National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for obsidian pool yellowstone

  1. Complete Genome Sequence of Paenibacillus strain Y4.12MC10, a Novel Paenibacillus lautus strain Isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mead, David [University of Wisconsin, Madison; Lucas, Susan [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Cheng, Jan-Fang [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Pitluck, Sam [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Chertkov, Olga [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Zhang, Xiaojing [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Hauser, Loren John [ORNL; Chang, Yun-Juan [ORNL; Kyrpides, Nikos C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ivanova, N [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Ovchinnikova, Galina [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Woyke, Tanja [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brumm, Catherine [United States Department of Energy Joint Genome Institute; Hochstein, Rebecca [Lucigen Corporation, Middleton, Wisconsin; Schoenfeld, Thomas [Lucigen Corporation, Middleton, Wisconsin; Brumm, Phillip [University of Wisconsin, Madison

    2012-01-01

    Paenibacillus speciesY412MC10 was one of a number of organisms initially isolated from Obsidian Hot Spring, Yellowstone National Park, Montana, USA. The isolate Y412MC10 was initially classified as a Geobacillus sp. based on its isolation conditions and similarity to other organisms isolated from hot springs at Yellowstone National Park. Comparison of 16 S rRNA sequences within the Bacillales indicated that Geobacillus sp.Y412MC10 clustered with Paenibacillus species and not Geobacillus; the 16S rRNA analysis indicated the organism was a strain of Paenibacillus lautus. Lucigen Corp. prepared genomic DNA and the genome was sequenced, assembled, and annotated by the DOE Joint Genome Institute. The genome of Paenibacillus lautus strain Y412MC10 consists of one circular chromosome of 7,121,665 bp with an average G+C content of 51.2%. The Paenibacillus sp.Y412MC10 genome sequence was deposited at the NCBI in October 2009 (NC{_}013406). Comparison to other Paenibacillus species shows the organism lacks nitrogen fixation, antibiotic production and social interaction genes reported in other Paenibacilli. Over 25% of the proteins predicted by the Y412MC10 genome share no identity with the closest sequenced Paenibacillus species; most of these are predicted hypothetical proteins and their specific function in the environment is unknown.

  2. Tikal obsidian: sources and typology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moholy-Nagy, H.; Asaro, F.; Stross, F.H.

    1984-01-01

    The obsidian industry of Classic period Tikal, Guatemala, is discussed with regard to geological source determinations and behavioral typology. The potential of these two approaches for cultural reconstruction is greatly extended when they can supplement each other. Recent source determinations of obsidian artifacts from Tikal indicate (1) a behavioral link between locally-produced prismatic blades of Highland Guatemalan stone and ceremonial incised obsidians and eccentrics, and (2) a Central Mexican origin for a seemingly large portion of Tikal's obsidian projectile points and knives. 25 references, 3 figures, 5 tables.

  3. Review: Yellowstone's Wildlife in Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tans, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Yellowstone National Park occupies a special place in the American imagination. Home to mountains, geothermal

  4. Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,Obsidian

  5. Appendix C: The sources of Copan Valley obsidian

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harbottle, G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Neff, H.; Bishop, R.L. [Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (United States). Conservation Analytical Lab.

    1995-05-01

    One hundred thirty-nine obsidian samples from the Copan Valley were subjected to neutron activation analysis at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Obsidian sources from Mesoamerica have been characterized by a number of different laboratories using several techniques. Over 1,800 samples from Mesoamerica have been analyzed by neutron activation at BNL. These data are now housed both at BNL and in the Smithsonian Archaeometric Research Collections and Records (SARCAR) data base. Previous statistical analysis of the Mesoamerican obsidian artifacts and source samples has produced reference groups representing many of the sources, including Ixtepeque, San Martin Jilotepeque, and El Chayal, the three sources closest to the Copan Valley and therefore most likely to be represented in the analyzed sample. As anticipated, the overwhelming majority of obsidian recovered in the Copan Valley comes from the closest source, Ixtepeque. Of the seven El Chayal specimens, four pertain to CV-43 and three pertain to CV-20. These data provide no evidence of a difference between the two localities in external obsidian exchange relations. Thus, the authors find no grounds for questioning the assumption that the minor quantities of El Chayal obsidian that reached the Copan Valley were distributed through the same channels responsible for distribution of the more common Ixtepeque obsidian.

  6. Quarrying Evidence at the Quispisisa Obsidian Source, Ayacucho, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; Contreras, Daniel A.

    2011-01-01

    along this slope that large nod- ules of obsidian are firstfarther downslope (Figure 2). Nod- ules in these areas rangeprimary flakes suggests that nod- ules were being assayed at

  7. Fungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    Monitoring Yellowstone's Bumble Bees · Microbial Diversity in Non-sulfur and Iron Geothermal Steam VentsFungi Inventory Endemic Plants of Yellowstone Restoration of Native Vegetation in Gardiner Basin v o l u m e 2 0 · i s s u e 1 · 2 0 1 2 Yellowstone Vegetation #12;F or two decades, Yellowstone

  8. Yellowstone in a Global Context n this issue of Yellowstone Science, Alethea Steingisser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, W. Andrew

    of Yellowstone (1991, 1995). Donald White, known for his research on geothermal resources and gYellowstone in a Global Context I n this issue of Yellowstone Science, Alethea Steingisser- tion of geysers at the hands of humans, and the tremendous importance of Yellowstone National Park

  9. Pool palms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Neyra, Alejandro; Vano-Galvan, Sergio; Álvarez-Twose, Iván; García-Salido, Alberto

    2009-01-01

    PubMed ] 7. Wong LC, Rogers M. Pool palms. Pediatr Dermatol.A, Duarte AM, Schachner LA. Pool palms. J Am Acad Dermatol.PubMed ] 5. Mandojana RM. Pool palms. J Am Acad Dermatol.

  10. PRECISE CHARACTERIZATION OF GUATEMALAN OBSIDIAN SOURCES, AND SOURCE DETERMINATION OF ARTIFACTS FROM QUIRIGUA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stross, Fred H.

    2013-01-01

    precision sources in Guatemala. chemical characterization ofField Archaeology 5(1): Guatemala. Journal of Sheets, P.D.some obsidian flakes from Guatemala. American Antiquity 42:

  11. Clean Cities: Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy Coalition The Yellowstone-Teton Clean Energy coalition works with vehicle fleets, fuel providers, community leaders, and other stakeholders to reduce...

  12. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  13. Pooled Cars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shaheen, Susan

    1999-01-01

    many ideas for reducing car use. Most popular of course areand promising is the idea of pooling cars. It’s an ideain Europe, and has Pooled Cars sometimes proved successful.

  14. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming.USA ABSTRACT The Yellowstone geothermal system provides anPrevious studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have

  15. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    fluid flow in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming,ROCK INTERACTION IN THE YELLOWSTONE GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USINGGeyser Basin of the Yellowstone geothermal system, has been

  16. An Overview of Yellowstone Geologic Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and southwestern Montana. Located along the continental divide within the Middle Rocky Mountains, Yellowstone is on a high plateau averaging 8,000 feet in elevation. The mountain ranges that encircle Yellowstone vary from Mountains to the north; the Absaroka Mountains on the eastern border; and the Teton Range, within Grand

  17. Archaeal viruses from Yellowstone’s high temperature environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. Young; B. Wiedenheft; J. Snyder; J. Spuhler; F. Roberto; T. Douglas

    2005-01-01

    In general, our understanding of Archaea lags far behind our knowledge of the other two domains of life—Bacteria and Eukarya. Unlike the other domains of life, very few viruses of Archaea have been characterized. Of the approximately 4000 viruses described to date, only 36 are associated with archaeal hosts--many of these from thermophilic Crenarchaeota. In this work we describe the discovery, isolation and preliminary characterization of viruses and novel virus-like particles isolated directly from diverse thermal environments in Yellowstone National Park.

  18. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al., 1985) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  19. The Evolution and Life Cycle of Valley Cold Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Travis Harold

    2015-01-01

    Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Adiabatic Cold Pools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  20. Yellowstone Agencies Plan to Reduce Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 10 federal land organizations — including two national parks, six national forests and two national wildlife refuges — in the Greater Yellowstone Area comprise an entire ecosystem of their own. Straddling Wyoming’s borders with Montana and Idaho, the region draws millions of visitors a year, attracted by the dramatic landscapes, geothermal activity and chances to spot wildlife like bison, elk and grizzly bear.

  1. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming. Journal ofMuffler, L.J.P (Eds. ), Geothermal Systems: Principles andrhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone drill

  2. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene,...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Goff ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not...

  4. Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Thermal And-Or Near Infrared At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Thermal And-Or Near...

  5. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of magma beneath the Yellowstone caldera. Authors Stephan Husen, Robert B. Smith and Gregory P. Waite Published Journal Journal of Volcanology and Geothermal Research,...

  6. Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative- Residential/Commercial Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Yellowstone Valley Electric Cooperative offers rebates to residential and commercial members for purchasing energy efficient add-on heat pumps, geothermal heat pumps, water heaters, dishwashers...

  7. Exploration And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    And Discovery In Yellowstone Lake- Results From High-Resolution Sonar Imaging, Seismic Reflection Profiling, And Submersible Studies Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  8. Trace element and technological analyses of obsidian artifacts from the Northern ridge of Lake Atitlan, Department of Solola, Guatemala 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woodward, Michelle Ruth

    1996-01-01

    One hundred obsidian artifacts from the San Jose Chacaya site area located along the northern ridge of Lake Atitlan, Guatemala were subjected to Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) to determine their provenience. In addition, sixty-six samples from...

  9. n this paper, we use obsidian source data as a method for identifying prehistoric and historic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    Basin and northern California. The Snake River and Greater Yellowstone volcanic regionproduceshighCentralRockyMountainsandnorthernHigh Plains and neighboring Plains farmers to the east. People also participated in extensive prehistoric

  10. Homestead Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Homestead Crater Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  11. Camperworld Hot Springs SCUBA Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    SCUBA Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Camperworld Hot Springs SCUBA Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  12. Klamath Swimming Pools (5) Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Swimming Pools (5) Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Klamath Swimming Pools (5) Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  13. Bonneville Seabase Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seabase Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Bonneville Seabase Scuba Dive Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  14. Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;Hydrogen and bioenergetics in the Yellowstone geothermal ecosystem John R. Spear*, Jeffrey J of organisms of the kinds that derive energy for primary productivity from the oxidation of molecular hydrogen of energy for primary production in the Yellowstone high-temperature ecosys- tem. Hydrogen concentrations

  15. Precise characterization of Guatemalan obsidian sources, and source determination of artifacts from Quirigua

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stross, F.H.; Sheets, P.; Asaro, F.; Michel, H.V.

