National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for obstacles confronting greater

  1. Confronting Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Confronting Challenges Confronting Challenges Developing solutions to problems Develop a DOE report on land and asset transfers Improve the 10 CFR 770 process Improve the ability ...

  2. Apparatus for obstacle traversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    2004-08-10

    An apparatus for traversing obstacles having an elongated, round, flexible body that includes a plurality of drive track assemblies. The plurality of drive track assemblies cooperate to provide forward propulsion wherever a propulsion member is in contact with any feature of the environment, regardless of how many or which ones of the plurality of drive track assemblies make contact with such environmental feature.

  3. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric potential in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level is described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The first obstacle which any developer must confront in Michigan is obtaining the authority to utilize the river bed, banks, and flowing water at a proposed dam site. This involves a determination of ownership of the stream banks and bed, and the manner of obtaining either their title or use; and existing constraints with regard to the use of the water. Michigan follows the riparian theory of water law. The direct regulation; indirect regulation; public utilities regulation; financing; and taxation are discussed.

  4. Obstacle-avoiding navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann; Koren, Yoram; Levine, Simon P.

    1991-01-01

    A system for guiding an autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle through a field of operation having obstacles thereon to be avoided employs a memory for containing data which defines an array of grid cells which correspond to respective subfields in the field of operation of the vehicle. Each grid cell in the memory contains a value which is indicative of the likelihood, or probability, that an obstacle is present in the respectively associated subfield. The values in the grid cells are incremented individually in response to each scan of the subfields, and precomputation and use of a look-up table avoids complex trigonometric functions. A further array of grid cells is fixed with respect to the vehicle form a conceptual active window which overlies the incremented grid cells. Thus, when the cells in the active window overly grid cell having values which are indicative of the presence of obstacles, the value therein is used as a multiplier of the precomputed vectorial values. The resulting plurality of vectorial values are summed vectorially in one embodiment of the invention to produce a virtual composite repulsive vector which is then summed vectorially with a target-directed vector for producing a resultant vector for guiding the vehicle. In an alternative embodiment, a plurality of vectors surrounding the vehicle are computed, each having a value corresponding to obstacle density. In such an embodiment, target location information is used to select between alternative directions of travel having low associated obstacle densities.

  5. Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy 2: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy Biomass 2012 Logo. Image consists of a curved leaf and green and yellow circles surrounding a silhouette of the US Capitol building. The text 'U.S. Department of Energy Biomass 2012' is overlayed on the image. July 10-11, 2012 Washington, D.C. Convention Center 801 Mt. Vernon Place, NW Washington, D.C. 20001 On July 10-11, 2012, the

  6. ADR Lunchtime Program: RESPECTFUL CONFRONTATION | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RESPECTFUL CONFRONTATION ADR Lunchtime Program: RESPECTFUL CONFRONTATION This workshop will explore how the principles of Respectful Confrontation are necessary for effective leadership in our new work culture. These principles are based on the belief that it is possible to stand in your power, speak your truth, hear the truth of others, and have your needs met in a way that will not cause harm. The use of Respectful Confrontation principles results in a shift in behavior, insight into yourself,

  7. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric potential in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory in the area, and the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC is examined. The initial obstacle that all developers confront in Wisconsin is obtaining the authority to utilize the bed, banks, and flowing water at a proposed dam site. This involves a determination of ownership of the stream banks and bed and the manner of obtaining either their title or use; and existing constraints with regard to the use of the water. Wisconsin follows the riparian theory of water law.

  8. Obstacles to applications of nanostructured thermoelectrics....

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Obstacles to ... 1184589 Report Number(s): SAND2014-19799J 542919 DOE Contract Number: AC04-94AL85000 Resource Type: Journal Article ...

  9. Whole arm obstacle avoidance for teleoperated robots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feddema, J.T.; Novak, J.L.

    1993-10-01

    This paper describes a collision avoidance system using Whole Arm Proximity (WHAP) sensors on a PUMA 560 robot arm. The capacitance-based sensors generate electric fields which can completely encompass the robot arm and detect obstacles as they approach from any direction. The directional obstacle information gathered by the WHAP sensors together with the sensor geometry and robot configuration is used to scale the commanded joint velocities of the robot. A linearized relationship between the WHAP sensor reading and the distance from the obstacle allows direct transformation of perturbations in VHAP readings to perturbations in joint velocities. The VHAP reading is used to directly reduce the component of the command input velocity along the normal axis of the sensor, allowing graceful reductions in speed as the arm approaches the obstacle. By scaling only the component of the velocity vector in the,direction of the nearest obstacles, the control system restricts motion in the direction of obstacles while permitting unconstrained motion in other directions.

  10. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A.; Bhattacharya, M. Barat, P.

    2014-10-14

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  11. Confronting DGP braneworld gravity with cosmico observations after Planck data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Lixin

    2014-02-01

    The normal branch of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld gravity with brane tension is confronted by the currently available cosmic observations from the geometrical and dynamical perspectives. On the geometrical side, the type Ia supernova as standard candle, the baryon acoustic oscillation as standard ruler and the cosmic microwave background measurement from the first released 15.5 months data were used to fix the background evolutions. On the dynamical side, the redshift space distortion data will be used to determine the evolution of the matter perturbation. Through a Markov chain Monte Carlo analysis, we found the dimensionless crossover scale ?{sub r{sub c}} = 1/(4H{sup 2}{sub 0}r{sup 2}{sub c}) = 0.00183{sub ?0.00183}{sup +0.000338} in a spatially flat normal branch of Dvali-Gabadadze-Porrati braneworld. This result suggests that the crossover scale r{sub c} should be around 12H{sup ?1}{sub 0} which is consistent with the previous result r{sub c} > 3H{sup ?1}{sub 0} and greater. It also implies that the five-dimensional gravity effect is weak to be observed in H{sup ?1}{sub 0} scale.

  12. Gauge-flation confronted with Planck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Namba, Ryo; Dimastrogiovanni, Emanuela; Peloso, Marco E-mail: ema@physics.umn.edu

    2013-11-01

    Gauge-flation is a recently proposed model in which inflation is driven solely by a non-Abelian gauge field thanks to a specific higher order derivative operator. The nature of the operator is such that it does not introduce ghosts. We compute the cosmological scalar and tensor perturbations for this model, improving over an existing computation. We then confront these results with the Planck data. The model is characterized by the quantity ? ? g{sup 2}Q{sup 2}/H{sup 2} (where g is the gauge coupling constant, Q the vector vev, and H the Hubble rate). For ? < 2, the scalar perturbations show a strong tachyonic instability. In the stable region, the scalar power spectrum n{sub s} is too low at small ?, while the tensor-to-scalar ratio r is too high at large ?. No value of ? leads to acceptable values for n{sub s} and r, and so the model is ruled out by the CMB data. The same behavior with ? was obtained in Chromo-natural inflation, a model in which inflation is driven by a pseudo-scalar coupled to a non-Abelian gauge field. When the pseudo-scalar can be integrated out, one recovers the model of Gauge-flation plus corrections. It was shown that this identification is very accurate at the background level, but differences emerged in the literature concerning the perturbations of the two models. On the contrary, our results show that the analogy between the two models continues to be accurate also at the perturbative level.

  13. On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem ...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem Citation Details In-Document Search Title: On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem We consider a ...

  14. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Carlos E.; Zumstein, James E.; Chang, John T.; Leach, Jr.. Richard R.

    2006-12-12

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  15. A Delicate Universe: Compactification Obstacles to D-brane Inflation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect A Delicate Universe: Compactification Obstacles to D-brane Inflation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: A Delicate Universe: Compactification Obstacles to D-brane Inflation We investigate whether explicit models of warped D-brane inflation are possible in string compactifications. To this end, we study the potential for D3-brane motion in a warped conifold that includes holomorphically embedded D7-branes involved in moduli stabilization. The

  16. Elimination of a spiral wave pinned at an obstacle by a train of plane

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    waves: Effect of diffusion between obstacles and surrounding media (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Elimination of a spiral wave pinned at an obstacle by a train of plane waves: Effect of diffusion between obstacles and surrounding media Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Elimination of a spiral wave pinned at an obstacle by a train of plane waves: Effect of diffusion between obstacles and surrounding media In excitable media such as cardiac tissue and Belousov-Zhabotinsky

  17. On a Highly Nonlinear Self-Obstacle Optimal Control Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Di Donato, Daniela; Mugnai, Dimitri

    2015-10-15

    We consider a non-quadratic optimal control problem associated to a nonlinear elliptic variational inequality, where the obstacle is the control itself. We show that, fixed a desired profile, there exists an optimal solution which is not far from it. Detailed characterizations of the optimal solution are given, also in terms of approximating problems.

  18. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton, Butler, Warren, and Clermont counties in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and...

  19. Hydrothermal Convection Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater than or equal to 90 degrees C Authors Brook, Mariner, Mabey, Swanson, Guffanti and Muffler Published Journal Assessment of...

  20. New Process Helps Overcome Obstacles to Produce Renewable Fuels and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chemicals - News Releases | NREL New Process Helps Overcome Obstacles to Produce Renewable Fuels and Chemicals Lignin Valorization Study Published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences August 20, 2014 There's an old saying in the biofuels industry: "You can make anything from lignin except money." But now, a new study may pave the way to challenging that adage. The study from the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) demonstrates a concept

  1. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  2. Home Upgrades: Leveraging HVAC Upgrades for Greater Impact (201...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Upgrades: Leveraging HVAC Upgrades for Greater Impact (201) Home Upgrades: Leveraging HVAC Upgrades for Greater Impact (201) Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call...

  3. Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Greater Mekong Subregion Jump to: navigation, search Name Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion AgencyCompany Organization AIT-UNEP Regional...

  4. The New Energy Future in Indian Country: Confronting Climate Change, Creating Jobs, and Conserving Nature

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    THE NEW ENERGY FUTURE IN INDIAN COUNTRY: Confronting Climate Change, Creating Jobs, and Conserving Nature N A T I O N A L W I L D L I F E F E D E R A T I O N 2 0 1 0 * On average, Tribal households pay significantly more in home energy expenses than other Americans. Most utilities are solely owned and operated by non-Tribal entities, so the money paid to energy providers immediately leaves tribal communities. THE NEW ENERGY FUTURE IN INDIAN COUNTRY * The infrastructure and revenue streams

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2...

  6. KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations Jump to: navigation, search Name: KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations Place: Missouri Phone Number: (660) 359-2208 Outage Hotline: (660) 359-2208...

  7. Home Upgrades: Leveraging HVAC Upgrades for Greater Impact (201)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series: Home Upgrades: Leveraging HVAC Upgrades for Greater Impact (201), November 18, 2015.

  8. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors | Department of Energy The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors, a publication of the U.S.

  9. Greater Sun Center, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greater Sun Center, Florida: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, search Equivalent URI DBpedia Coordinates 27.718086, -82.351759 Show Map Loading map... "minzoom":false,"map...

  10. Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value of Greater Investments...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Greater Investments in Clean Energy Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value ... in efficient and renewable energy and water conservation can create jobs and stimulate ...

  11. Dr. Bill Brinkman: Working Towards Greater Energy Security |...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Brinkman: Working Towards Greater Energy Security September 7, 2012 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook International Innovation, September 2012 International...

  12. Greater Sage-Grouse Populations and Energy Development in Wyoming...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    development affects greater sage-grouse populations in Wyoming. Authors Renee C. Taylor, Matthew R. Dzialak and Larry D. Hayden-Wing Published Taylor, Dzialak and...

  13. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government ... the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), the National ...

  14. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    November 2009 Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials. November 2009 The National Council on Electricity Policy (National ...

  15. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Focus Series CINCINNATI-EQUIPMENT LEASE PROGRAM Equipment Lease Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA), a Better ...

  16. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Calnin has worked with the Clean Cities initiative since 2007, having supported the Detroit Area coalition as well as the Greater Lansing Area coalition. With a background that...

  17. CONFRONTING THREE-DIMENSIONAL TIME-DEPENDENT JET SIMULATIONS WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff, Jan E.; Niebergal, Brian P.; Ouyed, Rachid; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Cai, Kai

    2010-10-20

    We perform state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, time-dependent simulations of magnetized disk winds, carried out to simulation scales of 60 AU, in order to confront optical Hubble Space Telescope observations of protostellar jets. We 'observe' the optical forbidden line emission produced by shocks within our simulated jets and compare these with actual observations. Our simulations reproduce the rich structure of time-varying jets, including jet rotation far from the source, an inner (up to 400 km s{sup -1}) and outer (less than 100 km s{sup -1}) component of the jet, and jet widths of up to 20 AU in agreement with observed jets. These simulations when compared with the data are able to constrain disk wind models. In particular, models featuring a disk magnetic field with a modest radial spatial variation across the disk are favored.

  18. Non-Economic Obstacles to Wind Deployment: Issues and Regional Differences (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation provides an overview of national obstacles to wind deployment, with regional assessments. A special mention of offshore projects and distributed wind projects is provided. Detailed maps examine baseline capacity, military and flight radar, golden and bald eagle habitat, bat habitat, whooping crane habitat, and public lands. Regional deployment challenges are also discussed.

  19. DOE prepared for Greater Sage-Grouse designation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 8, 2010 Media Contacts: DOE - Brad Bugger, 208-526-0833 or Tim Jackson, 208-526-8484 S.M. Stoller Corp. - Roger Blew, 208-525-9358 Note to news directors: Photographs of sage-grouse at INL Site are available on request. DOE prepared for Greater Sage-Grouse designation Greater Sage-Grouse male displaying on INL Site lek during early spring. Click on image to enlarge On March 5, the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service released its findings on a multi-year study of greater

  20. Greater Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greater Ohio Ethanol, LLC (GO Ethanol) Place: Lima, Ohio Zip: OH 45804 Product: GO Ethanol is a pure play ethanol...

  1. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin W. Gulf Coast Basin ... Major Tight Gas Plays, Lower 48 States 0 200 400 100 300 Miles Source: Energy ...

  2. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency, Save Money | Department of Energy Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy Efficiency, Save Money Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy Efficiency, Save Money November 26, 2013 - 2:44pm Addthis News Media Contact (202) 586-4940 WASHINGTON - Building on the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help communities save on energy bills, the Energy Department today awarded nearly $4

  3. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Efficiency, Save Money | Department of Energy Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy Efficiency, Save Money Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy Efficiency, Save Money November 26, 2013 - 12:00am Addthis Building on the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help communities save on energy bills, the Energy Department today awarded nearly $4 million to 13 states to increase statewide

  4. DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy 7 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency January 23, 2007 - 10:15am Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Alexander Karsner today announced that DOE intends issue $17 million in solicitations to improve automobile efficiency and reduce the United States's dependence on foreign sources of oil. The funding will be

  5. Increasing Reliability of the Nation's Power Grid through Greater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Visibility | Department of Energy Increasing Reliability of the Nation's Power Grid through Greater Visibility Increasing Reliability of the Nation's Power Grid through Greater Visibility March 22, 2016 - 10:15am Addthis Patricia A. Hoffman Patricia A. Hoffman Assistant Secretary, Office of Electricity Delivery & Energy Reliability DOE's Deputy Under Secretary for Science and Energy Adam Cohen today announced new funding that will build on recent progress in giving system operators

  6. LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy May 18, 2015 - 5:05pm Addthis A multicolored scatter plot that curves from left to right, bottom to top to show the wind power capacity factor and wind speed meters per second. The colors relate atmospheric stability conditions to reported power-output observations with black, dark blue, and lighter blue representing stable conditions; light blue, green and light green representing neutral conditions;

  7. NREL: News - Hybrid Buses Operate With Lower Emissions, Greater Fuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Efficiency Hybrid Buses Operate With Lower Emissions, Greater Fuel Efficiency Golden, Colo., August 1, 2002 A recently released study by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) concludes that hybrid buses operate with lower emissions and greater fuel efficiency than conventional diesel buses. The yearlong evaluation of 10 prototype diesel hybrid-electric buses in the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's New York City Transit (NYCT) fleet of

  8. Viscosity Solutions of Systems of PDEs with Interconnected Obstacles and Switching Problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamadene, S. Morlais, M. A.

    2013-04-15

    This paper deals with existence and uniqueness of a solution in viscosity sense, for a system of m variational partial differential inequalities with inter-connected obstacles. A particular case is the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellmann system of the Markovian stochastic optimal m-states switching problem. The switching cost functions depend on (t,x). The main tool is the notion of systems of reflected backward stochastic differential equations with oblique reflection.

  9. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials Prepared by The National Council on Electricity Policy November 2009 NATIONAL COUNCIL ON ELECTRICITY POLICY MEMBER ORGANIZATIONS The National Council on Electricity Policy (National Council) is a unique venture between the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO), the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL),

  10. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H.; Boswell, R.

    1993-12-31

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  11. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in West Virginia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric in West Virginia at the state level are described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The introductory section examines the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and concludes with an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by FERC. The development of small-scale hydroelectric energy depends on the selection of a site which will produce sufficient water power capacity to make the project economically attractive to a developer. In West Virginia, the right to use the flowing waters of a stream, creek, or river is appurtenant to the ownership of the lands bordering the watercourse. The lands are known as riparian lands. The water rights are known as riparian rights. Thus, the first obstacle a developer faces involves the acquisition of riparian lands and the subsequent right to the use of the water. The water law in West Virginia is discussed in detail followed by discussions on direct and indirect regulations; continuing obligations; financial considerations; and interstate organizations.

  12. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  13. CONFRONTING THE JET MODEL OF Sgr A* WITH THE FARADAY ROTATION MEASURE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ya-Ping; Yuan, Feng; Daniel Wang, Q. E-mail: wqd@astro.umass.edu

    2015-01-01

    Sgr A* is probably the supermassive black hole being investigated most extensively due to its proximity to Earth. Several theoretical models for its steady state emission have been proposed in the past two decades. Both the radiative-inefficient accretion flow and the jet model have been shown to well explain the observed spectral energy distribution. The Faraday rotation measure (RM) has been unambiguously measured at the submillimeter wavelength, but it has only been tested against the accretion flow model. Here we first calculate the RM based on the jet model and find that the predicted value is two orders of magnitude lower than the measured value. We then include an additional contribution from the accretion flow in front of the jet and show that the measured RM may be reconciled with the model under some tight constraints. The main constraint is that the inclination angle should be greater than ?73°. However, this requirement is not consistent with an existing observational estimate of the inclination angle.

  14. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area, and the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC is examined. The first step the small scale hydroelectric developer must take is that of acquiring title to the real property comprising the development site. The real estate parcel must include the requisite interest in the land adjacent to the watercourse, access to the underlying streambed and where needed, the land necessary for an upstream impoundment area. Land acquisition may be effectuated by purchase, lease, or grant by the state. In addition to these methods, New York permits the use of the eminent domain power of the state for public utilities under certain circumstances.

  15. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level in Maryland are described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The dual regulatory system is examined with the aim of creating a more orderly understanding of the vagaries of the system, focusing on the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC. In Maryland, by common law rule, title to all navigable waters and to the soil below the high-water mark of those waters is vested in the state as successor to the Lord Proprietary who had received it by grant from the Crown. Rights to non-navigable water, public trust doctrine, and eminent domain are also discussed. Direct and indirect regulations, continuing obligations, loan programs, and regional organizations are described in additional sections.

  16. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal July 20, 2007 - 2:55pm Addthis ...

  17. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) ...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) A transuranic (TRU) waste shipment makes its way to the ...

  18. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and ...

  19. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage ... DE-AC36-08GO28308 Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with ...

  20. Draft Greater Than Class C EIS Public Hearings to Come to Pasco...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The United States Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Environmental Management (EM), is preparing an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for disposal of Greater-Than-Class C...

  1. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications State of IndianaGreater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan North ...

  2. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mobility? Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater Mobility? AgencyCompany Organization:...

  3. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications State of IndianaGreater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan Utah Clean ...

  4. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Sage-Grouse | Department of Energy Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater Sage-Grouse Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater Sage-Grouse March 31, 2014 - 11:34am Addthis Photo of a sage grouse. The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Argonne National Laboratory developed a spatially explicit individual-based model for examining the cumulative impacts of wind energy development on populations and habitats of the greater

  5. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    In February 2016, DOE publicly issued the Final Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE/EIS-0375)(Final...

  6. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has prepared this Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (Draft...

  7. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Government Officials. November 2009 | Department of Energy Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials. November 2009 Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials. November 2009 The National Council on Electricity Policy (National Council) is a unique venture between the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC), the National Association of State Energy Officials (NASEO),

  8. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  9. 2011-05 "LANL Not Be Selected for Disposal of Greater Then Class C

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Low-Level Radioactive Waste" | Department of Energy 5 "LANL Not Be Selected for Disposal of Greater Then Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste" 2011-05 "LANL Not Be Selected for Disposal of Greater Then Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste" The intent of this NNMCAB recommendation is to see that the required cleanup at LANL is completed in the safest way, specifically relative to movement of waste. PDF icon Rec 2011-05 - May 12

  10. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    2013-05-22

    This report summarizes the results of a seven-year, DOE-funded research project, conducted by researchers from Kansas State University and the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative, to assess the effects of wind energy development in Kansas on the population and reproduction of greater prairie chickens.

  11. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan geothermal system, Philippines, as deduced from geochemical and isotopic data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alvis-Isidro, R.R.; Solana, R.R.; D`amore, F.; Nuti, S.; Gonfiantini, R.

    1993-10-01

    Fluids in the Greater Tongonan geothermal system exhibit a large positive {sup 18}O shift from the Leyte meteoric water line. However, there is also a significant shift in {sup 2}H. The {delta}{sup 2}H-{delta}{sup 18}O plot shows that the geothermal fluids may be derived by the mixing of meteoric water with local magmatic water. The most enriched water in the Greater Tongonan system, in terms of {delta}{sup 18}O, {delta}{sup 2}H and Cl, is comprised of approximately 40% magmatic water. Baseline isotope results support a hydrogeochemical model in which there is increasing meteoric water dilution to the southeast, from Mahiao to Sambaloran and towards Malitbog. The Cl-{delta}{sup 18}O plot confirms that the geothermal fluid in Mahanagdong, further southeast, is distinct from that of the Mahiao-Sambaloran-Malitbog system.

  12. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    i FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Project Title: Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens DOE Award Number: DE-EE0000526 Project Period: 12/01/2009 to 6/22/2012 Principal Investigator: Brett K. Sandercock, Professor of Wildlife Biology, Division of Biology, 116 Ackert Hall, Kansas State University, Manhattan, Kansas 66506, bsanderc@k- state.edu, 785-532-0120 Recipient Organization: Kansas State University (92-977-3554) Administrative Contact of

  13. NREL: Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Research - Stationary Fuel Cell Units Greater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Than 100 kW Achieve 2015 Target for Electrical Efficiency Stationary Fuel Cell Units Greater Than 100 kW Achieve 2015 Target for Electrical Efficiency Project Technology Validation: Stationary Fuel Cell Evaluation Contact Genevieve Saur Related Publications Stationary Fuel Cell System Composite Data Products Stationary Fuel Cell Systems Analysis Project: Partnership Opportunities In a newly released composite data product (CDP), NREL's National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center (NFCTEC)

  14. NREL: Climate Neutral Research Campuses - Campus-Wide Measures Have Greater

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Potential Campus-Wide Measures Have Greater Potential Pursuing climate neutrality on research campuses fits into the bigger picture of addressing the impacts of climate change and fossil-fuel depletion. International scientific bodies addressing climate change are calling for reductions of carbon emissions of 80% by 2050. Because of their size and complexity, research campuses are well positioned to take advantage of campus-wide efficient energy systems. For example, many campuses have

  15. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  16. COMPLETION OF THE TRANSURANIC GREATER CONFINEMENT DISPOSAL BOREHOLE PERFORMANCE ASSESSMENT FOR THE NEVADA TEST SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colarusso, Angela; Crowe, Bruce; Cochran, John R.

    2003-02-27

    Classified transuranic material that cannot be shipped to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico is stored in Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site on the Nevada Test Site. A performance assessment was completed for the transuranic inventory in the boreholes and submitted to the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group. The performance assessment was prepared by Sandia National Laboratories on behalf of the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office using an iterative methodology that assessed radiological releases from the intermediate depth disposal configuration against the regulatory requirements of the 1985 version of 40 CFR 191 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The transuranic materials are stored at 21 to 37 m depth (70 to 120 ft) in large diameter boreholes constructed in the unsaturated alluvial deposits of Frenchman Flat. Hydrologic processes that affect long- term isolation of the radionuclides are dominated by extremely slow upward rates of liquid/vapor advection and diffusion; there is no downward pathway under current climatic conditions and there is no recharge to groundwater under future ''glacial'' climatic conditions. A Federal Review Team appointed by the Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group reviewed the Greater Confinement Disposal performance assessment and found that the site met the majority of the regulatory criteria of the 1985 and portions of the 1993 versions of 40 CFR 191. A number of technical and procedural issues required development of supplemental information that was incorporated into a final revision of the performance assessment. These issues include inclusion of radiological releases into the complementary cumulative distribution function for the containment requirements associated with drill cuttings from inadvertent human intrusion, verification of mathematical models used in the performance assessment, inclusion of dose calculations from collocated low-level waste in the boreholes for the individual protection requirements, further assessments of engineered barriers and conditions associated with the assurance requirements, and expansion of documentation provided for assessing the groundwater protection requirements. The Transuranic Waste Disposal Federal Review Group approved the performance assessment for Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes in 2001 and did not approve the Application of the Assurance Requirements. Remaining issues concerned with engineered barriers and the multiple aspects of the Assurance Requirements will be resolved at the time of closure of the Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site. This is the first completion and acceptance of a performance assessment for transuranic materials under the U.S. Department of Energy self-regulation. The Greater Confinement Disposal boreholes are only the second waste disposal configuration to meet the safety regulatory requirements of 40 CFR 191.

  17. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  18. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  19. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW.

  20. Hydrology of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal system, Philippines and its implications to field exploitation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seastres, J.S. Jr.; Salonga, N.D.; Saw, V.S.

    1996-12-31

    The Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field will be operating a total of 694 MWe by July 1997. The field has produced steam for the 112.5 MWe Tongonan I power plant since June 1983. With massive fluid withdrawal starting July 1996, a pre-commissioning hydrology was constructed to assess its implications to field exploitation. Pressure drawdown centered at well 106 in Mahiao was induced by fluid withdrawal at Tongonan-I production field. This drawdown will be accelerated by major steam withdrawal (734 kg/s) upon commissioning of power plants at Mahiao, Sambaloran and Malitbog sectors. To resolve this concern, fluid injection will be conducted at the periphery of Mahiao to provide recharge of reheated reinjection fluids in the reservoir. At Mahanagdong, the acidic fluid breakthrough will unlikely occur since the acidic zone north of this sector is not hydrologically well-connected to the main neutral-pH reservoir as indicated by pressure profiles.

  1. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  2. The hydrological model of the Mahanagdong sector, Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herras, E.B.; Licup, A.C. Jr.; Vicedo, R.O.

    1996-12-31

    The Mahanagdong sector of the Greater Tongonan Geothermal Field is committed to supply 180 MWe of steam by mid-1997. An updated hydrological model was constructed based on available geoscientific and reservoir engineering data from a total of 34 wells drilled in the area. The Mahanagdong; resource is derived from a fracture-controlled and volcano hosted geothermal system characterized by neutral to slightly alkali-chloride fluids with reservoir temperatures exceeding 295{degrees}C. A major upflow region was identified in the vicinity of MG-3D, MG-14D and MG-5D. Isochemical contours indicate outflowing fluids with temperatures of 270-275{degrees}C to the south and west. Its southwesterly flow is restricted by the intersection of the impermeable Mahanagdong Claystone near MG-10D, which delimits the southern part of the resource. Low temperature (<200{degrees}C), shallow inflows are evident at the west near MG-4D and MG-17D wells which act as a cold recharge in this sector.

  3. Wintertime aerosol chemical composition, volatility, and spatial variability in the greater London area

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, L.; Williams, L. R.; Young, D. E.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Massoli, P.; Fortner, E.; Chhabra, P.; Herndon, S.; Brooks, W. A.; et al

    2015-08-28

    The composition of PM1 (particulate matter with diameter less than 1 ?m) in the greater London area was characterized during the Clean Air for London (ClearfLo) project in winter 2012. Two High-Resolution Time-of-Flight Aerosol Mass Spectrometers (HR-ToF-AMS) were deployed at a rural site (Detling, Kent) and an urban site (North Kensington, London). The simultaneous and high-temporal resolution measurements at the two sites provide a unique opportunity to investigate the spatial distribution of PM1. We find that the organic aerosol (OA) concentration is comparable between the rural and urban sites, but the sources of OA are distinctly different. The concentration ofmore »solid fuel OA at the urban site is about twice as high as at the rural site, due to elevated domestic heating in the urban area. While the concentrations of oxygenated OA (OOA) are well-correlated between the two sites, the OOA concentration at the rural site is almost twice that of the urban site. At the rural site, more than 70 % of the carbon in OOA is estimated to be non-fossil, which suggests that OOA is likely related to aged biomass burning considering the small amount of biogenic SOA in winter. Thus, it is possible that the biomass burning OA contributes a larger fraction of ambient OA in wintertime than what previous field studies have suggested. A suite of instruments was deployed downstream of a thermal denuder (TD) to investigate the volatility of PM1 species at the rural Detling site. After heating at 250 °C in the TD, 40 % of the residual mass is OA, indicating the presence of non-volatile organics in the aerosol. Although the OA associated with refractory black carbon (rBC, measured by a soot-particle aerosol mass spectrometer) only accounts for « less

  4. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    2013-05-22

    Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

  5. Project Summary (2012-2015) – Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinkle, Ross; Benscoter, Brian; Comas, Xavier; Sumner, David; DeAngelis, Donald

    2015-04-07

    Carbon Dynamics of the Greater Everglades Watershed and Implications of Climate Change The objectives of this project are to: 1) quantify above- and below-ground carbon stocks of terrestrial ecosystems along a seasonal hydrologic gradient in the headwaters region of the Greater Everglades watershed; 2) develop budgets of ecosystem gaseous carbon exchange (carbon dioxide and methane) across the seasonal hydrologic gradient; 3) assess the impact of climate drivers on ecosystem carbon exchange in the Greater Everglades headwater region; and 4) integrate research findings with climate-driven terrestrial ecosystem carbon models to examine the potential influence of projected future climate change on regional carbon cycling. Note: this project receives a one-year extension past the original performance period - David Sumner (USGS) is not included in this extension.

  6. Federal legal obstacles and incentives to the development of the small-scale hydroelectric potential of the nineteen Northeastern states. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The main report for which this report is the executive summary, DOE/RA--23-216.00.0-01 (see EAPA 5:3929), was published in revised form in March 1979. Also, since that time, Energy Law Institute has produced detailed legal memoranda on obstacles and incentives for each of the 19 states. This executive summary summarizes the findings and observations of the original report. Specific summaries included are: Federal Jurisdiction Over Small-Scale Hydroelectric Facilities; The FERC; The Regulation of Construction in and the Discharge of Dredged, Fill, and Other Materials into the Waters of the US; The Protection of Fish, Wildlife, and Endangered Species; The Preservation of Historic Places, Archaeological Sites, and Natural Areas; Regulation of the Use of Federal Lands; Federal Dam Construction and Power-Distribution Agencies; Additional Federal Agencies Concerned with Small-Scale Hydroelectric Dams; Federal Tax Devices and Business Structures Affecting Small-Scale Hydroelectric Development; and an Outline of Federal-Assistance programs Available for Small-Scale Hydroelectric Development.

  7. Vision-based obstacle avoidance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galbraith, John

    2006-07-18

    A method for allowing a robot to avoid objects along a programmed path: first, a field of view for an electronic imager of the robot is established along a path where the electronic imager obtains the object location information within the field of view; second, a population coded control signal is then derived from the object location information and is transmitted to the robot; finally, the robot then responds to the control signal and avoids the detected object.

  8. A Methodology for the Assessment of Unconventional (Continuous) Resources with an Application to the Greater Natural Buttes Gas Field, Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olea, Ricardo A.; Cook, Troy A.; Coleman, James L.

