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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Nuclear criticality information system  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear criticality safety program at LLNL began in the 1950's with a critical measurements program which produced benchmark data until the late 1960's. This same time period saw the rapid development of computer technology useful for both computer modeling of fissile systems and for computer-aided management and display of the computational benchmark data. Database management grew in importance as the amount of information increased and as experimental programs were terminated. Within the criticality safety program at LLNL we began at that time to develop a computer library of benchmark data for validation of computer codes and cross sections. As part of this effort, we prepared a computer-based bibliography of criticality measurements on relatively simple systems. However, it is only now that some of these computer-based resources can be made available to the nuclear criticality safety community at large. This technology transfer is being accomplished by the DOE Technology Information System (TIS), a dedicated, advanced information system. The NCIS database is described.

Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

1981-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

2

Only critical information was scanned  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Only critical information was scanned. Entire document is available upon request - Click here to email a...

3

Time-critical information services  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emergency medical services have never been more ready for the implementation of time-critical interorganizational information services for the public good.

Thomas A. Horan; Benjamin L. Schooley

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

Technical information resources for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

This paper will discuss some basic technical information resources that would be helpful to the novice nuclear criticality safety specialist. These include bibliographic and benchmark compilations, handbooks, and online resources. The specialist should also be familiar with benchmark quality experimental data needed for code validation. This paper will also discuss the critical experiment data obtained in the 1950s and 1960s at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Heinrichs, D.P.; Koponen, B.L.

1997-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

5

NCIS - a Nuclear Criticality Information System (overview)  

SciTech Connect

A Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) is being established at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in order to serve personnel responsible for safe storage, transport, and handling of fissile materials and those concerned with the evaluation and analysis of nuclear, critical experiments. Public concern for nuclear safety provides the incentive for improved access to nuclear safety information.

Koponen, B.L.; Hampel, V.E.

1983-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a criticality safety information meeting with Hanford site criticality safety engineers on May 14, 2012, to discuss criticality safety...

7

Using the Internet to Obtain Intellectual Property Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An enormous amount of information regarding various aspects of intellectual ... easy-to-use sources that enable one to employ retrieval based on key word...

8

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluations Activity Report for Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Dates of Activity : May 14, 2012 Report Preparer: Ivon Fergus...

9

Definition: Critical Peak Rebates | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rebates Rebates Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Critical Peak Rebates When utilities observe or anticipate high wholesale market prices or power system emergency conditions, they may call critical events during pre-specified time periods (e.g., 3 p.m.-6 p.m. summer weekday afternoons), the price for electricity during these time periods remains the same but the customer is refunded at a single, predetermined value for any reduction in consumption relative to what the utility deemed the customer was expected to consume.[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/critical_peak_rebates [[C LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ategory: Smart Grid Definitions|Template:BASEPAGENAME]]

10

Definition: Critical Peak Pricing | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Pricing Pricing Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Critical Peak Pricing When utilities observe or anticipate high wholesale market prices or power system emergency conditions, they may call critical events during a specified time period (e.g., 3 p.m.-6 p.m. on a hot summer weekday), the price for electricity during these time periods is substantially raised. Two variants of this type of rate design exist: one where the time and duration of the price increase are predetermined when events are called and another where the time and duration of the price increase may vary based on the electric grid's need to have loads reduced;[1] Related Terms electricity generation References ↑ https://www.smartgrid.gov/category/technology/critical_peak_pricing Ret LikeLike UnlikeLike

11

Status, plans, and capabilities of the Nuclear Criticality Information System  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS), in preparation since 1981, has substantially evolved and now contains a growing number of resources pertinent to nuclear criticality safety. These resources include bibliographic compilations, experimental data, communications media, and the International Directory of Nuclear Criticality Safety Personnel. These resources are part of the LLNL Technology Information System (TIS) which provides the host computer for NCIS. The TIS provides nationwide access to authorized members of the nuclear criticality community via interactive dial-up from computer terminals that utilize communication facilities such as commercial and federal telephone networks, toll-free WATS lines, TYMNET, and the ARPANET/MILNET computer network.

Koponen, B.L.

1984-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

12

U-076: OpenSSL Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service, Obtain Information, and  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

76: OpenSSL Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service, Obtain 76: OpenSSL Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service, Obtain Information, and Potentially Execute Arbitrary Code U-076: OpenSSL Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service, Obtain Information, and Potentially Execute Arbitrary Code January 6, 2012 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: OpenSSL Bugs Let Remote Users Deny Service, Obtain Information, and Potentially Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: OpenSSL prior to 0.9.8s; 1.x prior to 1.0.0f ABSTRACT: A remote user may be able to execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026485 OpenSSL Security Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in OpenSSL. A remote user can cause denial of service conditions. A remote user can obtain sensitive information. A remote user may be able to execute arbitrary code on the

13

T-723:Adobe Flash Player Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Information,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3:Adobe Flash Player Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain 3:Adobe Flash Player Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Information, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Execute Arbitrary Code T-723:Adobe Flash Player Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Information, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Execute Arbitrary Code September 22, 2011 - 8:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe Flash Player Multiple Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Information, Conduct Cross-Site Scripting Attacks, and Execute Arbitrary Code. PLATFORM: Adobe Flash Player 10.3.183.7 and earlier versions for Windows, Macintosh, Linux and Solaris. Adobe Flash Player 10.3.186.6 and earlier versions for Android. ABSTRACT: An attacker can exploit this issue by enticing an unsuspecting victim into visiting a malicious website. reference LINKS: Adobe Security Bulletin

14

Analysis of the Quality of Information Obtained About Uterine Artery Embolization From the Internet  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The Internet is widely used by patients to source health care-related information. We sought to analyse the quality of information available on the Internet about uterine artery embolization (UAE). Materials and Methods: We searched three major search engines for the phrase 'uterine artery embolization' and compiled the top 50 results from each engine. After excluding repeated sites, scientific articles, and links to documents, the remaining 50 sites were assessed using the LIDA instrument, which scores sites across the domains of accessibility, usability, and reliability. The Fleisch reading ease score (FRES) was calculated for each of the sites. Finally, we checked the country of origin and the presence of certification by the Health On the Net Foundation (HONcode) as well as their effect on LIDA and FRES scores.ResultsThe following mean scores were obtained: accessibility 48/60 (80%), usability 42/54 (77%), reliability 20/51 (39%), total LIDA 110/165 (67%), and FRES 42/100 (42%). Nine sites had HONcode certification, and this was associated with significantly greater (p < 0.05) reliability and total LIDA and FRES scores. When comparing sites between United Kingdom and United States, there was marked variation in the quality of results obtained when searching for information on UAE (p < 0.05). Conclusion: In general, sites were well designed and easy to use. However, many scored poorly on the reliability of their information either because they were produced in a non-evidence-based way or because they lacking currency. It is important that patients are guided to reputable, location-specific sources of information online, especially because prominent search engine rank does not guarantee reliability of information.

Tavare, Aniket N. [British Medical Association House, British Medical Journal Group (United Kingdom); Alsafi, Ali, E-mail: ali.alsafi03@imperial.ac.uk; Hamady, Mohamad S. [St. Mary's Hospital, Imaging Department (United Kingdom)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

15

Charting transformative practice : critical multiliteracies via informal learning design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

information and communication technology proficiencies (ICTother information and communication technologies [Electronicinformation and communication technology proficiencies (ICT

Clark, Kristen Radsliff

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Summary of criticality data obtained at Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories on fixed and soluble poisons in U + Pu nitrate solutions  

SciTech Connect

Knowledge of the effects of neutron poisons on U +Pu systems is necessary to better establish criticality safety programs. These data are needed in setting of criticality safety specifications for storage, processing and shipping of fissile material where it is desired to handle larger quantities with safety and efficiency. These data are needed also for validating calculational techniques and cross sections sets. U + Pu solutions containing 30% Pu in the total U + Pu were used in these experiments to determine the effect of neutron poisons. Criticality of heterogeneous systems of UO/sub 2/-PuO/sub 2/ rods in a lattice were studied when the U + Pu solutions with various amounts of Gd and + B were added to the system. Criticality of homogeneous systems of the U + Pu nitrate were determined with varying amounts of Gd and Gd + B added to the solution. Measurements were made to determine also the effect of boron-glass raschig rings on the criticality of the U + Pu nitrate solution systems.

Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.

1976-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

On the protection and technologies of critical information infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical Infrastructures are complex and highly interconnected systems that are crucial for the well-being of the society. Any type of failure can cause significant damage, affecting one or more sectors due to their inherent interdependency. Not only ...

Javier Lopez; Cristina Alcaraz; Rodrigo Roman

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

The Criticality Safety Information Resource Center at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The mission of the Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is the preservation of primary documentation supporting criticality safety. In many cases, but not all, this primary documentation consists of experimentalists` logbooks. Experience has shown that the logbooks and other primary information are vulnerable to being discarded. Destruction of these logbooks results in a permanent loss to the criticality safety community.

Henderson, B.D.; Meade, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Pruvost, N.L. [Galaxy Computer Services, Inc., Santa Fe, NM (United States)

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Abstract--Information Retrieval is a process made by a user to obtain relevant information which meets his needs using an  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- Information Retrieval is a process made by a user to obtain relevant information which meets his needs using an Information Retrieval System (IRS). However the IRS shows some differences Retrieval process. Keywords-- information retrieval, user profile, personalized IR, indexing, user re

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

20

Petroleum and geothermal production technology in Russia: Summary of information obtained during informational meetings with several Russian Institutes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Russian scientists and engineers have drilled the deepest holes in the world. It is recognized that this experience has given them an expertise in drilling superdeep holes, as well as other aspects of drilling, completions, and geophysics. More and more US oil and gas companies are vigorously expanding their exploration and development into Russia. It is important for them to identify and use Russian technology in drilling, completion, logging, and reservoir characterization to the extent possible, in order to both reduce drilling costs and help support the Russian economy. While these US companies are interested in becoming involved in and/or sponsoring research in Russia, they have been unsure as to which scientists and institutes are working on problems of interest. It was also important to determine in which areas Russian technology is farther advanced than in the West. Such technology could then be commercialized as part of the Industrial Partnering Program. In order to develop a clear understanding of these issues, two Sandia engineers with drilling and completions expertise and a geophysicist with expertise in reservoir analysis traveled to Russia to meet with Russian scientists and engineers to discuss their technologies and areas of interest. This report contains a summary of the information obtained during the visit.

Schafer, D.M.; Glowka, D.A.; Teufel, L.W.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

The Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The Criticality Safety Information Resource Center (CSIRC) at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) is a program jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in conjunction with the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2. The goal of CSIRC is to preserve primary criticality safety documentation from U.S. critical experimental sites and to make this information available for the benefit of the technical community. Progress in archiving criticality safety primary documents at the LANL archives as well as efforts to make this information available to researchers are discussed. The CSIRC project has a natural linkage to the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP). This paper raises the possibility that the CSIRC project will evolve in a fashion similar to the ICSBEP. Exploring the implications of linking the CSIRC to the international criticality safety community is the motivation for this paper.

Henderson, B.D.; Meade, R.A.; Pruvost, N.L.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

22

Criticality condition for information floating with random walk of nodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an opportunistic content sharing system referred to as floating content, information is copied between mobile nodes upon node encounters inside an area which is called the anchor zone. We study the conditions under which information can be sustained ... Keywords: Opportunistic networking, Random walk, Transport equation

Jorma Virtamo; Esa Hyyti; Pasi Lassila

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

The role of Wireless Sensor Networks in the area of Critical Information Infrastructure Protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical Infrastructures, such as energy, banking, and transport, are an essential pillar to the well-being of the national and international economy, security and quality of life. These infrastructures are dependent on a spectrum of highly interconnected ... Keywords: Critical Information Infrastructure Protection, Network Security, Wireless Sensor Networks

Rodrigo Roman; Cristina Alcaraz; Javier Lopez

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

The detailed evaluation criteria for designation of critical information infrastructure in the field of broadcasting and communication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing to dependency on information infrastructures involves various threats to cyber incidents. Most of nations or organizations work on protect to not only infrastructure but also information infrastructure. Korea established Critical Information ... Keywords: CII (critical information infrastructure), CIIP (CII protection), cyber incident, cyber security, designation criteria, information assets

Soontai Park; Wan S. Yi; Bong-Nam Noh

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Using Data Mining Techniques to Address Critical Information Exchange Needs in Disaster Affected  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

disaster information in the context of disaster management phases: Preparation, Response, RecoveryUsing Data Mining Techniques to Address Critical Information Exchange Needs in Disaster Affected Management and Disaster Recovery have gained immense importance in the wake of recent man and nature

Chen, Shu-Ching

26

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium Finihsing Plant, May 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2-05-14 2-05-14 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Dates of Activity : May 14, 2012 Report Preparer: Ivon Fergus Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a criticality safety information meeting with Hanford site criticality safety engineers on May 14, 2012, to discuss criticality safety issues and experiences principally with respect to the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). These discussions also included aspects of Non-

27

Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Hanford Plutonium Finihsing Plant, May 2012  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2-05-14 2-05-14 Site: DOE-Richland Operations Office Subject: Office of Enforcement and Oversight's Office of Safety and Emergency Management Evaluations Activity Report for Criticality Safety Information Meeting for the Plutonium Finishing Plant Dates of Activity : May 14, 2012 Report Preparer: Ivon Fergus Activity Description/Purpose: The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Enforcement and Oversight, within the Office of Health, Safety and Security (HSS), conducted a criticality safety information meeting with Hanford site criticality safety engineers on May 14, 2012, to discuss criticality safety issues and experiences principally with respect to the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) activities at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP). These discussions also included aspects of Non-

28

Obtaining field pricing and audit cognizance has been identified as a critical path activity for our contract and financial assistance awards and modifications  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PROCUREMENT AND ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT PROCUREMENT AND ASSISTANCE MANAGEMENT OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND ASSISTANCE POLICY (MA-61) MANAGEMENT OF CONTRACT/FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE AUDIT SUPPORT FOR AMERICAN RECOVERY AND REINVESTMENT ACT ACTIONS (JULY 23, 2009) Obtaining field pricing and audit support has been identified as a critical path activity for our Recovery Act contract and financial assistance awards and modifications. In order to meet the aggressive schedule commitments for placing contracts and financial assistance awards, we need to manage the audit process more effectively through increased management attention both at the field contracting office and Headquarters level. The guidance and direction provided herein is written primarily to cover audit support from the Defense Contract Audit Agency (DCAA). It

29

Managing critical information infrastructure security compliance: a standard based approach using ISO/IEC 17799 and 27001  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information technology constitutes a substantial component of the critical infrastructure of many nations Systems used by utilities and service industries such as electricity, water, wastewater treatment and gas are key components of these critical infrastructures ...

Wipul Jayawickrama

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Nanostructure of Solid Precipitates Obtained by Expansion of Polystyrene-block-Polybutadiene Solutions in Near Critical Propane: Block Ratio and Micellar Solution Effects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In contrast to incompressible liquid solutions, compressible near-critical solutions of block copolymers allow for controlling rapid structure transformations with pressure alone. For example, when dissolved in near-critical propane, polystyrene-block-polybutadiene can form a random molecular solution at high pressures, a micellar solution at moderate pressures, and a solvent-free precipitate at low pressures. In contrast to the unstructured virgin copolymer, such a propane-treated precipitate rapidly self-assembles toward structures characteristic of equilibrated block copolymers, such as lamellae, spheres, or cylinders, which depend on the block ratio rather than on the decompression rate or temperature, at least within the rate and temperature ranges investigated in this work. At lower temperatures, however, say below 40 C, glass transition of the styrene-butadiene diblocks can inhibit independent structure formation, while crystallization of their hydrogenated-butadiene analogues can preserve the micellar-solution structure.

Green, Jade [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Tyrrell, Zachary [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Radosz, Maciej [University of Wyoming, Laramie; Hong, Kunlun [ORNL; Mays, Jimmy [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Devising an architecture for time-critical information services: inter-organizational performance data components for emergency medical service (EMS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper reports on a case study analysis of a county-wide emergency medical services (EMS) system striving to implement information technology across service provider organizations (e.g., fire, ambulance, dispatch center, hospitals) to enhance e-governmental ... Keywords: architecture, e-government, emergency medical services, emergency response, performance, time-critical information services

Benjamin Schooley; Michael Marich; Thomas Horan

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Incremental criticality and yield gradients  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Criticality and yield gradients are two crucial diagnostic metrics obtained from Statistical Static Timing Analysis (SSTA). They provide valuable information to guide timing optimization and timing-driven physical synthesis. Existing work in the literature, ...

Jinjun Xiong; Vladimir Zolotov; Chandu Visweswariah

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Modeling mining economics and materials markets to inform criticality assessment and mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conventional criticality-assessment methods drawn from the existing literature are often limited to evaluations of scarcity risks, or rely on price as an indicator of criticality. Such approaches, however, are ill-suited ...

Poulizac, Claire Marie Franc?oise

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FULL-SCALE, WIND TUNNEL AND CFD WIND ENGINEERING STUDIES A variety of methods can be used to obtain wind engineering design information. These include codes of practice, full-scale, wind tunnel are listed in the table below: Table 1. Relative advantages and disadvantages of wind engineering techniques

Savory, Eric

35

Quantitatively assessing the vulnerability of critical information systems: A new method for evaluating security enhancements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper proposes a new approach for assessing the organization's vulnerability to information-security breaches. Although much research has been done on qualitative approaches, the literature on numerical approaches to quantify information-security ... Keywords: Information security, Information-security measurement, Risk analysis, Security threats, Vulnerability measurement

Sandip C. Patel; James H. Graham; Patricia A. S. Ralston

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Critical factors of hospital adoption on CRM system: Organizational and information system perspectives  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent rapid increase in the amount of medical information has pushed hospitals to confront an essential issue which is how to utilize healthcare information technology to improve healthcare services quality. Customer relationship management system ... Keywords: Customer relationship management, Healthcare information technology, Hospitals, Information systems adoption

Shin-Yuan Hung; Wei-Hsi Hung; Chia-An Tsai; Shu-Chen Jiang

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Information and The Brukner-Zeilinger Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics: A Critical Investigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Brukner and Zeilinger's interpretation of quantum mechanics, information is introduced as the most fundamental notion and the finiteness of information is considered as an essential feature of quantum systems. They also define a new measure of information which is inherently different from the Shannon information and try to show that the latter is not useful in defining the information content in a quantum object. Here, we show that there are serious problems in their approach which make their efforts unsatisfactory. The finiteness of information does not explain how objective results appear in experiments and what an instantaneous change in the so-called information vector (or catalog of knowledge) really means during the measurement. On the other hand, Brukner and Zeilinger's definition of a new measure of information may lose its significance, when the spin measurement of an elementary system is treated realistically. Hence, the sum of the individual measures of information may not be a conserved value in real experiments.

Afshin Shafiee; Feryal Safinejad; Farnoush Naqsh

2004-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Critical Systems View of Power-Ethics Interactions in Information Systems Evaluation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current developments in information systems IS evaluation emphasise stakeholder participation in order to ensure adequate and beneficial IS investments. It is now common to consider evaluation as a subjective process of interpretations, in which people's ...

Jos-Rodrigo Crdoba

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Nuclear criticality safety guide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This technical reference document cites information related to nuclear criticality safety principles, experience, and practice. The document also provides general guidance for criticality safety personnel and regulators.

Pruvost, N.L.; Paxton, H.C. [eds.] [eds.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Toward an ontology framework supporting the integration of geographic information with modeling and simulation for critical infrastructure protection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Protecting the nation's infrastructure from natural disasters, inadvertent failures, or intentional attacks is a major national security concern. Gauging the fragility of infrastructure assets, and understanding how interdependencies across critical infrastructures affect their behavior, is essential to predicting and mitigating cascading failures, as well as to planning for response and recovery. Modeling and simulation (M&S) is an indispensable part of characterizing this complex system of systems and anticipating its response to disruptions. Bringing together the necessary components to perform such analyses produces a wide-ranging and coarse-grained computational workflow that must be integrated with other analysis workflow elements. There are many points in both types of work flows in which geographic information (GI) services are required. The GIS community recognizes the essential contribution of GI in this problem domain as evidenced by past OGC initiatives. Typically such initiatives focus on the broader aspects of GI analysis workflows, leaving concepts crucial to integrating simulations within analysis workflows to that community. Our experience with large-scale modeling of interdependent critical infrastructures, and our recent participation in a DRS initiative concerning interoperability for this M&S domain, has led to high-level ontological concepts that we have begun to assemble into an architecture that spans both computational and 'world' views of the problem, and further recognizes the special requirements of simulations that go beyond common workflow ontologies. In this paper we present these ideas, and offer a high-level ontological framework that includes key geospatial concepts as special cases of a broader view.

Ambrosiano, John J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bent, Russell W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Linger, Steve P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

The Navy seeks to identify responsible sources and obtain information in regard to purchasing renewable power for Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, located in Fallon, NV  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation REQUEST FOR INFORMATION (RFI) for Renewable Generation Opportunities at NAWS China Lake, NAS Fallon, MCAGCC 29 Palms, and MCAS Yuma The Department of Navy (DoN) intends to issue a Request for Proposal (RFP) in early 2009 for renewable energy generation opportunities at Naval Air Weapons Station (NAWS) China Lake, California; Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada; Marine Corps Air Ground Combat Center (MCAGCC) Twentynine Palms, California, and Marine Corps Air Station (MCAS) Yuma, Arizona. The DoN will consider opportunities for the purchase of renewable power, developer wholesale generation, distributed generation, and the combination of those opportunities. Specifically, the Navy will provide Government land on these installations for large

42

Reference handbook: Nuclear criticality  

SciTech Connect

The purpose for this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with the information necessary to understand the basic principles underlying a nuclear criticality.

1991-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

43

On the safety implications of e-governance: assessing the hazards of enterprise information architectures in safety-critical applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Governments across Europe and North America have recently reviewed the ways in which they provide both the public and their own departments with access to electronic data. Information service architectures have been proposed as one important component ... Keywords: data integrity, e-governance, emergency planning, safety information

Christopher W. Johnson; Stefan Raue

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Clean Critical Experiment Benchmarks for Plutonium Recycle in LWRs (Foil Activation Studies)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to provide benchmark information for testing fuel-cycle analysis methods and nuclear data libraries, EPRI supported a series of critical lattice experiments at Battelle, Pacific Northwest Laboratories' plutonium recycle critical facility. These experiments involved water-moderated uniform uranium oxide and mixed (uranium-plutonium) oxide critical lattices. This volume presents the foil activation data obtained from this experimental program.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Nuclear criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

Important facts of the nuclear criticality safety field are covered in this volume. Both theoretical and practical aspects of the subject are included, based on insights provided by criticality experts and published information from many sources. An overview of nuclear criticality safety theory and a variety of practical in-plant operation applications are presented. Underlying principles of nuclear criticality safety are introduced and the state of the art of this technical discipline is reviewed. Criticality safety theoretical concepts, accident experience, standards, experiments computer calculations, integration of safety methods into individual practices, and overall facility operations are all included.

Knief, R.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Defending Critical Infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We apply new bilevel and trilevel optimization models to make critical infrastructure more resilient against terrorist attacks. Each model features an intelligent attacker (terrorists) and a defender (us), information transparency, and sequential actions ... Keywords: bilevel program, critical infrastructure protection, homeland defense, homeland security, mixed-integer program, trilevel program

Gerald Brown; Matthew Carlyle; Javier Salmern; Kevin Wood

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Improving the Availability and Delivery of Critical Information for Tight Gas Resource Development in the Appalachian Basin  

SciTech Connect

To encourage, facilitate and accelerate the development of tight gas reservoirs in the Appalachian basin, the geological surveys in Pennsylvania and West Virginia collected widely dispersed data on five gas plays and formatted these data into a large database that can be accessed by individual well or by play. The database and delivery system that were developed can be applied to any of the 30 gas plays that have been defined in the basin, but for this project, data compilation was restricted to the following: the Mississippian-Devonian Berea/Murrysville sandstone play and the Upper Devonian Venango, Bradford and Elk sandstone plays in Pennsylvania and West Virginia; and the 'Clinton'/Medina sandstone play in northwestern Pennsylvania. In addition, some data were collected on the Tuscarora Sandstone play in West Virginia, which is the lateral equivalent of the Medina Sandstone in Pennsylvania. Modern geophysical logs are the most common and cost-effective tools for evaluating reservoirs. Therefore, all of the well logs in the libraries of the two surveys from wells that had penetrated the key plays were scanned, generating nearly 75,000 scanned e-log files from more than 40,000 wells. A standard file-naming convention for scanned logs was developed, which includes the well API number, log curve type(s) scanned, and the availability of log analyses or half-scale logs. In addition to well logs, other types of documents were scanned, including core data (descriptions, analyses, porosity-permeability cross-plots), figures from relevant chapters of the Atlas of Major Appalachian Gas Plays, selected figures from survey publications, and information from unpublished reports and student theses and dissertations. Monthly and annual production data from 1979 to 2007 for West Virginia wells in these plays are available as well. The final database also includes digitized logs from more than 800 wells, sample descriptions from more than 550 wells, more than 600 digital photos in 1-foot intervals from 11 cores, and approximately 260 references for these plays. A primary objective of the research was to make data and information available free to producers through an on-line data delivery model designed for public access on the Internet. The web-based application that was developed utilizes ESRI's ArcIMS GIS software to deliver both well-based and play-based data that are searchable through user-originated queries, and allows interactive regional geographic and geologic mapping that is play-based. System tools help users develop their customized spatial queries. A link also has been provided to the West Virginia Geological Survey's 'pipeline' system for accessing all available well-specific data for more than 140,000 wells in West Virginia. However, only well-specific queries by API number are permitted at this time. The comprehensive project web site (http://www.wvgs.wvnet.edu/atg) resides on West Virginia Geological Survey's servers and links are provided from the Pennsylvania Geological Survey and Appalachian Oil and Natural Gas Research Consortium web sites.

Mary Behling; Susan Pool; Douglas Patchen; John Harper

2008-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

48

inform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The monthly member publication of AOCS. inform Inform Magazine Membership Merchandise Subscriptions Journals Membership Merchandise 8C5A902BB64F1A5D499524EFF5918AE0 INFORM-NM 2008

49

Criticality Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003) presents the methodology for evaluating potential criticality situations in the monitored geologic repository. As stated in the referenced Topical Report, the detailed methodology for performing the disposal criticality analyses will be documented in model reports. Many of the models developed in support of the Topical Report differ from the definition of models as given in the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management procedure AP-SIII.10Q, ''Models'', in that they are procedural, rather than mathematical. These model reports document the detailed methodology necessary to implement the approach presented in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report and provide calculations utilizing the methodology. Thus, the governing procedure for this type of report is AP-3.12Q, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''. The ''Criticality Model'' is of this latter type, providing a process evaluating the criticality potential of in-package and external configurations. The purpose of this analysis is to layout the process for calculating the criticality potential for various in-package and external configurations and to calculate lower-bound tolerance limit (LBTL) values and determine range of applicability (ROA) parameters. The LBTL calculations and the ROA determinations are performed using selected benchmark experiments that are applicable to various waste forms and various in-package and external configurations. The waste forms considered in this calculation are pressurized water reactor (PWR), boiling water reactor (BWR), Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF), Training Research Isotope General Atomic (TRIGA), Enrico Fermi, Shippingport pressurized water reactor, Shippingport light water breeder reactor (LWBR), N-Reactor, Melt and Dilute, and Fort Saint Vrain Reactor spent nuclear fuel (SNF). The scope of this analysis is to document the criticality computational method. The criticality computational method will be used for evaluating the criticality potential of configurations of fissionable materials (in-package and external to the waste package) within the repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada for all waste packages/waste forms. The criticality computational method is also applicable to preclosure configurations. The criticality computational method is a component of the methodology presented in ''Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report'' (YMP 2003). How the criticality computational method fits in the overall disposal criticality analysis methodology is illustrated in Figure 1 (YMP 2003, Figure 3). This calculation will not provide direct input to the total system performance assessment for license application. It is to be used as necessary to determine the criticality potential of configuration classes as determined by the configuration probability analysis of the configuration generator model (BSC 2003a).

A. Alsaed

2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

50

Mission Critical Networking  

SciTech Connect

Mission-Critical Networking (MCN) refers to networking for application domains where life or livelihood may be at risk. Typical application domains for MCN include critical infrastructure protection and operation, emergency and crisis intervention, healthcare services, and military operations. Such networking is essential for safety, security and economic vitality in our complex world characterized by uncertainty, heterogeneity, emergent behaviors, and the need for reliable and timely response. MCN comprise networking technology, infrastructures and services that may alleviate the risk and directly enable and enhance connectivity for mission-critical information exchange among diverse, widely dispersed, mobile users.

Eltoweissy, Mohamed Y.; Du, David H.C.; Gerla, Mario; Giordano, Silvia; Gouda, Mohamed; Schulzrinne, Henning; Youssef, Moustafa

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

HOW TO OBTAIN EIA PRODUCTS AND SERVICES  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

HOW TO OBTAIN EIA PRODUCTS AND SERVICES HOW TO OBTAIN EIA PRODUCTS AND SERVICES For further information on any or the following services, or for answers to energy information questions, please contact ElA's National Energy Information Outer National Energy Infomtaiion Center (NEIC) (202) 586-8800 Energy Information Administration (202) 586-0727 (fax) l-orrtslal Ituilding, Roam 1F-048 TTY: (202) 586-1ISI Washington. DC 20585 E-mail: infocir@eia.doc.gov Electronic Products and Services ElA's Internet Site Services offer nearly all E1A publications. Users can view and download selected pages or entire reports, search Tor information, download LIA tlaia and analysis applications, and find out about new KIA information products aitd sen-ices, World Wide Web: http://www.eia.doe.KOV Gopher: go ph« r ://go ph er .eia .d oe. gov

52

Exploring the Effect of mHealth Technologies on Communication and Information Sharing in a Pediatric Critical Care Unit: A Case Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Communication and information sharing is an important aspect of healthcare information technology and mHealth management. A main requirement in the quality of patient care is the ability of all health care participants to communicate. Research illustrates ... Keywords: Health Care Technology, Information Technology, Management of Technology, Professional Communication, Technology Assessment, eHealth, mHealth

Rocci Luppicini; Victoria Aceti

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Total Risk Approach in Applying PRA to Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

As nuclear industry continues marching from an expert-base support to more procedure-base support, it is important to revisit the total risk concept to criticality safety. A key objective of criticality safety is to minimize total criticality accident risk. The purpose of this paper is to assess key constituents of total risk concept pertaining to criticality safety from an operations support perspective and to suggest a risk-informed means of utilizing criticality safety resources for minimizing total risk. A PRA methodology was used to assist this assessment. The criticality accident history was assessed to provide a framework for our evaluation. In supporting operations, the work of criticality safety engineers ranges from knowing the scope and configurations of a proposed operation, performing criticality hazards assessment to derive effective controls, assisting in training operators, response to floor questions, surveillance to ensure implementation of criticality controls, and response to criticality mishaps. In a compliance environment, the resource of criticality safety engineers is increasingly being directed towards tedious documentation effort to meet some regulatory requirements to the effect of weakening the floor support for criticality safety. By applying a fault tree model to identify the major contributors of criticality accidents, a total risk picture is obtained to address relative merits of various actions. Overall, human failure is the key culprit in causing criticality accidents. Factors such as failure to follow procedures, lacks of training, lack of expert support at the floor level etc. are main contributors. Other causes may include lack of effective criticality controls such as inadequate criticality safety evaluation. Not all of the causes are equally important in contributing to criticality mishaps. Applying the limited resources to strengthen the weak links would reduce risk more than continuing emphasis on the strong links of criticality safety support. For example, some compliance failures such as lack of detailed documentation may not be as relevant as the lack of floor support in answering operator's questions during operations. Misuse of resources in reducing lesser causes rather than on major causes of criticality accidents is not risk free without severe consequences. A regulatory mandate without due consideration of total risk may have its opposite effect of increasing the total risk of an accident. A lesson is to be learned here. For regulatory standard/guide development, use of ANS/ANSI standard process, which provides the pedigree of consensus participation, is recommended.

Huang, S T

2005-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

54

Criticality safety basics, a study guide  

SciTech Connect

This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

V. L. Putman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Criticality safety basics, a study guide  

SciTech Connect

This document is a self-study and classroom guide, for criticality safety of activities with fissile materials outside nuclear reactors. This guide provides a basic overview of criticality safety and criticality accident prevention methods divided into three parts: theory, application, and history. Except for topic emphasis, theory and history information is general, while application information is specific to the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Information presented here should be useful to personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. However, the guide's primary target audience is fissile material handler candidates.

V. L. Putman

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Obtaining and Using USDA Market and Production Reports  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Producers who have superior information hold a distinct marketing advantage over those who do not. This publication lists various sources of marketing and production information and where to obtain them.

Bevers, Stan; Amosson, Stephen H.; Smith, Jackie; O'Brien, Daniel

2008-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

57

Criticality control in shipments of fissile materials  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a procedure for finite-array criticality analysis to ensure criticality safety of shipments of fissile materials in US DOE-certified packages. After the procedure has been performed, one can obtain the minimum transport index and determine the maximum number of fissile packages allowable in a shipment that meets the 10 CFR 71 criticality safety requirements.

Liaw, J. R.; Liu, Y. Y.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

58

MCNP/KENO criticality benchmarks  

SciTech Connect

In the past, criticality safety analyses related to the handling and storage of fissile materials were obtained from critical experiments, nuclear safety guides, and handbooks. As a result of rising costs and time delays associated with critical experiments, most experimental facilities have been closed, triggering an increased reliance on computational methods. With this reliance comes the need and requirement for redundant validation by independent criticality codes. Currently, the KENO Monte Carlo transport code is the most widely used tool for criticality safety calculations. For other transport codes, such as MCNP, to be accepted by the criticality safety community as a redundant validation tool they must be able to reproduce experimental results at least as well as KENO. The Monte Carlo neutron, photon, and electron transport code MCNP, has an extensive list of attractive features, including continuous energy cross sections, generalized 3-D geometry, time dependent transport, criticality k{sub eff} calculations, and comprehensive source and tally capabilities. It is widely used for nuclear criticality analysis, nuclear reactor shielding, oil well logging, and medical dosimetry calculations. This report specifically addresses criticality and benchmarks the KENO 25 problem test set. These sample problems constitute the KENO standard benchmark set and represent a relatively wide variety of criticality problems. The KENO Monte Carlo code was chosen because of its extensive benchmarking against analytical and experimental criticality results. Whereas the uncertainty in experimental parameters generally prohibits code validation to better than about 1% in k{sub eff}, the value of k{sub eff} for criticality is considered unacceptable if it deviates more than a few percent from measurements.