    1983-01-01

    For the determination of provenience of obsidian artifacts, precise and accurate measurements of composition patterns of the geologic sources are necessary for definitive and cost-effective assignments. Inter-comparison of data from different laboratories is often difficult. Suggestions for maximizing the usefulness of data already in the literature are made, contributions to a useful data bank of source composition patterns are recorded, and provenience determinations of 30 artifacts excavated in Quirigua, Guatemala are presented to exemplify the technique.

  16. Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas: EnergyYBR Solar JumpYasudaYellowstone

  17. Complete Genome Sequence of the hyperthermophilic sulfate-reducing bacterium Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elkins, James G [ORNL; Hamilton-Brehm, Scott [ORNL; Walston Davenport, Karen [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Goodwin, Lynne A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Tapia, Roxanne [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Meincke, Linda [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Detter, J C [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Bruce, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Han, Cliff [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Cottingham, Robert W [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Thermodesulfobacterium geofontis OPF15T was isolated from Obsidian Pool, Yellowstone National Park and grows optimally at 83 oC. The OPF15T genome was finished at the Joint Genome Institute and the 1.6 Mb sequence has been annotated and deposited for future genomic studies aimed at understanding microbial processes and nutrient cycles in high-temperature environments.

  18. Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    against a direct link between the Yellowstone hotspot and the initiation of extension, casting additional doubt on the role of the hotspot in extension across the broader Basin and...

  19. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    DOE-funding Unknown References B. M. Kennedy, M. A. Lynch, J. H. Reynolds, S. P. Smith (1985) Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I, Early Overview...

  20. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal

  1. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using toughreact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal

  2. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    debris out of the pool. Learn More Gas Swimming Pool Heaters Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heaters Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Installing and Operating an Efficient Swimming Pool...

  3. The Vernal Pool, Issue One

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiroma, Jerrold

    2014-01-01

    death deprived the vernal pool issue one , fall 2014 SummerTHE VERNAL POOL THEVERNAL POOL I S S U E O N E F A L L The Vernal Pool is the

  4. Vernal Pool Issue 2 All

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pool, Vernal

    2015-01-01

    golden locket the vernal pool issue two , spring 2015 TheTHE VERNAL POOL THEVERNAL POOL I S S U E T W O S P R I N G Th e Vernal Pool is

  5. Origin and deformation of Holocene shoreline terraces, Yellowstone Lake, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, G.A.; Locke, W.W.

    1986-08-01

    Geodetic surveys within the Yellowstone caldera have documented active uplift that is most likely caused by magmatic processes in the upper crust. Along the northeast shore of Yellowstone Lake, maximum relative uplift rates are 10 mm/yr for the period 1923-1975. However, information on deformation prior to historic instrumental records has been lacking. In this study, closely spaced data on elevations of postglacial shoreline terraces around the north end of Yellowstone Lake reveal complex tilting. Though most Holocene deformation is probably magma related, the pattern of shoreline tilting deviates significantly from the historic pattern of roughly symmetric inflation of the caldera. Along the northeast shore, where tilt directions of historic and shoreline deformation are similar, differential uplift of a > 2500-yr-old terrace is roughly 10 m; this gives a maximum uplift rate of 4 mm/yr. These unique Holocene terraces may exist due to episodic deformation because vertical movements affecting the lake outlet directly control lake level.

  6. The objectives for deep scientific drilling in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01

    The western area of the United Stated contains three young silicic calderas, all of which contain attractive targets for scientific drilling. Of the three, the Yellowstone caldera complex is the largest, has the most intense geothermal anomalies, and is the most seismically active. On the basis of scientific objectives alone. it is easily the first choice for investigating active hydrothermal processes. This report briefly reviews what is known about the geology of Yellowstone National Park and highlights unique information that could be acquired by research drilling only in Yellowstone. However, it is not the purpose of this report to recommend specific drill sites or to put forth a specific drilling proposal. 175 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Swimming Pool Heating | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    pool heater. Learn more about the following: Gas pool heaters Heat pump pool heaters Solar pool heaters. Using a Pool Cover > Covering a pool when it is not in use is...

  8. Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dueker, Ken

    Mantle transition zone topography and structure beneath the Yellowstone hotspot David Fee and Ken ± 1.6 km, with 36­40 km of peak to peak topography. This topography is spatially uncorrelated, providing no evidence for a lower mantle plume currently beneath the hotspot. The topography suggests

  9. Portable Emission Measurements of Yellowstone Park Snowcoaches and Snowmobiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    ], and oxides of nitrogen [NOx]). Large emissions variability was still observed despite using a standardized characterized by large emission ranges in CO (5­630 g/mi), HC (1­50 g/mi), and oxides of nitrogen (NOx; 1­49 gPortable Emission Measurements of Yellowstone Park Snowcoaches and Snowmobiles Gary A. Bishop, Ryan

  10. Geothermal Systems of the Yellowstone Caldera Field Trip Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Foley, Duncan; Neilson, Dennis L.; Nichols, Clayton R.

    1980-09-08

    Geothermal studies are proceedings on two fronts in the West Yellowstone area. High-temperature resources for the generation of electricity are being sought in the Island Park area, and lower temperatures resources for direct applications, primarily space heating, are being explored for near the town of West Yellowstone. Potential electric geothermal development in the Island Park area has been the subject of widespread publicity over fears of damage to thermal features in Yellowstone Park. At the time of writing this guide, companies have applied for geothermal leases in the Island Park area, but these leases have not yet been granted by the US Forest Service. The Senate is now discussing a bill that would regulate geothermal development in Island Park; outcome of this debate will determine the course of action on the lease applications. The Island Park area was the site of two cycles of caldera activity, with major eruptions at 2.0 and 1.2 million years ago. The US Geological Survey estimates that 16,850 x 10{sup 18} joules of energy may remain in the system. Geothermal resources suitable for direct applications are being sought in the West Yellowstone vicinity by the Montana Bureau of Mines and Geology, under funding from the US Department of Energy. West Yellowstone has a mean annual temperature of 1-2 C. Research thus far suggests that basement rocks in the vicinity are at a depth of about 600 m and are probably similar to the rocks exposed north of Hebgen Lake, where Precambrian, Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks have been mapped. A few sites with anomalously warm water have been identified near the town. Work is continuing on this project.

  11. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-01-01

    in the Yellowstone geothermal system, Wyoming, Jour. Volcan.engineering, In: Geothermal Systems: Principles and Caserhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellow- stone drill

  12. Solar Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Swimming Pool Heaters Solar Swimming Pool Heaters An example of a solar pool heater. An example of a solar pool heater. You can significantly reduce swimming pool heating costs by...

  13. Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tomberlin, Jeff

    Methylmercury enters an aquatic food web through acidophilic microbial mats in Yellowstone National the extreme environments in Yellowstone National Park (YNP), WY, USA. Little is known of their role in food webs that exist in the Park's geothermal habitats. Eukaryotic green algae associated

  14. Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Diversity of Life at the Geothermal Subsurface--Surface Interface: The Yellowstone Example example of Yellowstone National Park indi- cate that the diversity of microbial life at the geothermal temperatures. The geothermal subsurface-surface interface in the presence of both electron donors and acceptors

  15. Large-scale pool fires 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steinhaus, Thomas; Welch, Stephen; Carvel, Ricky O; Torero, Jose L

    2007-03-29

    A review of research into the burning behaviour of large pool fires and fuel spill fires is presented. The features which distinguish such fires from smaller pool fires are mainly associated with the fire dynamics at low ...

  16. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2009-01-01

    Report Southwest Power Pool,” Prepared by Boston PacificTables Figure 1. Southwest Power Pool Region Footprint and14 Table 1. Southwest Power Pool Membership

  17. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of heating pools with and without pool covers in different U.S. cities: Estimating Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heater Costs and Savings Estimating Swimming Pool Gas Heating Costs...

  18. Solar Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Solar Swimming Pool Heaters Solar Swimming Pool Heaters May 29, 2012 - 6:03pm Addthis An example of a solar pool heater. An example of a solar pool heater. You can significantly...

  19. An analysis of public testimonies on the reintroduction of wolves to the greater Yellowstone ecosystem 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wicker, Kristy Joann

    1996-01-01

    Public participation in review of draft environmental impact statements (DEIS) has been problematic. This study focused on public hearings regarding the DEIS for the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park and central Idaho...

  20. A Bayesian Approach to Estimate OJD Prevalence From Pooled Fecal Samples of Variable Pool Size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dhand, Navneet K.; Johnson, Wesley O.; Toribio, Jenny-Ann L.

    2010-01-01

    Only such con?rmed positive pools were considered to be PFCAustralia. Typically, seven fecal pools were collected fromeach cohort, with each pool generally constructed by one

  1. Fungi from geothermal soils in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Redman, R.S.; Litvintseva, A.; Sheehan, K.B.; Henson, J.M.; Rodriguez, R.J.

    1999-12-01

    Geothermal soils near Amphitheater Springs in Yellowstone National Park were characterized by high temperatures (up to 70 C), high heavy metal content, low pH values (down to pH 2.7), sparse vegetation, and limited organic carbon. From these soils the authors cultured 16 fungal species. Two of these species were thermophilic, and six were thermotolerant. They cultured only three of these species from nearby cool (0 to 22 C) soils. Transect studies revealed that higher numbers of CFUs occurred in and below the root zone of the perennial plant Dichanthelium lanuginosum (hot springs panic grass). The dynamics of fungal CFUs in geothermal soil and nearby nongeothermal soil were investigated for 12 months by examining soil cores and in situ mesocosms. For all of the fungal species studied, the temperature of the soil from which the organisms were cultured corresponded with their optimum axenic growth temperature.

  2. Swimming Pool Covers | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Gas Heating Costs and Savings Use of a pool cover also can help reduce the size of a solar pool heating system, which can save money. How They Work Swimming pools lose energy in...

