Sample records for obstacles confronting greater

  1. Apparatus for obstacle traversion

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for traversing obstacles having an elongated, round, flexible body that includes a plurality of drive track assemblies. The plurality of drive track assemblies cooperate to provide forward propulsion wherever a propulsion member is in contact with any feature of the environment, regardless of how many or which ones of the plurality of drive track assemblies make contact with such environmental feature.

  2. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric potential in Michigan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level is described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The first obstacle which any developer must confront in Michigan is obtaining the authority to utilize the river bed, banks, and flowing water at a proposed dam site. This involves a determination of ownership of the stream banks and bed, and the manner of obtaining either their title or use; and existing constraints with regard to the use of the water. Michigan follows the riparian theory of water law. The direct regulation; indirect regulation; public utilities regulation; financing; and taxation are discussed.

  3. Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Craig A.

    Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference 'HILQLQJ6XFFHVV Naples Beach a Committee of the South Florida Ecosystem Restoration Task Force and Working Group #12;Greater Everglades Ecosystem Restoration (G.E.E.R.) Science Conference Page ii #12;December 11-15, 2000 z Naples, Florida Page

  4. Obstacle-avoiding navigation system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann (Ann Arbor, MI); Koren, Yoram (Ann Arbor, MI); Levine, Simon P. (Ann Arbor, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for guiding an autonomous or semi-autonomous vehicle through a field of operation having obstacles thereon to be avoided employs a memory for containing data which defines an array of grid cells which correspond to respective subfields in the field of operation of the vehicle. Each grid cell in the memory contains a value which is indicative of the likelihood, or probability, that an obstacle is present in the respectively associated subfield. The values in the grid cells are incremented individually in response to each scan of the subfields, and precomputation and use of a look-up table avoids complex trigonometric functions. A further array of grid cells is fixed with respect to the vehicle form a conceptual active window which overlies the incremented grid cells. Thus, when the cells in the active window overly grid cell having values which are indicative of the presence of obstacles, the value therein is used as a multiplier of the precomputed vectorial values. The resulting plurality of vectorial values are summed vectorially in one embodiment of the invention to produce a virtual composite repulsive vector which is then summed vectorially with a target-directed vector for producing a resultant vector for guiding the vehicle. In an alternative embodiment, a plurality of vectors surrounding the vehicle are computed, each having a value corresponding to obstacle density. In such an embodiment, target location information is used to select between alternative directions of travel having low associated obstacle densities.

  5. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric potential in Wisconsin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level are discussed. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory in the area, and the dual regulatory system from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC is examined. The initial obstacle that all developers confront in Wisconsin is obtaining the authority to utilize the bed, banks, and flowing water at a proposed dam site. This involves a determination of ownership of the stream banks and bed and the manner of obtaining either their title or use; and existing constraints with regard to the use of the water. Wisconsin follows the riparian theory of water law.

  6. Travelling times in scattering by obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lyle Noakes; Luchezar Stoyanov

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper deals with some problems related to recovering information about an obstacle in an Euclidean space from certain measurements of lengths of generalized geodesics in the exterior of the obstacle. The main result is that if two obstacles satisfy some generic regularity conditions and have (almost) the same traveling times, then the generalized geodesic flows in their exteriors are conjugate on the non-trapping part of their phase spaces with a time preserving conjugacy. In the case of a union of two strictly convex domains in the plane, a constructive algorithm is described to recover the obstacle from traveling times.

  7. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF AN INVERSE OBSTACLE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Consider the scattering of an arbitrary time-harmonic incident wave by a sound soft ... the method is simple, efficient, and stable to reconstruct the obstacle with ...

  8. Guaranteed avoidance of unpredictable, dynamically constrained obstacles using velocity obstacle sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Albert (Albert Puming)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dynamic obstacle avoidance is an important, ubiquitous, and often challenging problem for autonomous mobile robots. This thesis presents a new method to guarantee collision avoidance with respect to moving obstacles that ...

  9. Greater West Texas State Employee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we change lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2013 Annual Report of Transportation-Odessa Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Local Campaign.ttuhsc.edu/relations/secc www.facebook.com/gwtsecc #12;2013 Top Greater West Texas State Agencies In Employee Participation 2013

  10. PARABOLIC OBSTACLE PROBLEMS APPLIED TO FINANCE A ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

    1. Introduction. 1.1. Background. The parabolic obstacle problem refers to finding the smallest supper-solution (for a given parabolic ... H. Shahgholian is supported by Swedish Research Council. 1 ...... MR MR2052937 (2005d:35276). [BD97].

  11. Statistics of dislocation pinning at localized obstacles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dutta, A. [S. N. Bose National Centre for Basic Sciences, Salt Lake, Kolkata 700098 (India); Bhattacharya, M., E-mail: mishreyee@vecc.gov.in; Barat, P. [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2014-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Pinning of dislocations at nanosized obstacles like precipitates, voids, and bubbles is a crucial mechanism in the context of phenomena like hardening and creep. The interaction between such an obstacle and a dislocation is often studied at fundamental level by means of analytical tools, atomistic simulations, and finite element methods. Nevertheless, the information extracted from such studies cannot be utilized to its maximum extent on account of insufficient information about the underlying statistics of this process comprising a large number of dislocations and obstacles in a system. Here, we propose a new statistical approach, where the statistics of pinning of dislocations by idealized spherical obstacles is explored by taking into account the generalized size-distribution of the obstacles along with the dislocation density within a three-dimensional framework. Starting with a minimal set of material parameters, the framework employs the method of geometrical statistics with a few simple assumptions compatible with the real physical scenario. The application of this approach, in combination with the knowledge of fundamental dislocation-obstacle interactions, has successfully been demonstrated for dislocation pinning at nanovoids in neutron irradiated type 316-stainless steel in regard to the non-conservative motion of dislocations. An interesting phenomenon of transition from rare pinning to multiple pinning regimes with increasing irradiation temperature is revealed.

  12. Flame acceleration and DDT in channels with obstacles: Effect of obstacle spacing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gamezo, Vadim N.; Oran, Elaine S. [Laboratory for Computational Physics and Fluid Dynamics, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Ogawa, Takanobu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Seikei University, Kichijoji-Kitamachi, Musashino-shi, Tokyo, 180-8633 (Japan)

    2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) in obstructed channels using 2D reactive Navier-Stokes numerical simulations. The energy release rate for the stoichiometric hydrogen-air mixture is modeled by one-step Arrhenius kinetics. Computations performed for channels with symmetrical and staggered obstacle configurations show two main effects of obstacle spacing S. First, more obstacles per unit length create more perturbations that increase the flame surface area more quickly, and therefore the flame speed grows faster. Second, DDT occurs more easily when the obstacle spacing is large enough for Mach stems to form between obstacles. These two effects are responsible for three different regimes of flame acceleration and DDT observed in simulations: (1) Detonation is ignited when a Mach stem formed by the diffracting shock reflecting from the side wall collides with an obstacle, (2) Mach stems do not form, and the detonation is not ignited, and (3) Mach stems do not form, but the leading shock becomes strong enough to ignite a detonation by direct collision with the top of an obstacle. Regime 3 is observed for small S and involves multiple isolated detonations that appear between obstacles and play a key role in final stages of flame and shock acceleration. For Regime 1 and staggered obstacle configurations, we observe resonance phenomena that significantly reduce the DDT time when S/2 is comparable to the channel width. Effects of imposed symmetry and stochasticity on DDT phenomena are also considered. (author)

  13. Confronting Higgcision with Electric Dipole Moments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kingman Cheung; Jae Sik Lee; Eibun Senaha; Po-Yan Tseng

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Current data on the signal strengths and angular spectrum of the 125.5 GeV Higgs boson still allow a CP-mixed state, namely, the pseudoscalar coupling to the top quark can be as sizable as the scalar coupling: $C_u^S \\approx C_u^P =1/2$. CP violation can then arise and manifest in sizable electric dipole moments (EDMs). In the framework of two-Higgs-doublet models, we not only update the Higgs precision (Higgcision) study on the couplings with the most updated Higgs signal strength data, but also compute all the Higgs-mediated contributions from the 125.5 GeV Higgs boson to the EDMs, and confront the allowed parameter space against the existing constraints from the EDM measurements of Thallium, neutron, Mercury, and Thorium monoxide. We found that the combined EDM constraints restrict the pseudoscalar coupling to be less than about $10^{-2}$, unless there are contributions from other Higgs bosons, supersymmetric particles, or other exotic particles that delicately cancel the current Higgs-mediated contributions.

  14. Foam flow around an obstacle: obstacle-wall interaction , B. Dollet2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Simon

    two-dimensional (2D) foams, such as can be made by squeezing a foam between two glass plates soFoam flow around an obstacle: obstacle-wall interaction S.J. Cox1 , B. Dollet2 , F. Graner2 1- chanics, University of Wales Aberystwyth, Ceredigion SY23 3BZ, UK, e-mail: foams@aber.ac.uk 2 Spectrom

  15. Confronting quasi-exponential inflation with WMAP seven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barun Kumar Pal; Supratik Pal; B. Basu

    2012-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We confront quasi-exponential models of inflation with WMAP seven years dataset using Hamilton Jacobi formalism. With a phenomenological Hubble parameter, representing quasi exponential inflation, we develop the formalism and subject the analysis to confrontation with WMAP seven using the publicly available code CAMB. The observable parameters are found to fair extremely well with WMAP seven. We also obtain a ratio of tensor to scalar amplitudes which may be detectable in PLANCK.

  16. Confronting quasi-exponential inflation with WMAP seven

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pal, Barun Kumar; Pal, Supratik; Basu, B., E-mail: barunp1985@rediffmail.com, E-mail: pal@th.physik.uni-bonn.de, E-mail: banasri@isical.ac.in [Physics and Applied Mathematics Unit, Indian Statistical Institute, 203 B.T. Road, Kolkata 700 108 (India)

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We confront quasi-exponential models of inflation with WMAP seven years dataset using Hamilton Jacobi formalism. With a phenomenological Hubble parameter, representing quasi exponential inflation, we develop the formalism and subject the analysis to confrontation with WMAP seven using the publicly available code CAMB. The observable parameters are found to fair extremely well with WMAP seven. We also obtain a ratio of tensor to scalar amplitudes which may be detectable in PLANCK.

  17. Distinguishing Between Greater and Lesser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    .e. knee high), minimal cover at ground level, and an abundance of flowering plants that harbor insects, see Ecology and Management of the Greater Prairie-Chicken E-969 at nrem.okstate.edu/extension. Threats power devel- opment. GPCs can tolerate some minimal levels of fragmentation, but at higher levels

  18. Numerical solution of an inverse obstacle scattering problem with ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peijun Li

    2015-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 5, 2015 ... the obstacle surface by using the near-field data. .... Let 1, 2 be two obstacles defined by the same base radius a and two surface functions f1, ...

  19. Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gutkin, Boris

    Confronting Nuclear Risks: Counter-Expertise as Politics Within the French Nuclear Energy Debate of knowledge and expertise on the environ- mental and health risks of nuclear energy in France. From disaster (26 April 1986). Since then, the biggest nuclear accident ever has added par- ticular significance

  20. Obstacle detection for autonomous navigation : an LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padilla, Denise D.

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the analytical and experimental efforts for the Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project entitled 'Obstacle Detection for Autonomous Navigation'. The principal goal of this project was to develop a mathematical framework for obstacle detection. The framework provides a basis for solutions to many complex obstacle detection problems critical to successful autonomous navigation. Another goal of this project was to characterize sensing requirements in terms of physical characteristics of obstacles, vehicles, and terrain. For example, a specific vehicle traveling at a specific velocity over a specific terrain requires a sensor with a certain range of detection, resolution, field-of-view, and sufficient sensitivity to specific obstacle characteristics. In some cases, combinations of sensors were required to distinguish between different hazardous obstacles and benign terrain. In our framework, the problem was posed as a multidimensional, multiple-hypothesis, pattern recognition problem. Features were extracted from selected sensors that allow hazardous obstacles to be distinguished from benign terrain and other types of obstacles. Another unique thrust of this project was to characterize different terrain classes with respect to both positive (e.g., rocks, trees, fences) and negative (e.g., holes, ditches, drop-offs) obstacles. The density of various hazards per square kilometer was statistically quantified for different terrain categories (e.g., high desert, ponderosa forest, and prairie). This quantification reflects the scale, or size, and mobility of different types of vehicles. The tradeoffs between obstacle detection, position location, path planning, and vehicle mobility capabilities were also to be characterized.

  1. Edinburgh Research Explorer Confronting the Liminal Spaces of Health Research Regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Millar, Andrew J.

    Edinburgh Research Explorer Confronting the Liminal Spaces of Health Research Regulation Citation for published version: Laurie, G, Confronting the Liminal Spaces of Health Research Regulation, 2014, Web c t o b e r 2 0 1 4 Confronting the Liminal Spaces of Health Research Regulation By Professor Graeme

  2. Obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Romero, Carlos E. (Livermore, CA); Zumstein, James E. (Livermore, CA); Chang, John T. (Danville, CA); Leach, Jr.. Richard R. (Castro Valley, CA)

    2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    An obstacle penetrating dynamic radar imaging system for the detection, tracking, and imaging of an individual, animal, or object comprising a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units that produce a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object, and a processing system for said set of return radar signals for detection, tracking, and imaging of the individual, animal, or object. The system provides a radar video system for detecting and tracking an individual, animal, or object by producing a set of return radar signals from the individual, animal, or object with a multiplicity of low power ultra wideband radar units, and processing said set of return radar signals for detecting and tracking of the individual, animal, or object.

  3. Chance-Constrained Optimal Path Planning with Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    . Williams Abstract--Autonomous vehicles need to plan trajectories to a specified goal that avoid obstacles validation with an aircraft obstacle avoidance example. I. INTRODUCTION Path planning for autonomous vehicles approach plans the future probabilistic distribution of the vehicle state so that the probability

  4. The relevance of didactic categories for analysing obstacles in conceptual change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prediger, Susanne

    1 The relevance of didactic categories for analysing obstacles in conceptual change Revisiting research like `Grundvorstellungen' and epistemological obstacles. These didactic categories help to make

  5. An obstacle-based probabilistic roadmap method for path planning 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new obstacle-based probabilistic roadmap method for motion planning for many degree of freedom robots that can be used to obtain high quality roadmaps even when the robot's configuration space is ...

  6. Chance-Constrained Optimal Path Planning With Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blackmore, Lars

    Autonomous vehicles need to plan trajectories to a specified goal that avoid obstacles. For robust execution, we must take into account uncertainty, which arises due to uncertain localization, modeling errors, and disturbances. ...

  7. ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE SURVIVABILITY, INHERENT LIMITATIONS, OBSTACLES AND MITIGATION STRATEGIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Krings, Axel W.

    ENERGY INFRASTRUCTURE SURVIVABILITY, INHERENT LIMITATIONS, OBSTACLES AND MITIGATION STRATEGIES technologically complex society makes our homeland security even more vulnerable. Therefore, knowing how vulnerable such systems are is essential to improving their intrinsic reliability/survivability (in

  8. An obstacle-based probabilistic roadmap method for path planning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new obstacle-based probabilistic roadmap method for motion planning for many degree of freedom robots that can be used to obtain high quality roadmaps even when the robot's configuration space is crowded. The main novelty...

  9. Obstacles to global CO? trading : a familiar problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellerman, A. Denny.

    There are many obstacles to the development of an international CO? emissions trading system, but the biggest is a feature that is often assumed: the existence of a single national system. Once a national system is in ...

  10. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2011 Annual Report of Transportation Vickie Wilhite, Health and Human Services Commission Greater West Texas Campaign Manager Nicole campaign information 2011 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (chair), Texas Tech University Health

  11. 2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    2010 Annual Report Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign You will find, as you look,717 and West Central Texas SECC raised $131,797 for a combined total of $957,514! · 4,608 state employees gave a fan! www.facebook.com/pages/Greater-West-Texas-State- Employee-Charitable-Campaign/103542263037744

  12. Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rock, Chris

    together we changed lives Greater West Texas State Employee Charitable Campaign 2012 Annual Report campaign information 2012 Local Employee Committee Darcy Pollock (Chair), Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center David Abercia, Texas Tech University Dianah Ascencio, Texas Department of Transportation

  13. Reverse Time Migration for Extended Obstacles: Acoustic Waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junqing Chen; Zhiming Chen; Guanghui Huang

    2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the resolution of the single frequency reverse time migration (RTM) method for extended targets without the assumption of the validation of geometric optics approximation. The resolution analysis, which applies in both penetrable and non-penetrable obstacles with sound soft or impedance boundary condition on the boundary of the obstacle, implies that the imaginary part of the cross-correlation imaging functional is always positive and thus may have better stability properties. Numerical experiments are included to illustrate the powerful imaging quality and to confirm our resolution results.

  14. Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Magnetic Wall Climbing Robot for Thin Surfaces with Specific Obstacles W. Fischer¹, F. Tâche high magnetic forces The main optimization criterion for this robot was to design it as light@ethz.ch Summary. This paper describes a novel solution to a mobile climbing robot on mag- netic wheels, designed

  15. Recovering a polyhedral obstacle by a few backscattering measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jingzhi Li; Hongyu Liu

    2015-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an inverse scattering scheme of recovering a polyhedral obstacle in $\\mathbb{R}^n$, $n=2,3$, by only a few high-frequency acoustic backscattering measurements. The obstacle could be sound-soft or sound-hard. It is shown that the modulus of the far-field pattern in the backscattering aperture possesses a certain local maximum behavior, from which one can determine the exterior normal directions of the front sides/faces. Then by using the phaseless backscattering data corresponding to a few incident plane waves with suitably chosen incident directions, one can determine the exterior unit normal vector of each side/face of the obstacle. After the determination of the exterior unit normals, the recovery is reduced to a finite-dimensional problem of determining a location point of the obstacle and the distance of each side/face away from the location point. For the latter reconstruction, we need make use of the far-field data with phases. Numerical experiments are also presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed scheme.

  16. RESIDUAL TYPE A POSTERIORI ERROR ESTIMATES FOR ELLIPTIC OBSTACLE PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nochetto, Ricardo H.

    to double obstacle problems are briefly discussed. Key words. a posteriori error estimates, residual Science Foundation under the grant No.19771080 and China National Key Project ``Large Scale Scientific\\Gamma satisfies / Ÿ 0 on @ and K is the convex set of admissible displacements K := fv 2 H 1 0(\\Omega\\Gamma : v

  17. Obstacle Avoidance Control of Humanoid Robot Arm through Tactile Interaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tachi, Susumu

    Obstacle Avoidance Control of Humanoid Robot Arm through Tactile Interaction Dzmitry Tsetserukou through tactile interaction. The implementation of the approach was realized on humanoid robot arm control are summarized and illustrated in this work as well. The controllable compliance of robot arm

  18. Flocking with Obstacle Avoidance in Switching Networks of Interconnected Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tanner, Herbert G.

    Flocking with Obstacle Avoidance in Switching Networks of Interconnected Vehicles Herbert G. Tanner Mechanical Engineering Department University of New Mexico Abstract--The paper introduces a set of nonsmooth- tivity requirements on the interconnection network can be relaxed due to the common objective. I

  19. A Probabilistic Approach to Optimal Robust Path Planning with Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Brian C.

    and Brian Williams Abstract-- Autonomous vehicles need to plan trajectories to a specified goal that avoid of aircraft obstacle avoidance scenarios. I. INTRODUCTION Path planning for autonomous vehicles the future probabilistic distribution of the vehicle state so that the probability of collision

  20. Little Science Confronts the Data Deluge: Habitat Ecology, Embedded Sensor Networks, and Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgman, C L; Wallis, J C; Enyedy, N

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. (2003). The Data Deluge: An e-Science Perspective. GridScience Confronts the Data Deluge: Habitat Ecology, EmbeddedScientists are facing a deluge of data beyond what can be

  1. CREATING THE COLOR LINE AND CONFRONTING JIM CROW: CIVIL RIGHTS IN MIDDLE AMERICA: 1850-1900

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peavler, David J.

    2008-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This dissertation examines the creation of the color line and the ways that African American communities confronted it throughout Kansas, Iowa, and Nebraska. A detailed search of school board minutes, newspapers, court ...

  2. Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    1 Confronting Uncertainty and Missing Values in Species Conservation Investment with Environmental: Environmental value transfer and species conservation Key words: environmental value transfer, uncertainty (Department of Environmental Heritage 2005). This results in an underinvestment of conservation dollars

  3. FLAME facility: The effect of obstacles and transverse venting on flame acceleration and transition on detonation for hydrogen-air mixtures at large scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherman, M.P.; Tieszen, S.R.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes research on flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) for hydrogen-air mixtures carried out in the FLAME facility, and describes its relevance to nuclear reactor safety. Flame acceleration and DDT can generate high peak pressures that may cause failure of containment. FLAME is a large rectangular channel 30.5 m long, 2.44 m high, and 1.83 m wide. It is closed on the ignition end and open on the far end. The three test variables were hydrogen mole fraction (12--30%), degree of transverse venting (by moving steel top plates---0%, 13%, and 50%), and the absence or presence of certain obstacles in the channel (zero or 33% blockage ratio). The most important variable was the hydrogen mole fraction. The presence of the obstacles tested greatly increased the flame speeds, overpressures, and tendency for DDT compared to similar tests without obstacles. Different obstacle configurations could have greater or lesser effects on flame acceleration and DDT. Large degrees of transverse venting reduced the flame speeds, overpressures, and possibility of DDT. For small degrees of transverse venting (13% top venting), the flame speeds and overpressures were higher than for no transverse venting with reactive mixtures (>18% H/sub 2/), but they were lower with leaner mixtures. The effect of the turbulence generated by the flow out the vents on increasing flame speed can be larger than the effect of venting gas out of the channel and hence reducing the overpressure. With no obstacles and 50% top venting, the flame speeds and overpressures were low, and there was no DDT. For all other cases, DDT was observed above some threshold hydrogen concentration. DDT was obtained at 15% H/sub 2/ with obstacles and no transverse venting. 67 refs., 62 figs.

  4. Deterministic separation of suspended particles in a reconfigurable obstacle array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Siqi

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a macromodel of a flow-driven deterministic lateral displacement (DLD) microfluidic system to investigate conditions leading to size-separation of suspended particles. This model system can be easily reconfigured to establish an arbitrary orientation between the average flow field and the array of obstacles comprising the stationary phase (forcing angle). We also investigate the effect of obstacle size using two arrays with different obstacles but same surface-to-surface distance between them. In all cases, we observe the presence of a locked mode at small forcing angles, in which particles move along a principal direction in the lattice until a locked-to-zigzag transition takes place when the driving force reaches a critical angle. We show that the transition occurs at increasing angles for larger particles, thus enabling particle separation at specific forcing angles. Moreover, we observe a linear correlation between the critical angle and the size of the particles that could be used in the design of...

  5. Greater Green River Basin Production Improvement Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Lim, F.H.; Calogero, D.

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) of Wyoming has produced abundant oil and gas out of multiple reservoirs for over 60 years, and large quantities of gas remain untapped in tight gas sandstone reservoirs. Even though GGRB production has been established in formations from the Paleozoic to the Tertiary, recent activity has focused on several Cretaceous reservoirs. Two of these formations, the Ahnond and the Frontier Formations, have been classified as tight sands and are prolific producers in the GGRB. The formations typically naturally fractured and have been exploited using conventional well technology. In most cases, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed when completing these wells to to increase gas production rates to economic levels. The objectives of the GGRB production improvement project were to apply the concept of horizontal and directional drilling to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift and to compare production improvements by drilling, completing, and testing vertical, horizontal and directionally-drilled wellbores at a common site.

  6. BOOK REVIEWS 583 to confront the problems associated with economic deindustrialization and the need

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kotchen, Matthew J.

    BOOK REVIEWS 583 to confront the problems associated with economic deindustrialization and the need, immigration), economics (growth of the information economy, energy costs), and consumer tastes may be making. The effects of these policies are so profound and systemic that a more comprehensive interre- gional modeling

  7. Structural and dynamic properties of propane coordinated to TpRh(CNR) from a confrontation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, William D.

    Structural and dynamic properties of propane coordinated to TpRh(CNR) from a confrontation between] in interaction with propane. Two complexes have been found as minima coordinated through either a methyl the methylene complex of propane into a methyl complex of pro- pane. This latter reaction has a much lower

  8. Cumulative effects in Swedish EIA practice - difficulties and obstacles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waernbaeck, Antoienette [Swedish EIA Centre, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)], E-mail: antoienette.warnback@sol.slu.se; Hilding-Rydevik, Tuija [Swedish EIA Centre, Department of Urban and Rural Development, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala (Sweden)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of considering cumulative effects (CE) in the context of environmental assessment is manifested in the EU regulations. The demands on the contents of Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) and Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA) documents explicitly ask for CE to be described. In Swedish environmental assessment documents CE are rarely described or included. The aim of this paper is to look into the reasons behind this fact in the Swedish context. The paper describes and analyse how actors implementing the EIA and SEA legislation in Sweden perceive the current situation in relation to the legislative demands and the inclusion of cumulative effects. Through semi-structured interviews the following questions have been explored: Is the phenomenon of CE discussed and included in the EIA/SEA process? What do the actors include in and what is their knowledge of the term and concept of CE? Which difficulties and obstacles do these actors experience and what possibilities for inclusion of CE do they see in the EIA/SEA process? A large number of obstacles and hindrances emerged from the interviews conducted. It can be concluded from the analysis that the will to act does seem to exist. A lack of knowledge in respect of how to include cumulative effects and a lack of clear regulations concerning how this should be done seem to be perceived as the main obstacles. The knowledge of the term and the phenomenon is furthermore quite narrow and not all encompassing. They experience that there is a lack of procedures in place. They also seem to lack knowledge of methods in relation to how to actually work, in practice, with CE and how to include CE in the EIA/SEA process. It can be stated that the existence of this poor picture in relation to practice concerning CE in the context of impact assessment mirrors the existing and so far rather vague demands in respect of the inclusion and assessment of CE in Swedish EIA and SEA legislation, regulations, guidelines and handbooks.

  9. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State Government Officials Prepared by The National Council on Electricity Policy November 2009 NATIONAL COUNCIL...

  10. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  11. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Rebate Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides rebate incentives for homeowners in Hamilton, Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties. To qualify for rebates, homeowners must receive a [http://www...

  12. Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molluscan Mariculture in the Greater Caribbean: An Overview DARRYL E. JORY and EDWIN S. IVERSEN mariculture in the greater Caribbean area (Fig. 1). Sea- food is and has been a staple for Carib- bean people since pre-Columbian times. ABSIRACF-Marine mollusks suitable for mariculture in the Caribbean area have

  13. Confronting predictive texture zeros in lepton mass matrices with current data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luís M. Cebola; David Emmanuel-Costa; Ricardo González Felipe

    2015-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Several popular Ans\\"atze of lepton mass matrices that contain texture zeros are confronted with current neutrino observational data. We perform a systematic $\\chi^2$-analysis in a wide class of schemes, considering arbitrary Hermitian charged lepton mass matrices and symmetric mass matrices for Majorana neutrinos or Hermitian mass matrices for Dirac neutrinos. Our study reveals that several patterns are still consistent with all the observations at 68.27% confidence level, while some others are disfavored or excluded by the experimental data. The well-known Frampton-Glashow-Marfatia two-zero textures, hybrid textures and parallel structures, among others, are considered.

  14. Confronting predictive texture zeros in lepton mass matrices with current data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cebola, Luís M; Felipe, Ricardo González

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several popular Ans\\"atze of lepton mass matrices that contain texture zeros are confronted with current neutrino observational data. We perform a systematic $\\chi^2$-analysis in a wide class of schemes, considering arbitrary Hermitian charged lepton mass matrices and symmetric mass matrices for Majorana neutrinos or Hermitian mass matrices for Dirac neutrinos. Our study reveals that several patterns are still consistent with all the observations at 68.27% confidence level, while some others are disfavored or excluded by the experimental data. The well-known Frampton-Glashow-Marfatia two-zero textures, hybrid textures and parallel structures, among others, are considered.

  15. Sensor integration for implementation of obstacle avoidance in an autonomous helicopter system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mentzer, Christopher Isaac

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the development of the Texas A&M University Autonomous Helicopter System and the integration of obstacle avoidance capabilities into that system. The helicopter system, composed of a Bergen Observer helicopter and a Rotomotion...

  16. Multi-layer approach to motion planning in obstacle rich environment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Hyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    obstacle-rich environments. This research has led to the development of the multilayer trajectory generation approach. It is built on the principle of separation of concerns, which partitions a given problem into multiple independent layers, and addresses...

  17. Obstacles to Teaching in the Face of Academic Diversity: Implcations for Planning for Students with Disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenz, B. Keith; Kissam, Brenda; Bulgren, Janis; Melvin, Jeff; Roth, Janet

    1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was a collaborative project the incorporated the concerns and insights of 52 secondary science and social studies teachers in identifying the major obstacles in planning to teach academically diverse groups of ...

  18. Multi-layer approach to motion planning in obstacle rich environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Sung Hyun

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    obstacle-rich environments. This research has led to the development of the multilayer trajectory generation approach. It is built on the principle of separation of concerns, which partitions a given problem into multiple independent layers, and addresses...

  19. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Ohio)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  20. Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance- Residential Loan Program (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance provides loans for single family residencies and owner occupied duplexes in Hamilton county in Ohio and Boone, Kenton, and Campbell counties in Kentucky. To...

  1. asymptomatic greater kudus: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Land Cover Change (1975-2000) in the Greater Border Lakes Region Research Map NRS-3 United land cover classifications and change detection for a 13.8 million ha landscape...

