar Cells, Cyanidin, Anthurium, hole conductor. 1.

  6. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  7. Immuno-PCR: Very sensitive antigen detection by means of specific antibody-DNA conjugates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sano, T.; Smith, C.L.; Cantor, C.R. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States))

    1992-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An antigen detection system, termed immuno-polymerase chain reaction (immuno-PCR), was developed in which a specific DNA molecule is used as the marker. A streptavidin-protein A chimera that possesses tight and specific binding affinity both for biotin and immunoglobulin G was used to attach a biotinylated DNA specifically to antigen-monoclonal antibody complexes that had been immobilized on microtiter plate wells. Then, a segment of the attached DNA was amplified by PCR. Analysis of the PCR products by agarose gel electrophoresis after staining with ethidium bromide allowed as few as 580 antigen molecules to be readily and reproducibly detected. Direct comparison with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay with the use of a chimera-alkaline phosphatase conjugate demonstrates that enhancement in detection sensitivity was obtained with the use of immuno-PCR. Given the enormous amplification capability and specificity of PCR, this immuno-PCR technology has a sensitivity greater than any existing antigen detection system and, in principle, could be applied to the detection of single antigen molecules.

  8. The sensitivity of the ICAL detector at India-based Neutrino Observatory to neutrino oscillation parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Daljeet; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) will host a 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector that will be able to detect muon tracks and hadron showers produced by Charged-Current muon neutrino interactions in the detector. The ICAL experiment will be able to determine the precision of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters and neutrino mass hierarchy using atmospheric muon neutrinos through earth matter effect. In this paper, we report on the sensitivity for the atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters ($\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$) for the ICAL detector using the reconstructed neutrino energy and muon direction as observables. We apply realistic resolutions and efficiencies obtained by the ICAL collaboration with a GEANT4-based simulation to reconstruct neutrino energy and muon direction. Our study shows that using neutrino energy and muon direction as observables for a $\\chi^{2}$ analysis, ICAL detector can measure $\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$ with 13% and 4%...

  9. Sensitivity of natural gas HCCI combustion to fuel and operating parameters using detailed kinetic modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aceves, S; Dibble, R; Flowers, D; Smith, J R; Westbrook, C K

    1999-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper uses the HCT (Hydrodynamics, Chemistry and Transport) chemical kinetics code to analyze natural gas HCCI combustion in an engine. The HCT code has been modified to better represent the conditions existing inside an engine, including a wall heat transfer correlation. Combustion control and low power output per displacement remain as two of the biggest challenges to obtaining satisfactory performance out of an HCCI engine, and these are addressed in this paper. The paper considers the effect of natural gas composition on HCCI combustion, and then explores three control strategies for HCCI engines: DME (dimethyl ether) addition, intake heating and hot EGR addition. The results show that HCCI combustion is sensitive to natural gas composition, and an active control may be required to compensate for possible changes in composition. The three control strategies being considered have a significant effect in changing the combustion parameters for the engine, and should be able to control HCCI combustion.

  10. High sensitivity tests of the Pauli Exclusion Principle with VIP2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marton, J; Bertolucci, S; Berucci, C; Bragadireanu, M; Cargnelli, M; Curceanu, C; Clozza, A; Di Matteo, S; Egger, J -P; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M; Ishiwatari, T; Laubenstein, M; Milotti, E; Pichler, A; Pietreanu, D; Piscicchia, K; Ponta, T; Scordo, A; Shi, H; Sirghi, D L; Sirghi, F; Sperandio, L; Doce, O Vazquez; Widmann, E; Zmeskal, J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pauli Exclusion Principle is one of the most fundamental rules of nature and represents a pillar of modern physics. According to many observations the Pauli Exclusion Principle must be extremely well fulfilled. Nevertheless, numerous experimental investigations were performed to search for a small violation of this principle. The VIP experiment at the Gran Sasso underground laboratory searched for Pauli-forbidden X-ray transitions in copper atoms using the Ramberg-Snow method and obtained the best limit so far. The follow-up experiment VIP2 is designed to reach even higher sensitivity. It aims to improve the limit by VIP by orders of magnitude. The experimental method, comparison of different PEP tests based on different assumptions and the developments for VIP2 are presented.