McKinney, G.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Wagner, J.C. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States); Sisolak, J.E. [Wisconsin Univ., Madison, WI (United States)

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Imaging systems and methods for obtaining and using biometric information  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are exemplary embodiments of imaging systems and methods of using such systems. In one exemplary embodiment, one or more direct images of the body of a clothed subject are received, and a motion signature is determined from the one or more images. In this embodiment, the one or more images show movement of the body of the subject over time, and the motion signature is associated with the movement of the subject's body. In certain implementations, the subject can be identified based at least in part on the motion signature. Imaging systems for performing any of the disclosed methods are also disclosed herein. Furthermore, the disclosed imaging, rendering, and analysis methods can be implemented, at least in part, as one or more computer-readable media comprising computer-executable instructions for causing a computer to perform the respective methods.

McMakin, Douglas L [Richland, WA; Kennedy, Mike O [Richland, WA

2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

DOE Information Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Information Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Center provides citizens a consolidated facility to obtain information and records related to the DOE's...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency. This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel. For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ). INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Definition: Critical Assets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bulk Electric System, System References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An i LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. nline...

63

Definition: Critical Cyber Assets | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Related Terms Cyber Assets References Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. inline...

64

The Information Revolution: Software's Critical Connection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Revolution, the kinds of changes it demanded in the ... how we think about what the demands will be ... systems with all that that implies, everything from ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

65

Nuclear criticality accidents  

SciTech Connect

Criticality occurs when a sufficient quantity of fissionable material is accumulated, and it results in the liberation of nuclear energy. All process accidents have involved plutonium or highly enriched uranium, as have most of the critical experiment accidents. Slightly enriched uranium systems require much larger quantities of material to achieve criticality. An appreciation of criticality accidents should be based on an understanding of factors that influence criticality, which are discussed in this article. 11 references.

Smith, D.R. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico (Unites States))

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

PRECLOSURE CRITICALITY ANALYSIS PROCESS REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes a process for performing preclosure criticality analyses for a repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada. These analyses will be performed from the time of receipt of fissile material until permanent closure of the repository (preclosure period). The process describes how criticality safety analyses will be performed for various configurations of waste in or out of waste packages that could occur during preclosure as a result of normal operations or event sequences. The criticality safety analysis considers those event sequences resulting in unanticipated moderation, loss of neutron absorber, geometric changes, or administrative errors in waste form placement (loading) of the waste package. The report proposes a criticality analyses process for preclosure to allow a consistent transition from preclosure to postclosure, thereby possibly reducing potential cost increases and delays in licensing of Yucca Mountain. The proposed approach provides the advantage of using a parallel regulatory framework for evaluation of preclosure and postclosure performance and is consistent with the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's approach of supporting risk-informed, performance-based regulation for fuel cycle facilities, ''Yucca Mountain Review Plan, Final Report'', and 10 CFR Part 63. The criticality-related criteria for ensuring subcriticality are also described as well as which guidance documents will be utilized. Preclosure operations and facilities have significant similarities to existing facilities and operations currently regulated by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission; therefore, the design approach for preclosure criticality safety will be dictated by existing regulatory requirements while using a risk-informed approach with burnup credit for in-package operations.

A.E. Danise

2004-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

67

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

OBJECTIVE CS.1 The LANL criticality safety program provides the required technical guidance and oversight capabilities to ensure a comprehensive criticality safety program for the storage of nuclear materials in SSTs. (Core Requirements 3, 4, 8) Criteria * The Criticality Safety Program is an administrative TSR and meets the General and * Specific Requirements of DOE O 420.1A, Section 4.3 Nuclear Criticality Safety. * All processes and operations involving significant quantities of fissile materials are * described in current procedures approved by line management. * Procedures contain approved criticality controls and limits, based on HSR-6 evaluations and recommendations. * Supervisors, operations personnel, and criticality safety officers have received

68

Computing criticality of lines in power systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract We propose a computationally efficient method based on nonlinear optimization to identify critical lines, failure of which can cause severe blackouts. Our method computes criticality measure for all lines at a time, as opposed to detecting a single vulnerability, providing a global view of the system. This information on criticality of lines can be used to identify multiple contingencies by selectively exploring multiple combinations of broken lines. The effectiveness of our method is demonstrated on the IEEE 30 and 118 bus systems, where we can very quickly detect the most critical lines in the system and identify severe multiple contingencies. I.

Ali P?nar; Adam Reichert; Bernard Lesieutre

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

CRITICALITY SAFETY (CS)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Objective CS.1 - A criticality safety program is established, sufficient numbers of qualified personnel are provided, and adequate facilities and equipment are available to ensure criticality safety support services are adequate for safe operations. (Core Requirements 1, 2, and 6) Criteria * Functions, assignments, responsibilities, and reporting relationships are clearly defined, understood, and effectively implemented. * Operations support personnel for the criticality safety area are adequately staffed and trained. Approach Record Review: Review the documentation that establishes the Criticality Safety Requirements (CSRs) for appropriateness and completeness. Review for adequacy and completion the criticality safety personnel training records that indicate training on facility procedures and systems under

70

Criticality Model Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the ''Criticality Model Report'' is to validate the MCNP (CRWMS M&O 1998h) code's ability to accurately predict the effective neutron multiplication factor (k{sub eff}) for a range of conditions spanned by various critical configurations representative of the potential configurations commercial reactor assemblies stored in a waste package may take. Results of this work are an indication of the accuracy of MCNP for calculating eigenvalues, which will be used as input for criticality analyses for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) storage at the proposed Monitored Geologic Repository. The scope of this report is to document the development and validation of the criticality model. The scope of the criticality model is only applicable to commercial pressurized water reactor fuel. Valid ranges are established as part of the validation of the criticality model. This model activity follows the description in BSC (2002a).

J.M. Scaglione

2003-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

71

Criticality Safety Basics for INL Emergency Responders  

SciTech Connect

This document is a modular self-study guide about criticality safety principles for Idaho National Laboratory emergency responders. This guide provides basic criticality safety information for people who, in response to an emergency, might enter an area that contains much fissionable (or fissile) material. The information should help responders understand unique factors that might be important in responding to a criticality accident or in preventing a criticality accident while responding to a different emergency.

This study guide specifically supplements web-based training for firefighters (0INL1226) and includes information for other Idaho National Laboratory first responders. However, the guide audience also includes other first responders such as radiological control personnel.

For interested readers, this guide includes clearly marked additional information that will not be included on tests. The additional information includes historical examples (Been there. Done that.), as well as facts and more in-depth information (Did you know ).

INL criticality safety personnel revise this guide as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Revision 0, issued May 2007, established the basic text. Revision 1 incorporates operation, program, and training changes implemented since 2007. Revision 1 increases focus on first responders because later responders are more likely to have more assistance and guidance from facility personnel and subject matter experts. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that help keep emergency responders safe. The changes are based on and consistent with changes made to course 0INL1226.

Valerie L. Putman

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Program. No new source requirements were released in 2011. A revision to LRD-18001 is

Andrea Hoffman

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

2011 Annual Criticality Safety Program Performance Summary  

SciTech Connect

The 2011 review of the INL Criticality Safety Program has determined that the program is robust and effective. The review was prepared for, and fulfills Contract Data Requirements List (CDRL) item H.20, 'Annual Criticality Safety Program performance summary that includes the status of assessments, issues, corrective actions, infractions, requirements management, training, and programmatic support.' This performance summary addresses the status of these important elements of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Assessments - Assessments in 2011 were planned and scheduled. The scheduled assessments included a Criticality Safety Program Effectiveness Review, Criticality Control Area Inspections, a Protection of Controlled Unclassified Information Inspection, an Assessment of Criticality Safety SQA, and this management assessment of the Criticality Safety Program. All of the assessments were completed with the exception of the 'Effectiveness Review' for SSPSF, which was delayed due to emerging work. Although minor issues were identified in the assessments, no issues or combination of issues indicated that the INL Criticality Safety Program was ineffective. The identification of issues demonstrates the importance of an assessment program to the overall health and effectiveness of the INL Criticality Safety Program. Issues and Corrective Actions - There are relatively few criticality safety related issues in the Laboratory ICAMS system. Most were identified by Criticality Safety Program assessments. No issues indicate ineffectiveness in the INL Criticality Safety Program. All of the issues are being worked and there are no imminent criticality concerns. Infractions - There was one criticality safety related violation in 2011. On January 18, 2011, it was discovered that a fuel plate bundle in the Nuclear Materials Inspection and Storage (NMIS) facility exceeded the fissionable mass limit, resulting in a technical safety requirement (TSR) violation. The TSR limits fuel plate bundles to 1085 grams U-235, which is the maximum loading of an ATR fuel element. The overloaded fuel plate bundle contained 1097 grams U-235 and was assembled under an 1100 gram U-235 limit in 1982. In 2003, the limit was reduced to 1085 grams citing a new criticality safety evaluation for ATR fuel elements. The fuel plate bundle inventories were not checked for compliance prior to implementing the reduced limit. A subsequent review of the NMIS inventory did not identify further violations. Requirements Management - The INL Criticality Safety program is organized and well documented. The source requirements for the INL Criticality Safety Program are from 10 CFR 830.204, DOE Order 420.1B, Chapter III, 'Nuclear Criticality Safety,' ANSI/ANS 8-series Industry Standards, and DOE Standards. These source requirements are documented in LRD-18001, 'INL Criticality Safety Program Requirements Manual.' The majority of the criticality safety source requirements are contained in DOE Order 420.1B because it invokes all of the ANSI/ANS 8-Series Standards. DOE Order 420.1B also invokes several DOE Standards, including DOE-STD-3007, 'Guidelines for Preparing Criticality Safety Evaluations at Department of Energy Non-Reactor Nuclear Facilities.' DOE Order 420.1B contains requirements for DOE 'Heads of Field Elements' to approve the criticality safety program and specific elements of the program, namely, the qualification of criticality staff and the method for preparing criticality safety evaluations. This was accomplished by the approval of SAR-400, 'INL Standardized Nuclear Safety Basis Manual,' Chapter 6, 'Prevention of Inadvertent Criticality.' Chapter 6 of SAR-400 contains sufficient detail and/or reference to the specific DOE and contractor documents that adequately describe the INL Criticality Safety Program per the elements specified in DOE Order 420.1B. The Safety Evaluation Report for SAR-400 specifically recognizes that the approval of SAR-400 approves the INL Criticality Safety Progra

Andrea Hoffman

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 | White Paper Page | 1 Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 | White Paper Page | 1 Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 White Paper October 2011 #12;Delivering Business-Critical Solutions with SharePoint 2010 | White Paper Page | 2 DISCLAIMER The information contained in this document

Chaudhuri, Surajit

75

AGING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this design calculation is to revise and update the previous criticality calculation for the Aging Facility (documented in BSC 2004a). This design calculation will also demonstrate and ensure that the storage and aging operations to be performed in the Aging Facility meet the criticality safety design criteria in the ''Project Design Criteria Document'' (Doraswamy 2004, Section 4.9.2.2), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirement described in the ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC [Bechtel SAIC Company] 2004f, p. 3-12). The scope of this design calculation covers the systems and processes for aging commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and staging Department of Energy (DOE) SNF/High-Level Waste (HLW) prior to its placement in the final waste package (WP) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-1). Aging commercial SNF is a thermal management strategy, while staging DOE SNF/HLW will make loading of WPs more efficient (note that aging DOE SNF/HLW is not needed since these wastes are not expected to exceed the thermal limits form emplacement) (BSC 2004f, p. 1-2). The description of the changes in this revised document is as follows: (1) Include DOE SNF/HLW in addition to commercial SNF per the current ''SNF Aging System Description Document'' (BSC 2004f). (2) Update the evaluation of Category 1 and 2 event sequences for the Aging Facility as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2004c, Section 7). (3) Further evaluate the design and criticality controls required for a storage/aging cask, referred to as MGR Site-specific Cask (MSC), to accommodate commercial fuel outside the content specification in the Certificate of Compliance for the existing NRC-certified storage casks. In addition, evaluate the design required for the MSC that will accommodate DOE SNF/HLW. This design calculation will achieve the objective of providing the criticality safety results to support the preliminary design of the Aging Facility. As the ongoing design evolution remains fluid, the results from this design calculation should be evaluated for applicability to any new or modified design. Consequently, the results presented in this document are limited to the current design. The information contained in this document was developed by Environmental and Nuclear Engineering and is intended for the use of Design and Engineering in its work regarding the various criticality related activities performed in the Aging Facility. Yucca Mountain Project personnel from Environmental and Nuclear Engineering should be consulted before the use of the information for purposes other than those stated herein or use by individuals other than authorized personnel in Design and Engineering.

C.E. Sanders

2004-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

76

Development of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Web Site for the Nuclear Criticality Safety Professional  

SciTech Connect

Development of the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) web site is the result of the efforts of marry members of the Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) community and is maintained by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under the direction of the NCSP Management Team. This World Wide Web (WWW) resource was developed as part of the DOE response to the DNFSB Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. The NCSP web site provides information of interest to NCS professionals and includes links to other sites actively involved in the collection and dissemination of criticality safety information. To the extent possible, the hyperlinks on this web site direct the user to the original source of the referenced material in order to ensure access to the latest, most accurate version.

Lee, C.K.; Huang, S.; Morman, J.A.; Garcia, A.S.

2000-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

HANFORD NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY PROGRAM DATABASE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Hanford Database is a useful information retrieval tool for a criticality safety practitioner. The database contains nuclear criticality literature screened for parameter studies. The entries, characterized with a value index, are segregated into 16 major and six minor categories. A majority of the screened entries have abstracts and a limited number are connected to the Office of Scientific and Technology Information (OSTI) database of full-size documents. Simple and complex searches of the data can be accomplished very rapidly and the end-product of the searches could be a full-size document. The paper contains a description of the database, user instructions, and a number of examples.

TOFFER, H.

2005-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

78

Evaluating Rail Transit Criticism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report evaluates criticism of rail transit systems. It examines claims that rail transit is ineffective at increasing public transit ridership and improving transportation system performance, that rail transit investments are not cost effective, and that transit is an outdated form of transportation. It finds that critics often misrepresent issues and use biased and inaccurate analysis. This is a companion to the report Rail Transit in

Todd Litman

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Treatment of biomass to obtain ethanol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ethanol was produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

2011-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

80

Information Security Guide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Security Guide For Government Executives Pauline Bowen Elizabeth Chew Joan Hash #12; Table of Contents Introduction 1 Why do I need to invest in information security? 2 Where do I need to focus my attention in accomplishing critical information security goals? 4 What are the key activities

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Nuclear multifragmentation critical exponents  

SciTech Connect

In a recent Letter, cited in a reference, the EoS collaboration presented data of fragmentation of 1 A GeV gold nuclei incident on carbon. By analyzing moments of the fragment charge distribution, the authors claim to determine the values of the critical exponents {gamma}, {beta}, and {tau} for finite nuclei. These data represent a crucial step forward in the understanding of the physics of nuclear fragmentation. However, as shown in this paper, the analysis presented in the cited reference is not sufficient to support the claim that the critical exponents for nuclear fragmentation have been unambiguously determined.

Bauer, W. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory]|[National Superconducting Cyclotron Lab., East Lansing, MI (United States); Friedman, W.A. [Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States). Inst. for Nuclear Theory]|[Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Physics

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

82

Line tensions, correlation lengths, and critical exponents in lipid membranes near critical points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membranes containing a wide variety of ternary mixtures of high chain-melting temperature lipids, low chain-melting temperature lipids, and cholesterol undergo lateral phase separartion into coexisting liquid phases at a miscibility transition. When membranes are prepared from a ternary lipid mixture at a critical composition, they pass through a miscibility critical point at the transition temperature. Since the critical temperature is typically on the order of room temperature, membranes provide an unusual opportunity in which to perform a quantitative study of biophysical systems that exhibit critical phenomena in the two-dimensional Ising universality class. As a critical point is approached from either high or low temperature, the scale of fluctuations in lipid composition, set by the correlation length, diverges. In addition, as a critical point is approached from low temperature, the line tension between coexisting phases decreases to zero. Here we quantitatively evaluate the temperature dependence of line tension between liquid domains and of fluctuation correlation lengths in lipid membranes in order to extract a critical exponent, nu. We obtain nu=1.2 plus or minus 0.2, consistent with the Ising model prediction nu=1. We also evaluate the probability distributions of pixel intensities in fluoresence images of membranes. From the temperature dependence of these distributions above the critical temperature, we extract an independent critical exponent beta=0.124 plus or minus 0.03 which is consistent with the Ising prediction of beta=1/8.

Aurelia R. Honerkamp-Smith; Pietro Cicuta; Marcus D. Collins; Sarah L. Veatch; Marcel den Nijs; M. Schick; Sarah L. Keller

2008-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

83

Glossary of nuclear criticality terms  

SciTech Connect

This is a glossary of terms generally encountered in the literature of nuclear criticality and criticality safety. Terms sometimes misused are emphasized. 7 refs.

Paxton, H.C.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Fast Reactor Spent Fuel Processing: Experience and Criticality Safety  

SciTech Connect

This paper discusses operational and criticality safety experience associated with the Idaho National Laboratory Fuel Conditioning Facility which uses a pyrometallurgical process to treat spent fast reactor metallic fuel. The process is conducted in an inert atmosphere hot cell. The process starts with chopping metallic fuel elements into a basket. The basket is lowered into molten salt (LiCl-KCl) along with a steel mandrel. Active metal fission products, transuranic metals and sodium metal in the spent fuel undergo chemical oxidation and form chlorides. Voltage is applied between the basket, which serves as an anode, and the mandrel, which serves as a cathode, causing metallic uranium in the spent fuel to undergo electro-chemical oxidation thereby forming uranium chloride. Simultaneously at the cathode, uranium chloride undergoes electro-chemical reduction and deposits uranium metal onto the mandrel. The uranium metal and accompanying entrained salt are placed in a distillation furnace where the uranium melts forming an ingot and the entrained salt boils and subsequently condenses in a separate crucible. The uranium ingots are placed in long term storage. During the ten year operating history, over one hundred criticality safety evaluations were prepared. All criticality safety related limits and controls for the entire process are contained in a single document which required over thirty revisions to accommodate the process changes. Operational implementation of the limits and controls includes use of a near real-time computerized tracking system. The tracking system uses an Oracle database coupled with numerous software applications. The computerized tracking system includes direct fuel handler interaction with every movement of material. Improvements to this system during the ten year history include introduction of web based operator interaction, tracking of moderator materials and the development of a plethora database queries to assist in day to day operations as well as obtaining historical information. Over 12,000 driver fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2500 kg of 20% enriched uranium. Also, over one thousand blanket fuel elements have been processed resulting in the production of 2400 kg of depleted uranium. These operations required over 35,000 fissile material transfers between zones and over 6000 transfers between containers. Throughout all of these movements, no mass limit violations occurred. Numerous lessons were learned over the ten year operating history. From a criticality safety perspective, the most important lesson learned was the involvement of a criticality safety practitioner in daily operations. A criticality safety engineer was assigned directly to facility operations, and was responsible for implementation of limits and controls including upkeep of the associated computerized tracking files. The criticality safety engineer was also responsible for conducting fuel handler training activities including serving on fuel handler qualification oral boards, and continually assessing operations from a criticality control perspective. The criticality safety engineer also attended bimonthly project planning meetings to identify upcoming process changes that would require criticality safety evaluation. Finally, the excellent criticality safety record was due in no small part to the continual support, involvement, trust, and confidence of project and operations mana

Chad Pope

2007-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. CRITICAL FOUNDATIONS PROTECTING AMERICA'S INFRASTRUCTURES The Report of the President's Commission ...

86

Critical Point Symmetries in Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical Point Symmetries (CPS) appear in regions of the nuclear chart where a rapid change from one symmetry to another is observed. The first CPSs, introduced by F. Iachello, were E(5), which corresponds to the transition from vibrational [U(5)] to gamma-unstable [O(6)] behaviour, and X(5), which represents the change from vibrational [U(5)] to prolate axially deformed [SU(3)] shapes. These CPSs have been obtained as special solutions of the Bohr collective Hamiltonian. More recent special solutions of the same Hamiltonian, to be described here, include Z(5) and Z(4), which correspond to maximally triaxial shapes (the latter with ``frozen'' gamma=30 degrees), as well as X(3), which corresponds to prolate shapes with ``frozen'' gamma=0. CPSs have the advantage of providing predictions which are parameter free (up to overall scale factors) and compare well to experiment. However, their mathematical structure [with the exception of E(5)] needs to be clarified.

Bonatsos, D; Petrellis, D; Terziev, P A; Yigitoglu, I; Bonatsos, Dennis

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

A survey SCADA of and critical infrastructure incidents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze several cyber-security incidents involving critical infrastructure and SCADA systems. We classify these incidents based on Source Sector, Method of Operations, Impact, and Target Sector. Using this standardized taxonomy we can ... Keywords: critical infrastructure, cyber attack, cyber security, information assurance and security, scada, security

Bill Miller; Dale Rowe

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Critical dynamics and decoherence  

SciTech Connect

We study dynamics of decoherence in a generic model where the environment is driven and undergoes a quantum phase transition. We model the environment by the Ising chain in the transverse field, and assume that the decohering system is a central spin-1/2. We found that when the environment is quenched slowly through the critical point, the decoherence factor of the central spin undergoes rapid decay that encodes the critical exponents of the environment. We also found that decoherence in a non-equilibrated, kink-contaminated, environment can be stronger than in a vacuum one. We derived a remarkably simple analytical expression that describes post-transition decoherence and predicts periodicities involving all system parameters. This research connects the fields of decoherence, quantum phase transitions, and Kibble-Zurek non-equilibrium dynamics.

Damski, Bogdan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Quan, Haitao T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zurek, Wojciech H [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety Project parameter study database  

SciTech Connect

A computerized, knowledge-screened, comprehensive database of the nuclear criticality safety documentation has been assembled as part of the Nuclear Criticality Technology and Safety (NCTS) Project. The database is focused on nuclear criticality parameter studies. The database has been computerized using dBASE III Plus and can be used on a personal computer or a workstation. More than 1300 documents have been reviewed by nuclear criticality specialists over the last 5 years to produce over 800 database entries. Nuclear criticality specialists will be able to access the database and retrieve information about topical parameter studies, authors, and chronology. The database places the accumulated knowledge in the nuclear criticality area over the last 50 years at the fingertips of a criticality analyst.

Toffer, H.; Erickson, D.G.; Samuel, T.J. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Pearson, J.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Applicability of ZPR critical experiment data to criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

More than a hundred zero power reactor (ZPR) critical assemblies were constructed, over a period of about three decades, at the Argonne National Laboratory ZPR-3, ZPR-6, ZPR-9 and ZPPR fast critical assembly facilities. To be sure, the original reason for performing these critical experiments was to support fast reactor development. Nevertheless, data from some of the assemblies are well suited to form the basis for valuable, new criticality safety benchmarks. The purpose of this paper is to describe the ZPR data that would be of benefit to the criticality safety community and to explain how these data could be developed into practical criticality safety benchmarks.

Schaefer, R.W.; Aumeier, S.E.; McFarlane, H.F.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

91

Obtaining the Bidirectional Transfer Distribution Function of Isotropically  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Obtaining the Bidirectional Transfer Distribution Function of Isotropically Obtaining the Bidirectional Transfer Distribution Function of Isotropically Scattering Materials Using an Integrating Sphere Title Obtaining the Bidirectional Transfer Distribution Function of Isotropically Scattering Materials Using an Integrating Sphere Publication Type Journal Article LBNL Report Number LBNL-61826 Year of Publication 2007 Authors Jonsson, Jacob C., and Henrik Branden Journal Optics Communications Volume 277 Pagination 228-236 Call Number LBNL-61826 Abstract This paper demonstrates a method to determine the bidirectional transfer distribution function (BTDF) using an integrating sphere. Information about the sample's angle dependent scattering is obtained by making transmittance measurements with the sample at different distances from the integrating sphere. Knowledge about the illuminated area of the sample and the geometry of the sphere port in combination with the measured data combines to an system of equations that includes the angle dependent transmittance. The resulting system of equations is an ill-posed problem which rarely gives a physical solution. A solvable system is obtained by using Tikhonov regularization on the ill-posed problem. The solution to this system can then be used to obtain the BTDF. Four bulk-scattering samples were characterised using both two goniophotometers and the described method to verify the validity of the new method. The agreement shown is great for the more diffuse samples. The solution to the low-scattering samples contains unphysical oscillations, but still gives the correct shape of the solution. The origin of the oscillations and why they are more prominent in low-scattering samples are discussed.

92

Dynamical Analysis of the Structure of Neutron Star Critical Collapses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Jin et al reported that axisymmetric simulations of NS-like objects with polytropic EOS undergo critical gravitational collapse. As the critical collapse observed via fine-tuning of the adiabatic index $\\Gamma$, they conjecture that critical phenomena may occur in realistic astrophysical scenarios. To clarify the implications this numerical observation has on realistic astrophysical scenarios, here, we perform dynamical analysis on the structure of the critical collapse observed in the former work. We report the time scales and oscillation frequencies exhibited by the critical solution and compare these results with values obtained from analytic perturbative mode analysis of equilibrium TOV configurations. We also establish the universality of the critical solution with respect to a 1-parameter family of initial data as well as the phase space manifold of the critical collapse.

M. -B. Wan; K. -J. Jin; W. -M. Suen

2008-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

93

Use Energy Information Services to Benchmark with ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Information Services to Energy Information Services to Benchmark with ENERGY STAR ® Tracking Building Energy Performance Tracking a building's energy performance provides a building owner or manager with critical knowledge to make improvements to the building's operations and reduce energy consumption. Energy information services offer a variety of ways to help companies obtain and organize this valuable energy information. Energy information service providers that have partnered with ENERGY STAR offer an additional tool to assess the energy performance of buildings: automated benchmarking. ENERGY STAR is the national symbol for saving the environment through energy efficiency, recognized by more than 65 percent of the American public. Automated benchmarking allows energy information service providers to provide their customers with ENERGY STAR

94

Critical Skills Master's Program  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Skills Master's Program Skills Master's Program (CSMP): The Critical Skills Master's Program (CSMP) provides exceptional bachelor's-level candidates with the opportunity to pursue a fully funded Master's of Science degree. Successful applicants will become regular full-time Sandia employees and join multidisciplinary teams that are advancing the frontiers of science and technology to solve the world's greatest challenges. Program Requirements: * Apply to a minimum of 3 nationally accredited universities. * Successfully complete the GRE as required by the universities of interest. * Complete a master's degree within:

95

Critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

High Mach number flight requires that the scramjet propulsion system operate at a relatively low static inlet pressure and a high inlet temperature. These two constraints can lead to extremely high temperatures in the combustor, yielding high densities of radical species and correspondingly poor chemical combustion efficiency. As the temperature drops in the nozzle expansion, recombination of these excess radicals can produce more product species, higher heat yield, and potentially more thrust. The extent to which the chemical efficiency can be enhanced in the nozzle expansion depends directly on the rate of the radical recombination reactions. A comprehensive assessment of the important chemical processes and an experimental validation of the critical rate parameters is therefore required if accurate predictions of scramjet performance are to be obtained. This report covers the identification of critical reactions, and the critical reaction rates in hypersonic combustion chemistry. 4 refs., 2 figs.

Oldenborg, R.C.; Harradine, D.M.; Loge, G.W.; Lyman, J.L.; Schott, G.L.; Winn, K.R.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

U-163: PHP Command Parameter Bug Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: PHP Command Parameter Bug Lets Remote Users Obtain 3: PHP Command Parameter Bug Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information and Execute Arbitrary Code U-163: PHP Command Parameter Bug Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information and Execute Arbitrary Code May 7, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: PHP Command Parameter Bug Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information and Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: Prior to 5.3.12 and 5.4.2 ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in PHP. A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. A remote user can execute arbitrary code on the target system. reference LINKS: SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027022 CVE-2012-1823 CVE-2012-2311 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: A remote user can submit a specially crafted request containing a command

97

U-053: Linux kexec Bugs Let Local and Remote Users Obtain Potentially  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

53: Linux kexec Bugs Let Local and Remote Users Obtain 53: Linux kexec Bugs Let Local and Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-053: Linux kexec Bugs Let Local and Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information December 7, 2011 - 7:30am Addthis PROBLEM: Linux kexec Bugs Let Local and Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information . PLATFORM: Red Hat Enterprise Linux Desktop (v. 6) Red Hat Enterprise Linux HPC Node (v. 6) Red Hat Enterprise Linux Server (v. 6) Red Hat Enterprise Linux Workstation (v. 6) ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities were reported in Linux kexec. A remote or local user can obtain potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: Red Hat Security Advisory: RHSA-2011:1532-3 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026375 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: Kdump uses the SSH "StrictHostKeyChecking=no" option when dumping to SSH

98

U-017: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain 7: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-017: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information October 24, 2011 - 12:30pm Addthis PROBLEM: HP MFP Digital Sending Software Lets Local Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information . PLATFORM: HP MFP Digital Sending Software v4.91.21 and all previous 4.9x versions ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP MFP Digital Sending Software. A local user can obtain potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: HP Advisory ID: c03052686 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026228 CVE-2011-3163 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A potential security vulnerability has been identified with HP MFP Digital Sending Software running on Windows. The vulnerability could result in

99

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain GAO is making recommendations to the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) to develop a strategy for coordinating control systems security efforts and to enhance information sharing with relevant stakeholders. DHS officials did not agree or disagree with GAO's recommendations, but stated that they would take them under advisement. CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain More Documents & Publications GAO Challenges and Efforts to Secure Control Systems (March 2004)

100

Plant critical concept  

SciTech Connect

The achievement of operation and maintenance (O&M) cost reductions is a prime concern for plant operators. Initiatives by the nuclear industry to address this concern are under way and/or in development. These efforts include plant reliability studies, reliability-centered maintenance, risk ranking and testing philosophies, performance-based testing philosophies, graded quality assurance, and so forth. This paper presents the results of an effort to develop a methodology that integrates and applies the common data and analysis requirements for a number of risk-based and performance-based initiatives. This initial phase of the effort applied the methodology and its results to two initiatives. These were the procurement function and the preventive maintenance function. This effort integrated multiple programs and functions to identify those components that are truly critical from an integrated plant performance perspective. The paper describes the scope of the effort, the development of a methodology to identify plant critical components, and the application of these results to the maintenance rule compliance, preventive maintenance, and procurement functions at the candidate plant.

O`Regan, P.J. [Yankee Atomic Electric Co., Bolton, MA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Infrastructure sectors and the information infrastructure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The protection of Critical Information Infrastructures (CIIs) is usually framed in the larger context of protecting all the Critical Infrastructures (CIs) that a Nation or a group of Nations (as is the case of the European Union) consider as essential ...

Andrea Glorioso; Andrea Servida

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Critical infrastructure security curriculum modules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical infrastructures have succumbed to the demands of greater connectivity. Although the scheme of connecting these critical equipment and devices to cyberspace has brought us tremendous convenience, it also enabled certain unimaginable risks and ... Keywords: SCADA, control systems, course modules, critical infrastructures, cybersecurity, programmable logic controllers, security, vulnerability

Guillermo A. Francia, III

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

The Department of Energy nuclear criticality safety program.  

SciTech Connect

This paper broadly covers key events and activities from which the Department of Energy Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) evolved. The NCSP maintains fundamental infrastructure that supports operational criticality safety programs. This infrastructure includes continued development and maintenance of key calculational tools, differential and integral data measurements, benchmark compilation, development of training resources, hands-on training, and web-based systems to enhance information preservation and dissemination. The NCSP was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 97-2, Criticality Safety, and evolved from a predecessor program, the Nuclear Criticality Predictability Program, that was initiated in response to Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendation 93-2, The Need for Critical Experiment Capability. This paper also discusses the role Dr. Sol Pearlstein played in helping the Department of Energy lay the foundation for a robust and enduring criticality safety infrastructure.

Felty, J. R. (James R.)

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Methods for obtaining an operating point sufficiently small signal stable in power systems including wind parks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper shows a simple approach to obtain an operating point sufficiently small signal stable. In the case of a stable operating point with a poorly damped oscillatory mode, the objective is to increase the damping of that mode. That is, the power ... Keywords: critical mode, damping, eigenvalues, inter-area oscillations, linearization, wind power converter

P. Ledesma; C. Gallardo

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Critical CRBR core pressure  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The conditions are detailed under which gas pressure will cause or initiate failure in the structural containment of the fuel core. The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant is the prototype structure. Two general classes of problems have been studied, representing two entirely distinct configurations of containment failure. The first model determines the minimum pressure to lift a portion or the entire core from its containment. The second model estimates the critical pressure above which the fuel rods interior to the hexagonal fuel can warp, leading to blockage of the gas passages. Such blockage might cause further buildup of the gas pressure to a level causing the failure of the fuel rod containment in the hexagonal fuel container.

Ju, F.D.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Information sharing and security in dynamic coalitions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Today, information sharing is critical to almost every institution. There is no more critical need for information sharing than during an international crisis, when international coalitions dynamically form. In the event of a crisis, whether it is humanitarian ... Keywords: access control, distributed systems, dynamic coalitions, information security

Charles E. Phillips, Jr.; T.C. Ting; Steven A. Demurjian

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

42: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, 42: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks April 6, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks PLATFORM: HP Onboard Administrator (OA) up to and including v3.32 ABSTRACT: A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: HP Support Document ID: c03263573 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026889 CVE-2012-0128, CVE-2012-0129, CVE-2012-0130 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in HP Onboard Administrator. A remote

108

U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, 2: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks U-142: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks April 6, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP Onboard Administrator Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access, Obtain Information, and Conduct URL Redirection Attacks PLATFORM: HP Onboard Administrator (OA) up to and including v3.32 ABSTRACT: A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: HP Support Document ID: c03263573 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026889 CVE-2012-0128, CVE-2012-0129, CVE-2012-0130 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: Several vulnerabilities were reported in HP Onboard Administrator. A remote

109

Criticality Safety Basics for INL FMHs and CSOs  

SciTech Connect

Nuclear power is a valuable and efficient energy alternative in our energy-intensive society. However, material that can generate nuclear power has properties that require this material be handled with caution. If improperly handled, a criticality accident could result, which could severely harm workers. This document is a modular self-study guide about Criticality Safety Principles. This guide's purpose it to help you work safely in areas where fissionable nuclear materials may be present, avoiding the severe radiological and programmatic impacts of a criticality accident. It is designed to stress the fundamental physical concepts behind criticality controls and the importance of criticality safety when handling fissionable materials outside nuclear reactors. This study guide was developed for fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates to use with related web-based course 00INL189, BEA Criticality Safety Principles, and to help prepare for the course exams. These individuals must understand basic information presented here. This guide may also be useful to other Idaho National Laboratory personnel who must know criticality safety basics to perform their assignments safely or to design critically safe equipment or operations. This guide also includes additional information that will not be included in 00INL189 tests. The additional information is in appendices and paragraphs with headings that begin with 'Did you know,' or with, 'Been there Done that'. Fissionable-material-handler and criticality-safety-officer candidates may review additional information at their own discretion. This guide is revised as needed to reflect program changes, user requests, and better information. Issued in 2006, Revision 0 established the basic text and integrated various programs from former contractors. Revision 1 incorporates operation and program changes implemented since 2006. It also incorporates suggestions, clarifications, and additional information from readers and from personnel who took course 00INL189. Revision 1 also completely reorganized the training to better emphasize physical concepts behind the criticality controls that fissionable material handlers and criticality safety officers must understand. The reorganization is based on and consistent with changes made to course 00INL189 due to a review of course exam results and to discussions with personnel who conduct area-specific training.