  2. Captive propagation and brood behavior of greater prairie chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Drake, David

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... May 1994 Major Subject: Wildlife and Fisheries Sciences CAPTIVE PROPAGATION AND BROOD BEHAVIOR OF GREATER PRAIRIE CHICKENS A Thesis by DAVID DRAKE Submitted to Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree...

  3. Demonstration of the Federation of OMF Control Framework with PlanetLab Peer-to-peer resolution of an obstacle problem using the P2Pdc framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ingrand, François

    of an obstacle problem using the P2Pdc framework Scenario: - Distributed Application for Problem Solving

  4. UNITY: Confronting Supernova Cosmology's Statistical and Systematic Uncertainties in a Unified Bayesian Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, David; Barbary, Kyle; Boone, Kyle; Chappell, Greta; Currie, Miles; Deustua, Susana; Fagrelius, Parker; Fruchter, Andrew; Hayden, Brian; Lidman, Chris; Nordin, Jakob; Perlmutter, Saul; Saunders, Clare; Sofiatti, Caroline

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While recent supernova cosmology research has benefited from improved measurements, current analysis approaches are not statistically optimal and will prove insufficient for future surveys. This paper discusses the limitations of current supernova cosmological analyses in treating outliers, selection effects, shape- and color-standardization relations, intrinsic dispersion, and heterogeneous observations. We present a new Bayesian framework, called UNITY (Unified Nonlinear Inference for Type-Ia cosmologY), that incorporates significant improvements in our ability to confront these effects. We apply the framework to real supernova observations and demonstrate smaller statistical and systematic uncertainties. We verify earlier results that SNe Ia require nonlinear shape and color standardizations, but we now include these nonlinear relations in a statistically well-justified way. This analysis was blinded, in that the method was first validated on simulated data, and no analysis changes were made after transiti...

  5. COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GQ COAL QUALITY AND GEOCHEMISTRY, GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, WYOMING By G.D. Stricker and M coal beds and zones in the Northern RockyMountains and Great Plains region, U.S. Geological Survey of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky Mountains and Great Plains region, U

  6. CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    CAN INTEGRATED WATERSHED MANAGEMENT BRING GREATER FOOD SECURITY IN ETHIOPIA? Oloro V. McHugh, Amy S, Ethiopia Gete Zeleke ARARI, Bahir Dar, Ethiopia Abstract: In the food insecure regions, short annual. Ethiopia's agricultural sector is driven by the subsistence strategies of smallholder farmers

  7. Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Don

    Paleoecology of the Greater Phyllopod Bed community, Burgess Shale Jean-Bernard Caron , Donald A and composition, ecological attributes, and environmental influences for the Middle Cambrian Burgess Shale ecosystems further suggest the Burgess Shale community was probably highly dependent on immigration from

  8. Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kraft, Clifford E.

    Ice Storm Damage Greater Along the Terrestrial-Aquatic Interface in Forested Landscapes Andrew A- tems. In 1998, a severe ice storm damaged over ten million hectares of forest across northern New York investigated the spatial arrangement of forest damage at the terrestrial-aquatic interface, an ecological edge

  9. Separation of suspended particles by arrays of obstacles in microfluidic devices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhigang Li; German Drazer

    2006-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The stochastic transport of suspended particles through a periodic pattern of obstacles in microfluidic devices is investigated by means of the Fokker-Planck equation. Asymmetric arrays of obstacles have been shown to induce the continuous separation of DNA molecules of different length. The analysis presented here of the asymptotic distribution of particles in a unit cell of these systems shows that separation is only possible in the presence of a driving force with a non-vanishing normal component at the surface of the solid obstacles. In addition, vector separation, in which different species move, in average, in different directions within the device, is driven by differences on the force acting on the various particles and not by differences in the diffusion coefficient. Monte-Carlo simulations performed for different particles and force fields agree with the numerical solutions of the Fokker-Planck equation in the periodic system.

  10. The world we now live in is confronted with various challenges. Environmental issues caused by global warming, and the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banbara, Mutsunori

    #12;The world we now live in is confronted with various challenges. Environmental issues caused by global warming, and the intensification of international competition over access to resources, energy by a single nation; rather, each country must work together for global solutions to tackle these environmental

  11. Distribution of Permo-Carboniferous clastics of Greater Arabian basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Laboun, A.A.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Strikingly correlative sequences of sediments composed of sandstones, siltstones, shales, and thin argillaceous carbonate beds are present, practically everywhere, underlying the Late Permian carbonates in the Greater Arabian basin. The Greater Arabian basin as defined here occupies the broad Arabian Shelf that borders the Arabian shield. This basin is composed of several smaller basins. These clastics are exposed as thin bands and scattered small exposures in several localities around the margins of the basin. The Permo-Carboniferous clastics are represented by the Unayzah Formation of Arabia, the Doubayat Group of Syria, the Hazro Formation of southeast Turkey, the Ga'arah Formation of Iraq, the Faraghan Formation of southwest Iran, and the Haushi Group of Oman. A Late Carboniferous-Early Permian age is assigned to these clastics because they contain fossil plants and palynomorphs. These sediments represent time-transgressive fluctuating sea deposits following a phase of regional emergence, erosion, and structural disturbance which preceded the Permian transgression. The basal contact of these clastics is marked by a well-pronounced angular unconformity with various older units, ranging in age from early Carboniferous to late Precambrian. This regional unconformity is probably related to the Hercynian movements. The upper contact is conformable with the Permian carbonates. The porous sandstones of the Permo-Carboniferous sediments are important hydrocarbon exploration targets. These reservoir rocks sometimes overlie mature source rocks and are capped by shales, marls, and tight carbonates. Significant quantities of hydrocarbons are contained in these reservoirs in different parts of the Greater Arabian basin.

  12. Greater Green River basin well-site selection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frohne, K.H. [USDOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center, WV (United States); Boswell, R. [EG and G Washington Analytical Services Center, Inc., Morgantown, WV (United States)

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent estimates of the natural gas resources of Cretaceous low-permeability reservoirs of the Greater Green River basin indicate that as much as 5000 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) of gas may be in place (Law and others 1989). Of this total, Law and others (1989) attributed approximately 80 percent to the Upper Cretaceous Mesaverde Group and Lewis Shale. Unfortunately, present economic conditions render the drilling of many vertical wells unprofitable. Consequently, a three-well demonstration program, jointly sponsored by the US DOE/METC and the Gas Research Institute, was designed to test the profitability of this resource using state-of-the-art directional drilling and completion techniques. DOE/METC studied the geologic and engineering characteristics of ``tight`` gas reservoirs in the eastern portion of the Greater Green River basin in order to identify specific locations that displayed the greatest potential for a successful field demonstration. This area encompasses the Rocks Springs Uplift, Wamsutter Arch, and the Washakie and Red Desert (or Great Divide) basins of southwestern Wyoming. The work was divided into three phases. Phase 1 consisted of a regional geologic reconnaissance of 14 gas-producing areas encompassing 98 separate gas fields. In Phase 2, the top four areas were analyzed in greater detail, and the area containing the most favorable conditions was selected for the identification of specific test sites. In Phase 3, target horizons were selected for each project area, and specific placement locations were selected and prioritized.

  13. Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open the obstacle, two main flow structures are observed: i a hydraulic jump in the near-surface region and ii turbulent regime , the detachment length of the hydraulic jump exceeds the one of the horseshoe vortex

  14. Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Simon

    Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction of foams around a circular obstacle within a long channel. In experiments, we confine the foam between liquid and glass surfaces. In simulations, we use a deterministic software, the Surface Evolver

  15. Failure-Tolerant Path Planning for the PA-10 Robot Operating Amongst Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    Failure-Tolerant Path Planning for the PA-10 Robot Operating Amongst Obstacles Rodrigo S. Jamisola/or orientation in the workspace despite any single locked-joint failure at any time. An algorithm is presented relative to its task, only a single locked-joint failure occurs at any given time, the robot is capable

  16. Non-Economic Obstacles to Wind Deployment: Issues and Regional Differences (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baring-Gould, I.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation provides an overview of national obstacles to wind deployment, with regional assessments. A special mention of offshore projects and distributed wind projects is provided. Detailed maps examine baseline capacity, military and flight radar, golden and bald eagle habitat, bat habitat, whooping crane habitat, and public lands. Regional deployment challenges are also discussed.

  17. Obstacles to Global CO2 Trading: A Familiar Problem A. Denny Ellerman1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    obstacles to the development of an international CO2 emissions trading system, but the biggest is a feature emissions trading. The paper reviews the various instruments by which such the Kyoto target might be met. The development of an international system for CO2 emissions trading should not be expected to be either quick

  18. Title of dissertation: A CONTINUUM MODEL FOR FLOCKING: OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE, EQUILIBRIUM,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    ABSTRACT Title of dissertation: A CONTINUUM MODEL FOR FLOCKING: OBSTACLE AVOIDANCE, EQUILIBRIUM, AND STABILITY Nicholas Alexander Mecholsky, Doctor of Philosophy, 2010 Dissertation directed by: Professor of animal groups is a subject of growing attention. In this dissertation, we present a partial- differential

  19. A Probabilistic-Numerical Approximation for an Obstacle Problem Arising in Game Theory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gruen, Christine, E-mail: christine.gruen@univ-brest.fr [Laboratoire de Mathematiques de Brest UMR 6205 (France)

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate a two-player zero-sum stochastic differential game in which one of the players has more information on the game than his opponent. We show how to construct numerical schemes for the value function of this game, which is given by the solution of a quasilinear partial differential equation with obstacle.

  20. Invited Presentation, EdMedia '94 Vancouver, Canada page 1 Issues and Obstacles with Multimedia Authoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Invited Presentation, EdMedia '94 Vancouver, Canada page 1 Issues and Obstacles with Multimedia, multimedia authoring involves making hard choices, forecasting technological evolution and adapting of the common threads shared by three dissimilar cases of multimedia authoring which we have experimented with

  1. Turbidity current flow over an obstacle and phases of sediment wave generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strauss, Moshe

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the flow of particle-laden turbidity currents down a slope and over an obstacle. A high-resolution 2D computer simulation model is used, based on the Navier-Stokes equations. It includes poly-disperse particle grain sizes in the current and substrate. Particular attention is paid to the erosion and deposition of the substrate particles, including application of an active layer model. Multiple flows are modeled from a lock release that can show the development of sediment waves (SW). These are stream-wise waves that are triggered by the increasing slope on the downstream side of the obstacle. The initial obstacle is completely erased by the resuspension after a few flows leading to self consistent and self generated SW that are weakly dependant on the initial obstacle. The growth of these waves is directly related to the turbidity current being self sustaining, that is, the net erosion is more than the net deposition. Four system parameters are found to influence the SW growth: (1) slope, (2) current ...

  2. The effects of obstacle geometry on jet mixing in releases of silane 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sposato, Christina F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Releases of silane into air and the effects of obstacles were modeled with the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) code, FLUENT. First the CFD code simulated the release of a free turbulent jet of silane into air to assure that the code agreed...

  3. A Moving Object Tracked by A Mobile Robot with Real-Time Obstacles Avoidance Capacity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abidi, Mongi A.

    . The robotic platform uses a visual camera to sense the movement of the desired object and a range sensor that assist a human driver for safety or comfort [6, 8]. NASA has applied this to help astronauts to carryA Moving Object Tracked by A Mobile Robot with Real-Time Obstacles Avoidance Capacity Chung

  4. Accelerating universe from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions: confrontation with SNeIa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zong-Hong Zhu; Jailson S. Alcaniz

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There is mounting observational evidence that the expansion of our universe is undergoing an acceleration. A dark energy component has usually been invoked as the most feasible mechanism for the acceleration. However, it is desirable to explore alternative possibilities motivated by particle physics before adopting such an untested entity. In this work, we focus our attention on an acceleration mechanism: one arising from gravitational leakage into extra dimensions. We confront this scenario with high-$z$ type Ia supernovae compiled by Tonry et al. (2003) and recent measurements of the X-ray gas mass fractions in clusters of galaxies published by Allen et al. (2002,2003). A combination of the two databases gives at a 99% confidence level that $\\Omega_m=0.29^{+0.04}_{-0.02}$, $\\Omega_{rc}=0.21^{+0.08}_{-0.08}$, and $\\Omega_k=-0.36^{+0.31}_{-0.35}$, indicating a closed universe. We then constrain the model using the test of the turnaround redshift, $z_{q=0}$, at which the universe switches from deceleration to acceleration. We show that, in order to explain that acceleration happened earlier than $z_{q=0} = 0.6$ within the framework of gravitational leakage into extra dimensions, a low matter density, $\\Omega_m < 0.27$, or a closed universe is necessary.

  5. Clean Cities: Greater Long Island Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater Long

  6. Clean Cities: Greater New Haven Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGeneseeGreater

  7. Confronting the Hubble Diagram of Gamma-Ray Bursts with Cardassian Cosmology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herman J. Mosquera Cuesta; Habib Dumet M.; Cristina Furlanetto

    2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the Hubble diagram (HD) of Gamma-Ray Bursts (GRBs) with redshifts reaching up to $z \\sim 6$, by using five luminosity vs. luminosity indicator relations calibrated with the Cardassian cosmology. This model has a major interesting feature: despite of being matter-dominated and flat, it can explain the present accelerate expansion of the universe. This is the first study of this class of models using high redshift GRBs. We have performed a $\\chi$-square statistical analysis of the GRBs calibrated with the Cardassian model, and also combined them with both the current Cosmic Microwave Background and Baryonic Acoustic Oscillation data. Our results show consistency between the current observational data and the model predictions. In particular, the best-fit parameters obtained from the $\\chi^2$-analysis are in agreement with those obtained from the Concordance Cosmology ($\\Lambda$-CDM). We determine the redshift at which the universe would start to follow the Cardassian expansion, i. e., \\zc, and both the redshift at which the universe had started to accelerate, i. e., \\zac, and the age-redshift relation $H_0t_0$. Our results also show that the universe, from the point of view of GRBs, had undergo a transition to acceleration at a redshift $z \\approx 0.2-0.7$, which agrees with the SNIa results. Hence, after confronting the Cardassian scenario with the GRBs HD and proving its consistency with it, we conclude that GRBs should indeed be considered a complementary tool to several other astronomical observations for studies of high accuracy in cosmology.

  8. Wave blocking and partial transmission in subcritical flows over an obstacle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Léo-Paul Euvé; Florent Michel; Renaud Parentani; Germain Rousseaux

    2015-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We study and measure the transmission coefficient of counter-propagating shallow-water waves produced by a wave generator and scattered by an obstacle. To precisely compare theoretical predictions and experimental data, we consider $\\sim 25$ frequencies for 5 subcritical background flows, where the maximum value of the Froude number ranges from $0.5$ to $0.75$. For each flow, the transmission coefficient displays a sharp transition separating total transmission from wave-blocking. Both the width and the central frequency of the transition are in good agreement with their theoretical values. The shape of the obstacle is identical to that used by the Vancouver team in the recent experiment aiming at detecting the analogue of stimulated Hawking radiation. Our results are compatible with the observations that have been reported. They complete them by establishing that the contribution of the transmission coefficient cannot be neglected for the lower half of the probed frequency range.

  9. Some Obstacles to United States Direct Private Foreign Investment in Manufacturing: 1950-1958.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Milton Dudley

    1960-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    their productivity and thus increase their costs. In order to avoid interruptions in power service, many firms have established their own power generating units. Needless to say, this may sometimes be quite costly and represents an additional investment on which...SOME OBSTACLES TO UNITED STATES DIRECT PRIVATE POREIGN INVESTMENT IN MANUPACTURING: 1950-195S A Thesis By Milton Dudley Stewart, Jr. Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas in partial fulfillment...

  10. Lower bounds on the obstacle number of graphs Padmini Mukkamala1, Janos Pach2, and Domotor Palvolgyi3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pach, János

    Lower bounds on the obstacle number of graphs Padmini Mukkamala1, J´anos Pach2, and D¨om¨ot¨or P are extensively studied and used in computational geometry, robot motion planning, computer vision, sensor

  11. Greater sage-grouse winter habitat selection and energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doherty, K.E.; Naugle, D.E.; Walker, B.L.; Graham, J.M. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent energy development has resulted in rapid and large-scale changes to western shrub-steppe ecosystems without a complete understanding of its potential impacts on wildlife populations. We modeled winter habitat use by female greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, to 1) identify landscape features that influenced sage-grouse habitat selection, 2) assess the scale at which selection occurred, 3) spatially depict winter habitat quality in a Geographic Information System, and 4) assess the effect of coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development on winter habitat selection. We developed a model of winter habitat selection based on 435 aerial relocations of 200 radiomarked female sage-grouse obtained during the winters of 2005 and 2006. Percent sagebrush (Artemisia spp.) cover on the landscape was an important predictor of use by sage-grouse in winter. Sage-grouse were 1.3 times more likely to occupy sagebrush habitats that lacked CBNG wells within a 4-km{sup 2} area, compared to those that had the maximum density of 12.3 wells per 4 km{sup 2} allowed on federal lands. We validated the model with 74 locations from 74 radiomarked individuals obtained during the winters of 2004 and 2007. This winter habitat model based on vegetation, topography, and CBNG avoidance was highly predictive (validation R{sup 2} = 0.984). Our spatially explicit model can be used to identify areas that provide the best remaining habitat for wintering sage-grouse in the PRB to mitigate impacts of energy development.

  12. Reserves in western basins: Part 1, Greater Green River basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study characterizes an extremely large gas resource located in low permeability, overpressured sandstone reservoirs located below 8,000 feet drill depth in the Greater Green River basin, Wyoming. Total in place resource is estimated at 1,968 Tcf. Via application of geologic, engineering and economic criteria, the portion of this resource potentially recoverable as reserves is estimated. Those volumes estimated include probable, possible and potential categories and total 33 Tcf as a mean estimate of recoverable gas for all plays considered in the basin. Five plays (formations) were included in this study and each was separately analyzed in terms of its overpressured, tight gas resource, established productive characteristics and future reserves potential based on a constant $2/Mcf wellhead gas price scenario. A scheme has been developed to break the overall resource estimate down into components that can be considered as differing technical and economic challenges that must be overcome in order to exploit such resources: in other words, to convert those resources to economically recoverable reserves. Total recoverable reserves estimates of 33 Tcf do not include the existing production from overpressured tight reservoirs in the basin. These have estimated ultimate recovery of approximately 1.6 Tcf, or a per well average recovery of 2.3 Bcf. Due to the fact that considerable pay thicknesses can be present, wells can be economic despite limited drainage areas. It is typical for significant bypassed gas to be present at inter-well locations because drainage areas are commonly less than regulatory well spacing requirements.

  13. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    STATE OF CALIFORNIA NEWLY CONSTRUCTED BUILDINGS AND ADDITIONS GREATER THAN 1,000 FT2 CEC- CF-1R Newly Constructed Buildings and Additions Greater Than 1,000 ft2 (Page 1 of 5) Project Name: Climate________ Project Type: New Building Construction New Addition1 greater than 1,000 ft2 1. Additions greater than 1

  14. Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle: Effect of liquid fraction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christophe Raufaste; B. Dollet; Simon Cox; Yi Jiang; François Graner

    2007-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the two-dimensional flow of foams around a circular obstacle within a long channel. In experiments, we confine the foam between liquid and glass surfaces. In simulations, we use a deterministic software, the Surface Evolver, for bubble details and a stochastic one, the extended Potts model, for statistics. We adopt a coherent definition of liquid fraction for all studied systems. We vary it in both experiments and simulations, and determine the yield drag of the foam, that is, the force exerted on the obstacle by the foam flowing at very low velocity. We find that the yield drag is linear over a large range of the ratio of obstacle to bubble size, and is independent of the channel width over a large range. Decreasing the liquid fraction, however, strongly increases the yield drag; we discuss and interpret this dependence.

  15. Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings Seeking Greater Influence in the World of Low-Energy Buildings July 23, 2010 - 4:03pm Addthis Cindy Regnier,...

  16. Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) EGU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over-parameterisation,a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? 693 Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 7(5), 693706 (2003) © EGU Over-parameterisation, a major obstacle to the use of artificial neural networks in hydrology ? Eric Gaume and Raphael Gosset Ecole Nationale des

  17. Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the conference.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kyte, Michael

    Group 1 Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the confer- ence. #12;Group 3 Obstacles and Call to Action as a result of the Sept. 22nd and 23rd Biofuels Sustainability portion of the conference

  18. hal-00090531,version4-6Jul2007 Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    hal-00090531,version4-6Jul2007 Yield drag in a two-dimensional foam flow around a circular obstacle-dimensional flow of foams around a circular obstacle within a long channel. In experiments, we confine the foam between liquid and glass surfaces. In simulations, we use a deterministic software, the Surface Evolver

  19. Strained-Si-on-Insulator (SSOI) and SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI): Fabrication Obstacles and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strained-Si-on-Insulator (SSOI) and SiGe-on-Insulator (SGOI): Fabrication Obstacles and Solutions-Si and SiGe-on-insulator were fabricated, combining both the benefits of high-mobility strained-Si and SOI) to oxidized handle wafers. Layer transfer onto insulating handle wafers can be accomplished using grind

  20. Evaluation of Direct and Indirect Haptic Aiding in an Obstacle Avoidance Task for Tele-Operated Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Automation, University of Pisa, Pisa, 56126, Italy (e-mail: lpollini@dsea.unipi.it) *** Dept. of Brain in teleoperation environments in which the operator is physically separated from the vehicle. It appears reasonable Vehicles), Human-machine interface, Telepresence, Obstacle avoidance, Multi-sensory interface. 1

  1. Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation for Application to Unmanned Ground

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    Development of an Integrated Sensor System for Obstacle Detection and Terrain Evaluation field of view of 50 degrees and 38 degrees, respectively. Two sensor systems were utilized to evaluate., Wexford Pennsylvania ABSTRACT This paper describes the development and performance of a sensor system

  2. The Russian oil industry between public and private governance: obstacles to international oil companies' investment strategies1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    The Russian oil industry between public and private governance: obstacles to international oil, July 2004 Submitted to Energy Policy The low level of involvement by international oil companies by international oil companies in that country. Meanwhile, Russia has become a principal actor on the international

  3. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications State of IndianaGreater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation Plan State of IndianaGICC Alternative Fuels Implementation...

  4. Legal obstacles and incentives to the development of small scale hydroelectric power in Maryland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The legal and institutional obstacles to the development of small-scale hydroelectric energy at the state level in Maryland are described. The Federal government also exercises extensive regulatory authority in the area. The dual regulatory system is examined with the aim of creating a more orderly understanding of the vagaries of the system, focusing on the appropriate legal doctrine, the law of pre-emption, application of the law to the case of hydroelectric development, and an inquiry into the practical use of the doctrine by the FERC. In Maryland, by common law rule, title to all navigable waters and to the soil below the high-water mark of those waters is vested in the state as successor to the Lord Proprietary who had received it by grant from the Crown. Rights to non-navigable water, public trust doctrine, and eminent domain are also discussed. Direct and indirect regulations, continuing obligations, loan programs, and regional organizations are described in additional sections.

  5. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beck, Jeffrey L.

    Prioritizing winter habitat quality for greater sage-grouse in a landscape influenced by energy, and F. C. Blomquist. 2014. Prioritizing winter habitat quality for Greater Sage-Grouse in a landscape influenced by energy development. Ecosphere 5(2):15. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ES13-00238. 1 Abstract

  6. 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Franz, Nico M.

    1 0040: 1-24 2008 The bees of Greater Puerto Rico (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) Julio A-mail:polimita@hotmail.com Nico M. Franz Department of Biology, University of Puerto Rico PO Box 9012, Mayagüez, PR 00681, U.S.A. E-mail:franz@uprm.edu Abstract. The bee fauna of the Greater Puerto Rico area was studied. A review

  7. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix H: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report develops and presents estimates for a set of three values that represent a reasonable range for the packaging factors for several waste streams that are potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste. The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level waste disposal container divided by the original, as-generated or ``unpackaged,`` volume of the wastes loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors take into account any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of a greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. The three values developed represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated volume of waste for disposal, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. Three categories of greater-than-Class C low-level waste are evaluated in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other wastes. Estimates of reasonable packaging factors for the low, base, and high cases for the specific waste streams in each category are shown in Table H-1.

  8. The Practical Obstacles of Data Transfer: Why researchers still love scp

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nam, Hai Ah [ORNL; Hill, Jason J [ORNL; Parete-Koon, Suzanne T [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The importance of computing facilities is heralded every six months with the announcement of the new Top500 list, showcasing the world s fastest supercomputers. Unfortu- nately, with great computing capability does not come great long-term data storage capacity, which often means users must move their data to their local site archive, to remote sites where they may be doing future computation or anal- ysis, or back to their home institution, else face the dreaded data purge that most HPC centers employ to keep utiliza- tion of large parallel filesystems low to manage performance and capacity. At HPC centers, data transfer is crucial to the scientific workflow and will increase in importance as computing systems grow in size. The Energy Sciences Net- work (ESnet) recently launched its fifth generation network, a 100 Gbps high-performance, unclassified national network connecting more than 40 DOE research sites to support scientific research and collaboration. Despite the tenfold increase in bandwidth to DOE research sites amenable to multiple data transfer streams and high throughput, in prac- tice, researchers often under-utilize the network and resort to painfully-slow single stream transfer methods such as scp to avoid the complexity of using multiple stream tools such as GridFTP and bbcp, and contend with frustration from the lack of consistency of available tools between sites. In this study we survey and assess the data transfer methods pro- vided at several DOE supported computing facilities, includ- ing both leadership-computing facilities, connected through ESnet. We present observed transfer rates, suggested opti- mizations, and discuss the obstacles the tools must overcome to receive wide-spread adoption over scp.

  9. Aristophane / Plaute : Confrontations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastin-Hammou Céline Candiard Anne de Crémoux Isabelle David Marion Faure-Ribreau Christina Filoche Marie

  10. The impact of multifamily development on single family home prices in the Greater Boston Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuur, Arah (Arah Louise Adele)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of large, multifamily developments on nearby single-family home prices was tested in five towns in the Greater Boston Area. Case studies that had recent multifamily developments built near transit nodes or town ...

  11. Landscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorcroft, Paul R.

    rust by examining changes in the spatial scale of significant stress and mortality clusters computedLandscape-scale patterns of forest pest and pathogen damage in the Greater Yellowstone Ecosystem

  12. You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behmer, Spencer T.

    You are on a path to greater prosperity and knowledge of nature, science, and engineering. Our'Texas Aggie football team is nationally acclaimed, and every game brings a festive atmosphere

  13. An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberger, Alfred H.

    An extinct monkey from Haiti and the origins of the Greater Antillean primates Siobhán B. Cookea from Haiti, Insulacebus toussaintiana, is described here from the most complete Caribbean subfossil

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-4: Packaging factors for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, G.; Grant, P.; Winberg, M.; Williams, K.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report estimates packaging factors for several waste types that are potential greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW). The packaging factor is defined as the volume of a GTCC LLW disposal container divided by the as-generated or ``unpackaged`` volume of the waste loaded into the disposal container. Packaging factors reflect any processes that reduce or increase an original unpackaged volume of GTCC LLW, the volume inside a waste container not occupied by the waste, and the volume of the waste container itself. Three values are developed that represent (a) the base case or most likely value for a packaging factor, (b) a high case packaging factor that corresponds to the largest anticipated disposal volume of waste, and (c) a low case packaging factor for the smallest volume expected. GTCC LLW is placed in three categories for evaluation in this report: activated metals, sealed sources, and all other waste.

  15. Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    Space use by female Greater Prairie-Chickens in response to wind energy development V. L. WINDER,1-Chickens in response to wind energy development. Ecosphere 5(1):3. http://dx.doi.org/10.1890/ ES13-00206.1 Abstract. Wind energy development is targeted to meet 20% of U.S. energy demand by 2030. In Kansas, optimal sites

  16. FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter GS FORT UNION COAL IN THE GREATER GREEN RIVER BASIN, EAST FLANK OF THE ROCK SPRINGS UPLIFT 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky in the toolbar to return. 1999 Resource assessment of selected Tertiary coal beds and zones in the Northern Rocky

  17. Effects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandercock, Brett K.

    community, grouse, hazard function, mortality, preda- tion, wind turbine *Correspondence author. EEffects of wind energy development on survival of female greater prairie-chickens Virginia L of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32611, USA Summary 1. The potential effects of wind energy development

  18. Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    Impact of folivory on photosynthesis is greater than the sum of its holes A. R. Zangerl*, J. G), pp. 135­151.]. An impediment to understanding the effects of leaf damage on photosynthesis has been chlorophyll fluo- rescence and used it to map the effects of caterpillar feeding on whole-leaf photosynthesis

  19. Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support Crowdsourced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Citizen Science System Assemblages: Toward Greater Understanding of Technologies to Support crowston@syr.edu ABSTRACT We explore the nature of technologies to support citizen science, a method different citizen science platforms may be comprised of widely varying functionalities, yet still support

  20. Asthenospheric upwelling, oceanic slab retreat, and exhumation of UHP mantle rocks: Insights from Greater Antilles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Greater Antilles in Hispaniola. We use numerical models of intra-oceanic subduction to explain exhumation Antilles in Hispaniola [Abbott et al., 2006; Abbott et al., 2005]. Field observations show that the garnet and Hispaniola islands [e.g., Lewis et al., 2006]. It was formed during subduction of the Proto-Caribbean oceanic

  1. The Potential of Distributed Cogeneration in Commercial Sites in the Greater Vancouver

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (production of electricity at the point of use) may reduce CO2 emissions relative to the most likely of electricity and CO2 emissions. The results showed that while greater energy efficiency is achieved: December 10, 1999 #12;iii ABSTRACT The Canadian government is evaluating options to reduce CO2 emissions

  2. Novel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety Standard

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    acceptance; o power and energy capability; o reliability; o lifetime and life cycle cost. ThereofNovel Battery Thermal Management System for Greater Lifetime Ratifying Current Quality and Safety,Denmark. Temperature excursions and non-uniformity of the temperature inside the battery systems are the main concern

  3. Solid waste workers and livelihood strategies in Greater Port-au-Prince, Haiti

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Noel, Claudel, E-mail: claudelnoel@gmail.co [University of the West Indies, Institute for Sustainable Development, Environmental Management Unit, 13 Gibraltar Camp Way, Mona Campus, Kingston (Jamaica)

    2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The solid waste management industry in Haiti is comprised of a formal and an informal sector. Many basic activities in the solid waste management sector are being carried out within the context of profound poverty, which exposes the failure of the socioeconomic and political system to provide sufficient job opportunities for the urban population. This paper examines the involvement of workers in the solid waste management industry in Greater Port-au-Prince and the implications for livelihood strategies. The findings revealed that the Greater Port-au-Prince solid waste management system is very inclusive with respect to age, while highly segregated with regard to gender. In terms of earning capacity, the results showed that workers hired by the State agencies were the most economically vulnerable group as more than 50% of them fell below the official nominal minimum wage. This paper calls for better salary scales and work compensation for the solid waste workers.