  11. Potential Energy Surfaces Donald G. Truhlar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truhlar, Donald G

    . Meyers (Academic Press, New York, 2001), Vol. 13, pages 9-17. httpPotential Energy Surfaces Donald G. Truhlar University of Minnesota I. Introduction II. Quantum Mechanical Basis for Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces III. Topology of Adiabatic Potential Energy Surfaces

  12. Renewable Energy Potential for Brownfield Redevelopment Strategies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that must be met for a brownfield site to be considered as high potential for wind power redevelopmentRenewable Energy Potential for Brownfield Redevelopment Strategies Renewable energy resources to identify high-potential sites for renewable energy technologies and can help determine those technologies

  13. Fusion-fission reactions with modified Woods-Saxon potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ning Wang; Kai Zhao; Werner Scheid; Xizhen Wu

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A modified Woods-Saxon potential model is proposed for a unified description of the entrance channel fusion barrier and the fission barrier of fusion-fission reactions based on the Skyrme energy-density functional approach. The fusion excitation functions of 120 reactions have been systematically studied. The fusion (capture) cross sections are well described with the calculated potential and an empirical barrier distribution. Incorporating a statistical model (HIVAP code) for describing the decay of the compound nucleus, the evaporation residue (and fission) cross sections of 51 fusion-fission reactions have been systematically investigated. Optimal values of some key parameters of the HIVAP code are obtained based on the experimental data of these reactions. The experimental data are reasonably well reproduced by the calculated results. The upper and lower confidence limits of the systematic errors of the calculated results are given.

  14. Rate Estimates In order to estimate the time needed to obtain a complete data set for one combination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix C Rate Estimates In order to estimate the time needed to obtain a complete data set for one combination of colliding beams at one energy the following requirements were defined to obtain the model predictions. Also, since emphasis is put on the most central collisions, a 5% trigger is employed

  15. Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa 2004; published 7 October 2004. [1] We have carried out a direct comparison of pulsating auroras), with reference to simultaneous data obtained by a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories. The aurora

  16. Extrapolation methods for obtaining low-lying eigenvalues of a large-dimensional shell model Hamiltonian matrix

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshinaga, N. [Department of Physics, Saitama University, Saitama City 338-8570 (Japan); Arima, A. [Science Museum, Japan Science Foundation, 2-1 Kitanomaru-koen, Chiyoda ku, Tokyo 102-0091 (Japan)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose some new, efficient, and practical extrapolation methods to obtain a few low-lying eigenenergies of a large-dimensional Hamiltonian matrix in the nuclear shell model. We obtain those energies at the desired accuracy by extrapolation after diagonalizing small-dimensional submatrices of the sorted Hamiltonian matrix.

  17. Learning Linear Classifiers Sensitive to Example Dependent and Noisy Costs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brefeld, Ulf

    Learning Linear Classifiers Sensitive to Example Dependent and Noisy Costs Peter Geibel, Ulf costs into ac- count or allow only costs depending on the classes of the examples that are used for learning. As an extension of class dependent costs, we con- sider costs that are example, i.e. feature

  18. Sensitivity of transient synchrotron radiation to tokamak plasma parameters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fisch, N.J.; Kritz, A.H.

    1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Synchrotron radiation from a hot plasma can inform on certain plasma parameters. The dependence on plasma parameters is particularly sensitive for the transient radiation response to a brief, deliberate, perturbation of hot plasma electrons. We investigate how such a radiation response can be used to diagnose a variety of plasma parameters in a tokamak. 18 refs., 13 figs.