V. L. Putman

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Critical review of mercury chemistry in flue gas.  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) and its compounds have long been recognized as potentially hazardous to human health and the environment. Many man-made sources of mercury have been reduced in recent years through process changes and control measures. However, emissions of mercury from coal-fired power plants, while exceedingly dilute by the usual pollution standards, still constitute a major source when considered in the aggregate. Concerns over those emissions and the prospect of impending emissions regulations have led to a wide range of research projects dealing with the measurement and control of mercury in flue gas. This work has made considerable progress in improving the understanding of mercury emissions and their behavior, but inconsistencies and unexpected results have also shown that a better understanding of mercury chemistry is needed. To develop a more complete understanding of where additional research on mercury chemistry is needed, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) asked Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to conduct a critical review of the available information as reported in the technical literature. The objectives were to summarize the current state of the art of chemistry knowledge, identify significant knowledge gaps, and recommend future research to resolve those gaps. An initial evaluation of potential review topics indicated that the scope of the review would need to be limited and focused on the most important topics relative to mercury control. To aid in this process, Argonne developed a brief survey that was circulated to researchers in the field who could help identify and prioritize the many aspects of the problem. The results of the survey were then used to design and guide a highly focused literature search that identified key papers for analysis. Each paper was reviewed, summarized, and evaluated for the relevance and quality of the information presented. The results of that work provided the basis for conclusions regarding the state of knowledge of mercury chemistry and recommendations for further research. This report begins by summarizing the survey process and describing how the results were used to shape the critical review. Analyses of information obtained from the various publications are presented chronologically, beginning with the earliest relevant publication found and concluding with the end of the review in early 2003. Finally, the conclusions and recommendations for future research are presented. The survey instrument is included in Appendix A, while detailed information on each of the publications reviewed is given in Appendix B.

Mendelsohn, M. H.; Livengood, C. D.

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

111

Web-based nuclear criticality safety bibliographic database  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has prepared a Nuclear Criticality Safety Bibliographic Database that is now available via the Internet. This database is a component of the U.S. DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) Web site. This WWW resource was developed as part of the DOE response to the DNFSB Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. To the extent possible, the hyperlinks on the Web pages direct the user to original source of the reference material in order to ensure accuracy and access to the latest versions. A master index is in place for simple navigation through the site. A search capability is available to assist in locating the on-line reference materials. Among the features included are: A user-friendly site map for ease of use; A personnel registry; Links to all major laboratories and organizations involved in the many aspects of criticality safety; General help for new criticality safety practitioners, including basic technical references and training modules; A discussion of computational methods; An interactive question and answer forum for the criticality safety community; and Collections of bibliographic references mdvahdation experiments. This paper will focus on the bibliographic database. This database evolved from earlier work done by the DOE's Nuclear Criticality Information System (NCIS) maintained at LLNL during the 1980s. The bibliographic database at the time of the termination of NCIS were composed principally of three parts: (1) A critical experiment bibliography of 1067 citations (reported in UCRL-52769); (2) A compilation of criticality safety papers from Volumes 1 through 41 of the Transactions of the American Nuclear Society (reported in UCRL-53369); and (3) A general criticality bibliography of several thousand citations (unpublished). When the NCIS project was terminated the database was nearly lost but, fortunately, several years later most of the data were restored from backup tapes that had been archived by LLNL's ICNC conferences and American Nuclear Society publications, Nuclear Science and Engineering and Nuclear Technology. Since the Rocky Flats facility is heading for closure maintenance of the database was again threatened. This has now been avoided since LLNL was selected in 1999 to fulfill part of the ''Information Preservation and Dissemination'' task of the DOE's Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Five-Year Plan. This effort will ''collect, preserve and make readily available criticality safety information'' and make the information available via the Internet.

Koponen, B L; Huang, S T

2000-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

112

System Demonstration: Interactive GIS-based interface for time-critical application  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many time-critical applications, such as emergency evacuation, demand decision-makers to make prompt decisions under time pressure. Therefore, it is essential to design an intuitive and interactive user interface to present critical information to users ... Keywords: GIS-based, UI, time-critical

Wenjuan Fan; Anhong Ling; Xiang Li; Gang Liu; Jian Zhan; Lian Li; Yongzhong Sha

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

V-136: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2013 | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

6: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2013 6: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2013 V-136: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2013 April 17, 2013 - 1:46am Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory - April 2013 PLATFORM: Oracle All Applicable Version(s) ABSTRACT: Several vulnerabilities addressed in this Critical Patch Update affect multiple products REFERENCE LINKS: Oracle Critical Patch Update Advisory IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A Critical Patch Update (CPU) is a collection of patches for multiple security vulnerabilities. Critical Patch Update patches are usually cumulative, but each advisory describes only the security fixes added since the previous Critical Patch Update advisory. Thus, prior Critical Patch Update advisories should be reviewed for information regarding earlier

114

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other...

115

FAQS Reference Guide Criticality Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide addresses the competency statements in the April 2009 edition of DOE-STD-1173-2009, Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

116

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure ur critical infrastructure--  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Asset Management of Critical Infrastructure O ur critical infrastructure-- roads, bridges, transit-of-the-art approach to asset management of public infrastructure. ORNL's Capabilities · Simulation-based, optimization. · Innovative optimization tools to assess tradeoffs between construction, maintenance, and demolition over

117

U-240: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users 0: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information U-240: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information August 21, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Apple Remote Desktop Encryption Failure Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information PLATFORM: Apple Remote Desktop after 3.5.1 and prior to 3.6.1 ABSTRACT: A remote user can monitor potentially sensitive information. reference LINKS: Apple.com Apple Article: HT5433 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027420 CVE-2012-0681 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in Apple Remote Desktop. When a user connects to a third-party VNC server with the 'Encrypt all network data' setting enabled, network data is not encrypted. A remote user monitoring the

118

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II February 2006 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a February 2006 Commencement of Operations assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II More Documents & Publications CRAD, Emergency Management - Idaho Accelerated Retrieval Project Phase II

119

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility January 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for a January 2005 assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Y-12 - Enriched Uranium Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, DOE Oversight - Y-12 Enriched Uranium Operations Oxide Conversion

120

CRAD, Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility CRAD, Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility June 2005 A section of Appendix C to DOE G 226.1-2 "Federal Line Management Oversight of Department of Energy Nuclear Facilities." Consists of Criteria Review and Approach Documents (CRADs) used for an assessment of the Criticality Safety program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory, TA 55 SST Facility. CRADs provide a recommended approach and the types of information to gather to assess elements of a DOE contractor's programs. CRAD, Criticality Safety - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST Facility More Documents & Publications CRAD, Configuration Management - Los Alamos National Laboratory TA 55 SST

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Criticality and safeguards at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant  

SciTech Connect

Reprocessing of high enriched irradiated reactor fuel at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) presents significant potential problems to the Criticality Safety (CS) and Safeguards and Security (S and S) Sections. Two major interactions between these sections occurs when irradiated fuel is stored and fuel is dissolved. S and S is assigned the responsibility of maintaining a centralized records and reporting system which provides detailed, timely knowledge of the location, quantity and measurement uncertainties associated with accountable nuclear material, including uranium and plutonium. The Criticality Safety Section uses this information in providing criticality safety evaluations with support analyses, inspection, field surveillance and audits to ensure criticality safety implementation. The interactions of these sections has minimized operational constraints and maximized criticality safeguards controls.

Kodman, G.P.; Wilson, R.E.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Review of Yucca Mountain Disposal Criticality Studies  

SciTech Connect

The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management, submitted a license application for construction authorization of a deep geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, in June of 2008. The license application is currently under review by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. However,on March 3, 2010 the DOE filed a motion requesting withdrawal of the license application. With the withdrawal request and the development of the Blue Ribbon Commission to seek alternative strategies for disposing of spent fuel, the status of the proposed repository at Yucca Mountain is uncertain. What is certain is that spent nuclear fuel (SNF) will continue to be generated and some long-lived components of the SNF will eventually need a disposition path(s). Strategies for the back end of the fuel cycle will continue to be developed and need to include the insights from the experience gained during the development of the Yucca Mountain license application. Detailed studies were performed and considerable progress was made in many key areas in terms of increased understanding of relevant phenomena and issues regarding geologic disposal of SNF. This paper reviews selected technical studies performed in support of the disposal criticality analysis licensing basis and the use of burnup credit. Topics include assembly misload analysis, isotopic and criticality validation, commercial reactor critical analyses, loading curves, alternative waste package and criticality control studies, radial burnup data and effects, and implementation of a conservative application model in the criticality probabilistic evaluation as well as other information that is applicable to operations regarding spent fuel outside the reactor. This paper summarizes the work and significant accomplishments in these areas and provides a resource for future, related activities.

Scaglione, John M [ORNL; Wagner, John C [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, Lawrence J; Taylor, Joseph Todd

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Preliminary Criticality Safety Evaluation for In Situ Grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area  

SciTech Connect

A preliminary criticality safety evaluation is presented for in situ grouting in the Subsurface Disposal Area (SDA) at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. The grouting materials evaluated are cement and paraffin. The evaluation determines physical and administrative controls necessary to preclude criticality and identifies additional information required for a final criticality safety evaluation. The evaluation shows that there are no criticality concerns with cementitious grout but a neutron poison such as boron would be required for the use of the paraffin matrix.

Slate, L.J.; Taylor, J.T.

2000-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

125

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized...

126

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure...

127

Use of a Web Site to Enhance Criticality Safety Training  

SciTech Connect

Currently, a website dedicated to enhancing communication and dissemination of criticality safety information is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). This website was developed as part of the DOE response to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB) Recommendation 97-2, which reflected the need to make criticality safety information available to a wide audience. The website is the focal point for DOE nuclear criticality safety (NCS) activities, resources and references, including hyperlinks to other sites actively involved in the collection and dissemination of criticality safety information. The website is maintained by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under auspices of the NCSP management. One area of the website contains a series of Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training (NCSET) modules. During the past few years, many users worldwide have accessed the NCSET section of the NCSP website and have downloaded the training modules as an aid for their training programs. This trend was remarkable in that it points out a continuing need of the criticality safety community across the globe. It has long been recognized that training of criticality safety professionals is a continuing process involving both knowledge-based training and experience-based operations floor training. As more of the experienced criticality safety professionals reach retirement age, the opportunities for mentoring programs are reduced. It is essential that some method be provided to assist the training of young criticality safety professionals to replenish this limited human expert resource to support on-going and future nuclear operations. The main objective of this paper is to present the features of the NCSP website, including its mission, contents, and most importantly its use for the dissemination of training modules to the criticality safety community. We will discuss lessons learned and several ideas for future development in the area of web-based training for criticality safety professionals. Our effort is intended to stimulate a discussion of ideas and solicit participation in the development of the next generation of a web-based criticality training site that can be used to assist the training of newcomers to this important safety discipline.

Huang, S T; Morman, J

2003-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

128

Computational methods for criticality safety analysis within the scale system  

SciTech Connect

The criticality safety analysis capabilities within the SCALE system are centered around the Monte Carlo codes KENO IV and KENO V.a, which are both included in SCALE as functional modules. The XSDRNPM-S module is also an important tool within SCALE for obtaining multiplication factors for one-dimensional system models. This paper reviews the features and modeling capabilities of these codes along with their implementation within the Criticality Safety Analysis Sequences (CSAS) of SCALE. The CSAS modules provide automated cross-section processing and user-friendly input that allow criticality safety analyses to be done in an efficient and accurate manner. 14 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Parks, C.V.; Petrie, L.M.; Landers, N.F.; Bucholz, J.A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

An Improved Non-Conventional Method for Obtaining Nuclear Pure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aug 1, 2000 ... Uranium oxide (U3O8) is obtained from this precipitate by calcination for ... The latter is reduced by stannous chloride to obtain uranium trioxide...

130

MCNP{sup TM} criticality primer and training experiences  

SciTech Connect

With the closure of many experimental facilities, the nuclear criticality safety analyst is increasingly required to rely on computer calculations to identify safe limits for the handling and storage of fissile materials. However, the analyst may have little experience with the specific codes available at his or her facility. Usually, the codes are quite complex, black boxes capable of analyzing numerous problems with a myriad of input options. Documentation for these codes is designed to cover all the possible configurations and types of analyses but does not give much detail on any particular type of analysis. For criticality calculations, the user of a code is primarily interested in the value of the effective multiplication factor for a system (k{sub eff}). Most codes will provide this, and truckloads of other information that may be less pertinent to criticality calculations. Based on discussions with code users in the nuclear criticality safety community, it was decided that a simple document discussing the ins and outs of criticality calculations with specific codes would be quite useful. The Transport Methods Group, XTM, at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) decided to develop a primer for criticality calculations with their Monte Carlo code, MCNP. This was a joint task between LANL with a knowledge and understanding of the nuances and capabilities of MCNP and the University of New Mexico with a knowledge and understanding of nuclear criticality safety calculations and educating first time users of neutronics calculations. The initial problem was that the MCNP manual just contained too much information. Almost everything one needs to know about MCNP can be found in the manual; the problem is that there is more information than a user requires to do a simple k{sub eff} calculation. The basic concept of the primer was to distill the manual to create a document whose only focus was criticality calculations using MCNP.

Briesmeister, J.; Forster, R.A. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Busch, R. [New Mexico Univ., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Critical Materials Research Alliance  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOVEMBER 2012 NOVEMBER 2012 The Critical Materials Research Alliance About the Critical Materials Research Alliance The recent surge of interest in critical materials, including rare earth elements (REEs), stems from supply shortages and escalating prices of some REEs. In 2010, the United States' sole REE supplier was China-previously responsible for 97% of global REE production-but the Chinese government curtailed their export. Because REEs and other critical elements are used in renewable energy resources, energy storage, energy efficiency technologies, and national defense, a shortage in their supply impedes development of energy technologies and hinders U.S. defense industries. To address the challenges faced in revitalizing the rare earth industry, the National Energy Technology

132

Approach to criticality in sandpiles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A popular theory of self-organized criticality predicts that the stationary density of the Abelian sandpile model equals the threshold density of the corresponding fixed-energy sandpile. We recently announced that this ...

Levine, Lionel

133

A Critical Point for Science?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, taboo ideas become arespectable part of science? Occult Sciences Tripos? CU Institute of Astrology? Telepathy, memory of water, cold fusion?Scientific theology, intelligent design? Mar. 5, 2008/CUPS A Critical Point for Science / Brian Josephson 32...

Josephson, B D

2008-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

134

Lecture notes for criticality safety  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

These lecture notes for criticality safety are prepared for the training of Department of Energy supervisory, project management, and administrative staff. Technical training and basic mathematics are assumed. The notes are designed for a two-day course, taught by two lecturers. Video tapes may be used at the options of the instructors. The notes provide all the materials that are necessary but outside reading will assist in the fullest understanding. The course begins with a nuclear physics overview. The reader is led from the macroscopic world into the microscopic world of atoms and the elementary particles that constitute atoms. The particles, their masses and sizes and properties associated with radioactive decay and fission are introduced along with Einstein's mass-energy equivalence. Radioactive decay, nuclear reactions, radiation penetration, shielding and health-effects are discussed to understand protection in case of a criticality accident. Fission, the fission products, particles and energy released are presented to appreciate the dangers of criticality. Nuclear cross sections are introduced to understand the effectiveness of slow neutrons to produce fission. Chain reactors are presented as an economy; effective use of the neutrons from fission leads to more fission resulting in a power reactor or a criticality excursion. The six-factor formula is presented for managing the neutron budget. This leads to concepts of material and geometric buckling which are used in simple calculations to assure safety from criticality. Experimental measurements and computer code calculations of criticality are discussed. To emphasize the reality, historical criticality accidents are presented in a table with major ones discussed to provide lessons-learned. Finally, standards, NRC guides and regulations, and DOE orders relating to criticality protection are presented.

Fullwood, R.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users 2: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-202: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager Bugs Let Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information July 25, 2013 - 2:52am Addthis PROBLEM: A remote user can obtain potentially sensitive information and modify some configuration settings. A remote user can exploit this to create, modify, and remove camera feeds, archives, logs, and users. PLATFORM: Cisco Video Surveillance Manager 7.1, 7.5 ABSTRACT: Two vulnerabilities were reported in Cisco Video Surveillance Manager REFERENCE LINKS: Security Tracker Alert ID: 1028827 CVE-2013-3429 CVE-2013-3430 CVE-2013-3431 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The vulnerability is due to an access control error that occurred. The

136

V-063: Adobe ColdFusion Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access and Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3: Adobe ColdFusion Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access and 3: Adobe ColdFusion Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access and Obtain Information V-063: Adobe ColdFusion Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access and Obtain Information January 7, 2013 - 1:00am Addthis PROBLEM: Adobe ColdFusion Bugs Let Remote Users Gain Access and Obtain Information PLATFORM: ColdFusion 10, 9.0.2, 9.0.1 and 9.0 for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX ABSTRACT: Adobe has identified three vulnerabilities affecting ColdFusion for Windows, Macintosh and UNIX REFERENCE LINKS: Adobe Security Bulletin APSA13-01 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027938 CVE-2013-0625 CVE-2013-0629 CVE-2013-0631 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High DISCUSSION: A remote user can bypass authentication and take control of the target system [CVE-2013-0625]. Systems with password protection disabled or with no password set are affected.

137

Rethinking regulations for disposal criticality  

SciTech Connect

This paper provides the basis for the position that the current U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) criticality regulation is in need of revision to address problems in implementing it for the postclosure period in a geologic high-level waste repository. The authors believe that the applicant for such a facility should be able to demonstrate that postulated postclosure criticality events will not cause unacceptable risk of deleterious effects on public health and safety. In addition, the applicant should be expected to take practical and feasible measures to reduce the probability of a criticality occurring, even if (as expected) the consequences of such a criticality for repository performance and public health and safety would be negligible. This approach, while recognizing the probabilistic nature of analyses of events and conditions in the distant future, is also arguably consistent with the defense in depth concept that has been successfully applied to nuclear reactor regulation. The authors believe regulations for postclosure criticality control should support this dual approach, rather than require a deterministic prohibition of criticality as does the current rule. The existing rule seems appropriate for the preclosure period, as long as it is clearly specified to apply only to that period.

Scott, M. [Duke Engineering and Services, Inc., Las Vegas, NV (United States); Doering, T. [Framatome Cogema Fuels, Las Vegas, NV (United States)

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Slide Rule for Rapid Response Estimation of Radiological Dose from Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes a functional slide rule that provides a readily usable ?in-hand? method for estimating nuclear criticality accident information from sliding graphs, thereby permitting (1) the rapid estimation of pertinent criticality accident information without laborious or sophisticated calculations in a nuclear criticality emergency situation, (2) the appraisal of potential fission yields and external personnel radiation exposures for facility safety analyses, and (3) a technical basis for emergency preparedness and training programs at nonreactor nuclear facilities. The slide rule permits the estimation of neutron and gamma dose rates and integrated doses based upon estimated fission yields, distance from the fission source, and time-after criticality accidents for five different critical systems. Another sliding graph permits the estimation of critical solution fission yields based upon fissile material concentration, critical vessel geometry, and solution addition rate. Another graph provides neutron and gamma dose-reduction factors for water, steel, and concrete shields.

Broadhead, B.L.; Childs, R.L.; Hopper, C.M.; Parks, C.V.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

139

Inform Editors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inform editorial board Inform Editors inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass business chemistry cottonseed date detergents fats filing first history inform inform Magazine international inventor law magazine member members monthly news oil oils

140

Subscription Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inform subscription rates. Subscription Information inform Magazine algae algal AOCS biomass business chemistry cottonseed date detergents fats filing first history inform inform Magazine international inventor law magazine member members monthly

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Information Collection Management | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Collection Management Information Collection Management The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires each Federal agency to seek and obtain approval from the...

142

SURVEY YEAR 2010 - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Department of Energy (DOE) seeks, ... may obtain this information in response to an order. The information may be used for any nonstatistical purposes

143

The Information Needed to Evaluate the Worth of Uncertain Information, Predictions and Forecasts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To evaluate the worth of uncertain information one must obtain three types of evaluative information: 1) statistical measures of the uncertainty of the information and of its likely occurrence; 2) the decision rule (how the information is used) ...

Donald R. Davis; Soronadi Nnaji

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Critical Gravity in Four Dimensions  

SciTech Connect

We study four-dimensional gravity theories that are rendered renormalizable by the inclusion of curvature-squared terms to the usual Einstein action with a cosmological constant. By choosing the parameters appropriately, the massive scalar mode can be eliminated and the massive spin-2 mode can become massless. This ''critical'' theory may be viewed as a four-dimensional analogue of chiral topologically massive gravity, or of critical 'new massive gravity' with a cosmological constant, in three dimensions. We find that the on-shell energy for the remaining massless gravitons vanishes. There are also logarithmic spin-2 modes, which have positive energy. The mass and entropy of standard Schwarzschild-type black holes vanish. The critical theory might provide a consistent toy model for quantum gravity in four dimensions.

Lue, H. [China Economics and Management Academy, Central University of Finance and Economics, Beijing 100081 (China); Institute for Advanced Study, Shenzhen University, Nanhai Avenue 3688, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Pope, C. N. [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A and M University, College Station, Texas 77843 (United States); DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Cambridge University, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 OWA (United Kingdom)

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

145

Nuclear data for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

A brief overview is presented on emerging requirements for new criticality safety analyses arising from applications involving nuclear waste management, facility remediation, and the storage of nuclear weapons components. A derivation of criticality analyses from the specifications of national consensus standards is given. These analyses, both static and dynamic, define the needs for nuclear data. Integral data, used primarily for analytical validation, and differential data, used in performing the analyses, are listed, along with desirable margins of uncertainty. Examples are given of needs for additional data to address systems having intermediate neutron energy spectra and/or containing nuclides of intermediate mass number.

Westfall, R.M.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. All personnel who are to perform nuclear criticality safety technical work are required to participate in the program. The program includes both general nuclear criticality safety and plant specific knowledge components. Advantage can be taken of previous experience for that knowledge which is portable such as performance of computer calculations. Candidates step through a structured process which exposes them to basic background information, general plant information, and plant specific information which they need to safely and competently perform their jobs. Extensive documentation is generated to demonstrate that candidates have met the standards established for qualification.

Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

1997-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

147

Nuclear Criticality Safety | More Science | ORNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety SHARE Criticality Safety Nuclear Criticality Safety ORNL is the lead national laboratory responsible for supporting the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) in managing the US Nuclear Criticality Safety Program. NCSP is chartered to maintain the technical infrastructure (integral experiments, computational tools, training, data, etc.) needed to support safe, efficient fissionable material operations. ORNL has extensive expertise in the area of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) based upon years of experience in the following areas: Operations Support: providing fissionable material operations support for enrichment, fabrication, production, and research; Critical Experiments: performing experiments at the Y-12 Critical Experiment Facility;

148

CRITICALITY SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Criticality Safety Qualification Standard Reference Guide APRIL 2011 This page is intentionally blank. Table of Contents i FIGURES ...................................................................................................................................... iii PURPOSE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 SCOPE ........................................................................................................................................... 1 PREFACE ...................................................................................................................................... 1 ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ......................................................................................................... 2

149

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure Control Systems Are Under Way, but Challenges Remain CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE PROTECTION Multiple Efforts to Secure...

150

Nuclear criticality safety: 2-day training course  

SciTech Connect

This compilation of notes is presented as a source reference for the criticality safety course. At the completion of this training course, the attendee will: be able to define terms commonly used in nuclear criticality safety; be able to appreciate the fundamentals of nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify factors which affect nuclear criticality safety; be able to identify examples of criticality controls as used as Los Alamos; be able to identify examples of circumstances present during criticality accidents; have participated in conducting two critical experiments; be asked to complete a critique of the nuclear criticality safety training course.

Schlesser, J.A. [ed.] [comp.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Inform App  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Access INFORM anytime with our free app available on iPad, iPhone, Android and Kindle. Inform App Inform App

152

Evaluation of the 17 June 1997 Criticality Accident at Arzamas-16  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On June 17, 1997, a critically accident occurred at Arzamas-16, which resulted in the death (within three days) of A. N. Zakharov, a Russian scientist with 20 years' experience conducting multiassembly experiments. In this case, the multiplying assembly was a fast metal system consisting of a {sup 235}U (90% enriched) core and a copper reflector. According to the Russian press, ''Zakharov misjudged the degree of criticality of the breeding system and committed several gross violations of regulations.'' As we see it, there were three major causes of this accident. First, the experiment was flawed by Zakharov's misreading of the appropriate size of the assembly, which he took from a notebook that described the old experiment he was attempting to repeat. Second, he disregarded the appropriate procedures and safety regulations. Third, these two mistakes were compounded by an improperly set audible alarm system and Zakharov's unsafe use of the table. We also discuss our reconstruction of the accident based on information given by the Russians to US scientists and information culled from Russian newspaper and magazine articles. We also describe our thoughts on the behavior of the assembly following the accident and the radiation dose level Zakharov may have received. These levels match values we have lately obtained from translations of Russian news articles. This accident clearly points out the penalty for weak administrative control of work with multiplying systems. Criticality experimentation requires formality of operation. The experimenter, his peers, and a trained safety person need to document that they understand the experiment and how it will be conducted. Knowing that the experiment was successfully run several decades ago does not justify bypassing a safety evaluation.

Morris Klein

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, Massachusetts, U.S.A. Prepared by Alexander Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge,...

154

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hole Oceanographic Institution Woods Hole, Massachusetts Prepared by Alexander Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge,...

155

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

**Scripps Institution of Oceanography La Jolla, California Prepared by Alexander Kozyr*** Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge,...

156

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained During...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Marine Environmental Laboratory National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Seattle, Washington, U.S.A. Prepared by Alexander Kozyr1 Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis...

157

Browse wiki | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the historyevolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether...

158

A Critical History of Renormalization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The history of renormalization is reviewed with a critical eye, starting with Lorentz's theory of radiation damping, through perturbative QED with Dyson, Gell-Mann & Low, and others, to Wilson's formulation and Polchinski's functional equation, and applications to "triviality", and dark energy in cosmology.

Huang, Kerson

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Asset Management of Critical.pub  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transportation Analysis Transportation Analysis 2360 Cherahala Boulevard Knoxville, TN 37932 For more information please contact: Diane Davidson (865) 946-1475 davidsond@ornl.gov Research Brief Oak Ridge National Laboratory managed by UT-Battelle, LLC for the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract number DE-AC05-00OR22725 Research Areas Freight Flows Passenger Flows Supply Chain Efficiency Transportation: Energy Environment Safety Security Vehicle Technologies O ur critical infrastructure-roads, bridges, transit, aviation, schools, drinking water, wastewater, dams, solid waste, hazardous waste, navigable waterways, and energy-is in disrepair. The American Society of Civil Engineers gives our public infrastructure a D+ grade, and an investment of at least $1.6 trillion

160

A Review of Criticality Accidents 2000 Revision  

SciTech Connect

Criticality accidents and the characteristics of prompt power excursions are discussed. Sixty accidental power excursions are reviewed. Sufficient detail is provided to enable the reader to understand the physical situation, the chemistry and material flow, and when available the administrative setting leading up to the time of the accident. Information on the power history, energy release, consequences, and causes are also included when available. For those accidents that occurred in process plants, two new sections have been included in this revision. The first is an analysis and summary of the physical and neutronic features of the chain reacting systems. The second is a compilation of observations and lessons learned. Excursions associated with large power reactors are not included in this report.

Thomas P. McLaughlin; Shean P. Monahan; Norman L. Pruvost; Vladimir V. Frolov; Boris G. Ryazanov; Victor I. Sviridov

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

COG - Publicly Available Now to Criticality Safety Practitioners  

SciTech Connect

COG is a modern, general-purpose, high fidelity, multi-particle transport code with a long history of use in criticality safety studies at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. This code was released to the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC) for distribution to the public for the first time in January 2006. This paper provides an overview of the code development history, a description of features and capabilities of interest to the criticality safety practitioner, and our plans in support of the next public RSICC release.

Buck, R M; Cullen, D E; Heinrichs, D P; Lent, E M; Nielsen, Jr, D E; Sale, K E

2006-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

162

Critical success factors in enterprise resource planning systems: Review of the last decade  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Organizations perceive ERP as a vital tool for organizational competition as it integrates dispersed organizational systems and enables flawless transactions and production. This review examines studies investigating Critical Success Factors (CSFs) in ... Keywords: CSFs, Critical success factors, ERP, enterprise resource planning, information systems, literature review

Levi Shaul, Doron Tauber

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Critical success factors for successful implementation of enterprise resource planning systems in manufacturing organisations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the impact of the Critical Success Factors (CSFs) on the successful implementation of Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems in Malaysian manufacturing organisations. The ERP system is an integrated package of ... Keywords: ERP implementation, Malaysia, business information systems, critical success factors, enterprise resource planning, implementation success, manufacturing organisations, moderating effect, organisational resistance, pre-determined goals, resistance to change, user satisfaction

T. Ramayah; Matthew H. Roy; Sawaridass Arokiasamy; Imad Zbib; Zafar U. Ahmed

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

T-535: Oracle Critical Patch Update - January 2011 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

T-535: Oracle Critical Patch Update - January 2011 T-535: Oracle Critical Patch Update - January 2011 T-535: Oracle Critical Patch Update - January 2011 January 14, 2011 - 9:39pm Addthis PROBLEM: Oracle Critical Patch Update - January 2011 PLATFORM: Oracle Database 11g Release 2, Oracle Database 11g Release 1, Oracle Database 10g Release 2, versions 10.2.0.3, 10.2.0.4, 10.2.0.5, Sun Oracle Database 10g Release 1, version 10.1.0.5 and other Oracle product suites. Please use the available URL for more details: Critical Patch Updates and Security Alerts ABSTRACT: This Critical Patch Update Pre-Release Announcement provides advance information about the Oracle Critical Patch Update for January 2011, which will be released on Tuesday, January 18, 2011. While this Pre-Release Announcement is as accurate as possible at the time of publication, the

165

Critical Operating Constraint Forecasting (COCF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document represents the progress report and Task 1 letter report of the California Institute for Energy and Environment (CIEE) contract funded by the California Energy Commission (CEC), Critical Operating Constraint Forecasting (COCF) for California Independent System Operator (CAISO) Planning Phase. Task 1 was to accomplish the following items: Collect data from CAISO to set up the WECC power flow base case representing the CAISO system in the summer of 2006 Run TRACE for maximizing California Impo...

2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

166

High Critical Current Coated Conductors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the important critical needs that came out of the DOEs coated conductor workshop was to develop a high throughput and economic deposition process for YBCO. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, the most critical steps in high technical micro fabrications, has been widely employed in semiconductor industry for various thin film growth. SuperPower has demonstrated that (Y,Gd)BCO films can be deposited rapid with world record performance. In addition to high critical current density with increased film thickness, flux pinning properties of REBCO films needs to be improved to meet the DOE requirements for various electric-power equipments. We have shown that doping with Zr can result in BZO nanocolumns, but at substantially reduced deposition rate. The primary purpose of this subtask is to develop high current density MOCVD-REBCO coated conductors based on the ion-beam assisted (IBAD)-MgO deposition process. Another purpose of this subtask is to investigate HTS conductor design optimization (maximize Je) with emphasis on stability and protection issues, and ac loss for REBCO coated conductors.

Paranthaman, M. P.; Selvamanickam, V. (SuperPower, Inc.)

2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

167

Networks, deregulation, and risk : the politics of critical infrastructure protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Standards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RMStandards for Critical Infrastructure Protection. Docket RM2- 13; GAO. ?Critical Infrastructure Protection: Multiple

Ellis, Ryan Nelson

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

DOE Information Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Information Center DOE Information Center The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Center provides citizens a consolidated facility to obtain information and records related to the DOE's various programs in Oak Ridge and abroad. Employees at the DOE Information Center are available to assist with your requests and searches from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. (EST), Monday through Friday, except for federal holidays. Requests Documents can be requested in person or by telephone, email, or fax. Reproduction Please allow DOE Information Center staff adequate time to reproduce documents. Some material requires special handling, security reviews, etc. Delivery Unless special arrangements have been made with DOE Information Center staff, documents should be picked up during normal business hours.

169

Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) - Obtaining Entry...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CNMS user project. Countries that are State Sponsors of Terrorism click to view Cuba Iran Sudan Syria (defined by the U.S. Department of State) Important Information for Users...

170

About EIA - Policies - U.S. Energy Information ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

... the keywords used in search engines to find information products ... enter E to the left of ... All terms and concepts critical to understanding ...

171

DOE O 471.6 Admin Chg. 1, Information Security  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The protection and control of classified information is critical to our nation??s security. This Order establishes requirements and responsibilities for ...

2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

Contractor Past Performance Information  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

December 2009) December 2009) 1 Contractor Performance Information Guiding Principles The primary purpose of past performance evaluations is to ensure that accurate data on contractor performance is current and available for use in source selections. A past performance evaluation report provides a record of a contractor's performance, both positive and negative, on a given contract during a specified period of time. The quality of the narrative component supporting the past performance information evaluation is critical. If the evaluator takes the time to prepare an accurate and complete report, the evaluator helps ensure better quality in the products and services DOE buys now and those DOE plans to buy in the future.

173

Generative mechanisms for innovation in information infrastructures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper investigates innovation in information infrastructures. The research question is, how can an information infrastructure provide generative mechanisms for innovation of ICT-based services? Building on a critical realist approach, the empirical ... Keywords: Case study, Generative mechanism, Information infrastructure, Innovation

Bendik Bygstad

2010-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Foundations and Trends R Information Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Foundations and Trends R in Information Retrieval Vol. 2, No. 3 (2008) 137­213 c 2008 C. Zhai DOI: 10.1561/1500000008 Statistical Language Models for Information Retrieval A Critical Review Cheng@cs.uiuc.edu Abstract Statistical language models have recently been successfully applied to many information retrieval

Zhai, ChengXiang

175

Some Observations on the Semantics of Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The term Information is widely used in the rhetoric of the Information Society, a rhetoric which some critics have judged to be empty, at least in part because of the overextension and inconsistent use of this word. We review the emergence ... Keywords: information society, knowledge, measurement, methodology, semiotics

Julian Newman

2001-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Western Wind Strategy: Addressing Critical Issues for Wind Deployment  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of the Western Wind Strategy project was to help remove critical barriers to wind development in the Western Interconnection. The four stated objectives of this project were to: (1) identify the barriers, particularly barriers to the operational integration of renewables and barriers identified by load-serving entities (LSEs) that will be buying wind generation, (2) communicate the barriers to state officials, (3) create a collaborative process to address those barriers with the Western states, utilities and the renewable industry, and (4) provide a role model for other regions. The project has been on the forefront of identifying and informing state policy makers and utility regulators of critical issues related to wind energy and the integration of variable generation. The project has been a critical component in the efforts of states to push forward important reforms and innovations that will enable states to meet their renewable energy goals and lower the cost to consumers of integrating variable generation.