  4. Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater Westerly Grannies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nightingale, Peter

    Drilling Off-Shore (Mademoiselle From Armentiers) Pedrolina "Paige" Delaparrucca and the Greater- George ofU Old Drill- Litt- heat lost had need had get E his no more his more belch, ba- Bush, A, Rea Car- Ba- Litt- U Old Drill- B 7 5 bon rack le S Ron- ing more oil, D o we his no more his in ma who we

  5. The Obstacle Version of the Geometric Dynamic Programming Principle: Application to the Pricing of American Options Under Constraints

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bouchard, Bruno, E-mail: bouchard@ceremade.dauphine.fr; Vu, Thanh Nam, E-mail: thanh@ceremade.dauphine.f [Universite Paris Dauphine, CEREMADE (France)

    2010-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We provide an obstacle version of the Geometric Dynamic Programming Principle of Soner and Touzi (J. Eur. Math. Soc. 4:201-236, 2002) for stochastic target problems. This opens the doors to a wide range of applications, particularly in risk control in finance and insurance, in which a controlled stochastic process has to be maintained in a given set on a time interval [0,T]. As an example of application, we show how it can be used to provide a viscosity characterization of the super-hedging cost of American options under portfolio constraints, without appealing to the standard dual formulation from mathematical finance. In particular, we allow for a degenerate volatility, a case which does not seem to have been studied so far in this context.

  6. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  7. Method to produce alumina aerogels having porosities greater than 80 percent

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Poco, John F.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A two-step method for producing monolithic alumina aerogels having porosities of greater than 80 percent. Very strong, very low density alumina aerogel monoliths are prepared using the two-step sol-gel process. The method of preparing pure alumina aerogel modifies the prior known sol method by combining the use of substoichiometric water for hydrolysis, the use of acetic acid to control hydrolysis/condensation, and high temperature supercritical drying, all of which contribute to the formation of a polycrystalline aerogel microstructure. This structure provides exceptional mechanical properties of the alumina aerogel, as well as enhanced thermal resistance and high temperature stability.

  8. Activities of ?-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. T. Cleveland; F. A. Duncan; I. T. Lawson; N. J. T. Smith; E. Vazquez-Jauregui

    2012-02-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  9. Vorticity generation in creeping flow past a magnetic obstacle Centro de Investigacin en Energa, UNAM, Apartado Postal 34, Temixco, Morelos 62580, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdou, Mohamed

    Vorticity generation in creeping flow past a magnetic obstacle S. Cuevas* Centro de Investigación Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering Department, UCLA, 44-114 Engineering IV, Los Angeles, California 90095 The generation of vorticity in the two-dimensional creeping flow of an incompressible, electrically conduct- ing

  10. Enabling Greater Penetration of Solar Power via the Use of CSP with Thermal Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Denholm, P.; Mehos, M.

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At high penetration of solar generation there are a number of challenges to economically integrating this variable and uncertain resource. These include the limited coincidence between the solar resource and normal demand patterns and limited flexibility of conventional generators to accommodate variable generation resources. Of the large number of technologies that can be used to enable greater penetration of variable generators, concentrating solar power (CSP) with thermal energy storage (TES) presents a number of advantages. The use of storage enables this technology to shift energy production to periods of high demand or reduced solar output. In addition, CSP can provide substantial grid flexibility by rapidly changing output in response to the highly variable net load created by high penetration of solar (and wind) generation. In this work we examine the degree to which CSP may be complementary to PV by performing a set of simulations in the U.S. Southwest to demonstrate the general potential of CSP with TES to enable greater use of solar generation, including additional PV.

  11. Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste treatment technology evaluation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrison, T W; Fischer, D K

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report was developed to provide the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Management Program with criteria and a methodology to select candidate treatment technologies for Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) destined for dedicated storage and ultimately disposal. The technology selection criteria are provided in a Lotus spreadsheet format to allow the methodology to evolve as the GTCC LLW Program evolves. It is recognized that the final disposal facility is not yet defined; thus, the waste acceptance criteria and other facility-specific features are subject to change. The spreadsheet format will allow for these changes a they occur. As additional treatment information becomes available, it can be factored into the analysis. The technology selection criteria were established from program goals, draft waste acceptance criteria for dedicated storage (including applicable regulations), and accepted remedial investigation methods utilized under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act. Kepner-Tregoe decisionmaking techniques are used to compare and rank technologies against the criteria.

  12. Department of Energy treatment capabilities for greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morrell, D.K.; Fischer, D.K.

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides brief profiles for 26 low-level and high-level waste treatment capabilities available at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL), Rocky Flats Plant (RFP), Savannah River Site (SRS), and West Valley Demonstration Plant (WVDP). Six of the treatments have potential use for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW). They include: (a) the glass ceramic process and (b) the Waste Experimental Reduction Facility incinerator at INEL; (c) the Super Compaction and Repackaging Facility and (d) microwave melting solidification at RFP; (e) the vitrification plant at SRS; and (f) the vitrification plant at WVDP. No individual treatment has the capability to treat all GTCC LLW streams. It is recommended that complete physical and chemical characterizations be performed for each GTCC waste stream, to permit using multiple treatments for GTCC LLW.

  13. Climatological simulations of ozone and atmospheric aerosols in the Greater Cairo region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steiner, A. L.; Tawfik, A. B.; Shalaby, A.; Zakey, A. S.; Abdel Wahab, M. M.; Salah, Z.; Solmon, F.; Sillman, S.; Zaveri, Rahul A.

    2014-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated chemistry-climate model (RegCM4-CHEM) simulates present-day climate, ozone and tropospheric aerosols over Egypt with a focus on Greater Cairo (GC) region. The densley populated GC region is known for its severe air quality issues driven by high levels of anthropogenic pollution in conjuction with natural sources such as dust and agricultural burning events. We find that current global emission inventories underestimate key pollutants such as nitrogen oxides and anthropogenic aerosol species. In the GC region, average-ground-based NO2 observations of 40-60 ppb are substantially higher than modeled estimates (5-10 ppb), likely due to model grid resolution, improper boundary layer representation, and poor emissions inventories. Observed ozone concentrations range from 35 ppb (winter) to 80 ppb (summer). The model reproduces the seasonal cycle fairly well, but modeled summer ozone is understimated by approximately 15 ppb and exhibits little interannual variability. For aerosols, springtime dust events dominate the seasonal aerosol cycle. The chemistry-climate model captures the springtime peak aerosol optical depth (AOD) of 0.7-1 but is slightly greater than satellite-derived AOD. Observed AOD decreases in the summer and increases again in the fall due to agricultural burning events in the Nile Delta, yet the model underestimates this fall observed AOD peak, as standard emissions inventories underestimate this burning and the resulting aerosol emissions. Our comparison of modeled gas and particulate phase atmospheric chemistry in the GC region indicates that improved emissions inventories of mobile sources and other anthropogenic activities are needed to improve air quality simulations in this region.

  14. Eocene climates, depositional environments, and geography, greater Green River basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The climates, depositional environments, and geography of Eocene rocks in the greater Green River basin are investigated to determine the origin, mode of deposition, and areal distribution of the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations. The data indicate that Eocene climates ranged from cool temperature to tropical and were affected by both terrestrial and astronomical factors. The terrestrial factors were mainly latitude, altitude, regional geography, tectonism, and volcanism. The astronomical factors are interpreted from reptitious rock sequences in the Wilkins Peak Member of the Green River Formation that record seasonal changes, 21,000 year precession of the equinox cycles, 100,000 year eccentricity cycles, and an undetermined cycle of 727,000 years. Eight depositional environments are identified, discussed, and illustrated by diagrams, columnar sections, and photographs. They are: (1) fluvial, (2) paludal, (3) freshwater lacustrine, (4) saltwater lacustrine, (5) pond and playa lake, (6) evaporite (salt pan), (7) mudflat, and (8) volcanic and fluviovolcanic. The areal distribution of the eight depositional environments in the Wasatch, Green River, Bridger, and Washakie Formations is illustrated by photographs and 13 paleogeographic maps. 76 refs., 90 figs.

  15. Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.L.; Naugle, D.E.; Doherty, K.E. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of landscapes due to energy development may alter both habitat use and vital rates of sensitive wildlife species. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, have experienced rapid, widespread changes to their habitat due to recent coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development. We analyzed lek-count, habitat, and infrastructure data to assess how CBNG development and other landscape features influenced trends in the numbers of male sage-grouse observed and persistence of leks in the PRB. From 2001 to 2005, the number of males observed on leks in CBNG fields declined more rapidly than leks outside of CBNG. Of leks active in 1997 or later, only 38% of 26 leks in CBNG fields remained active by 2004-2005, compared to 84% of 250 leks outside CBNG fields. By 2005, leks in CBNG fields had 46% fewer males per active lek than leks outside of CBNG. Persistence of 110 leks was positively influenced by the proportion of sagebrush habitat within 6.4 km of the lek. After controlling for habitat, we found support for negative effects of CBNG development within 0.8 km and 3.2 km of the lek and for a time lag between CBNG development and lek disappearance. Current lease stipulations that prohibit development within 0.4 km of sage-grouse leks on federal lands are inadequate to ensure lek persistence and may result in impacts to breeding populations over larger areas. Seasonal restrictions on drilling and construction do not address impacts caused by loss of sagebrush and incursion of infrastructure that can affect populations over long periods of time. Regulatory agencies may need to increase spatial restrictions on development, industry may need to rapidly implement more effective mitigation measures, or both, to reduce impacts of CBNG development on sage-grouse populations in the PRB.

  16. Greater Green River Basin production improvement project, Phase 1: Site characterization report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeJarnett, B.B.; Krystinik, L.F.; Mead, R.H.; Poe, S.C.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Several tight, naturally-fractured, gas-productive formations in the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) in Wyoming have been exploited using conventional vertical well technology. Typically, hydraulic fracture treatments must be performed in completing these wells to increase gas production rates to economic levels. However, with the maturation of horizontal drilling technology hydraulic fracture treatments may not be the most effective method for improving gas production from these tight reservoirs. Two of the most prolific tight gas reservoirs in the Green River Basin, the Frontier and the Mesaverde, are candidates for the application of horizontal well completion technology. The objective of the proposed project is to apply the DOE`s technical concept to the Second Frontier Formation on the western flank of the Rock Springs Uplift. Previous industry attempts to produce in commercial quantities from the Second Frontier Formation have been hampered by lack of understanding of both the in-situ natural fracture system and lack of adequate stimulation treatments. The proposed technical approach involves drilling a vertical characterization well to the Second Frontier Formation at a depth of approximately 16,000 ft. from a site located about 18 miles northwest of Rock Springs, Wyoming. Logging, coring, and well testing information from the vertical well will be used to design a hydraulic fracturing treatment and to assess the resulting production performance. Data from the vertical drilling phase will be used to design a 2,500 to 3,000-ft lateral wellbore which will be kicked off from the vertical hole and extend into the blanket marine sandstone bench of the Second Frontier Formation. The trajectory of this wellbore will be designed to intersect the maximum number of natural fractures to maximize production rates. Production testing of the resulting completion will provide an assessment of reserve potential related to horizontal lateral completions.

  17. Nepal: Obstacles to Peace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Crisis Group

    2003-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    not stand the test of time. By the reckoning of almost all involved, any peace deal will require some form of constitutional amendment, or even the preparation of a new constitution. Without the broad buy-in of society, constitutional revision... . However, five days later, an RNA spokesperson indicated that the military would not restrict its movements until the Maoists returned weapons looted from it during the war.35 This set off confusing and continuing exchanges regarding whether...

  18. Cryogenic moderator simulations : confronting reality.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Iverson, E. B.

    1999-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS) at Argonne National Laboratory is a spallation neutron source dedicated to materials research. Its three cryogenic methane moderators provide twelve neutron beams to fourteen instruments and test facilities. This report concerns ongoing activities for benchmarking our Monte Carlo model of the IPNS neutron generation system. This paper concentrates on the techniques (both experimental and calculational) used in such benchmarking activities.

  19. CERN scientists confront data deluge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, H

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation of particle accelerator is currently being designed at CERN. An understanding of the market forces in the computer industry will play a crucial role in the success of the project.

  20. Experimental data confronts nuclear structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garrett, J.D.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The physical content of experimental data for a variety of excitation energies and angular momenta is summarized. The specific nuclear structure questions which these data address are considered. The specific regions discussed are: low-spin data near the particle separation thresholds; low-spin data at intermediate excitation energies; high-spin, near-yrast data and high-spin data at larger excitation energies. 63 refs., 14 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Confronting Challenges | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space DataEnergyCompressedOil, and. NOTConfronting

  2. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sandercock, Brett K. [Kansas State University

    2013-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Executive Summary 1. We investigated the impacts of wind power development on the demography, movements, and population genetics of Greater Prairie-Chickens (Tympanuchus cupido) at three sites in northcentral and eastern Kansas for a 7-year period. Only 1 of 3 sites was developed for wind power, the 201MW Meridan Way Wind Power Facility at the Smoky Hills site in northcentral Kansas. Our project report is based on population data for prairie chickens collected during a 2-year preconstruction period (2007-2008), a 3-year postconstruction period (2009-2011) and one final year of lek surveys (2012). Where relevant, we present preconstruction data from our field studies at reference sites in the northern Flint Hills (2007-2009) and southern Flint Hills (2006-2008). 2. We addressed seven potential impacts of wind power development on prairie chickens: lek attendance, mating behavior, use of breeding habitat, fecundity rates, natal dispersal, survival rates, and population numbers. Our analyses of pre- and postconstruction impacts are based on an analysis of covariance design where we modeled population performance as a function of treatment period, distance to eventual or actual site of the nearest wind turbine, and the interaction of these factors. Our demographic and movement data from the 6-year study period at the Smoky Hills site included 23 lek sites, 251 radio-marked females monitored for 287 bird-years, and 264 nesting attempts. Our genetic data were based on genotypes of 1,760 females, males and chicks that were screened with a set of 27 microsatellite markers that were optimized in the lab. 3. In our analyses of lek attendance, the annual probability of lek persistence during the preconstruction period was ~0.9. During the postconstruction period, distance to nearest turbine did not have a significant effect on the probability of lek persistence. However, the probability of lek persistence increased from 0.69 at 0 m to 0.89 at 30 km from turbines, and most abandoned lek sites were located <5 km from turbines. Probability of lek persistence was significantly related to habitat and number of males. Leks had a higher probability of persistence in grasslands than agricultural fields, and increased from ~0.2 for leks of 5 males, to >0.9 for leks of 10 or more males. Large leks in grasslands should be a higher priority for conservation. Overall, wind power development had a weak effect on the annual probability of lek persistence. 3. We used molecular methods to investigate the mating behavior of prairie chickens. The prevailing view for lek-mating grouse is that females mate once to fertilize the clutch and that conspecific nest parasitism is rare. We found evidence that females mate multiple times to fertilize the clutch (8-18% of broods, 4-38% of chicks) and will parasitize nests of other females during egg-laying (~17% of nests). Variable rates of parentage were highest in the fragmented landscapes at the Smoky Hills field site, and were lower at the Flint Hills field site. Comparisons of the pre- and postconstruction periods showed that wind energy development did not affect the mating behaviors of prairie chickens. 4. We examined use of breeding habitats by radio-marked females and conducted separate analyses for nest site selection, and movements of females not attending nests or broods. The landscape was a mix of native prairie and agricultural habitats, and nest site selection was not random because females preferred to nest in grasslands. Nests tended to be closer to turbines during the postconstruction period and there was no evidence of behavioral avoidance of turbines by females during nest site selection. Movements of females not attending nests or broods showed that females crossed the site of the wind power development at higher rates during the preconstruction period (20%) than the postconstruction period (11%), and that movements away from turbines were more frequent during the postconstruction period. Thus, wind power development appears to affect movements in breeding habitats but not nest site s

  3. Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Does `Facebooking' lead to greater student engagement? Junco, R. (2012). The relationship between frequency of Facebook use, participation in Facebook activities, and student engagement. Computers, such as Facebook (FB) is also a somewhat prickly topic in higher education as the stakeholders listed above attempt

  4. Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total inter-vessel pit area per ves-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hacke, Uwe

    Summary We tested the hypothesis that greater cavitation resistance correlates with less total cavitation safety and transport efficiency. Fourteen species of diverse growth form (vine, ring- and diffuse species total). Two types of vulnerability-to-cavitation curves were found. Ring-porous trees and vines

  5. The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polz, Martin

    PROBLEM The seismic monitoring of buildings is particularly important in high-population urban areas like Greater Boston. While Massachusetts' seismic building codes are adapted from Cali- fornia to damage from earthquakes of small magnitude, particularly if the fundamen- tal frequency of the seismic

  6. Bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the greater Yellowstone area during four postfire years. Forest Service research paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, L.A.; Amman, G.D.; Vandygriff, J.C.; Oakes, R.D.; Munson, A.S.

    1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surveys of bark beetle and wood borer infestation in the Greater Yellowstone Area were conducted from 1991 through 1993 to determine the effect of delayed tree mortality on mosaics of fire-killed and green tree stands, the relationship between fire injury and infestation, but both types of mortality greatly altered the mosaics immediately apparent after the 1988 fires. The high level of infestation suggests that insects built up in fire-injured trees and then caused increased infestation of uninjured trees.

  7. Michael Langley GREATER MSP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levinson, David M.

    prosper here. People prosper here. OUR REGION'S STORY #12;RAPID URBANIZATION & GROWING MIDDLE CLASS Mumbai and Insurance Reports (examples) · Met Council: NARC Study · MGI: Game Changers Data Analysis · Sectors (Mc · Nutrition · Water filtration · Water purification Food & Water Solutions #12;BUSINESS AND PEOPLE PROSPER

  8. Activities of \\gamma-ray emitting isotopes in rainwater from Greater Sudbury, Canada following the Fukushima incident

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cleveland, B T; Lawson, I T; Smith, N J T; Vazquez-Jauregui, E

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the activity measured in rainwater samples collected in the Greater Sudbury area of eastern Canada on 3, 16, 20, and 26 April 2011. The samples were gamma-ray counted in a germanium detector and the isotopes 131I and 137Cs, produced by the fission of 235U, and 134Cs, produced by neutron capture on 133Cs, were observed at elevated levels compared to a reference sample of ice-water. These elevated activities are ascribed to the accident at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor complex in Japan that followed the 11 March earthquake and tsunami. The activity levels observed at no time presented health concerns.

  9. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix D-3: Characterization of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste from other generators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fish, L.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Other Generators category includes all greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) that is not generated or held by nuclear utilities or sealed sources licensees or that is not stored at Department of Energy facilities. To determine the amount of waste within this category, 90 LLW generators were contacted; 13 fit the Other Generators category. Based on information received from the 13 identified Other Generators, the GTCC LLW Management Program was able to (a) characterize the nature of industries in this category, (b) estimate the 1993 inventory of Other Generator waste for high, base, and low cases, and (c) project inventories to the year 2035 for high, base, and low cases. Assumptions were applied to each of the case estimates to account for generators who may not have been identified in this study.

  10. Catalog of documents produced by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Winberg, M.R.

    1995-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This catalog provides a ready reference for documents prepared by the Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Waste (GTCC LLW) Management Program. The GTCC LLW Management Program is part of the National Low-Level Waste Management Program (NLLWMP). The NLLWMP is sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is responsible for assisting the DOE in meeting its obligations under Public Law 99-240, The Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985. This law assigns DOE the responsibility of ensuring the safe disposal of GTCC LLW in a facility licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). The NLLWMP is managed at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL).

  11. Evaluation of Department of Energy-Held Potential Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A number of commercial facilities have generated potential greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW), and, through contractual arrangements with the US Department of Energy (DOE) or for health and safety reasons, DOE is storing the waste. This report presents the results of an assessment conducted by the GTCC LLW Management Program to consider specific circumstances under which DOE accepted the waste, and to determine whether disposal in a facility licensed by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, or by DOE in a nonlicensed facility, is appropriate. Input from EG&G Idaho, Inc., and DOE Idaho Operations Office legal departments concerning the disposal requirements of this waste were the basis for the decision process used in this report.

  12. Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Future. Ad hoc working group report, Key Biscayne, Florida, October 26-28, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorhaug, A. (ed.)

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report of Workshop I (presented in outline form) by the Greater Caribbean Energy and Environment Foundation begin an intensive focus on the energy problems of the Caribbean. The process by which environmental assessments by tropical experts can be successfully integrated into energy decisions is by: (1) international loan institutions requiring or strongly recommending excellent assessments; (2) engineering awareness of total effects of energy projects; (3) governmental environmental consciousness-raising with regard to natural resource value and potential inadvertent and unnecessary resource losses during energy development; and (4) media participation. Section headings in the outline are: preamble; introduction; research tasks: today and twenty years hence; needed research, demonstration and information dissemination projects to get knowledge about Caribbean energy-environment used; summary; recommendations; generalized conclusions; and background literature. (JGB)

  13. The potential for coalbed gas exploration and production in the Greater Green River Basin, southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyler, R.; Kaiser, W.R.; Scott, A.R.; Hamilton, D.S. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Coalbed gas is an important source of natural gas in the United States. In 1993, approximately 740 BCF of coalbed gas was produced in the United States, or about 4.2% of the nation`s total gas production. Nearly 96% of this coalbed gas is produced from just two basins, the San Juan (615.7 BCF; gas in place 84 TCF) and Black Warrior (105 BCF; gas in place 20 TCF), and current production represents only a fraction of the nation`s estimated 675 TCF of in-place coalbed gas. Coal beds in the Greater Green River Basin in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado hold almost half of the gas in place (314 TCF) and are an important source of gas for low-permeability Almond sandstones. Because total gas in place in the Greater Green River Basin is reported to exceed 3,000 TCF (Law et al., 1989), the basin may substantially increase the domestic gas resource base. Therefore, through integrated geologic and hydrologic studies, the coalbed gas potential of the basin was assessed where tectonic, structural, and depositional setting, coal distribution and rank, gas content, coal permeability, and ground-water flow are critical controls on coalbed gas producibility. Synergism between these geologic and hydrologic controls determines gas productivity. High productivity is governed by (1) thick, laterally continuous coals of high thermal maturity, (2) basinward flow of ground water through fractured and permeable coals, down the coal rank gradient toward no-flow boundaries oriented perpendicular to the regional flow direction, and (3) conventional trapping of gas along those boundaries to provide additional sources of gas beyond that sorbed on the coal surface.

  14. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-2: Mixed GTCC LLW assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirner, N.P. [Ebasco Environmental, Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mixed greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (mixed GTCC LLW) is waste that combines two characteristics: it is radioactive, and it is hazardous. This report uses information compiled from Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste Characterization: Estimated Volumes, Radionuclide Activities, and Other Characteristics (DOE/LLW 1 14, Revision 1), and applies it to the question of how much and what types of mixed GTCC LLW are generated and are likely to require disposal in facilities jointly regulated by the DOE and the NRC. The report describes how to classify a RCRA hazardous waste, and then applies that classification process to the 41 GTCC LLW waste types identified in the DOE/LLW-114 (Revision 1). Of the 41 GTCC LLW categories identified, only six were identified in this study as potentially requiring regulation as hazardous waste under RCRA. These wastes can be combined into the following three groups: fuel-in decontamination resins, organic liquids, and process waste consisting of lead scrap/shielding from a sealed source manufacturer. For the base case, no mixed GTCC LLW is expected from nuclear utilities or sealed source licensees, whereas only 177 ml of mixed GTCC LLW are expected to be produced by other generators through the year 2035. This relatively small volume represents approximately 40% of the base case estimate for GTCC wastes from other generators. For these other generators, volume estimates for mixed GTCC LLW ranged from less than 1 m{sup 3} to 187 m{sup 3}, depending on assumptions and treatments applied to the wastes.

  15. Greater Biopsy Core Number Is Associated With Improved Biochemical Control in Patients Treated With Permanent Prostate Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bittner, Nathan [Tacoma/Valley Radiation Oncology Centers, Tacoma, WA (United States); Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.or [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Galbreath, Robert W.; Butler, Wayne M. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Radiation Oncology, Puget Sound Health Care System, Department of Veterans Affairs, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Standard prostate biopsy schemes underestimate Gleason score in a significant percentage of cases. Extended biopsy improves diagnostic accuracy and provides more reliable prognostic information. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that greater biopsy core number should result in improved treatment outcome through better tailoring of therapy. Methods and Materials: From April 1995 to May 2006, 1,613 prostate cancer patients were treated with permanent brachytherapy. Patients were divided into five groups stratified by the number of prostate biopsy cores ({<=}6, 7-9, 10-12, 13-20, and >20 cores). Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS), cause-specific survival (CSS), and overall survival (OS) were evaluated as a function of core number. Results: The median patient age was 66 years, and the median preimplant prostate-specific antigen was 6.5 ng/mL. The overall 10-year bPFS, CSS, and OS were 95.6%, 98.3%, and 78.6%, respectively. When bPFS was analyzed as a function of core number, the 10-year bPFS for patients with >20, 13-20, 10-12, 7-9 and {<=}6 cores was 100%, 100%, 98.3%, 95.8%, and 93.0% (p < 0.001), respectively. When evaluated by treatment era (1995-2000 vs. 2001-2006), the number of biopsy cores remained a statistically significant predictor of bPFS. On multivariate analysis, the number of biopsy cores was predictive of bPFS but did not predict for CSS or OS. Conclusion: Greater biopsy core number was associated with a statistically significant improvement in bPFS. Comprehensive regional sampling of the prostate may enhance diagnostic accuracy compared to a standard biopsy scheme, resulting in better tailoring of therapy.

  16. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization. Appendix E-5: Impact of the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; Harris, G. [Waste Management Group, Inc., Peekskill, NY (United States)

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report evaluates the effects of concentration averaging practices on the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) generated by the nuclear utility industry and sealed sources. Using estimates of the number of waste components that individually exceed Class C limits, this report calculates the proportion that would be classified as GTCC LLW after applying concentration averaging; this proportion is called the concentration averaging factor. The report uses the guidance outlined in the 1993 Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging, as well as waste disposal experience at nuclear utilities, to calculate the concentration averaging factors for nuclear utility wastes. The report uses the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position and the criteria from the Barnwell, South Carolina, LLW disposal site to calculate concentration averaging factors for sealed sources. The report addresses three waste groups: activated metals from light water reactors, process wastes from light-water reactors, and sealed sources. For each waste group, three concentration averaging cases are considered: high, base, and low. The base case, which is the most likely case to occur, assumes using the specific guidance given in the 1993 NRC draft Branch Technical Position on concentration averaging. To project future GTCC LLW generation, each waste category is assigned a concentration averaging factor for the high, base, and low cases.

  17. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 3, Sealed sources held by general licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the third volume in a series of three volumes characterizing the population of sealed sources that may become greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW). In this volume, those sources possessed by general licensees are discussed. General-licensed devices may contain sealed sources with significant amounts of radioactive material. However, the devices are designed to be safe to use without special knowledge of radiological safety practices. Devices containing Am-241 or Cm-244 sources are most likely to become GTCC LLW after concentration averaging. This study estimates that there are about 16,000 GTCC devices held by general licensees; 15,000 of these contain Am-241 sources and 1,000 contain Cm-244 sources. Additionally, this study estimates that there are 1,600 GTCC devices sold to general licensees each year. However, due to a lack of available information on general licensees in Agreement States, these estimates are uncertain. This uncertainty is quantified in the low and high case estimates given in this report, which span approximately an order of magnitude.

  18. Characterization of Greater-Than-Class C sealed sources. Volume 1, Sealed sources held by specific licensees

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sealed sources are small, relatively high-activity radioactive sources typically encapsulated in a metallic container. The activities can range from less than 1 mCi to over 1,000 Ci. They are used in a variety of industries and are commonly available. Many of the sources will be classified as Greater-Than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) for the purpose of waste disposal. The US Department of Energy is responsible for disposing of this class of low-level radioactive waste. To better understand the scope of the GTCC LLW situation regarding sealed sources and to provide data to a model that projects future quantities of GTCC material, data from a comprehensive 1991 US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) survey and a related 1992 survey of Agreement States were analyzed to estimate the number, volume, and activity of Potential GTCC sealed sources currently available from specific licensees. Potential GTCC sealed sources are sources that exceed the limits stated in 10 CFR 61 when isotope concentrations are averaged over the volume of the capsule. Based on the surveys, the estimated number of existing Potential GTCC sealed sources held by specific licensees is 89,000, with an unpackaged volume of 0.93 m{sup 3} and an activity of 2,300,000 Ci. However, current disposal practices allow concentration averaging over the disposal container, substantially reducing the number of sealed sources which will actually be classified as GTCC LLW.