  3. Gas Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and pool use, they may not be the most energy-efficient option when compared to heat pump and solar pool heaters. How They Work Gas pool heaters use either natural gas or...

  4. Swimming Pool Heating | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Swimming Pool Heating Swimming Pool Heating June 15, 2012 - 6:11pm Addthis You can reduce the cost of heating your swimming pool by installing a high-efficiency or solar heater,...

  5. The Essentiality Test for Patent Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Antitrust for Patent Pools: A Century of Policy Evolution,Review Letters for two patent pools related to the DVD-ROM20 Bement was a licensee. The pool grew to twenty-two firms

  6. Aquificales in Yellowstone National Park Anna-Louise Reysenbach1* | Amy Banta1 | Sara Civello2 | Jim Daly2 | Kendra Mitchel3 | Stefan Lalonde4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reysenbach, Anna-Louise

    spring ecosystems. Key Words 130 GEOTHERMAL BIOLOGY AND GEOCHEMISTRY IN YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARKAquificales in Yellowstone National Park Anna-Louise Reysenbach1* | Amy Banta1 | Sara Civello2 in Geomicrobiology, Department of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, University of Alberta, Edmonton 5Yellowstone Center

  7. Pooling problems: relaxations and discretizations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-09-02

    Projx(·) is the projection operator onto the x-space. Mi· (M·i) denotes the ith ...... Typically, ?l ? |T| and the contracts are renewable. For a pool l ? Lc, the fixed.

  8. MOTOR POOL RESERVATIONS Reservation Number:_______________

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ottino, Julio M.

    of Department Chair or Organization Advisor: ________________________________________ Chart String Number: Fund: ______________________________________________________________________ Name of Department or Organization: _____________________________________________________ Name reservations require the "Organization Authorization for University Vehicles" form to be faxed to Motor Pool

  9. Analysis of hot springs and associated deposits in Yellowstone National Park using ASTER and AVIRIS remote sensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramsey, Michael

    Analysis of hot springs and associated deposits in Yellowstone National Park using ASTER and AVIRIS of Yellowstone National Park from the visible/near infrared (VNIR) to thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths. Field and techniques; geothermal systems; Mars 1. Introduction There are thousands of known thermal springs on Earth

  10. Cryogenic opal-A deposition from Yellowstone hot springs Alan Channing a,, Ian B. Butler b,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cryogenic opal-A deposition from Yellowstone hot springs Alan Channing a,, Ian B. Butler b,1 Sub-zero winter temperatures on the Yellowstone Plateau alter the opal-A precipitation pathway, contains abundant opal-A particles, comprising sheet and filament- like aggregations of opal-A microspheres

  11. Boundary Creek thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park: II, thermal water analyses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA); Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Water samples from 28 thermal springs, 2 non-thermal springs, and 2 creeks from the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas (BCTA) in the southwestern corner of Yellowstone National Park were analyzed to help establish a chemical water-quality base line prior to possible geothermal exploitation of the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA). The springs, situated at the southwestern end of the Madison Plateau, are the Yellowstone Park thermal waters nearest to the IPGA and might respond to geothermal exploitation in the IPGA. Water temperatures ranging from 50/sup 0/ to 90/sup 0/C and low Cl concentrations (< 110 mgL/sup -1/) characterize spring waters in the BCTA. They are chemically distinct from the major geysers and hot springs in Yellowstone Park. The Na-K-Ca and silica geothermometers are in general agreement, usually within 10/sup 0/C, and indicate reservoir temperatures of 150 to 170/sup 0/C.

  12. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, Gabe V. (Las Cruces, NM); Carlson, Nancy M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Donaldson, Alan D. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1991-01-01

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid.

  13. Conservation and Management of Vernal Pools/Temporary Wetlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, Matthew

    Jargon · Temporary ponds · Ephemeral pools · Springs pools · Woodland pools · Semi-permanent ponds · Fishless ponds · Salamander ponds · Intermittent woodland pools · Seasonal forest ponds · Seasonally astatic waters · Geographically isolated wetlands · Vernal pools · Specifics- Carolina Bays, Karst ponds

  14. Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    Introduction Yellowstone National Park with its thermal features and abundant wildlife draws about pollution. Measurements of air quality at the West Entrance found CO concentrations comparable to highly by percentages Snowmobile Snowmobile Snowmobil e Snowcoach Snowcoach Pollutant average 2-stroke average 4-stroke

  15. Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    1 Bark beetles, fuels and future fire hazard in contrasting conifer forests of Greater Yellowstone. Insects and fire have tremendous ecological and economic effects in western forests, yet surprisingly fire hazard in two widespread but contrasting forest types, lodgepole pine (Pinus contorta) and Douglas

  16. Yellowstone National Park as an opportunity for deep continental drilling in thermal regions. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.

    1983-03-01

    The Yellowstone caldera represnets the most intense magnatic and thermal anomaly within the conterminous United States. Voluminous rhyolite ash flows, accompanied by formation of huge calderas, occurred approximately 2.0, 1.3, and 0.6 My B.P. Although the last lava flow was about 70,000 B.P., much evidence suggests that magma may still be present at relatively shallow depth. The evidence from gravity and magnetic lows, magnetotelluric soundings, seismic wave velocities, maximum depths of earthquake foci, significant recent uplift of the caldera floor, and exceptionally high heat flux suggest that magmatic temperatures may be attained 5 to 10 km beneath much of the caldera. Most of the hot-spring and geyser activity occurs within the caldera and along a fault zone that trends north from the caldera rim through Norris Geyser Basin and Mammoth Hot Springs. The thermal waters and gases have been extensively sampled and analyzed over a period of 100 years. The chemical, isotopic, and hydrologic data obtained from natural discharges and from shallow wells drilled in thermal areas, enable formulation of models of the hydrothermal system. No previous intermediate-depth drilling has been conducted at Yellowstone to help select the best location for a deep drill hole, and because Yellowstone is a National Park, no commercial drilling will be available for add-on experiments. Also, a deep drill hole in Yellowstone would have to be sited with great regard to environmental and ecological considerations. Nevertheless, the large amount of existing data is sufficient to formulate testable models. The Yellowstone thermal anomaly is so extensive and scientifically interesting that almost any suitable drilling site there may be superior to the best drilling site in any other silicic caldera complex in the United States.

  17. Swimming Pool Heating | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    reduce the cost of heating your swimming pool by installing a high-efficiency or solar heater, using a pool cover, managing the water temperature, and using a smaller pump less...

  18. Pool power control in remelting systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williamson, Rodney L. (Albuquerque, NM); Melgaard, David K. (Albuquerque, NM); Beaman, Joseph J. (Austin, TX)

    2011-12-13

    An apparatus for and method of controlling a remelting furnace comprising adjusting current supplied to an electrode based upon a predetermined pool power reference value and adjusting the electrode drive speed based upon the predetermined pool power reference value.

  19. Solar Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    annual operating costs. Actually, solar pool heating is the most cost-effective use of solar energy in many climates. How They Work Most solar pool heating systems include the...

  20. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2008-10-10

    The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working fluid. Pool boiling...

  1. The Essentiality Test for Patent Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Gilbert, Antitrust for Patent Pools: A Century of Policydefinition of essential patents in its 1998 and 1999Review Letters for two patent pools related to the DVD-ROM

  2. Do Dark Pools Harm Price Discovery?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhu, Haoxiang

    Dark pools are equity trading systems that do not publicly display orders. Dark pools offer potential price improvements but do not guarantee execution. Informed traders tend to trade in the same direction, crowd on the ...

  3. Ties that Bind: Policies to Promote (Good) Patent Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    durability of beneficial pools that combine complementaryabout limiting abuses by pools that are potentiallyAntitrustforPatent Pools:A Centuryof Policy Evolution, 3

  4. Genotyping common and rare variation using overlapping pool sequencing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Dan; Zaitlen, Noah; Pasaniuc, Bogdan; Eskin, Eleazar; Halperin, Eran

    2011-01-01

    S, Pe’er I: Overlapping pools for high-throughput targetedusing overlapping pool sequencing. BMC Bioinformatics 2011variation using overlapping pool sequencing Dan He 1 , Noah

  5. Pool Heterogeneity and the Valuation of Mortgage-Backed Securities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanton, Richard

    1992-01-01

    Van Drunen. “Pricing Mortgage Pools with Heterogeneous Mort-shows proportion of pools in sample with estimated ? fallingmethodology for deriving pool-speci?c mortgage-backed

  6. Polymictic pool behavior in a montane meadow, Sierra Nevada, CA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas, Ryan Geoffrey

    2013-01-01

    33. Depth (m) Temperature ( C) Pool Fluent Figure C-62—1994. Thermally stratified pools and their use by steelheadstratification within stream pools as a mechanism to provide

  7. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Makarova, Kira S.

    2008-01-01

    Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme RadiationDeinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiationoriginally isolated from a hot pool at the Termi di Agnano,

  8. Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency The water...

  9. Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency May 29, 2012 - 7:42pm Addthis Managing Swimming Pool Temperature...

  10. Helium isotopes: Lower geyser basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kennedy, B.M.; Reynolds, J.H.; Smith, S.P.; Truesdell, A.H.

    1987-11-10

    High /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios associated with the Yellowstone caldera reflect the presence of a magmatic helium component. This component is ultimately derived from a mantle plume capped by a cooling batholith underlying the caldera. In surface hot springs, fumaroles, etc., the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio varies from approx.1 to 16 tims the air ratio. The variations are produced by varying degrees of dilution of the magmatic component with radiogenic helium. The radiogenic helium is crustal-derived and is thought to be scavenged from aquifers in which the hydrothermal fluids circulate. We determined the helium iosotopic composition in 12 different springs from the Lower Geyser Basin, a large hydrothermal basin with the caldera. The /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio was found to vary from approx.2.7 to 7.7 times the air ratio. The variations correlate with variations in water chemistry. Specifically, the /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratio increased with total bicarbonate concentration. The dissolved bicarbonate is from gas-water-rock interactions involving CO/sub 2/ and Na silicates. The concentration of bicarbonate is a function of the availability of dissolved CO/sub 2/, which, in turn, is a function of deep boiling with phase separation prior to CO/sub 2/-bicarbonate conversion. The correlation of high /sup 3/He//sup 4/He ratios with high bicarbonate is interpreted as the result of deep dilution of a single thermal fluid with cooler water during ascent to the surface. The dilution and cooling deters deep boiling, and therefore both CO/sub 2/ and /sup 3/He are retained in the rising fluid. Fluids that are not diluted with boil to a greater extent, losing a large proportion of /sup 3/He, as well as CO/sub 2/, leaving a helium-poor residual fluid in which the isotopic composition of helium will be strongly affected by the addition of radiogenic helium.