    2010-12-15

    The Greater Natural Buttes tight natural gas field is an unconventional (continuous) accumulation in the Uinta Basin, Utah, that began production in the early 1950s from the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group. Three years later, production was extended to the Eocene Wasatch Formation. With the exclusion of 1100 non-productive ('dry') wells, we estimate that the final recovery from the 2500 producing wells existing in 2007 will be about 1.7 trillion standard cubic feet (TSCF) (48.2 billion cubic meters (BCM)). The use of estimated ultimate recovery (EUR) per well is common in assessments of unconventional resources, and it is one of the main sources of information to forecast undiscovered resources. Each calculated recovery value has an associated drainage area that generally varies from well to well and that can be mathematically subdivided into elemental subareas of constant size and shape called cells. Recovery per 5-acre cells at Greater Natural Buttes shows spatial correlation; hence, statistical approaches that ignore this correlation when inferring EUR values for untested cells do not take full advantage of all the information contained in the data. More critically, resulting models do not match the style of spatial EUR fluctuations observed in nature. This study takes a new approach by applying spatial statistics to model geographical variation of cell EUR taking into account spatial correlation and the influence of fractures. We applied sequential indicator simulation to model non-productive cells, while spatial mapping of cell EUR was obtained by applying sequential Gaussian simulation to provide multiple versions of reality (realizations) having equal chances of being the correct model. For each realization, summation of EUR in cells not drained by the existing wells allowed preparation of a stochastic prediction of undiscovered resources, which range between 2.6 and 3.4 TSCF (73.6 and 96.3 BCM) with a mean of 2.9 TSCF (82.1 BCM) for Greater Natural Buttes. A second approach illustrates the application of multiple-point simulation to assess a hypothetical frontier area for which there is no production information but which is regarded as being similar to Greater Natural Buttes.

  9. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  10. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix A-2: Timing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinke, W.F.

    1994-09-01

    Planning for the storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste. Timing, or the date the waste will require storage or disposal, is an integral aspect of that planning. The majority of GTCC LLW is generated by nuclear power plants, and the length of time a reactor remains operational directly affects the amount of GTCC waste expected from that reactor. This report uses data from existing literature to develop high, base, and low case estimates for the number of plants expected to experience (a) early shutdown, (b) 40-year operation, or (c) life extension to 60-year operation. The discussion includes possible effects of advanced light water reactor technology on future GTCC LLW generation. However, the main focus of this study is timing for shutdown of current technology reactors that are under construction or operating.

  11. Potential co-disposal of greater-than-class C low-level radioactive waste with Department of Energy special case waste - greater-than-class C low-level waste management program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allred, W.E.

    1994-09-01

    This document evaluates the feasibility of co-disposing of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) special case waste (SCW). This document: (1) Discusses and evaluates key issues concerning co-disposal of GTCC LLW with SCW. This includes examining these issues in terms of regulatory concerns, technical feasibility, and economics; (2) Examines advantages and disadvantages of such co-disposal; and (3) Makes recommendations. Research and analysis of the issues presented in this report indicate that it would be technically and economically feasible to co-dispose of GTCC LLW with DOE SCW. However, a dilemma will likely arise in the current division of regulatory responsibilities between the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission and DOE (i.e., current requirement for disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission). DOE SCW is currently not subject to this licensing requirement.

  12. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  13. Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Future. Ad hoc working group report, Key Biscayne, Florida, October 26-28, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A.

    1980-01-01

    This report of Workshop I (presented in outline form) by the Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Foundation begin an intensive focus on the energy problems of the Caribbean. The process by which environmental assessments by tropical experts can be successfully integrated into energy decisions is by: (1) international loan institutions requiring or strongly recommending excellent assessments; (2) engineering awareness of total effects of energy projects; (3) governmental environmental consciousness-raising with regard to natural resource value and potential inadvertent and unnecessary resource losses during energy development; and (4) media participation. Section headings in the outline are: preamble; introduction; research tasks: today and twenty years hence; needed research, demonstration and information dissemination projects to get knowledge about Caribbean energy-environment used; summary; recommendations; generalized conclusions; and background literature. (JGB)

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  15. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for forming any conclusions regarding potential impacts of wind energy development on sage-grouse. Although the data collected during the initial phases of this study indicate that greater sage-grouse may continue to use habitats near wind-energy facilities, research conducted on greater sage-grouse response to oil and gas development has found population declines may not occur until 2-10 years after development. Therefore, long-term data from several geographic areas within the range of the sage-grouse will likely be required to adequately assess impacts of wind-energy development on greater sage-grouse.

  16. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  17. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  18. Preliminary identification of potentially disruptive scenarios at the Greater Confinement Disposal Facility, Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guzowski, R.V.; Newman, G.

    1993-12-01

    The Greater Confinement Disposal location is being evaluated to determine whether defense-generated transuranic waste buried at this location complies with the Containment Requirements established by the US Environmental Protection Agency. One step in determining compliance is to identify those combinations of events and processes (scenarios) that define possible future states of the disposal system for which performance assessments must be performed. An established scenario-development procedure was used to identify a comprehensive set of mutually exclusive scenarios. To assure completeness, 761 features, events, processes, and other listings (FEPS) were compiled from 11 references. This number was reduced to 205 primarily through the elimination of duplications. The 205 FEPs were screened based on site-specific, goal-specific, and regulatory criteria. Four events survived screening and were used in preliminary scenario development: (1) exploratory drilling penetrates a GCD borehole, (2) drilling of a withdrawal/injection well penetrates a GCD borehole, (3) subsidence occurs at the RWMS, and (4) irrigation occurs at the RWMS. A logic diagram was used to develop 16 scenarios from the four events. No screening of these scenarios was attempted at this time. Additional screening of the currently retained events and processes will be based on additional data and information from site-characterization activities. When screening of the events and processes is completed, a final set of scenarios will be developed and screened based on consequence and probability of occurrence.

  19. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  1. Particle physics confronts the solar neutrino problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, P.B.

    1991-06-01

    This review has four parts. In Part I, we describe the reactions that produce neutrinos in the sun and the expected flux of those neutrinos on the earth. We then discuss the detection of these neutrinos, and how the results obtained differ from the theoretical expectations, leading to what is known as the solar neutrino problem. In Part II, we show how neutrino oscillations can provide a solution to the solar neutrino problem. This includes vacuum oscillations, as well as matter enhanced oscillations. In Part III, we discuss the possibility of time variation of the neutrino flux and how a magnetic moment of the neutrino can solve the problem. WE also discuss particle physics models which can give rise to the required values of magnetic moments. In Part IV, we present some concluding remarks and outlook for the recent future.

  2. River meander modeling and confronting uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posner, Ari J.

    2011-05-01

    This study examines the meandering phenomenon as it occurs in media throughout terrestrial, glacial, atmospheric, and aquatic environments. Analysis of the minimum energy principle, along with theories of Coriolis forces (and random walks to explain the meandering phenomenon) found that these theories apply at different temporal and spatial scales. Coriolis forces might induce topological changes resulting in meandering planforms. The minimum energy principle might explain how these forces combine to limit the sinuosity to depth and width ratios that are common throughout various media. The study then compares the first order analytical solutions for flow field by Ikeda, et al. (1981) and Johannesson and Parker (1989b). Ikeda's et al. linear bank erosion model was implemented to predict the rate of bank erosion in which the bank erosion coefficient is treated as a stochastic variable that varies with physical properties of the bank (e.g., cohesiveness, stratigraphy, or vegetation density). The developed model was used to predict the evolution of meandering planforms. Then, the modeling results were analyzed and compared to the observed data. Since the migration of a meandering channel consists of downstream translation, lateral expansion, and downstream or upstream rotations several measures are formulated in order to determine which of the resulting planforms is closest to the experimental measured one. Results from the deterministic model highly depend on the calibrated erosion coefficient. Since field measurements are always limited, the stochastic model yielded more realistic predictions of meandering planform evolutions. Due to the random nature of bank erosion coefficient, the meandering planform evolution is a stochastic process that can only be accurately predicted by a stochastic model.

  3. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  4. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-02-01

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

  5. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS.

  6. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON – The Department of Energy (DOE) has issued a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE/EIS-0375D, Draft EIS) as required under the National Environmental Policy Act for public review and comment.

  7. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY SOLICITS PUBLIC INPUT TO INFORM DEVELOPMENT OF A PREFERRED ALTERNATIVE FOR DISPOSAL OF GREATER-THAN-CLASS C WASTE

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the months of April and May, 2011 the Department of Energy’s Office of Environmental Management will be holding nine public hearings on the Draft Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste. Hearings will be held at the each of the sites being considered for disposal of GTCC wastes and in Washington, DC.

  8. Preliminary evaluation of the use of the greater confinement disposal concept for the disposal of Fernald 11e(2) byproduct material at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cochran, J.R.; Brown, T.J.; Stockman, H.W.; Gallegos, D.P.; Conrad, S.H.; Price, L.L.

    1997-09-01

    This report documents a preliminary evaluation of the ability of the greater confinement disposal boreholes at the Nevada Test Site to provide long-term isolation of radionuclides from the disposal of vitrified byproduct material. The byproduct material is essentially concentrated residue from processing uranium ore that contains a complex mixture of radionuclides, many of which are long-lived and present in concentrations greater than 100,000 picoCuries per gram. This material has been stored in three silos at the fernald Environmental Management Project since the early 1950s and will be vitrified into 6,000 yd{sup 3} (4,580 m{sup 3}) of glass gems prior to disposal. This report documents Sandia National Laboratories` preliminary evaluation for disposal of the byproduct material and includes: the selection of quantitative performance objectives; a conceptual model of the disposal system and the waste; results of the modeling; identified issues, and activities necessary to complete a full performance assessment.

  9. Native American Housing: Obstacles and Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), this event will cover tribal housing and how to develop and implement programs based on and conducive to local conditions and...

  10. Obstacle to populating the string theory landscape

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, Matthew C; Larfors, Magdalena

    2008-12-15

    We construct domain walls and instantons in a class of models with coupled scalar fields, determining, in agreement with previous studies, that many such solutions contain naked timelike singularities. Vacuum bubble solutions of this type do not contain a region of true vacuum, obstructing the ability of eternal inflation to populate other vacua. We determine a criterion that potentials must satisfy to avoid the existence of such singularities and show that many domain wall solutions in type IIB string theory are singular.

  11. Survey of DOE NDA practices for CH-Tru waste certification--illustrated with a greater than 10,000 drum NDA data base

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schultz, F.J.; Caldwell, J.T.; Smith, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    We have compiled a greater than 10,000 CH-TRU waste drum data base from seven DOE sites which have utilized such multiple NDA measurements within the past few years. Most of these nondestructive assay (NDA) technique assay result comparisons have been performed on well-characterized, segregated waste categories such as cemented sludges, combustibles, metals, graphite residues, glasses, etc., with well-known plutonium isotopic compositions. Waste segregation and categorization practices vary from one DOE site to another. Perhaps the most systematic approach has been in use for several years at the Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), operated by Rockwell International, and located near Golden, Colorado. Most of the drum assays in our data base result from assays of RFP wastes, with comparisons available between the original RFP assays and PAN assays performed independently at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) Solid Waste Examination Pilot Plant (SWEPP) facility. Most of the RFP assays were performed with hyperpure germanium (HPGe)-based SGS assay units. However, at least one very important waste category, processed first-stage sludges, is assayed at RFP using a sludge batch-sampling procedure, prior to filling of the waste drums. 5 refs., 5 figs.

  12. A Case Study of Urbanization Impact on Summer Precipitation in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area. Urban Heat Island Versus Aerosol Effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhong, Shi; Qian, Yun; Zhao, Chun; Leung, Lai-Yung R.; Yang, Xiuqun

    2015-10-23

    Convection-resolving ensemble simulations using the WRF-Chem model coupled with a single-layer Urban Canopy Model (UCM) are conducted to investigate the individual and combined impacts of land use and anthropogenic pollutant emissions from urbanization on a heavy rainfall event in the Greater Beijing Metropolitan Area (GBMA) in China. The simulation with the urbanization effect included generally captures the spatial pattern and temporal variation of the rainfall event. An improvement of precipitation is found in the experiment including aerosol effect on both clouds and radiation. The expanded urban land cover and increased aerosols have an opposite effect on precipitation processes, with the latter playing a more dominant role, leading to suppressed convection and rainfall over the upstream (northwest) area, and enhanced convection and more precipitation in the downstream (southeast) region of the GBMA. In addition, the influence of aerosol indirect effect is found to overwhelm that of direct effect on precipitation in this rainfall event. Increased aerosols induce more cloud droplets with smaller size, which favors evaporative cooling and reduce updrafts and suppress convection over the upstream (northwest) region in the early stage of the rainfall event. As the rainfall system propagates southeastward, more latent heat is released due to the freezing of larger number of smaller cloud drops that are lofted above the freezing level, which is responsible for the increased updraft strength and convective invigoration over the downstream (southeast) area.

  13. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  14. Project management plan for low-level mixed wastes and greater-than category 3 waste per Tri-Party Agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-06-17

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-Than-Category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10. The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; and (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the techuical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are summarized in the table below, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  15. Project management plan for low-level mixed waste and greater-than-category 3 waste per tri-party agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-05-20

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-thaw category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10, The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the technical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are tabulated, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  16. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  17. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  18. How does pressure gravitate? Cosmological constant problem confronts observational cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Narimani, Ali; Scott, Douglas; Afshordi, Niayesh E-mail: nafshordi@pitp.ca

    2014-08-01

    An important and long-standing puzzle in the history of modern physics is the gross inconsistency between theoretical expectations and cosmological observations of the vacuum energy density, by at least 60 orders of magnitude, otherwise known as the cosmological constant problem. A characteristic feature of vacuum energy is that it has a pressure with the same amplitude, but opposite sign to its energy density, while all the precision tests of General Relativity are either in vacuum, or for media with negligible pressure. Therefore, one may wonder whether an anomalous coupling to pressure might be responsible for decoupling vacuum from gravity. We test this possibility in the context of the Gravitational Aether proposal, using current cosmological observations, which probe the gravity of relativistic pressure in the radiation era. Interestingly, we find that the best fit for anomalous pressure coupling is about half-way between General Relativity (GR), and Gravitational Aether (GA), if we include Planck together with WMAP and BICEP2 polarization cosmic microwave background (CMB) observations. Taken at face value, this data combination excludes both GR and GA at around the 3 σ level. However, including higher resolution CMB observations (''highL'') or baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO) pushes the best fit closer to GR, excluding the Gravitational Aether solution to the cosmological constant problem at the 4- 5 σ level. This constraint effectively places a limit on the anomalous coupling to pressure in the parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) expansion, ζ{sub 4} = 0.105 ± 0.049 (+highL CMB), or ζ{sub 4} = 0.066 ± 0.039 (+BAO). These represent the most precise measurement of this parameter to date, indicating a mild tension with GR (for ΛCDM including tensors, with 0ζ{sub 4}=), and also among different data sets.

  19. THE COSMIC BPT DIAGRAM: CONFRONTING THEORY WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kewley, Lisa J.; Dopita, Michael A.; Yuan Tiantian; Maier, Christian; Yabe, Kiyoto; Ohta, Kouji; Akiyama, Masayuki

    2013-09-01

    We compare a large sample of galaxies between 0.5 < z < 2.6 with theoretical predictions for how the optical diagnostic line ratios in galaxy ensembles change as a function of cosmic time. We show that star-forming galaxies at high redshift (z > 1.5) are consistent with a model in which the interstellar medium conditions are more extreme at high redshift than seen in the global spectra of local galaxies. We speculate that global spectra of our high-redshift galaxies may be dominated by H II regions similar to the extreme clumpy, dense star-forming complexes in the Antennae and M82. The transition to local-type conditions occurs between 0.8 < z < 1.5. We conclude that classification schemes developed for local samples should not be applied at high redshift (z {>=} 1.5). We use our theoretical models to derive a new redshift-dependent classification line that utilizes the standard optical diagnostic line ratios [O III]/H{beta} and [N II]/H{alpha}. Our new line can be used to separate star-forming galaxies from active galactic nuclei (AGN) between z = 0 to z {approx} 3.5. We anticipate that our redshift-dependent optical classification line will be useful for future large surveys with near-infrared multi-object spectrographs. We apply our classification line to a sample of gravitationally lensed galaxies at z {approx} 2.5. Although limited by small numbers, we show that our classification line is consistent with the position of AGN that have been independently confirmed via other methods.

  20. Testimony of Mark Whitney Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy House Energy and Commerce Committee Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Testimony of Mark Whitney Principal Deputy Assistant Secretary for Environmental Management Before the Subcommittee on Environment and the Economy House Energy and Commerce Committee Disposal of Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C Waste October 28, 2015

  1. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The reciprocity program allowed the engineers to bypass a three-day Radiological Worker Program at SNL nearly identical to training they recently completed at ICP. In addition, ...

  2. Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ":"","visitedicon":"" Cambridge Energy Alliance CleanTech Boston Consortium for Energy Efficiency Mass Energy Consumers Alliance Massachusetts Hydrogen Coalition New England...

  3. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Homewoners can review what energy efficiency upgrades are available and apply for either a 6.99% Whole Home loan  (which requires a Whole Home Energy Assessment) or a 9.99% Improvement Specific...

  4. Promoting greater Federal energy productivity [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Mark; Dudich, Luther

    2003-03-05

    This document is a close-out report describing the work done under this DOE grant to improve Federal Energy Productivity. Over the four years covered in this document, the Alliance To Save Energy conducted liaison with the private sector through our Federal Energy Productivity Task Force. In this time, the Alliance held several successful workshops on the uses of metering in Federal facilities and other meetings. We also conducted significant research on energy efficiency, financing, facilitated studies of potential energy savings in energy intensive agencies, and undertook other tasks outlined in this report.

  5. Technical survey of DOE programs and facilities applicable to the co-storage of commercial greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and DOE special Case Waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allred, W.E.

    1995-01-01

    This report presents information on those US Department of Energy (DOE) management programs and facilities, existing and planned, that are potentially capable of storing DOE Special Case Waste (SCW) until a disposal capability is available. Major emphasis is given to the possibility of storing commercial greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) together with DOE SCW, as well as with other waste types. In addition to this primary issue, the report gives an in-depth background on SCW and GTCC LLW, and discusses their similarities. Institutional issues concerning these waste types are not addressed in this report.

  6. On the possibility of the generation of high harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV upon interaction of intense mid-IR radiation with neutral gases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Emelina, A S; Emelin, M Yu; Ryabikin, M Yu

    2014-05-30

    Based on the analytical quantum-mechanical description in the framework of the modified strong-field approximation, we have investigated high harmonic generation of mid-IR laser radiation in neutral gases taking into account the depletion of bound atomic levels of the working medium and the electron magnetic drift in a high-intensity laser field. The possibility is shown to generate high-order harmonics with photon energies greater than 10 keV under irradiation of helium atoms by intense femtosecond laser pulses with a centre wavelength of 8 – 10.6 ÎŒm. (interaction of radiation with matter)

  7. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) - BETTER BUILDINGS NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM AT GREATER CINCINNATI ENERGY ALLIANCE Project Title: Home Performance with Energy StarÂź and Better Buildings Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR¼ Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training Center, a program that was developed and funded by the Energy Alliance and housed at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Nearly 100 residential and commercial contractors currently participate in the Energy Alliance’s two major programs, which have together served over 2,800 residential and 100 commercial customers. Additionally, the Energy Alliance established loan programs for homeowners, nonprofits and commercial businesses. The GC-HELP program was established to provide up to ten year low interest, unsecured loans to homeowners to cover the energy efficiency products they purchased through the Energy Alliance approved contractor base. To date the Energy Alliance has financed over $1 million in energy efficiency loans for homeowners, without any loans written off. The nonprofit business community is offered five year, fixed-interest rate loans through the Building Communities Loan Fund of $250,000. Additionally, the Energy Alliance has developed GC-PACE, a commercial financing tool that enables buildings owners to finance their energy upgrades through voluntary property assessments deploying low-interest extended-term capital from the bond market. The Energy Alliance and its partners are actively evaluating additional market-based financing solutions.

  8. A Delicate Universe: Compactification Obstacles to D-brane Inflation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    10.1103PhysRevLett.99.141601; (c) 2007 The American Physical Society; Country of input: International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Country of Publication: United States Language: ...

  9. Microsoft Word - THE EFFECT OF OBSTACLE#4781.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    KHADEM 1 , J. BADGER*, S. M. ULLAH, S. K. ADITYA, H. R. GHOSH & M. HUSSAIN Renewable Energy Research Centre, University of Dhaka, Bangladesh, e-mail: skkhadem@yahoo.com RISO...

  10. NREL Overcomes Obstacles in Lignin Valorization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01

    This NREL Highlight is being produced for the 2015 February Alliance S&T Board meeting, and describes research that shows lignin can be converted into renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials.

  11. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Friday, February 18, 2011 Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of ... many as 50,000 diagnostic medical procedures every day in the U.S. Today, the ...

  12. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Advancing Industrial Energy Efficiency - The Energy Department will invest approximately 751,000 to help Alabama, Iowa, Kentucky, Minnesota, Mississippi, Oregon, Texas and ...

  13. Fruition and greater struggle: water pollution in the 1980s

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, R.H.

    1980-01-01

    Examples of the elimination or reduction of pollution in lakes and rivers during recent years are given. A shift in emphasis from visible to nonvisible chemical pollution of surface waters was the result of release of the report on the EPA study on New Orleans drinking water in 1974. Passage of the Safe Drinking Water Act followed. Toxic chemicals in drinking water result from two primary sources: accidental or purposeful discharge and efforts to purify water through chlorination. Evidence is given as to the serious nature of the problem. (JGB)

  14. Dominican Republic-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Partner Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, National Energy Commission Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Economic Development,...

  15. Jamaica-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Partner Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, National Energy Commission Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Economic Development,...

  16. Clean Cities: Greater New Haven Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    alternative vehicle and fuel consultation and assistance to many organizations in Connecticut and outside the state, including several towns and cities, metropolitan transit...

  17. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil Greater Than 500 ppm Sulfur

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    15,747 15,675 15,436 1993-2016 PADD 1 9,594 10,156 10,022 10,045 9,893 9,629 1993-2016 New England 3,108 3,131 2,948 3,290 3,055 3,284 1993-2016 Central Atlantic 5,474 5,933...

  18. Clean Cities: Greater Washington Region Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from Columbia University. He completed additional graduate studies in economics and real estate at the University of California, Berkeley. 2000 14th St., NW, DPW-Ste 330 P.O. Box...

  19. Greater Than Class C Tracking, Inventory and Projections System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1993-06-28

    The GTIPS was developed as part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program''s effort to characterize GTCC waste. The primary purpose of this system is to store the Energy Information Administration''s (EIA) 1985 survey information (as well as future surveys by the program) in a central location; retrieve data with specific attributes or logical combinations of attributes; generate output in a textual or tabular form to aid in the preparation of reports and other documentsmore » required by the user; project a trend of disposal GTCC volumes and activities into the future to aid the user in decision making for the storage and disposal of GTCC waste.« less

  20. Setting the Stage for Greater Renewable Energy Penetration |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This is an excerpt from the Fourth Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D ... for local renewable power generation Maintenance of significant testing capabilities ...

  1. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Program More Documents & Publications Better Buildings Network View | May 2014 Generating Energy Efficiency Project Leads and Allocating Leads to Contractors Program Automation

  2. Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The study - which evaluated not only the use but also the manufacturing, transport, and ... In general, lamp models in the study had levels of federally-regulated elements below most ...

  3. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... It is also investigating the potential benefits of another form of BA cooperation through the implementation of 10-minute interchange schedules between BAs rather than traditional ...

  4. Community Action Partnership of the Greater Dayton Area … Weatherizat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The Office of Inspector General (OIG) contracted with an independent certified public accounting firm, Lopez and Company, LLP, to express an opinion on Dayton's compliance with ...

  5. Sonatrach prepares for greater exports of natural gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taleb, M. )

    1993-12-06

    Algeria is increasing its capacity to export natural gas in order to reinforce its strong position in the growing international market. The country's reserves are estimated at more than 3.6 trillion cu m. Algerian energy and development policy is based on a rational exploitation of this resource. A liquefield natural gas (LNG) pioneer, Algeria has one of the world's most important LNG production capacities. With a location encouraging export to nearby countries, Algeria has an important place in the world natural gas market and an exclusive role within its trading region. The effort will especially focus on southern Europe. The paper discusses Algeria's growing role in international markets, as well as local markets.

  6. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S.

    2008-01-15

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to date. The study - which evaluated not only the use but also the manufacturing, transport, and disposal of LED, CFL, and incandescent lamps throughout each product...

  8. Biogas electric power generation: 25 kW or greater

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    A biogas cogeneration system consists basically of: an anaerobic digester to produce the gas, a prime mover which burns the gas and makes power, and recovery devices which capture engine waste heat. Guidance is given through the exercise of determining whether biogas cogeneration is worthwhile. Design, construction, and operation are covered in general. Theoretical and practical background on biogas cogeneration are given, and directions for collecting site data and a method for performing a preliminary economic analysis for a given operation are given. (LEW)

  9. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    across the country cut energy waste and foster economic growth," said Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy David Danielson. "Through the State Energy ...

  10. Early F-type stars - refined classification, confrontation with Stromgren photometry, and the effects of rotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gray, R.O.; Garrison, R.F.

    1989-02-01

    The classification for early F-type stars in the MK spectral classification system presented by Gray and Garrison (1987) is refined. The effect of rotation on spectral classification and ubvy-beta photometry of early F-type stars is examined. It is found that the classical luminosity criterion, the 4417 A/4481 A ratio gives inconsistent results. It is shown that most of the stars in the Delta Delphini class of metallic-line stars are either normal or are indistinguishable from proto-Am stars. It is suggested that the designation Delta Delphini should be dropped. The classifications are compared with Stromgren photometry. The effects of rotation on the delta-c sub 1 index in the early-F field dwarfs is demonstrated. 55 references.

  11. The New Energy Future in Indian Country: Confronting Climate Change, Creating Jobs, and Conserving Nature

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    The Need for Validation from Concept to a Terrawatt The Need for Validation from Concept to a Terrawatt This presentation summaries the information given by CleanPath Ventures during the Photovoltaic Validation and Bankability Workshop in San Jose, California, on August 31, 2011. PDF icon cleanpathv_williams_pv_validation_2011_aug.pdf More Documents & Publications Federal Energy Management Program Report Template PV Performance and Reliability Validation Capabilities at Sandia National

  12. Dynamical vacuum energy in the expanding Universe confronted with observations: a dedicated study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gómez-Valent, Adrià; Solà, Joan [High Energy Physics Group, Dept. ECM, and Institut de Ciències del Cosmos, Univ. de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, E-08028 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Basilakos, Spyros, E-mail: adriagova@ecm.ub.edu, E-mail: sola@ecm.ub.edu, E-mail: svasil@academyofathens.gr [Academy of Athens, Research Center for Astronomy and Applied Mathematics, Soranou Efesiou 4, 11527, Athens (Greece)

    2015-01-01

    Despite the many efforts, our theoretical understanding of the ultimate nature of the dark energy component of the universe still lags well behind the astounding experimental evidence achieved from the increasingly sophisticated observational tools at our disposal. While the canonical possibility is a strict cosmological constant, or rigid vacuum energy density ?{sub ?} = const., the exceeding simplicity of this possibility lies also at the root of its unconvincing theoretical status, as there is no explanation for the existence of such constant for the entire cosmic history. Herein we explore general models of the vacuum energy density slowly evolving with the Hubble function H and/or its time derivative, ?{sub ?} = ?{sub ?}(H, H-dot ). Some of these models are actually well-motivated from the theoretical point of view and may provide a rich phenomenology that could be explored in future observations, whereas some others have more limitations. In this work, we put them to the test and elucidate which ones are still compatible with the present observations and which ones are already ruled out. We consider their implications on structure formation, in combination with data on type Ia supernovae, the Cosmic Microwave Background, the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations, and the predicted redshift distribution of cluster-size collapsed structures. The relation of these vacuum models on possible evidence of dynamical dark energy recently pointed out in the literature is also briefly addressed.

  13. Confronting Regulatory Cost and Quality Expectations. An Exploration of Technical Change in Minimum Efficiency Performance Standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taylor, Margaret; Spurlock, C. Anna; Yang, Hung-Chia

    2015-09-21

    The dual purpose of this project was to contribute to basic knowledge about the interaction between regulation and innovation and to inform the cost and benefit expectations related to technical change which are embedded in the rulemaking process of an important area of national regulation. The area of regulation focused on here is minimum efficiency performance standards (MEPS) for appliances and other energy-using products. Relevant both to U.S. climate policy and energy policy for buildings, MEPS remove certain product models from the market that do not meet specified efficiency thresholds.

  14. Confronting the galactic center gamma-ray excess with a light scalar dark matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Dilip Kumar; Mondal, Subhadeep; Saha, Ipsita

    2015-02-24

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope observed an excess in gamma-ray emission spectrum coming from the center of the Milky Way galaxy. This data reveals that a light dark matter (DM) candidate of mass in the range 31–40 GeV, dominantly decaying into bb{sup -bar} final state, can explain the presence of the observed bump in photon energy. We try to interpret this observed phenomena by sneutrino DM annihilation into pair of fermions in the Supersymmetric Inverse Seesaw Model (SISM). This model can also account for tiny non-zero neutrino masses satisfying existing neutrino oscillation data. We show that a Higgs portal DM in this model is in perfect agreement with this new interpretation besides satisfying all other existing collider, cosmological and low energy experimental constraints.

  15. Biomass energy: State of the technology present obstacles and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.

    1993-06-23

    The prevailing image of wood and waste burning as dirty and environmentally harmful is no longer valid. The use of biomass combustion for energy can solve many of our nation`s problems. Wood and other biomass residues that are now causing expensive disposal problems can be burned as cleanly and efficiently as natural gas, and at a fraction of the cost. New breakthroughs in integrated waste-to-energy systems, from fuel handling, combustion technology and control systems to heat transfer and power generation, have dramatically improved system costs, efficiencies, cleanliness of emissions, maintenance-free operation, and end-use applications. Increasing costs for fossil fuels and for waste disposal strict environmental regulations and changing political priorities have changed the economics and rules of the energy game. This report will describe the new rules, new playing fields and key players, in the hope that those who make our nation`s energy policy and those who play in the energy field will take biomass seriously and promote its use.

  16. Elimination of a spiral wave pinned at an obstacle by a train...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Authors: Tanaka, Masanobu 1 ; Hrning, Marcel 2 ; Kitahata, Hiroyuki, E-mail: kitahata@chiba-u.jp 3 ; Yoshikawa, Kenichi 4 + Show Author Affiliations Department of ...

  17. Obstacles to the use of exterior fenestration and daylighting control systems in the US

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sweitzer, G.; Johnson, R.

    1984-03-01

    Exterior fenestration and daylighting control systems can provide excellent control of solar gain and glare and still be visually satisfying elements in the design of building envelopes. However, US building industry experience with exterior fenestration and daylighting control systems suggests that durability and proper function of these systems is often unsatisfactory. Yet in Western Europe, exterior systems are a proven, cost-effective, and aesthetically accepted fenestration design element. It is suggested that these contrasting operating experiences reflect differences in prevailing US/Western European approaches to building design, construction, and operation. Three representative US building case studies are examined, each describing the application of exterior fenestration/daylighting control components previously untested as a system, and some unsatisfactory consequences. Several changes that may assist in increasing the acceptance and success of these systems in the US building industry are suggested.

  18. Proposed roadmap for overcoming legal and financial obstacles to carbon capture and sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Wendy ); Chohen, Leah; Kostakidis-Lianos, Leah; Rundell, Sara )

    2009-03-01

    Many existing proposals either lack sufficient concreteness to make carbon capture and geological sequestration (CCGS) operational or fail to focus on a comprehensive, long term framework for its regulation, thus failing to account adequately for the urgency of the issue, the need to develop immediate experience with large scale demonstration projects, or the financial and other incentives required to launch early demonstration projects. We aim to help fill this void by proposing a roadmap to commercial deployment of CCGS in the United States.This roadmap focuses on the legal and financial incentives necessary for rapid demonstration of geological sequestration in the absence of national restrictions on CO2 emissions. It weaves together existing federal programs and financing opportunities into a set of recommendations for achieving commercial viability of geological sequestration.

  19. Greater Energy Savings through Building Energy Performance Policy: Four Leading Policy and Program Options

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SEE Action Existing Commercial Buildings Working Group

    2014-05-30

    This paper lays out recommendations for linking existing policies and developing new policies, such that their success is based on the real energy savings achieved in buildings. This approach has the potential to affect the entire building lifecycle.

  20. Haiti-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Institute Partner Deutsche Gesellschaft fr Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) GmbH, National Energy Commission Sector Climate, Energy Focus Area Economic Development,...