Douglas Larson; Thomas Carr

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

177

Wood-Polymer composites obtained by gamma irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this work we impregnate three Peruvian woods (Calycophy spruceanum Be, Aniba amazonica Meiz and Hura crepitans L) with styrene-polyester resin and methyl methacrylate. The polymerization of the system was promoted by gamma radiation and the experimental optimal condition was obtained with styrene-polyester 1:1 and 15 kGy. The obtained composites show reduced water absorption and better mechanical properties compared to the original wood. The structure of the wood-polymer composites was studied by light microscopy. Water absorption and hardness were also obtained.

Gago, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470 Lima 41 (Peru); Lopez, A.; Rodriguez, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470 Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingenieria, Av. Tupac Amaru 210, Lima 25 (Peru); Santiago, J. [Instituto Peruano de Energia Nuclear, Av. Canada 1470 Lima 41 (Peru); Facultad de Quimica e Ing. Quimica, Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Lima 1 (Peru); Acevedo, M. [Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Universidad Nacional Agraria la Molina, Lima 12 (Peru)

2007-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

178

A theoretical framework on proactive information exchange in agent teamwork  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proactive information delivery is critical to achieving effective teamwork. However, existing theories do not adequately address proactive information delivery. This paper presents a formal framework for proactive information delivery in agent teamwork. ... Keywords: Agent teamwork, Communicative acts, Information needs, Proactive information delivery, Shared mental model

Xiaocong Fan; John Yen; Richard A. Volz

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

A theoretical framework on proactive information exchange in agent teamwork  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proactive information delivery is critical to achieving effective teamwork. However, existing theories do not adequately address proactive information delivery. This paper presents a formal framework for proactive information delivery in agent teamwork. ... Keywords: agent teamwork, communicative acts, information needs, proactive information delivery, shared mental model

Xiaocong Fan; John Yen; Richard A. Volz

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Definition: Field Sampling | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Field Sampling Field Sampling Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Field Sampling Systematic field sampling is critical for reliable characterize a geothermal resource. Some of the physical and chemical properties of rock samples can be estimated by visual inspection, but accurate determination of these properties requires detailed laboratory analysis. Surface or subsurface fluid sampling is also routinely performed to characterize the chemical, thermal, or hydrological properties of a hydrothermal system. Combinations of these sampling techniques have traditionally been used to obtain important information used to determine whether or not a viable power generation or heat utilization facility can be developed at a prospect. Soil sampling is a less commonly used method for exploration of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Treatment of biomass to obtain a target chemical  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Target chemicals were produced using biocatalysts that are able to ferment sugars derived from treated biomass. Sugars were obtained by pretreating biomass under conditions of high solids and low ammonia concentration, followed by saccharification.

Dunson, Jr., James B. (Newark, DE); Tucker, III, Melvin P. (Lakewood, CO); Elander, Richard T. (Evergreen, CO); Hennessey, Susan Marie (Avondale, PA)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

182

Use of Noncompetitive Procurements to Obtain Services at the Savannah River Site, IG-0862  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Use of Noncompetitive Use of Noncompetitive Procurements to Obtain Services at the Savannah River Site DOE/IG-0862 April 2012 U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General Office of Audits and Inspections Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 April 10, 2012 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "Use of Noncompetitive Procurements to Obtain Services at the Savannah River Site" INTRODUCTION AND OBJECTIVE Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC (SRNS), assumed management and operating responsibility for the Department of Energy's Savannah River Site located near Aiken, South Carolina, in August 2008. Under its contract, SRNS is responsible for environmental cleanup,

183

Gas-liquid critical point in ionic fluids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Based on the method of collective variables we develop the statistical field theory for the study of a simple charge-asymmetric $1:z$ primitive model (SPM). It is shown that the well-known approximations for the free energy, in particular DHLL and ORPA, can be obtained within the framework of this theory. In order to study the gas-liquid critical point of SPM we propose the method for the calculation of chemical potential conjugate to the total number density which allows us to take into account the higher order fluctuation effects. As a result, the gas-liquid phase diagrams are calculated for $z=2-4$. The results demonstrate the qualitative agreement with MC simulation data: critical temperature decreases when $z$ increases and critical density increases rapidly with $z$.

O. Patsahan; I. Mryglod; T. Patsahan

2006-06-27T23:59:59.000Z

184

Information Science  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Science Information Science1354608000000Information ScienceSome of these resources are LANL-only and will require Remote Access.NoQuestions? 667-5809library@lanl.gov...

185

User Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

User Information User Information Print User Guide A step-by-step guide for users about how to apply and prepare for beam time at the ALS. Includes information about submitting a...

186

Informed Traders  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is introduced in which there is a small agent who is more susceptible to the flow of information in the market than the general market participant, and who tries to implement strategies based on the additional information. In this model market participants have access to a stream of noisy information concerning the future return of an asset, whereas the informed trader has access to a further information source which is obscured by an additional noise that may be correlated with the market noise. The informed trader uses the extraneous information source to seek statistical arbitrage opportunities, while at the same time accommodating the additional risk. The amount of information available to the general market participant concerning the asset return is measured by the mutual information of the asset price and the associated cash flow. The worth of the additional information source is then measured in terms of the difference of mutual information between the general market participant and the informe...

Brody, Dorje C; Friedman, Robyn L; Hughston, Lane P

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

About Inform  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

AOCS member magazine that provide international news on fats, oils, surfactants, detergents, and related material. inform About Inform Publications aocs articles book books cdrom cdroms detergents echapters fats inform international journal journ

188

General Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... at the Embassy Suites Hotel, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. For more information on this location, check out the travel information and destination highlights page.

189

Peering Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Peering Information Network Overview Tools Peering Information Interactive Network Map Network Maps Connected Sites Contact Us Technical Assistance: 1 800-33-ESnet (Inside the US)...

190

Fusion algebra of critical percolation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present an explicit conjecture for the chiral fusion algebra of critical percolation considering Virasoro representations with no enlarged or extended symmetry algebra. The representations we take to generate fusion are countably infinite in number. The ensuing fusion rules are quasi-rational in the sense that the fusion of a finite number of these representations decomposes into a finite direct sum of these representations. The fusion rules are commutative, associative and exhibit an sl(2) structure. They involve representations which we call Kac representations of which some are reducible yet indecomposable representations of rank 1. In particular, the identity of the fusion algebra is a reducible yet indecomposable Kac representation of rank 1. We make detailed comparisons of our fusion rules with the recent results of Eberle-Flohr and Read-Saleur. Notably, in agreement with Eberle-Flohr, we find the appearance of indecomposable representations of rank 3. Our fusion rules are supported by extensive numerical studies of an integrable lattice model of critical percolation. Details of our lattice findings and numerical results will be presented elsewhere.

Jorgen Rasmussen; Paul A. Pearce

2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

191

CRITICAL ISSUES IN HIGH END COMPUTING - FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

High-End computing (HEC) has been a driver for advances in science and engineering for the past four decades. Increasingly HEC has become a significant element in the national security, economic vitality, and competitiveness of the United States. Advances in HEC provide results that cut across traditional disciplinary and organizational boundaries. This program provides opportunities to share information about HEC systems and computational techniques across multiple disciplines and organizations through conferences and exhibitions of HEC advances held in Washington DC so that mission agency staff, scientists, and industry can come together with White House, Congressional and Legislative staff in an environment conducive to the sharing of technical information, accomplishments, goals, and plans. A common thread across this series of conferences is the understanding of computational science and applied mathematics techniques across a diverse set of application areas of interest to the Nation. The specific objectives of this program are: Program Objective 1. To provide opportunities to share information about advances in high-end computing systems and computational techniques between mission critical agencies, agency laboratories, academics, and industry. Program Objective 2. To gather pertinent data, address specific topics of wide interest to mission critical agencies. Program Objective 3. To promote a continuing discussion of critical issues in high-end computing. Program Objective 4.To provide a venue where a multidisciplinary scientific audience can discuss the difficulties applying computational science techniques to specific problems and can specify future research that, if successful, will eliminate these problems.

Corones, James [Krell Institute

2013-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

192

1 Energy Information Administratlor  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2) 1 9 2) 1 9 1 Energy Information Administratlor ^1982 Washington D ANNUAL April 1983 ANNUAL ENERGY OUTLOOK With Projections to 1990 Ird __ PALm JA A_ .^ ^^^^^^^aaaaaayMN - C s 1s|! l4 1iw_ - _ ~ 1~ __ ~I. EN - i*' This publication is available from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO). Ordering information and purchase of this and other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications may be obtained from the GPO or the EIA's National Energy Information Center (NEIC). Questions on energy statistics should be directed to the NEIC. Addresses and telephone numbers appear below. An order form is enclosed for your convenience. National Energy Information Center, EI-20 Energy Information Administration Forrestal Building Room 1F-048 Washington, D.C. 20585

193

PUBLIC INFORMATION AND INPUT ON WIPP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PUBLIC INFORMATION AND INPUT ON WIPP Get The Information You Need 1. Check the EPA Website, Fact Sheets and Issue Papers. EPA will make sure that key information is available on its WIPP Website. EPA the EPA WIPP Information Line at 1-800-331-WIPP (1-800-331-9477) to obtain information on upcoming events

194

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

195

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment Idaho Site Obtains Patent for Nuclear Reactor Sodium Cleanup Treatment March 28, 2013 - 12:00pm Addthis CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. CWI engineers Jeff Jones, David Tolman, right, and Kirk Dooley (seated) developed a treatment to safely dissolve a bicarbonate crust and treat and remove the sodium in the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II at the Idaho site. Piping in the east boiler basement of the sodium processing building was color coded for easy identification. Orange indicates sodium and green identifies cooling water.

196

Manhattan Project: CP-1 Going Critical  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Painting of CP-1 Going Critical Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 Events > The Plutonium Path to the Bomb, 1942-1944 > CP-1 Goes Critical, Met Lab, December 2,...

197

CRITICALITY SAFETY QUALIFICATION STANDARD REFERENCE GUIDE  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2010 Page 1 of 47 9, 2010 Page 1 of 47 Criticality Safety Qualification Standard Reference Guide 2010 For use with DOE-STD 1173-2009, CRITICALITY SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD September 9, 2010 Page 2 of 47 PURPOSE....................................................................................................................... 5 SCOPE............................................................................................................................ 5 1. Criticality safety personnel must demonstrate a working-level knowledge of the fission process. .......................................................................................................... 6 2. Criticality safety personnel must demonstrate a working-level knowledge of the

198

Nuclear Criticality Safety: Current Activities - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

199

Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering Division (Argonne...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

200

Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality, Revision 6  

SciTech Connect

This report is revision 6 of the Anomalies of Nuclear Criticality. This report is required reading for the training of criticality professionals in many organizations both nationally and internationally. This report describes many different classes of nuclear criticality anomalies that are different than expected.

Clayton, E. D.; Prichard, Andrew W.; Durst, Bonita E.; Erickson, David; Puigh, Raymond J.

2010-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

METHOD FOR OBTAINING PLUTONIUM METAL FROM ITS TRICHLORIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method was developed for obtaining plutonium metal by direct reduction of plutonium chloride, without the use of a booster, using calcium and lanthamum as a reductant, the said reduction being carried out at temperature in the range of 700 to 850 deg C and at about atmospheric pressure. (AEC)

Reavis, J.G.; Leary, J.A.; Maraman, W.J.

1962-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

202

Obtaining a bimodal grain size distribution via thermal means  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Obtaining a bimodal grain size distribution via thermal means ... manipulating thermal history, a family of bimodal grain size distributions may be formed. ... Mild Carbon Steel Quenche in Coconut Water, Fresh urine, Nigerian unadultrated up-wine, ... Multi-scale modeling of phase transformations in steels.

203

Employment Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Employment Information. The CNST technical staff includes Project Leaders, Postdoctoral and Student Researchers, Visiting ...

2013-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

204

: The Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Resumption of Criticality Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site OAS-M-13-09 September 2013 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 September 30, 2013 MEMORANDUM FOR THE PRINCIPAL DEPUTY ADMINISTRATOR, NATIONAL NUCLEAR SECURITY ADMINISTRATION FROM: George W. Collard Assistant Inspector General for Audits Office of Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Audit Report on "The Resumption of Criticality Experiments Facility Operations at the Nevada National Security Site" BACKGROUND The mission of the Criticality Experiments Facility, located at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (Los Alamos) was to conduct nuclear criticality experiments and hands-on training in nuclear safeguards, criticality safety and emergency response in support of the National

205

Environmental assessment for consolidation of certain materials and machines for nuclear criticality experiments and training  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In support of its assigned missions and because of the importance of avoiding nuclear criticality accidents, DOE has adopted a policy to reduce identifiable nuclear criticality safety risks and to protect the public, workers, government property and essential operations from the effects of a criticality accident. In support of this policy, the Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF) at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Technical Area (TA) 18, provides a program of general purpose critical experiments. This program, the only remaining one of its kind in the United States, seeks to maintain a sound basis of information for criticality control in those physical situations that DOE will encounter in handling and storing fissionable material in the future, and ensuring the presence of a community of individuals competent in practicing this control.

NONE

1996-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

206

Advances in criticality predictions for EBR-II  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Improvements to startup criticality predictions for the EBR-II reactor have been made. More exact calculational models, methods and data are now used, and better procedures for obtaining experimental data that enter into the prediction are in place. Accuracy improved by more than a factor of two and the largest ECP error observed since the changes is only 18 cents. An experimental method using subcritical counts is also being implemented.

Schaefer, R.W.; Imel, G.R.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

NETL: Releases & Briefs - NETL Scientists Obtain In Situ Spectrum of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NETL Scientists Obtain In Situ Spectrum of Synthetic Methane Hydrate Sample NETL Scientists Obtain In Situ Spectrum of Synthetic Methane Hydrate Sample The National Energy Technology Laboratory's Methane Hydrate Research Team is investigating the physical properties of methane hydrates, including their use as a storage medium for natural gas. The Team has developed a method of obtaining Raman spectra of bulk, laboratory-prepared hydrate samples under the conditions of their synthesis. This unusual capability allows collection of vibrational spectroscopic data on samples unperturbed by changes in pressure and temperature, allowing new insights into hydrate structure, composition, and stability. This technique will be used to further provide important information about the hydrate, such as the presence of other cage types and the fraction of cages containing methane.

208

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, R.E.; Doman, M.J.; Wilson, E.C.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Critical heat flux test apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for testing, in situ, highly irradiated specimens at high temperature transients is provided. A specimen, which has a thermocouple device attached thereto, is manipulated into test position in a sealed quartz heating tube by a robot. An induction coil around a heating portion of the tube is powered by a radio frequency generator to heat the specimen. Sensors are connected to monitor the temperatures of the specimen and the induction coil. A quench chamber is located below the heating portion to permit rapid cooling of the specimen which is moved into this quench chamber once it is heated to a critical temperature. A vacuum pump is connected to the apparatus to collect any released fission gases which are analyzed at a remote location.

Welsh, R.E.; Doman, M.J.; Wilson, E.C.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

210

Information is Protophysical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thought experiments led Einstein to discovering that gravity and acceleration were identical, which lead to his famous theory of relativity. Thought experiments can also be used in critical thinking and understanding about the relationship between physics and computation. This paper will discus several computational oriented thought experiments related to spacetime (or gravity) that surfaced during the planning of the PhysComp 92 and PhysComp 94 conferences. Thought provoking questions will be developed from these thought experiments, as well as other questions people asked during this period. These thought experiments and questions will be discussed in light of actual research supporting those issues, and the result will be the view that information laws are topological constraints that precede physical laws and therefore are protophysical. 1.0 Introduction to information and spacetime: When Dr. Landauer argued that information was physical [1] he turned the concept of informatio...

Douglas Matzke

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

User-Centered Adaptive Information Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information retrieval systems are critical for overcoming information overload. A major deficiency of existing retrieval systems is that they generally lack user modeling and are not adaptive to individual users; information about the actual user and search context is largely ignored. For example, a tourist and a programmer may use the same word "java" to search for different information, but the current retrieval systems would return the same results. In the proposed

Xuehua Shen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

2002 --Eighth Americas Conference on Information Systems 93 ANALOGICAL REASONING FOR INFORMATION RETRIEVAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this paper aims to propose an efficient method for recognizing and retrieving information from that calculating the similarity between images can retrieve the Dunhuang Frescoes information. Introduction Digital useful and comprehensible features become a critical part of a successful information retrieval process

213

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards Energy asset owners are facing a monumental challenge as they address compliance with the North American Electric Reliability Corporation (NERC) Critical Infrastructure Protection (CIP) Standards (CIP-002 through CIP-009). The increased use of wireless technologies and their introduction into control center networks and field devices compound this challenge, as ambiguity exists regarding the applicability of the CIP requirements to wireless networking technologies. Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards More Documents & Publications

214

Criticality safety and facility design considerations  

SciTech Connect

Operations with fissile material introduce the risk of a criticality accident that may be lethal to nearby personnel. In addition, concerns over criticality safety can result in substantial delays and shutdown of facility operations. For these reasons, it is clear that the prevention of a nuclear criticality accident should play a major role in the design of a nuclear facility. The emphasis of this report will be placed on engineering design considerations in the prevention of criticality. The discussion will not include other important aspects, such as the physics of calculating limits nor criticality alarm systems.

Waltz, W.R.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection (PRA), & Records CONTACTS FOR INFORMATION MANAGEMENT: Forms, Information Collection (PRA), & Records Name Contact...

216

Hydrodesulfurization and hydrodenitrogenation catalysts obtained from coal mineral matter  

SciTech Connect

A hydrotreating catalyst is prepared from coal mineral matter obtained by low temperature ashing coals of relatively low bassanite content by the steps of: (a) depositing on the low temperature ash 0.25-3 grams of an iron or nickel salt in water per gram of ash and drying a resulting slurry; (b) crushing and sizing a resulting solid; and (c) heating the thus-sized solid powder in hydrogen.

Liu, Kindtoken H. D. (Newark, DE); Hamrin, Jr., Charles E. (Lexington, KY)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Maximizing Multi-Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stochastic interdependence of a probablility distribution on a product space is measured by its Kullback-Leibler distance from the exponential family of product distributions (called multi-information). Here we investigate low-dimensional exponential families that contain the maximizers of stochastic interdependence in their closure. Based on a detailed description of the structure of probablility distributions with globally maximal multi-information we obtain our main result: The exponential family of pure pair-interactions contains all global maximizers of the multi-information in its closure.

Nihat Ay; Andreas Knauf

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Carbon Dioxide, Hydrographic, and Chemical Data Obtained in the South  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992-April 1993) South Pacific Ocean (WOCE Section P16A/P17A, P17E/P19S, and P19C, R/V Knorr, October 1992-April 1993) NDP-065 (1998) data Download the Data and ASCII Documentation files of NDP-065 PDF Download a PDF of NDP-065 image Contributed by Stephany Rubin,* John G. Goddard,* David W. Chipman,* Taro Takahashi,* Stewart C. Sutherland,* Joseph L. Reid,* James H. Swift,** and Lynne D. Talley** *Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory Columbia University Palisades, New York **Scripps Institution of Oceanography University of California, San Diego La Jolla, California Prepared by Alexander Kozyr Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center Oak Ridge National Laboratory Oak Ridge, Tennessee, U.S.A. Abstract Contents Part 1: Overview Background Information Description of the Expeditions WOCE Section P16A/P17A

219

IT-Security for Safety-Critical Automation Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The protection of safety-critical and infrastructure systems (such as automation systems for utilities, but also for manufacturing plants) against electronic and communication network based attacks becomes more and more important. This paper investigates how such safety-critical plants and automation systems can be secured against information system and network based attacks. The two common approaches, hard perimeter, and defense-in-depth are discussed. Based on the defense-in-depth approach, a conceptional, generic security zone model for use in analysis and synthesis of a plant security architecture is proposed, and for each of its zones a survey of the available and appropriate security mechanisms is given. Using an example from the substation automation domain, it is shown how threats and counter-measures can be systematically derived and how the specific system and usage characteristics of automation systems (or at least their restricted safety critical sub-functions) can be exploited in a positive way to deploy security mechanisms that would in this form not be available and applicable to home or office information systems. 1.

Martin Naedele

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Posters Comparisons of Brightness Temperature Measurements and Calculations Obtained  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Posters Comparisons of Brightness Temperature Measurements and Calculations Obtained During the Spectral Radiance Experiment Y. Han, J. B. Snider, and E. R. Westwater National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Research Laboratories/Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado S. H. Melfi National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Space Flight Center Greenbelt, Maryland R. A. Ferrare Hughes STX Corporation Lanham, Maryland Introduction In radiometric remote sensing of the atmosphere, the ability to calculate radiances from underlying state variables is fundamental. To infer temperature and water vapor profiles from satellite- or ground-based radiometers, one must determine cloud-free regions and then calculate clear-sky radiance emerging from the top of the earth's

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Information Accountability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ease of information flow is both the boon and the bane of large-scale, decentralized systems like the World Wide Web. For all the benefits and opportunities brought by the information revolution, with that same revolution ...

Weitzner, Daniel J.

2007-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

222

Contractor Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vienna U.S. Vienna Vienna, Austria Other Information U.S. Dept. of State U.S. Dept. of Energy IAEA NRC CONTRACTOR INFORMATION Contractor Procurement Template SSTS Process...

223

Range of Neutronic Parameters for Repository Criticality Analyses  

SciTech Connect

The ''Range of Neutronic Parameters for Repository Criticality Analyses'' technical report contains a summary of the benchmark criticality analyses (including the laboratory critical experiment [LCEs] and the commercial reactor criticals [CRCs]) used to support the validation of the criticality evaluation methods. This report also documents the development of the Critical Limits (CLs) for the repository criticality analyses.

W.J. Anderson

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

224

Information Needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

...J.H. Westbrook, Sources of Materials Property Data and Information, Materials Selection and Design, Vol 20, ASM Handbook,

225

General Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video Business Small Business General Information General...

226

Information Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To encourage the exchange of information, NIST holds many workshops, seminars, tours and other events available to the public. ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

227

Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rod to obtain required reactivity worth  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid nuclear reactor grey rods are described, wherein geometric combinations of relatively weak neutron absorber materials such as stainless steel, zirconium or INCONEL, and relatively strong neutron absorber materials, such as hafnium, silver-indium cadmium and boron carbide, are used to obtain the reactivity worths required to reach zero boron change load follow. One embodiment includes a grey rod which has combinations of weak and strong neutron absorber pellets in a stainless steel cladding. The respective pellets can be of differing heights. A second embodiment includes a grey rod with a relatively thick stainless steel cladding receiving relatively strong neutron absorber pellets only. A third embodiment includes annular relatively weak netron absorber pellets with a smaller diameter pellet of relatively strong absorber material contained within the aperture of each relatively weak absorber pellet. The fourth embodiment includes pellets made of a homogeneous alloy of hafnium and a relatively weak absorber material, with the percentage of hafnium chosen to obtain the desired reactivity worth.

Miller, John V. (Munhall, PA); Carlson, William R. (Scott Township, Allegheny County, PA); Yarbrough, Michael B. (Hempfield Township, Westmoreland County, PA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

SILENE Benchmark Critical Experiments for Criticality Accident Alarm Systems  

SciTech Connect

In October 2010 a series of benchmark experiments was conducted at the Commissariat a Energie Atomique et aux Energies Alternatives (CEA) Valduc SILENE [1] facility. These experiments were a joint effort between the US Department of Energy (DOE) and the French CEA. The purpose of these experiments was to create three benchmarks for the verification and validation of radiation transport codes and evaluated nuclear data used in the analysis of criticality accident alarm systems (CAASs). This presentation will discuss the geometric configuration of these experiments and the quantities that were measured and will present some preliminary comparisons between the measured data and calculations. This series consisted of three single-pulsed experiments with the SILENE reactor. During the first experiment the reactor was bare (unshielded), but during the second and third experiments it was shielded by lead and polyethylene, respectively. During each experiment several neutron activation foils and thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLDs) were placed around the reactor, and some of these detectors were themselves shielded from the reactor by high-density magnetite and barite concrete, standard concrete, and/or BoroBond. All the concrete was provided by CEA Saclay, and the BoroBond was provided by Y-12 National Security Complex. Figure 1 is a picture of the SILENE reactor cell configured for pulse 1. Also included in these experiments were measurements of the neutron and photon spectra with two BICRON BC-501A liquid scintillators. These two detectors were provided and operated by CEA Valduc. They were set up just outside the SILENE reactor cell with additional lead shielding to prevent the detectors from being saturated. The final detectors involved in the experiments were two different types of CAAS detectors. The Babcock International Group provided three CIDAS CAAS detectors, which measured photon dose and dose rate with a Geiger-Mueller tube. CIDAS detectors are currently in use at Y-12 in the newly constructed Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility. The second CAAS detector used a {sup 6}LiF TLD to absorb neutrons and a silicon detector to count the charge particles released by these absorption events. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory provided four of these detectors, which had formerly been used at the Rocky Flats facility in the United States.

Miller, Thomas Martin [ORNL; Reynolds, Kevin H. [Y-12 National Security Complex

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Critical Casimir forces in cellular membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments suggest that membranes of living cells are tuned close to a miscibility critical point in the 2D Ising universality class. We propose that one role for this proximity to criticality in live cells is to provide a conduit for relatively long-ranged critical Casimir forces. Using techniques from conformal field theory we calculate potentials of mean force between membrane bound inclusions mediated by their local interactions with the composition order parameter. We verify these calculations using Monte-Carlo where we also compare critical and off-critical results. Our findings suggest that membrane bound proteins experience weak yet long range forces mediated by critical composition fluctuations in the plasma membranes of living cells.

Benjamin B. Machta; Sarah L. Veatch; James P. Sethna

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

230

Critical Operating Constraints Forecast-- Functional Specification  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical operating constraints that could result in curtailments of load may occur in a transmission grid with areas of potential generation deficit and limited transmission import capacities. In such situations, it is crucial that the grid operators have a tool to predict when and where critical operating constraints would occur. This report describes the functional specification of such a decision support tool, called the COCF (Critical Operating Constraint Forecast).

2008-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

231

Controlling colloidal phase transitions with critical Casimir forces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The critical Casimir effect provides a thermodynamic analogue of the well-known quantum mechanical Casimir effect. It acts between two surfaces immersed in a critical binary liquid mixture, and results from the confinement of concentration fluctuations of the solvent. Unlike the quantum mechanical effect, the magnitude and range of this attraction can be adjusted with temperature via the solvent correlation length, thus offering new opportunities for the assembly of nano and micron-scale structures. Here, we demonstrate the active assembly control of equilibrium phases using critical Casimir forces. We guide colloidal particles into analogues of molecular liquid and solid phases via exquisite control over their interactions. By measuring the critical Casimir particle pair potential directly from density fluctuations in the colloidal gas, we obtain insight into liquefaction at small scales: We apply the Van der Waals model of molecular liquefaction and show that the colloidal gas-liquid condensation is accurately described by the Van der Waals theory, even on the scale of a few particles. These results open up new possibilities in the active assembly control of micro and nanostructures.

Van Duc Nguyen; Suzanne Faber; Zhibing Hu; Gerard H. Wegdam; Peter Schall

2013-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

232

Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices  

SciTech Connect

The objective of the Abrasion Testing of Critical Components of Hydrokinetic Devices (Project) was to test critical components of hydrokinetic devices in waters with high levels of suspended sediment information that is widely applicable to the hydrokinetic industry. Tidal and river sites in Alaska typically have high suspended sediment concentrations. High suspended sediment also occurs in major rivers and estuaries throughout the world and throughout high latitude locations where glacial inputs introduce silt into water bodies. In assessing the vulnerability of technology components to sediment induced abrasion, one of the greatest concerns is the impact that the sediment may have on device components such as bearings and seals, failures of which could lead to both efficiency loss and catastrophic system failures.

Worthington, Monty [ORPC Alaska] [ORPC Alaska; Ali, Muhammad [Ohio University] [Ohio University; Ravens, Tom [University of Alaska Anchorage] [University of Alaska Anchorage

2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

233

Critical Minerals Policy Act (S. 1113)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 23, 2012 ... surveys and production to research and recycling and, in particular, to see that additional critical mineral supplies can ... Exploration. Strategic...

234

THE LONG TERM CALIBRATION STABILITY OF CRITICAL ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... through nf flow tubes with circular cross section, ... Real Gas Eflects in Critical Flow through Nozzles ... of the Effects of Heat Transfer and Compressible ...

2012-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

235

FAQS Reference Guide Criticality Safety (NNSA)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This reference guide has been developed to address the competency statements in DOE-STD-1173-2009, Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard.

236

July 1995, Department's Criticality Safety Assessment Program...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Company at the Lynchburg Research Center; and two-and-a-half years as a Criticality Safety Analyst for General Electric Company at the Wilmington Fuel Fabrication Facility....

237

Properties of Neutron Star Critical Collapses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical phenomena in gravitational collapse opened a new mathematical vista into the theory of general relativity and may ultimately entail fundamental physical implication in observations. However, at present, the dynamics of critical phenomena in gravitational collapse scenarios are still largely unknown. My thesis seeks to understand the properties of the threshold in the solution space of the Einstein field equations between the black hole and neutron star phases, understand the properties of the neutron star critical solution and clarify the implication of these results on realistic astrophysical scenarios. We develop a new set of neutron star-like initial data to establish the universality of the neutron star critical solution and analyze the structure of neutron star and neutron star-like critical collapses via the study of the phase spaces. We also study the different time scales involved in the neutron star critical solution and analyze the properties of the critical index via comparisons between neutron star and neutron star-like initial data. Finally, we explore the boundary of the attraction basin of the neutron star critical solution and its transition to a known set of non-critical fixed points.

Mew-Bing Wan

2010-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

238

Integrating hardware and software information flow analyses  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Security-critical communications devices must be evaluated to the highest possible standards before they can be deployed. This process includes tracing potential information flow through the device's electronic circuitry, for each of the device's operating ... Keywords: communications devices, embedded software, information security evaluation

Colin J. Fidge; Diane Corney

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Less Safe--The Dismantling of Public Information Systems After 9/11  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since the terrorist attacks of 9/11, there has been a tightening of public access. In response to perceived security threats, government agencies have taken information down from web sites, curtailed or restricted access to electronic sources of information, ... Keywords: Freedom of Information Act (FOIA), classification, information policy, public information, sensitive but unclassified, critical infrastructure information, state secrets privilege, web sites

Harry Hammitt

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

U-024: IBM Lotus Sametime Configuration Servlet Lets Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

024: IBM Lotus Sametime Configuration Servlet Lets Remote Users 024: IBM Lotus Sametime Configuration Servlet Lets Remote Users Obtain Configuration Data U-024: IBM Lotus Sametime Configuration Servlet Lets Remote Users Obtain Configuration Data November 1, 2011 - 8:15am Addthis PROBLEM: IBM Lotus Sametime Configuration Servlet Lets Remote Users Obtain Configuration Data. PLATFORM: All Sametime Platforms : 7.0, 7.5, 7.5.1, 7.5.1.1, 7.5.1.2, 8.0, 8.0.1, 8.0.2, 8.5, 8.5.1, 8.5.1.1, 8.5.2 ABSTRACT: A remote user can obtain configuration information. reference lINKS: IBM Sametime Security Bulletin SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1026255 CVE-2011-1370 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: The Sametime server contains a configuration servlet that is accessed by several Sametime server processes. By default, this servlet does not require authentication, which could potentially allow an unauthorized user

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Characterization strategy report for the criticality safety issue  

SciTech Connect

High-level radioactive waste from nuclear fuels processing is stored in underground waste storage tanks located in the tank farms on the Hanford Site. Waste in tank storage contains low concentrations of fissile isotopes, primarily U-235 and Pu-239. The composition and the distribution of the waste components within the storage environment is highly complex and not subject to easy investigation. An important safety concern is the preclusion of a self-sustaining neutron chain reaction, also known as a nuclear criticality. A thorough technical evaluation of processes, phenomena, and conditions is required to make sure that subcriticality will be ensured for both current and future tank operations. Subcriticality limits must be based on considerations of tank processes and take into account all chemical and geometrical phenomena that are occurring in the tanks. The important chemical and physical phenomena are those capable of influencing the mixing of fissile material and neutron absorbers such that the degree of subcriticality could be adversely impacted. This report describes a logical approach to resolving the criticality safety issues in the Hanford waste tanks. The approach uses a structured logic diagram (SLD) to identify the characterization needed to quantify risk. The scope of this section of the report is limited to those branches of logic needed to quantify the risk associated with a criticality event occurring. The process is linked to a conceptual model that depicts key modes of failure which are linked to the SLD. Data that are needed include adequate knowledge of the chemical and geometric form of the materials of interest. This information is used to determine how much energy the waste would release in the various domains of the tank, the toxicity of the region associated with a criticality event, and the probability of the initiating criticality event.

Doherty, A.L.; Doctor, P.G.; Felmy, A.R.; Prichard, A.W.; Serne, R.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

A new approach in utilizing a computer data acquisition system for criticality safety control  

SciTech Connect

A new approach in utilizing a computer data acquisition system is proposed to address many issues associated with criticality safety control. This Criticality Safety Support System (CSSS) utilizes many features of computer and information process technology such as digital pictures, barcodes, voice data entry, etc. to enhance criticality safety in an R and D environment. Due to on-line data retrieving, data recording, and data management offered by new technology, the CSSS would provide a framework to design new solutions to old problems. This pilot program is the first step in developing this application for the years to come.

Hopkins, H; Song, H; Warren, F

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

243

Critical infrastructure protection: The vulnerability conundrum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critical infrastructure and key resources (CIKR) refer to a broad array of assets which are essential to the everyday functionality of social, economic, political and cultural systems in the United States. The interruption of CIKR poses significant threats ... Keywords: Critical infrastructure, Fortification, Interdiction, Policy, Protection, Strategies, Vulnerability

Alan T. Murray; Tony H. Grubesic

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Steady water waves with multiple critical layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We construct small-amplitude periodic water waves with multiple critical layers. In addition to waves with arbitrarily many critical layers and a single crest in each period, two-dimensional sets of waves with several crests and troughs in each period are found. The setting is that of steady two-dimensional finite-depth gravity water waves with vorticity.