  19. PMR2088D September 2012 Smoke Sensitive Areas 2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koford, Rolf R.

    locations commonly have managed ventilation systems that could intake smoke. Larger urban areas are often, and local regulatory authorities. Iowa's rural landscape contains many similar smoke sensitive areas encountered in more typically urban settings. Managed ventilation systems are commonplace on most modern

  20. Promotion And Guidance For Recreation On Ecologically Sensitive Sites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    people go and what they do. 3,500 people were interviewed at over 70 sites; many with GPS units to track recreation, which reduces the impact of recreation by channelling people to more robust sites, raising. · To redirect visitors away from ecologically sensitive areas to more robust sites and change the way people use

  1. Methods for increasing the sensitivity of gamma-ray imagers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mihailescu, Lucian (Pleasanton, CA); Vetter, Kai M. (Alameda, CA); Chivers, Daniel H. (Fremont, CA)

    2012-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods are presented that increase the position resolution and granularity of double sided segmented semiconductor detectors. These methods increase the imaging resolution capability of such detectors, either used as Compton cameras, or as position sensitive radiation detectors in imagers such as SPECT, PET, coded apertures, multi-pinhole imagers, or other spatial or temporal modulated imagers.

  2. Blog Distillation via Sentiment-Sensitive Link Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastiani, Fabrizio

    Blog Distillation via Sentiment-Sensitive Link Analysis Giacomo Berardi, Andrea Esuli, Fabrizio blog distillation by adding a link analysis phase to the standard retrieval-by-topicality phase, where in blog distillation. 1 Introduction Blog distillation is a subtask of blog search. It is defined

  3. Blog Distillation via Sentiment-Sensitive Link Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sebastiani, Fabrizio

    Blog Distillation via Sentiment-Sensitive Link Analysis Giacomo Berardi, Andrea Esuli, Fabrizio report a new approach to blog distillation, defined as the task in which, given a user query, the system of the TREC Blog Track. 1 Introduction Blog distillation is a subtask of the blog search task. It is defined

  4. Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated threedimensional model study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Wuhu

    Arctic ozone loss and climate sensitivity: Updated three­dimensional model study Chipperfield winter­spring chemical ozone loss from 1991 2003, its observed correlation with low temperatures. CTM throughout studied. The model reproduces large column winters also captures shape of ozone loss profile

  5. Sensitivity, Approximation and Uncertainty in Power System Dynamic Simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Sensitivity, Approximation and Uncertainty in Power System Dynamic Simulation Ian A. Hiskens, Fellow, IEEE Jassim Alseddiqui Student Member, IEEE Abstract-- Parameters of power system models the influence of uncertainty in simulations of power system dynamic behaviour. It is shown that trajectory

  6. The Impact of System Design Parameters on Application Noise Sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bridges, Patrick

    by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed Martin Company, for the United States Department of Energy's National. In this paper, we examine the impact of three such system properties: platform balance, "noisy" node the sensitivity of ap- plications to OS noise: · The hardware balance of the system, the ra- tio of peak network

  7. Eect Modi...cation and Design Sensitivity in Observational Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Small, Dylan

    adjusting for measured pretreatment covariates, perhaps by matching, a sensitivity analysis determines a treatment and a pretreatment covariate controlled by matching, so that the treatment e¤ect is larger at some discovered empirically in the data at hand. In case (i), subgroup speci...c bounds on P-values are combined

  8. REVIEW ARTICLE The equilibrium sensitivity of the Earth's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    are expected to increase with warming. To prevent these and limit long-term global surface warming to sensitivity, the global equilibrium surface warming after a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentration, can help with the translation of atmospheric CO2 levels to warming. Various observations favour a climate

  9. Position sensitive radioactivity detection for gas and liquid chromatography

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cochran, Joseph L. (Knoxville, TN); McCarthy, John F. (Loudon, TN); Palumbo, Anthony V. (Oak Ridge, TN); Phelps, Tommy J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for the position sensitive detection of radioactivity in a fluid stream, particularly in the effluent fluid stream from a gas or liquid chromatographic instrument. The invention represents a significant advance in efficiency and cost reduction compared with current efforts.