  1. Condition for production of circulating proton beam with intensity greater than space charge limit.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vadim Dudnikov

    2002-11-19

    Transverse e-p instability in proton rings could be damped by increasing the beam density and the rate of secondary particles production above the threshold level, with the corresponding decrease of unstable wavelength {lambda} below the transverse beam size h (increase of beam density n{sub b} and ion density n{sub i} above the threshold level: n{sub b} + n{sub i} > {beta}{sup 2}/(r{sub e} h{sup 2}), where r{sub e} = e{sup 2}/mc{sup 2}). Such island of stability can be reached by a fast charge-exchange injection without painting and enhanced generation of secondary plasma, which was demonstrated in a small scale Proton Storage Ring (PSR) at the Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk, Russia. With successful damping of e-p instability, the intensity of circulating proton beam, with a space charge neutralization was increased up to 6 times above a space charge limit. Corresponding tune shift without space charge neutralization should be up to {Delta}v=0.85 x 6 (in the ring with v = 0.85). In this paper, they review experimental observations of transverse instability of proton beams in various rings. they also discuss methods which can be used to damp the instability. Such experimental data could be useful for verification of computer simulation tools developed for the studies of the space charge and instabilities in realistic conditions.

  2. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil Greater Than 15 ppm to 500 ppm...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7,736 8,385 8,505 8,299 1993-2016 PADD 1 5,695 5,241 5,102 5,162 5,289 5,069 1993-2016 New England 3,839 3,354 3,250 3,424 3,460 3,335 1993-2016 Central Atlantic 1,426 1,524...

  3. Precision wood particle feedstocks with retained moisture contents of greater than 30% dry basis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-10-28

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  4. Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 ... KY Grant County, KY Grayson County, KY Green County, KY Greenup County, KY Hancock ...

  5. Best Practices Case Study: Urbane Homes - Crestwood, KY, Various Locations, Greater Louisville, KY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2011-09-01

    Case study of Urbane Homes, who worked with Building America to build market rate homes with HERS scores of 57 to 62. Despite a down market they’ve sold every home within 3 weeks of listing, without any advertising.

  6. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2011 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program, and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation

  7. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    2012 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting

  8. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Contracting companies supporting EM’s cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies.

  9. Greater than the Sum of its Parts; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01

    NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together a diverse group of experts performing grid integration and optimization R&D activities.

  10. Advancing the technology base for high-temperature membranes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, R.C.; Birdsell, S.A.; Snow, R.C. [and others

    1997-10-01

    This is the final report of a two-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). This project addresses the major issues confronting the implementation of high-temperature membranes for separations and catalysis. We are pursuing high-temperature membrane systems that can have a large impact for DOE and be industrially relevant. A major obstacle for increased use of membranes is that most applications require the membrane material to withstand temperatures above those acceptable for polymer-based systems. Advances made by this project have helped industry and DOE move toward high-temperature membrane applications to improve overall energy efficiency.

  11. NREL Overcomes Obstacles in Lignin Valorization (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Using a "funneling" pathway inherent in nature, NREL researchers show that lignin can be converted into renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials. It has long been known how to convert biomass-derived carbohydrates, such as glu- cose, into fuels and chemicals such as ethanol. However, plants also contain a significant amount of lignin, comprising up to 30% of their cell walls. Lignin is a heterogeneous aro- matic polymer that plants use for strength, for defense against pathogens, and

  12. Structural foam-core panels in Northwest HUD-code manufactured housing: A preliminary assessment of opportunities and obstacles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durfee, D.L.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1993-07-01

    This investigation of structural foam-core panels (foam panels) in manufactured housing was initiated during the Super Good Cents (SGC) program. The SGC program limited allowable glazing area because of the relatively high thermal losses associated with most windows. Due to their superior thermal performance, foam panels appeared to be a viable option to allow increased glazing area without compromising the thermal integrity of the wall. With the inception of the Manufactured-Housing Acquisition Program (MAP), however, the focus of this study has shifted. MAP permits unlimited glazing area if expensive, super-efficient, vinyl-framed, argon-gas-filled, low-emissivity coated windows are installed. Although MAP permits unlimited glazing area, a foam panel wall could allow the use of less expensive windows, larger window area, or less insulation and still provide the required thermal performance for the building. Bonneville contracted with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the feasibility of using foam panels in HUD-code manufactured housing. This study presents the results from a product and literature search. The potential barriers and benefits to the use of foam panels are determined from a regional survey of the HUD-code manufacturers and foam panel producers.

  13. Confrontation between stellar pulsation and evolution; Proceedings of the Conference (ASP Series, Vol. 11), Bologna, Italy, May 28-31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cacciari, C.; Clementini, G.

    1990-01-01

    Attention is given to the folowing topics: population I and II variable stars; LP variables, the sun, and mass determination; and predegenerate and degenerate variables. Particular papers are presented on alternative evolutionary approaches to the absolute magnitude of the RR Lyrae variables; the evolution of the Cepheid stars; nonradial pulsations in rapidly rotating Delta Scuti stars; dynamical models of dust shells around Mira variables; and pulsations of central stars of planetary nebulae.

  14. Confronting X-Ray Emission Models with theHighest-Redshift Kiloparsec-Scale Jets: The z = 3.89 Jet in Quasar 1745+624

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheung, C.C.; Stawarz, L.; Siemiginowska, A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.

    2006-06-28

    A newly identified kiloparsec-scale X-ray jet in the high-redshift z=3.89 quasar 1745+624 is studied with multi-frequency Very Large Array, Hubble Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray imaging data. This is only the third large-scale X-ray jet beyond z > 3 known and is further distinguished as being the most luminous relativistic jet observed at any redshift, exceeding 10{sup 45} erg/s in both the radio and X-ray bands. Apart from the jet's extreme redshift, luminosity, and high inferred equipartition magnetic field (in comparison to local analogues), its basic properties such as X-ray/radio morphology and radio polarization are similar to lower-redshift examples. Its resolved linear structure and the convex broad-band spectral energy distributions of three distinct knots are also a common feature among known powerful X-ray jets at lower-redshift. Relativistically beamed inverse Compton and ''non-standard'' synchrotron models have been considered to account for such excess X-ray emission in other jets; both models are applicable to this high-redshift example but with differing requirements for the underlying jet physical properties, such as velocity, energetics, and electron acceleration processes. One potentially very important distinguishing characteristic between the two models is their strongly diverging predictions for the X-ray/radio emission with increasing redshift. This is considered, though with the limited sample of three z > 3 jets it is apparent that future studies targeted at very high-redshift jets are required for further elucidation of this issue. Finally, from the broad-band jet emission we estimate the jet kinetic power to be no less than 10{sup 46} erg/s, which is about 10% of the Eddington luminosity corresponding to this galaxy's central supermassive black hole mass M{sub BH} {approx}> 10{sup 9} M{sub {circle_dot}} estimated here via the virial relation. The optical luminosity of the quasar core is about ten times over Eddington, hence the inferred jet power seems to be much less than that available from mass accretion. The apparent super-Eddington accretion rate may however suggest contribution of the unresolved jet emission to the observed optical flux of the nucleus.

  15. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix A-3: Basis for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste light water reactor projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mancini, A.; Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Woodberry, S.

    1994-09-01

    This study characterizes low-level radioactive waste types that may exceed Class C limits at light water reactors, estimates the amounts of waste generated, and estimates radionuclide content and distribution within the waste. Waste types that may exceed Class C limits include metal components that become activated during operations, process wastes such as cartridge filters and decontamination resins, and activated metals from decommissioning activities. Operating parameters and current management practices at operating plants are reviewed and used to estimate the amounts of low-level waste exceeding Class C limits that is generated per fuel cycle, including amounts of routinely generated activated metal components and process waste. Radionuclide content is calculated for specific activated metals components. Empirical data from actual low-level radioactive waste are used to estimate radionuclide content for process wastes. Volumes and activities are also estimated for decommissioning activated metals that exceed Class C limits. To estimate activation levels of decommissioning waste, six typical light water reactors are modeled and analyzed. This study does not consider concentration averaging.

  16. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy

    2003-02-28

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  17. CONCENTRATION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM IONS, IN AN OXIDATION STATE NOT GREATER THAN +4, IN AQUEOUS ACID SOLUTION

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; Thompson, S.G.

    1960-06-14

    A process for concentrating plutonium is given in which plutonium is first precipitated with bismuth phosphate and then, after redissolution, precipitated with a different carrier such as lanthanum fluoride, uranium acetate, bismuth hydroxide, or niobic oxide.

  18. Scaling and Optimization of Magnetic Refrigeration for Commercial Building HVAC Systems Greater than 175 kW in Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar; West, David L; Mallow, Anne M

    2012-01-01

    Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) account for approximately one- third of building energy consumption. Magnetic refrigeration presents an opportunity for significant energy savings and emissions reduction for serving the building heating, cooling, and refrigeration loads. In this paper, we have examined the magnet and MCE material requirements for scaling magnetic refrigeration systems for commercial building cooling applications. Scaling relationships governing the resources required for magnetic refrigeration systems have been developed. As system refrigeration capacity increases, the use of superconducting magnet systems becomes more applicable, and a comparison is presented of system requirements for permanent and superconducting (SC) magnetization systems. Included in this analysis is an investigation of the ability of superconducting magnet based systems to overcome the parasitic power penalty of the cryocooler used to keep SC windings at cryogenic temperatures. Scaling relationships were used to develop the initial specification for a SC magnet-based active magnetic regeneration (AMR) system. An optimized superconducting magnet was designed to support this system. In this analysis, we show that the SC magnet system consisting of two 0.38 m3 regenerators is capable of producing 285 kW of cooling power with a T of 28 K. A system COP of 4.02 including cryocooler and fan losses which illustrates that an SC magnet-based system can operate with efficiency comparable to traditional systems and deliver large cooling powers of 285.4 kW (81.2 Tons).

  19. EnergyWorks Final Report: A Better Buildings Neighborhood Program in the Five-County Greater Philadelphia Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajewski, Katherine

    2014-03-05

    This report covers the grant performance period of July 1, 2010-September 30, 2013 and discusses of the program design, outcomes and best practices as they relate to the following six areas: 1. Institutional Design and Business Model; 2. Program Design and Customer Experience; 3. Driving Demand; 4. Workforce Development; 5. Financing and Incentives; 6. Data and Evaluation.

  20. The Whole is Greater than the Sum of the Parts: Optimizing the Joint Science Return from LSST, Euclid and WFIRST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jain, B.; Spergel, D.; Connolly, A.; Dell'antonio, I.; Frieman, J.; Gawiser, E.; Gehrels, N.; Gladney, L.; Heitmann, K.; Helou, G.; Hirata, C.; Ho, S.; Ivezic, Z.; Jarvis, M.; Kahn, S.; Kalirai, J.; Kim, A.; Lupton, R.; Mandelbaum, R.; Marshall, P.; Newman, J. A.; Postman, M.; Rhodes, J.; Strauss, M. A.; Tyson, J. A.; Wood-Vesey, W. M.

    2015-02-02

    The scientific opportunity offered by the combination of data from LSST, WFIRST and Euclid goes well beyond the science enabled by any one of the data sets alone. The range in wavelength, angular resolution and redshift coverage that these missions jointly span is remarkable. With major investments in LSST and WFIRST, and partnership with ESA in Euclid, the US has an outstanding scientific opportunity to carry out a combined analysis of these data sets. It is imperative for us to seize it and, together with our European colleagues, prepare for the defining cosmological pursuit of the 21st century. The main argument for conducting a single, high-quality reference co-analysis exercise and carefully documenting the results is the complexity and subtlety of systematics that define this co-analysis. Falling back on many small efforts by different teams in selected fields and for narrow goals will be inefficient, leading to significant duplication of effort.

  1. Case studies of the legal and institutional obstacles and incentives to the development of small-scale hydroelectric power: South Columbia Basin Irrigation District, Pasco, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, L.

    1980-05-01

    The case study concerns two modern human uses of the Columbia River - irrigation aimed at agricultural land reclamation and hydroelectric power. The Grand Coulee Dam has become synonomous with large-scale generation of hydroelectric power providing the Pacific Northwest with some of the least-expensive electricity in the United States. The Columbia Basin Project has created a half-million acres of farmland in Washington out of a spectacular and vast desert. The South Columbia River Basin Irrigation District is seeking to harness the energy present in the water which already runs through its canals, drains, and wasteways. The South District's development strategy is aimed toward reducing the costs its farmers pay for irrigation and raising the capital required to serve the remaining 550,000 acres originally planned as part of the Columbia Basin Project. The economic, institutional, and regulatory problems of harnessing the energy at site PEC 22.7, one of six sites proposed for development, are examined in this case study.

  2. Executive summary: legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric potential in the seven mid-western states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01

    The relationship of Federal law and regulation to state law and regulation of small-scale hydroelectric facilities is described. Important features of the constitutional law, statutory law, case law, and regulations of each of the 7 mid-western states (Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wisconsin) are highlighted. The introductory section examines the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, i.e., the law of pre-emption, and the application of this law to the case of hydroelectric development and regulation of water resources. A state-by-state synopsis of these important provisions of the laws of the states that have a bearing on small-scale hydroelectric development is presented.

  3. Diffuse gamma rays with energies greater than 1 x 10 to the 14th eV observed in the Southern Hemisphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suga, K.; Toyoda, Y.; Kamata, K.; Murakami, K.; Lapointe, M.

    1988-03-01

    The data of extensive air showers with a low content of muons and hadrons, observed in the period 1964-1966 at Mount Chacaltaya in Bolivia, have been reanalyzed. Arrival directions of those showers selected so as to favor small initiation depths in the atmosphere (to enhance the contribution from gamma-ray-initiated showers) reveal a 3.8 sigma peak above an expected background from the region of alpha = 180-210 deg in the band of delta = 0 to -40 deg. The integral flux of diffuse gamma-rays above 1 x 10 to the 14th eV estimated from this excess is about 6.0 x 10 to the -12th/sq cm per sec per sr. In order to explain this very high flux, the possible contribution of gamma-rays from Loop 1 as well as the inverse Compton photons produced in the 2.7 K photon background as progeny of gamma-rays from Cyg X-3-like sources. 24 references.

  4. Timing of the deposition of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene coal-bearing deposits in the Greater Glendive area, Montana and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-01

    With the aid of a grant from the National Geographic Society, a cooperative agreement with the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Late Cretaceous and Paleocene geologic and paleontologic field studies were undertaken in Makoshika, State Park and vicinity, Dawson County, Montana. This region was chosen as a study area because of its potential for yielding new fossil localities and extensive exposures both above and below the K/T boundary, as suggested by previous research by David W. Krause and Joseph H. Hartman. Related field studies were also undertaken in areas adjacent to the Cedar Creek Anticline in North Dakota. This work was part of ongoing research to document change in the composition of mammalian and molluscan faunas during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene and to relate observed patterns to floral and invertebrate changes in composition. This study focuses on the record of mammals and mollusks in the Makoshika stratigraphic section and places old and new observations into a paleomagnetic and palynomorph framework. Of particular interest is the appearance and diversification of archaic ungulate mammals. Simultaneous dinosaur extinction with ungulate radiation has been invoked in gradual, as opposed to catastrophic, models of faunal change at the K/T boundary. However, supposed Cretaceous localities bearing archaic ungulates and other mammals of {open_quotes}Paleocene aspect{close_quotes} may be the product of faunal reworking. Elsewhere in the Williston Basin (e.g., Garfield and McCone Counties, Montana), the molluscan record of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene strata indicates the extinction of all of the highly sculptured unionid bivalves just prior to the onset of coal swamps and subsequent coal formation.

  5. Gamma/neutron analysis for SNM signatures at high-data rates(greater than 107 cps) for single-pulse active interrogation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forman L.; Dioszegi, I.; Salwen, C.

    2011-04-26

    We are developing a high data gamma/neutron spectrometer suitable for active interrogation of special nuclear materials (SNM) activated by a single burst from an intense source. We have tested the system at Naval Research Laboratory's (NRL) Mercury pulsed-power facility at distances approaching 10 meters from a depleted uranium (DU) target. We have found that the gamma-ray field in the target room 'disappears' 10 milliseconds after the x-ray flash, and that gamma ray spectroscopy will then be dominated by isomeric states/beta decay of fission products. When a polyethylene moderator is added to the DU target, a time-dependent signature of the DU is produced by thermalized neutrons. We observe this signature in gamma-spectra measured consecutively in the 0.1-1.0 ms time range. These spectra contain the Compton edge line (2.2 MeV) from capture in hydrogen, and a continuous high energy gamma-spectrum from capture or fission in minority constituents of the DU.

  6. Gregory H. Friedman: Before the Subcommittee on National Security, Veterans Affairs, and International Relations of the Committee on Government Reform U.S. House of Representatives

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Statement of Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General Department of Energy Subject: Performance and management challenges confronting the Department of Energy

  7. Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

  8. Smart Grid - Transforming Power System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Kirkham, Harold

    2010-04-28

    Abstract—Electric power systems are entering a new realm of operations. Large amounts of variable generation tax our ability to reliably operate the system. Couple this with a greater reliance on the electricity network to serve consumer demand that is likely to rise significantly even as we drive for greater efficiency. Trade-offs between energy and environmental needs will be constantly negotiated, while a reliable supply of electricity needs even greater assurance in a world where threats of disruption have risen. Smart grid capabilities are being proposed to help address the challenges confronting system operations. This paper reviews the impact of smart grid functionality on transforming power system operations. It explores models for distributed energy resources (DER – generation, storage, and load) that are appearing on the system. It reviews the evolving nature of electricity markets to deal with this complexity and a change of emphasis on signals from these markets to affect power system control. Smart grid capabilities will also impact reliable operations, while cyber security issues must be addressed as a culture change that influences all system design, implementation, and maintenance. Lastly, the paper explores significant questions for further research and the need for a simulation environment that supports such investigation and informs deployments to mitigate operational issues as they arise.

  9. Phosphorus removal from slow-cooled steelmaking slags: Grain size determination and liberation studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fregeau-Wu, E.; Iwasaki, I.

    1995-07-01

    The major obstacle in recycling steelmaking slags to the blast furnace is their phosphorus content. Removal of the phosphorus, which is primarily associated with the silicate and phosphate phases, would allow for greater recycle of these slags for their iron, manganese, and lime contents. Calculations show that separation of the silicates from the oxide phases would remove nearly 90% of the phosphorus from the slag. The variable grain size of the as-received slag made liberation by fine grinding difficult. Therefore, slow-cooling experiments were undertaken to improve the grain size distribution. The grain size distributions were determined using in-situ image analysis. The samples were ground to their apparent liberation size and high gradient magnetic separation was used to separate the magnetic oxides from the nonmagnetic silicates and phosphates. Liberation analysis and modeling was performed on selected separation products for discussion of benefication characteristics.

  10. Study on Prompting Mechanism of Energy EFficiency Technology

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information on energy efficient technologies, the obstacles surrounding their implementation, and the methods for prompting use of these technologies.

  11. International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    while retaining the institutional agility necessary to confront the challenges of sustainable development. Resources IISD Tools Building REDD Capacity in Developing...

  12. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    model brain structure to help computers recognize objects December 20, 2011 LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, December 20, 2011-An essential question confronting neuroscientists and computer...

  13. Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Done correctly, occupancy sensors can substantially enhance the savings from an already efficient lighting system. However, this technology is confronted by several potential ...

  14. Secretary Chu Announces $37.5 Million Available for Joint U.S...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    "Cooperation between China and the United States on clean energy is crucial to confronting the global climate crisis and presents an important opportunity to create American jobs ...

  15. Evaluation Report: IG-0843 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    43 Evaluation Report: IG-0843 October 22, 2010 The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2010 Federal information systems are routinely confronted with increasingly ...

  16. Press Pass - Press Releases

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are subscribers to Chicago's Steppenwolf Theater, and recently attended the London production of "Copenhagen," which speculates on a wartime confrontation between physicists...

  17. Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsDiversity & Flexibility Key to SustainabilityDavid Babson, Senior Fuels Engineer, Union of...

  18. 022996A.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mike Zuteck MDZ Consulting 601 Clear Lake Road Clear Lake Shores, TX Abstract Improving wind turbine blades via bend-twist coupling confronts two difficult challenges. ...

  19. Changing Climate Doug Sisterson Environmental ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Change Minds about our Changing Climate Doug Sisterson Environmental Science Division, ... We are regularly confronted with arguments that deny climate change is happening or is a ...

  20. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  1. Radiochemical tracers as a mix diagnostic for the ignition double...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Springfield, VA at www.ntis.gov. One of the most important challenges confronting laser-driven capsule implosion experiments will be a quantitative evaluation of the...

  2. Radiochemical tracers as a mix diagnostic for the ignition double...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    for the ignition double-shell capsule One of the most important challenges confronting laser-driven capsule implosion experiments will be a quantitative evaluation of the...

  3. International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by working collaboratively with other institutions -building long term strategic alliances, while retaining the institutional agility necessary to confront the challenges of...

  4. Sandia Energy - Study Rebuts Hypothesis That Comet Attacks Ended...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Clovis comet hypothesis in 2007, proponents showed a National Geographic animation based on one of Boslough's simulations as inspiration for their idea. Confronted by...

  5. Multiple-reflection optical gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Matthews, Thomas G.

    1983-01-01

    A multiple-reflection optical cell for Raman or fluorescence gas analysis consists of two spherical mirrors positioned transverse to a multiple-pass laser cell in a confronting plane-parallel alignment. The two mirrors are of equal diameter but possess different radii of curvature. The spacing between the mirrors is uniform and less than half of the radius of curvature of either mirror. The mirror of greater curvature possesses a small circular portal in its center which is the effective point source for conventional F1 double lens collection optics of a monochromator-detection system. Gas to be analyzed is flowed into the cell and irradiated by a multiply-reflected composite laser beam centered between the mirrors of the cell. Raman or fluorescence radiation originating from a large volume within the cell is (1) collected via multiple reflections with the cell mirrors, (2) partially collimated and (3) directed through the cell portal in a geometric array compatible with F1 collection optics.

  6. A policy synthesis approach for slowing global warming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timilsina, G.R.

    1996-12-31

    Global warming is a burning environmental issue today but confronting with subjective as well as policy conflicts. The findings of various studies indicate that developed countries that are capable of affording effective measures towards the global warming mitigation have fewer incentives for doing so because they will have a minimal damage from global warming. The developing countries, although they will have greater damage, are unlikely to divert their development budget for taking preventive actions towards global warming. The only solution in this situation is to design a policy that encourages all the nation in the world to participate in the programs for slowing global warming. Without active participation of all nations, it seems unlikely to reduce the global warming problem in an effective way. This study presents a qualitative policy recommendation extracted from a comprehensive analysis of the findings of several studies conducted so far in this field. This study has categorized the policy approaches for mitigating the global warming in three groups: Engineering approach, forestry approach and economic approach.

  7. Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. ); McDermott, K.A. . Center for Regulatory Studies)

    1992-01-01

    The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry's SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

  8. Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A.; McDermott, K.A.

    1992-04-01

    The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry`s SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

  9. Polyanionic Polymers with High Alkali-Ion Conductivity and Wide...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In the search for suitable materials from which to construct high energy density solid state batteries, one of the principal obstacles has been the provision of a suitable ...

  10. DOE Office of Indian Energy to Host Tribal Renewable Energy Workshop...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    obstacles, setbacks, twists, and turns dictated by the tribe's unique energy landscape. ... experience using technology resource assessment tools, tap into local and federal ...

  11. Integrating Safeguards, Security, & Emergency Services at CNS...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    manager with developing an integration plan for his or her group then guided and assisted them in surmounting obstacles as they worked through their plans. Brian Deorocki...

  12. Biofuels for the Environment and Communities Webinar: Negri

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... chain obstacles Develop know how Promote broad partnerships and integrate research with broader stakeholder community 16 IT'S ABOUT TEAM WORK Michael Barrows, ...

  13. Name

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    When it's too close to a high voltage transmission line Electrical transmission lines ... and other obstacles that could cause power outages or endanger persons living or working ...

  14. SANDIA REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    grid, nested model. The black star indicates the location of the Mokapu Point CDIP buoy used for model validation. The white squares represent the locations of model obstacles...

  15. Microsoft Word - HERS Round-Table February 2016.docx

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to air flow Ducts in the attic are an obstacle in Texas and southwest (costperception - sealing) 3 Rating Modeling does not give sufficient credit for moving ducts to ...

  16. Testing the Effectiveness of an Avian Flight Diverter for Reducing...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Abstract Distribution power lines are placed high overhead, safely out of human reach; however, for birds, these overhead wires are a potentially fatal obstacle....

  17. FE Press Releases and Techlines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 18, 2012 First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles In support of large-scale carbon capture, utilization and storage projects, a...

  18. Section 83

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Introduction Validation and improvement of One of the major obstacles the current climate ... Experiment) and TOGA-COARE (Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere-Coupled Ocean Atmosphere ...

  19. Sandia Energy - Measurements of Thermal Stratification in a Homogenous...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    carbon dioxide. HCCI engines have diesel-engine efficiency but without the accompanying nitrogen oxide and particulate emissions. One of the main obstacles to HCCI development is...

  20. Building America Report Template

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... are reluctant to believe "zero" is a reality 5 5 Obstacles to Zero Energy Ready Homes ... Publish case studies and testimonials - virtual Parade of Homes * Conduct media outreach ...

  1. Wind Project Permitting | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Code Beta Version 1.5. Accessed March 29, 2013. The model code presents strategies to remove obstacles, create incentives, and enact standards to encourage wind...

  2. Implementing a Zero Energy Ready Home Multifamily Project (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    This report discusses challenges encountered, lessons learned, and how obstacles were overcome. Authors: Springer, David 1 ; German, Alea 1 + Show Author Affiliations Alliance ...

  3. Research Projects

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    accident scenarios. This design combines the obstacle avoidance features of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) with the efficiency and simplicity features of "rolling-class"...

  4. CSP Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    to one that is sustained on innovation and cleaner technologies. Creativity, research, and ... component costs, while policies continue to be developed to address soft-cost obstacles. ...

  5. Modeling needs for very large systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.

    2010-10-01

    Most system performance models assume a point measurement for irradiance and that, except for the impact of shading from nearby obstacles, incident irradiance is uniform across the array. Module temperature is also assumed to be uniform across the array. For small arrays and hourly-averaged simulations, this may be a reasonable assumption. Stein is conducting research to characterize variability in large systems and to develop models that can better accommodate large system factors. In large, multi-MW arrays, passing clouds may block sunlight from a portion of the array but never affect another portion. Figure 22 shows that two irradiance measurements at opposite ends of a multi-MW PV plant appear to have similar irradiance (left), but in fact the irradiance is not always the same (right). Module temperature may also vary across the array, with modules on the edges being cooler because they have greater wind exposure. Large arrays will also have long wire runs and will be subject to associated losses. Soiling patterns may also vary, with modules closer to the source of soiling, such as an agricultural field, receiving more dust load. One of the primary concerns associated with this effort is how to work with integrators to gain access to better and more comprehensive data for model development and validation.

  6. Parallel computing in enterprise modeling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldsby, Michael E.; Armstrong, Robert C.; Shneider, Max S.; Vanderveen, Keith; Ray, Jaideep; Heath, Zach; Allan, Benjamin A.

    2008-08-01

    This report presents the results of our efforts to apply high-performance computing to entity-based simulations with a multi-use plugin for parallel computing. We use the term 'Entity-based simulation' to describe a class of simulation which includes both discrete event simulation and agent based simulation. What simulations of this class share, and what differs from more traditional models, is that the result sought is emergent from a large number of contributing entities. Logistic, economic and social simulations are members of this class where things or people are organized or self-organize to produce a solution. Entity-based problems never have an a priori ergodic principle that will greatly simplify calculations. Because the results of entity-based simulations can only be realized at scale, scalable computing is de rigueur for large problems. Having said that, the absence of a spatial organizing principal makes the decomposition of the problem onto processors problematic. In addition, practitioners in this domain commonly use the Java programming language which presents its own problems in a high-performance setting. The plugin we have developed, called the Parallel Particle Data Model, overcomes both of these obstacles and is now being used by two Sandia frameworks: the Decision Analysis Center, and the Seldon social simulation facility. While the ability to engage U.S.-sized problems is now available to the Decision Analysis Center, this plugin is central to the success of Seldon. Because Seldon relies on computationally intensive cognitive sub-models, this work is necessary to achieve the scale necessary for realistic results. With the recent upheavals in the financial markets, and the inscrutability of terrorist activity, this simulation domain will likely need a capability with ever greater fidelity. High-performance computing will play an important part in enabling that greater fidelity.

  7. Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation: Federal Register Notice Volume 75, No. 180- Sep. 17, 2010

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking comments from interested parties on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, as well as recommendations on how to best...

  8. Dipole rescattering and the nuclear structure function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carvalho, F.; Goncalves, V. P.; Navarra, F. S.; Oliveira, E. G.

    2013-03-25

    In the framework of the dipole model, we study the effects of the dipole multiple scatterings in a nuclear target and compute the nuclear structure function. We compare different unitarization schemes and confront our results with the E665 data.

  9. Letter from the Wind Program Director: Fourth Quarter 2012 |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Together, we can learn from the experiences of the past and work towards confronting the challenges of the future. Thank you for your continued support. Jose Zayas Addthis Related ...

  10. History of SPR Releases

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Strategic Petroleum Reserve exists, first and foremost, as an emergency response tool the President can use should the United States be confronted with an economically-threatening disruption in...

  11. Environmental consequences of nuclear war

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Toon, Owen B.; Robock, Alan; Turco, Richard P.

    2014-05-09

    A regional war involving 100 Hiroshima-sized weapons would pose a worldwide threat due to ozone destruction and climate change. A superpower confrontation with a few thousand weapons would be catastrophic.

  12. Real-Time Characterization of Special Nuclear Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walston, Sean; Candy, Jim; Chambers, Dave; Chandrasekaran, Hema; Snyderman, Neal

    2015-09-04

    When confronting an item that may contain nuclear material, it is urgently necessary to determine its characteristics. Our goal is to provide accurate information with high-con dence as rapidly as possible.

  13. 3rd Annual Arctic Encounter Symposium Seattle

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Arctic Encounter Symposium will convene policymakers, industry leaders, and leading experts to confront the leading issues in Arctic policy, innovation, and development. The two-day program includes two keynote luncheons, expert plenary sessions and breakout sessions.

  14. Deputy Secretary Daniel Poneman's Remarks at the Council on Competitiv...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    businesses to discover and deliver new technologies. The national labs came into the world out of necessity. In the 1940s, our Nation was at war, confronting imperialist Japan...

  15. Neutron Compton Scattering as a Probe of Hydrogen Bonded (and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... A third theme was to confront the theory of the intensity deficit developed by the PI and ... of this theory are not born out, and that the intensity deficit is due to other sources. ...

  16. Harnessing the market: The opportunities and challenges of privatization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The decision to privatize comes from a policy determination that the Government no longer needs particular assets or no longer needs to be in control of all the means by which products or services are obtained or delivered. Most broadly defined, privatization substitutes, in whole or in part, private market mechanisms for the traditional Government role as employer, financier, owner, operator, and/or regulator of a product or service. This definition admits a wide variety of actions, from innovative contractual arrangements to outright divestiture of activities or assets. But all of these actions share common objectives: to remove the agency from those activities that are not inherently governmental functions or core business lines; to improve the management of remaining activities; to reduce the costs of doing business; and to shift greater performance and financial risk to the private sector. This report by the Privatization Working Group provides an indepth analysis of the major issues that surround privatization within the Department of Energy (DOE). The report divides privatization initiatives at the DOE into three major types: divestiture of functions, contracting out, and asset transfers. It includes the results of a survey of the entire DOE system that identifies more than 200 potential privatization opportunities. The report also includes 13 case studies that explore actual DOE privatization efforts over the past 2 years. Additionally, it summarizes the key legal authorities that govern each of the three types of privatization opportunities in the DOE. The report makes a series of recommendations and outlines accompanying actions that will help the DOE seize the opportunities presented by privatization and confront its challenges.