Mats Ehrnstrm; Joachim Escher; Erik Wahln

2010-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

245

Language choice for safety critical applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The programming languages currently most popular among software engineers for writing safety critical applications are C and, more recently, C++. The Ada language has been designed with software safety in mind. Although Ada is not perfect concerning ... Keywords: safety, safety-critical

James S. Rogers

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Information Forests  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe Information Forests, an approach to classification that generalizes Random Forests by replacing the splitting criterion of non-leaf nodes from a discriminative one -- based on the entropy of the label distribution -- to a generative one -- based on maximizing the information divergence between the class-conditional distributions in the resulting partitions. The basic idea consists of deferring classification until a measure of "classification confidence" is sufficiently high, and instead breaking down the data so as to maximize this measure. In an alternative interpretation, Information Forests attempt to partition the data into subsets that are "as informative as possible" for the purpose of the task, which is to classify the data. Classification confidence, or informative content of the subsets, is quantified by the Information Divergence. Our approach relates to active learning, semi-supervised learning, mixed generative/discriminative learning.

Yi, Zhao; Dewan, Maneesh; Zhan, Yiqiang

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Corridor Rate Analysis Results - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Energy Information Administration 113 ... with the pipeline company tariff rates obtained using the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Automated System for Tariff

248

Academic information, Prizes and Awards - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Academic information, Prizes and Awards. Degrees Obtained: B.A. (Honours Math) 1971, University of Western Ontario. M. Sc., 1972, Oxford University (Jesus ...

249

Retail Unbundling - New Jersey - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Municipalities will be able to obtain load profile and other customer information in electronic format. 02/99. The Electric Discount and ...

250

Energy Information Administration (EIA)- Commercial Buildings ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Survey Background & Technical Information. Building Type Definitions. Archived Reports. Is it possible to obtain a list of all the buildings that participated in your ...

251

Summary of the Supplemental Model Reports Supporting the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has committed to a series of model reports documenting the methodology to be utilized in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report (YMP 2000). These model reports detail and provide validation of the methodology to be utilized for criticality analyses related to: (1) Waste form/waste package degradation; (2) Waste package isotopic inventory; (3) Criticality potential of degraded waste form/waste package configurations (effective neutron multiplication factor); (4) Probability of criticality (for each potential critical configuration as well as total event); and (5) Criticality consequences. This purpose of this summary report is to provide a status of the model reports and a schedule for their completion. This report also provides information relative to the model report content and validation. The model reports and their revisions are being generated as a result of: (1) Commitments made in the Disposal Criticality Analysis Methodology Topical Report (YMP 2000); (2) Open Items from the Safety Evaluation Report (Reamer 2000); (3) Key Technical Issue agreements made during DOE/U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) Technical Exchange Meeting (Reamer and Williams 2000); and (4) NRC requests for additional information (Schlueter 2002).

D. A. Brownson

2002-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

252

2011 Critical Materials Strategy | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 Critical Materials Strategy 1 Critical Materials Strategy 2011 Critical Materials Strategy This report examines the role that rare earth metals and other key materials play in clean energy technologies such as wind turbines, electric vehicles, solar cells and energy-efficient lighting. The report found that several clean energy technologies use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term, with risks generally decreasing in the medium and long terms. Supply challenges for five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium) may affect clean energy technology deployment in the years ahead. DOE_CMS2011_FINAL_Full.pdf DOE_CMS_2011_Summary.pdf More Documents & Publications 2010 Critical Materials Strategy ARPA-E Workshop on Rare Earth and Critical Materials

253

CRITICALITY CURVES FOR PLUTONIUM HYDRAULIC FLUID MIXTURES  

SciTech Connect

This Calculation Note performs and documents MCNP criticality calculations for plutonium (100% {sup 239}Pu) hydraulic fluid mixtures. Spherical geometry was used for these generalized criticality safety calculations and three geometries of neutron reflection are: {sm_bullet}bare, {sm_bullet}1 inch of hydraulic fluid, or {sm_bullet}12 inches of hydraulic fluid. This document shows the critical volume and critical mass for various concentrations of plutonium in hydraulic fluid. Between 1 and 2 gallons of hydraulic fluid were discovered in the bottom of HA-23S. This HA-23S hydraulic fluid was reported by engineering to be Fyrquel 220. The hydraulic fluid in GLovebox HA-23S is Fyrquel 220 which contains phosphorus. Critical spherical geometry in air is calculated with 0 in., 1 in., or 12 inches hydraulic fluid reflection.

WITTEKIND WD

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

Critical phenomena in N=2* plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use gauge theory/string theory correspondence to study finite temperature critical behaviour of mass deformed N=4 SU(N) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory at strong coupling, also known as N=2* gauge theory. For certain range of the mass parameters, N=2* plasma undergoes a second-order phase transition. We compute all the static critical exponents of the model and demonstrate that the transition is of the mean-field theory type. We show that the dynamical critical exponent of the model is z=0, with multiple hydrodynamic relaxation rates at criticality. We point out that the dynamical critical phenomena in N=2* plasma is outside the dynamical universality classes established by Hohenberg and Halperin.

A. Buchel; C. Pagnutti

2010-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

255

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach,  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) Criticality Safety Controls Implementation Inspection Criteria, Approach, and Lines of Inquiry, October 23, 2009, (HSS CRAD 64-18, Rev 0 ) DOE has set expectations for implementing criticality safety controls that are selected to provide preventive and/or mitigative functions for specific potential accident scenarios. There are additional expectations for criticality safety controls that are also designated as Specific Administrative Controls (SACs) (see HSS CRAD 64-32). Also, in instances when the review addresses functionality and operability of structures, systems, and components (SSCs) of nuclear facilities specifically required

256

Information Repository  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Information Repository Index Permit Renewal Application (Parts A and B) Submissions, September 2009, Department of Energy CBFOWashington TRU Solutions Administrative Completeness...

257

Personal Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

with a friend or relative. Personal Information Full name Home address Street City State Zip Home phone E-mail address Birthday SSN (MMDDYYYY) Passport number Driver's license...

258

Radiation Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Radiation Information << Timeline >> Content on this page requires a newer version of Adobe Flash Player. Get Adobe Flash player July 31, 1942 The Army Corp of Engineers leases...

259

Project information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Information Amistad Project (Texas) Collbran Project (Colorado) Colorado River Storage Project Dolores Project (Colorado) Falcon Project (Texas) Provo River Project (Utah)...

260

Mathematical, Information and Computational Sciences Mathematical, Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Computational Sciences #12;High Performance Computing, Collaboration and Networks- Critical for DOE Science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Critical temperature for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition (from multifragmentation and fission)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Critical temperature Tc for the nuclear liquid-gas phase transition is stimated both from the multifragmentation and fission data. In the first case,the critical temperature is obtained by analysis of the IMF yields in p(8.1 GeV)+Au collisions within the statistical model of multifragmentation (SMM). In the second case, the experimental fission probability for excited 188Os is compared with the calculated one with Tc as a free parameter. It is concluded for both cases that the critical temperature is higher than 16 MeV.

V. A. Karnaukhov; H. Oeschler; A. Budzanowski; S. P. Avdeyev; A. S. Botvina; E. A. Cherepanov; W. Karcz; V. V. Kirakosyan; P. A. Rukoyatkin; I. Skwirczynska; E. Norbeck

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE Scientific and Technical Information DOE * OSTI * Go Mobile Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget...

263

FEATURES, EVENTS, AND PROCESSES: SYSTEM-LEVEL AND CRITICALITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The primary purpose of this Analysis/Model Report (AMR) is to identify and document the screening analyses for the features, events, and processes (FEPs) that do not easily fit into the existing Process Model Report (PMR) structure. These FEPs include the 3 1 FEPs designated as System-Level Primary FEPs and the 22 FEPs designated as Criticality Primary FEPs. A list of these FEPs is provided in Section 1.1. This AMR (AN-WIS-MD-000019) documents the Screening Decision and Regulatory Basis, Screening Argument, and Total System Performance Assessment (TSPA) Disposition for each of the subject Primary FEPs. This AMR provides screening information and decisions for the TSPA-SR report and provides the same information for incorporation into a project-specific FEPs database. This AMR may also assist reviewers during the licensing-review process.

D.L. McGregor

2000-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

264

Registration Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Registration Information Registration Information Registration Information Focusing on methods and computational tools used to help sequence, assemble, and finish genomes, including new sequencing technologies. Contact Chris Detter (505) 665-3024 Email Registration is limited to 150 participants so please register ASAP if you plan to attend. There is no deadline for registration. To register, please send an e-mail to Chris Detter with your contact information: Name Citizenship status. Institution information. Area(s) of specific interest. Do you plan to submit an abstract by March 30th? Within 48 hrs of registering you will be sent an e-mail confirmation number that you should include on your abstract if you are submitting one. To submit an abstract, please refer to the Abstract Submission guidelines.

265

SAFETY INSTRUMENTED FUNCTIONS AS CRITICALITY DEFENSES  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this paper is to share the SRS methodology for identifying the reliability requirements and documenting the expected performance of Safety Instrumented Functions (SIFs) used as criticality defenses. Nuclear Criticality SIFs are comprised of sensors, logic solvers, and final control elements, which may be either automatic or manual, to detect a process hazard and respond to prevent a criticality. The Savannah River Site (SRS) has invoked the chemical process industry safety standard (ANSI/ISA 84.00.01) for the design of safety significant instrumented systems. The ISA standard provides a graded approach to design based on the amount of risk reduction that is required of an SIF. SRS is embarking on application of this standard to nuclear criticality defenses, thus integrating criticality safety requirements with verifiable design methodology. Per the DOE G 421.1-1 discussion of the double contingency principle, guidance for a single contingency barrier includes, ''The estimated probability that the control will fail (when called upon for protection) is not greater than 1 in 100 demands''. The application of this standard to nuclear criticality SIFs will provide clear requirements in terms of safety availability and testing to assure that the instrumented criticality system as designed, installed, and maintained will meet is performance requirements. The paper identifies the numerous challenges presented by this initiative and the benefits of this approach.

Suttinger, L; William Hearn, W

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

266

Assessment of criticality safety in DOE facilities  

SciTech Connect

A study was made to assess nuclear criticality safety in DOE Facilities and to assess the effects of various types of possible improvements. The accident statistics in DOE operations show that the fatalities caused by Nuclear Criticality accidents are small compared to other accident categories. The data show the safety performance after 1965, compared to prior years, was considerably improved indicating that overall safety programs have been effective. Data on criticality safety violations were collected from eight major facilities. These data were categorized by severity indexes and causes were assigned. A total of 421 violations were used in the data base for analysis in a fault tree model. Calculations were made using the fault tree methodology to show expected improvement in safety (reduction in probability of a criticality accident) for a fixed reduction in the number of criticality violations. Based on this analysis, about equal emphasis should be placed on reducing mechanical failures and operator errors as efforts in these two areas will likely produce the most significant improvements in safety. A criticality safety infraction form was prepared to facilitate uniformity in recording data on infractions for subsequent analysis. Discussions with Nuclear Safety Specialists working in the field instilled confidence that criticality safety is being handled by concerned, capable, and knowledgable persons.

Lloyd, R.C.; Clayton, E.D.; Converse, W.E.; Kottwitz, D.A.

1981-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Bibliography for nuclear criticality accident experience, alarm systems, and emergency management  

SciTech Connect

The characteristics, detection, and emergency management of nuclear criticality accidents outside reactors has been an important component of criticality safety for as long as the need for this specialized safety discipline has been recognized. The general interest and importance of such topics receives special emphasis because of the potentially lethal, albeit highly localized, effects of criticality accidents and because of heightened public and regulatory concerns for any undesirable event in nuclear and radiological fields. This bibliography lists references which are potentially applicable to or interesting for criticality alarm, detection, and warning systems; criticality accident emergency management; and their associated programs. The lists are annotated to assist bibliography users in identifying applicable: industry and regulatory guidance and requirements, with historical development information and comments; criticality accident characteristics, consequences, experiences, and responses; hazard-, risk-, or safety-analysis criteria; CAS design and qualification criteria; CAS calibration, maintenance, repair, and testing criteria; experiences of CAS designers and maintainers; criticality accident emergency management (planning, preparedness, response, and recovery) requirements and guidance; criticality accident emergency management experience, plans, and techniques; methods and tools for analysis; and additional bibliographies.

Putman, V.L.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Nucleation of bulk superconductivity close to critical magnetic field  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the two-dimensional Ginzburg-Landau functional with constant applied magnetic field. For applied magnetic fields close to the second critical field $H_{C_2}$ and large Ginzburg-Landau parameter, we provide leading order estimates on the energy of minimizing configurations. We obtain a fine threshold value of the applied magnetic field for which bulk superconductivity contributes to the leading order of the energy. Furthermore, the energy of the bulk is related to that of the Abrikosov problem in a periodic lattice. A key ingredient of the proof is a novel $L^\\infty$-bound which is of independent interest.

S. Fournais; A. Kachmar

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

269

New enhancements to SCALE for criticality safety analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As the speed, available memory, and reliability of computer hardware increases and the cost decreases, the complexity and usability of computer software will increase, taking advantage of the new hardware capabilities. Computer programs today must be more flexible and user friendly than those of the past. Within available resources, the SCALE staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is committed to upgrading its computer codes to keep pace with the current level of technology. This paper examines recent additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis sections of the SCALE code package. These recent additions and enhancements made to SCALE can be divided into nine categories: (1) new analytical computer codes, (2) new cross-section libraries, (3) new criticality search sequences, (4) enhanced graphical capabilities, (5) additional KENO enhancements, (6) enhanced resonance processing capabilities, (7) enhanced material information processing capabilities, (8) portability of the SCALE code package, and (9) other minor enhancements, modifications, and corrections to SCALE. Each of these additions and enhancements to the criticality safety analysis capabilities of the SCALE code system are discussed below.

Hollenbach, D.F.; Bowman, S.M.; Petrie, L.M.; Parks, C.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Computational Physics and Engineering Div.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Critical Mission Support Through Energy Secuirty  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Critical Mission Support Critical Mission Support Through Energy Security Development of an Army Energy Security Assessment Model FUPWG Mr. Chuck Tremel, CTC 21 October 2010 2 2 Purpose * Provide an overview of the Army Energy Security Assessment (ESA) methodology - Being developed by Concurrent Technologies Corporation - Monitored by the US Army Corps of Engineers (USACE), Engineering Research and Development-Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (ERDC-CERL) * Engage Utility and Government Stakeholders 3 3 Overall Program Objectives * Develop/enhance the draft ESA methodology demonstrated under the Army Power and Energy Initiative (APEI) - Leverage existing processes (e.g., Anti-terrorism/Force Protection) - Critical Mission focused * Validate the methodology at an Army installation

271

Statistical Uncertainty Analysis Applied to Criticality Calculation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we present an uncertainty methodology based on a statistical approach, for assessing uncertainties in criticality prediction using monte carlo method due to uncertainties in the isotopic composition of the fuel. The methodology has been applied to criticality calculations with MCNP5 with additional stochastic input of the isotopic fuel composition. The stochastic input were generated using the latin hypercube sampling method based one the probability density function of each nuclide composition. The automatic passing of the stochastic input to the MCNP and the repeated criticality calculation is made possible by using a python script to link the MCNP and our latin hypercube sampling code.

Hartini, Entin; Andiwijayakusuma, Dinan; Susmikanti, Mike; Nursinta, A. W. [Centre for Nuclear Informatics Development, National Nuclear Energy Agency of Indonesia (Indonesia)

2010-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

272

The International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project  

SciTech Connect

Most safety concerns associated with operations at nuclear facilities are very similar to the safety concerns associated with operations at non-nuclear facilities. The potential for a nuclear criticality accident is one concern that is unique to the nuclear industry. However, if managed properly, the risk of a criticality accident can be reduced to an acceptable level. In fact, the risk of a criticality accident can generally be reduced to a level that is much lower than the risk associated with non-nuclear activities that have similar consequences.

Briggs, Joseph Blair; Dean, V. F.; Presic, M.

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Systematics of Reconstructed Process Facility Criticality Accidents  

SciTech Connect

The systematics of the characteristics of twenty-one criticality accidents occurring in nuclear processing facilities of the Russian Federation, the United States, and the United Kingdom are examined. By systematics the authors mean the degree of consistency or agreement between the factual parameters reported for the accidents and the experimentally known conditions for criticality. The twenty-one reported process criticality accidents are not sufficiently well described to justify attempting detailed neutronic modeling. However, results of classic hand calculations confirm the credibility of the reported accident conditions.

Pruvost, N.L.; McLaughlin, T.P.; Monahan, S.P.

1999-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

274

U.S. Department of Energy Critical Materials Strategy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report examines the role of rare earth metals and other materials in the clean energy economy. It was prepared by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) based on data collected and research performed during 2010. Its main conclusions include: (a) Several clean energy technologies -- including wind turbines, electric vehicles, photovoltaic cells and fluorescent lighting -- use materials at risk of supply disruptions in the short term. Those risks will generally decrease in the medium and long term. (b) Clean energy technologies currently constitute about 20 percent of global consumption of critical materials. As clean energy technologies are deployed more widely in the decades ahead, their share of global consumption of critical materials will likely grow. (c) Of the materials analyzed, five rare earth metals (dysprosium, neodymium, terbium, europium and yttrium), as well as indium, are assessed as most critical in the short term. For this purpose, 'criticality' is a measure that combines importance to the clean energy economy and risk of supply disruption. (d) Sound policies and strategic investments can reduce the risk of supply disruptions, especially in the medium and long term. (e) Data with respect to many of the issues considered in this report are sparse. In the report, DOE describes plans to (i) develop its first integrated research agenda addressing critical materials, building on three technical workshops convened by the Department during November and December 2010; (ii) strengthen its capacity for information-gathering on this topic; and (iii) work closely with international partners, including Japan and Europe, to reduce vulnerability to supply disruptions and address critical material needs. DOE will work with other stakeholders -- including interagency colleagues, Congress and the public -- to shape policy tools that strengthen the United States' strategic capabilities. DOE also announces its plan to develop an updated critical materials strategy, based upon additional events and information, by the end of 2011.DOE's strategy with respect to critical materials rests on three pillars. First, diversified global supply chains are essential. To manage supply risk, multiple sources of materials are required. This means taking steps to facilitate extraction, processing and manufacturing here in the United States, as well as encouraging other nations to expedite alternative supplies. In all cases, extraction and processing should be done in an environmentally sound manner. Second, substitutes must be developed. Research leading to material and technology substitutes will improve flexibility and help meet the material needs of the clean energy economy. Third, recycling, reuse and more efficient use could significantly lower world demand for newly extracted materials. Research into recycling processes coupled with well-designed policies will help make recycling economically viable over time.The scope of this report is limited. It does not address the material needs of the entire economy, the entire energy sector or even all clean energy technologies. Time and resource limitations precluded a comprehensive scope. Among the topics that merit additional research are the use of rare earth metals in catalytic converters and in petroleum refining. These topics are discussed briefly in Chapter 2.

Bauer, D.; Diamond, D.; Li, J.; Sandalow, D.; Telleen, P.; Wanner, B.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Information-Disturbance theorem and Uncertainty Relation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been shown that Information-Disturbance theorem can play an important role in security proof of quantum cryptography. The theorem is by itself interesting since it can be regarded as an information theoretic version of uncertainty principle. It, however, has been able to treat restricted situations. In this paper, the restriction on the source is abandoned, and a general information-disturbance theorem is obtained. The theorem relates information gain by Eve with information gain by Bob.

Takayuki Miyadera; Hideki Imai

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

276

General Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ASD General Information ASD General Information APS Resources & Information A list of useful links for APS staff and users. APS Technical Publications Links to APS technical publications. APS Publications Database The official and comprehensive source of references for APS-related journal articles, conference papers, book chapters, dissertations, abstracts, awards, invited talks, etc. Image Library A collection of APS images. Responsibilities & Interfaces for APS Technical Systems Descriptions of the responsibilities of APS technical groups and how they interface with one another. APS Procedures Operational procedures for the APS. APS Specifications Specifications and approvals for upgrades or changes to existing APS hardware and software. APS Radiation Safety Policy & Procedures Committee Minutes

277

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The purpose of this Quality Assurance for Capital Project Critical Decision Review Module (QARM) is to identify, integrate, and clarify the QA performance objectives, criteria, and guidance needed...

278

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automated Demand Response for Critical Peak Pricing Speaker(s): Naoya Motegi Date: June 9, 2005 - 12:00pm Location: Bldg. 90 California utilities have been exploring the use of...

279

Neutron absorbing coating for nuclear criticality control  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A neutron absorbing coating for use on a substrate, and which provides nuclear criticality control is described and which includes a nickel, chromium, molybdenum, and gadolinium alloy having less than about 5% boron, by weight.

Mizia, Ronald E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID); Swank, William D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lister, Tedd E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pinhero, Patrick J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

280

Nuclear criticality safety department training implementation  

SciTech Connect

The Nuclear Criticality Safety Department (NCSD) is committed to developing and maintaining a staff of qualified personnel to meet the current and anticipated needs in Nuclear Criticality Safety (NCS) at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant. The NCSD Qualification Program is described in Y/DD-694, Qualification Program, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department This document provides a listing of the roles and responsibilities of NCSD personnel with respect to training and details of the Training Management System (TMS) programs, Mentoring Checklists and Checksheets, as well as other documentation utilized to implement the program. This document supersedes Y/DD-696, Revision 2, dated 3/27/96, Training Implementation, Nuclear Criticality Safety Department. There are no backfit requirements associated with revisions to this document.

Carroll, K.J.; Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

A critical programmer searches for professionalism  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phrase "critical programmer" in this article's title is meant to be thought of as the programmer who carefully, respectfully, questions conventional wisdom. The particular conventional wisdom under consideration here (held mainly by those who do ...

Robert Schaefer

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Critical reflection in a digital media artwork - Playas: homeland mirage  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The introduction of digital media into the working practice of artists has produced challenges previously unknown to the field of art. This inquiry follows an atypical model of artist-driven research derived from disciplines such as social science and education. Here, an artwork functions as a model that is self-reflective, integrating methodologies in a form that benefits art and science. Using Naturalistic Inquiry, including semi-structured interviews of fifteen participants, the work illustrates a process of creation, analysis and evaluation that places the values of the artist on equal footing with the needs of science. Recently, artists have begun using video game engines as a tool to produce 3D navigable spaces. Using the hybrid video game/installation Playas: Homeland Mirage as a case study, this research examines the impact of technology on the artwork and identifies a number of key issues related to the function of critical reflection in this environment. Rules-of-play were a fundamental pre-requisite to the stimulation of critically reflective experience. The human interface with software and hardware was also a primary factor in reflective experience. Based on participant evaluation and observation, the interface was altered in response to its effect on critical reflection, illustrating how choices in this area impact aesthetic experience. Those with experience in visual art were more likely to engage the work in a critically reflective manner than seasoned video game players who tended to be more interested in scoring and winning. These findings and others inform our understanding of the stimulation of critical reflection in immersive environments and show how we can sensitively integrate technology with meaningful evaluative methods. By repurposing a video game in this manner, we learn about the nature of the video game and the nature of art. This research enables artists to gain a better understanding of the medium to more fully integrate technology within a meaningful practice. Conversely, other fields will benefit from a better understanding of the stimulation of meaning in immersive spaces and gain a comprehensive view of a work that strives to contribute to our culture on a deeper level than as simple entertainment. Ultimately, more fully understanding critical reflection in virtual environments will enable us to create enriched experiences that transcend space to create real or virtual place.

Stenner, Jack Eric

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Information Extraction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The automatic extraction of information from unstructured sources has opened up new avenues for querying, organizing, and analyzing data by drawing upon the clean semantics of structured databases and the abundance of unstructured data. The field of ...

Sunita Sarawagi

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Information Causality  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the literature on Information Causality. Since it's for a book, we don't think an abstract will be needed at all, so we have written this one just for the sake of the arXiv.

Marcin Paw?owski; Valerio Scarani

2011-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

285

Quantifying the severity of criticality limit violations  

SciTech Connect

Since August of 1994, the Los Alamos National Laboratory has been using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix for determining the need for and level of reporting criticality safety limit violations. The LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix is DOE approved, and is cited in a DOE approved SAR for the LANL Plutonium Facility as the method used to determine whether a criticality limit violation is reportable to DOE via 5000.3B ``Occurrence Categorization, notification and Reporting Requirements`` (replaced by DOE O 232.1). The use of the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix provides a framework that allows criticality limit violations to be objectively reviewed in terms of what were the consequences of the criticality safety limit violation. Using the LANL Categorization Criteria Matrix helps the criticality safety engineer and line supervision explain to others, in a quantifiable manner, the significance of the criticality limit violation, the levels of margin of safety built into operations, and demonstrate the difference between evaluated conditions and working conditions.

Vessard, S.G. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Steele, C.M. [Dept. of Energy, Los Alamos, NM (United States). Los Alamos Area Office

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Health information on the Internet : strategies for assessing consumer needs and improving consumer information retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Patients and their family members are increasingly turning to the Internet for health information. However, the search strategies consumers are using to obtain information are often unsuccessful. Since some patients are ...

Plovnick, Robert M. (Robert Matthew), 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Information engineering  

SciTech Connect

The Information Engineering thrust area develops information technology to support the programmatic needs of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s Engineering Directorate. Progress in five programmatic areas are described in separate reports contained herein. These are entitled Three-dimensional Object Creation, Manipulation, and Transport, Zephyr:A Secure Internet-Based Process to Streamline Engineering Procurements, Subcarrier Multiplexing: Optical Network Demonstrations, Parallel Optical Interconnect Technology Demonstration, and Intelligent Automation Architecture.

Hunt, D.N.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Written Information Equipment TECHNOLOGY: Oral Information  

SCIENTIFIC OR TECHNOLOGICAL Equipment TECHNOLOGY: DEVELOPMENTAL RESOURCES Written Information Oral Information Hardware Facilities Data

289

A critical view on transport and entanglement in models of photosynthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We revisit critically the recent claims, inspired by quantum optics and quantum information, that there is entanglement in the biological pigment protein complexes, and that it is responsible for the high transport efficiency. While unexpectedly long coherence times were experimentally demonstrated, the existence of entanglement is, at the moment, a purely theoretical conjecture; it is this conjecture that we analyze. As demonstrated by a toy model, a similar transport phenomenology can be obtained without generating entanglement. Furthermore, we also argue that even if entanglement does exist, it is purely incidental and seems to plays no essential role for the transport efficiency. We emphasize that our paper is not a proof that entanglement does not exist in light-harvesting complexes - this would require a knowledge of the system and its parameters well beyond the state of the art. Rather, we present a counter-example to the recent claims of entanglement, showing that the arguments, as they stand at the moment, are not sufficiently justified and hence cannot be taken as proof for the existence of entanglement, let alone of its essential role, in the excitation transport.

Markus Tiersch; Sandu Popescu; Hans J. Briegel

2011-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

290

Characteristics of pyrobitumen and oil obtained from the pyrolysis of Tipton member Green River oil shale  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The pyrobitumens and oils produced from the Green River oil shale at 375, 400 and 425{degree}C for various reaction times were characterized to obtain information for kerogen decomposition models. The atomic H/C ratio of pyrobitumen decreased with increasing reaction temperature and time. The average molecular weight of pyrobitumen increased with reaction temperature and time, reached a maximum at each temperature, and then decreased. The pyrobitumens contained an extremely high amount of polar materials; the variations of polar materials, nitrogen contents of pyrobitumen, and pyrobitumen amounts followed the same pattern, suggesting that the nitrogen functional groups play an important role during kerogen decomposition. In contrast, the oils contained much lower amounts of polars and had a constant atomic H/C ratio of 1.70 and an average molecular weight of about 270. Most of the aliphatic hydrocarbons occurred in the oil rather than pyrobitumen after the oil shale pyrolysis.

Chong, S.L.; Miknis, F.P. (Western Research Institute, Laramie, WY (USA)); Zhao, X. (Daqing Petroleum Institute, Heilongjiang (China)); Holmes, S. (Shell Development Co., Houston, TX (USA))

1989-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Corporate information management guidance  

SciTech Connect

At the request of the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Information Management (IM) Council, IM representatives from nearly all Headquarters (HQ) organizations have been meeting over the past year as the Corporate Guidance Group (CGG) to develop useful and sound corporate information management (IM) guidance. The ability of the Department`s IM community to develop such unified guidance continues to be critical to the success of future Departmental IM planning processes and the establishment of a well-coordinated IM environment between Headquarters and field organizations. This report, with 26 specific corporate IM guidance items documented and unanimously agreed to, as well as 12 items recommended for further development and 3 items deferred for future consideration, represents a highly successful effort by the IM community. The effort has proven that the diverse DOE organizations can put aside individual preferences and work together towards a common and mutually beneficial goal. In examining most areas and issues associated with information management in the Department, they have developed specific, far-reaching, and useful guidance. The IM representatives recommend that the documented guidance items provided in this report and approved by the DOE IM Council be followed by all IM organizations. The representatives also strongly recommend that the guidance process developed by the CGG be the single process for developing corporate IM guidance.

NONE

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

DOE-STD-1134-99 Review Guide for Criticality Safety Evaluations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-99 4-99 September 1999 DOE STANDARD REVIEW GUIDE FOR CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1134-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy Standard is approved for use by all DOE criticality safety personnel. It contains guidelines that should be followed when reviewing Criticality Safety Evaluations that

293

Assessing Vulnerabilities, Risks, and Consequences of Damage to Critical Infrastructure  

SciTech Connect

Since the publication of 'Critical Foundations: Protecting America's Infrastructure,' there has been a keen understanding of the complexity, interdependencies, and shared responsibility required to protect the nation's most critical assets that are essential to our way of life. The original 5 sectors defined in 1997 have grown to 18 Critical Infrastructures and Key Resources (CIKR), which are discussed in the 2009 National Infrastructure Protection Plan (NIPP) and its supporting sector-specific plans. The NIPP provides the structure for a national program dedicated to enhanced protection and resiliency of the nation's infrastructure. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides in-depth, multi-disciplinary assessments of threat, vulnerability, and consequence across all 18 sectors at scales ranging from specific facilities to infrastructures spanning multi-state regions, such as the Oil and Natural Gas (ONG) sector. Like many of the CIKR sectors, the ONG sector is comprised of production, processing, distribution, and storage of highly valuable and potentially dangerous commodities. Furthermore, there are significant interdependencies with other sectors, including transportation, communication, finance, and government. Understanding the potentially devastating consequences and collateral damage resulting from a terrorist attack or natural event is an important element of LLNL's infrastructure security programs. Our work began in the energy sector in the late 1990s and quickly expanded other critical infrastructure sectors. We have performed over 600 physical assessments with a particular emphasis on those sectors that utilize, store, or ship potentially hazardous materials and for whom cyber security is important. The success of our approach is based on building awareness of vulnerabilities and risks and working directly with industry partners to collectively advance infrastructure protection. This approach consists of three phases: The Pre-Assessment Phase brings together infrastructure owners and operators to identify critical assets and help the team create a structured information request. During this phase, we gain information about the critical assets from those who are most familiar with operations and interdependencies, making the time we spend on the ground conducting the assessment much more productive and enabling the team to make actionable recommendations. The Assessment Phase analyzes 10 areas: Threat environment, cyber architecture, cyber penetration, physical security, physical penetration, operations security, policies and procedures, interdependencies, consequence analysis, and risk characterization. Each of these individual tasks uses direct and indirect data collection, site inspections, and structured and facilitated workshops to gather data. Because of the importance of understanding the cyber threat, LLNL has built both fixed and mobile cyber penetration, wireless penetration and supporting tools that can be tailored to fit customer needs. The Post-Assessment Phase brings vulnerability and risk assessments to the customer in a format that facilitates implementation of mitigation options. Often the assessment findings and recommendations are briefed and discussed with several levels of management and, if appropriate, across jurisdictional boundaries. The end result is enhanced awareness and informed protective measures. Over the last 15 years, we have continued to refine our methodology and capture lessons learned and best practices. The resulting risk and decision framework thus takes into consideration real-world constraints, including regulatory, operational, and economic realities. In addition to 'on the ground' assessments focused on mitigating vulnerabilities, we have integrated our computational and atmospheric dispersion capability with easy-to-use geo-referenced visualization tools to support emergency planning and response operations. LLNL is home to the National Atmospheric Release Advisory Center (NARAC) and the Interagency Modeling and Atmospheric Assessment Center (IMAAC). NA

Suski, N; Wuest, C

2011-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

294

DOE/EM Criticality Safety Needs Assessment  

SciTech Connect

The issue of nuclear criticality safety (NCS) in Department of Energy Environmental Management (DOE/EM) fissionable material operations presents challenges because of the large quantities of material present in the facilities and equipment that are committed to storage and/or material conditioning and dispositioning processes. Given the uncertainty associated with the material and conditions for many DOE/EM fissionable material operations, ensuring safety while maintaining operational efficiency requires the application of the most-effective criticality safety practices. In turn, more-efficient implementation of these practices can be achieved if the best NCS technologies are utilized. In 2002, DOE/EM-1 commissioned a survey of criticality safety technical needs at the major EM sites. These needs were documented in the report Analysis of Nuclear Criticality Safety Technology Supporting the Environmental Management Program, issued May 2002. Subsequent to this study, EM safety management personnel made a commitment to applying the best and latest criticality safety technology, as described by the DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP). Over the past 7 years, this commitment has enabled the transfer of several new technologies to EM operations. In 2008, it was decided to broaden the basis of the EM NCS needs assessment to include not only current needs for technologies but also NCS operational areas with potential for improvements in controls, analysis, and regulations. A series of NCS workshops has been conducted over the past years, and needs have been identified and addressed by EM staff and contractor personnel. These workshops were organized and conducted by the EM Criticality Safety Program Manager with administrative and technical support by staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This report records the progress made in identifying the needs, determining the approaches for addressing these needs, and assimilating new NCS technologies into EM fissionable material operations. In addition, the report includes projections of future EM needs and associted recommendations.

Westfall, Robert Michael [ORNL; Hopper, Calvin Mitchell [ORNL

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Developing a Framework to Improve Critical Infrastructure ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... To that end any risk framework ... financial, telecommunications, transportation, energy, chemical, information ... heating and cooling, physical security ...

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

296

The critical success factors for websites for Chinese migrant farmer workers: a multi-case study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper is to explore the critical success factors for the websites for Chinese migrant farmer workers. A theoretical framework was put forward according to the theories of usability, information architecture, webometrics and business model. A multi-case ... Keywords: Chinese farmer workers, managerial-technical perspective, multi-case study, special website, vulnerable groups, website effect

Fang Wang, Lihong Gu

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Criticality Safety Evaluation of a LLNL Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS)  

SciTech Connect

Hands-on experimental training in the physical behavior of multiplying systems is one of ten key areas of training required for practitioners to become qualified in the discipline of criticality safety as identified in DOE-STD-1135-99, ''Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification''. This document is a criticality safety evaluation of the training activities (or operations) associated with HS-3200, ''Laboratory Class for Criticality Safety''. These activities utilize the Training Assembly for Criticality Safety (TACS). The original intent of HS-3200 was to provide LLNL fissile material handlers with a practical hands-on experience as a supplement to the academic training they receive biennially in HS-3100, ''Fundamentals of Criticality Safety'', as required by ANSI/ANS-8.20-1991, ''Nuclear Criticality Safety Training''. HS-3200 is to be enhanced to also address the training needs of nuclear criticality safety professionals under the auspices of the NNSA Nuclear Criticality Safety Program.