  19. Vitrification treatment options for disposal of greater-than-Class-C low-level waste in a deep geologic repository

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullmer, K.S.; Fish, L.W.; Fischer, D.K.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE), in keeping with their responsibility under Public Law 99-240, the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Amendments Act of 1985, is investigating several disposal options for greater-than-Class C low-level waste (GTCC LLW), including emplacement in a deep geologic repository. At the present time vitrification, namely borosilicate glass, is the standard waste form assumed for high-level waste accepted into the Civilian Radioactive Waste Management System. This report supports DOE`s investigation of the deep geologic disposal option by comparing the vitrification treatments that are able to convert those GTCC LLWs that are inherently migratory into stable waste forms acceptable for disposal in a deep geologic repository. Eight vitrification treatments that utilize glass, glass ceramic, or basalt waste form matrices are identified. Six of these are discussed in detail, stating the advantages and limitations of each relative to their ability to immobilize GTCC LLW. The report concludes that the waste form most likely to provide the best composite of performance characteristics for GTCC process waste is Iron Enriched Basalt 4 (IEB4).

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulse, R.A.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planning for storage or disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of that waste to estimate volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms. Data from existing literature, disposal records, and original research were used to estimate the characteristics and project volumes and radionuclide activities to the year 2035. GTCC LLW is categorized as: nuclear utilities waste, sealed sources waste, DOE-held potential GTCC LLW; and, other generator waste. It has been determined that the largest volume of those wastes, approximately 57%, is generated by nuclear power plants. The Other Generator waste category contributes approximately 10% of the total GTCC LLW volume projected to the year 2035. Waste held by the Department of Energy, which is potential GTCC LLW, accounts for nearly 33% of all waste projected to the year 2035; however, no disposal determination has been made for that waste. Sealed sources are less than 0.2% of the total projected volume of GTCC LLW.

  1. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste characterization: Estimated volumes, radionuclide activities, and other characteristics. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE`s) planning for the disposal of greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste (GTCC LLW) requires characterization of the waste. This report estimates volumes, radionuclide activities, and waste forms of GTCC LLW to the year 2035. It groups the waste into four categories, representative of the type of generator or holder of the waste: Nuclear Utilities, Sealed Sources, DOE-Held, and Other Generator. GTCC LLW includes activated metals (activation hardware from reactor operation and decommissioning), process wastes (i.e., resins, filters, etc.), sealed sources, and other wastes routinely generated by users of radioactive material. Estimates reflect the possible effect that packaging and concentration averaging may have on the total volume of GTCC LLW. Possible GTCC mixed LLW is also addressed. Nuclear utilities will probably generate the largest future volume of GTCC LLW with 65--83% of the total volume. The other generators will generate 17--23% of the waste volume, while GTCC sealed sources are expected to contribute 1--12%. A legal review of DOE`s obligations indicates that the current DOE-Held wastes described in this report will not require management as GTCC LLW because of the contractual circumstances under which they were accepted for storage. This report concludes that the volume of GTCC LLW should not pose a significant management problem from a scientific or technical standpoint. The projected volume is small enough to indicate that a dedicated GTCC LLW disposal facility may not be justified. Instead, co-disposal with other waste types is being considered as an option.

  2. Natural Recharge to the Unconfined Aquifer System on the Hanford Site from the Greater Cold Creek Watershed: Progress Report 2004

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waichler, Scott R.; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Movement of contaminants in groundwater at the Hanford Site is heavily dependent on recharge to the unconfined aquifer. As the effects of past artificial discharges dissipate, the water table is expected to return to more natural conditions, and natural recharge will become the driving force when evaluating future groundwater flow conditions and related contaminant transport. Previous work on the relationship of natural recharge to groundwater movement at the Hanford Site has focused on direct recharge from infiltrating rainfall and snowmelt within the area represented by the Sitewide Groundwater Model (SGM) domain. However, part of the groundwater recharge at Hanford is provided by flow from Greater Cold Creek watershed (GCC), a large drainage area on the western boundary of the Hanford Site that includes Cold Creek Valley, Dry Creek Valley, and the Hanford side of Rattlesnake Mountain. This study was undertaken to estimate the recharge from GCC, which is believed to enter the unconfined aquifer as both infiltrating streamflow and shallow subsurface flow. To estimate recharge, the Distributed Hydrology-Soil-Vegetation Model (DHSVM) was used to simulate a detailed water balance of GCC from 1956 to 2001 at a spatial resolution of 200~m and a temporal resolution of one hour. For estimating natural recharge to Hanford from watersheds along its western and southwestern boundaries, the most important aspects that need to be considered are 1)~distribution and relative magnitude of precipitation and evapotranspiration over the watershed, 2)~streamflow generation at upper elevations and infiltration at lower elevations during rare runoff events, and 3)~permeability of the basalt bedrock surface underlying the soil mantle.

  3. Greater Sage-Grouse Habitat Use and Population Demographics at the Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area, Carbon County, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gregory D. Johnson; Chad W. LeBeau; Ryan Nielsen; Troy Rintz; Jamey Eddy; Matt Holloran

    2012-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was conducted to obtain baseline data on use of the proposed Simpson Ridge Wind Resource Area (SRWRA) in Carbon County, Wyoming by greater sage-grouse. The first two study years were designed to determine pre-construction seasonally selected habitats and population-level vital rates (productivity and survival). The presence of an existing wind energy facility in the project area, the PacifiCorp Seven Mile Hill (SMH) project, allowed us to obtain some information on initial sage-grouse response to wind turbines the first two years following construction. To our knowledge these are the first quantitative data on sage-grouse response to an existing wind energy development. This report presents results of the first two study years (April 1, 2009 through March 30, 2011). This study was selected for continued funding by the National Wind Coordinating Collaborative Sage-Grouse Collaborative (NWCC-SGC) and has been ongoing since March 30, 2011. Future reports summarizing results of this research will be distributed through the NWCC-SGC. To investigate population trends through time, we determined the distribution and numbers of males using leks throughout the study area, which included a 4-mile radius buffer around the SRWRA. Over the 2-year study, 116 female greater sage-grouse were captured by spotlighting and use of hoop nets on roosts surrounding leks during the breeding period. Radio marked birds were located anywhere from twice a week to once a month, depending on season. All radio-locations were classified to season. We developed predictor variables used to predict success of fitness parameters and relative probability of habitat selection within the SRWRA and SMH study areas. Anthropogenic features included paved highways, overhead transmission lines, wind turbines and turbine access roads. Environmental variables included vegetation and topography features. Home ranges were estimated using a kernel density estimator. We developed resource selection functions (RSF) to estimate probability of selection within the SRWRA and SMH. Fourteen active greater sage-grouse leks were documented during lek surveys Mean lek size decreased from 37 in 2008 to 22 in 2010. Four leks located 0.61, 1.3, 1.4 and 2.5 km from the nearest wind turbine remained active throughout the study, but the total number of males counted on these four leks decreased from 162 the first year prior to construction (2008), to 97 in 2010. Similar lek declines were noted in regional leks not associated with wind energy development throughout Carbon County. We obtained 2,659 sage-grouse locations from radio-equipped females, which were used to map use of each project area by season. The sage-grouse populations within both study areas are relatively non-migratory, as radio-marked sage-grouse used similar areas during all annual life cycles. Potential impacts to sage-grouse from wind energy infrastructure are not well understood. The data rom this study provide insight into the early interactions of wind energy infrastructure and sage-grouse. Nest success and brood-rearing success were not statistically different between areas with and without wind energy development in the short-term. Nest success also was not influenced by anthropogenic features such as turbines in the short-term. Additionally, female survival was similar among both study areas, suggesting wind energy infrastructure was not impacting female survival in the short-term; however, further analysis is needed to identify habitats with different levels of risk to better understand the impact of wind enregy development on survival. Nest and brood-rearing habitat selection were not influenced by turbines in the short-term; however, summer habitat selection occurred within habitats closer to wind turbines. Major roads were avoided in both study areas and during most of the seasons. The impact of transmission lines varied among study areas, suggesting other landscape features may be influencing selection. The data provided in this report are preliminary and are not meant to provide a basis for fo

  4. Influence of the Fin on Two-Dimensional Characteristics of Dispersed Flow With Wall Liquid Film in the Vicinity of Obstacle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stosic, Zoran V. [Framatome ANP GmbH, P.O. Box 3220, 91050 Erlangen (Germany); Stevanovic, Vladimir D. [University of Belgrade, Kraljice Marije 16, 11000 Belgrade, Serbia and Montenegro (Yugoslavia); Serizawa, Akimi [Kyoto University, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan)

    2002-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spacers have positive effects on the heat transfer enhancement and critical heat flux (CHF) increase downstream of their location in the boiling channel. These effects are further increased by the inclusion of the fin on the spacer rear edge. Numerical simulation of a separation in a high void gas phase and dispersed droplets flow around a spacer, with a liquid film flowing on the wall, is performed. Mechanisms leading to the CHF increase due to the two-phase flow separation and liquid film thickening downstream the spacer are demonstrated. Numerical simulations of gas phase, entrained droplets and wall liquid film flows were performed with the three-fluid model and with the application of the high order numerical scheme for the liquid film surface interface tracking. Predicted is a separation of gas and entrained droplets streams around the spacer without and with a fin inclined 30 and 60 degrees to the wall, as well as a change of wall liquid film thickness in the vicinity of spacer. Results of liquid film dynamic behaviour are compared with the recently obtained experimental results. Multi-dimensional characteristics of surface waves on the liquid film were measured with newly developed ultrasonic transmission technique in a 3 3 rod bundle test section with air-water flow under atmospheric conditions. Obtained numerical results are in good agreement with experimental observations. The presented investigation gives insight into the complex mechanisms of separated two-phase flow with wall liquid film around the spacer and support thermal-hydraulic design and optimisation of flow obstacles in various thermal equipment. (authors)

  5. Meteorological and air quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative cover in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Taha, Haider; Hammer, Hillel; Akbari, Hashem

    2002-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The study described in this report is part of a project sponsored by the Toronto Atmospheric Fund, performed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, to assess the potential role of surface property modifications on energy, meteorology, and air quality in the Greater Toronto Area (GTA), Canada. Numerical models were used to establish the possible meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of increased urban albedo and vegetative fraction, i.e., ''cool-city'' strategies that can mitigate the urban heat island (UHI), significantly reduce urban energy consumption, and improve thermal comfort, particularly during periods of hot weather in summer. Mitigation is even more important during critical heat wave periods with possible increased heat-related hospitalization and mortality. The evidence suggests that on an annual basis cool-city strategies are beneficial, and the implementation of such measures is currently being investigated in the U.S. and Canada. We simulated possible scenari os for urban heat-island mitigation in the GTA and investigated consequent meteorological changes, and also performed limited air-quality analysis to assess related impacts. The study was based on a combination of mesoscale meteorological modeling, Lagrangian (trajectory), and photochemical trajectory modeling to assess the potential meteorological and ozone air-quality impacts of cool-city strategies. As available air-quality and emissions data are incompatible with models currently in use at LBNL, our air-quality analysis was based on photochemical trajectory modeling. Because of questions as to the accuracy and appropriateness of this approach, in our opinion this aspect of the study can be improved in the future, and the air-quality results discussed in this report should be viewed as relatively qualitative. The MM5 meteorological model predicts a UHI in the order of 2 to 3 degrees C in locations of maxima, and about 1 degree C as a typical value over most of the urban area. Our si mulations suggest that cool-city strategies can typically reduce local urban air temperature by 0.5-1 degrees C; as more sporadic events, larger decreases (1.5 degrees C, 2.5-2.7 degrees C and 4-6 degrees C) were also simulated. With regard to ozone mixing ratios along the simulated trajectories, the effects of cool-city strategies appear to be on the order of 2 ppb, a typical decrease. The photochemical trajectory model (CIT) also simulates larger decreases (e.g., 4 to 8 ppb), but these are not taken as representative of the potential impacts in this report. A comparison with other simulations suggest very crudely that a decrease of this magnitude corresponds to significant ''equivalent'' decreases in both NOx and VOCs emissions in the region. Our preliminary results suggest that significant UHI control can be achieved with cool-cities strategies in the GTA and is therefore worth further study. We recommend that better input data and more accurate modeling schemes be used to carry out f uture studies in the same direction.

  6. Vision-based obstacle avoidance

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Galbraith, John (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for allowing a robot to avoid objects along a programmed path: first, a field of view for an electronic imager of the robot is established along a path where the electronic imager obtains the object location information within the field of view; second, a population coded control signal is then derived from the object location information and is transmitted to the robot; finally, the robot then responds to the control signal and avoids the detected object.

  7. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Department of Energy GTCC-like Waste

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This EIS evaluates the reasonably foreseeable environmental impacts associated with the proposed development, operation, and long-term management of a disposal facility or facilities for Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste and GTCC-like waste. The Environmental Protection Agency is a cooperating agency in the preparation of this EIS.

  8. Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frothy Bloat Mitigation in Grazing Cattle Frothy bloat impacts on cattle production in the United States in 1999 were estimated to be greater than $300 million dollars. Frothy bloat is the major nonpathogenic cause of death loss and depressed weight gains in stocker cattle grazing winter wheat

  9. What is the Eelgrass Stressor Response Project? The Eelgrass Stressor Response Project was established in 2005 to identify causes of eelgrass decline in greater Puget

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carrington, Emily

    was established in 2005 to identify causes of eelgrass decline in greater Puget Sound. It is closely connected to DNR's long term eelgrass monitoring program. Both projects are part of the Puget Sound Assessment and Monitoring Program (PSAMP), a multi-agency monitoring effort that is coordinated by the Puget Sound

  10. Brandon Heller A number of recent advances in the physical layer are enabling wireless communications devices to reach ever-greater speeds. These

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jain, Raj

    -Division Multiplexing (OFDM) 3. Multi-Antenna Techniques 3.1 Multiple Input Single Output (MISO) 3.2 Multiple Input range, better bit rates, greater battery life, and increased reliability. Upcoming standards bit-error rates. Section 4 describes options for more reliably encoding data. Section five discusses

  11. Geohydrologic feasibility study of the greater Green River Basin for the potential applicability of Jack W. McIntyre`s patented tool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, P.D.

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geraghty & Miller, Inc, of Midland, Texas conducted geologic and hydrologic feasibility studies of the potential applicability of Jack McIntyre`s patented tool for the recovery of natural gas from coalbed/sand formations in the Greater Green River Basin through literature surveys.

  12. Confronting the Graduation Rate Crisis in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losen, Daniel; Orfield, Gary; Balfanz, Robert

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Benavides ISD United ISD Paducah ISD Clint ISD Dime Box ISDS John B Alexander H S Paducah H S Clint H S Dime Box School

  13. River meander modeling and confronting uncertainty.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Posner, Ari J. (University of Arizona Tucson, AZ)

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study examines the meandering phenomenon as it occurs in media throughout terrestrial, glacial, atmospheric, and aquatic environments. Analysis of the minimum energy principle, along with theories of Coriolis forces (and random walks to explain the meandering phenomenon) found that these theories apply at different temporal and spatial scales. Coriolis forces might induce topological changes resulting in meandering planforms. The minimum energy principle might explain how these forces combine to limit the sinuosity to depth and width ratios that are common throughout various media. The study then compares the first order analytical solutions for flow field by Ikeda, et al. (1981) and Johannesson and Parker (1989b). Ikeda's et al. linear bank erosion model was implemented to predict the rate of bank erosion in which the bank erosion coefficient is treated as a stochastic variable that varies with physical properties of the bank (e.g., cohesiveness, stratigraphy, or vegetation density). The developed model was used to predict the evolution of meandering planforms. Then, the modeling results were analyzed and compared to the observed data. Since the migration of a meandering channel consists of downstream translation, lateral expansion, and downstream or upstream rotations several measures are formulated in order to determine which of the resulting planforms is closest to the experimental measured one. Results from the deterministic model highly depend on the calibrated erosion coefficient. Since field measurements are always limited, the stochastic model yielded more realistic predictions of meandering planform evolutions. Due to the random nature of bank erosion coefficient, the meandering planform evolution is a stochastic process that can only be accurately predicted by a stochastic model.

  14. Confronting the Graduation Rate Crisis in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Losen, Daniel; Orfield, Gary; Balfanz, Robert

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Guide to Graduation Policy and Rates, Editorial Projects inthe Graduation Crisis. Bethesda, MD: Editorial Projects inthe Graduation Crisis. Bethesda, MD: Editorial Projects in

  15. RESEARCH ARTICLE Confronting collinearity: comparing methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    conservation resources are used efficiently. However, estimating relative effects is complicated because: 31 March 2009 / Accepted: 22 June 2009 / Published online: 14 July 2009 Ã? Springer Science+Business: residual regression, model or variable selection, averaged coefficients from all sup- ported models, summed

  16. Editorial Commentary Energy strategies to confront

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delaware, University of

    around the corner). The energy revolution required to mitigate the climate change predicted by the middle

  17. Confronting Dilaton-exchange gravity with experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. V. Klapdor-Kleingrothaus; H. Päs; U. Sarkar

    2000-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the experimental constraints on theories, where the equivalence principle is violated by dilaton-exchange contributions to the usual graviton-exchange gravity. We point out that in this case it is not possible to have any CPT violation and hence there is no constraint from the CPT violating measurements in the $K-$system. The most stringent bound is obtained from the $K_L - K_S$ mass difference. In contrast, neither neutrino oscillation experiments nor neutrinoless double beta decay imply significant constraints.

  18. Guest Editors' Introduction: Confronting the Hardware

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ) and IC piracy, to digital rights management, to untrusted third-party IP cores, to attacks designed. The authors designed two hardware Trojans, which leak the encryption key by manipulating the transmission of Computers8 #12;a way that they change neither the functionality of the digital part nor the performance

  19. Biomass 2012: Confronting Challenges, Creating Opportunities | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platform isEnergyMeeting | DepartmentBioenergyUS0 Conference Agendaof

  20. Greater-than-Class C low-level waste characterization. Appendix I: Impact of concentration averaging low-level radioactive waste volume projections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuite, P.; Tuite, K.; O`Kelley, M.; Ely, P.

    1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study provides a quantitative framework for bounding unpackaged greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste types as a function of concentration averaging. The study defines the three concentration averaging scenarios that lead to base, high, and low volumetric projections; identifies those waste types that could be greater-than-Class C under the high volume, or worst case, concentration averaging scenario; and quantifies the impact of these scenarios on identified waste types relative to the base case scenario. The base volume scenario was assumed to reflect current requirements at the disposal sites as well as the regulatory views. The high volume scenario was assumed to reflect the most conservative criteria as incorporated in some compact host state requirements. The low volume scenario was assumed to reflect the 10 CFR Part 61 criteria as applicable to both shallow land burial facilities and to practices that could be employed to reduce the generation of Class C waste types.

  1. Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lippert, Peter Gregory

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ! ! Detrital U-Pb geochronology provenance analyses: case studies in the Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, and the Book Cliffs, Utah By Peter Gregory Lippert Submitted to the graduate degree program in Geology and the Graduate Faculty... i Acceptance Page ii Abstract iii-iv Table of contents v-viii List of figures and tables ix-x Chapter 1. Introduction 11-16 Chapter 2. Geologic History...

  2. ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND CONSERVATION BLOCK GRANT (EECBG) - BETTER BUILDINGS NEIGHBORHOOD PROGRAM AT GREATER CINCINNATI ENERGY ALLIANCE Project Title: Home Performance with Energy Star® and Better Buildings Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzhauser, Andy; Jones, Chris; Faust, Jeremy; Meyer, Chris; Van Divender, Lisa

    2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (Energy Alliance) is a nonprofit economic development agency dedicated to helping Greater Cincinnati and Northern Kentucky communities reduce energy consumption. The Energy Alliance has launched programs to educate homeowners, commercial property owners, and nonprofit organizations about energy efficiency opportunities they can use to drive energy use reductions and financial savings, while extending significant focus to creating/retaining jobs through these programs. The mission of the Energy Alliance is based on the premise that investment in energy efficiency can lead to transformative economic development in a region. With support from seven municipalities, the Energy Alliance began operation in early 2010 and has been among the fastest growing nonprofit organizations in the Greater Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky area. The Energy Alliance offers two programs endorsed by the Department of Energy: the Home Performance with ENERGY STAR® Program for homeowners and the Better Buildings Performance Program for commercial entities. Both programs couple expert guidance, project management, and education in energy efficiency best practices with incentives and innovative energy efficiency financing to help building owners effectively invest in the energy efficiency, comfort, health, longevity, and environmental impact of their residential or commercial buildings. The Energy Alliance has raised over $23 million of public and private capital to build a robust market for energy efficiency investment. Of the $23 million, $17 million was a direct grant from the Department of Energy Better Buildings Neighborhood Program (BBNP). The organization’s investments in energy efficiency projects in the residential and commercial sector have led to well over $50 million in direct economic activity and created over 375,000 hours of labor created or retained. In addition, over 250 workers have been trained through the Building Performance Training Center, a program that was developed and funded by the Energy Alliance and housed at Cincinnati State Technical and Community College. Nearly 100 residential and commercial contractors currently participate in the Energy Alliance’s two major programs, which have together served over 2,800 residential and 100 commercial customers. Additionally, the Energy Alliance established loan programs for homeowners, nonprofits and commercial businesses. The GC-HELP program was established to provide up to ten year low interest, unsecured loans to homeowners to cover the energy efficiency products they purchased through the Energy Alliance approved contractor base. To date the Energy Alliance has financed over $1 million in energy efficiency loans for homeowners, without any loans written off. The nonprofit business community is offered five year, fixed-interest rate loans through the Building Communities Loan Fund of $250,000. Additionally, the Energy Alliance has developed GC-PACE, a commercial financing tool that enables buildings owners to finance their energy upgrades through voluntary property assessments deploying low-interest extended-term capital from the bond market. The Energy Alliance and its partners are actively evaluating additional market-based financing solutions.

  3. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid loaded nano-insulin has greater potentials of combating arsenic induced hyperglycemia in mice: Some novel findings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samadder, Asmita; Das, Jayeeta; Das, Sreemanti; De, Arnab; Saha, Santu Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Soumya Sundar; Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman, E-mail: prof_arkb@yahoo.co.in

    2013-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Diabetes is a menacing problem, particularly to inhabitants of groundwater arsenic contaminated areas needing new medical approaches. This study examines if PLGA loaded nano-insulin (NIn), administered either intraperitoneally (i.p.) or through oral route, has a greater cost-effective anti-hyperglycemic potential than that of insulin in chronically arsenite-fed hyperglycemic mice. The particle size, morphology and zeta potential of nano-insulin were determined using dynamic light scattering method, scanning electronic and atomic force microscopies. The ability of the nano-insulin (NIn) to cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB) was also checked. Circular dichroic spectroscopic (CD) data of insulin and nano-insulin in presence or absence of arsenic were compared. Several diabetic markers in different groups of experimental and control mice were assessed. The mitochondrial functioning through indices like cytochrome c, pyruvate-kinase, glucokinase, ATP/ADP ratio, mitochondrial membrane potential, cell membrane potential and calcium-ion level was also evaluated. Expressions of the relevant marker proteins and mRNAs like insulin, GLUT2, GLUT4, IRS1, IRS2, UCP2, PI3, PPAR?, CYP1A1, Bcl2, caspase3 and p38 for tracking-down the signaling cascade were also analyzed. Results revealed that i.p.-injected nano-encapsulated-insulin showed better results; NIn, due to its smaller size, faster mobility, site-specific release, could cross BBB and showed positive modulation in mitochondrial signaling cascades and other downstream signaling molecules in reducing arsenic-induced-hyperglycemia. CD data indicated that nano-insulin had less distorted secondary structure as compared with that of insulin in presence of arsenic. Thus, overall analyses revealed that PLGA nano-insulin showed better efficacy in combating arsenite-induced-hyperglycemia than that of insulin and therefore, has greater potentials for use in nano-encapsulated form. - Highlights: ? PLGA encapsulated nano-insulin attenuates arsenic-induced diabetes in mice. ? Encapsulated insulin acts effectively at nearly 10 fold lesser dose than insulin. ? Injection route is more effective than oral administration route. ? Nano-insulin can cross blood–brain barrier with added physiological implications. ? Nano-insulin acts mainly through regulation of mitochondrial signaling cascade.

  4. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste shipping package/container identification and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report identifies a variety of shipping packages (also referred to as casks) and waste containers currently available or being developed that could be used for greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level waste (LLW). Since GTCC LLW varies greatly in size, shape, and activity levels, the casks and waste containers that could be used range in size from small, to accommodate a single sealed radiation source, to very large-capacity casks/canisters used to transport or dry-store highly radioactive spent fuel. In some cases, the waste containers may serve directly as shipping packages, while in other cases, the containers would need to be placed in a transport cask. For the purpose of this report, it is assumed that the generator is responsible for transporting the waste to a Department of Energy (DOE) storage, treatment, or disposal facility. Unless DOE establishes specific acceptance criteria, the receiving facility would need the capability to accept any of the casks and waste containers identified in this report. In identifying potential casks and waste containers, no consideration was given to their adequacy relative to handling, storage, treatment, and disposal. Those considerations must be addressed separately as the capabilities of the receiving facility and the handling requirements and operations are better understood.

  5. Project management plan for low-level mixed wastes and greater-than category 3 waste per Tri-Party Agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-Than-Category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10. The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; and (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the techuical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are summarized in the table below, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  6. Project management plan for low-level mixed waste and greater-than-category 3 waste per tri-party agreement M-91-10

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOUNINI, L.

    1999-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project management plan is to define the tasks and deliverables that will support the treatment, storage, and disposal of remote-handled and large container contact-handled low-level mixed waste, and the storage of Greater-thaw category 3 waste. The plan is submitted to fulfill the requirements of the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order Milestone M-91-10, The plan was developed in four steps: (1) the volumes of the applicable waste streams and the physical, dangerous, and radioactive characteristics were established using existing databases and forecasts; (2) required treatment was identified for each waste stream based on land disposal restriction treatment standards and waste characterization data; (3) alternatives for providing the required treatment were evaluated and the preferred options were selected; (4) an acquisition plan was developed to establish the technical, schedule, and cost baselines for providing the required treatment capabilities. The major waste streams are tabulated, along with the required treatment for disposal.

  7. Stakeholder Engagement on the Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste -12565

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, Christine; Joyce, James; Edelman, Arnold [Office of Environmental Management, Office of Disposal Operations-EM-43 (United States)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Disposal Operations is responsible for developing a permanent disposal capability for a small volume, but highly radioactive, class of commercial low-level radioactive waste, known as Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste. DOE has issued a draft environmental impact statement (EIS) and will be completing a final EIS under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) that evaluates a range of disposal alternatives. Like other classes of radioactive waste, proposing and evaluating disposal options for GTCC waste is highly controversial, presents local and national impacts, and generates passionate views from stakeholders. Recent national and international events, such as the cancellation of the Yucca Mountain project and the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear accident, have heighten stakeholder awareness of everything nuclear, including disposal of radioactive waste. With these challenges, the Office of Disposal Operations recognizes that informed decision-making that will result from stakeholder engagement and participation is critical to the success of the GTCC EIS project. This paper discusses the approach used by the Office of Disposal Operations to engage stakeholders on the GTCC EIS project, provides advice based on our experiences, and proffers some ideas for future engagements in today's open, always connected cyber environment. (authors)

  8. Greater-than-Class C low-level radioactive waste transportation regulations and requirements study. National Low-Level Waste Management Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tyacke, M.; Schmitt, R.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this report is to identify the regulations and requirements for transporting greater-than-Class C (GTCC) low-level radioactive waste (LLW) and to identify planning activities that need to be accomplished in preparation for transporting GTCC LLW. The regulations and requirements for transporting hazardous materials, of which GTCC LLW is included, are complex and include several Federal agencies, state and local governments, and Indian tribes. This report is divided into five sections and three appendices. Section 1 introduces the report. Section 2 identifies and discusses the transportation regulations and requirements. The regulations and requirements are divided into Federal, state, local government, and Indian tribes subsections. This report does not identify the regulations or requirements of specific state, local government, and Indian tribes, since the storage, treatment, and disposal facility locations and transportation routes have not been specifically identified. Section 3 identifies the planning needed to ensure that all transportation activities are in compliance with the regulations and requirements. It is divided into (a) transportation packaging; (b) transportation operations; (c) system safety and risk analysis, (d) route selection; (e) emergency preparedness and response; and (f) safeguards and security. This section does not provide actual planning since the details of the Department of Energy (DOE) GTCC LLW Program have not been finalized, e.g., waste characterization and quantity, storage, treatment and disposal facility locations, and acceptance criteria. Sections 4 and 5 provide conclusions and referenced documents, respectively.

  9. Explanation of Significant Differences Between Models used to Assess Groundwater Impacts for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and Greater-Than-Class C-Like Waste Environmental Impact Statement (DOE/EIS-0375-D) and the

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Annette Schafer; Arthur S. Rood; A. Jeffrey Sondrup

    2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Models have been used to assess the groundwater impacts to support the Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE-EIS 2011) for a facility sited at the Idaho National Laboratory and the Environmental Assessment for the INL Remote-Handled Low-Level Waste Disposal Project (INL 2011). Groundwater impacts are primarily a function of (1) location determining the geologic and hydrologic setting, (2) disposal facility configuration, and (3) radionuclide source, including waste form and release from the waste form. In reviewing the assumptions made between the model parameters for the two different groundwater impacts assessments, significant differences were identified. This report presents the two sets of model assumptions and discusses their origins and implications for resulting dose predictions. Given more similar model parameters, predicted doses would be commensurate.