  11. Method of measuring a liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M.; Donaldson, A.D.

    1991-03-19

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools is disclosed, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figures.

  12. Equipment Pool | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy ServicesEnergy4th Quarter 2012 forPool What is

  13. The geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Keith, T.E.C. (Geological Survey, Reston, VA (USA)); Hutchinson, R.A. (US National Park Service (US))

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone Caldera, one of the largest volcanic features of its type in the world. Hydrothermal activity may have been continuous for {gt}100,000 years B.P. Norris Basin includes the highest erupting geyser of recent water types, colors of organisms and inorganic precipitates, frequent changes in activity and chemistry, and very high subsurface temperatures ({gt}240{degrees}C). Norris Basin is only a part of the Norris-Mammoth Corridor that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. Norris Basin has a heat flow roughly 10 percent of that of the Yellowstone Caldera and requires an estimated 0.01 km{sup 3} of rhyolitic magma per year-a quantity far greater than the corridor's rate of eruption.

  14. Chemical studies of selected trace elements in hot-spring drainages of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, R.E.; Jenne, E.A.; Ball, J.W.

    1980-01-01

    Intensive chemical studies were made of S(-II), O/sub 2/, Al, Fe, Mn, P, As(III), As(V), and Li in waters from two high-Cl, low Ca-Mg hotspring drainages in the Lower Geyser Basin, a warm spring system rich in Ca and Mg in the Yellowstone Canyon area, and the Madison River system above Hebgen Lake. Analyses were also made of other representative thermal waters from the Park.

  15. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Salah, Sonia; Spycher, Nicolas; Sonnenthal, Eric L.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to simulate the chemical and hydrological effects of water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to simulate the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  16. Simulation of water-rock interaction in the yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, P.F.; Salah, S.; Spycher, N.; Sonnenthal, E.

    2003-04-28

    The Yellowstone geothermal system provides an ideal opportunity to test the ability of reactive transport models to accurately simulate water-rock interaction. Previous studies of the Yellowstone geothermal system have characterized water-rock interaction through analysis of rocks and fluids obtained from both surface and downhole samples. Fluid chemistry, rock mineralogy, permeability, porosity, and thermal data obtained from the Y-8 borehole in Upper Geyser Basin were used to constrain a series of reactive transport simulations of the Yellowstone geothermal system using TOUGHREACT. Three distinct stratigraphic units were encountered in the 153.4 m deep Y-8 drill core: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous tuff. The main alteration phases identified in the Y-8 core samples include clay minerals, zeolites, silica polymorphs, adularia, and calcite. Temperatures observed in the Y-8 borehole increase with depth from sub-boiling conditions at the surface to a maximum of 169.8 C at a depth of 104.1 m, with near-isothermal conditions persisting down to the well bottom. 1-D models of the Y-8 core hole were constructed to determine if TOUGHREACT could accurately predict the observed alteration mineral assemblage given the initial rock mineralogy and observed fluid chemistry and temperatures. Preliminary simulations involving the perlitic rhyolitic lava unit are consistent with the observed alteration of rhyolitic glass to form celadonite.

  17. Cash Management Pool Guidelines The Cash Management Pool was established by the University of Utah as a pooled fund for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tipple, Brett

    Cash Management Pool Guidelines I. Purpose The Cash Management Pool was established the State of Utah Money Management Act, the Rules of the State Money Management Council, Utah State Board only be invested in authorized investments in accordance with the State of Utah Money Management Act

  18. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park. 1: The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W. [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.] [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1998-12-01

    Thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), polythionate (S{sub x}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), dissolved sulfide (H{sub 2}S), and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 {micro}mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 {micro}mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} between 10 and 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 {micro}mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 {micro}mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the hydrothermal discharge is turbulent and has a large surface area.

  19. Apparatus for draining lower drywell pool water into suppresion pool in boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus which mitigates temperature stratification in the suppression pool water caused by hot water drained into the suppression pool from the lower drywell pool. The outlet of a spillover hole formed in the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool is connected to and in flow communication with one end of piping. The inlet end of the piping is above the water level in the suppression pool. The piping is routed down the vertical downcomer duct and through a hole formed in the thin wall separating the downcomer duct from the suppression pool water. The piping discharge end preferably has an elevation at or near the bottom of the suppression pool and has a location in the horizontal plane which is removed from the point where the piping first emerges on the suppression pool side of the inner bounding wall of the suppression pool. This enables water at the surface of the lower drywell pool to flow into and be discharged at the bottom of the suppression pool.

  20. Motor Pool Guidelines for Geosciences A completed Motor Pool Request form must be submitted to Denise for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    Motor Pool Guidelines for Geosciences · A completed Motor Pool Request form must be submitted on the Geosciences website under the forms link. http://www.geo.arizona.edu/pdf/motor_pool_request.pdf · If the trip be submitted with the Motor Pool Request. · A list of passengers and drivers is for all motor pool travel (this

  1. Managing Swimming Pool Temperature for Energy Efficiency | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    affects the size of the pool's heater, but also your heating costs if use a gas or heat pump pool heater. Pool water temperatures typically range from 78F to 82F. The...

  2. Connect Postings to Move Applicants to Pool Position April 2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    Connect Postings to Move Applicants to Pool Position April 2013 To move applicants from the posted requisition to the Approved ­ Pool Position requisition requisition at any time, but you must leave the pool position at the state

  3. Pool resolution is NP-hard to recognize

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buss, Samuel R.

    2009-01-01

    2001) 11. Van Gelder, A. : Pool resolution and its relationvariables x 1 , . . . , x k . Pool resolution is NP-hard towill prove that R is a valid pool resolution refutation iff

  4. Enhancement of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer in Confined Space 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hsu, Chia-Hsiang

    2014-05-05

    Pool boiling is an effective method used in many technical applications for a long time. Its highly efficient heat transfer performance results from not only the convection effect but also the phase change process in pool boiling. Pool boiling...

  5. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England)); Sturchio, N.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  6. Void distribution in a shallow bubbling pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, Lap Y.; Ting, Lu

    1989-01-01

    An analytical model based on the variational principle of minimum energy is derived to determine the steady-state two-phase mixture level and axial void distribution of a non-condensable gas that is introduced uniformly across the base of a shallow liquid pool. The model expresses pool void fraction and mixture level in terms of the Froude and Weber numbers, while the void fraction just below the free surface depends only on the Weber number. The shallow pool model is based on the assumption of one-dimensional flow of an inviscid bubbly mixture in a pool with its height much less than its diameter. It is also assumed that both the hydrostatic pressure of the pool and the pressure difference across the bubble surface are much smaller than the ambient pressure. By including the dependency of the added mass coefficient on void fraction, the model predicts a maximum bubbly flow void fraction of 0.3 which agrees well with the observed transition from bubbly to churn-turbulent flow at a void fraction between 0.2 and 0.3. When the theoretical results for an inviscid shallow pool are compared with available experimental data for void fraction in pools which are not shallow and hence the viscous and wall effects are not negligible, the model under-estimates the data on pool fraction by about a factor of 5. Good agreement is obtained between the inviscid model and a drift flux correlation for pool void fraction when the viscosity of water is extrapolated to 1/10 of the value at room temperature. 14 refs., 7 figs.

  7. Population structure of the vernal pool fairy shrimp (Branchinecta lynchi) at two spatial scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McClintock, Kelly Marie

    2012-01-01

    and longitude for each sampled pool, number of segregatingPi). Population Latitude Longitude Pool Size n # Hap. Pool10and trends in ephemeral pool invertebrate conservation:

  8. Beyond the Inventory: An Interagency Collaboration to Reduce Greenhouse Gas Emissions in the Greater Yellowstone Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kandt, A.; Hotchkiss, E.; Fiebig, M.

    2010-10-01

    As one of the largest, intact ecosystems in the continental United States, land managers within the Greater Yellowstone Area (GYA) have recognized the importance of compiling and understanding agency greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The 10 Federal units within the GYA have taken an active role in compiling GHG inventories on a unit- and ecosystem-wide level, setting goals for GHG mitigation, and identifying mitigation strategies for achieving those goals. This paper details the processes, methodologies, challenges, solutions, and lessons learned by the 10 Federal units within the GYA throughout this ongoing effort.

  9. Core Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Dobson, Et Al., 2003) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobal LInformation Yellowstone

  10. Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Astoria Mineral Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  11. Paraiso Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paraiso Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Paraiso Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  12. Caliente Hot Springs Motel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hot Springs Motel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Caliente Hot Springs Motel Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  13. Democrat Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Democrat Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Democrat Hot Springs Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  14. Tassajara Buddhist Meditation Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tassajara Buddhist Meditation Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Tassajara Buddhist Meditation Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  15. Charles Motel & Bathhouse Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Motel & Bathhouse Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Charles Motel & Bathhouse Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  16. Camp Preventorium Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Preventorium Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Camp Preventorium Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  17. Ringboldt Rapids Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ringboldt Rapids Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Ringboldt Rapids Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  18. New Bond Helps Toledo, Ohio, Expand Financing Pool | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    New Bond Helps Toledo, Ohio, Expand Financing Pool New Bond Helps Toledo, Ohio, Expand Financing Pool The logo for Better Buildings Northwest Ohio, Toleco Lucas County Port...

  19. Sycamore Hot Spring Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sycamore Hot Spring Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Sycamore Hot Spring Resort Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  20. Calvary Chapel Conference Center Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Calvary Chapel Conference Center Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Calvary Chapel Conference Center Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

  1. Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Glenwood Springs Vapor Caves Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Facility...

  2. Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Blue Mountain Hot Spring Guest Ranch Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

  3. Jacumba Hot Springs Health Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jacumba Hot Springs Health Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Jacumba Hot Springs Health Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal...