  17. DE-FC26-02NT41318 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Differential Soil Impedance Obstacle Detection DE-FC26-02NT41318 Goal: The goal of this project is to design, fabricate, and test a prototype sensor system for detecting obstacles in front of, or nearby the head of a horizontal directional drilling (HDD) rig. The sensor will be designed to be sensitive to metallic, plastic, or ceramic obstacles embedded in the soil. Background: The use of guided directional drilling for the installation of gas services and mains by the natural gas industry is

  18. Measuring and tuning energy efficiency on large scale high performance computing platforms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laros, James H., III

    2011-08-01

    Recognition of the importance of power in the field of High Performance Computing, whether it be as an obstacle, expense or design consideration, has never been greater and more pervasive. While research has been conducted on many related aspects, there is a stark absence of work focused on large scale High Performance Computing. Part of the reason is the lack of measurement capability currently available on small or large platforms. Typically, research is conducted using coarse methods of measurement such as inserting a power meter between the power source and the platform, or fine grained measurements using custom instrumented boards (with obvious limitations in scale). To collect the measurements necessary to analyze real scientific computing applications at large scale, an in-situ measurement capability must exist on a large scale capability class platform. In response to this challenge, we exploit the unique power measurement capabilities of the Cray XT architecture to gain an understanding of power use and the effects of tuning. We apply these capabilities at the operating system level by deterministically halting cores when idle. At the application level, we gain an understanding of the power requirements of a range of important DOE/NNSA production scientific computing applications running at large scale (thousands of nodes), while simultaneously collecting current and voltage measurements on the hosting nodes. We examine the effects of both CPU and network bandwidth tuning and demonstrate energy savings opportunities of up to 39% with little or no impact on run-time performance. Capturing scale effects in our experimental results was key. Our results provide strong evidence that next generation large-scale platforms should not only approach CPU frequency scaling differently, but could also benefit from the capability to tune other platform components, such as the network, to achieve energy efficient performance.

  19. Broadening Industry Governance to Include Nonproliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hund, Gretchen; Seward, Amy M.

    2008-11-11

    As industry is the first line of defense in detecting and thwarting illicit trade networks, the engagement of the private sector is critical to any government effort to strengthen existing mechanisms to protect goods and services throughout the supply chain. This study builds on previous PNNL work to continue to evaluate means for greater industry engagement to complement and strengthen existing governmental efforts to detect and stem the trade of illicit goods and to protect and secure goods that could be used in making a weapon of mass destruction. Specifically, the study evaluates the concept of Industry Self Regulation, defined as a systematic voluntary program undertaken by an industry or by individual companies to anticipate, implement, supplement, or substitute for regulatory requirements in a given field, generally through the adoption of best practices. Through a series of interviews with companies with a past history of non-compliance, trade associations and NGOs, the authors identify gaps in the existing regulatory infrastructure, drivers for a self regulation approach and the form such an approach might take, as well as obstacles to be overcome. The authors conclude that it is at the intersection of industry, government, and security that—through collaborative means—the effectiveness of the international nonproliferation system—can be most effectively strengthened to the mutual benefit of both government and the private sector. Industry has a critical stake in the success of this regime, and has the potential to act as an integrating force that brings together the existing mechanisms of the global nonproliferation regime: export controls, physical protection, and safeguards. The authors conclude that industry compliance is not enough; rather, nonproliferation must become a central tenant of a company’s corporate culture and be viewed as an integral component of corporate social responsibility (CSR).

  20. INL Autonomous Navigation System

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The INL Autonomous Navigation System provides instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The system permits high-speed autonomous navigation including obstacle avoidance, waypoing navigation and path planning in both indoor and outdoor environments.

  1. BBAP ???for EH-53 v2.0

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Give large trucks time to slow down or stop Always obey flaggers and StopGo signs Stay alert for obstacles and debris Watch out for motorists that may not have seen you...

  2. Experiences from the Consumer Behavior Studies on Engaging Customers

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... to customers in prepay plans, in light of the risk of loss of consumer protections. ... A related obstacle is the potential lack of "elasticity" in energy demand for many ...

  3. FLAMMABILITY CHARACTERISTICS OF COMBUSTIBLE GASES AND VAPORS

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... of escaping gases increased the pressure due to resistance to fluid flow by the obstacle. ... and Volatile Solids. N F P A 325, 60 Battery march St., Boston 10, Mass., 1960, 126 pp. ...

  4. Fluid Dynamics with Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    RIPPLE is a two-dimensional, transient, free surface incompressible fluid dynamics program. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion forces and has a partial cell treatment which allows curved boundaries and interior obstacles.

  5. ARM - Field Campaign - NSA Snow IOP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    precipitation in the Arctic remains a challenge (e.g. Goodison et al. 1998, Benning and Yang 2005). Wind, drifting snow, and the accumulation of snow on and behind obstacles all...

  6. Autonomous navigation system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-08

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for autonomously navigating a robot. The instructions repeat, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon based on the robot's current velocity, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, testing for an event horizon intrusion by determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon, and adjusting rotational and translational velocity of the robot accordingly. If the event horizon intrusion occurs, rotational velocity is modified by a proportion of the current rotational velocity reduced by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle and translational velocity is modified by a proportion of the range to the nearest obstacle. If no event horizon intrusion occurs, translational velocity is set as a ratio of a speed factor relative to a maximum speed.

  7. Community Based Wood Heat System for Fort Yukon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    80,000 acres in one month Proposed Rural Wood Fuel Supply System *Capital costs for system capable of producing 7,000 TPY: 600,000 Key Obstacles to Overcome Development...

  8. CSP Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    fuels to one that is sustained on innovation and Aerial view of one of the Ivanpah ... component costs, while policies continue to be developed to address soft- cost obstacles. ...

  9. The future of energy efficiency in the steel industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lakshminarayana, B.

    1997-07-01

    Steel is present in every aspect of life, in all industrial, transportation sectors as well as in households in US. The American steel industry today can be counted among the most productive, efficient and technologically advanced in the world. Steel combines low cost with attractive engineering properties and is the most recycled of all materials. Despite these appealing characteristics of steel, the steel industry has confronted significant challenges from other competitive materials. To keep abreast with the competition it faces, pursuit of research and development activities is an absolute necessity. This competition has forced the steel industry to address many issues that here to fore were deemed unimportant. One of these areas is energy efficiency. Steelmaking energy costs comprise over 15 percent of the manufacturing cost of steel. This compares to less than five percent for most other manufacturing industries. The US steel industry, which accounts for about nine percent (1.8 quads/year) of the US industrial energy use, has made considerable progress in the area of energy efficiency. Over the past 20 years, the US steel industry has reduced its energy intensity by 43 percent. The impact of energy usage on environmental and the results of government regulations have made the industry concentrate more and more on the issues of energy efficiency. In addition, a possible energy shortage could become a global phenomenon in the 21st century if steps to conserve energy are not taken. The risk in researching and adapting new technologies is greater in the steel industry than in many other manufacturing industries. Steelmaking is capital intensive in both equipment and processes. Government/industry partnerships can help reduce such risks. The Department of Energy's Office of Industrial Technologies (DOE/OIT) has been supporting energy efficient research relevant to the steel industry. Salient features of some of the projects will be explored in this paper. These endeavors bring together the collective resources not only of the government and the industry, but also of national laboratories, universities and advanced technology companies. Such efforts continued into 21st century will make the US steel industry more environmentally friendly, energy efficient and globally competitive.

  10. Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC) Needs Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gougar, Hans

    2015-02-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) has made significant progress developing simulation tools to predict the behavior of nuclear systems with greater accuracy and of increasing our capability to predict the behavior of these systems outside of the standard range of applications. These analytical tools require a more complex array of validation tests to accurately simulate the physics and multiple length and time scales. Results from modern simulations will allow experiment designers to narrow the range of conditions needed to bound system behavior and to optimize the deployment of instrumentation to limit the breadth and cost of the campaign. Modern validation, verification and uncertainty quantification (VVUQ) techniques enable analysts to extract information from experiments in a systematic manner and provide the users with a quantified uncertainty estimate. Unfortunately, the capability to perform experiments that would enable taking full advantage of the formalisms of these modern codes has progressed relatively little (with some notable exceptions in fuels and thermal-hydraulics); the majority of the experimental data available today is the "historic" data accumulated over the last decades of nuclear systems R&D. A validated code-model is a tool for users. An unvalidated code-model is useful for code developers to gain understanding, publish research results, attract funding, etc. As nuclear analysis codes have become more sophisticated, so have the measurement and validation methods and the challenges that confront them. A successful yet cost-effective validation effort requires expertise possessed only by a few, resources possessed only by the well-capitalized (or a willing collective), and a clear, well-defined objective (validating a code that is developed to satisfy the need(s) of an actual user). To that end, the Idaho National Laboratory established the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center to address the challenges of modern code validation and to manage the knowledge from past, current, and future experimental campaigns. By pulling together the best minds involved in code development, experiment design, and validation to establish and disseminate best practices and new techniques, the Nuclear Energy Knowledge and Validation Center (NEKVaC or the ‘Center’) will be a resource for industry, DOE Programs, and academia validation efforts.

  11. Clean Cities ozone air quality attainment and maintenance strategies that employ alternative fuel vehicles, with special emphasis on natural gas and propane

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D.J.; Saricks, C.L.

    1998-08-04

    Air quality administrators across the nation are coming under greater pressure to find new strategies for further reducing automotive generated non-methane hydrocarbon (NMHC) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions. The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established stringent emission reduction requirements for ozone non-attainment areas that have driven the vehicle industry to engineer vehicles meeting dramatically tightened standards. This paper describes an interim method for including alternative-fueled vehicles (AFVs) in the mix of strategies to achieve local and regional improvements in ozone air quality. This method could be used until EPA can develop the Mobile series of emissions estimation models to include AFVs and until such time that detailed work on AFV emissions totals by air quality planners and emissions inventory builders is warranted. The paper first describes the challenges confronting almost every effort to include AFVs in targeted emissions reduction programs, but points out that within these challenges resides an opportunity. Next, it discusses some basic relationships in the formation of ambient ozone from precursor emissions. It then describes several of the salient provisions of EPA`s new voluntary emissions initiative, which is called the Voluntary Mobile Source Emissions Reduction Program (VMEP). Recent emissions test data comparing gaseous-fuel light-duty AFVs with their gasoline-fueled counterparts is examined to estimate percent emissions reductions achievable with CNG and LPG vehicles. Examples of calculated MOBILE5b emission rates that would be used for summer ozone season planning purposes by an individual Air Quality Control Region (AQCR) are provided. A method is suggested for employing these data to compute appropriate voluntary emission reduction credits where such (lighter) AFVs would be acquired. It also points out, but does not quantify, the substantial reduction credits potentially achievable by substituting gaseous-fueled for gasoline-fueled heavy-duty vehicles. Finally, it raises and expands on the relevance of AFVs and their deployment to some other provisions embedded in EPA`s current guidance for implementing 1-hour NAAQS--standards which currently remain in effect--as tools to provide immediate reductions in ozone, without waiting for promised future clean technologies.

  12. PROCEEDINGS OF THE 1983 DPF WORKSHOP ON COLLIDER DETECTORS: PRESENT CAPABILITIES AND FUTURE POSSIBILITIES, FEB. 28 - MARCH 4, 1983.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loken Ed, S.C.; Nemethy Ed, P.

    1983-04-01

    It is useful before beginning our work here to restate briefly the purpose of this workshop in the light of the present circumstances of elementary particle physics in the U.S. The goal of our field is easily stated in a general way: it is to reach higher center of mass energies and higher luminosities while employing more sensitive and more versatile event detectors, all in order to probe more deeply into the physics of elementary particles. The obstacles to achieving this goal are equally apparent. Escalating costs of construction and operation of our facilities limit alternatives and force us to make hard choices among those alternatives. The necessity to be highly selective in the choice of facilities, in conjunction with the need for increased manpower concentrations to build accelerators and mount experiments, leads to complex social problems within the science. As the frontier is removed ever further, serious technical difficulties and limitations arise. Finally, competition, much of which is usually healthy, now manifests itself with greater intensity on a regional basis within our country and also on an international scale. In the far ({ge}20 yr) future, collaboration on physics facilities by two or more of the major economic entities of the world will possibly be forthcoming. In the near future, we are left to bypass or overcome these obstacles on a regional scale as best we can. The choices we face are in part indicated in the list of planned and contemplated accelerators shown in Table I. The facilities indicated with an asterisk pose immediate questions: (1) Do we need them all and what should be their precise properties? (2) How are the ones we choose to be realized? (3) What is the nature of the detectors to exploit those facilities? (4) How do we respond to the challenge of higher luminosity as well as higher energy in those colliders? The decision-making process in this country and elsewhere depends on the answers to these technical questions. Those relating to the accelerators have been and continue to be addressed in many workshops and studies. For example, a workshop organized by M. Tigner will begin to study the means of achieving a very high energy (10 TeV x 10 TeV) hadron collider; this is scheduled at the end of March at Cornell University. If it seems desirable, continuity in the form of subsequent workshops on technical questions relating to accelerator facilities might be provided by the Division of Particles and Fields (DPF) of the American Physical Society, as it is doing here for collider detectors. The workshop we are about to begin is intended to address questions (3) and (4) above. It is an attempt to look at those questions from a broad point of view by assembling a wide spectrum of experts from universities and national and international laboratories. It is planned to make the proceedings of the workshop available to the 1983 Woods Hole Sub-Panel of HEPAP which is charged with the responsibility for recommendations concerning the choices that face the U.S. program. This is the main reason that we are meeting at the present time. In this connection, it is worth emphasizing that the DPF is an organization of roughly 3000 physicists from universities and national laboratories. It is an independent organization not affiliated with any laboratory or government agency. Most important, it is not a decision-making body or a lobbying group. Its aim is to provide neutral arenas for scholarly discussion of the salient issues of our area of science, e.g., the DPF Summer Study on Particle Physics and Facilities in Snowmass, Colorado, in the summer of 1982. For this reason it concentrates on technical questions such as those of this Workshop.

  13. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, Robert M. (Glastonbury, CT); Wright, David D. (Vershire, VT)

    1995-01-01

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal focii coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell.

  14. Uncovering Coal’s Secrets Through the University Coal Research Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The challenges confronting the environmentally sound use of our country’s fossil energy resources are best addressed through collaborative research and development. That’s why this approach, which stretches federal dollars, is at the heart of the Office of Fossil Energy’s University Coal Research Program.

  15. Biomass 2012 Agenda | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Agenda Biomass 2012 Agenda Detailed agenda from the July 10-11, 2012, Biomass conference--Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy. PDF icon bio2012_final_agenda.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass 2013 Agenda Biomass 2011 Conference Agenda Biomass 2010

  16. Navy Mobility Fuels Forecasting System Phase 6 report: The potential impacts of a worst-case military conflict on world petroleum availability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, R.; Das, S.; Leiby, P.N.

    1991-01-01

    A major Middle East and European military confrontation would cause an extremely large disruption in the supply of oil worldwide. There would be imbalances between oil supply and demand. These imbalances can only be solved by rationing and by military actions to ensure an adequate flow of crude oil and products. 25 refs., 5 tabs.

  17. Challenges with SMUD’s Community Renewable Energy Project Deployment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Community Renewable Energy Success Stories Webinar series presentation by Elaine Sison-Lebrilla, Sacramento Municipal Utility District (SMUD) on technical challenges confronting local solar energy programs in California.

  18. Folded-path optical analysis gas cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carangelo, R.M.; Wright, D.D.

    1995-08-08

    A folded-path gas cell employs an elliptical concave mirror in confronting relationship to two substantially spherical concave mirrors. At least one of the spherical mirrors, and usually both, are formed with an added cylindrical component to increase orthogonal foci coincidence and thereby to increase the radiation energy throughput characteristic of the cell. 10 figs.

  19. Personal Insights and Anecdotes about the Weatherization Assistance Program Process Field Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Treitler, Inga

    2014-09-01

    The present report is based on the research conducted for the Process Field Study between March and September 2011. The Process Field Study documents how Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP) services were delivered to clients, and the quality with which those services were delivered. The assessments were conducted by visiting 19 agencies in 19 states around the country interviewing agency managers, staff, and contractors; observing program intake along, with 43 audits, 45 measure installation and 37 final inspections; and conducting debriefing interviews with clients and weatherization staff following the observation of service delivery. In this report, we turn to detailed observations of a few field interactions. The client stories from our observations illustrate some of the ways clients and crew interact to build the success of the program, but shows there will always be unanticipated obstacles to building trust and getting the program to the public. Stories of staff and crew career paths indicate that weatherization technology and techniques are being learned and used by technicians out of the new home construction industry and that their new knowledge provides them with technical tools and methods that many hope to take back into the construction industry if and when they return. This report is organized according to the four stages of weatherization: intake, audit, installation, and inspection. It contributes to our understanding of the area where policy, environment, culture, and individual decisions influence social innovation. The anecdotes reveal the realities of implementing programs for the benefit of the greater good at minimal cost and sacrifice in times of ever restricting budgets. As the authors revisited their field notes and compiled memorable narratives to communicate the essence of the weatherization experience, they identified three key takeaways that summarize the major issues. First, in WAP as in all services there will always be challenges to reaching the community needing to be served. Second, crew and staff learn new skills and gain experience that can be and are applied in jobs elsewhere. Finally, in the best cases, changes from the weatherization experience permeate communities in unanticipated ways.

  20. Predicting the influence of long-range molecular interactions on macroscopic-scale diffusion by homogenization of the Smoluchowski equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kekenes-Huskey, P. M.; Gillette, A. K.; McCammon, J. A.; Department of Chemistry, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0636

    2014-05-07

    The macroscopic diffusion constant for a charged diffuser is in part dependent on (1) the volume excluded by solute “obstacles” and (2) long-range interactions between those obstacles and the diffuser. Increasing excluded volume reduces transport of the diffuser, while long-range interactions can either increase or decrease diffusivity, depending on the nature of the potential. We previously demonstrated [P. M. Kekenes-Huskey et al., Biophys. J. 105, 2130 (2013)] using homogenization theory that the configuration of molecular-scale obstacles can both hinder diffusion and induce diffusional anisotropy for small ions. As the density of molecular obstacles increases, van der Waals (vdW) and electrostatic interactions between obstacle and a diffuser become significant and can strongly influence the latter's diffusivity, which was neglected in our original model. Here, we extend this methodology to include a fixed (time-independent) potential of mean force, through homogenization of the Smoluchowski equation. We consider the diffusion of ions in crowded, hydrophilic environments at physiological ionic strengths and find that electrostatic and vdW interactions can enhance or depress effective diffusion rates for attractive or repulsive forces, respectively. Additionally, we show that the observed diffusion rate may be reduced independent of non-specific electrostatic and vdW interactions by treating obstacles that exhibit specific binding interactions as “buffers” that absorb free diffusers. Finally, we demonstrate that effective diffusion rates are sensitive to distribution of surface charge on a globular protein, Troponin C, suggesting that the use of molecular structures with atomistic-scale resolution can account for electrostatic influences on substrate transport. This approach offers new insight into the influence of molecular-scale, long-range interactions on transport of charged species, particularly for diffusion-influenced signaling events occurring in crowded cellular environments.

  1. NREL Quantifies Value of CSP to the Grid (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-08-01

    In California study, greater penetration of renewable energy means greater value of CSP with thermal energy storage.

  2. European refiners must seek creative processes to justify heavy-ends projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, P.

    1996-12-09

    There are strong reasons for wanting to upgrade the bottom of the crude oil barrel. But European refiners will not find it easy to get approval and funding for major capital investment projects. In most cases, investment justification will have to be creative and may need to rely on factors traditionally considered to be outside the conventional refinery fence. Examples of such creative upgrading schemes are those employed in four gasification projects planned for refineries in Italy. It is clear that the major obstacles to heavy residue processing are not technical, but economic. A review of these obstacles will set the stage for European investment in bottom-of-the-barrel processing.

  3. Assessing Security Needs of the multifaceted relationships of Energy and Water Providers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N; Newmark, R; Burton, L; May, D; McMahon, J; Whitehead, C D; Ghatikar, G

    2007-08-22

    In the near future, the United States will be facing constraints on energy availability due to the heightened demand for both energy and water, especially during droughts and summers. Increasing stress on the inextricably linked resource availability of both water and energy can be mitigated with integrated planning. Exchanging data is an important component to current and future mitigation approaches within the Energy-Water Nexus. We describe the types of relationships that are formed in the United States EWN, and address the data sharing obstacles within. Approaches to removing the obstacles of data sharing are presented, based on case studies.

  4. Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Real-Time Occupancy Change Analyzer (ROCA) produces an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scans the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converts the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. Changes in the occupancy grid can be reported in real time to support a number of tracking capabilities. The benefit of ROCA is that rather than only providing a vector tomore » the detected change, it provides the actual x,y position of the change.« less

  5. Urban hopper.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xavier, Patrick Gordon; Feddema, John Todd; Little, Charles Quentin; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John; Weagle, Christian A.; Salton, Jonathan Robert; Marron, Lisa Carol; Malchano, Matthew D.; Giarrantana, John; Murphy, Michael P.; Rizzi, Alfred A.; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2010-03-01

    Hopping robots provide the possibility of breaking the link between the size of a ground vehicle and the largest obstacle that it can overcome. For more than a decade, DARPA and Sandia National Laboratories have been developing small-scale hopping robot technology, first as part of purely hopping platforms and, more recently, as part of platforms that are capable of both wheeled and hopping locomotion. In this paper we introduce the Urban Hopper robot and summarize its capabilities. The advantages of hopping for overcoming certain obstacles are discussed. Several configurations of the Urban Hopper are described, as are intelligent capabilities of the system. Key challenges are discussed.

  6. Broken Symmetry

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    - Physics, as we know it, attempts to interpret the diverse natural phenomena as particular manifestations of general laws. This vision of a world ruled by general testable laws is relatively recent in the history of mankind. Basically it was initiated by the Galilean inertial principle. The subsequent rapid development of large-scale physics is certainly tributary to the fact that gravitational and electromagnetic forces are long-range and hence can be perceived directly without the mediation of highly sophisticated technical devices. - The discovery of subatomic structures and of the concomitant weak and strong short-range forces raised the question of how to cope with short-range forces in relativistic quantum field theory. The Fermi theory of weak interactions, formulated in terms of point-like current-current interaction, was well-defined in lowest order perturbation theory and accounted for existing experimental data.However, it was inconsistent in higher orders because of uncontrollable divergent quantum fluctuations. In technical terms, in contradistinction to quantum electrodynamics, the Fermi theorywas not ?renormalizable?. This difficulty could not be solved by smoothing the point-like interaction by a massive, and therefore short-range, charged ?vector? particle exchange: theories with massive charged vector bosons were not renormalizable either. In the early nineteen sixties, there seemed to be insuperable obstacles to formulating a consistent theory with short-range forces mediated by massive vectors. - The breakthrough came from the notion of spontaneous symmetry breaking which arose in the study of phase transitions and was introduced in field theory by Nambu in 1960. - Ferromagnets illustrate the notion in phase transitions. Although no direction is dynamically preferred, the magnetization selects a global orientation. This is a spontaneous broken symmetry(SBS)of rotational invariance. Such continuous SBS imply the existence of ?massless? modes (here spin-waves), which are the ancestors of the NG bosons discussed below. Fluctuations of the order parameter (the magnetization) are described by a ?massive? SBS mode. - In field theory, Nambu showed that broken chiral symmetry from a spontaneous generation of hadron masses induces massless pseudoscalar modes (identified with a massless limit of pion fields). This illustrates a general phenomenon made explicit by Goldstone: massless Nambu-Goldstone (NG) bosons are a necessary concomitant of spontaneously broken continuous symmetries. Massive SBS scalars bosons describe, as in phase transitions, the fluctuations of the SBS order parameters. - In 1964, with Robert Brout, we discovered a mechanism based on SBS by which short range interactions are generated from long range ones. A similar proposal was then made independently by Higgs in a different approach. Qualitatively, our mechanism works as follows. The long range fundamental electromagnetic and gravitational interactions are governed by extended symmetries,called gauge symmetries, which were supposed to guarantee that the elementary field constituents which transmit the forces, photons or gravitons, be massless. We considered a generalization of the electromagnetic ?vector? field, known as Yang-Mills fields, and coupled them to fields which acquire from SBS constant values in the vacuum. These fields pervade space, as did magnetization, but they have no spatial orientation: they are ?scalar?? fields. The vector Yang-Mills fields which interact with the scalar fields become massive and hence the forces they mediate become short ranged. We also showed that the mechanism can survive in absence of elementary scalar fields. - Because of the extended symmetries, the nature of SBS is profoundly altered: the NG fields are absorbed into the massive vector Yang-Mills fields and restore the gauge symmetry. This has a dramatic consequence. To confront precision experiments, the mechanism should be consistent at the quantum mechanical level, or in technical terms, should yield a ?renormalizable? theory. From our analysis of the preserved gauge symmetry, we suggested in 1966 that this is indeed the case, in contradistinction to the aforementioned earlier theories of charged massive vector fields. The full proof of ?renormalizability? is subtle and was achieved in the impressive work of ?t Hooft and Veltman. One gains some insight into the subtleties by making explicit the equivalence of Higgs? approach with ours. - To a large extend, the LHC was build to detect the massive SBS scalar boson, i.e. the fluctuations of the scalar field. More elaborate realizations of the mechanism without elementary scalars are possible, but their experimental confirmation may (or may not) be outside the scope of present available technology. - The mechanism of Brout, Englert and Higgs unified in the same theoretical framework short- and long-range forces. It became the cornerstone of the electroweak theory and opened the way to a modern view on unified laws of nature.

  7. CRADA Final Report For CRADA NO. CR-12-006 [Operation and Testing of an SO{sub 2}-depolarized Electrolyzer (SDE) for the Purpose of Hydrogen and Sulfuric Acid Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Summers, W. A.; Colon-Mercado, H. R.; Steimke, J. L.; Zahn, Steffen

    2014-02-24

    Over the past several years, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) has led a team of collaborators under the Department of Energy’s (DOE) nuclear hydrogen production program to develop the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process. HyS is a 2-step water-splitting process consisting of high temperature decomposition of sulfuric acid to generate SO{sub 2}, followed by the electrolysis of aqueous SO{sub 2} to generate hydrogen and sulfuric acid. The latter is fed back into the high temperature reactor. SRNL designed and built an SO{sub 2}-depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) and a test facility. Over 40 SDE’s were tested using different catalysts, membranes and other components. SRNL demonstrated that an SDE could be operated continuously for approximately 200 hours under certain conditions without buildup of sulfur at the SDE’s cathode, thus solving a key technical problem with SDE technology. Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. (APCI) is a major supplier of hydrogen production systems, and they have proprietary technology that could benefit from the SDE developed by SRNS, or some improved version thereof. However, to demonstrate that SRNL’s SDE is a truly viable approach to the electrolyzer design, continuous operation for far greater periods of time than 200 hours must be demonstrated, and the electrolyzer must be scaled up to greater hydrogen production capacities. SRNL and Air Products entered into a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement with the objective of demonstrating the effectiveness of the SDE for hydrogen and sulfuric acid production and to demonstrate long-term continuous operation so as to dramatically increase the confidence in the SDE design for commercial operation. SRNL prepared a detailed technical report documenting previous SDE development, including the current SDE design and operating conditions that led to the 200-hour sulfurfree testing. SRNL refurbished its single cell SDE test facility and qualified the equipment for continuous operation. A new membrane electrode assembly (MEA) was fabricated and installed in the single cell electrolyzer (60 cm{sup 2} active cell area). Shakedown testing was conducted, and several modifications were made to the test facility equipment. Seven different MEAs were used during testing. Beginning on May 20, 2013, SRNL was able to test the SDE continuously for 1200 hours, including 1000 hours under power to generate hydrogen at an average rate of 10.8 liters per hour. The SDE was not removed or repaired during the 50-day test and was successfully restarted after each shutdown. The test was intentionally stopped after 1200 hours (1000 hours of hydrogen production) due to funding constraints. Post-test examination of the MEA using Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Microanalysis (EDAX) showed no elemental sulfur deposits or sulfur layer inside the cell, thus successfully achieving the test goals. The results demonstrated that the SDE could be operated for extended periods without major performance degradation or the buildup of sulfur inside the MEA. Air Products conducted an assessment of the economic viability of the SDE based on the “as tested” design. The results indicated that the SDE faces significant economic obstacles in its current state. Further development and scale-up are necessary before the SDE is ready for commercialization.

  8. Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Information and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Communications Technology Perspective | Department of Energy Information and Communications Technology Perspective Buildings-to-Grid Technical Opportunities: From the Information and Communications Technology Perspective Information and communications technology has enabled the integration of computer and audio-visual networks, leading to unprecedented exchange of data between various users and entities. This report illustrates obstacles to information and communications technology (ICT),

  9. Mobility platform coupling device and method for coupling mobility platforms

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shirey, David L.; Hayward, David R.; Buttz, James H.

    2002-01-01

    A coupling device for connecting a first mobility platform to a second mobility platform in tandem. An example mobility platform is a robot. The coupling device has a loose link mode for normal steering conditions and a locking position, tight link mode for navigation across difficult terrain and across obstacles, for traversing chasms, and for navigating with a reduced footprint in tight steering conditions.

  10. The Finite Horizon Optimal Multi-Modes Switching Problem: The Viscosity Solution Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El Asri, Brahim Hamadene, Said

    2009-10-15

    In this paper we show existence and uniqueness of a solution for a system of m variational partial differential inequalities with inter-connected obstacles. This system is the deterministic version of the Verification Theorem of the Markovian optimal m-states switching problem. The switching cost functions are arbitrary. This problem is in relation with the valuation of firms in a financial market.

  11. Mathematical and Numerical Analyses of Peridynamics for Multiscale Materials Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gunzburger, Max

    2015-02-17

    We have treated the modeling, analysis, numerical analysis, and algorithmic development for nonlocal models of diffusion and mechanics. Variational formulations were developed and finite element methods were developed based on those formulations for both steady state and time dependent problems. Obstacle problems and optimization problems for the nonlocal models were also treated and connections made with fractional derivative models.

  12. State transmission infrastructure authorities: the story so far

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porter, Kevin; Fink, Sari

    2009-03-15

    State transmission infrastructure authorities offer a new tool for helping to overcome such obstacles to developing transmission as high capital investment requirements, uncertain cost allocation among multiple parties, and siting and permitting challenges. Yet to be determined is whether they can help stimulate large, multi-state regional transmission projects. (author)

  13. Robotic Follow Algorithm

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Robotic Follow Algorithm enables allows any robotic vehicle to follow a moving target while reactively choosing a route around nearby obstacles. The robotic follow behavior can be used with different camera systems and can be used with thermal or visual tracking as well as other tracking methods such as radio frequency tags.

  14. The Role of Appraisals in Energy Efficiency Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, Victoria

    2012-05-01

    This research identifies barriers and challenges and current industry status including several key appraisal industry developments for identifying and valuing energy efficiency. The report covers critical obstacles to documenting and assessing the potential added value from energy efficiency improvements, current opportunities to support and standardize reporting on energy efficiency and to ensure proper valuation, and next steps towards enabling energy efficiency financing market transformation.

  15. Role of Appraisals in Energy Efficiency Financing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, V.; Bhargava, A.

    2012-05-01

    This research identifies barriers and challenges and current industry status including several key appraisal industry developments for identifying and valuing energy efficiency, critical obstacles to documenting and assessing the potential added value from energy efficiency improvements, current opportunities to support and standardize reporting on energy efficiency and to ensure proper valuation, and next steps towards enabling energy efficiency financing market transformation.

  16. Long range hopping mobility platform.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spletzer, Barry Louis; Fischer, Gary John

    2003-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a mesoscale hopping mobility platform (Hopper) to overcome the longstanding problems of mobility and power in small scale unmanned vehicles. The system provides mobility in situations such as negotiating tall obstacles and rough terrain that are prohibitive for other small ground base vehicles. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Administration (DARPA) provided the funding for the hopper project.

  17. Metal-to-ceramic attachment device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pavelka, Edwin A.; Grindstaff, Quirinus G.; Scheppele, Stuart E.

    1985-01-01

    A metal-to-ceramic fastening device is disclosed for securing a metal member to a ceramic member with respective confronting surfaces thereon clamped together, comprising a threaded bolt adapted to extend through a bolt hole in the metal member and into an aligned opening in the ceramic member, a rod nut threadedly receiving the bolt and adapted to span the opening in the ceramic member, and a pressure limiting member received on the bolt between the nut and the confronting surface of the metal member for limiting the movement of the nut toward the metal member when the bolt is tightened, so as to limit the pressure applied by the nut to the ceramic member to avoid damage thereto. The fastening device also prevents damage to the ceramic member due to thermal stresses. The pressure limiting member may have a shallow dish-shaped depression facing the rod nut to assist in accommodating thermal stresses.

  18. QER- Comment of William Pickard 1

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It seems obvious that America needs massive electricity storage if it is going to transition successfully from the Age of Fossil Fuels to the Age of Renewables. The recent DOE report prepared at the insistence of Senator Wyden barely scratched the surface. A critique is attached. If the QER does not confront these issues squarely and does not issue a call for Immediate and Massive Action, the Public shall have been short-changed.