  10. NUMERICAL SOLUTION OF AN INVERSE OBSTACLE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    n?Z. An exp(in?),. (2.6) where An and An are constants. Adding (2.2) and (2.5), ...... [10] T. Cheng, P. Li, and Y. Wang, Near-field imaging of perfectly conducting

  11. On smooth relaxations of obstacle sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 18, 2011 ... Institute of Operations Research, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, .... quel the family of functions (?t , t > 0) will have to satisfy the following.

  12. Greater Rochester Nursing Home Quality Consortium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldman, Steven A.

    Agenda 08:15 Registration; Continental Breakfast; Lean Six Sigma Teams' Posters 09:00 Welcome the Impact of Transforming Elder Care 10:15 Lean Six Sigma Team Project Presentations Melissa Allmaier, RN, Six Sigma Master Black Belt John Biuso, BSIE, Six Sigma Black Belt, CPIM Project Team leaders

  13. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    the module includes training on the Idaho site commitment to safety and safety programs, quality assurance and environmental protection and the right to a safe and healthful...

  14. Ecology and Greater Prairie-Chicken

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balasundaram, Balabhaskar "Baski"

    of Mortality and Competition _______________ 5 Wind Power Generation ___________________________ 5 Habitat

  15. Promoting greater Federal energy productivity [Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Mark; Dudich, Luther

    2003-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a close-out report describing the work done under this DOE grant to improve Federal Energy Productivity. Over the four years covered in this document, the Alliance To Save Energy conducted liaison with the private sector through our Federal Energy Productivity Task Force. In this time, the Alliance held several successful workshops on the uses of metering in Federal facilities and other meetings. We also conducted significant research on energy efficiency, financing, facilitated studies of potential energy savings in energy intensive agencies, and undertook other tasks outlined in this report.

  16. Greater Boston Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJump to: navigation,II Wind FarmGratiotLakesWind

  17. Clean Cities: Greater Indiana Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee RegionIndiana

  18. Held Hostage: America and Its Allies Confront OPEC, 1973 - 1981 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Kathleen

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    system in 1971 and the advent of petrodollars on world currency markets, the emergence of the Soviet Union as an oil exporter, the rise of OPEC as a regulator of oil prices and the consequent decline in the power of the seven major multinational oil...

  19. Confronting GRB prompt emission with a model for subphotospheric dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahlgren, Björn; Nymark, Tanja; Ryde, Felix; Pe'er, Asaf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of the prompt emission in gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) is still an unsolved problem and several different mechanisms have been suggested. Here we fit Fermi GRB data with a photospheric emission model which includes dissipation of the jet kinetic energy below the photosphere. The resulting spectra are dominated by Comptonization and contain no significant contribution from synchrotron radiation. In order to fit to the data we span a physically motivated part of the model's parameter space and create DREAM ($\\textit{Dissipation with Radiative Emission as A table Model}$), a table model for ${\\scriptsize XSPEC}$. We show that this model can describe different kinds of GRB spectra, including GRB 090618, representing a typical Band function spectrum, and GRB 100724B, illustrating a double peaked spectrum, previously fitted with a Band+blackbody model, suggesting they originate from a similar scenario. We suggest that the main difference between these two types of bursts is the optical depth at the dissipatio...

  20. Share this with Enterprises continue to confront the challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    that intend to leverage mobile technologies to solve pressing business issues are faced with the daunting task be scaled to support future growth while capable of evolving with the underlying technology. AT&T Mobility strategy and custom development to the integration, hosting and lifecycle management of mobile applications

  1. Confrontation, comparison and reconstruction of the walled city of Shahjahanabad

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Ajit, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cities offer a platform for cultural, social, physical and economic co-existence and conflict. Many traditional cities of India, which were conceived on the basis of relative autonomy of the existing societal structure, ...

  2. Inspired Start: Experiences of Adult Students Confronting the GED Process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McKay, Pilar Erin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with, so he developed the in-class philosophy of Kaizen.He defined Kaizen as small steps for continual improvementclass. The definition of Kaizen was written on the side

  3. Black hole accretion versus star formation rate: theory confronts observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volonteri, Marta; Netzer, Hagai; Bellovary, Jillian; Dotti, Massimo; Governato, Fabio

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a suite of hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy mergers to compare star formation rate (SFR) and black hole accretion rate (BHAR) for galaxies before the interaction ('stochastic' phase), during the 'merger' proper, lasting ~0.2-0.3 Gyr, and in the 'remnant' phase. We calculate the bi-variate distribution of SFR and BHAR and define the regions in the SFR-BHAR plane that the three phases occupy. No strong correlation between BHAR and galaxy-wide SFR is found. A possible exception are galaxies with the highest SFR and the highest BHAR. We also bin the data in the same way used in several observational studies, by either measuring the mean SFR for AGN in different luminosity bins, or the mean BHAR for galaxies in bins of SFR. We find that the apparent contradiction or SFR versus BHAR for observed samples of AGN and star forming galaxies is actually caused by binning effects. The two types of samples use different projections of the full bi-variate distribution, and the full information would lead to unamb...

  4. Held Hostage: America and Its Allies Confront OPEC, 1973 - 1981

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barr, Kathleen

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The oil shocks of the 1970s, initiated by the first Arab oil embargo in 1973, stunned the industrialized world. The Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) controlled a resource that was vital to the national well-being and national...

  5. CONFRONTING COLD DARK MATTER PREDICTIONS WITH OBSERVED GALAXY ROTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obreschkow, Danail; Meyer, Martin; Power, Chris; Staveley-Smith, Lister [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia)] [International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), M468, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Hwy, Crawley, WA 6009 (Australia); Ma, Xiangcheng [The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Centre for Astrophysics, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)] [The University of Sciences and Technology of China, Centre for Astrophysics, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China); Zwaan, Martin [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany)] [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, D-85748 Garching b. Muenchen (Germany); Drinkwater, Michael J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The rich statistics of galaxy rotations as captured by the velocity function (VF) provide invaluable constraints on galactic baryon physics and the nature of dark matter (DM). However, the comparison of observed galaxy rotations against cosmological models is prone to subtle caveats that can easily lead to misinterpretations. Our analysis reveals full statistical consistency between {approx}5000 galaxy rotations, observed in line-of-sight projection, and predictions based on the standard cosmological model ({Lambda}CDM) at the mass-resolution of the Millennium simulation (H I line-based circular velocities above {approx}50 km s{sup -1}). Explicitly, the H I linewidths in the H I Parkes All Sky Survey (HIPASS) are found to be consistent with those in S{sup 3}-SAX, a post-processed semi-analytic model for the Millennium simulation. Previously found anomalies in the VF can be plausibly attributed to (1) the mass-limit of the Millennium simulation, (2) confused sources in HIPASS, (3) inaccurate inclination measurements for optically faint sources, and (4) the non-detectability of gas-poor early-type galaxies. These issues can be bypassed by comparing observations and models using linewidth source counts rather than VFs. We investigate if and how well such source counts can constrain the temperature of DM.

  6. Off-road obstacle classification and traversability analysis in the presence of negative obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Jacoby

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    those areas that are the most hazardous. Classificationin the area of mobility in the face of hazardous terrain.

  7. Off-road obstacle classification and traversability analysis in the presence of negative obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Jacoby

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2.5D multi-level surface map grid representation (image03], or 3D map. A 2D grid map, also known as an occupancyquick to search. The 3D grid map is made up of voxels that

  8. Greater solubility usually = greater toxicity Chromium (Cr) Six oxidation states, +1, +2, +3, +4, +5, +6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruns, Tom

    (depleted uranium) · 4 oxidation states (+4, +6 most common) · U(VI) water-soluble, U(IV) in-soluble Metals Uranium ­ heaviest natural element - 17 isotopes · Natural form % = U-238 (99.27), U-235 (0.72), U-234 (0 in nuclear fuel ­ U-235 (readily fissionable) · Used in nuclear and conventional weapons · Uranium enrichment

  9. Obstacles and Opportunity: Overcoming Barriers in Today's CHP Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chittum, A.; Kaufman, N.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Combined heat and power (CHP), which can offer tremendous efficiency benefits to industrial facilities around the country, continues to be viewed as a long-term efficiency opportunity. However, the high up-front cost of CHP equipment and fuel...

  10. ON THE GLOBAL SOLUTIONS OF THE PARABOLIC OBSTACLE PROBLEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shahgholian, Henrik

    analysis is essential in studying the local properties of a free boundary. The idea to use information investigation in [CPS]. Notations and de#12;nitions. Throughout the paper we will use the following notations: z

  11. Mobile Robot Obstacle Avoidance Via Depth From Focus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomasi, Carlo

    Abstract A critical challenge in the creation of autonomous mobile robots is the reliable detection radiation such as direct sunlight. In contrast, vision systems are passive and can provide lateral and depth market. However, our particular embodiment of this concept is remarkable because our focus-based system

  12. Managing stormwater in Watertown, MA : overcoming obstacles to change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chai, Shutsu K. (Shutsu Kindness)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As effective imperviousness increases with urbanization, the impacts of stormwater runoff on local water systems and aquatic life are more and more deleterious. Stormwater runoff carries pollutants into nearby water bodies, ...

  13. Medical waste management in Ibadan, Nigeria: Obstacles and prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coker, Akinwale [Department of Civil Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); School of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1SB (United Kingdom)], E-mail: cokerwale@yahoo.com; Sangodoyin, Abimbola [Department of Agricultural and Environmental Engineering, Faculty of Technology, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Sridhar, Mynepalli [Division of Environmental Health, Faculty of Public Health, College of Medicine, University of Ibadan, Ibadan (Nigeria); Booth, Colin; Olomolaiye, Paul; Hammond, Felix [School of Engineering and the Built Environment, University of Wolverhampton, Wolverhampton WV1 1SB (United Kingdom)

    2009-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantification and characterization of medical waste generated in healthcare facilities (HCFs) in a developing African nation has been conducted to provide insights into existing waste collection and disposal approaches, so as to provide sustainable avenues for institutional policy improvement. The study, in Ibadan city, Nigeria, entailed a representative classification of nearly 400 healthcare facilities, from 11 local government areas (LGA) of Ibadan, into tertiary, secondary, primary, and diagnostic HCFs, of which, 52 HCFs were strategically selected. Primary data sources included field measurements, waste sampling and analysis and a questionnaire, while secondary information sources included public and private records from hospitals and government ministries. Results indicate secondary HCFs generate the greatest amounts of medical waste (mean of 10,238 kg/day per facility) followed by tertiary, primary and diagnostic HCFs, respectively. Characterised waste revealed that only {approx}3% was deemed infectious and highlights opportunities for composting, reuse and recycling. Furthermore, the management practices in most facilities expose patients, staff, waste handlers and the populace to unnecessary health risks. This study proffers recommendations to include (i) a need for sustained cooperation among all key actors (government, hospitals and waste managers) in implementing a safe and reliable medical waste management strategy, not only in legislation and policy formation but also particularly in its monitoring and enforcement and (ii) an obligation for each HCF to ensure a safe and hygienic system of medical waste handling, segregation, collection, storage, transportation, treatment and disposal, with minimal risk to handlers, public health and the environment.

  14. Overcoming the obstacles: life stories of scientists with learning disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Force, Crista Marie

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    of most individuals with learning disabilities. The purpose of this research was to better understand the methods by which successful learning disabled scientists have overcome the barriers and challenges associated with their learning disabilities...

  15. THE TWO-PHASE FRACTIONAL OBSTACLE PROBLEM 1 ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    development of new tools such as the Caffarelli-Silvestre extension, .... preliminary results on our problem: energy inequality, local boundedness, Weiss-

  16. Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned...

  17. On the shrinking obstacle limit in a viscous incompressible flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    -Miyakawa-Osada) but uniqueness was proved only very recently (Gallagher-Gallay). The existence in the full plane case uses L1 es

  18. Political obstacles to adopting congestion pricing in New York City

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lynch, Patrick (Patrick Michael)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 2007, New York City's Mayor Bloomberg released PlaNYC, a broad ranging set of planning initiatives for the city. A centerpiece of the plan was a congestion-pricing proposal for the downtown core in Manhattan. The ...

  19. Obstacles and Opportunity: Turbine Motorization in Refineries Today 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feng, Hua; Liu, Jinghing; Liu, Xiang; Ahmad, Mushtaq; Deng, Alan

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam turbines have been widely used in oil refineries for driving pumps, compressors and other rotary machines. However, in recent years, the authors of this paper have seen substantial turbine motorization projects completed or being planned...

  20. OPTIMAL CONTROL OF THE OBSTACLE FOR A PARABOLIC VARIATIONAL INEQUALITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kentucky, University of

    variational inequalityis considered on a domain Q = (0 T), with Rn , a bounded domain with C1 boundary @ . Let inequalityby approximat- ing with a semilinearparabolic PDE. There the existenceof an optimal control

  1. Elliptic and parabolic problems with thin and Lipschitz obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arshak Petrosyan

    2011-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Page 41 ...... For our generalization, however, iu and hu are too irregular and we have to average them to regain missing regularity: Hu(r) = r. ?r hu(t)dt = r. S+r.

  2. OBSTACLE-AVOIDING SIMILARITY METRICS AND SHORTEST PATH PROBLEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at San Antonio, University of

    Foundation grant NSF CAREER CCF-0643597 and the 2009 University of Texas at San Antonio Presidential with guidelines which permit the inclusion as part of the Doctoral Dissertation the text of an original paper

  3. NREL Overcomes Obstacles in Lignin Valorization (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This NREL Highlight is being produced for the 2015 February Alliance S&T Board meeting, and describes research that shows lignin can be converted into renewable fuels, chemicals, and materials.

  4. Microsoft Word - THE EFFECT OF OBSTACLE#4781.doc

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere I Geothermal Pwer Plant JumpMarysville, Ohio:Menomonee| OpenMickey HotVII, Cologne, Germany, 29

  5. Native American Housing: Obstacles and Opportunities | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOrigin of Contamination in Many DevilsForum |Energy NovemberC O ORH E N A T IDepartment

  6. Soil type: Metabasic soils have 50 to 80 percent more mineralizable C than granitic soils. The same soils appear to more efficiently retain TN and some TOC at greater depths. Very low DOC in both soils indicate efficient C utilization and incorporation in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Norton, Jay B.

    Soil type: Metabasic soils have 50 to 80 percent more mineralizable C than granitic soils. The same indicate efficient C utilization and incorporation in microbial or SOM pools. Greater mineral N in granite percent. There is not evidence of the impact of increased available C on TOC in granitic soils. Soil

  7. 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle near the floor.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahrami, Majid

    4-36 Ideal Gas 4-70C Propane (molar mass = 44.1 kg/kmol) poses a greater fire danger than methane (molar mass = 16 kg/kmol) since propane is heavier than air (molar mass = 29 kg/kmol), and it will settle MATERIAL. © 2008 The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. Limited distribution permitted only to teachers

  8. LE BULLETIN DE L'EPI N 46 14-18 UNE CONFRONTATION ENTRE DES LVES UNE CONFRONTATION ENTRE DES LEVES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    à la disposition des élèves des témoi- gnages de soldats saisis et traités sur ordinateur. L et les orages d'acier, pour 1916. Le quotidien du soldat et du civil doit permettre d'approcher des témoignages de soldats. Pour 1915, c'est un trimestre d'un carnet qu'un de mes élèves m'a apporté en cours

  9. PLANNING FOR WATER CONSERVATION Greater Vancouver Regional District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the public and private sectors in providing a supply of high quality urban water? Best management practices in urban areas around the globe, yet per capita water consumption continues to increase. Faced with increasing populations and costs associated with urban growth--related to infrastructure, energy, operation

  10. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    1, 2012 - 3:10pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Second Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. Since February 2010, the Variable Generation Subcommittee at...

  11. The health of manufacturing in the UK is assuming greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mottram, Nigel

    , energy production and mineral extraction would place the total to nearer 25% of the economy manufac- turing processes, are in- volved. A wider definition, including, for example, con- struction

  12. Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value of Greater Investments...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Antonio International Airport. The city's EECBG management team knew the new airport terminal offered a highly visible location to showcase renewable energy technologies and help...

  13. Greater fuel diversity needed to meet growing US electricity demand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burt, B.; Mullins, S. [Industrial Info Resources (United States)

    2008-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity demand is growing in the USA. One way to manage the uncertainty is to diversity fuel sources. Fuel sources include coal, natural gas, nuclear and renewable energy sources. Tables show actual and planned generation projects by fuel types. 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  14. Wise detections of known QSOs at redshifts greater than six

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blain, Andrew W. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, 1 University Road, Leicester LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Assef, Roberto; Stern, Daniel; Tsai, Chao-Wei; Eisenhardt, Peter [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Bridge, Carrie [California Institute of Technology, 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Benford, Dominic [Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Jarrett, Tom [Astronomy Department, University of Cape Town (South Africa); Cutri, Roc [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, MS100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Petty, Sara [Virginia Tech, Department of Physics MC 0435, 910 Drillfield Drive, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Wu, Jingwen; Wright, Edward L., E-mail: ab520@le.ac.uk [Division of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Los Angeles, Physics and Astronomy Building, 430 Portola Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1547 (United States)

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present WISE All-Sky mid-infrared (IR) survey detections of 55% (17/31) of the known QSOs at z > 6 from a range of surveys: the SDSS, the CFHT-LS, FIRST, Spitzer, and UKIDSS. The WISE catalog thus provides a substantial increase in the quantity of IR data available for these sources: 17 are detected in the WISE W1 (3.4 ?m) band, 16 in W2 (4.6 ?m), 3 in W3 (12 ?m), and 0 in W4 (22 ?m). This is particularly important with Spitzer in its warm-mission phase and no faint follow-up capability at wavelengths longward of 5 ?m until the launch of James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). WISE thus provides a useful tool for understanding QSOs found in forthcoming large-area optical/IR sky surveys using PanSTARRS, SkyMapper, VISTA, DES, and LSST. The rest-UV properties of the WISE-detected and the WISE-non-detected samples differ: the detections have brighter i/z-band magnitudes and redder rest-UV colors. This suggests that a more aggressive hunt for very high redshift QSOs by combining WISE W1 and W2 data with red, observed optical colors could be effective at least for a subset of dusty candidate QSOs. Stacking the WISE images of the WISE-non-detected QSOs indicates that they are, on average, significantly fainter than the WISE-detected examples, and are thus not narrowly missing detection in the WISE catalog. The WISE catalog detection of three of our sample in the W3 band indicates that their mid-IR flux can be detected individually, although there is no stacked W3 detection of sources detected in W1 but not W3. Stacking analyses of WISE data for large active galactic nucleus samples will be a useful tool, and high-redshift QSOs of all types will be easy targets for JWST.

  15. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WASHINGTON - Building on the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help communities save on energy bills, the Energy Department today...

  16. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    - 12:00am Addthis Building on the Obama Administration's efforts to double energy productivity by 2030 and help communities save on energy bills, the Energy Department today...

  17. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Verification Plan: Residential Retrofits A Primer on EM&V, Data Collection, Tracking and Reporting of Efficiency Savings, and Supporting Available Tools for EECBG and SEP Grantees...

  18. Greater Platte River Basins Symposium PROGRAM Thursday, October 7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nebraska-Lincoln, University of

    of the Niobrara River in the National Scenic Reach, Nebraska ­ Jason Alexander, US Geological Survey ­ Nebraska and Computational Investigations of Sandbar Dynamics ­ Paul Kinzel, U.S. Geological Survey ­ Colorado Water Science and Values in the Niobrara Basin: Does Water Flow to Money? ­ Steven Shultz, University of Nebraska-Omaha 2

  19. THE GREATER TORONTO AREA TRAVEL DEMAND MODELLING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    . Miller Bahen-Tanenbaum Professor Department of Civil Engineering University of Toronto Joint Program Distribution 32 4.5.3 Mode Split 32 4.6 Modelling Socio-Economic Attributes 32 #12;4 TABLE OF CONTENTS, cont with a basic understanding of what the model does, the key assumptions upon which the model is built

  20. Title: Boundary File: GTA (Greater Toronto Area) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Municipal Boundary shapefiles: Municipal Boundary ­ Upper Tier and District, and Municipal Boundary ­ Lower Municipality of Durham, Regional Municipality of York Data Type: Digital Vector Data Format: Shapefile Datum

  1. DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPM | DepartmentI Office of ENERGYAgrees withDepartment of

  2. affords greater survival: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 41 Page 1 of 2 Affordable Care Act Health Care Reform Physics Websites Summary: Page 1 of 2 Affordable Care Act Health Care Reform...

  3. Dining Options Near the Greater Richmond Convention Center

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on traditional deli fare. Fish platters, build- your own sandwiches, "deli dogs", potato-and- duck pierogis and more. ** B BR L D 4-12 blocks from GRCC Rappahannock 320...

  4. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOnSTATEMENT8.pdf MoreRevisedProgram Breaks Down Barriers for

  5. Cooperation Among Balancing Authorities Offers Greater Use of Renewable

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube platformBuildingCoalComplex(GC-72) |Reserve |Sadesh Sookraj,ImproveEnergy with

  6. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE Hydrogen andMeeting Date:FocusProgram

  7. DOE Announces $17 Million to Promote Greater Automobile Efficiency |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613PortsmouthBartlesvilleAbout » Contact UsDepartment ofNuclear Energy forDepartment of

  8. Setting the Stage for Greater Renewable Energy Penetration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreakingMay 2015ParentsMiddle|SecurityDepartment ofSeptember 2013Service

  9. Texas-Louisiana- Mississippi Salt Basin Greater Green River Basin

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumber ofTexas-Louisiana-

  10. LLNL Predicts Wind Power with Greater Accuracy | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAMEnergyInvestigativeCogginLES' URENCO-USA

  11. Clean Cities: Greater Lansing Area Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro CleanGenesee

  12. Clean Cities: Greater Washington Region Clean Cities coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office511041clothAdvanced Materials Advanced. C o w l i t z CPlasma0 12Denver Metro

  13. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23,EnergyChicopeeTechnology PerformanceDepartmentforEfficiency, Save Money |

  14. KCP&L Greater Missouri Operations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOf Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii |Island, Florida: Energy

  15. Hydrothermal Convection Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater than or

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long Valley Caldera | Openequal

  16. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil Greater Than 500 ppm Sulfur

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO) Highlights ï‚·2008DeutscheState470,6036,190

  17. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavings forinitialThose

  18. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy SolarRadioactive LiquidSavings forinitialThoseEfficiency,

  19. Setting the Stage for Greater Renewable Energy Penetration | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretary of EnergyFocus Group HSS/Union WorkSession Chair:Energy

  20. DOE prepared for Greater Sage-Grouse designation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power Administration wouldDECOMPOSITION OF CALCIUMCOSTDOE

  1. Greater Carrollwood, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska: EnergyGratingsGreatRiverCarrollwood,

  2. Greater Northdale, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:

  3. Greater Ohio Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to:

  4. Greater Sun Center, Florida: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to:EnergySun

  5. Thirteen States Receive Energy Department Awards to Drive Greater Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideoStrategic|Industrial Sector,Department Third Report to theEfficiency, Save

  6. Sustainable Development Strategy for the Greater Mekong Subregion | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnualProperty Edit with formSoutheastern ILSunseeker Energy HoldingEnergy Information Subregion

  7. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742Energy Chinaof EnergyImpactOn July 2, 2014 in theGroup ReportLow IncomeE-Government ActEight

  8. Study: Environmental Benefits of LEDs Greater Than CFLs | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn April 23, 2014,Zaleski -Blueprint | DepartmentExcellence |Science BowlSimulation Model

  9. Dr. Bill Brinkman: Working Towards Greater Energy Security | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69Christopher Fecko ChemicalJohnBenjamin L.

  10. First-ever carbon denial reflects stiff opposition now confronting coal

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Coal, the dominant fuel source for electric power generation in the U.S. - and in many other countries around the world - is facing unprecedented opposition from environmentalists and energy conservation advocates. Growing concerns about global climate change have made it so much more difficult for many coal projects to get the necessary permits to proceed. In October 2007 a new precedent was set for denying a power plant permit on grounds of carbon emissions.

  11. HOT GAS HALOS AROUND DISK GALAXIES: CONFRONTING COSMOLOGICAL SIMULATIONS WITH OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rasmussen, Jesper [Carnegie Observatories, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Sommer-Larsen, Jesper [Excellence Cluster Universe, Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Boltzmannstr. 2, D-85748 Garching bei Muenchen (Germany); Pedersen, Kristian; Toft, Sune; Grove, Lisbeth F. [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Benson, Andrew [Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, Mail Code 130-33, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bower, Richard G. [Institute for Computational Cosmology, University of Durham, South Road, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: jr@ociw.edu

    2009-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Models of disk galaxy formation commonly predict the existence of an extended reservoir of accreted hot gas surrounding massive spirals at low redshift. As a test of these models, we use X-ray and H{alpha} data of the two massive, quiescent edge-on spirals NGC 5746 and NGC 5170 to investigate the amount and origin of any hot gas in their halos. Contrary to our earlier claim, the Chandra analysis of NGC 5746, employing more recent calibration data, does not reveal any significant evidence for diffuse X-ray emission outside the optical disk, with a 3{sigma} upper limit to the halo X-ray luminosity of 4 x 10{sup 39} erg s{sup -1}. An identical study of the less massive NGC 5170 also fails to detect any extraplanar X-ray emission. By extracting hot halo properties of disk galaxies formed in cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, we compare these results to expectations for cosmological accretion of hot gas by spirals. For Milky-Way-sized galaxies, these high-resolution simulations predict hot halo X-ray luminosities which are lower by a factor of {approx}2 compared to our earlier results reported by Toft et al. We find the new simulation predictions to be consistent with our observational constraints for both NGC 5746 and NGC 5170, while also confirming that the hot gas detected so far around more actively star-forming spirals is in general probably associated with stellar activity in the disk. Observational results on quiescent disk galaxies at the high-mass end are nevertheless providing powerful constraints on theoretical predictions, and hence on the assumed input physics in numerical studies of disk galaxy formation and evolution.

  12. Dynamical vacuum energy in the expanding Universe confronted with observations: a dedicated study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adria Gomez-Valent; Joan Sola; Spyros Basilakos

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Despite the many efforts, our theoretical understanding of the ultimate nature of the dark energy component of the universe still lags well behind the astounding experimental evidence achieved from the increasingly sophisticated observational tools at our disposal. While the canonical possibility is a strict cosmological constant, or rigid vacuum energy density $\\rho_{\\Lambda}=$const., the exceeding simplicity of this possibility lies also at the root of its unconvincing theoretical status, as there is no explanation for the existence of such constant for the entire cosmic history. Herein we explore general models of the vacuum energy density slowly evolving with the Hubble function $H$ and/or its time derivative, $\\rho_{\\Lambda}(H,\\dot{H})$. Some of these models are actually well-motivated from the theoretical point of view and may provide a rich phenomenology that could be explored in future observations, whereas some others have more limitations. In this work, we put them to the test and elucidate which ones are still compatible with the present observations and which ones are already ruled out. We consider their implications on structure formation, in combination with data on type Ia supernovae, the Cosmic Microwave Background, the Baryonic Acoustic Oscillations, and the predicted redshift distribution of cluster-size collapsed structures. The relation of these vacuum models on possible evidence of dynamical dark energy recently pointed out in the literature is also briefly addressed.

  13. Helioseismology of Sunspots: Confronting Observations with Three-Dimensional MHD Simulations of Wave Propagation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Cameron; L. Gizon; T. L. Duvall Jr

    2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The propagation of solar waves through the sunspot of AR 9787 is observed using temporal cross-correlations of SOHO/MDI Dopplergrams. We then use three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations to compute the propagation of wave packets through self-similar magneto-hydrostatic sunspot models. The simulations are set up in such a way as to allow a comparison with observed cross-covariances (except in the immediate vicinity of the sunspot). We find that the simulation and the f-mode observations are in good agreement when the model sunspot has a peak field strength of 3 kG at the photosphere, less so for lower field strengths. Constraining the sunspot model with helioseismology is only possible because the direct effect of the magnetic field on the waves has been fully taken into account. Our work shows that the full-waveform modeling of sunspots is feasible.

  14. Exurbia from the bottom-up: Confronting empirical challenges to characterizing a complex system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Illinois at Chicago, University of

    (Hansen et al., 2005), and material and energy flows such as carbon sequestration (Pickett et al., 2001

  15. Futurist War Noises: Confronting and Coping with the First World War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Selena

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Press, 1998. _____. “Violence, War, Revolution: Marinetti’sPerloff, Marjorie. “The Great War and the European Avant-Literature of the First World War, edited by V. Sherry, 141-

  16. Confronting Hydrodynamic Simulations Of Relativistic Jets With Data: What Do We Learn About Particles & Fields?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Philip A. Hughes

    2000-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We review recent relativistic hydrodynamic simulations of jets, and their interpretation in terms of the results from linear stability analysis. These studies show that, interpreted naively, the distribution of synchrotron intensity will in general be a poor guide to the physical state (density and pressure) of the underlying flow, and that even if the physical state can be inferred, it, in turn, may prove to be a poor guide to the source dynamics, in terms of the transport of energy and momentum from the central engine. However, we demonstrate that an interplay of simulation and linear stability analysis provides a powerful tool for elucidating the nature and character of structures that jets may sustain. From such studies we can explain the complex behavior of observed jets, which manifest both stationary and propagating structures, without recourse to ad hoc macroscopic disturbances. This provides a framework for the interpretation of multi-epoch total intensity data wherein an understanding of the character of individual flow features will allow the effects of physical state and dynamics to be deconvolved.