Heinrichs, D P

2006-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

298

Information Request  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 25, 2008 November 25, 2008 TO: Sue Tierney, Phil Niedzielski-Eichner, Skila Harris FROM: Chris Kouts SUBJECT: Information Request As requested, enclosed is the additional information you requested yesterday. 1. Testimony: * September 24, 2008 before the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, * July 15, 2008 before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce * October 4, 2007 before the House Committee on the Budget and Chairman Spratt 2. Proposed Legislation "Nuclear Fuel Management and Disposal Act" submitted to Congress March 6, 2007 3. State-by-State Maps that outline each state's electricity generation mix, commercial spent nuclear fuel inventories, and payments into the Nuclear Waste Fund The additional information on the history of the use of engineered barriers will be

299

Local Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Local Information Local Information Local Information Welcome to Golden, Colorado, the location of the 2014 Electrical Safety Workshop. Visiting NREL The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has research facilities and offices at several locations in Golden, Colorado (near Boulder), and in Washington, D.C. In Golden, you'll find the NREL Education Center, along with many of our research laboratories and administrative offices. The National Wind Technology Center is a separate facility located about 5 miles south of Boulder. Read more » Transportation NREL is accessible via bus on the Regional Transportation District (RTD) Route 20 from Aurora and Denver. Route 20 travels along 20th Avenue and ends at the NREL Education Center. Visit the RTD Web site or call 303-299-6000 to plan your trip or for more

300

AN INFORMATION STRATEGY UNIVERSITY OF SASKATCHEWAN  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to information management, business intelligence and performance measurement activities (such as developing and providing "business intelligence" solutions to attend to information needs are new to our campus. Since we. · implementing "business intelligence" solutions that allow us to obtain the most value from our information

Saskatchewan, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Energy Information Administration  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Internal PMA Scorecard for Human Capital Management (HCM) - FY 2006, Quarter 4 Office: Energy Information Administration Progress Score: Status Score: Requirements for HCM Plan 4th QTR REQUIREMENTS FY 06, Q4 Comments Integrate HCM Plan into decision-making processes - Plan linked to DOE mission, strategy, and goals - designates accountable officials Link performance appraisal plans and awards to DOE mission & goals for SES, managers, and more than 60% of workforce (HQ and Field); discuss difference between various levels of performance, discuss consequences based on performance HCM is linked to EIA's mission, strategy, and goals. Employee performance plans have at least one critical element with corresponding tasks supporting

302

The Value of Information from Water Sampling in Massachusetts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Bayesian decision framework is used to determine the value of information from water sampling with respect to alternative pollution abatement strategies. The critical low stream flow months of August 1966-77 for a New England river basin are ...

Kevin M. Moore; Bernard J. Morzuch

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Self-Adaptive Systems for Information Survivability: PMOP and AWDRAT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information systems form the backbones of the critical infrastructures of modern societies. Unfortunately, these systems are highly vulnerable to attacks that can result in enormous damage. Furthermore, traditional approaches ...

Shrobe, Howard

2007-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

304

Processes for Software in Safety Critical Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two complementary standards are compared, both of which are concerned with the production of quality software. One, IEC 61508, is concerned with the safety of software intensive systems and the other, ISO/IEC TR 15504, takes a process view of software capability assessment. The standards are independent, though both standards build on ISO/IEC 12207. The paper proposes a correspondence between the safety integrity levels (SILs) of 61508 and the capability levels (CLs) of 15504, and considers the appropriateness of the 15504 reference model as a framework for assessing safety critical software processes. Empirical work from the SPICE trials and COCOMO II is used to support the arguments of the paper as well as to investigate their consequences. The development of a 15504 compatible assessment model for software in safety critical systems is proposed. Keywords Process assessment, safety critical software, international standards 1

Benediktsson Hunter And; O Benediktsson; R B Hunter; A D Mcgettrick

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Utility-driven proactive management of availability in enterprise-scale information flows  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enterprises rely critically on the timely and sustained delivery of information. To support this need, we augment information flow middleware with new functionality that provides high levels of availability to distributed applications while at the same ...

Zhongtang Cai; Vibhore Kumar; Brian F. Cooper; Greg Eisenhauer; Karsten Schwan; Robert E. Strom

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Analysis of fresh fuel critical experiments appropriate for burnup credit validation  

SciTech Connect

The ANS/ANS-8.1 standard requires that calculational methods used in determining criticality safety limits for applications outside reactors be validated by comparison with appropriate critical experiments. This report provides a detailed description of 34 fresh fuel critical experiments and their analyses using the SCALE-4.2 code system and the 27-group ENDF/B-IV cross-section library. The 34 critical experiments were selected based on geometry, material, and neutron interaction characteristics that are applicable to a transportation cask loaded with pressurized-water-reactor spent fuel. These 34 experiments are a representative subset of a much larger data base of low-enriched uranium and mixed-oxide critical experiments. A statistical approach is described and used to obtain an estimate of the bias and uncertainty in the calculational methods and to predict a confidence limit for a calculated neutron multiplication factor. The SCALE-4.2 results for a superset of approximately 100 criticals are included in uncertainty analyses, but descriptions of the individual criticals are not included.

DeHart, M.D.; Bowman, S.M.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information FAQ * Widget * Site Map Information Bridge Home * Basic Search * Fielded Search * Alerts * Help Bookmark and Share...

308

CRITICALITY EXCURSION OF NOVEMBER 10, 1961  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A criticality excursion occurred at the Oak Ridge Critical Experiments Laboratory on November l0, l961 as enriched uranium metal, neutron reflected and moderated by hydrogen, was being assembled. It is estimated that the energy yield was between 10/sup 15/ and 10/sup 16/ fissions. There was no personnel exposure or property damage. Fission product contamination, both airborne and contained in the metal, decayed sufficiently overnight to allow unhindered continuation of the experiment. The excursion was caused by a too rapid approach of the two sections of uranium constituting the experiment. (auth)

Callihan, D.

1962-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

309

Critical Magnetic Field Determination of Superconducting Materials  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superconducting RF technology is becoming more and more important. With some recent cavity test results showing close to or even higher than the critical magnetic field of 170-180 mT that had been considered a limit, it is very important to develop a way to correctly measure the critical magnetic field (H{sup RF}{sub c}) of superconductors in the RF regime. Using a 11.4 GHz, 50-MW, electric field at the sample surface. A model of the system is presented in this paper along with a discussion of preliminary experimental data.

Canabal, A.; Tajima, T.; /Los Alamos; Dolgashev, V.A.; Tantawi, S.G.; /SLAC; Yamamoto, T.; /Tsukuba, Natl. Res. Lab. Metrol.

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

310

Basic criticality relations for gas core design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Minimum critical fissile concentrations are calculated for U-233, U-235, Pu-239, and Am-242m mixed homogeneously with hydrogen at temperatures to 15,000K. Minimum critical masses of the same mixtures in a 1000 liter sphere are also calculated. It is shown that propellent efficiencies of a gas core fizzler engine using Am-242m as fuel would exceed those in a solid core engine as small as 1000L operating at 100 atmospheres pressure. The same would be true for Pu-239 and possibly U-233 at pressures of 1000 atm. or at larger volumes.

Tanner, J.E.

1992-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

311

Probaability of Criticality for MOX SNF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this calculation is to provide a conservative (upper bound) estimate of the probability of criticality for mixed oxide (MOX) spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of the Westinghouse pressurized water reactor (PWR) design that has been proposed for use. with the Plutonium Disposition Program (Ref. 1, p. 2). This calculation uses a Monte Carlo technique similar to that used for ordinary commercial SNF (Ref. 2, Sections 2 and 5.2). Several scenarios, covering a range of parameters, are evaluated for criticality. Parameters specifying the loss of fission products and iron oxide from the waste package are particularly important. This calculation is associated with disposal of MOX SNF.

P. Gottlieb

1999-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Dehydration of acetic acid-water mixtures with near critical and supercritical fluid solvents  

SciTech Connect

Equilibrium tie lines and phase densities are presented for acetic acid-water mixtures with near critical propane at 361K and 52 bar. Experimental measurements were obtained with a static technique; the equilibrium phases were directly sampled with high-pressure liquid sample injection valves at the temperature and pressure of interest. The data obtained in this work indicate that near critical propane can be used to facilitate the production of glacial acetic acid from dilute acetic acid-water solutions. Both these experimental data and the authors earlier results for acetic acid-water mixtures with supercritical carbon dioxide have been used to test an equation of state which has recently been developed by Grenzheuser and Gmehling for systems which contain associating fluids. Results indicate that the equation's pure component parameters need to be refitted to represent the critical region more accurately.

McCully, M.A.; Mullins, J.C.; Thies, M.C.; Hartley, I.J.

1988-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

314

CRITICALITY HAZOP EFFICIENTLY EVALUATING HAZARDS OF NEW OR REVISED CRITICALITY SAFETY EVALUATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The 'Criticality HazOp' technique, as developed at Hanford's Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP), has allowed for efficiencies enabling shortening of the time necessary to complete new or revised criticality safety evaluation reports (CSERs). For example, in the last half of 2007 at PFP, CSER revisions undergoing the 'Criticality HazOp' process were completed at a higher rate than previously achievable. The efficiencies gained through use of the 'Criticality HazOp' process come from the preliminary narrowing of potential scenarios for the Criticality analyst to fully evaluate in preparation of the new or revised CSER, and from the use of a systematized 'Criticality HazOp' group assessment of the relevant conditions to show which few parameter/condition/deviation combinations actually require analytical effort. The 'Criticality HazOp' has not only provided efficiencies of time, but has brought to criticality safety evaluation revisions the benefits of a structured hazard evaluation method and the enhanced insight that may be gained from direct involvement of a team in the process. In addition, involved personnel have gained a higher degree of confidence and understanding of the resulting CSER product.

CARSON DM

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

315

Understanding Bulk Power Reliability: The Importance of Good Data and A Critical Review of Existing Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bulk power system reliability is of critical importance to the electricity sector. Complete and accurate information on events affecting the bulk power system is essential for assessing trends and efforts to maintain or improve reliability. Yet, current sources of this information were not designed with these uses in mind. They were designed, instead, to support real-time emergency notification to industry and government first-responders. This paper reviews information currently collected by both industry and government sources for this purpose and assesses factors that might affect their usefulness in supporting the academic literature that has relied upon them to draw conclusions about the reliability of the US electric power system.

Fisher, Emily; Eto, Joseph H.; LaCommare, Kristina Hamachi

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

316

Independent Oversight Review of Nevada Site Office Criticality...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Safety CEF Criticality Experiments Facility CRAD Criteria and Review Approach Documents CSP Criticality Safety Plan DAF Device Assembly Facility DOE Department of Energy DSA...

317

CYBER-RELATED CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CYBER-RELATED CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION MEASURES, IG-0545 CYBER-RELATED CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE IDENTIFICATION AND PROTECTION MEASURES, IG-0545 In...

318

Surveillance Guide - NSS 18.1 Criticality Safety  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CRITICALITY SAFETY CRITICALITY SAFETY 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to ensure that effective programs have been developed and implemented to protect the public and DOE's workers from unplanned criticality. The programs should minimize the potential for inadvertent criticality, provide appropriate training for personnel on criticality hazards and procedures for preventing inadvertent criticality, and provide appropriate systems to detect such criticalities and warn workers. The surveillance activities provide a basis for evaluating the effectiveness of policies, programs, and procedures and for reviewing compliance with specific DOE requirements. 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 5480.24, Nuclear Criticality Safety

319

Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) Energy: Critical Infrastructure and Key...

320

Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key Resources Sector-Specific Plan as input to the National Infrastructure Protection Plan (Redacted) Energy Critical Infrastructure and Key...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project Idaho Governor Praises DOE, Contractor Effort for Resuming Critical Cleanup Project July 30, 2013 -...

322

The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and more efficient use to significantly lower global demand for critical materials. In 2011 DOE updated its criticality assessments and provided in-depth market and technology...

323

Computer-aided modeling of superconducting striplines with ground planes using critical state models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for publication 29 May 2001 The effect of ground planes on the current-induced critical states and flux and the field and current distribution10,11 and the surface impedance from hysteretic loss4 was obtained penetration for a thin superconducting strip carrying a microwave current has been calculated numerically

Sridhar, Srinivas

324

Estimates for the energy density of critical points of a class of conformally invariant variational problems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the energy density of critical points of a class of conformally invariant variational problems with small energy on the unit 2-disk B_1 lies in the local Hardy space h^1(B_1). As a corollary we obtain a new proof of the energy convexity and uniqueness result for weakly harmonic maps with small energy on B_1.

Lamm, Tobias

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Analysis of Godiva-IV delayed-critical and static super-prompt-critical conditions  

SciTech Connect

Super-prompt-critical burst experiments were conducted on the Godiva-IV assembly at Los Alamos National Laboratory from the 1960s through 2005. Detailed and simplified benchmark models have been constructed for four delayed-critical experiments and for the static phase of a super-prompt-critical burst experiment. In addition, a two-dimensional cylindrical model has been developed for the super-prompt-critical condition. Criticality calculations have been performed for all of those models with four modern nuclear data libraries: ENDFIB-VI, ENDF/8-VII.0, JEFF-3.1 , and JENDL-3.3. Overall, JENDL-3.3 produces the best agreement with the reference values for k{sub eff}.

Mosteller, Russell D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goda, Joetta M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Current Competition Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 48243. TIP 2010 White Papers. Manufacturing and Biomanufacturing: Materials Advances and Critical Processes. Submitting ...

2011-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

327

National Information Assurance Partnership  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Lines Substation Equipment Critical Operational Data Performance Metering Events and Alarms Communication Methods Directly wired Power ...

2007-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

328

Integrating Equipment Health Information Into Grid Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In recent years, grid operators have expressed keen interest in having equipment health information available in real time. The health status of critical power system equipment can help operators assess situations, identify associated risks, and develop mitigation strategies/solutions in a time frame commensurate with the risk level. Health status information can also help operators recognize potential failures and take proactive actions, such as unloading a transformer or breaker that has shown signs of...

2011-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

329

Personal information - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personal information. ... Next: Academic information, Prizes and Up: Curriculum Vitae Previous: Curriculum Vitae. Personal information. Name: Jonathan...

330

U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users 5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code September 21, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP SiteScope v11.10, v11.11, v11.12 for Windows, Linux and Solaris ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin Document ID: c03489683 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027547 CVE-2012-3259 CVE-2012-3260 CVE-2012-3261 CVE-2012-3262 CVE-2012-3263 CVE-2012-3264 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. A remote user can execute

331

U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users 5: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code U-265: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code September 21, 2012 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: HP SiteScope Bugs in SiteScope SOAP Feature Let Remote Users Obtain Information and Execute Arbitrary Code PLATFORM: HP SiteScope v11.10, v11.11, v11.12 for Windows, Linux and Solaris ABSTRACT: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. reference LINKS: HP Security Bulletin Document ID: c03489683 SecurityTracker Alert ID: 1027547 CVE-2012-3259 CVE-2012-3260 CVE-2012-3261 CVE-2012-3262 CVE-2012-3263 CVE-2012-3264 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium Discussion: A vulnerability was reported in HP SiteScope. A remote user can execute

332

Supplemental information source document : socioeconomics.  

SciTech Connect

This document provides information on expenditures and staffing levels at Sandia National Laboratories/New Mexico (SNL/NM). This report is based on the best available information obtained from Sandia Corporation for Fiscal Years 2008 and 2009, and was prepared in support of future analyses, including those that may be performed as part of the SNL/NM Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement.

Sedore, Lora Jeannette

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Finding critical thresholds for defining bursts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A burst, i.e., an unusally high frequency of an event in a time-window, is interesting in monitoring systems as it often indicates abnormality. While the detection of bursts is well addressed, the question of what "critical" thresholds, on the number ... Keywords: analytics for temporal data, massive data analytics

Bibudh Lahiri; Ioannis Akrotirianakis; Fabian Moerchen

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Nuclear data for criticality safety - current issues  

SciTech Connect

Traditionally, nuclear data evaluations have been performed in support of the analysis and design of thermal and fast reactors. In general, the neutron spectra characteristic of the thermal and fast systems used for data testing are predominantly in the low- and high-energy range with a relatively small influence from the intermediate-energy range. In the area of nuclear criticality safety, nuclear systems arising from applications involving fissionable materials outside reactors can lead to situations very different from those most commonly found in reactor analysis and design. These systems are not limited to thermal or fast and may have significant influence from the intermediate energy range. The extension of the range of applicability of the nuclear data evaluation beyond thermal and fast systems is therefore needed to cover problems found in nuclear criticality safety. Before criticality safety calculations are performed, the bias and uncertainties of the codes and cross sections that are used must be determined. The most common sources of uncertainties, in general, are the calculational methodologies and the uncertainties related to the nuclear data, such as the microscopic cross sections, entering into the calculational procedure. The aim here is to focus on the evaluated nuclear data pertaining to applications in nuclear criticality safety.

Leal, L.C.; Jordan, W.C.; Wright, R.Q.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Reactor Testing and Qualification: Prioritized High-level Criticality Testing Needs  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) were tasked with reviewing possible criticality testing needs to support development of the fission surface power system reactor design. Reactor physics testing can provide significant information to aid in development of technologies associated with small, fast spectrum reactors that could be applied for non-terrestrial power systems, leading to eventual system qualification. Several studies have been conducted in recent years to assess the data and analyses required to design and build a space fission power system with high confidence that the system will perform as designed [Marcille, 2004a, 2004b; Weaver, 2007; Parry et al., 2008]. This report will provide a summary of previous critical tests and physics measurements that are potentially applicable to the current reactor design (both those that have been benchmarked and those not yet benchmarked), summarize recent studies of potential nuclear testing needs for space reactor development and their applicability to the current baseline fission surface power (FSP) system design, and provide an overview of a suite of tests (separate effects, sub-critical or critical) that could fill in the information database to improve the accuracy of physics modeling efforts as the FSP design is refined. Some recommendations for tasks that could be completed in the near term are also included. Specific recommendations on critical test configurations will be reserved until after the sensitivity analyses being conducted by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are completed (due August 2011).

S. Bragg-Sitton; J. Bess; J. Werner; G. Harms; S. Bailey

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

DRY TRANSFER FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

This design calculation updates the previous criticality evaluation for the fuel handling, transfer, and staging operations to be performed in the Dry Transfer Facility (DTF) including the remediation area. The purpose of the calculation is to demonstrate that operations performed in the DTF and RF meet the nuclear criticality safety design criteria specified in the ''Project Design Criteria (PDC) Document'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171599], Section 4.9.2.2), the nuclear facility safety requirement in ''Project Requirements Document'' (Canori and Leitner 2003 [DIRS 166275], p. 4-206), the functional/operational nuclear safety requirement in the ''Project Functional and Operational Requirements'' document (Curry 2004 [DIRS 170557], p. 75), and the functional nuclear criticality safety requirements described in the ''Dry Transfer Facility Description Document'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173737], p. 3-8). A description of the changes is as follows: (1) Update the supporting calculations for the various Category 1 and 2 event sequences as identified in the ''Categorization of Event Sequences for License Application'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 171429], Section 7). (2) Update the criticality safety calculations for the DTF staging racks and the remediation pool to reflect the current design. This design calculation focuses on commercial spent nuclear fuel (SNF) assemblies, i.e., pressurized water reactor (PWR) and boiling water reactor (BWR) SNF. U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Management (EM) owned SNF is evaluated in depth in the ''Canister Handling Facility Criticality Safety Calculations'' (BSC 2005 [DIRS 173284]) and is also applicable to DTF operations. Further, the design and safety analyses of the naval SNF canisters are the responsibility of the U.S. Department of the Navy (Naval Nuclear Propulsion Program) and will not be included in this document. Also, note that the results for the Monitored Geologic Repository (MGR) Site specific Cask (MSC) calculations are limited to the specific design chosen (see Assumption 3.4). A more current design will be included in the next revision of the criticality calculations for the Aging Facility. In addition, this calculation is valid for the current design as provided in Attachment III of the DTF and may not reflect the ongoing design evolution of the facility. However, it is anticipated that design changes to the facility layout will have little or no impact on the criticality results and/or conclusions presented in this document.

C.E. Sanders

2005-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

337

Information Repository  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 Information Repository Documents 3 Information Repository Documents WIPP Annual Waste Minimization Report Transmittal of the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Annual Waste Minimization Report, dated November 14, 2013 Class 1 Permit Modifications and NMED Responses Class 1 Modification, August 29, 2013 WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088. (1. revise a course outline; 2. revise table and panel figures to include Panel 7; 3. update description related to Type B Packages; and 4. update TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT figures) JE Kieling, NMED dated October 13, 2013 Fee Assessment Class 1 Permit Modification WIPP Hazardous Waste Facility Permit EPA I.D. Number NM4890139088-TSDF (Revise a Course Outline; Revise Table and Panel Figures to Include Panel 7; Update Descriptions Related to Type B Packages; and Update TRUPACT-ll and HalfPACT Figures) JM Kieling, NMED dated September 23, 2013

338

Informal Report  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - W-^^ LA-8034-MS ^ - - ^ / Informal Report "c o O o -*-* "co > Specific Heat and Thermal Conductivity of Explosives, Mixtures, and Plastic-Bonded Explosives Determined Experimentally \mm ^ts\ LOS ALAMOS SCIENTIFIC LABORATORY Post Office Box 1663 Los Alamos. New Mexico 87545 DISTR!DU7irM o r TdiS BGGbT.lENT IS UNLIMITED DISCLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency Thereof, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately

339

Critical Path-Based Thread Placement for NUMA Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multicore multiprocessors use Non Uniform Memory Architecture (NUMA) to improve their scalability. However,NUMA introduces performance penalties due to remote memory accesses. Without efficiently managing data layout and thread mapping to cores, scientific applications, even if they are optimized for NUMA, may suffer performance loss. In this paper, we present an algorithm that optimizes the placement of OpenMP threads on NUMA processors. By collecting information from hardware counters and defining new metrics to capture the effects of thread placement, the algorithm reduces NUMA performance penalty by minimizing the critical path of OpenMP parallel regions and by avoiding local memory resource contention. We evaluate our algorithm with NPB benchmarks and achieve performance improvement between 8.13% and 25.68%, compared to the OS default scheduling.

Su, Chun-Yi [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Li, Dong [ORNL; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios [FORTH-ICS; Grove, Matthew [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); Cameron, Kirk W. [Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University (Virginia Tech); de Supinski, Bronis R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Improved criticality search techniques for low and high enriched systems  

SciTech Connect

A new automated search technique has been developed to improve the computational efficiency of performing criticality searches on low and high enriched systems with codes such as ANISN and KENO-IV. The technique employs a least-squares fit to a cubic polynomial on parameter values that have been previously generated either by the Extended Mean Value Theorem (EMVT) or by previous curve fits. The solution of the cubic for its roots at the desired value of K-effective completes one pass for the fixed value search while the solution of its derivative provides information about maximum values. This new search technique has been implemented in a FORTRAN routine called OPTMIZ which will eventually be part of a module in the SCALE system.

Lorek, M.J.; Dodds, H.L.; Petrie, L.M.; Westfall, R.M.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff  

SciTech Connect

A training and qualification program for nuclear criticality safety technical staff personnel has been developed and implemented. The program is compliant with requirements and provides evidence that a systematic approach has been taken to indoctrinate new technical staff. Development involved task analysis to determine activities where training was necessary and the standard which must be attained to qualify. Structured mentoring is used where experienced personnel interact with candidates using checksheets to guide candidates through various steps and to provide evidence that steps have been accomplished. Credit can be taken for the previous experience of personnel by means of evaluation boards which can credit or modify checksheet steps. Considering just the wealth of business practice and site specific information a new person at a facility needs to assimilate, the program has been effective in indoctrinating new technical staff personnel and integrating them into a productive role. The program includes continuing training.

Taylor, R.G.; Worley, C.A.

1996-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

342

Update Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Washington, DC 20585This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIAs data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the Department of Energy or other Federal agencies.

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Mercury Information Clearinghouse  

SciTech Connect

The Canadian Electricity Association (CEA) identified a need and contracted the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) to create and maintain an information clearinghouse on global research and development activities related to mercury emissions from coal-fired electric utilities. With the support of CEA, the Center for Air Toxic Metals{reg_sign} (CATM{reg_sign}) Affiliates, and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the EERC developed comprehensive quarterly information updates that provide a detailed assessment of developments in the various areas of mercury monitoring, control, policy, and research. A total of eight topical reports were completed and are summarized and updated in this final CEA quarterly report. The original quarterly reports can be viewed at the CEA Web site (www.ceamercuryprogram.ca). In addition to a comprehensive update of previous mercury-related topics, a review of results from the CEA Mercury Program is provided. Members of Canada's coal-fired electricity generation sector (ATCO Power, EPCOR, Manitoba Hydro, New Brunswick Power, Nova Scotia Power Inc., Ontario Power Generation, SaskPower, and TransAlta) and CEA, have compiled an extensive database of information from stack-, coal-, and ash-sampling activities. Data from this effort are also available at the CEA Web site and have provided critical information for establishing and reviewing a mercury standard for Canada that is protective of environment and public health and is cost-effective. Specific goals outlined for the CEA mercury program included the following: (1) Improve emission inventories and develop management options through an intensive 2-year coal-, ash-, and stack-sampling program; (2) Promote effective stack testing through the development of guidance material and the support of on-site training on the Ontario Hydro method for employees, government representatives, and contractors on an as-needed basis; (3) Strengthen laboratory analytical capabilities through analysis and quality assurance programs; and (4) Create and maintain an information clearinghouse to ensure that all parties can keep informed on global mercury research and development activities.

Chad A. Wocken; Michael J. Holmes; Dennis L. Laudal; Debra F. Pflughoeft-Hassett; Greg F. Weber; Nicholas V. C. Ralston; Stanley J. Miller; Grant E. Dunham; Edwin S. Olson; Laura J. Raymond; John H. Pavlish; Everett A. Sondreal; Steven A. Benson

2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

344

Giddens's structuration theory and information systems research  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The work of the contemporary British sociologist Anthony Giddens, and in particular his structuration theory, has been widely cited by Information Systems researchers. This paper presents a critical review of the work of Giddens and its application in ... Keywords: IS research, review, structuration theory

Matthew R. Jones; Helena Karsten

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Reactor Physics and Criticality Benchmark Evaluations for Advanced Nuclear Fuel - Final Technical Report  

SciTech Connect

The nuclear industry interest in advanced fuel and reactor design often drives towards fuel with uranium enrichments greater than 5 wt% 235U. Unfortunately, little data exists, in the form of reactor physics and criticality benchmarks, for uranium enrichments ranging between 5 and 10 wt% 235U. The primary purpose of this project is to provide benchmarks for fuel similar to what may be required for advanced light water reactors (LWRs). These experiments will ultimately provide additional information for application to the criticality-safety bases for commercial fuel facilities handling greater than 5 wt% 235U fuel.

William Anderson; James Tulenko; Bradley Rearden; Gary Harms

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

346

Criticality safety training at the Hot Fuel Examination Facility  

SciTech Connect

HFEF comprises four hot cells and out-of-cell support facilities for the US breeder program. The HFEF criticality safety program includes training in the basic theory of criticality and in specific criticality hazard control rules that apply to HFEF. A professional staff-member oversees the implementation of the criticality prevention program. (DLC)

Garcia, A.S.; Courtney, J.C.; Thelen, V.N.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

VENUS-F: A fast lead critical core for benchmarking  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The zero-power thermal neutron water-moderated facility VENUS at SCK-CEN has been extensively used for benchmarking in the past. In accordance with GEN-IV design tasks (fast reactor systems and accelerator driven systems), the VENUS facility was modified in 2007-2010 into the fast neutron facility VENUS-F with solid core components. This paper introduces the projects GUINEVERE and FREYA, which are being conducted at the VENUS-F facility, and it presents the measurement results obtained at the first critical core. Throughout the projects other fast lead benchmarks also will be investigated. The measurement results of the different configurations can all be used as fast neutron benchmarks. (authors)

Kochetkov, A.; Wagemans, J.; Vittiglio, G. [SCK.CEN, Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

From chemical freezeout to critical conditions in heavy ion collisions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We compare the statistical thermodynamics of hadron resonance gas with recent LGT results at finite chemical potential. We argue that for $T\\leq T_c$ the equation of state derived from Monte--Carlo simulations of two quark--flavor QCD at finite chemical potential is consistent with that of a hadron resonance gas when applying the same set of approximations as used in LGT calculations. We indicate the relation of chemical freezeout conditions obtained from a detailed analysis of particle production in heavy ion collisions with the critical conditions required for deconfinement. We argue that the position of a hadron--quark gluon boundary line in temperature chemical potential plane can be determined in terms of the resonance gas model by the condition of fixed energy density.

Krzysztof Redlich

2004-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

349

SWERA Information Sheet | OpenEI  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Information Sheet Information Sheet Dataset Summary Description (Abstract): Project Overview As energy planners seek cleaner energy solutions using renewable energy technologies, the availability of reliable, accurate, and easily accessible solar and wind energy resource data is critical and can greatly accelerate the deployment of these technologies. The Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment (SWERA) is a pilot project designed to compile such data in 13 developing countries and to facilitate investments in solar and wind energy projects.With a US$9.3 million investment including US$6.8 million from the Global Environment Facility (GEF), SWERA is developing new informational tools for energy planners and project developers. These tools include regional and national maps of solar and wind energyresources and a geographical information system (GIS) that will allow easy access to the detailed information contained in these maps (see box right). These information tools can then be used to screen projects at their pre-investment planning stage.

350

Modular invariant partition function of critical dense polymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A lattice model of critical dense polymers is solved exactly for arbitrary system size on the torus. More generally, an infinite family of lattice loop models is studied on the torus and related to the corresponding Fortuin-Kasteleyn random cluster models. Starting with a cylinder, the commuting periodic single-row transfer matrices are built from the periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra extended by the shift operators Omega and Omega^{-1}. In this enlarged algebra, the non-contractible loop fugacity is alpha and the contractible loop fugacity is beta. The torus is formed by gluing the top and bottom of the cylinder. This gives rise to a variety of non-contractible loops winding around the torus. Because of their nonlocal nature, the standard matrix trace does not produce the proper geometric torus. Instead, we introduce a modified matrix trace for this purpose. This is achieved by using a representation of the enlarged periodic Temperley-Lieb algebra with a parameter v that keeps track of the winding of defects on the cylinder. The transfer matrix representatives and their eigenvalues thus depend on v. The modified trace is constructed as a linear functional on planar connectivity diagrams in terms of matrix traces Tr_d (with a fixed number of defects d) and Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind. For critical dense polymers, where beta=0, the transfer matrix eigenvalues are obtained by solving a functional equation in the form of an inversion identity. The solution depends on d and is subject to selection rules which we prove. Simplifications occur if all non-contractible loop fugacities are set to alpha=2 in which case the traces are evaluated at v=1. In the continuum scaling limit, the corresponding conformal torus partition function obtained from finite-size corrections agrees with the known modular invariant partition function of symplectic fermions.

Alexi Morin-Duchesne; Paul A. Pearce; Jorgen Rasmussen

2013-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

351

Information management as an enabler of knowledge management maturity: A South African perspective  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper explores the much ignored but critically important subject of the perceived relationship between information and communications technology (ICT), information management (IM) and knowledge management (KM). Defining the border between ICT, IM ... Keywords: Information and communications technology, Information management, Knowledge management, Knowledge management maturity

C. J. (Neels) Kruger; Roy D. Johnson

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Approval of the Critical Decision 4.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

SUBJECT: ACTION: Approval of the Critical Decision 4 for the Closeout SUBJECT: ACTION: Approval of the Critical Decision 4 for the Closeout of the General Atomics (GA) Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Decontamination and Decommissioning (D&D) Project, Project Baseline Summary VL-GA-0012, and the Transfer for the GA Project Files to the Office of Legacy Management (LM) ISSUE: None BACKGROUND: Activities associated with the cleanup of the GA HCF and surrounding site were completed on September 28,2003. The GA site has been remediated to negotiated cleanup standards and released by the U. S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the State of California Department of Health Services Radiological Health Branch (CAL-RHB) to unrestricted use. All project generated waste and legacy spent fuel materials have been dispositioned. GAts Special Nuclear

353

Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews RM  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Quality Assurance for Quality Assurance for Critical Decision Reviews Module March 2010 CD-0 O 0 OFFICE OF Q C CD-1 F ENVIRO Standard R Quality A Rev Critical Decis CD-2 M ONMENTAL Review Plan Assuranc view Module sion (CD) Ap CD March 2010 L MANAGE n (SRP) e (QA) e pplicability D-3 EMENT CD-4 Post Ope eration Standard Review Plan, 2 nd Edition, March 2010 i FOREWORD The Standard Review Plan (SRP) 1 provides a consistent, predictable corporate review framework to ensure that issues and risks that could challenge the success of Office of Environmental Management (EM) projects are identified early and addressed proactively. The internal EM project review process encompasses key milestones established by DOE O 413.3A, Change 1, Program and Project Management for the Acquisition of Capital Assets, DOE-STD-1189-2008,

354

Fuel Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cells for Critical Cells for Critical Communications Backup Power Greg Moreland SENTECH, Inc. Supporting the U.S. Department of Energy August 6, 2008 APCO Annual Conference and Expo 2 2 Fuel cells use hydrogen to create electricity, with only water and heat as byproducts Fuel Cell Overview * An individual fuel cell produces about 1 volt * Hundreds of individual cells can comprise a fuel cell stack * Fuel cells can be used to power a variety of applications -Bibliographic Database * Laptop computers (50-100 W) * Distributed energy stationary systems (5-250 kW) * Passenger vehicles (80-150 kW) * Central power generators (1-200 MW) 3 3 Stationary/ Backup Power Transportation Specialty Markets Nuclear Natural Gas (for transition period only) Coal (with carbon sequestration) Renewable

355

Magnetothermoelectric Response near Quantum Critical Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following on from our previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166801 (2007)] we examine the finite temperature magnetothermoelectric response in the vicinity of a quantum critical point (QCP). We begin with general scaling considerations relevant to an arbitrary QCP, either with or without Lorentz invariance, and in arbitrary dimension. In view of the broad connections to high temperature superconductivity, and cold atomic gases, we focus on the quantum critical fluctuations of the relativistic Landau--Ginzburg theory. This paradigmatic model arises in many contexts, and describes the (particle-hole symmetric) superfluid--Mott insulator quantum phase transition in the Bose--Hubbard model. The application of a magnetic field opens up a wide range of physical observables, and we present a detailed overview of the charge and thermal transport and thermodynamic response. We combine several different approaches including the epsilon expansion and associated Quantum Boltzmann Equation (QBE), entropy drift, and argument...