  4. Steamboat Springs Health and Rec. Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Steamboat Springs Health and Rec. Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Steamboat Springs Health and Rec. Pool & Spa Low Temperature...

  5. The LON-CAPA Shared Content Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    years? #12;Experiences · Focus on online educational resources for learners Not on research, what is the point of a digital library/ repository/ resource pool for education? #12;Sharing unused anyway · Particularly for educational libraries: Provide infrastructure for using resources

  6. Pool boiling on nano-finned surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sriraman, Sharan Ram

    2009-05-15

    The effect of nano-structured surfaces on pool boiling heat transfer is explored in this study. Experiments are conducted in a cubical test chamber containing fluoroinert coolant (PF5060, Manufacturer: 3M Co.) as the working ...

  7. Performance Study of Swimming Pool Heaters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDonald, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this report is to perform a controlled laboratory study on the efficiency and emissions of swimming pool heaters based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected variations in operational parameters. Swimming pool heater sales trends have indicated a significant decline in the number of conventional natural gas-fired swimming pool heaters (NGPH). On Long Island the decline has been quite sharp, on the order of 50%, in new installations since 2001. The major portion of the decline has been offset by a significant increase in the sales of electric powered heat pump pool heaters (HPPH) that have been gaining market favor. National Grid contracted with Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to measure performance factors in order to compare the relative energy, environmental and economic consequences of using one technology versus the other. A field study was deemed inappropriate because of the wide range of differences in actual load variations (pool size), geographic orientations, ground plantings and shading variations, number of hours of use, seasonal use variations, occupancy patterns, hour of the day use patterns, temperature selection, etc. A decision was made to perform a controlled laboratory study based on a limited field investigation into the range of expected operational variations in parameters. Critical to this are the frequency of use, temperature selection, and sizing of the heater to the associated pool heating loads. This would be accomplished by installing a limited amount of relatively simple compact field data acquisition units on selected pool installations. This data included gas usage when available and alternately heater power or gas consumption rates were inferred from the manufacturer's specifications when direct metering was not available in the field. Figure 1 illustrates a typical pool heater installation layout.

  8. Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after the 1988 Yellowstone fires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turner, Monica G.

    is essential for good stewardship of these rapidly changing landscapes. Stand-replacing forest fires trigger one of the most notorious fires of the 20th Century. Yellowstone's postfire forests may be effective1 Paths of recovery: landscape variability in forest structure, function and fuels 25 years after

  9. Yellowstone as an Analog for Thermal-Hydrological-Chemical Processes at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. F. Dobson; T. J. Kneafsey; A. Simmons; J. Hulen

    2001-05-29

    Enhanced water-rock interaction resulting from the emplacement of heat-generating nuclear waste in the potential geologic repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, may result in changes to fluid flow (resulting from mineral dissolution and precipitation in condensation and boiling zones, respectively). Studies of water-rock interaction in active and fossil geothermal systems (natural analogs) provide evidence for changes in permeability and porosity resulting from thermal-hydrological-chemical (THC) processes. The objective of this research is to document the effects of coupled THC processes at Yellowstone and then examine how differences in scale could influence the impact that these processes may have on the Yucca Mountain system. Subsurface samples from Yellowstone National Park, one of the largest active geothermal systems in the world, contain some the best examples of hydrothermal self-sealing found in geothermal systems. We selected core samples from two USGS research drill holes from the transition zone between conductive and convective portions of the geothermal system (where sealing was reported to occur). We analyzed the core, measuring the permeability, porosity, and grain density of selected samples to evaluate how lithology, texture, and degree of hydrothermal alteration influence matrix and fracture permeability.

  10. Hydrothermal changes related to earthquake activity at Mud Volcano, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, A.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1982-04-10

    The Mud Volcano hydrothermal area in Yellowstone National Park is near the intersection of a 20-km-long zone of northeast trending normal faults with the eastern resurgent dome within the 600,000-year-odd Yellowstone caldera. Recent crustal uplift along the northeast trending axis of the caldera is at a maximum (700 mm since 1923) near the Mud Volcano area. From 1973 through April 1978, less than 10 earthquakes (largest M 2.4) were located within 3 km of the Mud Volcano area. In May 1978, earthquakes began occurring beneath the hydrothermal area at depths of 1 to 5 km. The seismic activity continued until the end of November with intense swarms (100 events per hour) occurring on October 23 and November 7. The largest event (M 3.1) occured on November 14 and at least 8 events were M 2.5 or larger. In December 1978, heat flux in the Mud Volcano hydrothermal features began increasing along a 2-km-long northeast trending zone. Existing mud cauldrons became more active, new mud cauldrons and fumeroles were formed, and vegetation (primarily lodgepole pine) was killed by increased soil temperature. The increase in heat flux continued through July 1979 then gradually declined, reaching the early 1978 level by June 1980. The spatial and temporal association of earthquakes and increased hydrothermal activity at Mud Volcano suggests that the seismic activity expanded preexisting fracture systems, premitting increased fluid flow from depths of several kilometers.

  11. Extension of the Yellowstone plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Owyhee plateau

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rodgers, D.W.; Hackett, W.R.; Ore, H.T. (Idaho State Univ., Pocatello (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Formation of the late Cenozoic volcanic province comprising the Owyhee plateau, eastern Snake River Plain, and Yellowstone plateau has been accompanied by east-northeast-directed crustal extension. A new vector of 45 mm/yr, N56{degree}E for the migration of silicic volcanism across the volcanic province is calculated. If migration of volcanism reflects west-southwest continental drift over a mantle plume, a zone of crustal extension must separate the volcanic province from the more slowly moving North American craton. Space-time relations of basin fill in the adjacent Basin and Range province provide evidence for a zone of extension, about 125 km wide, coincident with and east of coeval silicic volcanism. Since 16 Ma, the zone of extension has migrated along with silicic volcanism, maintaining its position between the province and the unextended craton.

  12. Boundary Creek Thermal areas of Yellowstone National Park I: thermal activity and geologic setting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hutchinson, R.A.

    1980-09-01

    Proposed geothermal leasing in the Island Park Geothermal Area (IPGA) in national forest and public lands adjacent to Yellowstone National Park has called attention to the moderate to high temperature springs of the Boundary Creek Thermal Areas. Up until late 1977 no description or geochemical inventory studies had been conducted in these areas. The thermal springs are scattered in four major groups along the Boundary Creek drainage with three to six km. of the IPGA - park border. Observations and analyses of physical and chemical indicators suggest that the source is under the Madison Plateau and that the waters are generally similar in the lower three thermal units. These hot springs should be monitored so as to provide early warning of change in the event that geothermal development in the IPGA causes withdrawal of groundwater from Yellow Stone National Park.

  13. Anomalous shear wave delays and surface wave velocities at Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daniel, R.G.; Boore, D.M.

    1982-04-10

    To investigate the effects of a geothermal area on the propagation of intermediate-period (1--30 s) teleseismic body waves and surface waves, a specially designed portable seismograph system was operated in Yellowstone Caldera, Wyoming. Travel time residuals, relative to a station outside the caldera, of up to 2 s for compressional phases are in agreement with short-period residuals for P phases measured by other investigators. Travel time delays for shear arrivals in the intermediate-period band range from 2 to 9 s and decrease with increasing dT/d..delta... Measured Rayleigh wave phase velocities are extremely low, ranging from 3.2 km/s at 27-s period to 2.0 km/s at 7-s period; the estimated uncertainty associated with these values is 15%. We propose a model for compressional and shear velocities and Poisson's ratio beneath the Yellowstone caldera which fits the teleseismic body and surface wave data: it consists of a highly anomalous crust with an average shear velocity of 3.0 km/s overlying an upper mantle with average velocity of 4.1 km/s. The high average value of Poisson's ratio in the crust (0.34) suggests the presence of fluids there; Poisson's ratio in the mantle between 40 and approximately 200 km is more nearly normal (0.29) than in the crust. A discrepancy between normal values of Poisson's ratio in the crust calculated from short-period data and high values calculated from teleseismic data can be resolved by postulating a viscoelastic crustal model with frequency-dependent shear velocity and attenuation.

  14. Spent fuel pool analysis using TRACE code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanchez-Saez, F.; Carlos, S.; Villanueva, J. F.; Martorell, S.

    2012-07-01

    The storage requirements of Spent Fuel Pools have been analyzed with the purpose to increase their rack capacities. In the past, the thermal limits have been mainly evaluated with conservative codes developed for this purpose, although some works can be found in which a best estimate code is used. The use of best estimate codes is interesting as they provide more realistic calculations and they have the capability of analyzing a wide range of transients that could affect the Spent Fuel Pool. Two of the most representative thermal-hydraulic codes are RELAP-5 and TRAC. Nowadays, TRACE code is being developed to make use of the more favorable characteristics of RELAP-5 and TRAC codes. Among the components coded in TRACE that can be used to construct the model, it is interesting to use the VESSEL component, which has the capacity of reproducing three dimensional phenomena. In this work, a thermal-hydraulic model of the Maine Yankee spent fuel pool using the TRACE code is developed. Such model has been used to perform a licensing calculation and the results obtained have been compared with experimental measurements made at the pool, showing a good agreement between the calculations predicted by TRACE and the experimental data. (authors)

  15. POOL WATER TREATMENT AND COOLING SYSTEM DESCRIPTION DOCUMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    V. King

    2000-06-19

    The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System is located in the Waste Handling Building (WHB), and is comprised of various process subsystems designed to support waste handling operations. This system maintains the pool water temperature within an acceptable range, maintains water quality standards that support remote underwater operations and prevent corrosion, detects leakage from the pool liner, provides the capability to remove debris from the pool, controls the pool water level, and helps limit radiological exposure to personnel. The pool structure and liner, pool lighting, and the fuel staging racks in the pool are not within the scope of the Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System. Pool water temperature control is accomplished by circulating the pool water through heat exchangers. Adequate circulation and mixing of the pool water is provided to prevent localized thermal hotspots in the pool. Treatment of the pool water is accomplished by a water treatment system that circulates the pool water through filters, and ion exchange units. These water treatment units remove radioactive and non-radioactive particulate and dissolved solids from the water, thereby providing the water clarity needed to conduct waste handling operations. The system also controls pool water chemistry to prevent advanced corrosion of the pool liner, pool components, and fuel assemblies. Removal of radioactivity from the pool water contributes to the project ALARA (as low as is reasonably achievable) goals. A leak detection system is provided to detect and alarm leaks through the pool liner. The pool level control system monitors the water level to ensure that the minimum water level required for adequate radiological shielding is maintained. Through interface with a demineralized water system, adequate makeup is provided to compensate for loss of water inventory through evaporation and waste handling operations. Interface with the Site Radiological Monitoring System provides continuous radiological monitoring of the pool water. The Pool Water Treatment and Cooling System interfaces with the Waste Handling Building System, Site-Generated Radiological Waste Handling System, Site Radiological Monitoring System, Waste Handling Building Electrical System, Site Water System, and the Monitored Geologic Repository Operations Monitoring and Control System.