  19. 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Confronting Models with Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Data: A Statistical Comparison of Southern Great Plains Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer Radiance Spectra and Global Climate Models Output J.A. Dykema, S.S. Leroy, B.F. Farrell, and J.G. Anderson Harvard University Division of Engineering and Applied Science Cambridge, Massachusetts D. Tobin, R. Knuteson, and H. Revercomb University of Wisconsin - Madison Space Science and Engineering Center Madison, Wisconsin X. Huang National

  20. Microsoft Word - Blue Cover Report - DOE FISMA

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Evaluation Report The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2010 DOE/IG-0843 October 2010 Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 October 22, 2010 MEMORANDUM FOR THE SECRETARY FROM: Gregory H. Friedman Inspector General SUBJECT: INFORMATION: Evaluation Report on "The Department's Unclassified Cyber Security Program - 2010" BACKGROUND Federal information systems are routinely confronted with increasingly sustained cyber attacks - many of which involve targeted and serious

  1. COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST FOR

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    INFORMATION REGARDING SMART GRID POLICY | Department of Energy COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST FOR INFORMATION REGARDING SMART GRID POLICY COMMENTS OF THE MICHIGAN PUBLIC SERVICE COMMISSION STAFF TO REQUEST FOR INFORMATION REGARDING SMART GRID POLICY The Michigan Public Service Commission Staff (MPSC Staff) commends the Department of Energy for seeking comments on policy and challenges confronting smart grid deployments as stated in the Request for

  2. Sustainable Bioenergy and the RSB | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bioenergy and the RSB Sustainable Bioenergy and the RSB Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting Misconceptions Sustainable Bioenergy and the RSB Barbara Bramble, Senior Director for International Wildlife Conservation at National Wildlife Federation and Chair of Board of Directors for the Roundtable on Sustainable Biomaterials PDF icon bramble_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications Biobased Chemicals Landscape in 2015: What's the Role of

  3. Computer Code Gives Astrophysicists First Full Simulation of Star's Final Hours

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Andy Nonaka

    2010-01-08

    The precise conditions inside a white dwarf star in the hours leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova are one of the mysteries confronting astrophysicists studying these massive stellar explosions. But now, a team of researchers, composed of three applied mathematicians at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and two astrophysicists, has created the first full-star simulation of the hours preceding the largest thermonuclear explosions in the universe.

  4. History | U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    History of SPR Releases History of SPR Releases The Strategic Petroleum Reserve exists, first and foremost, as an emergency response tool the President can use should the United States be confronted with an economically-threatening disruption in oil supplies. A Presidentially-directed release has occurred three times under these conditions. First, in 1991, at the beginning of Operation Desert Storm, the United States joined its allies in assuring the adequacy of global oil supplies when war

  5. Subtask 1: Molecules, Materials, and Systems for Solar Fuels | ANSER Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Argonne-Northwestern National Laboratory 1: Molecules, Materials, and Systems for Solar Fuels Home > Research > Subtask 1 The above figure depicts an iridium catalyst used for water splitting. The above figure depicts an iridium catalyst used for water splitting. The greatest challenge facing the development of solar fuels is efficient fuel production at acceptable rates and driving forces. The ANSER Center is confronting this challenge by taking a hierarchical approach to designing,

  6. Biomass Program Monthly News Blast January 2012

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2012 Save the Date: Biomass 2012 Location and Date Announced On July 10-11, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy's Biomass Program will host its fifth annual conference, Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy. This year's conference will examine the dynamic playing field of bioenergy in 2012, as exciting new technologies move forward within a shifting policy and economic landscape. Situated just blocks away from Capitol Hill,

  7. Biomass Program September 2012 News Blast

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    September 2012 Bioenergy YouTube Channel Features Biomass 2012 Videos On July 10-11, 2012, the Energy Department's Biomass Program hosted its fifth annual conference, Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy, at the Washington, D.C., Convention Center. The Biomass Program created several videos to archive the event, including an interview with Energy Secretary Steven Chu, clips from keynote speakers, an image documentary, as well as

  8. longfinal.PDF

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    FRIEDMAN INSPECTOR GENERAL DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY BEFORE THE SUBCOMMITTEE ON NATIONAL SECURITY, VETERANS AFFAIRS, AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS OF THE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT REFORM U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES FOR RELEASE ON DELIVERY EXPECTED AT 9:00 AM Thursday, March 15, 2001 1 Good morning Mr. Chairman and members of the Subcommittee. I am pleased to be here to respond to your request to testify on the major performance and management challenges confronting the Department of Energy

  9. The 2001 Power Plant Improvement Initiative | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2001 Power Plant Improvement Initiative The 2001 Power Plant Improvement Initiative When U.S. consumers were confronted in 1999 and 2000 with blackouts and brownouts of electric power in major regions of the country, Congress responded by directing the Department of Energy to issue "a general request for proposals for the commercial scale demonstration of technologies to assure the reliability of the nation's energy supply from existing and new electric generating facilities...." The

  10. DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects DOE Awards First Three Large-Scale Carbon Sequestration Projects October 9, 2007 - 3:14pm Addthis U.S. Projects Total $318 Million and Further President Bush's Initiatives to Advance Clean Energy Technologies to Confront Climate Change WASHINGTON, DC - In a major step forward for demonstrating the promise of clean energy technology, U.S Deputy Secretary of Energy Clay Sell today announced that the Department of Energy

  11. "Insurance as a Risk Management Instrument for Energy Infrastructure

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Security and Resilience" Report (March 2013) | Department of Energy "Insurance as a Risk Management Instrument for Energy Infrastructure Security and Resilience" Report (March 2013) "Insurance as a Risk Management Instrument for Energy Infrastructure Security and Resilience" Report (March 2013) The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a report that examines the key risks confronting critical energy infrastructure and ways in which the

  12. National Postdoctoral Association | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    National Postdoctoral Association The National Postdoctoral Association (NPA) is a member-driven organization that provides a unique, national voice for postdoctoral scholars. Since 2003, we have taken on the ambitious agenda to enhance the quality of the postdoctoral experience in the U.S. We have assumed a leadership role in addressing the many issues confronting the postdoctoral community that are national in scope and requiring action beyond the local level. Read more. Argonne National Lab

  13. Insurance as a Risk Management Instrument for Energy Infrastructure Security and Resilience Report Now Available

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has released a report that examines the key risks confronting critical energy infrastructure and ways in which the insurance industry can help manage these risks. In most developed countries, insurance is one of the principal risk management instruments for aiding in recovery after a disaster and for encouraging future investments that are more resilient to potential hazards.

  14. June 2012 News Blast: Algae on the Mind

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    June 2012 Biomass 2012 Is Less Than Two Weeks Away It's not too late to reserve your spot at Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities - Sustaining a Commitment to Bioenergy, the Energy Department's fifth annual networking and informational conference. Join Secretary of Energy Steven Chu, White House Energy Advisor Heather Zichal, members of Congress, and an exciting list of confirmed speakers by registering now! Visit the Biomass 2012 website to find out more information

  15. Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing for High Structural Performance Through Microstructural Control

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Friction Stir Additive Manufacturing as a potential route to achieve high performing structures James Withers MER Corporation Rajiv S. Mishra Center for Friction Stir Processing, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of North Texas, Denton, TX 76203, USA US DOE workshop on Advanced Methods for Manufacturing (AMM) September 29, 2015 Acknowledgement - DOE STTR Contract No. DE-SC0013783; Dr. Alison Hahn, Program Manager Presentation outline  Grand challenges confronting

  16. House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy and Commerce | Department of Energy Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce House Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations of the Committee on Energy and Commerce April 20, 2007 - 12:36pm Addthis Statement of Secretary Samuel Bodman Chairman Stupak, Congressman Whitfield, and Members of the Subcommittee, I'm pleased to appear before you to discuss what I consider to be one of the most pressing management issues confronting the Department of Energy

  17. Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Challenges | Department of Energy Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges Steffes Corporation Smart Grid RFI: Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges. The Department of Energy is seeking comments on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, as well as recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges. PDF icon Steffes Corporation

  18. Smart Grid Request for Information and Public Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of its ongoing effort regarding the formation of smart grid policy, the Department of Energy issued a Request for Information in September of 2010 on the topic of “Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation.” The purpose was to solicit comments from interested stakeholders on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, and recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges.

  19. Jefferson Lab Human Resources

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Highlights Applications open next week for the Conferences for Undergraduate Women in Physics. Katherine Myers, George Washington University, won the 2012 Jefferson Science Associates Thesis Prize Look at this video from "Project Lead The Way" by students from Hilliard Davidson High School in Columbus, OH Bias Persists for Women of Science, a Study Finds Girls in STEM: A New Generation of Women and Science Millennials struggle with confrontation at work image Diversity Statement

  20. Smart Grid Request for Information and Public Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of its ongoing effort regarding the formation of smart grid policy, the Department of Energy issued a Request for Information in September of 2010 on the topic of “Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation.” The purpose was to solicit comments from interested stakeholders on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, and recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges.

  1. SMART GRID Request for Information And Public Comments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    As part of its ongoing effort regarding the formation of smart grid policy, the Department of Energy issued a Request for Information in September of 2010 on the topic of “Addressing Policy and Logistical Challenges to Smart Grid Implementation.” The purpose was to solicit comments from interested stakeholders on policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation, and recommendations on how to best overcome those challenges.

  2. Department of Energy Seeks Information on Smart Grid Challenges

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy’s Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability has issued a Request For Information (RFI) seeking information from stakeholders on the policy and logistical challenges that confront smart grid implementation. Responses to this RFI will also help inform the Administration’s analysis of policy challenges and possible solutions being developed by the Smart Grid Subcommittee of the National Science and Technology Council’s Committee on Technology.

  3. Strategic Perspectives on Biofuels | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Perspectives on Biofuels Strategic Perspectives on Biofuels Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting Misconceptions Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions Lee R. Lynd, Professor of Engineering, Dartmouth College PDF icon lynd_bioenergy_2015.pdf More Documents & Publications Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply Growing

  4. Rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rubinstein, Herbert J.; Clark, Philip M.; Gilcrest, James D.

    1978-06-20

    A rack for storing spent nuclear fuel elements in which a plurality of aligned rows of upright enclosures of generally square cross-sectional areas contain vertically disposed fuel elements. The enclosures are fixed at the lower ends thereof to a base. Pockets are formed between confronting walls of adjacent enclosures for receiving high absorption neutron absorbers, such as Boral, cadmium, borated stainless steel and the like for the closer spacing of spent fuel elements.

  5. Arctic Black Carbon Loading and Profile Using the Single-Particle Soot

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Technical Report: Arctic Black Carbon Loading and Profile Using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Arctic Black Carbon Loading and Profile Using the Single-Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) Field Campaign Report One of the major issues confronting aerosol climate simulations of the Arctic and Antarctic cryospheres is

  6. Distributed PV Interconnection: Recent Analysis Findings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 21, 2015 "NREL and SEPA Recent Analysis Findings" Miriam Makhyoun, Solar Electric Power Association (SEPA) Kristen Ardani, National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) 2 Purpose of Today's Meeting * Hear results from SEPA's recent survey of utility interconnection practices. o SEPA finds that utilities confront common challenges as they move towards more streamlined interconnection application processing. * Hear NREL results of forthcoming DGIC data collection and analysis,

  7. Emilio SegrĂš and Spontaneous Fission

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Emilio SegrĂš and Spontaneous Fission As the staff at Los Alamos began research in the spring of 1943, the most formidable problems it confronted were related to the new materials that would be used in atomic bombs. These materials, uranium-235 and plutonium, were largely unknown. Uranium-235 formed only a tiny fraction of natural uranium (less than 1 percent) and plutonium had been discovered only two years earlier at the University of California, Berkeley, Radiation Laboratory by chemistry

  8. Environmental regulation of coal mining. SMCRA`s Second Decade

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McElfish, J.M.; Beier, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    If you find yourself involved in the workings of the Surface Mining Control and Reclamation Act of 1977 (SMCRA), let ELI`s guide take you through SMCRA`s second decade. Environmental Regulation of Coal mining: SMCRA`s Second Decade gives you a clear picture of SMCRA`s statutory and regulatory requirements, and identifies the key policy disputes and problems that will be confronted in the years ahead.

  9. Supporting Photovoltaics in Market-Rate Residential NewConstruction: A Summary of Programmatic Experience to Date and LessonsLearned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-02-10

    As a market segment for solar photovoltaic (PV) adoption, new homes have a number of attractive attributes. Homebuyers can easily roll the cost of the PV system into their tax-deductible home mortgage and, with rebates and other financial incentives, potentially achieve an immediate net-positive cash flow from the investment. New homes are amenable to building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV), which are less susceptible to aesthetic concerns than traditional, rack-mounted systems. The performance of PV systems can be optimized on new homes by taking roof orientation and shading into account when designing the home. Perhaps most importantly, subdivisions with PV systems installed on a large number of homes offer potential cost savings from volume purchases of modules and inverters and from scale economies in system design and installation. Finally, the ability of builders to install PV as a standard feature on multiple homes in new subdivisions offers an opportunity to circumvent the high transaction costs and information-related market barriers typically confronted when each individual homeowner must make a decision about installing PV. Builders may benefit in several ways from incorporating PV into new homes. Builders may gain greater market differentiation, enhanced media exposure, and less community or political opposition to development projects. Additionally, if homebuyers place a high value on PV, builders may be able to earn additional profits, just as they would on granite countertops or other high-value home features. Although the impact of PV on the original sale price of new homes has not yet been rigorously examined, some limited empirical evidence does suggest that PV and energy efficient features may have a positive effect on resale value. Along with its unique advantages, residential new construction also faces unique barriers to PV adoption. Most fundamentally, perhaps, is the general aversion to technology risk within the building industry, particularly in ''hot'' housing markets where builders face little difficulty selling homes. Builders may also be concerned about the up-front cost of PV and its impact on new home prices and profits. The potential for project delays associated with PV module availability, installation scheduling, utility interconnection agreements, building inspections, permit processing, or other factors, may also be of great concern. Finally, many builders may believe that most homebuyers are not particularly interested in PV, given its cost, and that some may even be opposed based on concerns about aesthetics, maintenance, or reliability. In this paper, prepared on behalf of the Clean Energy States Alliance (CESA), we describe early efforts by state clean energy funds to support the deployment of PV in new, market-rate homes. (Other recent reports prepared for CESA describe experiences with programs targeting affordable housing.) We focus on the activities of clean energy funds in nine states that have funded specific projects and/or have offered targeted programs for PV in market-rate residential new construction. We also include in our review several other state or local organizations whose efforts are particularly noteworthy or have some direct bearing on the efforts of clean energy funds in the same state--however, we do not attempt to comprehensively review the activities of entities other than state clean energy funds.

  10. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

  11. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade Year-0...

  12. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels)...

  13. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than...

  14. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

  15. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion...

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Greater than 200...

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Decade...

  18. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Proved...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent)...

  19. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade...

  20. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Production from Greater than 200...

  1. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0...

  2. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million...

  3. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Dry Natural Gas Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

  4. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent)...

  5. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Percent) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Percentage of Natural Gas Liquids Lease Condensate Production from Greater than 200 Meters...

  6. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas, Wet After Lease Separation, Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep...

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/8-NM-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    transmission lines requiring a right of way (ROW) width greater than 100 feet. Any person proposing to construct transmission lines requiring a ROW width greater than 100 feet...

  8. Saving Energy and Keeping Seniors Warm This Season | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Using money from a Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, the Greater Randolph ... Using money from a Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, the Greater Randolph ...

  9. TransForum - Special Issue: Batteries - August 2010

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    greater than conventional capacitors and a power density hundreds of times greater than lithium-ion batteries. "Ultracapacitors give an electric vehicle the initial boost it...

  10. EIA-800

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm sulfur (incl.) 466 Greater than 500 ppm sulfur 467 Total 999 * Includes propane, propylene, ethane, ethylene, normal butane, butylene, isobutane, ...

  11. 03-2-2015 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Today, the modern grid is driven by a desire for variable renewable power, greater consumer participation, greater reliability and power quality, and affordability. Instead of ...

  12. Final Report: DOE/ID/14215

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Bryden; J. Richard Hess; Thomas Ulrich; Robert Zemetra

    2008-08-18

    The proposed straw separation system developed in the research project harvests the large internode sections of the straw which has the greater potential as a feedstock for lignocellulosic ethanol production while leaving the chaff and nodes in the field. This strategy ensures sustainable agriculture by preventing the depletion of soil minerals, and it restores organic matter to the soil in amounts and particle sizes that accommodate farmers’ needs to keep tillage and fertilizer costs low. A ton of these nutrient-rich plant tissues contains as much as $10.55 worth of fertilizer (economic and energy benefits), in terms of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and other nutrients provided to the soil when incorporated by tillage instead of being burned. Biomass conversion to fermentable sugars for the purpose of producing fuels, chemicals, and other industrial products is well understood. Most bioenergy strategies rely on low-cost fermentable sugars for sustainability and economic viability in the marketplace. Exploitation of the “whole crop”—specifically, wheat straw or other plant material currently regarded as residue or waste—is a practical approach for obtaining a reliable and low-cost source of sugars. However, industrial-scale production of sugars from wheat straw, while technically feasible, is plagued by obstacles related to capital costs, energy consumption, waste streams, production logistics, and the quality of the biomass feedstock. Currently available separation options with combine harvesters are not able to achieve sufficient separation of the straw/stover and chaff streams to realize the full potential of selective harvest. Since ethanol yield is a function of feedstock structural carbohydrate content, biomass anatomical fractions of higher product yield can have a significant beneficial impact on minimum ethanol selling price. To address this advanced biomass separation computation engineering models were developed to more effectively and efficiently engineer high-fidelity and high throughput separation systems for biomass components. INL and Iowa State University developed a computational modeling strategy for simulating multi-phase flow with an integrated solver using various computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. ISU set up a classic multi-phase test problem to be solved by the various CFD codes. The benchmark case was based on experimental data for bubble gas holdup and bed expansion for a gas/solid fluidized bed. Preliminary fluidization experiments identified some unexpected fluidization behavior, where rather than the bed uniformly fluidizing, a “blow out” would occur where a hole would open up in the bed through which the air would preferentially flow, resulting in erratic fluidization. To improve understanding of this phenomena and aid in building a design tool, improved computational tools were developed. The virtual engineering techniques developed were tested and utilized to design a separation baffle in a CNH combine. A computational engineering approach involving modeling, analysis, and simulation was used in the form of virtual engineering to design a baffle separator capable of accomplishing the high-fidelity residue separation established by the performance targets. Through the use of the virtual engineering model, baffle designs were simulated to (1) determine the effect of the baffle on the airflow of the combine cleaning system, and (2) predict the effectiveness of the baffle in separating the residue streams. A baffle design was selected based on the virtual engineering modeling, built into the INL selective harvest test combine. The result of the baffle changes improved the crop separation capability of the combine, enabling downstream improvement in composition and theoretical ethanol yield. In addition, the positive results from the application of the virtual engineering tools to the CNH combine design resulted in further application of these tools to other INL areas of research. INL and the University of Idaho identified, characterized, and modified a key plant biosynt

  13. Spinning Reserve From Responsive Loads

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirby, B.J.

    2003-04-08

    Responsive load is the most underutilized reliability resource available to the power system today. It is currently not used at all to provide spinning reserve. Historically there were good reasons for this, but recent technological advances in communications and controls have provided new capabilities and eliminated many of the old obstacles. North American Electric Reliability Council (NERC), Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), Northeast Power Coordinating Council (NPCC), New York State Reliability Council (NYSRC), and New York Independent System Operator (NYISO) rules are beginning to recognize these changes and are starting to encourage responsive load provision of reliability services. The Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostats provide an example of these technological advances. This is a technology aimed at reducing summer peak demand through central control of residential and small commercial air-conditioning loads. It is being utilized by Long Island Power Authority (LIPA), Consolidated Edison (ConEd), Southern California Edison (SCE), and San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E). The technology is capable of delivering even greater response in the faster spinning reserve time frame (while still providing peak reduction). Analysis of demand reduction testing results from LIPA during the summer of 2002 provides evidence to back up this claim. It also demonstrates that loads are different from generators and that the conventional wisdom, which advocates for starting with large loads as better ancillary service providers, is flawed. The tempting approach of incrementally adapting ancillary service requirements, which were established when generators were the only available resources, will not work. While it is easier for most generators to provide replacement power and non-spinning reserve (the slower response services) than it is to supply spinning reserve (the fastest service), the opposite is true for many loads. Also, there is more financial reward for supplying spinning reserve than for supplying the other reserve services as a result of the higher spinning reserve prices. The LIPAedge program (LIPA's demand reduction program using Carrier ComfortChoice thermostats) provides an opportunity to test the use of responsive load for spinning reserve. With potentially 75 MW of spinning reserve capability already installed, this test program can also make an important contribution to the capacity needs of Long Island during the summer of 2003. Testing could also be done at ConEd ({approx}30 MW), SCE ({approx}15 MW), and/or SDG&E ({approx}15 MW). This paper is divided into six chapters. Chapter 2 discusses the contingency reserve ancillary services, their functions in supporting power system reliability, and their technical requirements. It also discusses the policy and tariff requirements and attempts to distinguish between ones that are genuinely necessary and ones that are artifacts of the technologies that were historically used to provide the services. Chapter 3 discusses how responsive load could provide contingency reserves (especially spinning reserve) for the power system. Chapter 4 specifically discusses the Carrier ComfortChoice responsive thermostat technology, the LIPAedge experience with that technology, and how the technology could be used to supply spinning reserve. Chapter 5 discusses a number of unresolved issues and suggests areas for further research. Chapter 6 offers conclusions and recommendations.

  14. The Cost of Transmission for Wind Energy: A Review of Transmission Planning Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mills, Andrew D.; Wiser, Ryan; Porter, Kevin

    2009-02-02

    The rapid development of wind power that the United States has experienced over the last several years has been coupled with a growing concern that wind development will require substantial additions to the nation's transmission infrastructure. Transmission is particularly important for wind power due to the locational dependence of wind resources, the relatively low capacity factor of wind plants, and the mismatch between the short lead time to build a new wind project and the longer lead time often needed to plan, permit, and construct transmission. It is clear that institutional issues related to transmission planning, siting, and cost allocation will pose major obstacles to accelerated wind power deployment, but also of concern is the potential cost of this infrastructure build out. Simply put, how much extra cost will society bear to deliver wind power to load centers? Without an answer to this question, there can be no consensus on whether or not the cost of developing transmission for wind will be a major barrier to further wind deployment, or whether the institutional barriers to transmission expansion are likely to be of more immediate concern. In this report, we review a sample of 40 detailed transmission studies that have included wind power. These studies cover a broad geographic area, and were completed from 2001-2008. Our primary goal in reviewing these studies is to develop a better understanding of the transmission costs needed to access growing quantities of wind generation. A secondary goal is to gain a better appreciation of the differences in transmission planning approaches in order to identify those methodologies that seem most able to estimate the incremental transmission costs associated with wind development. Finally, we hope that the resulting dataset and discussion might be used to inform the assumptions, methods, and results of higher-level assessment models that are sometimes used to estimate the cost of wind deployment (e.g. NEMS and WinDS). The authors and general location of the 40 detailed transmission studies included in our review are illustrated in Figure ES-1. As discussed in the body of the report, these studies vary considerably in scope, authorship, objectives, methodology, and tools. Though we recognize this diversity and are cognizant that comparisons among these studies are therefore somewhat inappropriate, we nonetheless emphasize such simple comparisons in this report. We do so in order to improve our understanding of the range of transmission costs needed to access greater quantities of wind, and to highlight some of the drivers of those costs. In so doing, we gloss over many important details and differences among the studies in our sample. In emphasizing simple comparisons, our analysis focuses primarily on the unit cost of transmission implied by each of the studies. The unit cost of transmission for wind in $/kW terms on a capacity-weighted basis is estimated by simply dividing the total transmission cost in a study by the total amount of incremental generation capacity (wind and non-wind) modeled in that study. In so doing, this metric assumes that within any individual study all incremental generation capacity imposes transmission costs in proportion to its nameplate capacity rating. The limitations to this approach are described in some detail in the body of the report.

  15. Robotic guarded motion system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2010-02-23

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for repeating, on each iteration through an event timing loop, the acts of defining an event horizon, detecting a range to obstacles around the robot, and testing for an event horizon intrusion. Defining the event horizon includes determining a distance from the robot that is proportional to a current velocity of the robot and testing for the event horizon intrusion includes determining if any range to the obstacles is within the event horizon. Finally, on each iteration through the event timing loop, the method includes reducing the current velocity of the robot in proportion to a loop period of the event timing loop if the event horizon intrusion occurs.

  16. Toward US-Russian strategic defense: Ban the ABM Treaty now

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savelyev, A.

    1992-11-12

    Boris Yeltsin and George Bush agreed on June 17 to develop and deploy a jointly controlled global protection system against ballistic missile strikes. Three teams of Russian and American experts now are studying the Bush-Yeltsin idea, called the Joint Defense Program (JDP). The drive to develop a U.S.-Russian defense system, however, faces a formidable obstacle-the 1972 Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) Treaty, which prohibits not only the deployment of territorial defenses against strategic missiles but the creation of an infrastructure (or `base`) for such a defense. If America and Russia hope to build a common defense against ballistic missiles, they first will have to remove ABM Treaty obstacles to expanded U.S.-Russian cooperation and missile defense.

  17. Robotic follow system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J [Idaho Falls, ID; Anderson, Matthew O [Idaho Falls, ID

    2007-05-01

    Robot platforms, methods, and computer media are disclosed. The robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller, which executes instructions for a robot to follow a target in its environment. The method includes receiving a target bearing and sensing whether the robot is blocked front. If the robot is blocked in front, then the robot's motion is adjusted to avoid the nearest obstacle in front. If the robot is not blocked in front, then the method senses whether the robot is blocked toward the target bearing and if so, sets the rotational direction opposite from the target bearing, and adjusts the rotational velocity and translational velocity. If the robot is not blocked toward the target bearing, then the rotational velocity is adjusted proportional to an angle of the target bearing and the translational velocity is adjusted proportional to a distance to the nearest obstacle in front.

  18. Three dimensional numerical simulations of the UPS-292 stratified charge engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Rourke, P.J.; Amsden, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present and analyze three-dimensional calculations of the spray, mixing and combustion in the UPS-292 stratified charge engine for three different operating conditions, corresponding to overall air-fuel ratios between 22.4 and 61.0. The numerical calculations are performed with KIVA, a multidimensional arbitrary-mesh, finite-difference hydrodynamics program for internal combustion engine applications. The calculations use a mesh of 10,000 computational cells. Each operating condition is calculated from intake valve closure at 118/sup 0/ BTDC to 90/sup 0/ ATDC and requires approximately three hours of CRAY-XMP computer time. Combustion occurs primarily in the wake of the spark plug, and to include the effects of the spark plug on the flow field, we use a novel internal obstacle treatment. The methodology, in which internal obstacles are represented by computational particles, promises to be applicable to the calculation of the flows around intake and exhaust valves.

  19. Occupancy change detection system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bruemmer, David J. [Idaho Falls, ID; Few, Douglas A. [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-09-01

    A robot platform includes perceptors, locomotors, and a system controller. The system controller executes instructions for producing an occupancy grid map of an environment around the robot, scanning the environment to generate a current obstacle map relative to a current robot position, and converting the current obstacle map to a current occupancy grid map. The instructions also include processing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map. Within the processing of each grid cell, the instructions include comparing each grid cell in the occupancy grid map to a corresponding grid cell in the current occupancy grid map. For grid cells with a difference, the instructions include defining a change vector for each changed grid cell, wherein the change vector includes a direction from the robot to the changed grid cell and a range from the robot to the changed grid cell.

  20. NREL Theory Establishes a Path to High-Performance 2D Semiconductor Devices

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - News Releases | NREL Theory Establishes a Path to High-Performance 2D Semiconductor Devices April 22, 2016 Researchers at the Energy Department's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) have uncovered a way to overcome a principal obstacle in using two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors in electronic and optoelectronic devices. 2D semiconductors such as molybdenum disulfide are only a few layers thick and are considered promising candidates for next-generation devices. Scientists first

  1. DOE Science Showcase - Oil Shale Research | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of Scientific and Technical Information Oil Shale Research Oil shale has been recognized as a potentially valuable U.S. energy resource for a century. Obstacles to its use have included the expense of current shale-oil production technologies and their effects on our environment. The energy landscape is evolving. Technology has advanced, global economic, political, and market conditions have changed and the regulatory landscape has matured. Recent efforts to realize the potential of this

  2. In the OSTI Collections: Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay-Are Neutrinos and

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Antineutrinos the Same? | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay-Are Neutrinos and Antineutrinos the Same? Dr. Watson computer sleuthing scientist. Article Acknowledgement: Dr. William N. Watson, Physicist DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information Observational Obstacles Experiments References Reports available from SciTech Connect and E-print Network Organizations and Laboratories Additional Reference Figure 1. The

  3. Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Clean Energy Manufacturing Initiative AEMC Northeast Regional Summit AEMC Northeast Regional Summit On May 12, 2016, join Assistant Secretary Dr. Dave Danielson for an unforgettable dialogue on advances and obstacles in clean energy manufacturing in the northeast and across the nation. Read more Funding Opportunity: High-Performance Computing for Manufacturing Funding Opportunity: High-Performance Computing for Manufacturing The Energy Department announced up to $3 million in funding for

  4. Technology Validation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technology Validation Technology Validation In addition to the technical challenges being addressed through research, design, and development, there are obstacles to successful implementation of fuel cells and the corresponding hydrogen infrastructure that can be addressed only by integrating the components into complete systems. After a technology achieves its technical targets in the laboratory, the next step is to show that it can work as designed within complete systems (i.e., fuel cell

  5. Environmentally Benign Electrolytes With Wide Electrochemical Windows -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Innovation Portal Environmentally Benign Electrolytes With Wide Electrochemical Windows DOE Grant Recipients Arizona Technology Enterprises Contact Arizona Technology Enterprises About This Technology Technology Marketing SummaryAs mobile electronics continue to evolve, the need for safe, long-lasting rechargeable batteries has grown tremendously. In the search for suitable materials from which to construct high energy density solid state batteries, one of the principal obstacles has

  6. Integrated, proportionally controlled, and naturally compliant universal joint actuator with controllable stiffness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann; Granosik, Grzegorz

    2005-03-22

    An apparatus for traversing obstacles having an elongated, round, flexible body that includes a plurality of segments interconnected by an integrated joint actuator assembly. The integrated joint actuator assembly includes a plurality of bellows-type actuators individually coupling adjacent segments to permit pivotal actuation of the apparatus therebetween. A controller is employed to maintain proper positional control and stiffness control while minimize air flow.

  7. Technology and Commercialization Organization Chart | Argonne National

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Validation Technology Validation In addition to the technical challenges being addressed through research, design, and development, there are obstacles to successful implementation of fuel cells and the corresponding hydrogen infrastructure that can be addressed only by integrating the components into complete systems. After a technology achieves its technical targets in the laboratory, the next step is to show that it can work as designed within complete systems (i.e., fuel cell

  8. Quantification of Hydrological, Geochemical, and Mineralogical Processes Governing the Fate and Transport of Uranium over Multiple Scales in Hanford Sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mayes, Melanie A.; Perfect, Edmund; van den Berg, Elmer; Parker, Jack C.; Jardine, Philip M.; Tang, Guoping; Fendorf, Scott

    2006-11-15

    A long-term measure of the DOE Environmental Remediation Sciences Division is to provide sufficient scientific understanding to allow a significant fraction of DOE sites to incorporate coupled biological, chemical, and physical processes into decision making for environmental remediation and long-term stewardship by 2015. Our research targets two related, major obstacles to understanding and predicting contaminant transport at DOE sites: the heterogeneity of subsurface geologic media, and the scale dependence of experimental and modeled results.

  9. Space propulsion: The antimatter advantage (Journal Article) | SciTech

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Connect Journal Article: Space propulsion: The antimatter advantage Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Space propulsion: The antimatter advantage With each century come new and exciting technologies, but perhaps the most challenging innovations have occurred in the modern era as a result of man's quest to explore the universe. While enormous advancements have occurred during the space age, there still remain significant obstacles in deep space exploration. A practical challenge to

  10. Wheeled hopping robot

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-08-17

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  11. Combustion powered linear actuator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gary J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-09-04

    The present invention provides robotic vehicles having wheeled and hopping mobilities that are capable of traversing (e.g. by hopping over) obstacles that are large in size relative to the robot and, are capable of operation in unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides combustion powered linear actuators, which can include latching mechanisms to facilitate pressurized fueling of the actuators, as can be used to provide wheeled vehicles with a hopping mobility.