Bhaseen, M J; Sondhi, S L

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Information for Travelers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information for Travelers. Background Notes of Countries and International Organizations; Centers for Disease Control Health Information; ...

2012-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

357

Pervasive Information Technology Homepage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pervasive Information Technology. Pervasive information technology is the trend towards increasingly ubiquitous connected ...

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

358

Agriculture Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Agriculture Information at NIST. Agriculture Information at NIST. CCQM BAWG - P113, Relative Quantification ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

359

Information Retrieval Library (IRLIB)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Information Retrieval Library (IRLIB). Carolyn ... Information Retrieval Experiment (1981), book by Karen Sparck Jones. The ...

360

Role of criticality models in ANSI standards for nuclear criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

Two methods used in nuclear criticality safety evaluations in the area of neutron interaction among subcritical components of fissile materials are the solid angle and surface density techniques. The accuracy and use of these models are briefly discussed. (TFD)

Thomas, J.T.

1976-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Architecture for high critical current superconducting tapes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Improvements in critical current capacity for superconducting film structures are disclosed and include the use of, e.g., multilayer YBCO structures where individual YBCO layers are separated by a layer of an insulating material such as CeO.sub.2 and the like, a layer of a conducting material such as strontium ruthenium oxide and the like or by a second superconducting material such as SmBCO and the like.

Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Foltyn, Stephen R. (Los Alamos, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

362

Critical error rate of quantum-key-distribution protocols versus the size and dimensionality of the quantum alphabet  

SciTech Connect

A quantum-information analysis of how the size and dimensionality of the quantum alphabet affect the critical error rate of the quantum-key-distribution (QKD) protocols is given on an example of two QKD protocols--the six-state and {infinity}-state (i.e., a protocol with continuous alphabet) ones. In the case of a two-dimensional Hilbert space, it is shown that, under certain assumptions, increasing the number of letters in the quantum alphabet up to infinity slightly increases the critical error rate. Increasing additionally the dimensionality of the Hilbert space leads to a further increase in the critical error rate.

Sych, Denis V.; Grishanin, Boris A.; Zadkov, Victor N. [International Laser Center and Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119899 Moscow (Russian Federation)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Recent Changes to the Criticality Safety Program at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

During the 1996 audit, a corrective action program was developed and implemented to enhance the Criticality Safety Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Criticality Safety Program at LLNL has been rebuilt to combine a strong core criticality safety program with direct field support to floor operations. Field staff are integrated into the supported facility and program efforts. This method of operation effects all aspects of the criticality safety program including, as examples, development of criticality safety controls and training.

Pearson, J.S.; Burch, J.G.; Huang, S.T.

2001-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

364

INFORMAL REPORT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

q?% q?% LA-5031 -MS INFORMAL REPORT krs $ 1 0 s N o t e on Inverse Bremsstrahlung in Strong E!ect:omGgnetic c;alPl I j a l a m o s scientific laboratory of the University of California LOS A L A M O S , NEW MEXICO 8 7 5 4 4 U N I T E D S T A T E S A T O M I C E N E R G Y C O M M I S S I O N a This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by the United States Government. Neither the United States nor the United States Atomic Energy Commission, nor any of their employees, nor any of their contrac- tors, subcontractors, or their employees, makes any warranty, express or im- plied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, com- pleteness or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product or process dis- closed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights.

365

How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

How to Obtain Authorization to Import andor Export Natural Gas and LNG How to Obtain Authorization to Import andor Export Natural Gas and LNG Petroleum Reserves International...

366

How to Obtain Authorization to Import and/or Export Natural Gas...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Services Natural Gas Regulation How to Obtain Authorization to Import andor Export Natural Gas and LNG How to Obtain Authorization to Import andor Export Natural Gas...

367

License Application Chapter 5 Nuclear Criticality Safety  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

uranium or other fissile material outside of check-sources and various standards for radiological measurement calibration. As such, no criticality safety programs or procedures are maintained or implemented at the facility; however, the IIFP Integrated Safety Analysis (ISA), as documented in the ISA Summary, did evaluate the potential for a criticality accident at the IIFP Site. The only potential method of having a criticality accident at the facility involves the inadvertent receipt and processing of fissile materials, which is addressed in the ISA. Controls are established to verify that no enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) is received and processed at the facility. The cylinders processed at the IIFP Facility are the large, 14-ton or 10-ton UF6 tails cylinders, not the 2 -ton enriched product cylinders. Processing equipment at the plant, namely the autoclaves, is not sized to handle these smaller cylinders, so there is no method to feed enriched material into the processing plants. Additionally, each cylinder will be scanned with a detector to verify that the incoming cylinders do not contain fissile materials. The scan does not determine the shippers assay exactness for the cylinder contents, but does provide a reasonable indication if the cylinder is depleted or enriched. Both the receipt inspection and the scan for the assay at the Facility Site are maintained as Items Relied on for Safety (IROFS) controls. Also, feed suppliers (UF6 enrichment plants) have redundant and

Uranium De-conversion; Revision B

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Tools Tools Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: State Information on AddThis.com... State Information Click on the map below to obtain state-specific information on alternative fuel and advanced vehicle incentives and laws, locations of alternative fueling stations and truck stop electrification sites, area fuel prices,

369

Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) Criticality Alarm System Commercial Grade Item (CGI) Critical Characteristics  

SciTech Connect

This document specifies the critical characteristics for Commercial Grade Items (CGI) procured for PFP's criticality alarm system as required by HNF-PRO-268 and HNF-PRO-1819. These are the minimum specifications that the equipment must meet in order to properly perform its safety function. There may be several manufacturers or models that meet the critical characteristics for any one item. PFP's Criticality Alarm System includes the nine criticality alarm system panels and their associated hardware. This includes all parts up to the first breaker in the electrical distribution system. Specific system boundaries and justifications are contained in HNF-SD-CP-SDD-003, ''Definition and Means of Maintaining the Criticality Detectors and Alarms Portion of the PFP Safety Envelope.'' The procurement requirements associated with the system necessitates procurement of some system equipment as Commercial Grade Items in accordance with HNF-PRO-268, ''Control of Purchased Items and Services.''

WHITE, W.F.

1999-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

370

COMPARISON OF SEISMIC SIGNATURES OF FLARES OBTAINED BY SOHO/MICHELSON DOPPLER IMAGER AND GONG INSTRUMENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first observations of seismic responses to solar flares were carried out using time-distance (TD) and holography techniques applied to SOHO/Michelson Doppler Imager (MDI) Dopplergrams obtained from space and unaffected by terrestrial atmospheric disturbances. However, the ground-based network GONG is potentially a very valuable source of sunquake observations, especially in cases where space observations are unavailable. In this paper, we present an updated technique for pre-processing of GONG observations for the application of subjacent vantage holography. Using this method and TD diagrams, we investigate several sunquakes observed in association with M- and X-class solar flares and compare the outcomes with those reported earlier using MDI data. In both GONG and MDI data sets, for the first time, we also detect the TD ridge associated with the 2001 September 9 flare. Our results show reassuringly positive identification of sunquakes from GONG data that can provide further information about the physics of seismic processes associated with solar flares.

Zharkov, S.; Matthews, S. A. [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Zharkova, V. V. [Horton D Building, Department of Mathematics, University of Bradford, Bradford, BD7 1DP (United Kingdom)

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CRITICALITY SAFETY CALCULATIONS  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this design calculation is to perform a criticality evaluation of the Fuel Handling Facility (FHF) and the operations and processes performed therein. The current intent of the FHF is to receive transportation casks whose contents will be unloaded and transferred to waste packages (WP) or MGR Specific Casks (MSC) in the fuel transfer bays. Further, the WPs will also be prepared in the FHF for transfer to the sub-surface facility (for disposal). The MSCs will be transferred to the Aging Facility for storage. The criticality evaluation of the FHF features the following: (I) Consider the types of waste to be received in the FHF as specified below: (1) Uncanistered commercial spent nuclear fuel (CSNF); (2) Canistered CSNF (with the exception of horizontal dual-purpose canister (DPC) and/or multi-purpose canisters (MPCs)); (3) Navy canistered SNF (long and short); (4) Department of Energy (DOE) canistered high-level waste (HLW); and (5) DOE canistered SNF (with the exception of MCOs). (II) Evaluate the criticality analyses previously performed for the existing Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC)-certified transportation casks (under 10 CFR 71) to be received in the FHF to ensure that these analyses address all FHF conditions including normal operations, and Category 1 and 2 event sequences. (III) Evaluate FHF criticality conditions resulting from various Category 1 and 2 event sequences. Note that there are currently no Category 1 and 2 event sequences identified for FHF. Consequently, potential hazards from a criticality point of view will be considered as identified in the ''Internal Hazards Analysis for License Application'' document (BSC 2004c, Section 6.6.4). (IV) Assess effects of potential moderator intrusion into the fuel transfer bay for defense in depth. The SNF/HLW waste transfer activity (i.e., assembly and canister transfer) that is being carried out in the FHF has been classified as safety category in the ''Q-list'' (BSC 2003, p. A-6). Therefore, this design calculation is subject to the requirements of the ''Quality Assurance Requirements and Description'' (DOE 2004), even though the FHF itself has not yet been classified in the Q-list. Performance of the work scope as described and development of the associated technical product conform to the procedure AP-3.124, ''Design Calculations and Analyses''.

C.E. Sanders

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

372

Geneial Information  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

--- _____ --- _____ ii3 ' 6 f Geneial Information su-u+./ I The Commission maintains a residue storage area known as the Airport Site at Robertson, l Missouri. This site is located immediately north of the St. Louis Municipal Airport and east of the McIknnell Aircraft Corporation Plant on Rr~wn Road in St. Louis County. Consent to use and occupy the 21.7 acre tract was obtalned by the Manhattan Dlstrlot on Marsh 2, 19&6. T!ltle uas auqubed to the property on Janwry 3, 1947 by condemnation proceeding8 for ~%20,000. It was aerquired for the purpose of storing residues fxvm the llestrehan Street Refinery and the Metal Plant at Plant 4. A coveredcoarrrete storage pad &t x 250' was constructed for storing drums. A concrete pit 202' x 42* x 16' was constructed to store radium bearing residues (K-6). Ihe area was enclosed with a chaiu-

373

Historical. Information.  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Historical. Information. Historical. Information. ~ H.. 1 . General Project Rulison Manager' s Report, April. 1973 DISCLAIMER Portions of this document may be illegible in electronic image products. Images are produced from the best available original document. PROJECT RULISON MANAGER'S R E P O R T APRIL 197.3 UNITED STATES ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE Las Vegas, Nevada PREFACE , The R u l i s o n ' p r o j e c t , d e t o n a t e d September 1 0 , 1969, 'was t h e second n u c l e a r . d e t o n a t i o n designed t o d e t e r m i n e t h e economic and t e c h n i c a l f e a s i b i l i t y . of u s i n g n u c l e a r e x p l o s i v e s t o s t i m u l a t e an underground, low-productivity n a t u r a l gas r e s e r v o i r . The p r o j e c t was p a r t of t h e Atomic Energy Commission's (AEC) Plowshare program f o r d e v e l o p i n g p e a c e f u l a p p l i c a t i o n of n u c l e a r e x p l

374

A decision support system for secure information sharing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In both the commercial and defense sectors a compelling need is emerging for highly dynamic, yet risk optimized, sharing of information across traditional organizational boundaries. Risk optimal decisions to disseminate mission critical tactical intelligence ... Keywords: description logic, flexible information sharing, justification for non-shareability, semantic reasoner

Achille Fokoue; Mudhakar Srivatsa; Pankaj Rohatgi; Peter Wrobel; John Yesberg

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

A Discrepancy Model of Information System Personnel Turnover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turnover of information system (IS) personnel is a critical problem for organizations. To gain a better understanding of turnover, researchers have explored career orientations that characterize an employee's internal motivations and desires. The inability ... Keywords: Career Orientations, Career Satisfaction, Discrepancy Theory, Employee Turnover, Information Systems Personnel

James J. Jiang; Gary Klein

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

What's new? perspectives on freedom of information and the internet  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Critics of the notion or concept of "information society" have often made claims to put the new ICTs into a more historical and institutional context. As a response, in this chapter, the more than 200-year-old right of access to governmental information ...

Sonja Bugdahn

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Validation and Comparison of Carbon Sequestration Project Cost Models with Project Cost Data Obtained from the Southwest Partnership  

SciTech Connect

Obtaining formal quotes and engineering conceptual designs for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) sequestration sites and facilities is costly and time-consuming. Frequently, when looking at potential locations, managers, engineers and scientists are confronted with multiple options, but do not have the expertise or the information required to quickly obtain a general estimate of what the costs will be without employing an engineering firm. Several models for carbon compression, transport and/or injection have been published that are designed to aid in determining the cost of sequestration projects. A number of these models are used in this study, including models by J. Ogden, MIT's Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program Model, the Environmental Protection Agency and others. This report uses the information and data available from several projects either completed, in progress, or conceptualized by the Southwest Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership on Carbon Sequestration (SWP) to determine the best approach to estimate a project's cost. The data presented highlights calculated versus actual costs. This data is compared to the results obtained by applying several models for each of the individual projects with actual cost. It also offers methods to systematically apply the models to future projects of a similar scale. Last, the cost risks associated with a project of this scope are discussed, along with ways that have been and could be used to mitigate these risks.

Robert Lee; Reid Grigg; Brian McPherson

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

Free Software and Information via Computer Network  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Through anonymous ftp accounts accessible over the Internet computer network, one can obtain much free quality software, documentation, and information relevant to meteorology. A program named archie can locate sites that offer desired ...

Jon Ahlquist

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Understanding Bulk Power Reliability: The Importance of Good Data and A Critical Review of Existing Sources  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Understanding Bulk Power Reliability: Understanding Bulk Power Reliability: The Importance of Good Data and A Critical Review of Existing Sources Emily Fisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory esfisher@lbl.gov Joseph H. Eto Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory jheto@lbl.gov Kristina Hamachi LaCommare Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory kshamachi@lbl.gov Abstract Bulk power system reliability is of critical importance to the electricity sector. Complete and accurate information on events affecting the bulk power system is essential for assessing trends and efforts to maintain or improve reliability. Yet, current sources of this information were not designed with these uses in mind. They were designed, instead, to support real-time emergency notification to industry and government first-responders. This

380

DOE-STD-1135-99 Guidance for Nuclear Criticality Safety Engineer Training and Qualification  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5-99 5-99 September 1999 DOE STANDARD GUIDANCE FOR NUCLEAR CRITICALITY SAFETY ENGINEER TRAINING AND QUALIFICATION U.S. Department of Energy AREA SAFT Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. TS This document has been reproduced from the best available copy. Available to DOE and DOE contractors from ES&H Technical Information Services, U.S. Department of Energy, (800) 473-4375, fax: (301) 903-9823. Available to the public from the U.S. Department of Commerce, Technology Administration, National Technical Information Service, Springfield, VA 22161; (703) 605-6000. DOE-STD-1135-99 iii FOREWORD This Department of Energy Standard is required for use by all DOE Contractor criticality safety personnel. It contains guidelines that should be followed for NCS training and qualification

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

FAQS Qualification Card - Criticality Safety | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Criticality Safety Criticality Safety FAQS Qualification Card - Criticality Safety A key element for the Department's Technical Qualification Programs is a set of common Functional Area Qualification Standards (FAQS) and associated Job Task Analyses (JTA). These standards are developed for various functional areas of responsibility in the Department, including oversight of safety management programs identified as hazard controls in Documented Safety Analyses (DSA). For each functional area, the FAQS identify the minimum technical competencies and supporting knowledge and skills for a typical qualified individual working in the area. FAQC-CriticalitySafety.docx Description Criticality Safety Qualification Card More Documents & Publications FAQS Gap Analysis Qualification Card - Criticality Safety

382

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized process for cyber vulnerability assessment in compliance with the Critical Infrastructure Protection standards adopted by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation in 2006. This guide covers the planning, execution, and reporting process. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards "Cybersecurity for State Regulators" - NARUC Primer (June 2012)

383

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment This document describes a customized process for cyber vulnerability assessment in compliance with the Critical Infrastructure Protection standards adopted by the North American Electric Reliability Corporation in 2006. This guide covers the planning, execution, and reporting process. Guide to Critical Infrastructure Protection Cyber Vulnerability Assessment More Documents & Publications Wireless System Considerations When Implementing NERC Critical Infrastructure Protection Standards New No-Cost ANTFARM Tool Maps Control System Networks to Help Implement Cyber Security Standards "Cybersecurity for State Regulators" - NARUC Primer (June

384

Information Release Notice - Energy Information Administration  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

On February 22, 2010, the Energy Information Administration (EIA) will change the web addresses for key information releases in the Weekly Natural Gas Storage Report ...

385

REACT: Alternatives to Critical Materials in Magnets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

REACT Project: The 14 projects that comprise ARPA-Es REACT Project, short for Rare Earth Alternatives in Critical Technologies, are developing cost-effective alternatives to rare earths, the naturally occurring minerals with unique magnetic properties that are used in electric vehicle (EV) motors and wind generators. The REACT projects will identify low-cost and abundant replacement materials for rare earths while encouraging existing technologies to use them more efficiently. These alternatives would facilitate the widespread use of EVs and wind power, drastically reducing the amount of greenhouse gases released into the atmosphere.

None

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Critical phenomena in N=4 SYM plasma  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Strongly coupled N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills plasma at finite temperature and chemical potential for an R-symmetry charge undergoes a second order phase transition. We demonstrate that this phase transition is of the mean field theory type. We explicitly show that the model is in the dynamical universality class of 'model B' according to the classification of Hohenberg and Halperine, with dynamical critical exponent z=4. We study bulk viscosity in the mass deformed version of this theory in the vicinity of the phase transition. We point out that all available models of bulk viscosity at continuous phase transition are in conflict with our explicit holographic computations.

Alex Buchel

2010-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

387

For More Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

For More Information For More Information about the Conversion EIS Who to contact for more information about the Depleted UF6 Conversion EISs Please direct questions, comments, or...

388

Information Markets and Aggregation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Information Markets and Aggregation by Narahari Mohan PhatakSpring 2012 Information Markets and Aggregation CopyrightMohan Phatak Abstract Information Markets and Aggregation by

Phatak, Narahari Mohan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Finite size scaling for quantum criticality using the finite-element method  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Finite size scaling for the Schr\\"{o}dinger equation is a systematic approach to calculate the quantum critical parameters for a given Hamiltonian. This approach has been shown to give very accurate results for critical parameters by using a systematic expansion with global basis-type functions. Recently, the finite element method was shown to be a powerful numerical method for ab initio electronic structure calculations with a variable real-space resolution. In this work, we demonstrate how to obtain quantum critical parameters by combining the finite element method (FEM) with finite size scaling (FSS) using different ab initio approximations and exact formulations. The critical parameters could be atomic nuclear charges, internuclear distances, electron density, disorder, lattice structure, and external fields for stability of atomic, molecular systems and quantum phase transitions of extended systems. To illustrate the effectiveness of this approach we provide detailed calculations of applying FEM to approximate solutions for the two-electron atom with varying nuclear charge; these include Hartree-Fock, density functional theory under the local density approximation, and an "exact"' formulation using FEM. We then use the FSS approach to determine its critical nuclear charge for stability; here, the size of the system is related to the number of elements used in the calculations. Results prove to be in good agreement with previous Slater-basis set calculations and demonstrate that it is possible to combine finite size scaling with the finite-element method by using ab initio calculations to obtain quantum critical parameters. The combined approach provides a promising first-principles approach to describe quantum phase transitions for materials and extended systems.

Edwin Antillon; Birgit Wehefritz-Kaufmann; Sabre Kais

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

390

Method to obtain absolute impurity density profiles combining charge exchange and beam emission spectroscopy without absolute intensity calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Investigation of impurity transport properties in tokamak plasmas is essential and a diagnostic that can provide information on the impurity content is required. Combining charge exchange recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) and beam emission spectroscopy (BES), absolute radial profiles of impurity densities can be obtained from the CXRS and BES intensities, electron density and CXRS and BES emission rates, without requiring any absolute calibration of the spectra. The technique is demonstrated here with absolute impurity density radial profiles obtained in TEXTOR plasmas, using a high efficiency charge exchange spectrometer with high etendue, that measures the CXRS and BES spectra along the same lines-of-sight, offering an additional advantage for the determination of absolute impurity densities.

Kappatou, A.; Delabie, E. [FOM Institute DIFFER - Dutch Institute for Fundamental Energy Research, Association EURATOM-FOM, 3430 BE Nieuwegein (Netherlands); Jaspers, R. J. E.; Jakobs, M. A. [Science and Technology of Nuclear Fusion, Eindhoven University of Technology, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Marchuk, O.; Biel, W. [Institute for Energy and Climate Research, Forschungszentrum Julich GmbH, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, 52425 Julich (Germany)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

391

Freedom of Information Act | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Operational Management » Freedom of Information Act Operational Management » Freedom of Information Act Freedom of Information Act The Office of Information Resources is responsible for administering policies, programs, and procedures to ensure DOE compliance with the Freedom of Information Act (FOlA), 5 U.S.C. 552. The resources on these pages are provided to aid in finding answers to questions about programs of the Department of Energy and to obtain information that is publicly available without submitting a FOlA request. You may also search on the FOIA Portal that consists of documents previously released under the FOIA. If the information is not available here, submit a Freedom of Information Act request electronically. You may also mail in your FOIA request to the following address: FOIA Requester Service Center

392

Apparatus and method for critical current measurements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for the measurement of the critical current of a superconductive sample, e.g., a clad superconductive sample, the apparatus including a conductive coil, a means for maintaining the coil in proximity to a superconductive sample, an electrical connection means for passing a low amplitude alternating current through the coil, a cooling means for maintaining the superconductive sample at a preselected temperature, a means for passing a current through the superconductive sample, and, a means for monitoring reactance of the coil. The alternating current capable of generating a magnetic field sufficient to penetrate, e.g., any cladding, and to induce eddy currents in the superconductive material, passing a steadily increasing current through the superconductive material, the current characterized as having a different frequency than the alternating current, and, monitoring the reactance of the coil with a phase sensitive detector as the current passed through the superconductive material is steadily increased whereby critical current of the superconductive material can be observed as the point whereat a component of impedance deviates.

Martin, J.A.; Dye, R.C.

1991-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

393

Assessment of national systems for obtaining local acceptance of waste management siting and routing activities  

SciTech Connect

There is a rich mixture of formal and informal approaches being used in our sister nuclear democracies in their attempts to deal with the difficulties of obtaining local acceptance for siting of waste management facilities and activities. Some of these are meeting with a degree of success not yet achieved in the US. Although this survey documents and assesses many of these approaches, time did not permit addressing in any detail their relevance to common problems in the US. It would appear the US could benefit from a periodic review of the successes and failures of these efforts, including analysis of their applicability to the US system. Of those countries (Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, Japan, Belgium, and the US) who are working to a time table for the preparation of a high-level waste (HLW) repository, Germany is the only country to have gained local siting acceptance for theirs. With this (the most difficult of siting problems) behind them they appear to be in the best overall condition relative to waste management progress and plans. This has been achieved without a particularly favorable political structure, made up for by determination on the part of the political leadership. Of the remaining three countries studied (France, UK and Canada) France, with its AVM production facility, is clearly the world leader in the HLW immobilization aspect of waste management. France, Belgium and the UK appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions. US, Switzerland and Canada appear to have the least favorable political structures and environments for arriving at waste management decisions.

Paige, H.W.; Lipman, D.S.; Owens, J.E.

1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program - Nuclear Engineering Division  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Nuclear Criticality Safety Overview Experience Analysis Tools Current NCS Activities Current R&D Activities DOE Criticality Safety Support Group (CSSG) Other Major Programs Work with Argonne Contact us For Employees Site Map Help Join us on Facebook Follow us on Twitter NE Division on Flickr The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program Bookmark and Share J. Morman and R. Bucher load J. Morman and R. Bucher load samples into the ZPR-6 critical assembly for material worth measurements. Click on image to view larger image. The DOE Nuclear Criticality Safety Program (NCSP) is focused on maintaining fundamental infrastructure that enables retention of DOE capabilities and expertise in nuclear criticality safety necessary to support line

395

ORNL partners on critical materials hub | ornl.gov  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ORNL partners on critical materials hub ORNL partners on critical materials hub January 01, 2013 The Critical Materials Institute builds on the Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy report, which addresses the use of rare earths and other critical materials in clean energy components, products, and processes. December 2011. Credit: U.S. DOE. ORNL wins big as part of a team led by Ames Labora-tory, which was selected for an Energy Innovation Hub to address shortages of critical materials, including rare earth metals. The award of up to $120 million over five years for the Critical Materials Institute involves four national labs, academia, and industrial partners. ORNL will play a key role in conducting the CMI's mis-sion to eliminate materials criticality as an impediment to the commercialization of clean

396

Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) Approval Template | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 (CD-4) Approval Template Critical Decision 4 (CD-4) Approval Template ExampleCD-4Template02-14-12.docx More Documents & Publications Critical Decision 2 (CD-2...

397

Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

2 (CD-2) Approval Template Critical Decision 2 (CD-2) Approval Template ExampleCD-2Template02-14-12.docx More Documents & Publications Critical Decision 4 (CD-4...

398

Historical perspective of criticality safety in the United States  

SciTech Connect

The stages through which criticality safety has progressed are reviewed and speculation about present signs of maturity is made. Early history, evolution, and accident experiences are described. It is concluded that criticality safety as a discipline is mature.

Paxton, H.C. (comp.)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Oil Extraction and Analysis: Critical Issues and Comparative Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This book contains papers from the symposium Critical Issues, Current and Emerging Technologies for Determination of Crude Fat Content in Food, Feed, and Seeds. Oil Extraction and Analysis: Critical Issues and Comparative Studies Processing agricultura

400

Critically pressured free-gas reservoirs below gas-hydrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

; importantly, no observed gas column thickness significantly exceeds the calculated critical value (Fig. 3 complete gas evacuation3,24 . A Received 16 June; accepted 5 November 2003; doi:10.1038/nature02172. 1.............................................................. Critically pressured free-gas

Holbrook, W. Steven

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Recent developments in the TWODANT system of codes for criticality safety  

SciTech Connect

The application of deterministic, discrete ordinates codes to criticality safety problems can be a very useful complement to analyses performed using Monte Carlo methods. This is especially so if there is a need for dose or flux maps of the system or if configuration perturbations are to be studied. In these latter two situations, it is difficult to obtain reliable Monte Carlo results due to statistical effects. Deterministic calculations are also useful as an independent check and verification of Monte Carlo results. The TWODANT system of discrete ordinates codes` has recently been enhanced for criticality safety analysis. In addition to ONEDANT, TWODANT, and TWOHEX, the TWODANT system now includes TWODANT/GQ and THREEDANT. These two new code modules expand the applicability of the TWODANT system. These new capabilities will be demonstrated on a representative sample of nuclear criticality safety problems. First, TWODANT/GQ and THREEDANT will be described. Salient features of each code module will be discussed. Calculational results obtained by each will be presented and compared with each other and with Monte Carlo results. Finally, some guidelines for the effective use of the TWODANT system on criticality applications will be given.

Parsons, D.K.; Alcouffe, R.E.; Marr, D.R.; Brinkley, F.W.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Medical Information and the Internet: Do You Know What You Are Getting?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Due to the Internet technology, hundreds of Web sites are accessible for medical information, and the retrieval of such information is quite rapid. Once you as a consumer obtain all of this information, how do you determine whether the information you ... Keywords: Internet, evaluation, health information, medical information, telemedicine

Fitzgerald Craan; Denise M. Oleske

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

NIST Issues New Call for White Papers on Critical National ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... in energy research, including technologies for improved manufacturing of critical components for alternative energy production; replacement of ...

2010-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

404

Computational Method for Improved Forewarning of Critical Events  

ORNLs computational method for analyzing nonlinear processes provides improvedforewarning of imminent critical events. This is achieved through phase ...

405

Current R&D Activities in Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

406

Analysis Tools for Nuclear Criticality Safety - Nuclear Engineering...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Nuclear Safety Materials Disposition Decontamination & Decommissioning Nuclear Criticality Safety Nuclear Data Program Nuclear Waste Form Modeling Departments Engineering...

407

ITL Bulletin Generating Secure Cryptographic Keys: A Critical ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... KEYS: A CRITICAL COMPONENT OF CRYPTOGRAPHIC ... relies upon two basic components: an algorithm (or ... and of keys for symmetric algorithms. ...

2013-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

408

Grid Information Security Functional Requirement - Fulfilling Information Security of a Smart Grid System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper describes the background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid information security. It introduces the conceptual analysis to the methodology with the application of hermeneutic circle and information security functional requirement identification. Information security for the grid market cover matters includes automation and communications industry that affects the operation of electric power systems and the functioning of the utilities that manage them and its awareness of this information infrastructure has become critical to the reliability of the power system. Community benefits from of cost savings, flexibility and deployment along with the establishment of wireless communications. However, concern revolves around the security protections for easily accessible devices such as the smart meter and the related communications hardware. On the other hand, the changing points between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the information security importance on...

Ling, Amy Poh Ai; 10.5121/ijgca.2011.2201

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Personalized Proactive Information Retrieval  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Personalized Proactive Information Retrieval Yi Zhang Assistant Professor Information Retrieval Proactive Information Retrieval has Many Potential Markets n You need to know new products related to yours Personalized Proactive Information Retrieval Statistics, optimization Artificial Intelligence Natural language

Lee, Herbie

410

Geographic Information System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geographic Information System Geographic Information System Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Geographic Information System Details Activities (24) Areas (11) Regions (4) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Data and Modeling Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Data Techniques Parent Exploration Technique: Data Techniques Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Any mapable information Stratigraphic/Structural: Any mapable information Hydrological: Any mapable information Thermal: Any mapable information Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 70.007,000 centUSD 0.07 kUSD 7.0e-5 MUSD 7.0e-8 TUSD / hour Median Estimate (USD): 80.008,000 centUSD 0.08 kUSD 8.0e-5 MUSD 8.0e-8 TUSD / hour High-End Estimate (USD): 150.0015,000 centUSD

411

Criticality Safety Support to a Project Addressing SNM Legacy Items at LLNL  

SciTech Connect

The programmatic, facility and criticality safety support staffs at the LLNL Plutonium Facility worked together to successfully develop and implement a project to process legacy (DNFSB Recommendation 94-1 and non-Environmental, Safety, and Health (ES&H) labeled) materials in storage. Over many years, material had accumulated in storage that lacked information to adequately characterize the material for current criticality safety controls used in the facility. Generally, the fissionable material mass information was well known, but other information such as form, impurities, internal packaging, and presence of internal moderating or reflecting materials were not well documented. In many cases, the material was excess to programmatic need, but such a determination was difficult with the little information given on MC&A labels and in the MC&A database. The material was not packaged as efficiently as possible, so it also occupied much more valuable storage space than was necessary. Although safe as stored, the inadequately characterized material posed a risk for criticality safety noncompliances if moved within the facility under current criticality safety controls. A Legacy Item Implementation Plan was developed and implemented to deal with this problem. Reasonable bounding conditions were determined for the material involved, and criticality safety evaluations were completed. Two appropriately designated glove boxes were identified and criticality safety controls were developed to safely inspect the material. Inspecting the material involved identifying containers of legacy material, followed by opening, evaluating, processing if necessary, characterizing and repackaging the material. Material from multiple containers was consolidated more efficiently thus decreasing the total number of stored items to about one half of the highest count. Current packaging requirements were implemented. Detailed characterization of the material was captured in databases and new ES&H container labels applied. In many cases, legacy material that was inspected was determined to be excess to programmatic needs and it was then either processed to meet the DOE-3013-STD or designated as TRU waste and disposed of accordingly. During FY2003 through FY2004 approximately 1600 items were opened and the items processed if necessary, repackaged and newly labeled with ES&H labels. As of April, 2005, there are only 32 non-ES&H labeled items in existence within the Plutonium Facility. Due to a consolidated effort in dealing with the legacy items, the problems associated with storage of these items at LLNL has been substantially abated. The paper will discuss the background, implementation, and results of the SNM Legacy Items Implementation Project. Benefits and Lessons Learned will be identified.

Pearson, J S; Burch, J G; Dodson, K E; Huang, S T

2005-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

412

Assessor Forms and Information  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Other Forms and Information for Assessors. What's on this page? ... Other Forms and Information. Assessor Biographical Sketch Template, PDF, Word. ...

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

413

Spintronics Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIST Home > Spintronics Information at NIST. Spintronics Information at NIST. (the links below are a compilation of programs ...

2010-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

414

NETL: Science Bowl Information  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Educational Initiatives > Science Bowl Information Educational Initiatives Science Bowl Information Regional Sites Southwestern PA Regional Site West Virginia Regional Site...

415

Evaluative Schemas and the Mediating Role of Critics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How do critics enable producers and consumers to come to mutually agreeable terms of trade? We propose that critics offer more guidance to those who set prices when their quality assessments are structured by clearer evaluative schemas. Schema clarity ... Keywords: categories, critics, mediated markets, sociology of markets

Greta Hsu; Peter W. Roberts; Anand Swaminathan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Martin Marietta Energy Systems Nuclear Criticality Safety Improvement Program  

SciTech Connect

This report addresses questions raised by criticality safety violation at several DOE plants. Two charts are included that define the severity and reporting requirements for the six levels of accidents. A summary is given of all reported criticality incident at the DOE plants involved. The report concludes with Martin Marietta's Nuclear Criticality Safety Policy Statement. (JDH)

Speas, I.G.

1987-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

417

Criticality safety evaluation - an endusers's perspective  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents criticality safety evaluations from an enduser's perspective. Overall issues related to a criticality safety evaluation in an operations support setting are discussed. A work flow process is presented which shows the key steps in conducting an effective criticality evaluation. Finally, a few suggestions are given to assist newcomers to this field.

Huang, S T

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

418

Manipulating a single adsorbed DNA for a critical endpoint  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show the existence of a critical endpoint in the phase diagram of unzipping of an adsorbed double-stranded (ds) polymer like DNA. The competition of base pairing, adsorption and stretching by an external force leads to the critical end point. From exact results, the location of the critical end point is determined and its classical nature established.

Rajeev Kapri; Somendra M. Bhattacharjee

2008-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

419

Medical (visual) information retrieval  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This text gives a broad overview of the domain of visual medical information retrieval and medical information analysis/search in general. The goal is to describe the specifics of medical information analysis and more specifically of medical visual information ... Keywords: content-based image retrieval, medical information retrieval, medical visual information retrieval

Henning Mller

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Influence of the ab-initio nd cross sections in the critical heavy-water benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The n-d elastic and breakup cross sections are computed by solving the three-body Faddeev equations for realistic and semi-realistic Nucleon-Nucleon potentials. These cross sections are inserted in the Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear processes considered in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP). The results obtained using thes ab initio n-d cross sections are compared with those provided by the most renown international libraries.