  10. Geoacoustic characterization by the image source method: a sensitivity study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Geoacoustic characterization by the image source method: a sensitivity study S. Pinsona , L in the localization of the image sources. 1 Introduction Most of the present techniques to characterize the seafloor. The configuration is a broadband source and a vertical or an horizontal array. The method con- siders geological

  11. Piezoelectric composite lattices with high sensitivity Roderic Lakes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lakes, Roderic

    modes of vibration [5]. Too, the voltage coefficient g33 (open circuit electric field divided by stress are amenable to piezoelectric vibration damping. Piezoelectric sensitivity can be arbitrarily large value by virtue of reciprocity, provided the material is elastic; the units pm/volt are equivalent to p

  12. ENVIRONMENTAL MODELING: 1 APPLICATIONS: MONTE CARLO SENSITIVITY SIMULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimov, Ivan

    SIMULATIONS TO THE PROBLEM OF AIR POLLUTION TRANSPORT 3 1.1 The Danish Eulerian Model #12;Chapter 1 APPLICATIONS: MONTE CARLO SENSITIVITY SIMULATIONS TO THE PROBLEM OF AIR POLLUTION of pollutants in a real-live scenario of air-pollution transport over Europe. First, the developed technique

  13. Suitability, Position Sensitivity Designations, and Related Personnel Matters

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1989-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The order identifies the interrelationships among suitability, security and access authorizations; to establish guidance and policy regarding position sensitivity designations, certain background investigations, and suitability determinations; and to establish the policies and procedures regarding waivers of pre-employment investigations. Chg 1, dated 7-8-92.

  14. OFFICIAL SENSITIVE STFC(2014)51 Page 1 of 13

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the challenges of hydrogen fuel storage and cost, using ammonia as a clean and secure hydrogen-containing energy transfer has taken place, the UK will be a 10.5% Shareholder for the ESRF. 4.3 Hydrogen as a "green" fuel source to produce hydrogen on demand in- #12;OFFICIAL SENSITIVE STFC(2014)51 Page 3 of 13 situ

  15. AMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weston, Ken

    , although they are difficult or impossible to fabricate like standard copper wire, HTS materials can provideAMRIS Update Ultra High Sensitivity NMR: 1-mm HTS Triple Resonance Probe W.W. Brey, NHMFL A and Rich Withers) and others at Conductus developed the first HTS (high temperature superconducting

  16. Directionally Sensitive Neutron Detector For Homeland Security Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spence, Grant

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    might be able to overcome many of these limitations. This thesis presents a method to create a directionally sensitive neutron detector using a unique characteristic of 10B. This characteristic is the Doppler broadening of the de-excitation gamma-ray...

  17. NPS-IJWA-00-003 ENVIRONMENTAL SENSITIVITY STUDY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Peter C.

    NPS-IJWA-00-003 ENVIRONMENTAL SENSITIVITY STUDY ON MINE IMPACT BURIAL PREDICTION MODEL Peter C. Chu #12;ABSTRACT The Navy's Impact Burial Prediction Model creates a two-dimensional time history consists of environmental parameters and mine characteristics, as well as parameters describing the mine

  18. Manufacturers of light sensitive devices need to measure the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    and calibrating simultaneously Compared to a traditional solar simulator this new system is in control of output of light sensitive devices. The Solar cells testing system has won the Dutch Cleantech Challenge 2014 in the process of production, as it is time consuming to check each produced cell. A team of TU Delft scientists

  19. Back Propagation is Sensitive to Initial Conditions John F. Kolen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, Jordan B.

    Back Propagation is Sensitive to Initial Conditions John F. Kolen Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA kolen­j@cis.ohio­state.edu, pollack@cis.ohio­state.edu TR 90­JK­BPSIC ABSTRACT. Kolen Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research Computer and Information Science

  20. Back Propagation is Sensitive to Initial Conditions John F. Kolen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollack, Jordan B.

    Back Propagation is Sensitive to Initial Conditions John F. Kolen Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory Columbus, Ohio 43210, USA kolen-j@cis.ohio-state.edu, pollack@cis.ohio-state.edu TR 90-JK-BPSIC ABSTRACT. Kolen Jordan B. Pollack Laboratory for Artificial Intelligence Research Computer and Information Science