  12. About the SunShot Prize | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Soft Costs » About the SunShot Prize About the SunShot Prize The Motivation Despite unprecedented cost reductions for solar hardware over recent years, the going solar experience for most Americans is long and arduous due to inefficient processes and complex administrative obstacles. Customers may wait as long as 180 days for permitting, installation, inspection, and grid interconnection before they can flip the switch and generate electricity from a small solar system. Every one day cut from

  13. Prosperity without pollution: The prevention strategy for industry and consumers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirschhorn, J.S.; Oldenburg, K.U.

    1991-12-31

    ;Contents: Pollution prevention pays for everyone; What pollution prevention is-What waste recycling and other strategies are not; Achieving succcess by overcoming obstacles; Data tells the story-too much waste; The ozone groan-do we still have time; Harm to the farm and home from chemical pesticides; Changing consumption-reducing garbage; Household toxic products-thinking more and buying less; and No time to waste.

  14. Conference on natural gas use state regulation and market dynamics in the Post 636/Energy Policy Act Era: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-08-01

    Reports in this Record of Proceedings explore a wide variety of issues related to the regulation of natural gas and its future role as one of the critical fuels that powers the economy of the United States. The focus is mainly on problems, obstacles, barriers, and the incredibly complex system created to bring a fuel from wellhead to burner tip. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  15. South San Joaquin Irrigation District

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    and Economic Development Tribal Utility Formation July 27, 2015 Indian Pueblo Cultural Center Albuquerque, New Mexico Presentation by Jeff Shields Retail Energy Distribution Service * What is the purpose for becoming a retail energy provider? * What options are available to meet your goals? * What are the obstacles that stand in the way of success? PURPOSE * It is important to have a clear purpose for initiating the formation of a new retail energy business. This effort will be expensive and

  16. DE-FC26-02NT41645 | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of an Inspection Platform and Suite of Sensors for Assessing Corrosion and Mechanical Damage in Un-Piggable Transmission Mains DE-FC26-02NT41645 Goal: The goal is to help maintain a high level of safety, reliability, and integrity in the United States natural gas transmission and distribution system through the development and design of a new robotic platform and sensor module capable of navigating through all known physical obstacles found in un-piggable transmission and

  17. Final report - Sundyne Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.B.

    1994-09-27

    Solar cookers offer a viable alternative to conventional cooking methods in many areas, and can be an effective tool in the fight against the deforestation and desertification that plague many developing countries. However, there have been numerous obstacles to the successful dissemination of solar cookers in the past. The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities, review constraints and develop a marketing strategy to disseminate the Sundyne Solar Cooker (SSC) in developing countries.

  18. Evaluation of Non-Nuclear Techniques for Well Logging: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bond, Leonard J.; Griffin, Jeffrey W.; Harris, R. V.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Moran, Traci L.

    2011-08-01

    The focus of this study is the understanding of the technical obstacles that hinder the replacement of and the disadvantages from the loss of extensive interpretation experience based on data accumulated with AmBe. Enhanced acoustic and electromagnetic sensing methods in combination with non-isotope-based well logging techniques have the potential to complement and/or replace existing isotope-based techniques, providing the opportunity to reduce oil industry dependence on isotopic sources such as AmBe.

  19. Final Scientific Report - Wireless and Sensing Solutions Advancing Industrial Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Budampati, Rama; McBrady, Adam; Nusseibeh, Fouad

    2009-09-28

    The project team's goal for the Wireless and Sensing Solution Advancing Industrial Efficiency award (DE-FC36-04GO14002) was to develop, demonstrate, and test a number of leading edge technologies that could enable the emergence of wireless sensor and sampling systems for the industrial market space. This effort combined initiatives in advanced sensor development, configurable sampling and deployment platforms, and robust wireless communications to address critical obstacles in enabling enhanced industrial efficiency.

  20. Solar technical assistance provided to Forest City military communities in Hawaii for incorporation of 20-30 MW of solar energy generation to power family housing for US Navy personnel.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dominick, Jeff; Merrigan, Tim; Boudra, Will; Miller, Ryan; Cisneros, Gabriela; Rosenthal, Andrew L.; Kuszmaul, Scott S.; Gupta, Vipin P.

    2010-06-01

    In May 2007, Forest City Military Communities won a US Department of Energy Solar America Showcase Award. As part of this award, executives and staff from Forest City Military Communities worked side-by-side with a DOE technical assistance team to overcome technical obstacles encountered by this large-scale real estate developer and manager. This paper describes the solar technical assistance that was provided and the key solar experiences acquired by Forest City Military Communities over an 18 month period.

  1. U.S. Wind projected to Be $60 billion business by 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-11-15

    A recent U.S. Department of Energy report concluded that there are no insurmountable barriers to meeting 20 percent of U.S. electricity generation from wind by 2030, but identified upgrading of the transmission grid as a major challenge, requiring a $60+ billion investment. One major obstacle is the highly fragmented ownership of the 200,000-mile network among some 500 diverse, intensely territorial entities.

  2. ORISE: Public Health Preparedness

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preparedness Public Health Preparedness The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) recognizes that public health events will largely be managed at the local level, at least for the first 48 to 72 hours after a major event. As a result, ORISE works with community partners, and in conjunction with government agencies and organizations, to help address gaps and obstacles experienced at the local level in order to plan for an effective response. This is accomplished largely through

  3. Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    hemorrhagic fever DNA. (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Quantification of false positive reduction in nucleic acid purification on hemorrhagic fever DNA. Columbia University has developed a sensitive highly multiplexed system for genetic identification of nucleic acid targets. The primary obstacle to implementing this technology is the high rate of

  4. LNG SAFETY RESEARCH: FEM3A MODEL DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jerry Havens; Iraj A. Salehi

    2005-05-10

    The objective of this report is to develop the FEM3A model for application to general scenarios involving dispersion problems with obstacles and terrain features of realistic complexity, and for very low wind speed, stable weather conditions as required for LNG vapor dispersion application specified in 49 CFR 193. The dispersion model DEGADIS specified in 49 CFR 193 is limited to application for dispersion over smooth, level terrain free of obstacles (such as buildings, tanks, or dikes). There is a need for a dispersion model that allows consideration of the effects of terrain features and obstacles on the dispersion of LNG vapor clouds. Project milestones are: (1) Simulation of Low-Wind-Speed Stable Atmospheric Milestones Conditions; (2) Verification for Dispersion over Rough Surfaces, With And Without Obstacles; and (3) Adapting the FEM3A Model for General Application. Results for this quarter are work continues to underway to address numerical problems during simulation of low-wind-speed, stable, atmospheric conditions with FEM3A. Steps 1 and 2 in the plan outlined in the first Quarterly report are complete and steps 3 and 4 are in progress. During this quarter, we have been investigating the effect upon numerical stability of the heat transfer model used to predict the surface-to-cloud heat transfer, which can be important for LNG vapor dispersion. Previously, no consideration has been given to ground cooling as a result of heat transfer to the colder gas cloud in FEM3A. The present effort is directed to describing the ground surface temperature decrease as a function of time.

  5. Convergent method of and apparatus for distributed control of robotic systems using fuzzy logic

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Feddema, John T. (Albuquerque, NM); Driessen, Brian J. (Albuquerque, NM); Kwok, Kwan S. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01

    A decentralized fuzzy logic control system for one vehicle or for multiple robotic vehicles provides a way to control each vehicle to converge on a goal without collisions between vehicles or collisions with other obstacles, in the presence of noisy input measurements and a limited amount of compute-power and memory on board each robotic vehicle. The fuzzy controller demonstrates improved robustness to noise relative to an exact controller.

  6. Opportunities for the utilization of natural gas in the developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carameros, G.D. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A review of natural gas resources and utilization in the less-developed countries (LDCs) demonstrates that gas can be a very attractive option in meeting a nation's energy needs. Furthermore, some LDCs have sufficient reserves to undertake an export project as a new source of income. The obstacles hindering gas programs in LDCs involve market development, high-risk investment requirements, and manpower resources.

  7. Fossil Energy Today - Fourth Quarter, 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 Fossil Energy Today - Fourth Quarter, 2012 Topics In This Issue.... National Sequestration Education Center Opens in Illinois Environment, Security, Safety & Health in the Office of Fossil Energy AVESTAR Center Deploys 3-D Virtual Training System FE Teams Earn Secretary of Energy Achievement Awards NETL Organizes Coal and Power Training Course for State Department Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles PDF icon Fossil Energy Today, Issue No. 8, Fourth Quarter, 2012 More

  8. Postirradiation examination of light water reactor fuel: a United States perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neimark, L.A.; Ocken, H.

    1980-01-01

    Poolside and hot-cell postirradiation examination (PIE) have played and will continue to play a significant role in the US LWR program. The principal uses of PIE are in fuel surveillance, fuel improvement, and failure analysis programs and in the postmortem analysis of safety-related tests. Institutional problems associated with fuel shipping, waste disposal, and fuel disposal can be expected to pose obstacles to hot-cell examinations and likely result in more sophisticated poolside examinations.

  9. Light-Duty Diesel Vehicles: Market Issues and Potential Energy and Emissions Impacts

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Jeff Sessions for an analysis of the environmental and energy efficiency attributes of light-duty diesel vehicles. Specifically, the inquiry asked for a comparison of the characteristics of diesel-fueled vehicles with those of similar gasoline-fueled, E85-fueled, and hybrid vehicles, as well as a discussion of any technical, economic, regulatory, or other obstacles to increasing the use of diesel-fueled vehicles in the United States.

  10. University of Delaware | CCEI News

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News [January 2016] Wei Fan, professor of chemical engineering at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, is among scientists highlighted in the U.S. Department of Energy's online feature article titled "Driving to Great: Science and the Journey to Waste-Free Biodiesel." The article, which discusses how scientists are overcoming obstacles in order to turn fuel waste into valued chemicals, discusses Fan's discovery of a one-pot reaction that turns glycerol into large quantities of

  11. Microsoft PowerPoint - PA CoP Presentation October 2014

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Webinar * October 2014 Decision Making under Uncertainty: Introduction to Structured Decision Analysis for Performance Assessments Improving the quality of environmental decision making. Paul Black, Ph.D. and lots of others at Neptune 2 Performance and Risk Assessment Community of Practice * Webinar * October 2014 * We like to be objective * Currently, radioactive waste disposal is an obstacle to the nuclear industry * A paradigm shift is needed for better decision making * We think this is

  12. Real Time Diagnostics for Algae-final-sm

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real-time Monitoring And Diagnostics Detecting pathogens and predators to quickly recover from pond crashes Algal Pond Crash Detection Sandia National Laboratories is developing a suite of complementary technologies to help the emerging algae industry detect and quickly recover from algal pond crashes, an obstacle to large-scale algae cultivation for biofuels. Because of the way algae is grown and produced in most algal ponds, they are prone to attack by fungi, rotifers, viruses or other

  13. Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging Archaeopteryx Feathers and Bone Chemistry Fully Revealed via Synchrotron Imaging Archaeopteryx specimens are important but extremely rare fossils. Due to their possession of both reptilian (jaws with teeth, long bony tail) and avian (feathered wings) characters, Archaeopteryx has been crucial in the development of Darwinian evolution. Despite their importance, no Archaeopteryx specimen has ever been chemically analyzed. This in large part may be explained by the analytical obstacles

  14. Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2005-03-30

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has created codes that ensure that a robot will come to a stop at a precise, specified distance from any obstacle regardless of the robot's initial speed, its physical characteristics, and the responsiveness of the low-level motor control schema. This Guarded Motion for Mobile Robots system iteratively adjusts the robot's action in response to information about the robot's environment.

  15. Request for Comments on Including Onsite Renewable Energy Generation under Energy Savings Performance Contracts

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) released this Request for Comments on February 1, 2016, in an effort to obtain information about potential obstacles associated with the implementation of onsite renewable energy generation projects under the federal Energy Savings Performance Contract (ESPC) Authority, including potential issues with regard to project eligibility for the federal solar investment tax credit and the use of the ESPC ENABLE program for such projects.

  16. 428th Brookhaven Lecture

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Kenneth Evans-Lutterodt

    2010-09-01

    At Brookhaven Lab, a team of researchers has overcome a major x-ray focusing obstacle to allow the study of molecules, atoms, and advanced materials at the nanoscale, which is on the order of billionths of a meter. Their innovative method uses a type of refractive lens called a kinoform lens --similar to the kind found in lighthouses -- in order to focus the x-rays down to the extremely small spots needed for a sharp image at small dimensions.

  17. Impact of Limitations on Access to Oil and Natural Gas Resources in the Federal Outer Continental Shelf (released in AEO2009)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. offshore is estimated to contain substantial resources of both crude oil and natural gas, but until recently some of the areas of the lower 48 states Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) have been under leasing moratoria. The Presidential ban on offshore drilling in portions of the lower 48 OCS was lifted in July 2008, and the Congressional ban was allowed to expire in September 2008, removing regulatory obstacles to development of the Atlantic and Pacific OCS.

  18. Integrated envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.; Schuman, J.

    1992-07-01

    Fenestration systems are major contributors to peak cooling loads in commercial buildings and thus to HVAC system costs, peak electric demand, and annual energy use. These loads can be reduced significantly through proper fenestration design and the use of daylighting strategies. However, there are very few documented applications of energy-saving daylighted buildings today, which suggests that significant obstacles to efficient fenestration and lighting design and utilization still exist. This paper reports results of the first phase of a utility-sponsored research, development, and demonstration project to more effectively address the interrelated issues of designing and implementing energy-efficient envelope and lighting systems. We hypothesize that daylighting and overall energy efficiency will not be achieved at a large scale until true building integration has been accomplished to some meaningful degree. Moving beyond the vague concept of ``intelligent` buildings long popular in the design sector, we attempt to integrate component technologies into functional systems in order to optimize the relevant building energy performance and occupant comfort parameters. We describe the first set of integrated envelope and lighting concepts we are developing using available component technologies. Emerging and future technologies will be incorporated in later phases. Because new hardware systems alone will not ensure optimal building performance, we also discuss obstacles to innovation within the design community and proposed strategies to overcome these obstacles.

  19. Integrated envelope and lighting technologies for commercial buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Selkowitz, S.; Schuman, J.

    1992-07-01

    Fenestration systems are major contributors to peak cooling loads in commercial buildings and thus to HVAC system costs, peak electric demand, and annual energy use. These loads can be reduced significantly through proper fenestration design and the use of daylighting strategies. However, there are very few documented applications of energy-saving daylighted buildings today, which suggests that significant obstacles to efficient fenestration and lighting design and utilization still exist. This paper reports results of the first phase of a utility-sponsored research, development, and demonstration project to more effectively address the interrelated issues of designing and implementing energy-efficient envelope and lighting systems. We hypothesize that daylighting and overall energy efficiency will not be achieved at a large scale until true building integration has been accomplished to some meaningful degree. Moving beyond the vague concept of intelligent' buildings long popular in the design sector, we attempt to integrate component technologies into functional systems in order to optimize the relevant building energy performance and occupant comfort parameters. We describe the first set of integrated envelope and lighting concepts we are developing using available component technologies. Emerging and future technologies will be incorporated in later phases. Because new hardware systems alone will not ensure optimal building performance, we also discuss obstacles to innovation within the design community and proposed strategies to overcome these obstacles.

  20. Aligning Incentives With Program Goals

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presents techniques used by Michigan Saves to increase participation and provide greater incentives.

  1. Media Training

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    With the LHC starting up soon, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. The training is open for everybody. Make sure you arrive early enough to get a seat - there are only 200 seats in the Globe. The session will also be webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  2. LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence LiveChat Wed, 6/29, 2pm: Our Energy Independence June 27, 2011 - 9:29am Addthis Ginny Simmons Ginny Simmons Former Managing Editor for Energy.gov, Office of Public Affairs How can I participate? Submit a question via E-mail, Facebook or Twitter Watch live on June 29 at 2 PM ET As many of us hit the road to celebrate America's independence this upcoming 4th of July weekend, we must once again confront the reality of our country's economy, environment and

  3. Characterization of shape memory alloys for safety mechanisms.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLaughlin, Jarred T.; Buchheit, Thomas Edward; Massad, Jordan Elias

    2008-03-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are metals that exhibit large recoverable strains and exert large forces with tremendous energy densities. The behavior of SMAs is thermomechanically coupled. Their response to temperature is sensitive to their loading condition and their response to loading is sensitive to their thermal condition. This coupled behavior is not to be circumvented, but to be confronted and understood, since it is what manifests SMA's superior clamping performance. To reasonably characterize the coupled behavior of SMA clamping rings used in safety mechanisms, we conduct a series of experiments on SMA samples. The results of the tests will allow increased fidelity in modeling and failure analysis of parts.

  4. Merging weak and QCD showers with matrix elements

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Christiansen, Jesper Roy; Prestel, Stefan

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present a consistent way of combining associated weak boson radiation in hard dijet events with hard QCD radiation in Drell–Yan-like scatterings. This integrates multiple tree-level calculations with vastly different cross sections, QCD- and electroweak parton-shower resummation into a single framework. The new merging strategy is implemented in the P ythia event generator and predictions are confronted with LHC data. Improvements over the previous strategy are observed. Results of the new electroweak-improved merging at a future 100 TeV proton collider are also investigated.

  5. Computer Code Gives Astrophysicists First Full Simulation of Star's Final Hours

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Applin, Bradford

    2013-05-29

    The precise conditions inside a white dwarf star in the hours leading up to its explosive end as a Type Ia supernova are one of the mysteries confronting astrophysicists studying these massive stellar explosions. But now, a team of researchers, composed of three applied mathematicians at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and two astrophysicists, has created the first full-star simulation of the hours preceding the largest thermonuclear explosions in the universe. http://www.lbl.gov/cs/Archive/news091509.html

  6. Directing Matter and Energy: Five Challenges for Science and the Imagination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hemminger, J.; Fleming, G.; Ratner, M.

    2007-12-20

    The twin aspects of energy and control (or direction) are the underlying concepts. Matter and energy are closely linked, and their understanding and control will have overwhelming importance for our civilization, our planet, our science, and our technology. This importance ranges even beyond the large portfolio of BES, both because these truly significant Grand Challenges confront many other realms of science and because even partial solutions to these challenges will enrich scientists’ collective imagination and ability to solve problems with new ideas and new methods.

  7. Two-photon exclusive processes in quantum chromodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brodsky, S.J.

    1986-07-01

    QCD predictions for ..gamma gamma.. annihilation into single mesons, meson pairs, and baryon pairs are reviewed. Two-photon exclusive processes provide the most sensitive and practical measure of the distribution amplitudes, and thus a critical confrontation between QCD and experiment. Both the angular distribution and virtual photon mass dependence of these amplitudes are sensitive to the shapes of the phi (chi, Q). Novel effects involving the production of qq anti q anti q states at threshold are also discussed, and a new method is presented for systematically incorporating higher-order QCD corrections in ..gamma gamma.. reactions.

  8. Concluding remarks: Where do we go from here?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farland, W.H.

    1990-12-31

    Where do we go from here in terms of access and use of information resources in assessing health risks from chemical exposure? We will need to look at new applications of relevant information available to programs at the federal, regional, and state levels and try to develop additional hands-on tools that will allow all of us to do our jobs. The application of available information to program decision-making and to risk management is one of the most important things that confronts us.

  9. The Public Utilities Regulatory Policy Act (PURPA) and US Geothermal Industry: Current controversies and trends in federal and state implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-09-01

    This report is an analysis of the issues confronting US energy policymakers and the US geothermal industry as the result of the implementation and interpretation of the 1978 Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act, commonly known as PURPA. It seeks to answer four sets of questions about PURPA: (1) What has the existence of PURPA meant to the US geothermal industry. (2) How has the interpretation of PURPA evolved over the past decade. (3) What particular portions of PURPA rule making have been most crucial to the growth and development of the geothermal industry. (4) What aspects of PURPA have been most troubling to utilities purchasing or developing geothermal energy.

  10. Going Extreme For Small Solutions To Big Environmental Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bagwell, Christopher E.

    2011-03-31

    This chapter is devoted to the scale, scope, and specific issues confronting the cleanup and long-term disposal of the U.S. nuclear legacy generated during WWII and the Cold War Era. The research reported is aimed at complex microbiological interactions with legacy waste materials generated by past nuclear production activities in the United States. The intended purpose of this research is to identify cost effective solutions to the specific problems (stability) and environmental challenges (fate, transport, exposure) in managing and detoxifying persistent contaminant species. Specifically addressed are high level waste microbiology and bacteria inhabiting plutonium laden soils in the unsaturated subsurface.

  11. Can mirror matter solve the the cosmological lithium problem?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coc, Alain [Centre de Sciences Nucléaires et de Sciences de la Matière (CSNSM), CNRS/IN2P3, Université Paris Sud 11, UMR 8609, Bâtiment 104, 91405 Orsay Campus (France); Uzan, Jean-Philippe; Vangioni, Elisabeth [Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, UMR-7095 du CNRS, Université Pierre et Marie Curie, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris, France and Sorbonne Universités, Institut Lagrange de Paris, 98 bis bd Arago, 75014 Paris (France)

    2014-05-02

    The abundance of lithium-7 confronts cosmology with a long lasting inconsistency between the predictions of standard Big Bang Nucleosynthesis with the baryonic density determined from the Cosmic Microwave Background observations on the one hand, and the spectroscopic determination of the lithium-7 abundance on the other hand. We investigated the influence of the existence of a mirror world, focusing on models in which mirror neutrons can oscillate into ordinary neutrons. Such a mechanism allows for an effective late time neutron injection, which induces an increase of the destruction of beryllium-7and thus a lower final lithium-7 abundance.

  12. Method of fabricating a flow device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Robert L.

    1978-01-01

    This invention is a novel method for fabricating leak-tight tubular articles which have an interior flow channel whose contour must conform very closely with design specifications but which are composed of metal which tends to warp if welded. The method comprises designing two longitudinal half-sections of the article, the half-sections being contoured internally to cooperatively form the desired flow passageway. Each half-section is designed with a pair of opposed side flanges extending between the end flanges and integral therewith. The half-sections are positioned with their various flanges in confronting relation and with elongated metal gaskets extending between the confronting flanges for the length of the array. The gaskets are a deformable metal which is fusion-weldable to the end flanges. The mating side flanges are joined mechanically to deform the gaskets and provide a longitudinally sealed assembly. The portions of the end flanges contiguous with the ends of the gaskets then are welded to provide localized end welds which incorporate ends of the gaskets, thus transversely sealing the assembly. This method of fabrication provides leak-tight articles having the desired precisely contoured flow channels, whereas various conventional methods have been found unsatisfactory.

  13. High-temperature, high-pressure bonding of nested tubular metallic components

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Quinby, Thomas C. (Kingston, TN)

    1980-01-01

    This invention is a tool for effecting high-temperature, high-compression bonding between the confronting faces of nested, tubular, metallic components. In a typical application, the tool is used to produce tubular target assemblies for irradiation in nuclear reactors or particle accelerators, the target assembly comprising a uranium foil and an aluminum-alloy substrate. The tool preferably is composed throughout of graphite. It comprises a tubular restraining member in which a mechanically expandable tubular core is mounted to form an annulus with the member. The components to be bonded are mounted in nested relation in the annulus. The expandable core is formed of individually movable, axially elongated segments whose outer faces cooperatively define a cylindrical pressing surface and whose inner faces cooperatively define two opposed, inwardly tapered, axial bores. Tapered rams extend respectively into the bores. The loaded tool is mounted in a conventional hot-press provided with evacuation means, heaters for maintaining its interior at bonding temperature, and hydraulic cylinders for maintaining a selected inwardly directed pressure on the tapered rams. With the hot-press evacuated and the loaded tool at the desired temperature, the cylinders are actuated to apply the selected pressure to the rams. The rams in turn expand the segmented core to maintain the nested components in compression against the restraining member. These conditions are maintained until the confronting faces of the nested components are joined in a continuous, uniform bond characterized by high thermal conductivity.

  14. Municipal-building conservation project: financing conservation in municipal buildings. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gatton, David; Mounts, Richard; Scrimger, Kay; Wood, Elizabeth; Musselwhite, Ron; Wanning, Helen; Frazier, Andrew; Pyles, Odessa

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this survey was to assess one dimension of the energy problem that confronts cities - energy costs for public buildings - and to see how a sample of local governments had confronted that problem. While cities of all sizes tend to have a considerable variety of buildings, most are related to the basic municipal service of administration, police and fire protection, public works, and recreation. Most of these buildings consume natural gas and electricity as their primary source of energy, sources whose price is likely to rise more rapidly than the rate of inflation in the next few years. While it is difficult to assess the reports of energy costs without comparing them to the total city budget, these costs were found to be sizable among small and medium cities, and quite large among larger cities. While several of the conservation programs in the sample dated back to 1976, almost half (14) were relatively new, having been undertaken only in the last three years. Administratively, most have been placed under the direction of budget or public works officials, and, substantively, have emphasized no-cost/low-cost measures, such as employee awareness programs and improvements in building maintenance. In keeping with this, most of the programs have been supported by reprogramming funds, supplemented with local capital improvement funds, and state and federal grants. Case studies for five localities are appended.

  15. Total

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Fuel Kerosene Distillate Fuel Oil Distillate Fuel Oil, 15 ppm Sulfur and Under Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur Distillate Fuel Oil, Greater than 500 ppm ...

  16. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Million Barrels) Decade Year-0 Year-1...

  17. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from...

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater than 200 Meters Deep (Billion Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0...

  18. Property:Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    @Ventures (California) + Bay Area + @Ventures (Massachusetts) + Greater Boston Area + A A1 Sun, Inc. + Bay Area + A10 Power + Bay Area + A123 Systems + Greater Boston Area + A2BE...

  19. EIS-0391: Draft Environmental Impact Statement | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    and half-lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram of waste; (3) low-level radioactive waste (LLW), which is radioactive waste that is ...

  20. Lumileds Develops High-Voltage LED Light Engine with Integrated Driver

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    With the help of DOE funding, Lumileds has developed a high-voltage LED light engine with an integrated driver, achieving an efficacy greater than 128 lm/W at a luminous flux greater than 4,100 lm...

  1. Achieving Energy Efficiency Through Real-Time Feedback

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nesse, Ronald J.

    2011-09-01

    Through the careful implementation of simple behavior change measures, opportunities exist to achieve strategic gains, including greater operational efficiencies, energy cost savings, greater tenant health and ensuing productivity and an improved brand value through sustainability messaging and achievement.

  2. FAQs for Survey Forms 802 and 812

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    ppm sulfur and under" include fuel with sulfur content greater than 15 ppm but within test tolerance, and fuel with sulfur content greater than 15 ppm during transitions or other ...

  3. DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Waste DOE Issues Final Environmental Impact Statement for Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Waste February 25, ...

  4. Department of Energy Finalizes $197 Million Loan Guarantee to SoloPower, Inc. for a Solar Manufacturing Facility

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project Expected to Create Over 700 Jobs and Create Greater Efficiencies in the Manufacturing of Photovoltaic Modules

  5. ISO 50001 Conformant Energy Management Systems

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    improvement of energy performance; * greater reliability ... making decisions; * more strategic deployment of energy ... efficiency practices into daily organizational operations. ...

  6. CenterPoint Energy Healthcare Energy Efficiency Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: Program is only available to electric customers in CenterPoint Energy's service territory (greater Houston, Texas area)

  7. Cleantech Solutions (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Massachusetts Zip: 02108 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Energy efficiency solutions and consumption monitoring systems for buildings Website:...

  8. New ITER head is confident the fusion energy project will succeed

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kramer, David

    2015-05-15

    Bernard Bigot sees management of the seven-party international effort as a greater challenge than the technological demands.

  9. CenterPoint Energy- Residential and Small Commercial Efficiency Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Note: Rebate Incentives are only available to CenterPoint Energy electric customers in the greater Houston area, Texas.

  10. Microsoft Word - Final Industrial Documentation AEO2008 _6-12...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) - - - max...

  11. Industrial Sector Demand Module of the National Energy Modeling...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    factors are multiplicative for all fuels which have values greater than zero and are additive otherwise. ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) - - - fg...

  12. EnerNOC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boston, Massachusetts Zip: 02110 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Demand response provider serving commercial and industrial customers Website:...

  13. Enernoc (Massachusetts) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Boston, Massachusetts Zip: 02110 Region: Greater Boston Area Sector: Efficiency Product: Demand response provider serving commercial and industrial customers Website:...

  14. " Row: NAICS Codes;"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    " Level: National Data; " " Row: NAICS Codes;" " Column: Floorspace and Buildings;" " ... " QWithheld because Relative Standard Error is greater than 50 percent." " ...

  15. EIS-0375: Corrected Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste

  16. CenterPoint Energy- Commercial and Industrial Energy Efficiency Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Note: This program only applies to electric customers of CenterPoint Energy in the greater Houston area, Texas.

  17. Introduction

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Radiation is energy in the form of waves or particles. Although radiation is around us every day, you cannot see, hear, or smell it. Radiation is detected by measuring the activity of the energy released as it decays. It comes from natural and man-made sources as unstable atoms decay to form more stable atoms. Different Types of Radiation Alpha particles travel only a few inches in the air and lose energy almost as soon as they encounter an obstacle such as a sheet of paper or the outer layer of

  18. Entangled-state preparation via dissipation-assisted adiabatic passages

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, Carsten; Rempe, Gerhard; Beige, Almut

    2003-09-01

    The main obstacle for coherent control of open quantum systems is decoherence due to different dissipation channels and the inability to precisely control experimental parameters. To overcome these problems we propose to use dissipation-assisted adiabatic passages. These are relatively fast processes where the presence of spontaneous decay rates corrects for errors due to nonadiabaticity while the system remains in a decoherence-free state and behaves as predicted for an adiabatic passage. As a concrete example we present a scheme to entangle atoms by moving them in and out of an optical cavity.

  19. In Situ Immobilization of Uranium in Structured Porous Media via Biomineralization at the Fracture/Matrix Interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scheibe, Timothy D.; Brooks, Scott C.; Roden, Eric E.

    2006-06-01

    Although the biogeochemical processes underlying key bioremediation technologies are increasingly well understood, field-scale heterogeneity (both physical and biogeochemical) remains a major obstacle to successful field-scale implementation. In particular, slow release of contamination from low-permeability regions (primarily by diffusive/dispersive mass transfer) can hinder the effectiveness of remediation. This research aims to evaluate strategies that target bioremediation efforts at interfaces between high- and low-permeability regions of an aquifer in order to minimize the rate of contaminant transfer into high-permeability (high-flux) zones, and thereby reduce ultimate contaminant delivery to environmental receptors.

  20. Scanning angle Raman spectroscopy: Investigation of Raman scatter enhancement techniques for chemical analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, Matthew W.

    2013-03-14

    This thesis outlines advancements in Raman scatter enhancement techniques by applying evanescent fields, standing-waves (waveguides) and surface enhancements to increase the generated mean square electric field, which is directly related to the intensity of Raman scattering. These techniques are accomplished by employing scanning angle Raman spectroscopy and surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy. A 1064 nm multichannel Raman spectrometer is discussed for chemical analysis of lignin. Extending dispersive multichannel Raman spectroscopy to 1064 nm reduces the fluorescence interference that can mask the weaker Raman scattering. Overall, these techniques help address the major obstacles in Raman spectroscopy for chemical analysis, which include the inherently weak Raman cross section and susceptibility to fluorescence interference.

  1. Simulations of flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transitions in methane-air systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kessler, D.A.; Gamezo, V.N.; Oran, E.S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States)

    2010-11-15

    Flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transitions (DDT) in large obstructed channels filled with a stoichiometric methane-air mixture are simulated using a single-step reaction mechanism. The reaction parameters are calibrated using known velocities and length scales of laminar flames and detonations. Calculations of the flame dynamics and DDT in channels with obstacles are compared to previously reported experimental data. The results obtained using the simple reaction model qualitatively, and in many cases, quantitatively match the experiments and are found to be largely insensitive to small variations in model parameters. (author)

  2. Status of the ATF Damping Ring BPM Upgrade Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briegel, C.; Eddy, N.; Haynes, B.; May, J.; McCormick, D.; Nelson, J.; Nicklaus, D.; Prieto, P.; Rechenmacher, R.; Smith, T.; Teranuma, N.; Urakawa, J.; Voy, D.; Wendt, M.; Woodley, M.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A substantial upgrade of the beam position monitors (BPM) at the ATF (Accelerator Test Facility) damping ring is currently in progress. Implementing digital read-out signal processing techniques in line with an optimized, low-noise analog downconverter, a resolution well below 1 mum could be demonstrated at 20 (of 96) upgraded BPM stations. The narrowband, high resolution BPM mode permits investigation of all types of non-linearities, imperfections and other obstacles in the machine which may limit the very low target aimed vertical beam emittance of < 2 pm. The technical status of the project, first beam measurements and an outlook to it's finalization are presented.