  17. Using Novel Technologies To Confront Challenges In Predator Conservation, Community Ecology, and Citizen Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yiwei

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of mountain goats based on citizen science. Wildlife SocietyJ. 2009. A new dawn for citizen science. Trends in Ecology &The impact of a citizen science project. International

  18. Little Science Confronts the Data Deluge: Habitat Ecology, Embedded Sensor Networks, and Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borgman, C L; Wallis, J C; Enyedy, N

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    N. (2006). Building digital libraries for scientific data:European Conference on Digital Libraries, Alicante, Spain,B. P. (Eds. ). (2003). Digital library use: Social practice

  19. Confronting the Superbubble Model with X-ray Observations of 30 Dor C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David A. Smith; Q. Daniel Wang

    2004-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of XMM-Newton observations of the superbubble 30 Dor C and compare the results with the predictions from the standard wind-blown bubble model. We find that the observed X-ray spectra cannot be fitted satisfactorily with the model alone and that there is evidence for nonthermal X-ray emission, which is particularly important at > 4 keV. The total unabsorbed 0.1-10 keV luminosities of the eastern and western parts of the bubble are ~3 10^36 erg/s and ~5 10^36 erg/s, respectively. The unabsorbed 0.1-10 keV luminosity of the bubble model is 4 10^36 erg/s and so the power-law component contributes between 1/3 and 1/2 to the total unabsorbed luminosity in this energy band. The nature of the hard nonthermal emission is not clear, although recent supernovae in the bubble may be responsible. We expect that about one or two core-collapse supernovae could have occured and are required to explain the enrichment of the hot gas, as evidenced by the overabundance of alpha-elements by a factor of 3, compared to the mean value of 0.5 solar for the interstellar medium in the Large Magellanic Cloud. As in previous studies of various superbubbles, the amount of energy currently present in 30 Dor C is significantly less than the expected energy input from the enclosed massive stars over their lifetime. We speculate that a substantial fraction of the input energy may be radiated in far-infrared by dust grains, which are mixed with the hot gas because of the thermal conduction and/or dynamic mixing.

  20. From the Woman's Viewpoint: Ethical Dilemmas Confronted by Women as Informal Caregivers of Frail Elders

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koenig, Terry L.

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    impacts ethical dilemmas and decision-making processes (Bedini 8c Guinan, 1996; Pratt, Schmall, 8c Wright, 1987) . In contrast, the proposed ethical decision-making model incorporates caregivers' distinctive viewpoints and narra­ tives about ethical...

  1. Confronting the retranslation hypothesis: Flaubert and Sand in the British literary system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deane, Sharon Louise

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The phenomenon of retranslation (the repeated translation of a given work into a given target language) is widespread in practice, and yet its motivations remain relatively underexplored. One very prevalent justification ...

  2. Global patterns of nitrogen limitation: confronting two global biogeochemical models with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Templer, Pamela

    representations of Earth System Models have included the carbon (C) cycle (Friedlingstein et al., 2006

  3. Confronting the Galactic Center Gamma Ray Excess With a Light Scalar Dark Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dilip Kumar Ghosh; Subhadeep Mondal; Ipsita Saha

    2015-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fermi Large Area Telescope observed an excess in gamma ray emission spectrum coming from the center of the Milky Way galaxy. This data reveals that a light Dark Matter (DM) candidate of mass in the range 31-40 GeV, dominantly decaying into $b\\bar b$ final state, can explain the presence of the observed bump in photon energy. We try to interpret this observed phenomena by sneutrino DM annihilation into pair of fermions in the Supersymmetric Inverse Seesaw Model (SISM). This model can also account for tiny non-zero neutrino masses satisfying existing neutrino oscillation data. We show that a Higgs portal DM in this model is in perfect agreement with this new interpretation besides satisfying all other existing collider, cosmological and low energy experimental constraints.

  4. Futurist War Noises: Confronting and Coping with the First World War

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Selena

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were L’aspettazione, La Battaglia and La Vittoria. In anof August 1912, entitled “Battaglia Peso + Odore,” whichthe “orchestra di una grande battaglia,” 13 he published an

  5. Solar energy research at Princeton University Universities today bear the same responsibility to confront environmental challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar energy research at Princeton University Universities today bear the same responsibility in anticipation of increased power demands required by almost two million square feet of new development by the central power facility that provides power, heating, and cooling to campus buildings. Although additional

  6. March 10, 2014 - "Respectful Confrontation" | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil & Gas »ofMarketingSmartManufacturingMarch 10, 2014 -

  7. Design of low-voltage, high-bandwidth radio frequency power converters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Jingying, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mass and volume required for power electronics circuitry is a dominant obstacle to the miniaturization and integration of many systems. Likewise, power electronics with greater bandwidth and efficiency are becoming ...

  8. Opportunities and obstacles for US investors in Moscow : office market comparative return study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stolyarik, Alexander V., 1974-

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Moscow in recent years has seen significant changes in the amount of investment grade office space. In the period before the financial crisis of 1998, in which Russia defaulted on its debt and the ruble was drastically ...

  9. Brownfields redevelopment in rural Massachusetts : understanding the obstacles & identifying opportunities for success

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gallant, Darlene E. (Darlene Elizabeth), 1978-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Remediating and redeveloping contaminated properties represents a mounting national concern. Commonly referred to as brownfields, these contaminated and often vacant or underused, properties present significant environmental ...

  10. Pair interaction lattice gas simulations: Flow past obstacles in two and three dimensions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogeler, A.; Wolf-Gladrow, D.A. (Alfred-Wegener-Institute for Polar and Marine Research, Bremerhaven (Germany))

    1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apart from the FCHC (face-centered hypercube), Nasilowski's pair interaction lattice gas (PI) is the only known lattice gas automaton for three-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations. Unfortunately, the viscosity of PI is not isotropic. In order to determine the degree anisotropy, the authors derive fluid dynamic equations for the regime of compressible viscid flow. From relaxation measurements of waves propagating in various directions they compute the physically relevant dissipation coefficients and compare their results with theoretical predictions. Although PI shows a high degree of anisotropy, they define the mean value of the dissipation tensor as effective shear viscosity. Using this value of v[sub eff][sup 2D] = 0.35, two-dimensional simulations of flow past a cylinder yield drag coefficients in quantitative agreement with wind tunnel measurements over a range of Reynolds numbers of 5-50. Three-dimensional simulations of flow past a sphere yield qualitative agreement with various references. A fit of the results to a semi-empirical curve provides an effective value of v[sub eff][sup 2D] = 0.21 for a range of Reynolds numbers from 0.19 to 40. In order to check for finite-size effects, the authors measured the mean free path [lambda] and computed the Knudsen numbers. They obtained [lambda] [approx]1 lattice unit, corresponding to Kn = 0.01 (2D) and Kn = 0.1 (3D). They found no significant finite-size effects. 44 refs., 10 figs.

  11. Dislocation climb strengthening in systems with immobile obstacles: Three-dimensional level-set simulation study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Kevin T.

    of High Performance Computing, Singapore, Singapore 5 Department of Materials Science and Engineering

  12. The effects of obstacle geometry on jet mixing in releases of silane

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sposato, Christina F

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of the Realizable k-s Model and VW Model with Experimental Data and Data Fit for a Turbulent Free Jet. . . . . , . . . . . . . . 29 Problem Description for a Plate-Impinging Jet. . . Sample Grid for a Plate-Impinging Jet. . Close up of Grid near the Jet Axis.../Air Mixture at L/Do = 100. . . . . . 40 14 Explosive Volume for a Silane/Air Mixture at L/Dp = 150. . . . . . . 40 15 Explosive Volume for a Silane/Air Mixture at L/Dc = 250. . . . . . . 41 FIGURE Page 16 Explosive Volume for a Silane/Air Mixture at L...

  13. Field descriptions for a developing laminar tube flow with and without a concentrically located spherical obstacle 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mikkelsen, Clark Douglas

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the steady, isothermal, originally Poiseuillean flow of an incompressible, Newtonian fluid around a rigid sphere fixed on the axis of an infinitely-long, circular cylinder. Similarities in the flow fields of Cases 1 ~ 2, and 3 were indicated as were..., vorticity, and velocity fields for the steady, isothermal, originally Poiseuillean flow of an incompressible, Newtonian fluid around a rigid sphere f fixed on the axis of an infinitely-long, circular cylinder. t The above definitions for Case 1, 2, and 3...

  14. Optimal Longitudinal Control Planning with Moving Obstacles Jeff Johnson and Kris Hauser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hauser, Kris

    . INTRODUCTION The Federal Highway Administration in the United States notes that the frequency of automobile application to a simulated urban intersection involving pedestrians, bicyclists, and automobiles, as well is a challenging prob- lem with a long history. In one class of problems, the vehicle has

  15. Experimental Study of Curvature-based Control Laws for Obstacle Avoidance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Fumin

    , krishna}@isr.umd.edu Abstract-- A novel curvature-based steering control law is introduced to produce- thermore, with appropriate dynamic model, the algorithm produces an explicit control law for the robot, a recent development in this category is to keep the robot moving at a constant speed with steering control

  16. Saving Energy in Industrial Compressed Air Systems: Issues and Obstacles in DSM Program Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trojanowski, D.; Parfomak, P.

    contained compressed air systems.(I) Air compressors are generally driven by electric motors, often in large sizes and often operating continuously throughout the day. As a result, compressors can account for a substantial fraction of the electricity... consumption and peak demand in a given facility. A study by North Carolina A&T University found that air compressors accounted for as much as 49 % of base energy consumption, and up to 58% of peak electrical demand, in the facilities they audited.(2...

  17. Calculation of unsteady turbulent flow around obstacles using the large eddy simulation turbulence model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Helton, Donald McLean

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The premise of the work presented here is to use a common analytical tool, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), along with a prevalent turbulence model, Large Eddy Simulation (LES), to study the flow past rectangular cylinders. In an attempt to use...

  18. NEAR-FIELD IMAGING OF OBSTACLES Peijun Li and Yuliang Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

    In far-field imaging, data is measured at a distance which is a few wavelength or longer away ...... Lastly we examine the effect of the base radius a. In view of.

  19. Obstacles in pursuing teacher certification of paraprofessional employees in a Texas urban school district 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marz, Carrie Oden

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    School districts across the country are faced with teacher shortages in critical need areas such as special education and bilingual education. Further complicating this shortage is the movement to augment the existing ...

  20. Elastic-wave identification of penetrable obstacles using shape-material sensitivity framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzina, Bojan

    in general has been the subject of intensive mathematical and computational research [40,26,13,16], only Palaiseau Cedex, France b Department of Civil Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455-material sensitivity Elastodynamics Identification Inclusion Boundary element method Constrained optimization a b s t r

  1. Obstacles in pursuing teacher certification of paraprofessional employees in a Texas urban school district

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marz, Carrie Oden

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    teachers in order to more closely reflect the changing demographics of the student population. Many states/districts have turned to alternative routes to teaching certification as the answer to expedite the recruitment of teachers. A largely untapped...

  2. Study of the Effects of Obstacles in Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vapor Dispersion using CFD Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz Vasquez, Roberto

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of the potential hazards related with the operation of an LNG terminal includes possible release scenarios with the consequent flammable vapor dispersion within the facility; therefore, it is important to know the behavior...

  3. Proposed roadmap for overcoming legal and financial obstacles to carbon capture and sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobs, Wendy (Harvard Environmental Law and Policy, Cambridge, MA (US)); Chohen, Leah; Kostakidis-Lianos, Leah; Rundell, Sara (Harvard Law School, Cambridge, MA (US))

    2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many existing proposals either lack sufficient concreteness to make carbon capture and geological sequestration (CCGS) operational or fail to focus on a comprehensive, long term framework for its regulation, thus failing to account adequately for the urgency of the issue, the need to develop immediate experience with large scale demonstration projects, or the financial and other incentives required to launch early demonstration projects. We aim to help fill this void by proposing a roadmap to commercial deployment of CCGS in the United States.This roadmap focuses on the legal and financial incentives necessary for rapid demonstration of geological sequestration in the absence of national restrictions on CO2 emissions. It weaves together existing federal programs and financing opportunities into a set of recommendations for achieving commercial viability of geological sequestration.

  4. A remote lab for multi-robot experiments with virtual obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giannitrapani, Antonello

    the advantages of a real laboratory, remote labs make available to students a number of physical processes of available resources. Over the last decade, a remote lab focused on robotics and control systems curricula (ACT) puts a number of different teaching experiences at users' disposal, ranging from basic electric

  5. More than a “Subspecies of American Literature”: Obstacles toward a Transnational Mormon Novel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hales, Scott

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Margaret Blair. Salvador. Salt Lake City: Aspen Books, 1993.Salvador (Salt Lake City: Aspen Books, 1993), 32. Robert

  6. A survey of David Lewis's theory of counterfactuals: resolved difficulties and resilient obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botham, Thad M

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    David Lewis [1973b] offers a possible worlds approach to a theory of counterfactuals. He attempts to specify necessary and sufficient conditions according to which a given counterfactual is true or false. My profit surveys Lewis's theory...

  7. Removing Obstacles in Neuroscience Drug Discovery: The Future Path for Animal Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalueff, Allan V.

    to ensure that basic science knowledge gained from improved animal models with good predictive and construct patients as quickly as possible. Neuropsychopharmacology Reviews (2009) 34, 74­89; doi:10.1038/npp.2008

  8. A Path Planning Strategy for Kinematically Redundant Manipulators Anticipating Joint Failures in the Presence of Obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maciejewski, Anthony A.

    's reliability. However, robot failures are not uncommon. It has been estimated that 28.7% of industrial robots that over 60% of industrial robots had a mean-time-between-failure of less than 500 hours [7]. A number

  9. Advancing TOD in Boston's suburbs : advantages and obstacles in the entitlement process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simonson, Kristin (Kristin Andrea)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is an inquiry into the feasibility of creating new compact, mixed-use transit-oriented development (TOD) within existing suburbs. I have focused on the entitlement phase of projects, during which land is rezoned, ...

  10. Airports and Bicycles: what are the obstacles and incentives for operators 1 to improve bicycle access?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orrick, Phyllis; Frick, Karen Trapenberg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    43. South Coast Air Quality Management District. SCAQMDunder South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD)air quality requirements(8). BOS travel demand management

  11. On beyond the standard model for high explosives: challenges & obstacles to surmount

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph Ds [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Plastic-bonded explosives (PBX) are heterogeneous materials. Nevertheless, current explosive models treat them as homogeneous materials. To compensate, an empirically determined effective burn rate is used in place of a chemical reaction rate. A significant limitation of these models is that different burn parameters are needed for applications in different regimes; for example, shock initiation of a PBX at different initial temperatures or different initial densities. This is due to temperature fluctuations generated when a heterogeneous material is shock compressed. Localized regions of high temperatures are called hot spots. They dominate the reaction for shock initiation. The understanding of hot spot generation and their subsequent evolution has been limited by the inability to measure transients on small spatial ({approx} 1 {micro}m) and small temporal ({approx} 1 ns) scales in the harsh environment of a detonation. With the advances in computing power, it is natural to try and gain an understanding of hot-spot initiation with numerical experiments based on meso-scale simulations that resolve material heterogeneities and utilize realistic chemical reaction rates. However, to capture the underlying physics correctly, such high resolution simulations will require more than fast computers with a large amount of memory. Here we discuss some of the issues that need to be addressed. These include dissipative mechanisms that generate hot spots, accurate thermal propceties for the equations of state of the reactants and products, and controlling numerical entropy error from shock impedance mismatches at material interfaces. The later can generate artificial hot spots and lead to premature reaction. Eliminating numerical hot spots is critical for shock initiation simulations due to the positive feedback between the energy release from reaction and the hydrodynamic flow.

  12. NEAR-FIELD IMAGING OF OBSTACLES Peijun Li and Yuliang Wang

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    linearized by dropping the higher order terms in the power series expansion. ... the measurement data is simulated by solving the direct problem by using a derived ..... The following theorem shows that it is true, at least when h is sufficiently.

  13. Biomass energy: State of the technology present obstacles and future potential

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, L.

    1993-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The prevailing image of wood and waste burning as dirty and environmentally harmful is no longer valid. The use of biomass combustion for energy can solve many of our nation`s problems. Wood and other biomass residues that are now causing expensive disposal problems can be burned as cleanly and efficiently as natural gas, and at a fraction of the cost. New breakthroughs in integrated waste-to-energy systems, from fuel handling, combustion technology and control systems to heat transfer and power generation, have dramatically improved system costs, efficiencies, cleanliness of emissions, maintenance-free operation, and end-use applications. Increasing costs for fossil fuels and for waste disposal strict environmental regulations and changing political priorities have changed the economics and rules of the energy game. This report will describe the new rules, new playing fields and key players, in the hope that those who make our nation`s energy policy and those who play in the energy field will take biomass seriously and promote its use.

  14. Turbulent boundary layers interacting with groups of obstacles Project Staff Principal investigator: Dr Costantino Manes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sóbester, András

    (wind or marine) can generate, estimating carbon dioxide exchange between forests and the atmosphere-Dimensional (2-D) flow, where mean turbulent properties are uniform (or almost uniform) along one direction

  15. The parking policy and smart growth disconnect : obstacles to establishing and implementing smart growth parking policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richardson, Heather Eileen Seyfang

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban areas are plagued by congestion, economic inequality, and inefficient land use that result from highway and single family housing subsidies, segregated land uses, and many other government policies established over ...

  16. Size based separation of submicron nonmagnetic particles through magnetophoresis in structured obstacle arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annavarapu, V. N. Ravikanth (Venkata Nagandra Ravikanth)

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this work was on developing a novel scalable size based separation technology for nonmagnetic particles in the submicron size range utilizing magnetophoretic forces. When a nonmagnetic particle is immersed in ...

  17. An Integrated Framework for Obstacle Mapping with See-Through Capabilities using Laser and Wireless

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liebling, Michael

    of the environment (the parts that can be sensed directly by the laser scanners) using occupancy grid mapping/object map can be a 2D (or 3D) grid map of the environment, where we have zeros at locations where, for instance, occupancy grid mapping approaches [1], [5] have been proposed to build a grid map

  18. First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently20,000 Russian NuclearandJunetrackEllen|JulyR--FOIADepartmentJulyDeputyUpdatesDepartment

  19. Study of the Effects of Obstacles in Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) Vapor Dispersion using CFD Modeling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruiz Vasquez, Roberto

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The evaluation of the potential hazards related with the operation of an LNG terminal includes possible release scenarios with the consequent flammable vapor dispersion within the facility; therefore, it is important to ...

  20. Movement reproduction and obstacle avoidance with dynamic movement primitives and potential fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaal, Stefan

    demonstration [5], [6]. A human movement is recorded and later reproduced by a robot. Challenges that arise@usc.edu, sschaal@usc.edu Abstract--Robots in a human environment need to be compli- ant. This compliance requires the abilities of our approach in simulations and with an anthropomorphic robot arm. I. INTRODUCTION Humans can

  1. Generalized Velocity Obstacles David Wilkie Jur van den Berg Dinesh Manocha

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of

    robot- human interactions, such as robotic wheelchairs [18]. In many of these applications, the robot, but it may not capture the movement of car-like robots well, which can only move, at any instant the problem of real-time navigation in dynamic environments for car-like robots. We present an approach

  2. First-Generation Risk Profiles Help Predict CO2 Storage Site Obstacles |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,OfficeEnd ofEvaluations inCommittee |a Career in92 of 864 5.0First

  3. Colloque Recompositions territoriales, confronter et innover, Territorial restructurings, comparisons and innovations. Proceedings of the FrenchSouth African meeting on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ) African challenge Maano Ramutsindela, Dr., Senior Lecturer, University of Cape Town maano@enviro on the impact of colonial rule and the appropriation of that rule by post- liberation African leaders reasons: experiences in Africa and the impact of apartheid rule in rural areas. Many post-colonial states

  4. Confronting chemobrain: an in-depth look at survivors’ reports of impact on work, social networks, and health care response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boykoff, Nelli; Moieni, Mona; Subramanian, Saskia Karen

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Surviv (2009) 3:223–232 cancer treatment itself (surgery,1 (continued) Variable Cancer treatments Surgery Radiationaccustomed to pre-cancer treatment. Mary, a Pacific Bell

  5. Confronting the challenge of hybrid modeling: Using discrete choice models to inform the behavioural parameters of a hybrid model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Industry Sustainability in Industry: Increasing Energy Efficiency, Reducing Emissions Rye Brook, New York. Heavy use of such models has spurred the creation of many different energy models throughout the past

  6. Confronting the Cold War Legacy: The Forgotten History of the American Colony in St. Petersburg / A Case Study of Reconciliation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ginzburg, Lyubov Alexandrovna

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    my most challenging needs. I would like to especially thank Edward Kasinec, a former chief of the Slavic and Baltic Division of the New York Public Library, and Tanya Chebotarev, curator of the Bakhmeteff Archive of Russian and East European History... and America.” A letter of invitation from the Society to George Kennan, Petrograd, 5 April 1915. George Kennan Papers, 1856-1987. Box 1, series I. Correspondence, 1903-1916, folder 1.5. Manuscripts & Archives Division, hereafter cited as (MAD), New York...

  7. Confronting fluctuations of conserved charges in central nuclear collisions at the LHC with predictions from Lattice QCD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Braun-Munzinger; Alexander Kalweit; Krzysztof Redlich; Johanna Stachel

    2015-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct net baryon number and strangeness susceptibilities as well as correlations between electric charge and strangeness from experimental data of the ALICE Collaboration at the CERN LHC. The data were taken in Pb-Pb collisions at $\\sqrt{s_{NN}}$=2.76 TeV. The resulting fluctuations and correlations are consistent with Lattice QCD results at the chiral crossover pseudocritical temperature $T_c\\simeq 155$ MeV. This agreement lends strong support to the assumption that the fireball created in these collisions is of thermal origin and exhibits characteristic properties expected in QCD at the transition from the quark gluon plasma to the hadronic phase. The volume of the fireball for one unit of rapidity at $T_c$ is found to exceed 4000 fm$^3$. A detailed discussion on uncertainties in the temperature and volume of the fireball is presented. The results are linked to pion interferometry measurements and predictions from percolation theory.

  8. Towards greater personalisation of active labour market policy? Britain and Germany compared 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goerne, Rudolf Alexander

    2012-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This PhD study centres on analysing the changing employment service portfolios available to disadvantaged people out of work in Britain and Germany. Looking at the recent wave of comparative studies on ‘activation’ ...

  9. he need for efficient food production has never been greater. One in seven

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Napp, Nils

    is undernourished1 . Urbani- zation and biofuel production are reducing land availability, and climate change, lack fallen in one-quarter of countries. Meanwhile, developing nations and the growing world population'sfoodcomesfrom farms that raise both. Animals pull ploughs and carts, and their manure fertilizes crops, which supply

  10. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Region(s): Europe, Latin America & Caribbean, Global This paper shows that a decline in car ownership in cities in developed nations can be attributed primarily to people living...

  11. Greater Cincinnati Regional High School Science Bowl | U.S. DOE...

    Office of Science (SC) Website

    News Media WDTS Home Contact Information National Science Bowl U.S. Department of Energy SC-27 Forrestal Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P:...

  12. Training Reciprocity Achieves Greater Consistency, Saves Time and Money for Idaho, Other DOE Sites

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    IDAHO FALLS, Idaho – Contracting companies supporting EM’s cleanup program at the Idaho site volunteered to be among the first to use a new DOE training reciprocity program designed to bring more consistency to health and safety training across the complex, reduce redundancy and realize savings and other efficiencies.

  13. Greater than the Sum of its Parts; Electricity, Resources, & Building Systems Integration (ERBSI) (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    NREL's Electricity, Resources, and Building Systems Integration Center brings together a diverse group of experts performing grid integration and optimization R&D activities.

  14. Energy impacts of heat island reduction strategies in the Greater Toronto Area, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Konopacki, Steven; Akbari, Hashem

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1999. “Cool Home Features Bring Peak Energy Savings. ”Home Energy 16:22–27. Sherman, M. , D. Wilson and D. Kiel.Residential Heating and Cooling Energy Use in Four Canadian

  15. Food For Thought: The Social Impact of Community Gardens in the Greater Cleveland Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flachs, Andrew

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identity – one of sustainable living, group values, andliving – a sort of utopian agrarianism in which food is both environmentally sustainable and

  16. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) ...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Washington; Idaho National Laboratory in Idaho; the Los Alamos National Laboratory, the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), and the WIPP vicinity in New Mexico; the Nevada...

  17. lem of greater complexity than the overhaul of the global energy system. Energy touches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into place. Substantial govern- ment spending on research and development will be required, along of energy for the world in this century,and we will have to develop new technologies for its use if we.N.Secretary-GeneralKofiAnnanontheMil- lennium Development Goals. In April 2004, Timemagazinenamedhimoneofthe100most influential people

  18. Outreach NOW 6 Outreach NOW 7 Acrowd of more than 60 people from the greater Wash-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buehrer, R. Michael

    Science Foundation, other leading federal research agencies, and foreign embassies is helping Virginia.S. federal government. Charles Clancy, director, says, "Our goal is to lead the country in holistically "Joseph" Wang, the Grant A. Dove Profes- sor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and director

  19. Greater Acceleration through Sparsity-Promoting GRAPPA Kernel Calibration Daniel S Weller1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goyal, Vivek K

    , Boston, MA, United States, 4 Dept. of Image Analytics and Informatics, Siemens Corporate Research,2, where N is the total number of fits, is a tuning parameter, is the DWT sparsifying transform, F-1 resolution), requiring 8 minutes in a Siemens Trio 3 T scanner with a vendor-supplied 32-channel head array

  20. Radiation risk to low fluences of particles may be greater than we thought

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    was significantly eliminated in cells pretreated with a 1 mM dose of octanol, which inhibits gap junction-mediated intercellular communication, or in cells carrying a dominant negative connexin 43 vector. The data imply in Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. These data provide the best estimate of human cancer risk over the dose

  1. An analysis of public testimonies on the reintroduction of wolves to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicker, Kristy Joann

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Public participation in review of draft environmental impact statements (DEIS) has been problematic. This study focused on public hearings regarding the DEIS for the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho...

  2. Precision wood particle feedstocks with retained moisture contents of greater than 30% dry basis

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, James H; Lanning, David N

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Wood particles having fibers aligned in a grain, wherein: the wood particles are characterized by a length dimension (L) aligned substantially parallel to the grain, a width dimension (W) normal to L and aligned cross grain, and a height dimension (H) normal to W and L; the L.times.H dimensions define two side surfaces characterized by substantially intact longitudinally arrayed fibers; the W.times.H dimensions define two cross-grain end surfaces characterized individually as aligned either normal to the grain or oblique to the grain; the L.times.W dimensions define two substantially parallel top and bottom surfaces; and, a majority of the W.times.H surfaces in the mixture of wood particles have end checking.

  3. Weed evolution after crop gene introgression: greater survival and fecundity of hybrids in a new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snow, Allison A.

    . raphanistrum · Raphanus sativus) in Michigan (MI), USA. Hybrid and wild populations had similar growth rates-wild hybrids, we established four wild (Raphanus raphanistrum) and four hybrid radish populations (R, Raphanus raphanistrum. Ecology Letters (2006) 9: 1198­1209 I N T R O DU C T I O N Weed populations can

  4. ENJOYING THE RAIN FOREST Nowhere in the world will your eyes observe a greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    will see today are the same as those that dazzled the first Spanish explorers more than 500 years ago. You

  5. Mitogenomic sequences better resolve stock structure of southern Greater Caribbean green turtle rookeries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Florida, University of

    confounds assessment of the scale of natal homing and population structure among regional rookeries. We, Venezuela; Galibi, Suriname; and Tortuguero, Costa Rica. Five single- nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were differentiation supports demographic indepen- dence of Aves Island and Suriname, emphasizing the need to recognize

  6. Charitable Practices of Muslim Americans in the Greater Kansas City Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Joseph

    2014-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    American civil rights and discourage Islamic philanthropy; "The passage of both USA Patriot Acts, the closing of several Muslim charities, and the curbing of civil liberties beginning with the Bush administration and continuing through the Obama...

  7. "Justification of Effort" in Animals 60 Animals Prefer Reinforcement that Follows Greater Effort

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cook, Robert

    , Emily Klein, Kelly DiGian, and Jérôme Alessandri without whose help mush of the research described

  8. Distribution, Abundance, and Status of the Greater Sage-Grouse, Centrocercus urophasianus, in Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldridge, Cameron

    , in Canada CAMERON L. ALDRIDGE1,2 and R. MARK BRIGHAM Department of Biology, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan S4S 0A2 Canada 1Corresponding Author's e-mail: aldridge@ualberta.ca 2Current Address: Department of Biological Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 2E9 Canada Aldridge, Cameron L., and R

  9. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    at Texas A&M University, Sam Houston State University Vertebrate Museum, the Natural Science Research Laboratory at Texas Tech University Museum, the natural history collections at Angelo State University, the Rob and Bessie Welder Wildlife Foundation...

  10. Growth and poverty in the urban fringe : decentralization, dispersion, and inequality in greater Buenos Aires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Libertun de Duren, Nora R

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents the case of growth in Buenos Aires since the late 1970s, when the decentralization of urban planning powers in the Province of Buenos Aires began, until 2001, when an economic crisis submerged -even ...

  11. World-Class Energy Assessments: Industrial Action Plans for Greater and More Durable Energy Cost Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Russell, C.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes recommendations for improving the impact of industrial energy assessments. This initiative responds to the observation that less than half of recommended energy improvements are implemented as a result of traditional...

  12. Asymptotic Zero Energy States for SU(N greater or equal 3)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jens Hoppe

    1999-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Some ideas are presented concerning the question which of the harmonic wavefunctions constructed in [hep-th/9909191] may be annihilated by all supercharges.