  16. Cesium in rock-water interaction, Yellowstone National Park. [Abstract only

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, J.M.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1983-03-01

    Chemical analyses of thermal waters from research drill holes and nearby hot springs and geysers in Upper and Lower Geyser Basins indicate that Cs may be a reactive ion. A nearly constant Cs:Cl is found for four wells drilled in Lower Geyser Basin and for some hot spring and geysers. It is inferred from this plot that points falling below the trend indicate Cs depleted waters. A plot of Cs:CHO/sub 3//Cl, another measure of rock-water interaction, also indicates Cs removal from the waters. These data correlate well with a parallel study of chemistry and mineralogy of hydrothermally altered rocks from the drill holes which show that the rocks involved in hydrothermal rock-water reactions are vitrophyric rhyolite lava flows and pumiceous tuff overlain by obsidian-rich sands and gravels. Nearly 55 m of such a section from well Y-8 has been hydrothermally altered into alternating intervals consisting of analcime - quartz - clay (smectite, celadonite) or clinoptilolite - ..cap alpha..-cristobalite - smectite. Whole rock analyses of randomly selected samples of these intervals from several wells have Cs contents somewhat higher than those of the unaltered host rhyolite. However, the Cs content of the analcime - quartz - clay intervals is as much as 700 times higher than that of the host rock. Analyses of mineral separates show that analcime, containing as much as 4700 ppM Cs, is more enriched in Cs than any other mineral. Examination of experimental data suggests that Cs is incorporated into the analcime structure during crystallization. Clinoptilolite, which has been shown to readily exchange Cs, is only slightly enriched in this system.

  17. Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    pool's water, the water drawn from the pool passes through a filter and the heat pump heater. The heat pump heater has a fan that draws in the outside air and directs it over the...

  18. Installing and Operating an Efficient Swimming Pool Pump | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Installing and Operating an Efficient Swimming Pool Pump Installing and Operating an Efficient Swimming Pool Pump May 29, 2012 - 7:54pm Addthis Photo courtesy iStockphoto.com Photo...

  19. Investigating step-pool sequence stability Kevin A. Waters1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curran, Joanna C.

    Investigating step-pool sequence stability Kevin A. Waters1 and Joanna Crowe Curran1 Received 22 during a flow event. Citation: Waters, K. A., and J. C. Curran (2012), Investigating step-pool sequence

  20. Stay Above Water with an Efficient Swimming Pool | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Above Water with an Efficient Swimming Pool Stay Above Water with an Efficient Swimming Pool August 10, 2009 - 10:38am Addthis Allison Casey Senior Communicator, NREL All eyes were...

  1. Several new lower bounds for football pool systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Litsyn, Simon

    Several new lower bounds for football pool systems Uri Blass and Simon Litsyn Tel­Aviv University a big deal of attention due to its equivalence to constructing systems for football pools. A survey

  2. Installing and Operating an Efficient Swimming Pool Pump | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    size pump, you can consult a pool supplier's design chart. Using the chart, match the hydraulic characteristics of the pump to both the piping and the pool's flow characteristics....

  3. IS URBAN LOGISTICS POOLING VIABLE? A MULTISTAKEHOLDER MULTICRITERIA ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    IS URBAN LOGISTICS POOLING VIABLE? A MULTISTAKEHOLDER MULTICRITERIA ANALYSIS Jesus Gonzalez. Urban consolidation and logistics sharing. III. Multi-stakeholder mutli-criteria methodology. A of application. V. Conclusion. ABSTRACT Collaborative transportation and logistics pooling are relatively new

  4. Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heaters Heat Pump Swimming Pool Heaters May 29, 2012 - 1:49pm Addthis How a heat pump works. How a heat pump works. How They Work Heat pumps use electricity...

  5. Statistical Mutation Calling from Sequenced Overlapping DNA Pools in TILLING Experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Missirian, Victor; Comai, Luca; Filkov, Vladimir

    2011-01-01

    S, Pe’er I: Overlapping pools for high-throughput targetedSequenced Overlapping DNA Pools in TILLING Experiments. BMCgeneration resequencing of DNA pools. Bioinformatics 2010,

  6. Skimming the Profit Pool: The American Mutual Fund Scandals and the Risk for Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    9090-7 Skimming the Profit Pool: The American Mutual Fundto accommodate its varying pool of money. Each transactionby giving offenders a larger pool of investments from which

  7. Exogenous Productivity Shocks and Capital Investment in Common-pool Resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fissel, Benjamin E; Glibert, Ben

    2010-01-01

    Capital Investment in Common-pool Resources ? Benjamin E.technology shocks in common-pool industries using a compoundhallmarks of congestible, common-pool re- sources. Symmetric

  8. Morphology, hydrology, and water quality of two vernal pools in Madera County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renz, Wendy; Higgins, Tanya

    2006-01-01

    precipitation regime on vernal pool hydrology. FreshwaterColburn, E.A. (2004). Vernal pools: Natural history andof California’s Puddles, Pools, and Playas. Eureka: Mad

  9. Structure and seasonal changes of nematode communities from vernal pools (Santa Rosa Plateau)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Ley, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Communities from Vernal Pools (Santa Rosa Plateau) PIMarch 2006 Abstract Vernal pools are ephemeral wetlands,and around each of two vernal pool basins in the Santa Rosa

  10. The Evolution and Life Cycle of Valley Cold Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Travis Harold

    2015-01-01

    inversions in limestone sinkholes of different sizes andcold-air pools in elevated sinkholes: An idealized numerical

  11. Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the Board of Directors of the Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority (PWRPA or service at least 3 days before the meeting. Requests should be sent to: Power and Water Resources Pooling

  12. Renting Vehicles Renting Vehicles from MSU Motor Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Renting Vehicles Renting Vehicles from MSU Motor Pool Motor Pool/Transportation Services Motor Pool vehicles may ONLY be used for club-related travel). 2) Valid U.S. driver's license in good standing; 3) Completed Vehicle Use Authorization form for all drivers; and 4) Personal medical insurance

  13. Antitrust for Patent Pools: A Century of Policy Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadoulet, Elisabeth

    Antitrust for Patent Pools: A Century of Policy Evolution Richard J. Gilbert1 October 3, 2002 Abstract This paper reviews the antitrust treatment of patent pooling and cross-licensing arrangements from on the MPEG and DVD patent pools. I examine the factors that the courts identified as pertinent

  14. CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Strategic inputs into patent pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 CERNA WORKING PAPER SERIES Strategic inputs into patent pools Justus Baron Henry Delcamp Working;2 Strategic inputs into patent pools1 Justus BARON2 Henry DELCAMP3 Abstract: This article explores what factors determine the decision of a patent pool to accept new inputs. We propose a dynamic analysis

  15. Poole-frenkel piezoconductive element and sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Habermehl, Scott D.

    2004-08-03

    A new class of highly sensitive piezoconductive strain sensor elements and sensors has been invented. The new elements function under conditions such that electrical conductivity is dominated by Poole-Frenkel transport. A substantial piezoconductive effect appears in this regime, allowing the new sensors to exhibit sensitivity to applied strain as much as two orders of magnitude in excess of prior art sensors based on doped silicon.

  16. Solar Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report AppendicesAVideoSolar Decathlon 2015:Solar6 SolarSwimming Pool

  17. Depositional facies and aqueous-solid geochemistry of travertine-depositing hot springs (Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, USA)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fouke, B.W.; Farmer, J.D.; Des Marais, D.J.; Pratt, L.; Sturchio, N.C.; Burns, P.C.; Discipulo, M.K.

    2000-05-01

    Petrographic and geochemical analyses of travertine-depositing hot springs at Angel Terrace, Mammoth Hot Springs, Yellowstone National Park, have been used to define five depositional facies along the spring drainage system. Spring waters are expelled in the vent facies at 71 to 73 C and precipitate mounded travertine composed of aragonite needle botryoids. The apron and channel facies (43--72 C) is floored by hollow tubes composed of aragonite needle botryoids that encrust sulfide-oxidizing Aquificales bacteria. The travertine of the pond facies (30--62 C) varies in composition from aragonite needle shrubs formed at higher temperatures to ridged networks of calcite and aragonite at lower temperatures. Calcite ice sheets, calcified bubbles, and aggregates of aragonite needles (fuzzy dumbbells) precipitate at the air-water interface and settle to pond floors. The proximal-slope facies (28--54 C), which forms the margins of terracette pools, is composed of arcuate aragonite needle shrubs that create small microterracettes on the steep slope face. Finally, the distal-slope facies (28--30 C) is composed of calcite spherules and calcite feather crystals. Despite the presence of abundant microbial mat communities and their observed role in providing substrates for mineralization, the compositions of spring-water and travertine predominantly reflect abiotic physical and chemical processes. Vigorous CO{sub 2} degassing causes a +2 unit increase in spring water pH, as well as Rayleigh-type covariations between the concentration of dissolved inorganic carbon and corresponding {delta}{sup 13}C. Travertine {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O are nearly equivalent to aragonite and calcite equilibrium values calculated from spring water in the higher-temperature ({approximately}50--73 C) depositional facies. Conversely, travertine precipitating in the lower-temperature (<{approximately}50 C) depositional facies exhibits {delta}{sup 13}C and {delta}{sup 18}O values that are as much as 4% less than predicted equilibrium values. This isotopic shift may record microbial respiration as well as downstream transport of travertine crystals. Despite the production of H{sub 2}S and the abundance of sulfide-oxidizing microbes, preliminary {delta}{sub 34}S data do not uniquely define the microbial metabolic pathways present in the spring system. This suggests that the high extent of CO{sub 2} degassing and large open-system solute reservoir in these thermal systems overwhelm biological controls on travertine crystal chemistry.