  3. The production of iron carbide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, K.M.; Scheel, J.

    1997-12-31

    From start-up in 1994 to present, Nucor`s Iron Carbide plant has overcome many obstacles in achieving design production. Many of these impediments were due to flaws in equipment design. With the integration existing within the plant, limitations in any one system reduced the operating capacity of others. For this reason, as modifications were made and system capacities were increased, the need for additional modifications became apparent. Subsequently, operating practices, maintenance scheduling, employee incentives, and production objectives were continually adapted. This paper discusses equipment and design corrections and the quality issues that contributed to achieving the plant`s production capacity.

  4. EIA Energy Conferences & Presentations, April 8, 2009

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    9: "Investing in Oil and Natural Gas - Opportunities and Barriers" Mr. Bawks: Thank you all for staying to the last session of the conference. Appreciate you all for being here. I think this is a very important session, and we have a very good panel of people to discuss a very important issue, that of investing in oil and natural gas. We'll talk about some of the obstacles, some of the opportunities in the market. We'll talk about the changes that are taking place in the market and how

  5. Hopping robot

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Marron, Lisa C.; Martinez, Michael A.; Kuehl, Michael A.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a hopping robot that includes a misfire tolerant linear actuator suitable for long trips, low energy steering and control, reliable low energy righting, miniature low energy fuel control. The present invention provides a robot with hopping mobility, capable of traversing obstacles significant in size relative to the robot and capable of operation on unpredictable terrain over long range. The present invention further provides a hopping robot with misfire-tolerant combustion actuation, and with combustion actuation suitable for use in oxygen-poor environments.

  6. New Investigator Award Established at SSRL to Honor W.E. Spicer (1929-2004)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Co-Founder of SSRL and Pioneer in Photoemission Spectroscopy | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource New Investigator Award Established at SSRL to Honor W.E. Spicer (1929-2004) Co-Founder of SSRL and Pioneer in Photoemission Spectroscopy William E. (Bill) Spicer On June 6, 2004 while vacationing in London, William E. (Bill) Spicer died of heart failure. Overcoming a series of obstacles as a youth, Bill went on to become an esteemed member of the international scientific community as a

  7. Group theoretical methods in physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachary, W.W.

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a colloquium on group theory. Topics considered at the colloquium included supersymmetric Yang-Mills fields and relations with other nonlinear systems, quantum chaos, a Lie-transformed action principle for classical plasma dynamics, an obstacle to predictability, perturbation theory, simple Lie groups, coherent states, scattering and band structure problems, scattering amplitudes, bosons, charge density wave superconductors, harmonic analysis of boson algebras, the gauge principle, the equivalence principle, supergravity, quantum field theory, quantum gravity, and the Cauchy problem.

  8. Centralized and Modular Architectures for Photovoltaic Panels with Improved Efficiency: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dhakal, B.; Mancilla-David, F.; Muljadi, E.

    2012-07-01

    The most common type of photovoltaic installation in residential applications is the centralized architecture, but the performance of a centralized architecture is adversely affected when it is subject to partial shading effects due to clouds or surrounding obstacles, such as trees. An alternative modular approach can be implemented using several power converters with partial throughput power processing capability. This paper presents a detailed study of these two architectures for the same throughput power level and compares the overall efficiencies using a set of rapidly changing real solar irradiance data collected by the Solar Radiation Research Laboratory at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  9. Formation of carbon deposits from coal in an arc plasma

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, B.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Zhu, S.; Lu, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Xie, K.

    2007-07-01

    The issue of deposited carbon (DC) on a reactor wall during the production of acetylene by the coal/arc plasma process is a potential obstacle for the industrialization process. The formation mechanism of DC is very difficult to reveal because the high complexity of coal and the volatile matter. Combining with quenching technique, the methane, liquid petroleum gas and benzene were employed as the model materials to roughly act as the light gas, chain and aromatic subcomponents of volatile matter, and then the reasonable formation mechanism of DC was subtly speculated accordingly.

  10. Fossil generation restructuring in the Ukraine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Galambas, J.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes the Ukrainian electrical system as it was in 1991, defines the need for restructuring, outlines the restructuring process, identifies a number of major obstacles that are hindering the implementation of the fossil generation, restructuring process, and points out major problems in the coal procurement system. It describes the visits to several Ukrainian power plants, defines restructuring success to date, makes suggestions for improved restructuring progress, highlights lessons learned, and enlightens the audience on the opportunities of investing in the Ukrainian power generation industry. The primary focus is on the Fossil Generator Advisor task, which was carried out under the direction of Hagler Bailly Consulting, Inc. (Hagler Bailly).

  11. Permeability barrier of Gram-negative cell envelopes and approaches to bypass it

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zgurskaya, Helen I.; LĂłpez, Cesar A.; Gnanakaran, Sandrasegaram

    2015-09-18

    Gram-negative bacteria are intrinsically resistant to many antibiotics. Species that have acquired multidrug resistance and cause infections that are effectively untreatable present a serious threat to public health. The problem is broadly recognized and tackled at both the fundamental and applied levels. This article summarizes current advances in understanding the molecular bases of the low permeability barrier of Gram-negative pathogens, which is the major obstacle in discovery and development of antibiotics effective against such pathogens. Gaps in knowledge and specific strategies to break this barrier and to achieve potent activities against difficult Gram-negative bacteria are also discussed.

  12. Update of Market Assessment for Capturing Water Conservation Opportunities in the Federal Sector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mcmordie, Katherine; Solana, Amy E.; Elliott, Douglas B.; Sullivan, Gregory P.; Parker, Graham B.

    2005-09-08

    This updated market assessment for capturing water conservation opportunities in the Federal sector is based on a new analytical approach that utilizes newly available data and technologies. The new approach fine-tunes the original assessment by using actual Federal water use, which is now tracked by DOE (as compared to using estimated water use). Federal building inventory data is also used to disseminate water use by end-use technology in the Federal sector. In addition, this analysis also examines the current issues and obstacles that face performance contracting of water efficiency projects at Federal sites.

  13. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-016.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-016 SECTION A. Project Title: Reverse Osmosis System Removal SECTION B. Project Description: The project will remove a reverse osmosis water treatment system (FU-HA-101) from TAN 681 room 182. The system is out-of-service, with no intent of future use. Work will involve removal of the reverse osmosis system, and associated plumbing/piping and electrical lines and conduit. The project will clear the area of obstacles and tripping hazards associated with unused/unnecessary

  14. How to Solve Schroedinger Problems by Approximating the Potential Function

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ledoux, Veerle; Van Daele, Marnix

    2010-09-30

    We give a survey over the efforts in the direction of solving the Schroedinger equation by using piecewise approximations of the potential function. Two types of approximating potentials have been considered in the literature, that is piecewise constant and piecewise linear functions. For polynomials of higher degree the approximating problem is not so easy to integrate analytically. This obstacle can be circumvented by using a perturbative approach to construct the solution of the approximating problem, leading to the so-called piecewise perturbation methods (PPM). We discuss the construction of a PPM in its most convenient form for applications and show that different PPM versions (CPM,LPM) are in fact equivalent.

  15. Vectorization of an applicative language: Current results and future directions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cann, D.C.

    1990-11-01

    The most important and challenging problem facing researchers today is the effective use of parallel processors. Few would deny that the biggest obstacle is the inadequacy of current software tools -- an inadequacy born of imperative programming. As an alternative, applicative and functional programming languages provide a cleaner and simpler parallel programming model. They hide architectural idiosyncrasies, guarantee determinancy, enforce software engineering principles, and in many ways simplify compilation. Regrettably these languages have acquired a reputation for inefficiency. In this report, we show that applicative programs do not require special hardware for efficient execution, and with little effort can automatically exploit concurrent and vector processors. 17 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  16. Coal mine methane ownership issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-09-30

    The article summarizes the CMM ownership conditions in the US and the obstacles they present for project development. The first section discusses CMM resources and rights on lands controlled by the US Government, the case in several western states. The second section reviews the situation on private lands, such as in much of the eastern US, where ownership of the mineral; resources is governed by state laws. Each of the two sections analyses the ownership procedures and rules that govern both the relationship between the surface and subsurface owners and the relationship between two or more subsurface resource owners. 8 refs., 1 tab.

  17. Modular multimorphic kinematic arm structure and pitch and yaw joint for same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, H. Lee; Williams, Daniel M.; Holt, W. Eugene

    1989-01-01

    A multimorphic kinematic manipulator arm is provided with seven degrees of freedom and modular kinematic redundancy through identical pitch/yaw, shoulder, elbow and wrist joints and a wrist roll device at the wrist joint, which further provides to the manipulator arm an obstacle avoidance capability. The modular pitch/yaw joints are traction drive devices which provide backlash free operation with smooth torque transmission and enhanced rigidity. A dual input drive arrangement is provided for each joint resulting in a reduction of the load required to be assumed by each drive and providing selective pitch and yaw motions by control of the relative rotational directions of the input drive.

  18. Incompressible Flows Free Surfaces

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1992-02-01

    NASA-VOF3D is a three-dimensional, transient, free surface, incompressible fluid dynamics program. It is specifically designed to calculate confined flows in a low gravity environment in which surface physics must be accurately treated. It allows multiple free surfaces with surface tension and wall adhesion and includes a partial cell treatment that allows curved boundaries and internal obstacles. Variable mesh spacing is permitted in all three coordinate directions. Boundary conditions available are rigid free-slip wall, rigid no-slipmore » wall, continuative, periodic, and specified pressure outflow boundary.« less

  19. Impact of antitrust enforcement on the Country's minerals posture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-07

    This review found that there have not been a significant number of nonfuel-minerals-industry-related antitrust cases litigated at FTC or Justice over the last several years. In addition, officials interviewed in the nonfuel minerals industries generally do not view antitrust enforcement as a serious obstacle to their activities. The Department of Justice and FTC's Bureau of Competition comments on this report are included in enclosure II. Enclosure I presents a background discussion on antitrust enforcement, followed by detailed findings and conclusions. Enclosure III summarizes several antitrust investigations and cases cited by minerals industry spokesmen as examples of antitrust problems. (PSB)

  20. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    RF Kristensen; JF Beausang; DM DePoy

    2004-06-28

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1 mm to 100 mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  1. Frequency Selective Surfaces as Near Infrared Electro-Magnetic Filters for Thermophotovoltaic Spectral Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ryan T. Kristensen; John F. Beausang; David M. DePoy

    2003-12-01

    Frequency selective surfaces (FSS) effectively filter electromagnetic radiation in the microwave band (1mm to 100mm). Interest exists in extending this technology to the near infrared (1 {micro}m to 10 {micro}m) for use as a filter of thermal radiation in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) direct energy conversion. This paper assesses the ability of FSS to meet the strict spectral performance requirements of a TPV system. Inherent parasitic absorption, which is the result of the induced currents in the FSS metallization, is identified as a significant obstacle to achieving high spectral performance.

  2. FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT: 20% Wind by 2030: Overcoming the Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tom Kaiserski; Dan Lloyd

    2012-02-28

    The funds allocated through the Wind Powering America (WPA) grant were utilized by the State of Montana to support broad outreach activities communicating the benefits and opportunities of increased wind energy and transmission development. The challenges to increased wind development were also clearly communicated with the understanding that a clearer comprehension of the challenges would be beneficial in overcoming the obstacles to further development. The ultimate purpose of these activities was to foster the increased development of Montana's rich wind resources through increased public acceptance and wider dissemination of technical resources.

  3. High intensity proton operation at the Brookhaven AGS accelerator complex

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahrens, L.A.; Blaskiewicz, M.; Bleser, E.; Brennan, J.M.; Gardner, C.; Glenn, J.W.; Onillon, E.; Reece, R.K.; Roser, T.; Soukas, A.

    1994-08-01

    With the completion of the AGS rf upgrade, and the implementation of a transition {open_quotes}jump{close_quotes}, all of accelerator systems were in place in 1994 to allow acceleration of the proton intensity available from the AGS Booster injector to AGS extraction energy and delivery to the high energy users. Beam commissioning results with these new systems are presented. Progress in identifying and overcoming other obstacles to higher intensity are given. These include a careful exploration of the stopband strengths present on the AGS injection magnetic porch, and implementation of the AGS single bunch transverse dampers throughout the acceleration cycle.

  4. Success Stories T E C H T R A N S F E R

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Success Stories T E C H T R A N S F E R 2 0 1 2 S A N D I A N AT I O N A L L A B O R AT O R I E S Securing a peaceful and free world through technology 2 Sandia National Laboratories Front Cover: Sandia's GEMINI-Scout Mine Rescue Robot is equipped to handle any number of obstacles, including rubble piles and flooded rooms, to help rescuers reach trapped miners safely and efficiently. (Photo by Randy Montoya) 3 Tech Transfer Success Stories * 2012 4 Acoustic Wave Biosensor: Rapid Point-of-Care

  5. Overview of interstate hydrogen pipeline systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillette, J .L.; Kolpa, R. L

    2008-02-01

    The use of hydrogen in the energy sector of the United States is projected to increase significantly in the future. Current uses are predominantly in the petroleum refining sector, with hydrogen also being used in the manufacture of chemicals and other specialized products. Growth in hydrogen consumption is likely to appear in the refining sector, where greater quantities of hydrogen will be required as the quality of the raw crude decreases, and in the mining and processing of tar sands and other energy resources that are not currently used at a significant level. Furthermore, the use of hydrogen as a transportation fuel has been proposed both by automobile manufacturers and the federal government. Assuming that the use of hydrogen will significantly increase in the future, there would be a corresponding need to transport this material. A variety of production technologies are available for making hydrogen, and there are equally varied raw materials. Potential raw materials include natural gas, coal, nuclear fuel, and renewables such as solar, wind, or wave energy. As these raw materials are not uniformly distributed throughout the United States, it would be necessary to transport either the raw materials or the hydrogen long distances to the appropriate markets. While hydrogen may be transported in a number of possible forms, pipelines currently appear to be the most economical means of moving it in large quantities over great distances. One means of controlling hydrogen pipeline costs is to use common rights-of-way (ROWs) whenever feasible. For that reason, information on hydrogen pipelines is the focus of this document. Many of the features of hydrogen pipelines are similar to those of natural gas pipelines. Furthermore, as hydrogen pipeline networks expand, many of the same construction and operating features of natural gas networks would be replicated. As a result, the description of hydrogen pipelines will be very similar to that of natural gas pipelines. The following discussion will focus on the similarities and differences between the two pipeline networks. Hydrogen production is currently concentrated in refining centers along the Gulf Coast and in the Farm Belt. These locations have ready access to natural gas, which is used in the steam methane reduction process to make bulk hydrogen in this country. Production centers could possibly change to lie along coastlines, rivers, lakes, or rail lines, should nuclear power or coal become a significant energy source for hydrogen production processes. Should electrolysis become a dominant process for hydrogen production, water availability would be an additional factor in the location of production facilities. Once produced, hydrogen must be transported to markets. A key obstacle to making hydrogen fuel widely available is the scale of expansion needed to serve additional markets. Developing a hydrogen transmission and distribution infrastructure would be one of the challenges to be faced if the United States is to move toward a hydrogen economy. Initial uses of hydrogen are likely to involve a variety of transmission and distribution methods. Smaller users would probably use truck transport, with the hydrogen being in either the liquid or gaseous form. Larger users, however, would likely consider using pipelines. This option would require specially constructed pipelines and the associated infrastructure. Pipeline transmission of hydrogen dates back to late 1930s. These pipelines have generally operated at less than 1,000 pounds per square inch (psi), with a good safety record. Estimates of the existing hydrogen transmission system in the United States range from about 450 to 800 miles. Estimates for Europe range from about 700 to 1,100 miles (Mohipour et al. 2004; Amos 1998). These seemingly large ranges result from using differing criteria in determining pipeline distances. For example, some analysts consider only pipelines above a certain diameter as transmission lines. Others count only those pipelines that transport hydrogen from a producer to a customer (e.g., those pipelines designed for in-plant transport of hydrogen for use as feedstock or fuel are not counted). Operational status and hydrogen purity levels are also factors in defining these ranges. Hydrogen pipelines in the United States are predominantly along the Gulf Coast and connect major hydrogen producers with well-established, long-term customers. These hydrogen transmission systems pall by comparison with the 180,000-mile natural gas transmission pipeline. Since 1939, Germany has had a 130-mile pipeline carrying 20,000 lb/hour of hydrogen in a 10-inch pipe at 290 psi gauge (psig). The longest hydrogen pipeline in Europe is owned by Air Liquide and extends 250 miles from Northern France to Belgium. In theory, a blend of up to 20% hydrogen in natural gas can be transported without modifying natural gas pipelines (Oney et al. 1994).

  6. Final Report: Metal Perhydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hwang, J-Y.; Shi, S.; Hackney, S.; Swenson, D.; Hu, Y.

    2011-07-26

    Hydrogen is a promising energy source for the future economy due to its environmental friendliness. One of the important obstacles for the utilization of hydrogen as a fuel source for applications such as fuel cells is the storage of hydrogen. In the infrastructure of the expected hydrogen economy, hydrogen storage is one of the key enabling technologies. Although hydrogen possesses the highest gravimetric energy content (142 KJ/g) of all fuels, its volumetric energy density (8 MJ/L) is very low. It is desired to increase the volumetric energy density of hydrogen in a system to satisfy various applications. Research on hydrogen storage has been pursed for many years. Various storage technologies, including liquefaction, compression, metal hydride, chemical hydride, and adsorption, have been examined. Liquefaction and high pressure compression are not desired due to concerns related to complicated devices, high energy cost and safety. Metal hydrides and chemical hydrides have high gravimetric and volumetric energy densities but encounter issues because high temperature is required for the release of hydrogen, due to the strong bonding of hydrogen in the compounds. Reversibility of hydrogen loading and unloading is another concern. Adsorption of hydrogen on high surface area sorbents such as activated carbon and organic metal frameworks does not have the reversibility problem. But on the other hand, the weak force (primarily the van der Waals force) between hydrogen and the sorbent yields a very small amount of adsorption capacity at ambient temperature. Significant storage capacity can only be achieved at low temperatures such as 77K. The use of liquid nitrogen in a hydrogen storage system is not practical. Perhydrides are proposed as novel hydrogen storage materials that may overcome barriers slowing advances to a hydrogen fuel economy. In conventional hydrides, e.g. metal hydrides, the number of hydrogen atoms equals the total valence of the metal ions. One LiH molecule contains one hydrogen atom because the valence of a Li ion is +1. One MgH2 molecule contains two hydrogen atoms because the valence of a Mg ion is +2. In metal perhydrides, a molecule could contain more hydrogen atoms than expected based on the metal valance, i.e. LiH1+n and MgH2+n (n is equal to or greater than 1). When n is sufficiently high, there will be plenty of hydrogen storage capacity to meet future requirements. The existence of hydrogen clusters, Hn+ (n = 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15) and transition metal ion-hydrogen clusters, M+(H2)n (n = 1-6), such as Sc(H2)n+, Co(H2)n+, etc., have assisted the development of this concept. Clusters are not stable species. However, their existence stimulates our approach on using electric charges to enhance the hydrogen adsorption in a hydrogen storage system in this study. The experimental and modeling work to verify it are reported here. Experimental work included the generation of cold hydrogen plasma through a microwave approach, synthesis of sorbent materials, design and construction of lab devices, and the determination of hydrogen adsorption capacities on various sorbent materials under various electric field potentials and various temperatures. The results consistently show that electric potential enhances the adsorption of hydrogen on sorbents. NiO, MgO, activated carbon, MOF, and MOF and platinum coated activated carbon are some of the materials studied. Enhancements up to a few hundred percents have been found. In general, the enhancement increases with the electrical potential, the pressure applied, and the temperature lowered. Theoretical modeling of the hydrogen adsorption on the sorbents under the electric potential has been investigated with the density functional theory (DFT) approach. It was found that the interaction energy between hydrogen and sorbent is increased remarkably when an electric field is applied. This increase of binding energy offers a potential solution for DOE when looking for a compromise between chemisorption and physisorption for hydrogen storage. Bonding of chemisorption is too

  7. Cable Effects Study. Tangents, Rabbit Holes, Dead Ends, and Valuable Results

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ardelean, Emil V.; BabuĆĄka, VĂ­t; Goodding, James C.; Coombs, Douglas M.; Robertson, Lawrence M.; Lane, Steven A.

    2014-08-04

    Lessons learned during a study on the effects that electrical power and signal wiring harness cables introduce on the dynamic response of precision spacecraft is presented, along with the most significant results. Our study was a three year effort to discover a set of practical approaches for updating well-defined dynamic models of harness-free structures where knowledge of the cable type, position, and tie-down method are known. Although cables are found on every satellite, the focus was on precision, low damping, and very flexible structures. Obstacles encountered, classified as tangents, rabbit holes, and dead ends, offer practical lessons for structural dynamicsmore » research. The paper traces the historical, experiential progression of the project, describing how the obstacles affected the project. Methods were developed to estimate cable properties. Problems were encountered because of the flexible, highly damped nature of cables. A beam was used as a test article to validate experimentally derived cable properties and to refine the assumptions regarding boundary conditions. Furthermore, a spacecraft bus-like panel with cables attached was designed, and finite element models were developed and validated through experiment. Various paths were investigated at each stage before a consistent test and analysis methodology was developed« less

  8. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Analysis: Lessons Learned from Stationary Power Generation Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott E. Grasman; John W. Sheffield; Fatih Dogan; Sunggyu Lee; Umit O. Koylu; Angie Rolufs

    2010-04-30

    This study considered opportunities for hydrogen in stationary applications in order to make recommendations related to RD&D strategies that incorporate lessons learned and best practices from relevant national and international stationary power efforts, as well as cost and environmental modeling of pathways. The study analyzed the different strategies utilized in power generation systems and identified the different challenges and opportunities for producing and using hydrogen as an energy carrier. Specific objectives included both a synopsis/critical analysis of lessons learned from previous stationary power programs and recommendations for a strategy for hydrogen infrastructure deployment. This strategy incorporates all hydrogen pathways and a combination of distributed power generating stations, and provides an overview of stationary power markets, benefits of hydrogen-based stationary power systems, and competitive and technological challenges. The motivation for this project was to identify the lessons learned from prior stationary power programs, including the most significant obstacles, how these obstacles have been approached, outcomes of the programs, and how this information can be used by the Hydrogen, Fuel Cells & Infrastructure Technologies Program to meet program objectives primarily related to hydrogen pathway technologies (production, storage, and delivery) and implementation of fuel cell technologies for distributed stationary power. In addition, the lessons learned address environmental and safety concerns, including codes and standards, and education of key stakeholders.

  9. Cooperative phenomena in laminar fluids: Observation of streamlines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fink, Martin A.; Kretschmer, M.; Hoefner, H.; Konopka, U.; Morfill, G.E.; Ratynskaia, S. [Max Planck Institute for extraterrestrial Physics, Giessenbachstrasse, 85741 Garching (Germany); Fortov, V.; Petrov, O.; Usachev, A.; Zobnin, A. [Institute for High Energy Density, Russian Academy of Sciences, ul. Izhorskaya 13/19, 125412 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2005-10-31

    Complex plasmas are an ideal model system to investigate laminar fluids as they allow to study fluids at the kinetic level. At this level we are able to identify streamlines particle by particle. This gives us the ability to research the behaviour of these streamlines as well as the behaviour of each individual particle of the streamline.We carried out our experiments in a modified GEC-RF-Reference cell. We trapped the particles within two glass rings and forced them to form a circular flow by using several stripe electrodes. In this flow the particles behave like an ideal fluid and form streamlines. By putting an obstacle into the flow we reduce the cross-section. To pass through this constricted cross-section some streamlines have to reconnect. After the obstacle the streamlines split up again. An analysis how streamlines split up and reconnect as result of external pressure on the fluid in our system is presented here.Streamlines also occur if two clouds of particles penetrate each other. We call this 'Lane formation'. Results from our PK-4 experiment are presented here also.

  10. The future steelmaking industry and its technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fruehan, R.J.; Paxton, H.W.; Giarratani, F.; Lave, L. |

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this report is to develop a vision of the future steelmaking industry including its general characteristics and technologies. In addition, the technical obstacles and research and development opportunities for commercialization of these technologies are identified. The report is being prepared by the Sloan Steel Industry Competitiveness Study with extensive input from the industry. Industry input has been through AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute), SMA (Steel Manufacturers Association) and contacts with individual company executives and technical leaders. The report identifies the major industry drivers which will influence technological developments in the industry for the next 5--25 years. Initially, the role of past drivers in shaping the current industry was examined to help understand the future developments. Whereas this report concentrates on future technologies other major factors such as national and international competition, human resource management and capital concerns are examined to determine their influence on the future industry. The future industry vision does not specify specific technologies but rather their general characteristics. Finally, the technical obstacles and the corresponding research and development required for commercialization are detailed.

  11. Key management and encryption under the bounded storage model.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Draelos, Timothy John; Neumann, William Douglas; Lanzone, Andrew J.; Anderson, William Erik

    2005-11-01

    There are several engineering obstacles that need to be solved before key management and encryption under the bounded storage model can be realized. One of the critical obstacles hindering its adoption is the construction of a scheme that achieves reliable communication in the event that timing synchronization errors occur. One of the main accomplishments of this project was the development of a new scheme that solves this problem. We show in general that there exist message encoding techniques under the bounded storage model that provide an arbitrarily small probability of transmission error. We compute the maximum capacity of this channel using the unsynchronized key-expansion as side-channel information at the decoder and provide tight lower bounds for a particular class of key-expansion functions that are pseudo-invariant to timing errors. Using our results in combination with Dziembowski et al. [11] encryption scheme we can construct a scheme that solves the timing synchronization error problem. In addition to this work we conducted a detailed case study of current and future storage technologies. We analyzed the cost, capacity, and storage data rate of various technologies, so that precise security parameters can be developed for bounded storage encryption schemes. This will provide an invaluable tool for developing these schemes in practice.

  12. ENERGETIC NEUTRAL ATOMS AROUND HD 209458b: ESTIMATIONS OF MAGNETOSPHERIC PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ekenbaeck, A.; Holmstroem, M.; Wurz, P.; Griessmeier, J.-M.; Lammer, H.; Selsis, F.; Penz, T.

    2010-02-01

    HD 209458b is an exoplanet found to transit the disk of its parent star. Observations have shown a broad absorption signature about the Lyalpha stellar line during transit, suggesting the presence of a thick cloud of atomic hydrogen around the 'hot Jupiter' HD 209458b. This work expands on an earlier work studying the production of energetic neutral atoms (ENAs) as a result of the interaction between the stellar wind and the exosphere. We present an improved flow model of HD 209458b and use stellar wind values similar to those in our solar system. We find that the ENA production is high enough to explain the observations, and we show that-using expected values for the stellar wind and exosphere-the spatial and velocity distributions of ENAs would give absorption in good agreement with the observations. We also study how the production of ENAs depends on the exospheric parameters and establish an upper limit for the obstacle standoff distance at approximately 4-10 planetary radii. Finally, we compare the results obtained for the obstacle standoff distance with existing exomagnetospheric models and show how the magnetic moment of HD 209458b can be estimated from ENA observations.

  13. Atomic-scale mechanisms of helium bubble hardening in iron

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    Generation of helium due to (n,α) transmutation reactions changes the response of structural materials to neutron irradiation. The whole process of radiation damage evolution is affected by He accumulation and leads to significant changes in the material s properties. A population of nanometric He-filled bubbles affects mechanical properties and the impact can be quite significant because of their high density. Understanding how these basic mechanisms affect mechanical properties is necessary for predicting radiation effects. In this paper we present an extensive study of the interactions between a moving edge dislocation and bubbles using atomic-scale modeling. We focus on the effectmore » of He bubble size and He concentration inside bubbles. Thus, we found that ability of bubbles to act as an obstacle to dislocation motion is close to that of voids when the He-to-vacancy ratio is in the range from 0 to 1. A few simulations made at higher He contents demonstrated that the interaction mechanism is changed for over-pressurized bubbles and they become weaker obstacles. The results are discussed in light of post-irradiation materials testing.« less

  14. Atomic-scale mechanisms of helium bubble hardening in iron

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Osetskiy, Yury N.; Stoller, Roger E.

    2015-06-03

    Generation of helium due to (n,α) transmutation reactions changes the response of structural materials to neutron irradiation. The whole process of radiation damage evolution is affected by He accumulation and leads to significant changes in the material s properties. A population of nanometric He-filled bubbles affects mechanical properties and the impact can be quite significant because of their high density. Understanding how these basic mechanisms affect mechanical properties is necessary for predicting radiation effects. In this paper we present an extensive study of the interactions between a moving edge dislocation and bubbles using atomic-scale modeling. We focus on the effect of He bubble size and He concentration inside bubbles. Thus, we found that ability of bubbles to act as an obstacle to dislocation motion is close to that of voids when the He-to-vacancy ratio is in the range from 0 to 1. A few simulations made at higher He contents demonstrated that the interaction mechanism is changed for over-pressurized bubbles and they become weaker obstacles. The results are discussed in light of post-irradiation materials testing.

  15. Advanced robot locomotion.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neely, Jason C.; Sturgis, Beverly Rainwater; Byrne, Raymond Harry; Feddema, John Todd; Spletzer, Barry Louis; Rose, Scott E.; Novick, David Keith; Wilson, David Gerald; Buerger, Stephen P.

    2007-01-01

    This report contains the results of a research effort on advanced robot locomotion. The majority of this work focuses on walking robots. Walking robot applications include delivery of special payloads to unique locations that require human locomotion to exo-skeleton human assistance applications. A walking robot could step over obstacles and move through narrow openings that a wheeled or tracked vehicle could not overcome. It could pick up and manipulate objects in ways that a standard robot gripper could not. Most importantly, a walking robot would be able to rapidly perform these tasks through an intuitive user interface that mimics natural human motion. The largest obstacle arises in emulating stability and balance control naturally present in humans but needed for bipedal locomotion in a robot. A tracked robot is bulky and limited, but a wide wheel base assures passive stability. Human bipedal motion is so common that it is taken for granted, but bipedal motion requires active balance and stability control for which the analysis is non-trivial. This report contains an extensive literature study on the state-of-the-art of legged robotics, and it additionally provides the analysis, simulation, and hardware verification of two variants of a proto-type leg design.

  16. A penalization technique to model plasma facing components in a tokamak with temperature variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paredes, A.; Bufferand, H.; Ciraolo, G.; Schwander, F.; Serre, E.; Ghendrih, P.; Tamain, P.

    2014-10-01

    To properly address turbulent transport in the edge plasma region of a tokamak, it is mandatory to describe the particle and heat outflow on wall components, using an accurate representation of the wall geometry. This is challenging for many plasma transport codes, which use a structured mesh with one coordinate aligned with magnetic surfaces. We propose here a penalization technique that allows modeling of particle and heat transport using such structured mesh, while also accounting for geometrically complex plasma-facing components. Solid obstacles are considered as particle and momentum sinks whereas ionic and electronic temperature gradients are imposed on both sides of the obstacles along the magnetic field direction using delta functions (Dirac). Solutions exhibit plasma velocities (M=1) and temperatures fluxes at the plasma–wall boundaries that match with boundary conditions usually implemented in fluid codes. Grid convergence and error estimates are found to be in agreement with theoretical results obtained for neutral fluid conservation equations. The capability of the penalization technique is illustrated by introducing the non-collisional plasma region expected by the kinetic theory in the immediate vicinity of the interface, that is impossible when considering fluid boundary conditions. Axisymmetric numerical simulations show the efficiency of the method to investigate the large-scale transport at the plasma edge including the separatrix and in realistic complex geometries while keeping a simple structured grid.

  17. Making the case for direct hydrogen storage in fuel cell vehicles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James, B.D.; Thomas, C.E.; Baum, G.N.; Lomas, F.D. Jr.; Kuhn, I.F. Jr.