  13. Atmospheric effects in astroparticle physics experiments and the challenge of ever greater precision in measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Louedec

    2014-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Astroparticle physics and cosmology allow us to scan the universe through multiple messengers. It is the combination of these probes that improves our understanding of the universe, both in its composition and its dynamics. Unlike other areas in science, research in astroparticle physics has a real originality in detection techniques, in infrastructure locations, and in the observed physical phenomenon that is not created directly by humans. It is these features that make the minimisation of statistical and systematic errors a perpetual challenge. In all these projects, the environment is turned into a detector medium or a target. The atmosphere is probably the environment component the most common in astroparticle physics and requires a continuous monitoring of its properties to minimise as much as possible the systematic uncertainties associated. This paper introduces the different atmospheric effects to take into account in astroparticle physics measurements and provides a non-exhaustive list of techniques and instruments to monitor the different elements composing the atmosphere. A discussion on the close link between astroparticle physics and Earth sciences ends this paper.

  14. Feb., 1958 CARBONFORRIATIONFROM CARBONMONOXIDE-HYDROGEN RIIXTURES 133 550". Thisispiesuniably connectedwith the greater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : CARBON JIOSOSIDE-HYDROGES MIXTURES OVER IRON CAThLYSTS.'s2 I. PROPERTIES OF CARBON FORMED BYP. L. WALKER, University Park, Pennsylvania Raceived April 8, 1965 The properties of carbons formed from various carbon graphite is used as the moderator and carbon dioxide as the coolant. The extent of carbon transfer

  15. Contamination of the agricultural land due to industrial activities southern of greater Cairo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, E.A.; Ibrahim, Y.H.; Nasralla, M.M. (National Research Centre, Cairo (Egypt))

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The industrial processes in the investigated area include ferrous and non-ferrous metallurgical work, ceramics, fire bricks, cement industry, etc. Soil, weeds, vegetation and dust samples were collected and analysed for several heavy metals. High levels of Pb, Cd, Ni, Cr, Mn and zinc found in the soil close to a lead, zinc smelter. In the heavy contaminated area concentrations of more than 500 ug/g Pb, 1200 ug/g zinc and 50 ug/g Ni and Cd were recorded in the surface soil at 1500 m from the smelter. The concentrations of the heavy metals in the contaminated area (3-5) km from the smelter reached more than 200 ug/g Pb and 25 ug/g Ni and Cd and 160 ug/g zinc. Higher levels of these toxic elements were found in the dust on the leaves of the examined vegetations. Furthermore, accumulated concentrations reached more than 100 ug/g Pb and 10 ug/g Cd in leaves of herbs and maize. Soil close to cement industry found enriched with heavy metals but it is much less pronounced. 10 refs., 3 figs., 5 tabs.

  16. From waterfront to watershed : mapping a big idea in the Greater Toronto Region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciesielski, Linda C. (Linda Claire)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, Toronto is revered among Great Lakes' and waterfront cities for its environmental planning: its massive re-investment in water and stormwater infrastructure; protected headwaters of the region's rivers; realized ...

  17. Snake rivers. The Council also believes the changes would provide greater flexibility to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The same month, the Bonneville Power Administration predicted it would lose more than $250 million spending poli- cies, the Bonneville Power Administra- tion could help relieve its financial crisis Commission's proposed Standard Market Design Rule for wholesale power markets was "seriously flawed

  18. Behavioral Ecology Vol. 13 No. 3: 375380 Female greater wax moths reduce sexual

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auckland, University of

    , and Stuart Parsons School of Biological Sciences, University of Bristol, Woodland Road, Bristol BS8 1UG, UK in the evolution of audition (Faure and Hoy, 2000) and will present the greatest challeng- es when conspecifics) with peak energy between 80 and 100 kHz, and they are emitted in ap- proximatley 0.5-s bursts

  19. A Guide to Wildlands Conservation in the Greater Sierra Nevada Bioregion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shilling, Fraser; Girvetz, Evan; Erichsen, Chris; Johnson, Brenda; Nichols, Pete

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wilderness Coalition 2655 Portage Bay East, Suite 5 Davis,Wilderness Coalition 2655 Portage Bay East, Suite 5 Davis,

  20. Nesting Range, Spatial Use, Habitat Selection and Sex Identification of the Greater Raodrunner (Geococcyx californianus) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montalvo, Andrea

    2012-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    .05 percent. Habitat selection ratios showed a preference for ridge as well as grassland habitat and avoidance of bare ground and flatland habitats. The location data from west Texas was further analyzed to build a predictive logistic regression model...

  1. Title: Boundary File: GTHA (Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area) Data Creator /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Natural Resources 2012 Municipal Boundary shapefiles: Municipal Boundary ­ Upper Tier and District Data Type: Digital Vector Data Format: Shapefile Datum / Map Projection: WGS84 / UTM (17) Resolution: N

  2. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 Federal Register / Vol.6: RecordJune-YearEffectEfficientGovernment

  3. EIS-0375: Disposal of Greater-than-Class-C Low-Level Radioactive Waste and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:Revised Finding of98-F,-SA-01:5-SA-01:DraftoftotoRecord of

  4. Recovery of carboxylic acids at pH greater than pK{sub a}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tung, L.A.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Economics of producing carboxylic acids by fermentation is often dominated, not by the fermentation cost, but by the cost of recovering and purifying the acids from dilute aqueous solutions. Experiments were performed to measure uptakes of lactic and succinic acids as functions of pH by basic polymeric sorbents; sorbent regeneration was also tested. Performance at pH > pK{sub a} and regenerability depend on sorbent basicity; apparent pK{sub a} and monomer pK{sub a} can be used to predict sorbent performance. Two basic amine extractants, Alamine 336 and Amberlite LA-2, in were also studied; they are able to sustain capacity to higher pH in diluents that stabilize the acid-amine complex through H bonding. Secondary amines perform better than tert-amines in diluents that solvate the additional proton. Competitive sulfate and phosphate, an interference in fermentation, are taken up by sorbents more strongly than by extractants. The third step in the proposed fermentation process, the cracking of the trimethylammonium (TMA) carboxylate, was also examined. Because lactic acid is more soluble and tends to self-esterify, simple thermal cracking does not remove all TMA; a more promising approach is to esterify the TMA lactate by reaction with an alcohol.

  5. Many voices, one wilderness : collaborative conservation in the greater Chicago region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bates, Justin (Justin Timothy)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There has been a growing recognition in the conservation community that landscape-scale networks of preserves and habitat corridors are needed to adequately protect native biodiversity. While most of the efforts to protect ...

  6. Anim. Behav., 1998, 55, 337350 Social calls coordinate foraging in greater spear-nosed bats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, Gerald S.

    as they attack prey (Barclay 1982; Balcombe & Fenton 1988). Although echo- location calls can serve other

  7. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Production from Greater than 200

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfter LeaseMeters Deep

  8. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Crude Oil Proved Reserves from Greater than

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfter LeaseMeters200 Meters

  9. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Dry Natural Gas Production from Greater

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfterthan 200 Meters Deep

  10. Gulf of Mexico Federal Offshore Natural Gas Liquids Production from Greater

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 111 1,613 122 40Coal Stocks at1,066,688Electricity UseFoot)ProvedAfterthanReserves fromthan

  11. Texas: City of San Antonio Demonstrates Value of Greater Investments in

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon DOE-HDBK-1046-2008CommerceClean Energy |

  12. Greater-than-Class C Low-Level Radioactive Waste (GTCC LLW) | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov.Energy02.pdf7 OPAM Flash2011-37 OPAM DOEofScienceDepartmentEnergy

  13. Environmental Impacts of Wind Power Development on the Population Biology of Greater Prairie-Chickens

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the YouTube|6721 FederalTexas Energyof 2005Site-Level ExerciseMarch 14, 2014NovemberImpact

  14. Haiti-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI ReferenceJumpEnergyStrategy | Open EnergyHackberry,gateway

  15. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"WaveInteractionsMaterials |ProductionDepartmentDevelopment |to|

  16. Stocks of Distillate Fuel Oil Greater Than 15 ppm to 500 ppm Sulfur

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for On-Highway4,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,9,1,50022,3,,,,6,1,Decade Energy I I' a(STEO) Highlights ï‚·2008DeutscheState470,6036,190 5,932

  17. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy,Policy ActDetroit7471 FederalDonnaDraft3:C Low-Level Radioactive

  18. DOE to Weigh Alternatives for Greater Than Class C Low-Level Waste Disposal

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directed off Energy.gov. Are you0and Transparency, and MoreEnergyof Energy DOEEnergy DOEDOE|

  19. Greater Sage-Grouse Populations and Energy Development in Wyoming | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetec AG Contracting JumpGoveNebraska:Ethanol LLC GO Ethanol Jump to:Energy

  20. Eight Approaches to Enable Greater Energy Efficiency: A Guide for State

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny:RevisedAdvisory BoardNucleate Boiling Efficient Cooling inEffluentGovernment

  1. Dominican Republic-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand JumpConceptual Model,DOE FacilityDimondale, Michigan:Emerling FarmCenter,Dolliver,Open Energy

  2. Jamaica-Low-Carbon Energy Roadmaps for the Greater Antilles | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunanInformation sourceInvensysIslandJackson(EC-LEDS)

  3. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpringout by electric and gas utilitiesEnergy

  4. State of Indiana/Greater IN Clean Cities Alternative Fuels Implementation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn'tOriginEducationVideo »UsageSecretaryVideosSpringout by electric and gas utilitiesEnergyPlan

  5. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport(FactDepartment3311,OfficialProducts | Department of EnergyMobile

  6. Model Examines Cumulative Impacts of Wind Energy Development on the Greater

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYouTube YouTube Note: Since the.pdfBreaking ofOil &315_ArnibanPriorityof Energy Poneman || Department

  7. Are We Heading Towards a Reversal of the Trend for Ever-Greater Mobility? |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual Siteof EnergyInnovation in Carbon Capture andsoftware and hardware orIndexes LLC Jump

  8. Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69Christopher FeckoDraft ResourceAdvice:ProjectC

  9. Draft Greater Than Class C EIS Public Hearings to Come to Pasco, WA and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField Campaign:INEA : Papers69Christopher FeckoDraftDraft For-Profit

  10. IIT Delhi launches SmartCaneTM to assist visually impaired to detect above-the-knee obstacles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banerjee, Subhashis

    manufacturer of medical devices for infant and maternity care is the industrial partner of Smart Delhi, March 30, 2014: The Indian Institute of Technology Delhi's Assistive Technologies Group-level. Utilising modern sensor technology, this device detects obstructions up to a distance of 3 metres

  11. Using Section 111 of the Clean Air Act for Cap-and-Trade of Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Obstacles and Solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Enion, Rhead M.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    focused nitro- gen oxide emissions-trading program for largeNSPS program could use emissions trading, including cap-and-regulations that allow emissions trading, to achieve GHG

  12. Experiments of trajectory generation and obstacle avoidance for a UGV David Vissi`ere, Dong Eui Chang, and Nicolas Petit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    on a mobile robotic experiment developed at the DGA Laboratoire de Recherche en Balistique et A david.vissiere@dga.defense.gouv.fr D. E. Chang is Assistant Professor in the Department of Applied

  13. I., Generation and measurement of random wave spectra, II., Transmission of random waves past a surface obstacle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayden, David Dantagnan

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Theoretical Narrow-Banded Spectrum with f s 0.80 Hz 7 2 peak 2 3 Comparison of Measured and Theoretical Broad-Banded Spectrum with f a 1 . 2 0 Hz 7 3 peak 24 Comparison of Measured and Theoretical Broad-Banded Spectrum with f 2 0.90 Hz 7 4 peak 25... Comparison of Measured and Theoretical Broad-Banded Spectrum with f a 0.75 Hz, Velocity Control 7 5 peak 26 Comparison of Measured and Theoretical Broad-Banded Spectrum with f ^ = 0.75 Hz, Absorption Control. . . . 76 27 Schematic of Water...

  14. To appear in IEEE Trans. On CAD 1 Abstract--Partial shading is a serious obstacle to the effective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedram, Massoud

    utilization of photovoltaic (PV) systems since it can result in a significant degradation in the PV system of a large-scale PV system comprised of 3 PV modules with 60 PV cells per module. Index Terms--Photovoltaic system, partial shading, photovoltaic module reconfiguration, dynamic programming. I. INTRODUCTION UE

  15. Structural foam-core panels in Northwest HUD-code manufactured housing: A preliminary assessment of opportunities and obstacles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durfee, D.L.; Lee, A.D.; Onisko, S.A.

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This investigation of structural foam-core panels (foam panels) in manufactured housing was initiated during the Super Good Cents (SGC) program. The SGC program limited allowable glazing area because of the relatively high thermal losses associated with most windows. Due to their superior thermal performance, foam panels appeared to be a viable option to allow increased glazing area without compromising the thermal integrity of the wall. With the inception of the Manufactured-Housing Acquisition Program (MAP), however, the focus of this study has shifted. MAP permits unlimited glazing area if expensive, super-efficient, vinyl-framed, argon-gas-filled, low-emissivity coated windows are installed. Although MAP permits unlimited glazing area, a foam panel wall could allow the use of less expensive windows, larger window area, or less insulation and still provide the required thermal performance for the building. Bonneville contracted with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to investigate the feasibility of using foam panels in HUD-code manufactured housing. This study presents the results from a product and literature search. The potential barriers and benefits to the use of foam panels are determined from a regional survey of the HUD-code manufacturers and foam panel producers.

  16. Analysis of the obstacles to financing geothermal hydrothermal commercialization projects and the government programs designed to remove them

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The risks associated with geothermal hydrothermal commercialization are broken down into five categories: resource risk; technological risk; regulatory risk; investment parity risks; and institutional risk aversion. The impact of each risk upon geothermal financing is assessed. The federal government's programs to provide financial incentives for geothermal development are presented as follows: tax incentives; indirect financial incentives programs; direct grant/cost-sharing programs; and attempts at reducing regulatory risk through the enactment of legal and institutional reforms. (MHR)

  17. Executive summary: legal obstacles and incentives to small-scale hydroelectric development in the six middle atlantic states

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The executive summary describes the relationship of Federal law and regulation to state law and regulation of small-scale hydroelectric facilities, highlighting important features of the constitutional, statutory, case law, and regulations of each of the six middle atlantic states (Maryland, Delaware, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and Virginia). Water law, direct and indirect regulation, and financial considerations for each state are presented. A flow diagram of regulation of small dams in each state is also included.

  18. Morphologic and computational fluid dynamic analysis of sand dune-topographic obstacle interactions on Earth and Titan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cisneros, Julia

    2014-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Earth and Titan have vastly different physical environments, but similar landscapes. Sand dunes, like those found in Earth’s deserts, cover large areas of Titan’s equatorial region and are important records of climate. Titan’s linear dunes...

  19. NREL Overcomes Obstacles in Lignin Valorization (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights in Research & Development, NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparency Visit | National Nuclear 1 NATIONALexaminesDynamic

  20. L'analyse de l'activit infirmire : ses effets sur l'auto-efficacit collective de cadres formateurs confronts au changement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    d'une recherche-action conduite dans cinq instituts de formation en soins infirmiers, auprès de cent neuf formateurs. Anticipant la réforme 2009 de la formation en soins infirmiers, cette recherche professionnelle, auto-efficacité collective, évaluation des compétences, formation en soins infirmiers, compétence

  1. Worker rights protection in Mexico's Silicon Valley : confronting low-road labor practices in high-tech manufacturing through antagonistic collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salazar Salame, Héctor

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Front and center against a backdrop of globalization and the ensuing outsourcing of manufacturing activities to low-income countries, has been a growing interest from scholars regarding the protection of labor rights and ...

  2. Natural Gas Resources of the Greater Green River and Wind River Basins of Wyoming (Assessing the Technology Needs of Sub-economic Resources, Phase I: Greater Green River and Wind river Basins, Fall 2002)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boswell, Ray; Douds, Ashley; Pratt, Skip; Rose, Kelly; Pancake, Jim; Bruner, Kathy (EG& G Services) [EG& G Services; Kuuskraa, Vello; Billingsley, Randy (Advanced Resources International) [Advanced Resources International

    2003-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In 2000, NETL conducted a review of the adequacy of the resource characterization databases used in its Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). This review indicated that the most striking deficiency in GSAM’s databases was the poor representation of the vast resource believed to exist in low-permeability sandstone accumulations in western U.S. basins. The model’s databases, which are built primarily around the United States Geological Survey (USGS) 1995 National Assessment (for undiscovered resources), reflected an estimate of the original-gas-inplace (OGIP) only in accumulations designated “technically-recoverable” by the USGS –roughly 3% to 4% of the total estimated OGIP of the region. As these vast remaining resources are a prime target of NETL programs, NETL immediately launched an effort to upgrade its resource characterizations. Upon review of existing data, NETL concluded that no existing data were appropriate sources for its modeling needs, and a decision was made to conduct new, detailed log-based, gas-in-place assessments.

  3. Twentieth-Century Global-Mean Sea Level Rise: Is the Whole Greater than the Sum of the Parts?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marzeion, Ben

    and Atmospheric Research, Hobart, Australia c Department of Physical Geography, Utrecht University, Utrecht Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands f Department of Geography, Trent University for Marine and Atmospheric Research Utrecht, Utrecht University, Utrecht, Netherlands h Department

  4. Electrical Hazards The greater hazards related to electricity are electrical shock and fire. Electrical shock occurs when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Petriu, Emil M.

    , the amount of current, the duration of exposure, and whether the skin is wet or dry. Water is a good for the level of hazard. Lab coats (knee-length) and proper footwear are required for work involving chemicals or moving machinery. · Leave behind protective equipment (lab coats, gloves, etc.) when leaving the work

  5. An examination of the impact of introducing greater contextual interference during practice on learning to golf putt 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Gyu-Young

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    participant practiced putting to three targets (4 ft, 8 ft, and 12 ft distance) for a total of 108 trials (36 trials to each target). On Day Two 30 trials of retention (10 trials to each target) and 10 transfer trials (10 ft distance) were performed...

  6. 1st World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography, Buxton, Greater Manchester 1417 April 1999. Eddy Current Tomography for Metal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Yingbo

    . 451 Eddy Current Tomography for Metal Solidification Imaging Minh H. Pham* , Yingbo Hua* , Neil B of molten metal inside a pipe by eddy currents. A complete mathematical model is developed which reveals functions in multiple layered media. Keywords: eddy current tomography, electromagnetic field, numerical

  7. EnergyWorks Final Report: A Better Buildings Neighborhood Program in the Five-County Greater Philadelphia Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gajewski, Katherine [City of Philadelphia] [City of Philadelphia

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This report covers the grant performance period of July 1, 2010-September 30, 2013 and discusses of the program design, outcomes and best practices as they relate to the following six areas: 1. Institutional Design and Business Model; 2. Program Design and Customer Experience; 3. Driving Demand; 4. Workforce Development; 5. Financing and Incentives; 6. Data and Evaluation.

  8. An examination of the impact of introducing greater contextual interference during practice on learning to golf putt

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hwang, Gyu-Young

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    adjustments. Such adjustments were beneficial when participants had to respond to a novel target location during transfer. Wegman (1999) examined the effect of three practice methods (repetitions, random, and combined) on ball rolling, racket striking...

  9. COMPLETE TRACKING OF PROTON FLOW IN THYLAKOIDS THE UNIT CONDUCTANCE OF CFo IS GREATER THAN 10 fS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schönknecht, Gerald

    further 20% of CF1 and increased the proton permeability of membranes by 3 orders of magnitude. In control, B, y, .sand £· 3 subunits (a, band c) are found for bacterial F0 , while 4 subunits (IV, I and III low, some percent of a 213 #12;femto-Siemens (fS) [6,8]. than 100 protons/sand F0 · 900 protons

  10. Identification of Water Resources Planning Problems in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio and its Associated Counties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, J. K.; Shih, C. S.

    1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    agencies, river authorities and interest groups in water resources management have evolved into a complicated system in this area. Thus, it was realized that an overview embedded with the systems approach for the current water resources problems is needed...

  11. W E R E ' S THEMANAGEMENT IN COLLECTIONS MANAGEMENT? Planning for Improved Care, Greater Use, and Growth of Collections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    LA GESTION EN LA ADMINISTRACIONDE LAS COLECCIONES? La necesidad urgente de documentar y proteger la de un sistema asociado de perfiles de colecciones; 2) establecimiento de un indice de salud de la mCtodo de medir la calidad de las colecciones; y 5) uso de 10s informes de impacto de colecciones

  12. The interest across our nation in the health and welfare of children has never been greater. In

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Nilanjan

    to demonstrate that the approach proposed is likely to be effective. The more cutting-edge and creative funding is fierce. A key factor for success is whether an applicant has preliminary (pilot) data given our researchers that extra competitive edge needed to secure larger grants. The following examples

  13. Scaling and Optimization of Magnetic Refrigeration for Commercial Building HVAC Systems Greater than 175 kW in Capacity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Mallow, Anne M [ORNL] [ORNL

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heating, ventilation, air-conditioning and refrigeration (HVACR) account for approximately one- third of building energy consumption. Magnetic refrigeration presents an opportunity for significant energy savings and emissions reduction for serving the building heating, cooling, and refrigeration loads. In this paper, we have examined the magnet and MCE material requirements for scaling magnetic refrigeration systems for commercial building cooling applications. Scaling relationships governing the resources required for magnetic refrigeration systems have been developed. As system refrigeration capacity increases, the use of superconducting magnet systems becomes more applicable, and a comparison is presented of system requirements for permanent and superconducting (SC) magnetization systems. Included in this analysis is an investigation of the ability of superconducting magnet based systems to overcome the parasitic power penalty of the cryocooler used to keep SC windings at cryogenic temperatures. Scaling relationships were used to develop the initial specification for a SC magnet-based active magnetic regeneration (AMR) system. An optimized superconducting magnet was designed to support this system. In this analysis, we show that the SC magnet system consisting of two 0.38 m3 regenerators is capable of producing 285 kW of cooling power with a T of 28 K. A system COP of 4.02 including cryocooler and fan losses which illustrates that an SC magnet-based system can operate with efficiency comparable to traditional systems and deliver large cooling powers of 285.4 kW (81.2 Tons).

  14. Identification of Management and Planning Problems of Urban Water Resources in the Metropolitan Area of Greater San Antonio

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Garner, K.; Shih, C. S.

    including the inventory and planning control for both surface and ground Water Resource Management of the San Antonio area are presented. Emphasis has been placed upon the identification of the probabilistic nature of various decision-making parameters...

  15. Evaluation of carbon fluxes and trends (2000e2008) in the Greater Platte River Basin: A sustainability study for potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    world food shortages, livestock and food price increases, and negative environmental effects: A sustainability study for potential biofuel feedstock development, Biomass and Bioenergy (2012), http

  16. Focus Series: The Greater Cincinnati Energy Alliance (GCEA) Equipment Lease Program Breaks Down Barriers for Cincinnati Contractors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't YourTransport inEnergy0.pdf Flash2010-60.pdf2 DOE Hydrogen andMeeting Date:FocusProgramFocus

  17. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S. D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D. [P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. We have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  18. Reducing the risk to Mars: The gas core nuclear rocket

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas-core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The authors have completed a comparative study of the potential impact that a GCNR could have on a manned Mars mission. The total IMLEO, transit times, and accumulated radiation dose to the crew will be compared with the NASA Design Reference Missions.

  19. OBPRM: An ObstacleBased PRM for 3D Workspaces Nancy M. Amato, Texas A&M University, College Station, TX, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LaValle, Steven M.

    methods, known as Probabilistic Roadmap Methods (prms) have shown great potential for solving compli a graph of representative paths in C­space (a roadmap) whose vertices correspond to collision roadmap method (obprm), in cluttered 3­dimensional Workspaces. Various node generation strategies

  20. The Effectiveness of Emergency Preparedness Animal Issues Education: Perceived Advantages and Obstacles of Roles Played By Texas AgriLife Extension Service Agents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxwell, Ricky G.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    million in the Turks and Caicos, amounting to a total of $32 billion in 18 Texas Tech University, Rick Maxwell, May 2010 damages. Ike was the third costliest Atlantic hurricane of all time, behind Hurricane Andrew of 1992 and Hurricane Katrina of 2005... Background The past few years have brought several natural disasters to the United States and especially the southern states. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita brought massive devastation to the gulf coast region, especially in the states of Louisiana...

  1. Obstacles to the application of soil and water conservation practices on tenant-operated farms cooperating with the Navarro-Hill Soil Conservation District

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boykin, Calvin C

    1956-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    laxxAloxd haa a long time stake in the maintenance of' hia soil resources, chile tha tenant, by vixtuc of tbs limits of hia contract, is primarily concerned with the aurrsat year's xeturns. Thus, a conf'. ct of interacts frecuezA)g retards...

  2. Proceedings of the 1998 IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation. Leuven, Belgium, May 1621, 1998, pp. 1572 -1577 VFH+: Reliable Obstacle Avoidance for Fast Mobile Robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Borenstein, Johann

    to this algorithm is a map grid of the local environment, called histogram grid [Borenstein and Koren, 1991], which. In the first three stages, the two-dimensional map grid is reduced to one-dimensional polar histograms the active region Ca of the map grid C onto the primary polar histogram Hp . The active region Ca

  3. ITER Siting Decision Clears One Important Obstacle in Congress "This is real . . . we've got a project on our hands." -DOE Office of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Moscow that representatives of the United States, European Union, Japan, the Russia Federation, China in late 2003 (see page 14 of www.sc.doe.gov/Sub/Facilities_for_future/facilities_future.htm .) Congress, he said, has "given reality to the project." DOE's site at http://www.science.doe.gov/ provides

  4. Motion Planning in the Presence of Motling Obstacles 765 trajectories but cannot rotate. This problem has many applications to robot, automobile, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reif, John H.

    . This problem has many applications to robot, automobile, and aircraft collision avoidance. Our main positive) Automobile Collision Avoidance. B is an automobile with an automatic steering system that must avoid collision with other automobiles with known trajectories on a highway. #12;766 J. REIF AND M. SHARIR (3

  5. Legal obstacles and incentives to the third development of small-scale hydroelectric potential in the six New England states: executive summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None,

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This executive summary describes the relationship of Federal law and regulation to state law and regulation of small-scale hydroelectric facilities. It also highlights important features of the constitutional law, statutory law, case law, and regulations of each of the six New England states. The summary may serve as a concise overview of and introduction to the detailed reports prepared by the Energy Law Institute on the legal and regulatory systems of each of the six states. The dual regulatory system is a function of the federalist nature of our government. This dual system is examined from the standpoint of the appropriate legal doctrine, i.e., the law of pre-emption, and the application of this law to the case of hydroelectric development. The regulation of small dams are discussed and flow diagrams of the regulations are presented for each of the six states - Maine, Massachusetts, Vermont, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Connecticut.

  6. May 18, 2010 14:15 WSPC -Proceedings Trim Size: 9in x 6in paper BEHAVIOR-BASED OBSTACLE DETECTION AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berns, Karsten

    they are applied very often to enhance human's capacity to act. One of these tasks is the inspection of large endangering human technicians. In this context our climbing robot project focusses on the development DETECTION AND AVOIDANCE SYSTEM FOR THE OMNIDIRECTIONAL WALL-CLIMBING ROBOT CROMSCI M. JUNG, D. SCHMIDT and K

  7. A Framework for the Systematic Collection of Open Source Intelligence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL] [ORNL; Trien, Joseph P [ORNL] [ORNL; Dobson, Jonathan D [ORNL] [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following legislative directions, the Intelligence Community has been mandated to make greater use of Open Source Intelligence (OSINT). Efforts are underway to increase the use of OSINT but there are many obstacles. One of these obstacles is the lack of tools helping to manage the volume of available data and ascertain its credibility. We propose a unique system for selecting, collecting and storing Open Source data from the Web and the Open Source Center. Some data management tasks are automated, document source is retained, and metadata containing geographical coordinates are added to the documents. Analysts are thus empowered to search, view, store, and analyze Web data within a single tool. We present ORCAT I and ORCAT II, two implementations of the system.

  8. Bill Post is a Valley leader, involved with the ASU Foundation, Blue Cross/Blue Shield of Arizona, The Greater Phoenix Leadership, The Institute of Nuclear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junshan

    , The Thunderbird School of Global Management, and Translational Genomics Research Institute. In 2007, he was Valley such as efforts to improve power plant emissions-to-algae-to-biofuel, high efficiency solar cells, and projects for the fifth consecutive year in the 2009 Dow Jones World Sustainability Index and the 2009 Dow Jones North

  9. 1st World Congress on Industrial Process Tomography, Buxton, Greater Manchester, April 14-17, 1999. Development of Iterative Algorithms for Industrial Tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pickalov, Valery

    , Novosibirsk 630090, Russia Pickalov@itam.nsc.ru *Institute of Introscopy, Tomsk 634028, Russia Abstract

  10. Timing of the deposition of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene coal-bearing deposits in the Greater Glendive area, Montana and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    With the aid of a grant from the National Geographic Society, a cooperative agreement with the State University of New York at Stony Brook, and contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, Late Cretaceous and Paleocene geologic and paleontologic field studies were undertaken in Makoshika, State Park and vicinity, Dawson County, Montana. This region was chosen as a study area because of its potential for yielding new fossil localities and extensive exposures both above and below the K/T boundary, as suggested by previous research by David W. Krause and Joseph H. Hartman. Related field studies were also undertaken in areas adjacent to the Cedar Creek Anticline in North Dakota. This work was part of ongoing research to document change in the composition of mammalian and molluscan faunas during the Late Cretaceous and Paleocene and to relate observed patterns to floral and invertebrate changes in composition. This study focuses on the record of mammals and mollusks in the Makoshika stratigraphic section and places old and new observations into a paleomagnetic and palynomorph framework. Of particular interest is the appearance and diversification of archaic ungulate mammals. Simultaneous dinosaur extinction with ungulate radiation has been invoked in gradual, as opposed to catastrophic, models of faunal change at the K/T boundary. However, supposed Cretaceous localities bearing archaic ungulates and other mammals of {open_quotes}Paleocene aspect{close_quotes} may be the product of faunal reworking. Elsewhere in the Williston Basin (e.g., Garfield and McCone Counties, Montana), the molluscan record of uppermost Cretaceous and Paleocene strata indicates the extinction of all of the highly sculptured unionid bivalves just prior to the onset of coal swamps and subsequent coal formation.