  18. Porosity, permeability and fluid flow in the YellowstoneGeothermal System, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dobson, Patrick F.; Kneafsey, Timothy J.; Hulen, Jeffrey; Simmons, Ardyth

    2002-03-29

    Cores from two of 13 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) research holes at Yellowstone National Park (Y-5 and Y-8) were evaluated to characterize lithology, texture, alteration, and the degree and nature of fracturing and veining. Porosity and matrix permeability measurements and petrographic examination of the cores were used to evaluate the effects of lithology and hydrothermal alteration on porosity and permeability. The intervals studied in these two core holes span the conductive zone and the upper portion of the convective geothermal reservoir. Variations in porosity and matrix permeability observed in the Y-5 and Y-8 cores are primarily controlled by lithology. Y-8 intersects three distinct lithologies: volcaniclastic sandstone, perlitic rhyolitic lava, and nonwelded pumiceous ash-flow tuff. The sandstone typically has high permeability and porosity, and the tuff has very high porosity and moderate permeability, while the perlitic lava has very low porosity and is essentially impermeable. Hydrothermal self-sealing appears to have generated localized permeability barriers within the reservoir. Changes in pressure and temperature in Y-8 correspond to a zone of silicification in the volcaniclastic sandstone just above the contact with the perlitic rhyolite; this silicification has significantly reduced porosity and permeability. In rocks with inherently low matrix permeability (such as densely welded ash-flow tuff), fluid flow is controlled by the fracture network. The Y-5 core hole penetrates a thick intracaldera section of the0.6 Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix permeability, and the frequency of fractures and veins. Fractures are most abundant within the more densely welded sections of the tuff. However, the most prominent zones of fracturing and mineralization are associated with hydrothermal breccias within densely welded portions of the tuff. These breccia zones represent transient conduits of high fluid flow that formed by the explosive release of overpressure in the underlying geothermal reservoir and that were subsequently sealed by supersaturated geothermal fluids. In addition to this fracture sealing, hydrothermal alteration at Yellowstone appears generally to reduce matrix permeability and focus flow along fractures, where multiple pulses of fluid flow and self-sealing have occurred.

  19. Inversion for sources of crustal deformation and gravity change at the Yellowstone caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vasco, D.W.; Taylor, C.L. (Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA (USA)); Smith, R.B. (Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City (USA))

    1990-11-10

    The Yellowstone caldera was formed in the latest of three explosive eruptions of rhyolites and ash flow tuffs totaling 3,700 km{sup 3} at 2, 1.2, and 0.6 m.y. before present. Its youthful volcanic history, widespread hydrothermal activity, intense seismicity, and extremely high heat flow, in excess of 30 times the continental average, marks the Yellowstone volcanic system as a giant caldera at unrest. Orthometric height increases of the caldera of up to 76 cm, measured from precise leveling surveys from 1923 to 1975-1977, were inverted to determine volume expansion source models for the caldera-wide deformation. For the 1923 to 1977 uplift episode, two regions of expansion were found: (1) in the northern part of the caldera near the Sour Creek resurgent dome of {approximately}0.37 km{sub 3}, and (2) in the southern part of the caldera, near the Mallard Lake resurgent dome of {approximately}0.41 km{sub 3}. Both bodies occur in the upper crust from near-surface depths to 6.0 km, but the largest volume expansions were found in the 3.0-6.0 km depth range. The southern caldera source volume, near the Mallard Lake dome, may extend down to 9.0 km. From 1976 to 1987, nearly simultaneous measurements of elevation and gravity changes were made on a profile across the northern caldera during a period of net uplift. Models of the temporal gravity variation infer that the volume increase for the northern caldera source must lie above 9.0 km and involved a density perturbation greater than +0.002 g/cm{sup 3}. The modeled volumetric sources are in the same general locations as bodies of low P wave velocities, high seismic attenuation, and large negative Bouguer gravity anomalies. It is likely that the modeled volumetric increases were caused by migration of magmas and/or the introduction of large volumes of hydrothermal fluids into the upper crust.

  20. A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garcia, G.V.; Carlson, N.M., Donaldson, A.D.

    1990-12-12

    A method of measuring a molten metal liquid pool volume and in particular molten titanium liquid pools, including the steps of (a) generating an ultrasonic wave at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, (b) shining a light on the surface of a molten metal liquid pool, (c) detecting a change in the frequency of light, (d) detecting an ultrasonic wave echo at the surface of the molten metal liquid pool, and (e) computing the volume of the molten metal liquid. 3 figs.

  1. Isotone Optimization in R: Pool-Adjacent-Violators Algorithm (PAVA) and Active Set Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leeuw, Jan de; Hornik, Kurt; Mair, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    Optimization in R: Pool-Adjacent-Violators Algorithm (PAVA)discuss a generalized version of the Pool-Adjacent-Violators

  2. Isotone Optimization in R: Pool-Adjacent-Violators Algorithm (PAVA) and Active Set Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jan de Leeuw; Kurt Hornik; Patrick Mair

    2011-01-01

    Optimization in R: Pool-Adjacent-Violators Algorithm (PAVA)discuss a generalized version of the Pool-Adjacent-Violators

  3. Geology and remarkable thermal activity of Norris Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, D.E.; Hutchinson, R.A.; Keith, T.E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Norris Geyser Basin is adjacent to the north rim of the Yellowstone caldera at the common intersection of the caldera rim and the Norris-Mammoth Corridor, a zone of faults, volcanic vents, and thermal activity that strikes north from the caldera rim to Mammoth Hot Springs. The dominant quartz sand is hydrothermally cemented by chalcedony and is extremely hard, thereby justifying the term hydrothermal quartzite. The fundamental water type in Norris Basin is nearly neutral in pH and high in Cl and SiO/sub 2/. Another common type of water in Norris Basin is high in SO/sub 4/ and moderately high in Cl, with Cl/SO/sub 4/ ratios differing considerably. This study provides no new conclusive data on an old problem, the source or sources of rare dissolved constitutents. An important part of this paper consists of examples of numerous changes in behavior and chemical composition of most springs and geysers, to extents not known elsewhere in the park and perhaps in the world. Hydrothermal mineralogy in core samples from three research holes drilled entirely in Lava Creek Tuff to a maximum depth of -331.6 m permits an interpretation of the hydrothermal alteration history. A model for large, long-lived, volcanic-hydrothermal activity is also suggested, involving all of the crust and upper mantle and using much recent geophysical data bearing on crust-mantle interrelations.

  4. A Distributed Pool Architecture for Genetic Algorithms 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Gautam

    2011-02-22

    stream_source_info ROY-THESIS.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 70881 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ROY-THESIS.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 A DISTRIBUTED POOL... ARCHITECTURE FOR GENETIC ALGORITHMS A Thesis by GAUTAM SAMARENDRA N ROY Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2009 Major Subject: Computer...

  5. Solar pool heating | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'SHeavyAgencyTendo New Energy Equipment CoSolar pool heating Jump to:

  6. Gas Swimming Pool Heaters | Department of Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would likeUniverse (Journal Article)ForthcomingGENERALProblems I n QEstimates -Gas Swimming Pool

  7. Pooling quantum states obtained by indirect measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Spekkens; H. M. Wiseman

    2007-02-24

    We consider the pooling of quantum states when Alice and Bob both have one part of a tripartite system and, on the basis of measurements on their respective parts, each infers a quantum state for the third part S. We denote the conditioned states which Alice and Bob assign to S by alpha and beta respectively, while the unconditioned state of S is rho. The state assigned by an overseer, who has all the data available to Alice and Bob, is omega. The pooler is told only alpha, beta, and rho. We show that for certain classes of tripartite states, this information is enough for her to reconstruct omega by the formula omega \\propto alpha rho^{-1} beta. Specifically, we identify two classes of states for which this pooling formula works: (i) all pure states for which the rank of rho is equal to the product of the ranks of the states of Alice's and Bob's subsystems; (ii) all mixtures of tripartite product states that are mutually orthogonal on S.

  8. POOL BOILING OF HIGH-FREQUENCY CONDUCTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wright, S. E. (Spencer E.); Konecni, S. (Snezana); Ammerman, C. N. (Curtt N.); Sims, J. R. (James R.)

    2001-01-01

    This study presents development of a unique, powerful method for cooling high-frequency, AC conductors that can benefit end users of transformer windings, electrical machine windings, and magnet coils. This method of heat removal involves boiling a dielectric, fluorinert refrigerant that is in direct contact with litz wire conductors. A pool boiling test vessel is constructed, which provides for temperature control of the pool of fluorinert liquid. The test vessel is fitted with viewing ports so that the experiments are observed and studied with the aid of high-speed photography. Tests are performed on a variety of litz wire conductors. The boiling heat transfer coefficient is dependent on the conductor surface roughness. The size of the features on the conductor surface depends on the single-strand wire gage from which the conductor is constructed. All tests are performed with the conductors mounted horizontally. These tests are performed using a DC power supply. The results of these experiments will aid in the design of future cooling systems.

  9. New multi-commodity flow formulations for the pooling problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-06-11

    Jun 11, 2015 ... ... of pooling problems are in the refining and petrochemical industries [49]. ... an important feature of numerous other manufacturing processes, ...

  10. Ties that Bind: Policies to Promote (Good) Patent Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbert, Richard J

    2009-01-01

    pooling of complementary patents an equilibrium outcome forcombine complementary patents, just as they are concernedbecause they combine patents that are substitutes for each

  11. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool | Department of...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool More Documents &...