    1997-12-31

    Three obstacles to the introduction of direct hydrogen fuel cell vehicles are often states: (1) inadequate onboard hydrogen storage leading to limited vehicle range; (2) lack of an hydrogen infrastructure, and (3) cost of the entire fuel cell system. This paper will address the first point with analysis of the problem/proposed solutions for the remaining two obstacles addressed in other papers. Results of a recent study conducted by Directed Technologies Inc. will be briefly presented. The study, as part of Ford Motor Company/DOE PEM Fuel Cell Program, examines multiple pure hydrogen onboard storage systems on the basis of weight, volume, cost, and complexity. Compressed gas, liquid, carbon adsorption, and metal hydride storage are all examined with compressed hydrogen storage at 5,000 psia being judged the lowest-risk, highest benefit, near-term option. These results are combined with recent fuel cell vehicle drive cycle simulations to estimate the onboard hydrogen storage requirement for full vehicle range (380 miles on the combined Federal driving schedule). The results indicate that a PNGV-like vehicle using powertrain weights and performance realistically available by the 2004 PNGV target data can achieve approximate fuel economy equivalent to 100 mpg on gasoline (100 mpg{sub eq}) and requires storage of approximately 3.6 kg hydrogen for full vehicle storage quantity allows 5,000 psia onboard storage without altering the vehicle exterior lines or appreciably encroaching on the passenger or trunk compartments.

  18. Cable Effects Study. Tangents, Rabbit Holes, Dead Ends, and Valuable Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ardelean, Emil V.; BabuĆĄka, VĂ­t; Goodding, James C.; Coombs, Douglas M.; Robertson, Lawrence M.; Lane, Steven A.

    2014-08-04

    Lessons learned during a study on the effects that electrical power and signal wiring harness cables introduce on the dynamic response of precision spacecraft is presented, along with the most significant results. Our study was a three year effort to discover a set of practical approaches for updating well-defined dynamic models of harness-free structures where knowledge of the cable type, position, and tie-down method are known. Although cables are found on every satellite, the focus was on precision, low damping, and very flexible structures. Obstacles encountered, classified as tangents, rabbit holes, and dead ends, offer practical lessons for structural dynamics research. The paper traces the historical, experiential progression of the project, describing how the obstacles affected the project. Methods were developed to estimate cable properties. Problems were encountered because of the flexible, highly damped nature of cables. A beam was used as a test article to validate experimentally derived cable properties and to refine the assumptions regarding boundary conditions. Furthermore, a spacecraft bus-like panel with cables attached was designed, and finite element models were developed and validated through experiment. Various paths were investigated at each stage before a consistent test and analysis methodology was developed

  19. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, K.K.D.

    1998-09-22

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space is disclosed. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degrees of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns. 3 figs.

  20. High precision redundant robotic manipulator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Young, Kar-Keung David

    1998-01-01

    A high precision redundant robotic manipulator for overcoming contents imposed by obstacles or imposed by a highly congested work space. One embodiment of the manipulator has four degrees of freedom and another embodiment has seven degreed of freedom. Each of the embodiments utilize a first selective compliant assembly robot arm (SCARA) configuration to provide high stiffness in the vertical plane, a second SCARA configuration to provide high stiffness in the horizontal plane. The seven degree of freedom embodiment also utilizes kinematic redundancy to provide the capability of avoiding obstacles that lie between the base of the manipulator and the end effector or link of the manipulator. These additional three degrees of freedom are added at the wrist link of the manipulator to provide pitch, yaw and roll. The seven degrees of freedom embodiment uses one revolute point per degree of freedom. For each of the revolute joints, a harmonic gear coupled to an electric motor is introduced, and together with properly designed based servo controllers provide an end point repeatability of less than 10 microns.

  1. 1983 annual outlook for US coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paull, M.K.

    1983-11-01

    This report highlights projections and discusses them in relation to coal's future domestic uses; the report also examines factors affecting coal's future growth. Coal was the primary source of energy in the United States from the mid-1800's until after World War II. After that war, coal lost most of its markets to oil and natural gas. In the 1960's, coal development was also hampered by environmental and mine safety concerns, and by the emergence of nuclear power. The 1973-74 oil embargo, however, demonstrated that the United States could no longer depend on imported oil to fuel its energy growth. Through 1990, coal is projected to meet an increasing share of total US energy demand. The projections for the 1985 to 1990 time period show an increased growth in coal consumption, particularly in the electric utility sector where new coal-fired power plants are coming on line. The projected growth in coal production, however, is subject to a series of potential constraints and/or obstacles that must be overcome. These potential constraints and obstacles are described after the history of coal supply and demand is reviewed and future projections are discussed.

  2. Steady-state magnetohydrodynamic flow around an unmagnetized conducting sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Romanelli, N.; Gómez, D.; Bertucci, C.; Delva, M. E-mail: Magda.Delva@oeaw.ac.at

    2014-07-01

    The noncollisional interaction between conducting obstacles and magnetized plasma winds can be found in different scenarios, from the interaction occurring between regions inside galaxy clusters to the interaction between the solar wind and Mars, Venus, and active comets, or even the interaction between Titan and the Saturnian magnetospheric flow. These objects generate, through several current systems, perturbations in the streaming magnetic field leading to its draping around the obstacle's effective conducting surface. Recent observational results suggest that several properties associated with magnetic field draping, such as the location of the polarity reversal layer of the induced magnetotail, are affected by variations in the conditions of the streaming magnetic field. To improve our understanding of these phenomena, we perform a characterization of several magnetic field draping signatures by analytically solving an ideal problem in which a perfectly conducting magnetized plasma (with frozen-in magnetic field conditions) flows around a spherical body for various orientations of the streaming magnetic field. In particular, we compute the shift of the inverse polarity reversal layer as the orientation of the background magnetic field is changed.

  3. High power all-metal spin torque oscillator using full Heusler Co{sub 2}(Fe,Mn)Si

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seki, Takeshi Sakuraba, Yuya; Ueda, Masaki; Okura, Ryo; Takanashi, Koki; Arai, Hiroko; Imamura, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    We showed the high rf power (P{sub out}) emission from an all-metal spin torque oscillator (STO) with a Co{sub 2}Fe{sub 0.4}Mn{sub 0.6}Si (CFMS)/Ag/CFMS giant magnetoresistance (GMR) stack, which was attributable to the large GMR effect thanks to the highly spin-polarized CFMS. The oscillation spectra were measured by varying the magnetic field direction, and the perpendicular magnetic field was effective to increase P{sub out} and the Q factor. We simultaneously achieved a high output efficiency of 0.013%, a high Q of 1124, and large frequency tunability. CFMS-based all-metal STO is promising for overcoming the difficulties that conventional STOs are confronted with.

  4. Emerging Energy-Efficient Technologies for Industry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Worrell, Ernst; Martin, Nathan; Price, Lynn; Ruth, Michael; Elliot, Neal; Shipley, Anna; Thorn, Jennifer

    2005-05-05

    U.S. industry consumes approximately 37 percent of thenation's energy to produce 24 percent of the nation's GDP. Increasingly,society is confronted with the challenge of moving toward a cleaner, moresustainable path of production and consumption, while increasing globalcompetitiveness. Technology is essential in achieving these challenges.We report on a recent analysis of emerging energy-efficient technologiesfor industry, focusing on over 50 selected technologies. The technologiesare characterized with respect to energy efficiency, economics andenvironmental performance. This paper provides an overview of theresults, demonstrating that we are not running out of technologies toimprove energy efficiency, economic and environmental performance, andneither will we in the future. The study shows that many of thetechnologies have important non-energy benefits, ranging from reducedenvironmental impact to improved productivity, and reduced capital costscompared to current technologies.

  5. The Y-12 Times, May 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 May 2009 www.y12.doe.gov/news/times.php P.O. Box 2009 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8245 Managing Editors Amy Alley: alleyab@y12.doe.gov Heidi Spurling: spurlinghw@y12.doe.gov Layout/Design Lisa Harris Contributors Ellen Boatner Ken Davis Cynthia Ensor Kathy Fahey Vicki Hinkel Jamie Loveday W H A T ' S I N S I D E W H A T ' S I N S I D E Page 2 Page 2 Tech Transfer rolls out container technology Page 2 Page 2 Take the test that could save your life Page 3 Page 3 Partnering, preparing and confronting

  6. Theory of hadronic production of heavy quarks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, C.

    1981-07-01

    Conventional theoretical predictions for hadronic production of heavy quarks (Q anti Q) are reviewed and confronted with data. Perturbative hard scattering predictions agree qualitatively well with hidden Q anti Q production (e.g., psi, chi, T) whereas for open Q anti Q-production (e.g., pp ..-->.. ..lambda../sub c//sup +/X) additional mechanisms or inputs are needed to explain the forwardly produced ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ at ISR. It is suggested that the presence of c anti c-pairs on the 1 to 2% level in the hadron Fock state decomposition (intrinsic charm) gives a natural description of the ISR data. The theoretical foundations of the intrinsic charm hypotheses together with its consequences for lepton-induced reactions is discussed in some detail.

  7. Percolation in a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stacy, Stephen; Allen, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    Water management in the catalyst layers of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) is confronted by two issues, flooding and dry out, both of which result in improper functioning of the fuel cell and lead to poor performance and degradation. At the present time, the data that has been reported about water percolation and wettability within a fuel cell catalyst layer is limited. A method and apparatus for measuring the percolation pressure in the catalyst layer has been developed based upon an experimental apparatus used to test water percolation in porous transport layers (PTL). The experimental setup uses a pseudo Hele-Shaw type testing where samples are compressed and a fluid is injected into the sample. Testing the samples gives percolation pressure plots which show trends in increasing percolation pressure with an increase in flow rate. A decrease in pressure was seen as percolation occurred in one sample, however the pressure only had a rising effect in the other sample.

  8. Engineering approximations in welding: Bridging the gap between the speculation and simulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Robino, Charles V.

    2016-01-15

    During the course of their careers, welding engineers and welding metallurgists are often confronted with questions regarding welding process and properties that on the surface appear to be simple and direct, but are in fact quite challenging. These questions generally mask an underlying complexity whose underpinnings in scientific and applied research predate even the founding of the American Welding Society, and previous Comfort A. Adams lectures provide ample and fascinating evidence of the breadth and depth of this complexity. Using these studies or their own experiences and investigations as a basis, most welding and materials engineers have developed engineering toolsmore » to provide working approaches to these day-to-day questions and problems. In this article several examples of research into developing working approaches to welding problems are presented.« less

  9. Sécurité au-delà des mythes et des croyances

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Présentation orale en français, support visuel en français et en anglais. La pire des failles de sécurité est l'impression de sécurité. Le décalage entre la compréhension que l?on a des technologies utilisées, et leurs potentiels réels, ainsi que l'impact potentiellement négatif qu'elles peuvent avoir sur nos vies, n'est pas toujours compris, ou pris en compte par la plupart d'entre-nous. On se contente de nos perceptions pour ne pas avoir à se confronter à la réalité... Alors qu'en est-il vraiment ? En matiÚre de sécurité qui de l'humain ou des technologies a le contrÎle ?

  10. Summary of the Mid-Atlantic conference on small-scale hydropower in the Mid-Atlantic states: resolution of the barriers impeding its development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01

    The workshop was conducted to bring together interested persons to examine and discuss the major problems associated with small-scale hydroelectric dam development in the Mid-Atlantic region. The conference opened with an introductory panel which outlined the objectives and the materials available to conference participants. Two of the workshops discussed problems and policy responses raised by state and Federal regulation. The other two workshops concerned economic issues confronting small-scale hydro development and the operation and usefulness of the systems dynamics model under development by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth. Various Federal and state programs designed to stimulate small-scale hydro development were discussed. A plenary session completed the workshops.

  11. Germany, garbage, and the green dot: Challenging the throwaway society

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fishbein, B.K.

    1994-09-01

    For US policymakers and citizens who are grappling with the question of how to handle this country's mounting municipal garbage and commercial wastes, this report offers a revolutionary approach taken by Germany to promote both recycling and source reduction. The sweeping new German legislation is stimulating industry efforts to reduce packaging and product waste by requiring that the businesses producing packages and products be financially responsible for taking back their used materials and recycling, reusing or disposing of them. This report describes what Germans have done in solid waste policies, the difficulties they are confronting and the impact on wastes to date. It discusses the environmental problems that the US and other industrialized countries face, identifies practical solutions: programs and policies that work to conserve our valuable air, land, water and natural resources and enable us to live and do business less wastefully.

  12. Summary of the Midwest conference on small-scale hydropower in the Midwest: an old technology whose time has come

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    A variety of decision makers convened to examine and discuss certain significant problems associated with small-scale hydroelectric development in the Midwestern region, comprised of Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Michigan, Ohio, West Virginia, and Wisconsin. The conference opened with an introductory panel of resource persons who outlined the objectives of the conference, presented information on small-scale hydro, and described the materials available to conference participants. A series of workshop sessions followed. Two of the workshop sessions discussed problems and policy responses raised by state and Federal regulation. The remaining two workshops dealt with economic issues confronting small-scale hydro development and the operation and usefulness of the systems dynamics model developed by the Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College. A plenary session and recommendations completed the workshop.

  13. Rotary shaft seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langebrake, C.O.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotary shaft seal assembly which provides positive-contact sealing when the shaft is not rotated and which operates with its sealing surfaces separated by a film of compressed ambient gas whose width is independent of the speed of shaft rotation. In a preferred embodiment, the assembly includes a disc affixed to the shaft for rotation therewith. Axially movable, non-rotatable plates respectively supported by sealing bellows are positioned on either side of the disc to be in sealing engagement therewith. Each plate carries piezoelectric transucer elements which are electrically energized at startup to produce films of compressed ambient gas between the confronting surfaces of the plates and the disc. Following shutdown of the shaft, the transducer elements are de-energized. A control circuit responds to incipient rubbing between the plate and either disc by altering the electrical input to the transducer elements to eliminate rubbing.

  14. Astrophysics Simulations from the ASC/Alliances Center for Astrophysical Thermonuclear Flashes

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The "Flash Center" works to solve the long-standing problem of thermonuclear flashes on the surfaces of compact stars such as neutron stars and white dwarfs, and in the interior of white dwarfs (i.e., Type I supernovae). The physical conditions, and many of the physical phenomena, are similar to those confronted by the Department of Energy Stockpile Stewardship program. The (fully ionized) plasmas are at very high temperatures and densities; and the physical problems of nuclear ignition, deflagration or detonation, turbulent mixing, and interface dynamics for complex multicomponent fluids are common to the weapons program. Because virtually every aspect of this problem represents a computational Grand Challenge, large-scale numerical simulations are at the heart of its resolution (Taken from Executive Summary page). More than 35 simulations and computer animations developed through research at the "Flash Center" are available here. Each .avi or .mov file also references the related research paper or presentation and provides a link.

  15. Use of Occupancy Sensors in LED Parking Lot and Garage Applications: Early Experiences

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinzey, Bruce R.; Myer, Michael; Royer, Michael P.; Sullivan, Greg P.

    2012-11-07

    Occupancy sensor systems are gaining traction as an effective technological approach to reducing energy use in exterior commercial lighting applications. Done correctly, occupancy sensors can substantially enhance the savings from an already efficient lighting system. However, this technology is confronted by several potential challenges and pitfalls that can leave a significant amount of the prospective savings on the table. This report describes anecdotal experiences from field installations of occupancy sensor controlled light-emitting diode (LED) lighting at two parking structures and two parking lots. The relative levels of success at these installations reflect a marked range of potential outcomes: from an additional 76% in energy savings to virtually no additional savings. Several issues that influenced savings were encountered in these early stage installations and are detailed in the report. Ultimately, care must be taken in the design, selection, and commissioning of a sensor-controlled lighting installation, else the only guaranteed result may be its cost.

  16. Big data for ecologists: Highlighting the ORNL DAAC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyer, Alison G; Cook, Robert B; Devarakonda, Ranjeet; Eby, Pete I; Thornton, Michele M; Thornton, Peter E; SanthanaVannan, Suresh K; Virdi, Makhan L; Wei, Yaxing

    2014-01-01

    Ecologists are increasingly confronted by questions that can be addressed only by integrating data from numerous sources, often across large geographic areas and broad time periods. The supply of ecological big data is increasing at a rapid pace as researchers are publishing their data sets and large, public science and data infrastructures (such as NEON, DataONE, LTER, & NCEAS) are producing and curating extensive volumes of complex data and metadata. While supply of, and demand for, ecological data is on the rise, many ecologists now face a new challenge in locating and synthesizing the data relevant for their particular question. Here we highlight selected popular big data products applicable to ecological research available from the NASA Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC) located at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL).

  17. Westinghouse ICF power plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sucov, E. W.

    1980-10-01

    In this study, two different electric power plants for the production of about 1000 MWe which were based on a CO/sub 2/ laser driver and on a heavy ion driver have been developed and analyzed. The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine in a self consistent way the technological and institutional problems that need to be confronted and solved in order to produce commercially competitive electricity in the 2020 time frame from an inertial fusion reactor, and (2) to compare, on a common basis, the consequences of using two different drivers to initiate the DT fuel pellet explosions. Analytic descriptions of size/performance/cost relationships for each of the subsystems comprising the power plant have been combined into an overall computer code which models the entire plant. This overall model has been used to conduct trade studies which examine the consequences of varying critical design values around the reference point.

  18. Toward the understanding of hydration phenomena in aqueous electrolytes from the interplay of theory, molecular simulation, and experiment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Vlcek, Lukas

    2015-05-22

    We confront the microstructural analysis of aqueous electrolytes and present a detailed account of the fundamentals underlying the neutron scattering with isotopic substitution (NDIS) approach for the experimental determination of ion coordination numbers in systems involving both halides anions and oxyanions. We place particular emphasis on the frequently overlooked ion-pairing phenomenon, identify its microstructural signature in the neutron-weighted distribution functions, and suggest novel techniques to deal with either the estimation of the ion-pairing magnitude or the correction of its effects on the experimentally measured coordination numbers. We illustrate the underlying ideas by applying these new developments to the interpretation ofmore » four NDIS test-cases via molecular simulation, as convenient dry runs for the actual scattering experiments, for representative aqueous electrolyte solutions at ambient conditions involving metal halides and nitrates.« less

  19. Eliminating Voltage Decay of Lithium-Rich Li1.14Mn0.54Ni0.14Co0.14O2 Cathodes by Controlling the Electrochemical Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Q.; Qiu, B.; Han, S.; Xia, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2015-03-27

    Lithium-rich material owns a particularly high capacity owing to the activation of electrochemical inactive Li2MnO3 phase. But at the same time, MnO2 phase formed after Li2MnO3 activation confronts a severe problem of converting to spinel phase, and resulting in voltage decay. To our knowledge, this phenomenon is inherent property of layered manganese oxide materials and can hardly be overcome. Based on this, unlike previous reports, herein we design a method for the first time to accelerate the phase transformation by tuning the charge upper-limit voltage at a high value, so the phase transformation process can be finished in a few cycles. Then material structure remains stable while cycling at a low upper-limit voltage. By this novel method voltage decay is eliminated significantly.

  20. Light dark matter in the light of CRESST-II

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2012-03-01

    Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4ÎŁ significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results and with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.

  1. U.S. Aims for Zero-Energy: Support for PV on New Homes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barbose, Galen; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark

    2006-05-11

    As a market segment for solar photovoltaic (PV) adoption, new homes have a number of attractive attributes. Homebuyers can easily roll the cost of the PV system into their mortgage and, with rebates or other financial incentives, potentially realize an immediate net positive cash flow from the investment. PV system performance can be optimized by taking roof orientation, shading, and other structural factors into account in the design of new homes. Building-integrated photovoltaics (BIPV), which are subject to fewer aesthetic concerns than traditional, rack-mounted systems, are well-suited to new construction applications. In large new residential developments, costs can be reduced through bulk purchases and scale economies in system design and installation. Finally, the ability to install PV as a standard feature in new developments - like common household appliances - creates an opportunity to circumvent the high transaction costs and other barriers typically confronted when each individual homeowner must make a distinct PV purchase decision.

  2. NEUTRON MEASURING METHOD AND APPARATUS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Seaborg, G.T.; Friedlander, G.; Gofman, J.W.

    1958-07-29

    A fast neutron fission detecting apparatus is described consisting of a source of fast neutrons, an ion chamber containing air, two electrodes within the ion chamber in confronting spaced relationship, a high voltage potential placed across the electrodes, a shield placed about the source, and a suitable pulse annplifier and recording system in the electrode circuit to record the impulse due to fissions in a sannple material. The sample material is coated onto the active surface of the disc electrode and shielding means of a material having high neutron capture capabilities for thermal neutrons are provided in the vicinity of the electrodes and about the ion chamber so as to absorb slow neutrons of thermal energy to effectively prevent their diffusing back to the sample and causing an error in the measurement of fast neutron fissions.

  3. Ab-Initio Hamiltonian Approach to Light Nuclei And to Quantum Field Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vary, J.P.; Honkanen, H.; Li, Jun; Maris, P.; Shirokov, A.M.; Brodsky, S.J.; Harindranath, A.; de Teramond, G.F.; Ng, E.G.; Yang, C.; Sosonkina, M.; /Ames Lab

    2012-06-22

    Nuclear structure physics is on the threshold of confronting several long-standing problems such as the origin of shell structure from basic nucleon-nucleon and three-nucleon interactions. At the same time those interactions are being developed with increasing contact to QCD, the underlying theory of the strong interactions, using effective field theory. The motivation is clear - QCD offers the promise of great predictive power spanning phenomena on multiple scales from quarks and gluons to nuclear structure. However, new tools that involve non-perturbative methods are required to build bridges from one scale to the next. We present an overview of recent theoretical and computational progress with a Hamiltonian approach to build these bridges and provide illustrative results for the nuclear structure of light nuclei and quantum field theory.

  4. Light dark matter in the light of CRESST-II

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kopp, Joachim; Schwetz, Thomas; Zupan, Jure

    2012-03-01

    Recently the CRESST collaboration has published the long anticipated results of their direct Dark Matter (DM) detection experiment with a CaWO4 target. The number of observed events exceeds known backgrounds at more than 4Σ significance, and this excess could potentially be due to DM scattering. We confront this interpretation with null results from other direct detection experiments for a number of theoretical models, and find that consistency is achieved in non-minimal models such as inelastic DM and isospin-violating DM. In both cases mild tension with constraints remain. The CRESST data can, however, not be reconciled with the null results andmore » with the positive signals from DAMA and CoGeNT simultaneously in any of the models we study.« less

  5. Demilitarization of the Siachen conflict zone : concepts for implementation and monitoring.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kanwal, Gurmeet (Indian Army); Hakeem, Asad (Pakistan Army); Vannoni, Michael Geoffrey; Rajen, Gaurav

    2007-09-01

    Pakistani and Indian militaries have been occupying the Siachen Glacier and surrounding regions for decades. Although a cease-fire is in place, continued occupation carries the risk of an inadvertent conflict, which could escalate into a full-fledged nuclear-backed confrontation. Political and military analysts in Pakistan and India now question the strategic significance of the Siachen Glacier and agree that under the right circumstances, military withdrawal from the Siachen Glacier region would not adversely affect either state. The difficulty lies in conducting the withdrawal in such a way that neither side feels vulnerable, and in maintaining the demilitarization in a way that can be verified. In this paper, the authors who have both held command responsibilities in the Siachen Glacier region present a process for conducting and verifying the demilitarization of the Siachen Glacier region. The authors discuss the role of monitoring and verification tools and their relevance to this border zone of conflict.

  6. Carbon sequestration technology roadmap and program plan: ensuring the fossil energy systems through the successful deployment of carbon capture and storage technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2007-04-15

    The overall goal of the Carbon Sequestration Program is to develop, by 2012, fossil fuel conversion systems that achieve 90 percent CO{sub 2} capture with 99 percent storage permanence at less than a 10 percent increase in the cost of energy services. This document describes the Technology Roadmap and Program Plan that will guide the Carbon Sequestration Program in 2007 and beyond. An overview of the Program and the key accomplishments in its 10-year history are presented as well as the challenges confronting deployment and successful commercialization of carbon sequestration technologies. The research pathways that will be used to achieve Program goals and information on key contacts and web links related to the Program are included. 23 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to ΌΜ decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance of the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.

  8. Homeland Security and Defense Applications

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2015-01-09

    Homeland Security and Defense Applications personnel are the best in the world at detecting and locating dirty bombs, loose nukes, and other radiological sources. The site trains the Nation's emergency responders, who would be among the first to confront a radiological or nuclear emergency. Homeland Security and Defense Applications highly training personnel, characterize the threat environment, produce specialized radiological nuclear detection equipment, train personnel on the equipment and its uses, test and evaluate the equipment, and develop different kinds of high-tech equipment to defeat terrorists. In New York City for example, NNSS scientists assisted in characterizing the radiological nuclear environment after 9/11, and produced specialized radiological nuclear equipment to assist local officials in their Homeland Security efforts.

  9. Combined features in the primordial spectra induced by a sudden turn in two-field DBI inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mizuno, Shuntaro; Saito, Ryo; Langlois, David E-mail: rsaito@apc.univ-paris7.fr

    2014-11-01

    We investigate the features generated by a sharp turn along the inflationary trajectory in a two-field model of Dirac-Born-Infeld inflation, where one of the fields is heavy. Distinct features are generated by two different effects: the mixing of the light and heavy modes during the turn, on the one hand, and the resonance between the oscillations along the heavy direction after the turn, on the other hand. Contrary to models with standard kinetic terms, the resonance effect is not strongly suppressed because the action contains derivative interactions. Working in the potential basis, we study the oscillations after the turn and compute the amplitude of the mixing and resonance features in the power spectrum, as well as in the bispectrum for the latter effect. We find that the amplitudes and positions of these combined features obey specific consistency relations, which could be confronted with cosmological data.

  10. Element choices for explicit and implicit nonlinear finite-element computation. ISPRA courses on structural dynamics - lecture notes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goudreau, G.L.

    1983-05-01

    The confrontation of the finite element technology with the awesome number crunching required for the nonlinear problem has forced a new assessment. The finite element community discovered that for impact, wave propagation and even slower impulsively driven dynamic problems, the finite difference hydrocodes were much more efficient, albeit requiring contorted mesh topologies to model practical geometries and fifty thousand time steps to follow a quasi-static process or reach static equilibrium. The experience of engineering analysis at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has straddled both worlds, and the intent of this lecture is to review choices in the context of the two and three dimensional implicit and explicit Lagrangian codes developed in our Methods Development Group. The explicit DYNA2D and DYNA3D and implicit NIKE2D and NIKE3D of Hallquist form the focus of this discussion.

  11. Open Media Training Session

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-10-06

    Have you ever wondered how the media work and why some topics make it into the news and other don't? Would you like to know how to (and how not to) give an interview to a journalist? With the LHC preparing for first collisions at high energies, the world's media are again turning their attention to CERN. We're all likely to be called upon to explain what is happening at CERN to media, friends and neighbours. The seminar will be given by BBC television news journalists Liz Pike and Nadia Marchant, and will deal with the kind of questions we're likely to be confronted with through the restart period. Follow the webcast: http://webcast.cern.ch/

  12. Legislative examination of the new perspectives program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, L.

    1994-01-01

    'We need a fundamental reform in managing all of the resources associated with the lands of the National Forest system ... The days have ended when the forest may be viewed as timber. The soil and the water, the grasses and the shrubs, the fish and the wildlife, and the beauty that is the forest must become integral parts of the resource manager's thinking and action' (Humphrey in Greiman 1990). This call for change and plea for policy revision within the U.S. Forest Service could easily describe the difficulty facing the agency in the 1990s. Ironically, it is a passage taken from Senator Hubert Humphrey's initial speech to Congress in l976 as he introduced the National Forest Management Act. The problem today is a familiar one for the Forest Service-- public discontent with land management policies. In an attempt to confront public dissatisfaction, the Forest Service has devised a program called New Perspectives.

  13. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  14. Toward the understanding of hydration phenomena in aqueous electrolytes from the interplay of theory, molecular simulation, and experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chialvo, Ariel A.; Vlcek, Lukas

    2015-05-22

    We confront the microstructural analysis of aqueous electrolytes and present a detailed account of the fundamentals underlying the neutron scattering with isotopic substitution (NDIS) approach for the experimental determination of ion coordination numbers in systems involving both halides anions and oxyanions. We place particular emphasis on the frequently overlooked ion-pairing phenomenon, identify its microstructural signature in the neutron-weighted distribution functions, and suggest novel techniques to deal with either the estimation of the ion-pairing magnitude or the correction of its effects on the experimentally measured coordination numbers. We illustrate the underlying ideas by applying these new developments to the interpretation of four NDIS test-cases via molecular simulation, as convenient dry runs for the actual scattering experiments, for representative aqueous electrolyte solutions at ambient conditions involving metal halides and nitrates.

  15. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, T.C.

    1993-03-30

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  16. Monolithic dye laser amplifier

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuklo, Thomas C.

    1993-01-01

    A fluid dye laser amplifier for amplifying a dye beam by pump beams has a channel structure defining a channel through which a laseable fluid flows and the dye and pump beams pass transversely to one another through a lasing region. The channel structure is formed with two pairs of mutually spaced-apart and mutually confronting glass windows, which are interlocked and make surface-contacts with one another and surround the lasing region. One of the glass window pairs passes the dye beam and the other passes the pump beams therethrough and through the lasing region. Where these glass window pieces make surface-contacts, glue is used to join the pieces together to form a monolithic structure so as to prevent the dye in the fluid passing through the channel from entering the space between the mutually contacting glass window pieces.

  17. Extending theories on muon-specific interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Carlson, Carl E.; Freid, Michael C.

    2015-11-23

    The proton radius puzzle, the discrepancy between the proton radius measured in muonic hydrogen and electronic hydrogen, has yet to be resolved. There are suggestions that beyond the standard model (BSM) physics could resolve both this puzzle and the muon anomalous magnetic moment discrepancy. Karshenboim et al. point out that simple, nonrenormalizable, models in this direction involving new vector bosons have serious problems when confronting high energy data. The prime example is radiative corrections to W to ΌΜ decay which exceed experimental bounds. We show how embedding the model in a larger and arguably renormalizable theory restores gauge invariance ofmore » the vector particle interactions and controls the high energy behavior of decay and scattering amplitudes. Thus BSM explanations of the proton radius puzzle can still be viable.« less

  18. Rotary shaft seal

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Langebrake, Clair O.

    1984-01-01

    The invention is a novel rotary shaft seal assembly which provides positive-contact sealing when the shaft is not rotated and which operates with its sealing surfaces separated by a film of compressed ambient gas whose width is independent of the speed of shaft rotation. In a preferred embodiment, the assembly includes a disc affixed to the shaft for rotation therewith. Axially movable, non-rotatable plates respectively supported by sealing bellows are positioned on either side of the disc to be in sealing engagement therewith. Each plate carries piezoelectric transducer elements which are electrically energized at startup to produce films of compressed ambient gas between the confronting surfaces of the plates and the disc. Following shutdown of the shaft, the transducer elements are de-energized. A control circuit responds to incipient rubbing between the plate and either disc by altering the electrical input to the transducer elements to eliminate rubbing.

  19. Eliminating Voltage Decay of Lithium-Rich Li1.14Mn0.54Ni0.14Co0.14O2 Cathodes by Controlling the Electrochemical Process

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wei, Z.; Zhu, Y.; Zhang, W.; Wang, F.; Zhang, Q.; Qiu, B.; Han, S.; Xia, Y.; Liu, Z.

    2015-03-27

    Lithium-rich material owns a particularly high capacity owing to the activation of electrochemical inactive Li2MnO3 phase. But at the same time, MnO2 phase formed after Li2MnO3 activation confronts a severe problem of converting to spinel phase, and resulting in voltage decay. To our knowledge, this phenomenon is inherent property of layered manganese oxide materials and can hardly be overcome. Based on this, unlike previous reports, herein we design a method for the first time to accelerate the phase transformation by tuning the charge upper-limit voltage at a high value, so the phase transformation process can be finished in a fewmore » cycles. Then material structure remains stable while cycling at a low upper-limit voltage. By this novel method voltage decay is eliminated significantly.« less

  20. Notices

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    80348 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 247 / Thursday, December 24, 2015 / Notices 1 Transuranic (TRU) waste is waste that contains alpha particle-emitting radionuclides with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium (92) and half- lives greater than 20 years in concentrations greater than 100 nanocuries per gram of waste. science, technology, and innovation may bear on the policy choices before the President. PCAST is co-chaired by Dr. John P. Holdren, Assistant to the President for Science