  11. A .--The continental scaup population (Lesser [Aythya affinis] and Greater [A. marila] combined) has declined markedly since 1978. One hypothesis for the population decline states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Afton, Alan D.

    hipótesis comparando el peso corporal y las reservas de nutrientes (lípidos, proteínas y minerales) de A y 2000. Encontramos que el peso corporal promedio y las reservas de lípidos y minerales de las Louisiana; de modo similar, el peso corporal y las reservas de lípidos y minerales de los machos fueron 108

  12. Planning the Ranch for Greater Profit: A Study of Physical and Economic Factors Affecting Organization and Management of Ranches in the Edwards Plateau Grazing Area.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabbard, L. P. (Letcher P.); Bonnen, C. A. (Clarence Alfred); Tate, J. N. (James Norman)

    1930-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    the numbers of cattle have been decreasing since 1923. The decline in numbers of all kinds of livestock in the area from 1917-1919 was apparently due to drought conditions during 1917 and 1918. This de- cline was only temporary-the trend continuing upward...; two-year heifers 1.04. vearling steers 96- two-year steer I .OB; three-year steer 1.14; ewes -15; rams .17; lambs .08. vearling e.wes .11; ykirling wethers .'I];' wethers .lfi; does .13; bucks .15; kids .05; yearling does .lo; chevons .ii...

  13. cast rates greater than about 0.4 per output port, since at that rate the multicast queues themselves become unstable.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pennsylvania, University of

    1998. [4] G. Birkhoff. Tres observaciones sobre el algebra lineal. Univ. Nac. Tu­ cumâ??an Rev. Ser. A5

  14. The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means are not. This gives GMMs a greater flexibility since the covariance matrices k of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Clustering Exercise 1 The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means are not want and hence the clusters may have any desired elliptical shapes. It can be shown that k-means in R. The function to apply k-means is kmeans. The function to apply the EM algorithm is the function

  15. The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means are not. This gives GMMs a greater flexibility since the covariance matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spang, Rainer

    Clustering Exercise 1 Question 1 The main difference is that GMMs are probabilistic whereas k-means be anything we want and hence the clusters may have any desired elliptical shapes. It can be shown that k-means

  16. 20 Gy Versus 44 Gy of Supplemental External Beam Radiotherapy With Palladium-103 for Patients With Greater Risk Disease: Results of a Prospective Randomized Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrick, Gregory S., E-mail: gmerrick@urologicresearchinstitute.org [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Wallner, Kent E. [Puget Sound Healthcare Corporation, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States); Butler, Wayne M.; Galbreath, Robert W. [Schiffler Cancer Center/Wheeling Jesuit University, Wheeling, WV (United States); Taira, Al V. [Western Radiation Oncology Inc, Mountain View, CA (United States); Orio, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Adamovich, Edward [Department of Pathology, Wheeling Hospital, Wheeling, WV (United States)

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: The necessity of external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) as a supplement to prostate brachytherapy remains unknown. We report brachytherapy outcomes for patients with higher risk features randomized to substantially different supplemental EBRT regimens. Methods and Materials: Between December 1999 and June 2004, 247 patients were randomized to 20 Gy vs. 44 Gy EBRT followed by a palladium-103 boost (115 Gy vs. 90 Gy). The eligibility criteria included clinically organ-confined disease with Gleason score 7-10 and/or pretreatment prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level 10-20 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.0 years. Biochemical progression-free survival (bPFS) was defined as a PSA level of {<=}0.40 ng/mL after nadir. The median day 0 prescribed dose covering 90% of the target volume was 125.7%; 80 men received androgen deprivation therapy (median, 4 months). Multiple parameters were evaluated for their effect on bPFS. Results: For the entire cohort, the cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival rates were 97.7%, 93.2%, and 80.8% at 8 years and 96.9%, 93.2%, and 75.4% at 10 years, respectively. The bPFS rate was 93.1% and 93.4% for the 20-Gy and 44-Gy arms, respectively (p = .994). However, no statistically significant differences were found in cause-specific survival or overall survival were identified. When stratified by PSA level of {<=}10 ng/mL vs. >10 ng/mL, Gleason score, or androgen deprivation therapy, no statistically significant differences in bPFS were discerned between the two EBRT regimens. On multivariate analysis, bPFS was most closely related to the preimplant PSA and clinical stage. For patients with biochemically controlled disease, the median PSA level was <0.02 ng/mL. Conclusion: The results of the present trial strongly suggest that two markedly different supplemental EBRT regimens result in equivalent cause-specific survival, bPFS, and overall survival. It is probable that the lack of benefit for a higher supplemental EBRT dose is the result of the high-quality brachytherapy dose distributions.

  17. Random variation in rectal position during radiotherapy for prostate cancer is two to three times greater than that predicted from prostate motion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scaife, J.; Harrison, K.; Romanchikova, M.; Parker, A.; Sutcliffe, M.; Bond, S.; Thomas, S.; Freeman, S.; Jena, R.; Bates, A.; Burnet, N.

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    of slices required to show the entire rectum on the MV scans (i.e. half the number of kV slices) are shown as circles. The interquartile ranges, of the actual numbers of slices showing rectum on the MV scans, are shown as bars (25% percentile as the lower... bar and 75% percentile as the upper bar). Full paper: Random rectal variation is higher than predicted during prostate RT BJR 3 of 12 birpublications.org/bjr Br J Radiol;87:20140343 In order to investigate any and all differences in median position...

  18. 24 J. Am. Chem. SOC.1988, 110, 24-30 greater than the lower limit set by the present experiments. A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    , exhibits reactivity similar to that of the group 3 transition metal cations. Product distributions in GdH2+ is 120 f 5 kcal/mol. Gd(CH3)(H)+ is produced in the reaction with propane indicatingHlz,463-82-1;n- C6HI4,110-54-3; propane-2,2-d2,2875-95-8; 2-methylpropane-2-dI, 20717-74-2;n

  19. no pedestrian call during some cycles. It is not a problem if the required vehicle phase split is greater than the pedestrian Walk plus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tian, Zong Z.

    Xin Cheng, Zong Z. Tian, and Hongchao Liu 125 For an actuated signalized intersection, pedestrian calls

  20. Greater accordance with the DASH dietary pattern is associated with lower diet-related greenhouse gas production but higher dietary costs in the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monsivais, Pablo; Scarborough, Peter; Lloyd, Tina; Mizdrak, Anja; Luben, Robert; Mulligan, Angela A.; Wareham, Nicholas J.; Woodcock, James

    2015-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    of the DASH score. The FFQ data were processed by using the FFQ EPIC Tool for Analysis (17), software based on the earlier analysis system (16), to estimate average daily nutrient and energy intakes. Dietary data were deemed implausible when energy estimates... : climate, diet quality, food prices, prevention, public health INTRODUCTION Diets that are consistent with the Dietary Approaches to Stop Hypertension (DASH)5 are associated with reduced cardiometabolic risk and better health outcomes. The design...

  1. Patterns of habitat use by fishes associated with Sargassum mats in the Gulf of Mexico, with an emphasis on the greater amberjack (Seriola dumerili)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Robert Joseph David

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    WITH SARGASSUM MATS IN THE NW GULF OF MEXICO. Introduction. Materials and Methods ? Sampling design. Data analysis, . Results. Environmental conditions. Mat characteristics . . Catch composition. . Size distribution. . . . Spatial and temporal patterns.... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 34 Introduction. . Materials and Methods. . . 34 35 Vl6 CHAPTER Field collections. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Otolith procedures, . Data analysis. . Results. Environmental conditions . . Spatial and temporal distribution. . . . Size...

  2. Governing Poverty Amidst Plenty: Philanthropic Investments and the California Dream

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohl, Erica L.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Confronting Concentrated Poverty Across America,” NovemberConfronting Concentrated Poverty Across America,” DC: TheChallenge of Concentrated Poverty Across America: Case

  3. The application of MacArthur's model to the relative abundance of species of aquatic Coleoptera in Fish Lake, Brazos County, Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Conte, Fred Sequin

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    rises and falls with the level of the lake, The beetles were collected in water from 0. 5 mm. to 9, 0 cm. deep with a coarse mesh strainer following the technique of Zimmerman (7960). The strainer used has a diameter of three inches ~ rather than... the six-inch strainer used by Zimmerman, to provide greater mobility around obstacles in the littoral zone and to produce as little alteration of natural conditions as possible. Larger nets could not be used, as they would destroy much of the marginal...

  4. Introduction 5 Mechanism of Irradiation Hardening 5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    these obstacles either by the Orowan mechanism , in which the dislocations bow out between the obstacles, thermal activation can help in overcoming the energy barrier caused by the obstacles. This thermal

  5. Flame acceleration studies in the MINIFLAME facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tieszen, S.R.; Sherman, M.P.; Benedick, W.B.

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flame acceleration and deflagration-to-detonation transition (DDT) studies have been conducted in a 19.4-cm high, 14.5-cm wide, and 2. 242-m long channel (MINIFLAME) that is a 1:12.6 scale model of the 136-m{sup 3} FLAME facility. Tests were conducted with two levels of hydrogen concentration -- 20% and 30%, with and without obstacles in the channel, and with three levels of transverse top venting -- 0%, 13%, and 50%. The flame acceleration results in MINIFLAME are qualitatively similar to those in FLAME; however, the small-scale results are more benign quantitatively. The results show that insufficient venting, 13% venting in this case, can promote flame acceleration due to turbulence produced by the flow through the vents in smooth channels. However, with obstacle-generated turbulence in the channel, 13% top venting was found to be beneficial. Flame acceleration resulting in DDT was shown to occur in as little as 35 liters of mixture. Comparison of the DDT data with obstacles in MINIFLAME and FLAME supports d/{lambda} scaling of DDT, where {lambda} is the detonation cell width of the mixture and d is the characteristic open diameter of the channel. In the MINIFLAME and FLAME tests, DDT occurred for d/{lambda} greater than approximately three. Comparison with other experiments shows that the value of d/{lambda} for DDT is not constant but depends on the obstacle type, spacing, and channel geometry. The comparison of MINIFLAME and FLAME experiments extends the use of d/{lambda} scaling to different geometries and larger scales than previous studies. Small-scale-model testing of flame acceleration and DDT with the same combustible mixture as the full-scale prototype underpredicts flame speeds, overpressures, and the possibility of DDT. 18 refs., 16 figs.

  6. actin filament labels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    irrespective of obstacle geometry, and clarify how simulated and electron tomography data have to be analyzed for non-flat obstacle geometries. Julian Weichsel; Ulrich S....

  7. Gas core nuclear rocket feasibility project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howe, S.D.; DeVolder, B.; Thode, L.; Zerkle, D.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next giant leap for mankind will be the human exploration of Mars. Almost certainly within the next thirty years, a human crew will brave the isolation, the radiation, and the lack of gravity to walk on and explore the Red planet. However, because the mission distances and duration will be hundreds of times greater than the lunar missions, a human crew will face much greater obstacles and a higher risk than those experienced during the Apollo program. A single solution to many of these obstacles is to dramatically decrease the mission duration by developing a high performance propulsion system. The gas core nuclear rocket (GCNR) has the potential to be such a system. The gas core concept relies on the use of fluid dynamic forces to create and maintain a vortex. The vortex is composed of a fissile material which will achieve criticality and produce high power levels. By radiatively coupling to the surrounding fluids, extremely high temperatures in the propellant and, thus, high specific impulses can be generated. The ship velocities enabled by such performance may allow a 9 month round trip, manned Mars mission to be considered. Alternatively, one might consider slightly longer missions in ships that are heavily shielded against the intense Galactic Cosmic Ray flux to further reduce the radiation dose to the crew. The current status of the research program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory into the gas core nuclear rocket feasibility will be discussed.

  8. In: Proceedings of the Participatory Design Conference (PDC 2000), 29.11. 1.12.2000, New York, pp. 143 147 Obstacles to tele-cooperation in engineering networks of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    In: Proceedings of the Participatory Design Conference (PDC 2000), 29.11. ­ 1.12.2000, New York, pp

  9. China's Presence in Rwanda and Africa, through the Lens of the Product Life Cycle Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sofiani, Lily

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    South Africa where infrastructure and communication are more attractive to investors. Obstacles such as energy

  10. YouProve: Authenticity and Fidelity in Mobile Sensing Peter Gilbert

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , Egypt, and Libya is difficult. Due to logistical obstacles, govern- ment bans, and reprisals against

  11. Industrial Combustion Technology Roadmap. A Technology Roadmap by and for the Industrial Combustion Community

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. combustion industry is among the most productive, efficient, and technologically sophisticated in the world and remains vital to the nation’s economic competitiveness and national security. As the industry looks forward, it confronts tremendous growth opportunities but also significant technical and market challenges. Future industry success will depend on the industry's ability to respond to competitive pressures as well as public expectations for a clean and sustainable industry. Much progress has been made in understanding the fundamental science of combustion; however, much more is needed as regulatory and competitive forces push the industry to develop combustion equipment with better performance, lower environmental impact, and greater flexibility. Immense opportunities exist for companies to develop and apply new technology responding to these needs. Unfortunately, few companies can accept the high technical and financial risk required for the research if the technology is not adopted widely enough to provide a payback on their investment.

  12. Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

  13. The variety of insecticides available today is much greater than it was 20 years ago. It includes some made from bacteria, insect-killing fungi or viruses; products such as insecticidal soaps that kill by physical processes; and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Hampshire, University of

    of nerve impulses by affecting the potassium or sodium ion channel in nerve cells. Insect Growth Regulators interfere with the normal movement of potassium and sodium ions across nerve cell surfaces. This prevents that breaks it down is acetylcholinesterase. OP insecticides function by inhibiting the action of the enzyme

  14. Godiva Rim Member: A new stratigraphic unit of the Green River Formation in southwest Wyoming and northwest Colorado. Geology of the Eocene Wasatch, Green River, and Bridger (Washakie) Formations, Greater Green River Basin, Wyoming, Utah, and Colorado. Professional paper

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roehler, H.W.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The report names and describes the Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation in the eastern part of the Washakie basin in southwest Wyoming and the central part of the Sand Wash basin in northwest Colorado. The Godiva Rim Member comprises lithofacies of mixed mudflat and lacustrine origin situated between the overlying lacustrine Laney Member of the Green River Formation and the underlying fluvial Cathedral Bluffs Tongue of the Wasatch Formation. The Godiva Rim Member is laterally equivalent to and grades westward into the LaClede Bed of the Laney Member. The Godiva Rim Member of the Green River Formation was deposited along the southeast margins of Lake Gosiute and is correlated to similar lithologic units that were deposited along the northeast margins of Lake Uinta in the Parachute Creek Member of the Green River Formation. The stratigraphic data presented provide significant evidence that the two lakes were periodically connected around the east end of the Uinta Mountains during the middle Eocene.

  15. IMPROVING ACCESS TO CARDIOVASCULAR PREVENTIVE HEALTH CARE FOR THE UNINSURED POLISH POPULATION IN THE GREATER CHICAGO AREA-EXPERIENCE FROM THE POLISH AMERICAN ATHEROSCLEROSIS RISK FACTOR MODIFICATION (POLAARIS) PROJECT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhimaraj, Arvind

    2010-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

    more than 40% underwent percutaneous coronary intervention. Also, the lipid profiles indicated high triglycerides, low HDL and normal LDL levels. In fact, an institutional learning has been that being ?Polish? is a risk factor for coronary artery...

  16. Community Action Partnership of the Greater Dayton Area Â… Weatherization Assistance Program Funds Provided by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009, OAS-RA-11-18

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T, Inc.'sEnergyTexas1.Space Data CorporationPastCommunicatingSupport

  17. DOE/EIS-0375D: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (February 2011)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone | DepartmentEA - 0942 E N v m

  18. DOE/EIS-0375D: Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Disposal of Greater-Than-Class C (GTCC) Low-Level Radioactive Waste and GTCC-Like Waste (DOE/EIS-0375D)(February 2011)

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011AT&T,Office of Policy, OAPMMilestone | DepartmentEA - 0942 E N v m Impact Statement

  19. The Distribution of Data Management Responsibility within Scientific Research Groups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallis, Jillian C.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A. (2003). The Data Deluge: An e-Science Perspective. InScience confronts the data deluge: Habitat ecology, embeddedScience confronts the data deluge: Habitat ecology, embedded

  20. FROM YEARNING TO BURNING Marshall Rosenbluth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    experiment. It is there that we confront the unresolved issues of transport scaling, self-heating, burn

  1. Pipelines, Pathways, and Payoffs: Economic Challenges and Returns to Changing Demographics in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stiles, Jon; Brady, Henry

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Project, Harvard University, “Confronting the GraduationProject (HCRP) used this approach to estimate ethnicity-specific graduation

  2. Smart Grid - Transforming Power System Operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Widergren, Steven E.; Kirkham, Harold

    2010-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract—Electric power systems are entering a new realm of operations. Large amounts of variable generation tax our ability to reliably operate the system. Couple this with a greater reliance on the electricity network to serve consumer demand that is likely to rise significantly even as we drive for greater efficiency. Trade-offs between energy and environmental needs will be constantly negotiated, while a reliable supply of electricity needs even greater assurance in a world where threats of disruption have risen. Smart grid capabilities are being proposed to help address the challenges confronting system operations. This paper reviews the impact of smart grid functionality on transforming power system operations. It explores models for distributed energy resources (DER – generation, storage, and load) that are appearing on the system. It reviews the evolving nature of electricity markets to deal with this complexity and a change of emphasis on signals from these markets to affect power system control. Smart grid capabilities will also impact reliable operations, while cyber security issues must be addressed as a culture change that influences all system design, implementation, and maintenance. Lastly, the paper explores significant questions for further research and the need for a simulation environment that supports such investigation and informs deployments to mitigate operational issues as they arise.

  3. On the hyperplanes arrangements in mixed-integer techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    the obstacles in the best path generation is provided. Other works, like [9], consider ..... a target position while avoiding the randomly distributed obstacles. .... Navigation, and Control Conference, Providence, Rhode Island, USA,. 16-19 August ...

  4. Branch-and-Lift Algorithm for Global Optimal Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    example in controlling a car or a robot in the presence of obstacles, a local solver will typically fail to determine whether passing a given obstacle on the right or ...

  5. Final Report: Mobile Surveillance and Wireless Communication Systems Field Operational Test Volume 2: FOT Objectives, Organization, System Design, Results, Conclusions and Recommendations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Lawrence

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    obstacle to using solar power to charge the ramp metersystem do utilize solar power to supplement power supplied

  6. Minimal Trap Design Pankaj K. Agarwal, Anne D. Collinsy, and John L. Harerz

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.

    ].) Along this track is placed a sequence of obstacles (ramps, wiper blades, traps, etc.) designed to allow

  7. Navigation Functions for Focally Admissible Surfaces Ioannis Filippidis and Kostas J. Kyriakopoulos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Low, Steven H.

    focal surface within the obstacle. Secondly, a critical point which is not near a second- order contac

  8. Speed Map for Autonomous Rovers over Rough Terrain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Loh, Jonathan Edau

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Grid Map . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .considered obstacles [27] Grid Map showing Tile Size, Cellspeed map. It also covers grid maps and terrain roughness,

  9. Study on Prompting Mechanism of Energy EFficiency Technology

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Information on energy efficient technologies, the obstacles surrounding their implementation, and the methods for prompting use of these technologies.

  10. The Magellanic System: Stars, Gas, and Galaxies Proceedings IAU Symposium No. 256, 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gamma Ray Bursts progenitors foresee possible LGRBs progenitors at the SMC's metallicity. We confront parameters, gamma rays: theory 1. Introduction, observations This document deals with the determination

  11. Quantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsJennifer B....

  12. Diversity & Flexibility Key to Sustainability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsDiversity & Flexibility Key to SustainabilityDavid Babson, Senior Fuels Engineer, Union of...

  13. The Ethics of Distribution /

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pummer, Theron

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    3.5: Taking Stock..…………………………………………………. 3.6: Two Moreand Critical Thresholds Taking Stock Two More Monstersturn, too implausible. Taking Stock Before confronting any

  14. Power and Frequency Control as it Relates to Wind-Powered Generation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lacommare, Kristina S H

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    scale additions of wind generation. The objectives of thisof large amounts of wind generation confronts the grid withhave been important as wind generation has gone from being a

  15. Know Thy Sensor: Trust, Data Quality, and Data Integrity in Scientific Digital Libraries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wallis, J C; Borgman, C L; Mayernik, Matthew; Pepe, Alberto; Ramanathan, Nithya; Hansen, Mark

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Trefethen, A. : The Data Deluge: An e-Science Perspective.Science confronts the data deluge: Habitat ecology, embeddedfield methods. The “data deluge” resulting from these new

  16. Forecasting the Path of China's CO2 Emissions Using Province Level Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auffhammer, Maximilian; Carson, Richard T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to the Environmental Kuznets Curve, Ecological Economics 28,Confronting the environmental kuznets curve, Journal of2004, The Environmental Kuznets Curve and Flow Versus Stock

  17. Strategic Perspectives on Biofuels

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Plenary V: Biofuels and Sustainability: Acknowledging Challenges and Confronting MisconceptionsQuantitative Analysis of Biofuel Sustainability, Including Land Use Change GHG EmissionsLee R. Lynd,...

  18. U.S. Energy Secretary Addresses International Atomic Energy Agency...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the world. Its role grows more valuable as we confront a changing climate, increasing energy demand, and a struggling global economy... The United States recently announced the...

  19. Screening in (2+1)D pure gauge theory at high temperatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Laermann; C. Legeland; B. Petersson

    1995-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We compute heavy quark potentials in pure gauge $SU(3)$ at high temperatures in $2+1$ dimensions and confront them with expectations emerging from perturbative calculations.

  20. Energy risk in Latin America:Energy risk in Latin America: the growing challengesthe growing challenges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dixon, Juan

    fuel prices, fuel availability, economic and political changes, among others, are confronting those Projected Under Evaluation Under Study, LNG Projects Under Construction Transportation Capacity(MMm3/día

  1. abejas jalea real: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market. Ewa Broszkiewicz-Suwaj 2006-08-16 7 Regular Real Analysis Swarat...

  2. antioxidant therapeutic options: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    estimators are calculated. The theoretical part is confronted with real data from electricity market. Ewa Broszkiewicz-Suwaj 2006-08-16 19 Option Pricing Andrea Gagliano...

  3. Discovering and validating biological hypotheses from coherent patterns in functional genomics data using associative biclustering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joachimiak, Marcin P.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    patterns in functional genomics data using associativeand Environmental Research, Genomics:GTL program throughof Energy Functional genomics confronts researchers with a

  4. accuracy neutrino oscillation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effects are reviewed. The results from oscillations are confronted with neutrinoless double beta decay. G. Rajasekaran 2000-04-17 22 Neutrino Mass and Oscillation HEP -...

  5. active-sterile neutrino oscillations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    effects are reviewed. The results from oscillations are confronted with neutrinoless double beta decay. G. Rajasekaran 2000-04-17 60 Neutrino Mass and Oscillation HEP -...

  6. Re-Imagining the Past in Transnational Online Communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nikunen, Kaarina

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    memory. Online Memories: Kurdistan The question of homelandin-the-making. Since Kurdistan is not a recognized state,79), the idea of a single Kurdistan confronts the complexity

  7. anger regulation coping: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the perceived magnitude of upset each sex would experience when confronted by each source. Study 3 (N 214) tested predictions within married couples about sex differences in...

  8. The struggle for vibrancy : a study of local government intervention in Detroit's inner suburbs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kohn, Amy J. (Amy Jennifer)

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Today, many communities located on the periphery of central cities confront traditionally "urban" problems. Detroit's inner suburbs struggle with aging infrastructure, limited governmental capacity, commercial disinvestment, ...

  9. Civil society strategies on urban waterways : stewardship, contention, and coalition building

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Lindsay Kathleen

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Urban, industrial waterways-with their contamination, environmental injustice, and nebulous development futures given changing economies-present multiple problems that are confronted by environmental civil society ...

  10. 2014-10-08, 7:44 PM--FORESTS: Sugar maples reveal obstacles facing species in their e...nge --researchers --Monday, September 29, 2014 --www.eenews.net Page 1 of 3http://www.eenews.net/climatewire/stories/1060006547/print

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vellend, Mark

    the Appalachian Mountains where temperatures were lower. Sap from these trees is boiled down to produce maple syrup. "We knew the system had warmed, but we weren't seeing the response you would expect," said.3 miles) per decade. Projected temperature increases between 2050 and 2090 under high carbon emissions

  11. Emergency preparedness for the small oilfield contractor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reavis, H.C.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Changes in the oil and gas industry have been dramatic in recent years. Operators have consolidated field office facilities and downsized staffing at many of their remaining facilities. As a result, operators are turning to independent Contractors as a method of controlling both peak personnel demands and selected production functions. With these changes in the business environment, the role of the specialized contractor has been greatly expanded. Tasks Diane performed by operator employees are now ongoing services provided by the contractor. Their performance can Taken be exemplary until a major emergency occurs. Emergency response can no longer be considered a secondary issue. Every contractor, small or large, must be equally prepared for an emergency. Their ability to address emergency incidents will have a direct effect in their success. This paper is a presentation of the actual learning experiences of one oilfield contractor confronted with the ask of emergency preparedness, more specifically a small contractor. Oilfield service contractors commonly employ field personnel who work for extended periods of time without direct supervision. These employees may singularly or collectively float between sites or anchor one site. Operating sites might be localized or spread over a vast geographical area. Because of the uniqueness of their situation, direct supervision is minimal and the employees will shoulder greater responsibilities and authority. The contractor must evaluate operating conditions and develop an approach which will achieve the optimum results.

  12. Energy-efficiency solutions: What commodity prices can`t deliver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cavanagh, R. [Natural Resources Defense Council, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the past two decades, the brightest feature of US energy policy has been largely successful efforts to accelerate the pace of energy-efficiency improvements. Fortunately, the process is nowhere near complete, as continued progress is essential for meeting compelling environmental and economic objectives, both at home and abroad. One now confronts a debate over how to achieve this progress in a nation--and a world--that seeks more competition in the production of all fuels, including those traditionally controlled by integrated monopolies. That debate typically is not over whether more competition is good for energy users and energy efficiency; rather, dispute centers on the terms on which competition should occur, and the criteria that will determine winners and losers. Also, meeting today`s US energy needs carries a half trillion dollar annual price tag: about $5,000 per household. Every one of those households stands to benefit from new energy-efficient technologies, which can get more work out of less energy at lower cost while reducing the vulnerability to fluctuations in fossil fuel prices. For developing countries, economic opportunities are even greater.

  13. Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); McDermott, K.A. (Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry's SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

  14. Emissions trading and compliance: Regulatory incentives and barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    South, D.W.; Bailey, K.A. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); McDermott, K.A. [Illinois State Univ., Normal, IL (United States). Center for Regulatory Studies

    1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Title IV of the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1990 (P.L. 101-549) authorizes the use of transferable emission allowances to achieve reductions in the power generating industry`s SO{sub 2} emissions at a minimum possible cost. All electricity generators (greater than 25 MW) are required to hold emissions allowances equal to the amount (tons) of SO{sub 2} emitted during a given year, and meet NO{sub x} reduction levels indicated by the Revised New Source Performance Standards (NSPS). This paper will examine the multifaceted goals and problems of states and utilities relative to compliance with Title IV, and in particular as they pertain to the development and functioning of the allowance market together with utility pollution control and power generation technology choice. Section 2 presents possible utility compliance strategies along with possible barriers that utilities may confront regarding the development of a SO{sub 2} allowance market. Section 3 discusses current regulatory barriers and requirements being implemented by state public utility commissions, and Section 4 offers some policy recommendations to achieve the goals of Title IV. Finally, Section 5 presents a summary and conclusions; Appendix A provides programs/mandates developed to data by high sulfur coal states in response to Title IV compliance requirements.

  15. Russell, J. 1974. Floating nplants proposed off ____. 1969. Nuclear power-anadromous Stober, Q. J., and E. O. Salo. 1973. Ecological New Jersey. Nat!. Fisherman 55(6):6B-7B. fishes. Greater Portland Commer. 53(31) studies of the proposed Kiket Island nucl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fishing Institute. 1972a. Costly fish kill. County PUD and Seattle City Light, 537 p. lumbia River of Dredging on Aquatic Organisms With Special Application to Areas Adjacent to the Northeastern Pacific Ocean ties in the rivers and harbors of the United States is the dredging and dis posing of approximately 380

  16. AN EFFICIENT AND ACCURATE SPECTRAL METHOD FOR ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. An efficient and accurate method for solving the two-dimensional Helmholtz ... has proven to be very efficient for obstacles that can be considered as a ...

  17. Principal Characteristics of a Modern Grid

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    consumer participation Informed, involved and active consumers. Broad penetration of Demand Response Relatively small number of large generating plants. Numerous obstacles...

  18. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial vehicle instrumentation Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. McLain, Randal W. Beard, "Maximizing miniature aerial vehicles," IEEE Robotics and Automation... Unexpected Obstacle Research Overview Guidance, Navigation, Vehicle...

  19. E-Print Network 3.0 - aerial vehicle radome Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. McLain, Randal W. Beard, "Maximizing miniature aerial vehicles," IEEE Robotics and Automation... Unexpected Obstacle Research Overview Guidance, Navigation, Vehicle...

  20. E-Print Network 3.0 - automated surface mount Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    automated, including parking garages. Less effort, fewer collisions... What's to lose? Vehicle... distance sensors One mounted in the front to detect obstacles to forward...