Morillon, B; Carbonell, J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Influence of the ab-initio nd cross sections in the critical heavy-water benchmarks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The n-d elastic and breakup cross sections are computed by solving the three-body Faddeev equations for realistic and semi-realistic Nucleon-Nucleon potentials. These cross sections are inserted in the Monte Carlo simulation of the nuclear processes considered in the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments (ICSBEP). The results obtained using thes ab initio n-d cross sections are compared with those provided by the most renown international libraries.

B. Morillon; R. Lazauskas; J. Carbonell

2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

422

Criticality Safety Functional Area Qualification Standard  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE-STD-1173-2009 April 2009 DOE STANDARD CRITICALITY SAFETY FUNCTIONAL AREA QUALIFICATION STANDARD DOE Nuclear Facilities Technical Personnel U.S. Department of Energy AREA TRNG Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. DOE-STD-1173-2009 ii This document is available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web Page at http://www.hss.energy.gov/nuclearsafety/techstds/ DOE-STD-1173-2009 iii APPROVAL The Federal Technical Capability Panel consists of senior U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) managers responsible for overseeing the Federal Technical Capability Program. This Panel is responsible for reviewing and approving the qualification standard for Department-wide

423

Tropical Cyclones as a Critical Phenomenon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been proposed that the number of tropical cyclones as a function of the energy they release is a decreasing power-law function, up to a characteristic energy cutoff determined by the spatial size of the ocean basin in which the storm occurs. This means that no characteristic scale exists for the energy of tropical cyclones, except for the finite-size effects induced by the boundaries of the basins. This has important implications for the physics of tropical cyclones. We discuss up to what point tropical cyclones are related to critical phenomena (in the same way as earthquakes, rainfall, etc.), providing a consistent picture of the energy balance in the system. Moreover, this perspective allows one to visualize more clearly the effects of global warming on tropical-cyclone occurrence.

Corral, A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Fuzzy architecture assessment for critical infrastructure resilience  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an approach for the selection of alternative architectures in a connected infrastructure system to increase resilience of the overall infrastructure system. The paper begins with a description of resilience and critical infrastructure, then summarizes existing approaches to resilience, and presents a fuzzy-rule based method of selecting among alternative infrastructure architectures. This methodology includes considerations which are most important when deciding on an approach to resilience. The paper concludes with a proposed approach which builds on existing resilience architecting methods by integrating key system aspects using fuzzy memberships and fuzzy rule sets. This novel approach aids the systems architect in considering resilience for the evaluation of architectures for adoption into the final system architecture.

Muller, George

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

5-D Choptuik critical exponent and holography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently, a holographic argument was used to relate the saturation exponent, {gamma}{sub BFKL}, of 4-dimensional Yang-Mills theory in the Regge limit to the Choptuik critical scaling exponent, {gamma}{sub 5d}, in 5-dimensional black hole formation via scalar field collapse [L. Alvarez-Gaume, C. Gomez, and M. A. Vazquez-Mozo, arXiv:hep-th/0611312.]. Remarkably, the numerical value of the former agreed quite well with previous calculations of the latter. We present new results of an improved calculation of {gamma}{sub 5d} with substantially decreased numerical error. Our current result is {gamma}{sub 5d}=0.4131{+-}0.0001, which is close to, but not in strict agreement with, the value of {gamma}{sub BFKL}=0.409 552 quoted in [L. Alvarez-Gaume, C. Gomez, and M. A. Vazquez-Mozo, arXiv:hep-th/0611312.].

Bland, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Winnipeg Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3T 2N2 (Canada); Kunstatter, G. [Department of Physics and Winnipeg Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba, R3B 2E9 (Canada)

2007-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

426

Critical challenges for EUV resist materials  

SciTech Connect

Although Extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) is now well into the commercialization phase, critical challenges remain in the development of EUV resist materials. The major issue for the 22-nm half-pitch node remains simultaneously meeting resolution, line-edge roughness (LER), and sensitivity requirements. Although several materials have met the resolution requirements, LER and sensitivity remain a challenge. As we move beyond the 22-nm node, however, even resolution remains a significant challenge. Chemically amplified resists have yet to demonstrate the required resolution at any speed or LER for 16-nm half pitch and below. Going to non-chemically amplified resists, however, 16-nm resolution has been achieved with a LER of 2 nm but a sensitivity of only 70 mJ/cm{sup 2}.

Naulleau, Patrick P.; Anderson, Christopher N.; Baclea-an, Lorie-Mae; Denham, Paul; George, Simi; Goldberg, Kenneth A.; Jones, Gideon; McClinton, Brittany; Miyakawa, Ryan; Rekawa, Seno; Smith, Nathan

2011-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Transposed critical temperature Rankine thermodynamic cycle  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transposed critical temperature (TPCT) is shown to be an extremely important thermodynamic property in the selection of the working fluid and turbine states for optimized geothermal power plants operating on a closed organic (binary) Rankine cycle. When the optimum working fluid composition and process states are determined for given source and sink conditions (7 parameter optimization), turbine inlet states are found to be consistently adjacent to the low pressure side of the working fluids' TPCT line on pressure-enthalpy coordinates. Although the TPCT concepts herein may find numerous future applications in high temperature, advanced cycles for fossil or nuclear fired steam power plants and in supercritical organic Rankine heat recovery bottoming cycles for Diesel engines, this discussion is limited to moderate temperature (150 to 250/sup 0/C) closed simple organic Rankine cycle geothermal power plants. Conceptual design calculations pertinent to the first geothermal binary cycle Demonstration Plant are included.

Pope, W.L.; Doyle, P.A.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Critical adsorption at chemically structured substrates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider binary liquid mixtures near their critical consolute points and exposed to geometrically flat but chemically structured substrates. The chemical contrast between the various substrate structures amounts to opposite local preferences for the two species of the binary liquid mixtures. Order parameters profiles are calculated for a chemical step, for a single chemical stripe, and for a periodic stripe pattern. The order parameter distributions exhibit frustration across the chemical steps which heals upon approaching the bulk. The corresponding spatial variation of the order parameter and its dependence on temperature are governed by universal scaling functions which we calculate within mean field theory. These scaling functions also determine the universal behavior of the excess adsorption relative to suitably chosen reference systems.

Monika Sprenger; Frank Schlesener; S. Dietrich

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

429

Cation Geothermometers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Cation Geothermometers Cation Geothermometers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Cation Geothermometers Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Liquid Geothermometry Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Used to estimate reservoir temperatures. Dictionary.png Cation Geothermometers: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Introduction Some experts have stated that the factor that changes the risk assessment of a geothermal prospect the fastest is obtaining attractive chemical confirmation (geothermometry, gas analyses) that a thermal resource exists

430

Silica Geothermometers | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Silica Geothermometers Silica Geothermometers Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Silica Geothermometers Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Geochemical Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Geochemical Data Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Liquid Geothermometry Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Thermal: Used to estimate reservoir temperatures. Dictionary.png Silica Geothermometers: No definition has been provided for this term. Add a Definition Introduction Some experts have stated that the factor that changes the risk assessment of a geothermal prospect the fastest is obtaining attractive chemical confirmation (geothermometry, gas analyses) that a thermal resource exists

431

Magnetothermoelectric Response near Quantum Critical Points  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Following on from our previous work [Phys. Rev. Lett. 98, 166801 (2007)] we examine the finite temperature magnetothermoelectric response in the vicinity of a quantum critical point (QCP). We begin with general scaling considerations relevant to an arbitrary QCP, either with or without Lorentz invariance, and in arbitrary dimension. In view of the broad connections to high temperature superconductivity, and cold atomic gases, we focus on the quantum critical fluctuations of the relativistic Landau--Ginzburg theory. This paradigmatic model arises in many contexts, and describes the (particle-hole symmetric) superfluid--Mott insulator quantum phase transition in the Bose--Hubbard model. The application of a magnetic field opens up a wide range of physical observables, and we present a detailed overview of the charge and thermal transport and thermodynamic response. We combine several different approaches including the epsilon expansion and associated Quantum Boltzmann Equation (QBE), entropy drift, and arguments based on Lorentz invariance. The results differ markedly from the zero field case, and we include an extended discussion of the finite thermal conductivity which emerges in the presence of a magnetic field. We derive an integral equation that governs its response and explore the crossover upon changing the magnetic field. This equation may be interpreted as a projection equation in the low field limit, and clearly highlights the important role of collision invariants (or zero modes) in the hydrodynamic regime. Using an epsilon expansion around three-dimensions, our analytic and numerical results interpolate between our previously published value and the exact limit of two-dimensional relativistic magnetohydrodynamics.

M. J. Bhaseen; A. G. Green; S. L. Sondhi

2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microsoft Word - Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month.docx  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Office of the Press Secretary For Immediate Release October 31, 2013 Presidential Proclamation -- Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, 2013 CRITICAL INFRASTRUCTURE SECURITY AND RESILIENCE MONTH, 2013 - - - - - - - BY THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA A PROCLAMATION Over the last few decades, our Nation has grown increasingly dependent on critical infrastructure, the backbone of our national and economic security. America's critical infrastructure is complex and diverse, combining systems in both cyberspace and the physical world -- from power plants, bridges, and interstates to Federal buildings and the massive electrical grids that power our Nation. During Critical Infrastructure Security and Resilience Month, we

433

Critical Needs for Distribution System Operations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The electric power distribution system (voltages up to 35 kV) is the most extensive network. While the operation of this system is of great importance from the reliability and safety point of view, managing this network varies among utilities from cases where modern distribution management systems are utilized to cases of minimal central operational capability. Distribution Management Systems (DMS) provide real time information to DSOs for the continuous moment by moment (24 hours a day, 7 days a week) o...

2005-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

434

Real-time power system analysis: Feasibility and critical technologies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Modern electrical grids face increasing demands to serve new or unusual loads, to integrate unconventional new resources, and to transmit power in unforeseen ways. These expanding demands will require utilities to operate existing systems closer to steady-state limits, thus increasing the performance requirements of operation and control systems. In this paper we use the challenges posed by power system stability analysis to motivate a discussion of the technologies required to advance the state-of-the-art in real-time power system control. We consider the computational requirements of system stability analysis techniques (transient simulation, eigenanalysis, time-domain fitting, and frequency-response analysis). Additional requirements are imposed by the necessity that the computational results support either human or automated decision making. We then address the role that critical computer and information technologies must play in addressing these needs. Our emphasis is on high performance computing, where we consider both hardware issues and algorithmic requirements. Data management, user interface, visualization, and expert system technologies are also discussed. We conclude by suggesting elements of a strategic plan for creating the next generation of computer tools for power system analysis, and for their use in real-time control applications. 18 refs.

Pearson, E.W.; Trudnowski, D.J. (Battelle Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Hauer, J.F.; Watkins, D.S. (USDOE Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States))

1991-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Residential implementation of critical-peak pricing ofelectricity  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates how critical-peak pricing (CPP)affects households with different usage and income levels, with the goalof informing policy makers who are considering the implementation of CPPtariffs in the residential sector. Using a subset of data from theCalifornia Statewide Pricing Pilot of 2003-2004, average load changeduring summer events, annual percent bill change, and post-experimentsatisfaction ratings are calculated across six customer segments,categorized by historical usage and income levels. Findings show thathigh-use customers respond significantly more in kW reduction than dolow-use customers, while low-use customers save significantly more inpercentage reduction of annual electricity bills than do high-usecustomers results that challenge the strategy of targeting only high-usecustomers for CPP tariffs. Across income levels, average load and billchanges were statistically indistinguishable, as were satisfaction ratesresults that are compatible with a strategy of full-scale implementationof CPP rates in the residential sector. Finally, the high-use customersearning less than $50,000 annually were the most likely of the groups tosee bill increases about 5 percent saw bill increases of 10 percent ormore suggesting that any residential CPP implementation might considertargeting this customer group for increased energy efficiencyefforts.

Herter, Karen

2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

436

The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy | Department of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy's Critical Materials The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy The Department of Energy's Critical Materials Strategy The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) supports a proactive and comprehensive approach to address the challenges associated with the use of rare earth elements and other critical materials in clean energy technologies. In 2010 the Department developed its first-ever Critical Materials Strategy based on three strategic pillars: 1) diversifying global supply chains to mitigate supply risk; 2) developing material and technology substitutes; and 3) promoting recycling, reuse and more efficient use to significantly lower global demand for critical materials. In 2011 DOE updated its criticality assessments and provided in-depth market and technology analyses in response to important developments during the year. DOE will

437

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Critical Updates to Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) to someone by E-mail Share Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Facebook Tweet about Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Twitter Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Google Bookmark Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Delicious Rank Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Critical Updates to the Hydrogen Analysis Production Model (H2A v3) (Text Version) on Digg

438

National Criticality Experiments Research Center: Capability and Status  

SciTech Connect

After seven years, the former Los Alamos Critical Experiments Facility (LACEF), or Pajarito Site, has reopened for business as the National Criticality Experiments Research Center (NCERC) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Four critical assembly machines (Comet, Planet, Flat-Top, and Godiva-IV) made the journey from Los Alamos to the NNSS. All four machines received safety system upgrades along with new digital control systems. Between these machines, systems ranging from the thermal through the intermediate to the fast spectrum may be assembled. Steady-State, transient, and super-prompt critical conditions may be explored. NCERC is the sole remaining facility in the United States capable of conducting general-purpose nuclear materials handling including the construction and operation of high-multiplication assemblies, delayed critical assemblies, and prompt critical assemblies. Reconstitution of the unique capabilities at NCERC ensures the viability of (1) The Nuclear Renaissance, (2) Stockpile Stewardship, and (3) and the next generation of criticality experimentalists.

Hayes, David K. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, William L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

439

Climate Registry Information System | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Registry Information System Climate Registry Information System Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Registry Information System Agency/Company /Organization: The Climate Registry Sector: Climate Focus Area: Greenhouse Gas Phase: Determine Baseline, Evaluate Effectiveness and Revise as Needed Resource Type: Online calculator User Interface: Website Website: www.theclimateregistry.org/climate-registry-information-system-cris/ Web Application Link: www.theclimateregistry.org/climate-registry-information-systhttps://ww Cost: Free References: General Reporting Protocol[1] The Climate Registry Information System (CRIS) is the official online greenhouse gas calculation, reporting, and verifcation tool for The Climate Registry, a North American registry through which members voluntarily

440

Information Collection Management | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Guidance » Information Collection Management Guidance » Information Collection Management Information Collection Management The Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 requires each Federal agency to seek and obtain approval from the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) before undertaking a collection of information directed to 10 or more persons (including operations of Government-owned, contractor-operated facilities). Under the PRA, OMB approval for each information collection instrument can last a maximum of 3 years. This site provides information about the Paperwork Reduction Act's requirements and guidance in fulfilling those requirements. DOE's Chief Information Officer (CIO) is the Senior Official responsible for DOE's compliance with the Paperwork Reduction Act. Office of Management and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

1 THE CRITICAL ZONE The critical zone is "the heterogeneous, near surface  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

mechanistic information at smaller scales, i.e. mi- croscopic, molecular, and atomistic is required. Small of environmental conditions. This information then needs to be integrated into field scale hydro- logic are synchrotron-based, one can elucidate reaction mechanisms at a small scale. This has been one of the major

Sparks, Donald L.

442

Research on Agricultural Information Service Platform Based on Information Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For exiting problems of information technology in agriculture, modern information technologies are used to make agricultural information service platform, which can integrate information resources, then agricultural network information service sharing ... Keywords: modern information technology, agricultural information, service platform

Zhang Yubin; Liu Zhiguo; Lin Lizhong

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

A security risk analysis model for information systems: Causal relationships of risk factors and vulnerability propagation analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With the increasing organizational dependence on information systems, information systems security has become a very critical issue in enterprise risk management. In information systems, security risks are caused by various interrelated internal and ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Bayesian networks, Information systems, Security risk, Vulnerability propagation

Nan Feng, Harry Jiannan Wang, Minqiang Li

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Choice of governance mechanisms to promote information sharing via boundary objects in the disaster recovery process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the difficulties and criticality of information sharing in a multi-agency setting, this paper looks at the IT governance mechanisms used to promote information sharing via shared boundary objects in the disaster response and recovery process. A ... Keywords: Disaster response and recovery, IT governance, Information sharing, Multi-agency governance, Shared boundary objects

Barry A. Cumbie; Chetan S. Sankar

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Incorporation of corpus-specific semantic information into question answering context  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In today's environment of information overload, Question Answering (QA) is a critically important research area for the Semantic Web. In order for humans to make effective use of the expansive information sources available to us, we require automated ... Keywords: information retrieval, language modeling, question answering, statistical language modeling

Protima Banerjee; Hyoil Han

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Firms' information security investment decisions: Stock market evidence of investors' behavior  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the information society, it is important for firms to manage their core information resources securely. However, the difficulty of measuring the return on an IT security investment is one of the critical obstacles for firms in making such investment ... Keywords: Abnormal returns, Event methodology, Information security investment, Investors' behavior, Market value, Sarbanes-Oxley Act (SOX)

Sangmi Chai; Minkyun Kim; H. Raghav Rao

2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Performance-based usability evaluation of a safety information and alarm system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Evaluation of the appropriateness of information technical systems for complex professional usage in safety-critical contexts poses significant methodical and practical challenges. In this study, the usability of a Safety Information and Alarm Panel ... Keywords: control room, information presentation, nuclear power plant, operators, practice, validation method

Leena Norros; Maaria Nuutinen

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

448

Smart Grid Information Security (IS) Functional Requirement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is important to implement safe smart grid environment to enhance people's lives and livelihoods. This paper provides information on smart grid IS functional requirement by illustrating some discussion points to the sixteen identified requirements. This paper introduces the smart grid potential hazards that can be referred as a triggering factor to improve the system and security of the entire grid. The background of smart information infrastructure and the needs for smart grid IS is described with the adoption of hermeneutic circle as methodology. Grid information technology and security-s session discusses that grid provides the chance of a simple and transparent access to different information sources. In addition, the transformation between traditional versus smart grid networking trend and the IS importance on the communication field reflects the criticality of grid IS functional requirement identification is introduces. The smart grid IS functional requirements described in this paper are general and ...

Ling, Amy Poh Ai

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Information Bridge: DOE Scientific and Technical Information...  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Information Bridge Alerts Log On Alerts provide users with e-mail notification of updates to the Information Bridge in specific areas of interest. If you wish to receive an Alert...

450

Enterprise Information Management: When Information Becomes Inspiration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

How an organization manages its information is arguably the most important skill in todays dynamic and hyper-competitive environment. In Enterprise Information Management, editor Paul Baan and a team of expert contributors present a holistic approach ...

Paul Baan

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Criticality considerations for /sup 233/U fuels in an HTGR fuel refabrication facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Eleven /sup 233/U solution critical assemblies spanning an H//sup 233/U ratio range of 40 to 2000 and a bare metal /sup 233/U assembly have been calculated with the ENDF/B-IV and Hansen-Roach cross sections. The results from these calculations are compared with the experimental results and with each other. An increasing disagreement between calculations with ENDF/B and Hansen-Roach data with decreasing H//sup 233/U ratio was observed, indicative of large differences in their intermediate energy cross sections. The Hansen-Roach cross sections appeared to give reasonably good agreement with experiments over the whole range; whereas the ENDF/B calculations yielded high values for k/sub eff/ on assemblies of low moderation. It is concluded that serious problems exist in the ENDF/B-IV representation of the /sup 233/U cross sections in the intermediate energy range and that further evaluation of this nuclide is warranted. In addition, it is recommended that an experimental program be undertaken to obtain /sup 233/U criticality data at low H//sup 233/U ratios for verification of generalized criticality safety guidelines. Part II of this report presents the results of criticality calculations on specific pieces of equipment required for HTGR fuel refabrication. In particular, fuel particle storage hoppers and resin carbonization furnaces are criticality safe up to 22.9 cm (9.0 in.) in diameter providing water or other hydrogenous moderators are excluded. In addition, no criticality problems arise due to accumulation of particles in the off-gas scrubber reservoirs provided reasonable administrative controls are exercised.

McNeany, S. R.; Jenkins, J. D.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

A critical review of residual stress technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The current technology for evaluating residual in materials has been critically reviewed from the perspective of LLNL needs. The primary technique available continues to be x-ray diffraction (XRD). Substantial analytical and experimental refinements have been made in the past decade. An especially promising development in XRD is the use of energy dispersive spectroscopy for evaluating triaxial stress. This would provide an alternative to neutron diffraction, a technique limited to a relatively small number of outside laboratories. Recent research in residual stress measurement using ultrasonics have concentrated on shear wave techniques. Substantial progress has been made in the use of electromagnetic acoustic transducers (EMAT's), surface waves, corrections for texture, and, of special interest to LLNL, the ability to characterize interfacial stress. Strain gages and related technologies continue to be actively used in field measurements of residual stress, although there is generally some destructive nature to those techniques. An increased use of multiple technique approaches to residual stress evaluation is occurring for the purposes of both verification and complementary measurements. Among a number of miscellaneous techniques found in the recent literature are several involving the use of stress-sensitive magnetic properties and an especially promising use of the thermoelastic effect for noncontact stress mapping. Recommendations for LLNL activity include energy dispersive XRD, ultrasonics characterization of anisotropy and interfacial stress, and investigation of the thermoelastic effect. 57 refs.

Shackelford, J.F.; Brown, B.D.

1987-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

453

Critical infrastructure systems of systems assessment methodology.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Assessing the risk of malevolent attacks against large-scale critical infrastructures requires modifications to existing methodologies that separately consider physical security and cyber security. This research has developed a risk assessment methodology that explicitly accounts for both physical and cyber security, while preserving the traditional security paradigm of detect, delay, and respond. This methodology also accounts for the condition that a facility may be able to recover from or mitigate the impact of a successful attack before serious consequences occur. The methodology uses evidence-based techniques (which are a generalization of probability theory) to evaluate the security posture of the cyber protection systems. Cyber threats are compared against cyber security posture using a category-based approach nested within a path-based analysis to determine the most vulnerable cyber attack path. The methodology summarizes the impact of a blended cyber/physical adversary attack in a conditional risk estimate where the consequence term is scaled by a ''willingness to pay'' avoidance approach.

Sholander, Peter E.; Darby, John L.; Phelan, James M.; Smith, Bryan; Wyss, Gregory Dane; Walter, Andrew; Varnado, G. Bruce; Depoy, Jennifer Mae

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Quantum mechanical cluster calculations of critical scintillationprocesses  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of commercial quantum chemistrycodes to simu-late several critical scintillation processes. The crystalis modeled as a cluster of typically 50 atoms embedded in an array oftypically 5,000 point charges designed to reproduce the electrostaticfield of the infinite crystal. The Schrodinger equation is solved for theground, ionized, and excited states of the system to determine the energyand electron wavefunction. Computational methods for the followingcritical processes are described: (1) the formation and diffusion ofrelaxed holes, (2) the formation of excitons, (3) the trapping ofelectrons and holes by activator atoms, (4) the excitation of activatoratoms, and (5) thermal quenching. Examples include hole diffusion in CsI,the exciton in CsI, the excited state of CsI:Tl, the energy barrier forthe diffusion of relaxed holes in CaF2 and PbF2, and prompt hole trappingby activator atoms in CaF2:Eu and CdS:Te leading to an ultra-fast (<50ps) scintillation risetime.

Derenzo, Stephen E.; Klintenberg, Mattias K.; Weber, Marvin J.

2000-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

455

Critical partnerships: Los Alamos, universities, and industry  

SciTech Connect

Los Alamos National Laboratory, situated 35 miles northwest of Santa Fe, NM, is one of the Department of Energy`s three Defense Programs laboratories. It encompasses 43 square miles, employees approximately 10,000 people, and has a budget of approximately $1.1B in FY97. Los Alamos has a strong post-cold war mission, that of reducing the nuclear danger. But even with that key role in maintaining the nation`s security, Los Alamos views partnerships with universities and industry as critical to its future well being. Why is that? As the federal budget for R&D comes under continued scrutiny and certain reduction, we believe that the triad of science and technology contributors to the national system of R&D must rely on and leverage each others capabilities. For us this means that we will rely on these partners to help us in 5 key ways: We expect that partnerships will help us maintain and enhance our core competencies. In doing so, we will be able to attract the best scientists and engineers. To keep on the cutting edge of research and development, we have found that partnerships maintain the excellence of staff through new and exciting challenges. Additionally, we find that from our university and corporate partners we often learn and incorporate {open_quotes}best practices{close_quotes} in organizational management and operations. Finally, we believe that a strong national system of R&D will ensure and enhance our ability to generate revenues.

Berger, C.L.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

A RE-INTRODUCTION TO ANOMALIES OF CRITICALITY  

SciTech Connect

In 1974, a small innocuous document was submitted to the American Nuclear Society's Criticality Safety Division for publication that would have lasting impacts on this nuclear field The author was Duane Clayton, manager of the Battelle Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's Critical Mass Lab, the world's preeminent reactor critical experimenter with plutonium solutions. The document was entitled, 'Anomalies of Criticality'. 'Anomalies...' was a compilation of more than thirty separate and distinct examples of departures from what might be commonly expected in the field of nuclear criticality. Mr. Clayton's publication was the derivative of more than ten thousand experiments and countless analytical studies conducted world-wide on every conceivable reactor system imaginable: from fissile bearing solutions to solids, blocks to arrays of fuel rods, low-enriched uranium oxide systems to pure plutonium and highly enriched uranium systems. After publication, the document was commonly used within the nuclear fuel cycle and reactor community to train potential criticality/reactor analysts, experimenters and fuel handlers on important things for consideration when designing systems with critically 'safe' parameters in mind The purpose of this paper is to re-introduce 'Anomalies of Criticality' to the current Criticality Safety community and to add new 'anomalies' to the existing compendium. By so doing, it is the authors' hope that a new generation of nuclear workers and criticality engineers will benefit from its content and might continue to build upon this work in support of the nuclear renaissance that is about to occur.

PUIGH RJ

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

457

Information Technology and Community Restoration Studies/Task 1: Information Technology  

SciTech Connect

Executive Summary The Interagency Biological Restoration Demonstrationa program jointly funded by the Department of Defense's Defense Threat Reduction Agency and the Department of Homeland Security's (DHS's) Science and Technology Directorateis developing policies, methods, plans, and applied technologies to restore large urban areas, critical infrastructures, and Department of Defense installations following the intentional release of a biological agent (anthrax) by terrorists. There is a perception that there should be a common system that can share information both vertically and horizontally amongst participating organizations as well as support analyses. A key question is: "How far away from this are we?" As part of this program, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted research to identify the current information technology tools that would be used by organizations in the greater Seattle urban area in such a scenario, to define criteria for use in evaluating information technology tools, and to identify current gaps. Researchers interviewed 28 individuals representing 25 agencies in civilian and military organizations to identify the tools they currently use to capture data needed to support operations and decision making. The organizations can be grouped into five broad categories: defense (Department of Defense), environmental/ecological (Environmental Protection Agency/Ecology), public health and medical services, emergency management, and critical infrastructure. The types of information that would be communicated in a biological terrorism incident include critical infrastructure and resource status, safety and protection information, laboratory test results, and general emergency information. The most commonly used tools are WebEOC (web-enabled crisis information management systems with real-time information sharing), mass notification software, resource tracking software, and NW WARN (web-based information to protect critical infrastructure systems). It appears that the current information management tools are used primarily for information gathering and sharingnot decision making. Respondents identified the following criteria for a future software system. It is easy to learn, updates information in real time, works with all agencies, is secure, uses a visualization or geographic information system feature, enables varying permission levels, flows information from one stage to another, works with other databases, feeds decision support tools, is compliant with appropriate standards, and is reasonably priced. Current tools have security issues, lack visual/mapping functions and critical infrastructure status, and do not integrate with other tools. It is clear that there is a need for an integrated, common operating system. The system would need to be accessible by all the organizations that would have a role in managing an anthrax incident to enable regional decision making. The most useful tool would feature a GIS visualization that would allow for a common operating picture that is updated in real time. To capitalize on information gained from the interviews, the following activities are recommended: Rate emergency management decision tools against the criteria specified by the interviewees. Identify and analyze other current activities focused on information sharing in the greater Seattle urban area. Identify and analyze information sharing systems/tools used in other regions.

Upton, Jaki F.; Lesperance, Ann M.; Stein, Steven L.

2009-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

458

Can I obtain a list of companies involved in the natural gas ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Can I obtain a list of companies involved in the natural gas industry, such as utilities, pipeline companies, and storage operators? Yes. EIA collects and publishes a ...

459

Obtaining and Ensuring Persistence of O&M Savings Through Resource Conservation Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Resource conservation management is a management program similar to financial management in that its success requires commitment by all levels of the organization to the process as well as an accounting procedure and auditing of critical components. Resource conservation management provides a framework for all elements of efficient building operations and maintenance. The savings connected with the program are principally connected with changes in the way buildings are operated and maintained. This paper discusses the evolution of the resource conservation management service and the savings associated with the two-year pilot effort with seven school districts as well as the critical components of a successful program. The hope is that top-management will recognize the value of resource conservation management in keeping their overhead costs under control and will incorporate it into the management structure of their jurisdiction or firm.

Miller, W.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Information Inaccuracy in Inventory Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many companies have automated their inventory management processes and rely on an information system in critical decision making. However, if the information is inaccurate, the ability of the system to provide high availability of products at the minimal operating cost can be compromised. In this paper, analytical and simulation modelling demonstrate that even a small rate of stock loss undetected by the information system can lead to inventory inaccuracy that disrupts the replenishment process and creates severe out-of-stocks. In fact, revenue losses due to out-of-stocks can far outweigh the stock losses themselves. This sensitivity of performance to the inventory inaccuracy becomes even higher in systems operating in lean environments. Motivated by an automatic product identification technology under development at the Auto-ID Center, various methods of compensating for the inventory inaccuracy are presented and evaluated. Comparisons of the methods reveal that the inventory inaccuracy problem can be effectively treated even without automatic product identification technologies in some situations. 1

Stock Loss; Yun Kang; Stanley B. Gershwin

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "obtain information critical" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

WIPP - Joint Information Center  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Joint Information Center is located at 4021 National Parks Highway in Carlsbad, N.M. Joint Information Center In the unlikely event of an emergency, the WIPP Joint Information...

462

The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The chemistry of minerals obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale Awni Y. Al was performed on the spent oil shale (oil shale ash) obtained from the combustion of Jordanian oil shale process, minimal fragmentation was encountered since Jordanian oil shale contains large proportions of ash

Shawabkeh, Reyad A.

463

Method and apparatus for obtaining enhanced production rate of thermal chemical reactions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Reactors and processes are disclosed that can utilize high heat fluxes to obtain fast, steady-state reaction rates. Porous catalysts used in conjunction with microchannel reactors to obtain high rates of heat transfer are also disclosed. Reactors and processes that utilize short contact times, high heat flux and low pressure drop are described. Improved methods of steam reforming are also provided.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Gao, Yufei (Kennewick, WA)

2006-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

464

Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain 4 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input Attached is Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Policy, Office Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1337 or at Michael.Righi@hq.doe.gov. POLICY_FLASH_2013-24 disseminating the Dep Sec's memo of Jan 28 2013 on Fee Determ and AEs.pdf Fee Determinations - Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash: 2013-52 Contractor Legal Management Requirements: Final Rule

465

Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain 4 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input Attached is Policy Flash 2013-24 Fee Determinations: Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input. Questions concerning this policy flash should be directed to Michael Righi of the Contract and Financial Assistance Policy Division, Office of Policy, Office Acquisition and Project Management at (202) 287-1337 or at Michael.Righi@hq.doe.gov. POLICY_FLASH_2013-24 disseminating the Dep Sec's memo of Jan 28 2013 on Fee Determ and AEs.pdf Fee Determinations - Requirement to Obtain Acquisition Executive's Input.pdf More Documents & Publications Policy Flash: 2013-52 Contractor Legal Management Requirements: Final Rule

466

Criticality concerns in cleaning large uranium hexafluoride cylinders  

SciTech Connect

Cleaning large cylinders used to transport low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) presents several challenges to nuclear criticality safety. This paper presents a brief overview of the cleaning process, the criticality controls typically employed and their bases. Potential shortfalls in implementing these controls are highlighted, and a simple example to illustrate the difficulties in complying with the Double Contingency Principle is discussed. Finally, a summary of recommended criticality controls for large cylinder cleaning operations is presented.

Sheaffer, M.K.; Keeton, S.C.; Lutz, H.F.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

468

Providing Nuclear Criticality Safety Analysis Education through Benchmark Experiment Evaluation  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges that today's new workforce of nuclear criticality safety engineers face is the opportunity to provide assessment of nuclear systems and establish safety guidelines without having received significant experience or hands-on training prior to graduation. Participation in the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and/or the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) provides students and young professionals the opportunity to gain experience and enhance critical engineering skills.

John D. Bess; J. Blair Briggs; David W. Nigg

2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

Critical behavior of the aperiodic quantum Ising chain in a transverse magnetic field  

SciTech Connect

The authors consider the quantum spin-1/2 Ising chain in an uniform transverse magnetic field, with an aperiodic sequence of ferromagnetic exchange couplings. This system is a limiting anisotropic case of the classical two-dimensional Ising model with an arbitrary layered modulation. Its formal solution via a Jordan-Winger transformation enables one to obtain a detailed description of the influence of the aperiodic modulation on the singularity of the ground-state energy at the critical point. The key concept is that of the fluctuation of the sums of any number of consecutive couplings at the critical point. When the fluctuation is bounded, the model belongs to the Onsager universality class of the uniform chain. The amplitude of the logarithmic divergence in the specific heat is proportional to the velocity of the fermionic excitations, for which the authors give explicit expressions in most cases of interest, including the periodic and quasiperiodic cases, the Thue-Morse chain, and the random dimer model. When the couplings exhibit an unbounded fluctuation, the critical singularity is shown to be generically similar to that of the critical point, and an exponentially small singular part, for which the authors give a quantitative estimate. In the marginal case of a logarithmically divergent fluctuation, e.g., for the period-doubling sequence or the circle sequence or the circle sequence, there is a negative specific heat exponent [alpha], which varies continuously with the strength of the aperiodic modulation. 55 refs., 2 figs.

Luck, J.M. (Centre D'Etudes de Saclay, Gif-sur-Yvette (France))

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Energy information sheets  

SciTech Connect

The National Energy Information Center (NEIC), as part of its mission, provides energy information and referral assistance to Federal, State, and local governments, the academic community, business and industrial organizations, and the public. The Energy Information Sheets was developed to provide general information on various aspects of fuel production, prices, consumption, and capability. Additional information on related subject matter can be found in other Energy Information Administration (EIA) publications as referenced at the end of each sheet.

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