  12. Thorium-uranium disequilibrium in a geothermal discharge zone at Yellowstone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Binz, C.M.; Lewis C.H. III

    1987-07-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally-altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for /sup 230/Th, /sup 234/U, /sup 238/U, and /sup 232/Th. Extreme disequilibrium was found, with (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/U) ranging from 0.30 to 1.27. Values of (/sup 230/Th//sup 232/Th) and (/sup 234/U//sup 232/Th) define a linear correlation with a slope of 0.16 +/- 0.01, which corresponds to a (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/) age of approximately 19 ka. The (/sup 230/Th//sup 234/U) disequilibrium was apparently caused by U redistribution which occurred mostly at about 19 ka, and is not related simply to the relative degree of hydrothermal alteration and self-sealing of the rhyolite. Mass balance of U requires a large flux of U-bearing ground water through the rhyolite at the time of U redistribution; rough estimates of minimum water/rock ratio range from 10/sup 2/ to 10/sup 4/, for a range of possible ground water U concentrations. Conservative hydraulic calculations indicate that the required ground water flux could have occurred within a period of hundreds of years prior to self-sealing. The disequilibrium data are consistent with a model involving U redistribution during the initial stages of development of a geothermal discharge zone that formed in response to the hydrogeologic effects of glacial melting and unloading during the decline of the Pinedale Glaciation.

  13. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

    1981-05-01

    Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

  14. Coupled variations in helium isotopes and fluid chemistry: Shoshone Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hearn, E.H.; Kennedy, B.M. (Univ. of California, Berkeley (USA)); Truesdell, A.H. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    Early studies of {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He variations in geothermal systems have generally attributed these fluctuations to either differences in the source of the magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium or to local differences in the deep flux of magmatic {sup 3}He-rich helium. Kennedy et al, however, show that near-surface processes such as boiling and dilution may also drastically affect {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He ratios of geothermal vapors. Helium isotope ratios were determined for several hot springs at Shoshone Geyser Basin of Yellowstone National Park for this study, along with other noble gas data. Stable isotope data and water and gas chemistry data for each spring were also compiled. The water chemistry indicates that there is one deep, hot thermal water in the area which is mixing with dilute meteoric water that has entered the system at depth. Spring HCO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} concentrations correlate with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He values, as in nearby Lower Geyser Basin. This correlation is attributed to variable amounts of deep dilution of thermal waters with a relatively cool water that inhibits boiling at depth, thus preventing the loss of CO{sub 2} and magmatic He in the most diluted samples. Oxygen and hydrogen isotope data also support a boiling and dilution model, but to produce the observed fractionations, the boiling event would have to be extensive, with steam loss at the surface, whereas the boiling that affected the helium isotope ratios was probably a small scale event with steam loss at depth. It is possible that deep boiling occurred in the basin and that small amounts of steam escaped along fractures at about 500 m below the surface while all subsequently produced steam was lost near or at the surface.

  15. Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development - An Application on Alternative Fuels in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shropshire, D.E.; Cobb, D.A.; Worhach, P.; Jacobson, J.J.; Berrett, S.

    2000-12-30

    The Demonstration of Decision Support Tools for Sustainable Development project integrated the Bechtel/Nexant Industrial Materials Exchange Planner and the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory System Dynamic models, demonstrating their capabilities on alternative fuel applications in the Greater Yellowstone-Teton Park system. The combined model, called the Dynamic Industrial Material Exchange, was used on selected test cases in the Greater Yellow Teton Parks region to evaluate economic, environmental, and social implications of alternative fuel applications, and identifying primary and secondary industries. The test cases included looking at compressed natural gas applications in Teton National Park and Jackson, Wyoming, and studying ethanol use in Yellowstone National Park and gateway cities in Montana. With further development, the system could be used to assist decision-makers (local government, planners, vehicle purchasers, and fuel suppliers) in selecting alternative fuels, vehicles, and developing AF infrastructures. The system could become a regional AF market assessment tool that could help decision-makers understand the behavior of the AF market and conditions in which the market would grow. Based on this high level market assessment, investors and decision-makers would become more knowledgeable of the AF market opportunity before developing detailed plans and preparing financial analysis.

  16. Novel Thermo-Acidophilic Bacteria Isolated from Geothermal Sites in Yellowstone National Park: Physiological and Phylogenetic Characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    D. B. Johnson; N. Okibe; F. F. Roberto

    2003-07-01

    Moderately thermophilic acidophilic bacteria were isolated from geothermal (30–83 °C) acidic (pH 2.7– 3.7) sites in Yellowstone National Park. The temperature maxima and pH minima of the isolates ranged from 50 to 65 °C, and pH 1.0–1.9. Eight of the bacteria were able to catalyze the dissimilatory oxidation of ferrous iron, and eleven could reduce ferric iron to ferrous iron in anaerobic cultures. Several of the isolates could also oxidize tetrathionate. Six of the iron-oxidizing isolates, and one obligate heterotroph, were low G+C gram-positive bacteria (Firmicutes). The former included three Sulfobacillus-like isolates (two closely related to a previously isolated Yellowstone strain, and the third to a mesophilic bacterium isolated from Montserrat), while the other three appeared to belong to a different genus. The other two iron-oxidizers were an Actinobacterium (related to Acidimicrobium ferrooxidans) and a Methylobacterium-like isolate (a genus within the a-Proteobacteria that has not previously been found to contain either iron-oxidizers or acidophiles). The other three (heterotrophic) isolates were also a-Proteobacteria and appeared be a novel thermophilic Acidisphaera sp. An ARDREA protocol was developed to discriminate between the iron-oxidizing isolates. Digestion of amplified rRNA genes with two restriction enzymes (SnaBI and BsaAI) separated these bacteria into five distinct groups; this result was confirmed by analysis of sequenced rRNA genes.

  17. Control of Gas Tungsten Arc welding pool shape by trace element addition to the weld pool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Heiple, C.R.; Burgardt, P.

    1984-03-13

    An improved process for Gas Tungsten Arc welding maximizes the depth/width ratio of the weld pool by adding a sufficient amount of a surface active element to insure inward fluid flow, resulting in deep, narrow welds. The process is especially useful to eliminate variable weld penetration and shape in GTA welding of steels and stainless steels, particularly by using a sulfur-doped weld wire in a cold wire feed technique.

  18. PISA -Pooling Information from Several Agents: Multiplayer Argumentation from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coenen, Frans

    PISA - Pooling Information from Several Agents: Multiplayer Argumentation from Experience Maya Abstract In this paper a framework, PISA (Pooling Information from Several Agents), to facilitate argumentation is a form of dialogue game involving three or more players. The PISA framework is founded on a two

  19. Urban logistics pooling viabililty analysis via a multicriteria multiactor method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Urban logistics pooling viabililty analysis via a multicriteria multiactor method Jesus Gonzalez transportation and logistics pooling are relatively new concepts in research, but are very popular in practice. In the last years, collaborative transportation seems a good city logistics alternative to classical urban

  20. Root Modeling: Estimating Storage, Live, and Dead Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Post, Wilfred M.

    Root Modeling: Estimating Storage, Live, and Dead Pool Turnover Times; Storage Inputs to New Root to choose best-fit parameters · "Storage" simulations with in-growth cores · Live and dead pool simulations Atmosphere East Atmosphere; 1 SD East tree rings f(Average respiration and soil gas) Modeled GSD = 1.3 Range

  1. Post-project appraisals of constructed vernal pools in Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baraona, Maya; Ippolito, Teresa; Renz, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    Mitigation Bank POOL- 51 Ponding Area (CAD)= 0.06 acresArea (Acres) (ft) (inches) 72.5 paces = 372 Created Pool 43 Created Pool 51Area (Acres) (inches) NA NA Created Pool 43 NA NA NA NA Created Pool 51

  2. Radium-thorium disequilibrium and zeolite-water ion exchange in a Yellowstone hydrothermal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Bohlke, J.K. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Binz, C.M. (Loras College, Dubuque, IA (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 230}Th to determine the extent of radioactive disequilibrium and its relation to the rates and mechanisms of element transport in the shallow portion of an active hydrothermal system. The ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) activity ratios range from 0.73 to 1.46 and are generally correlated with Th-normalized Ba concentrations (Ba{sub N}). Compositions of clinoptilolite and mordenite in these samples are consistent with ion exchange equilibrium between zeolites and coexisting thermal waters. Average K{sup Ba}{sub d mineral-water} values are 1.0 {center dot} 10{sup 5} mL/g for clinoptilolite and 1.4 {center dot} 10{sup 4} mL/g for mordenite. Apparent diffusivities through matrix porosity estimated for R and Ba range from {approximately}10{sup {minus}12} to {approximately}10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1} in thoroughly zeolitic rhyolite; these rates of diffusion are too low to account for the observed distance scale of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium. The correlated values of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium and Ba{sub N} represent zeolite-water ion exchange equilibrium that is caused by porous flow of water through the rock matrix and by the relatively rapid diffusion of cations within the zeolite lattices. A water flux of at least {approximately}2.5 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required to produce measurable ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium, whereas at least {approximately}23 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required for the sample exhibiting the most extreme ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium; these fluxes are much higher than those that can be inferred from net mass transfers of stable species.

  3. A. MOTOR POOL VEHICLE GUIDELINES The goal of Notre Dame's Motor Pool is to make available a variety of vehicles for rent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buechler, Steven

    A. MOTOR POOL VEHICLE GUIDELINES The goal of Notre Dame's Motor Pool is to make available a variety University business. When vehicle needs are sporadic, use of the Motor Pool should be a convenient of Motor Pool vehicles: 1. Authorization Current University employees, students or authorized personnel may

  4. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, Peter T.; Mather, James H.; Vaughan, Geraint; Jakob, Christian; McFarquhar, Greg; Bower, Keith; Mace, Gerald G.

    2008-05-01

    One of the most complete data sets describing tropical convection ever collected will result from the upcoming Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) in the area around Darwin, Northern Australia in January and February 2006. The aims of the experiment, which will be operated in conjunction with the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) site in Darwin, will be to examine convective cloud systems from their initial stages through to the decay of the cirrus generated and to measure their impact on the environment. The experiment will include an unprecedented network of ground-based observations (soundings, active and passive remote sensors) combined with low, mid and high altitude aircraft for in-situ and remote sensing measurements. A crucial outcome of the experiment will be a data set suitable to provide the forcing and evaluation data required by cloud resolving and single column models as well as global climate models (GCMs) with the aim to contribute to parameterization development. This data set will provide the necessary link between the observed cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a large multi-agency experiment including substantial contributions from the United States DOE ARM program, ARM-UAV program, NASA, the Australian Bureau of Meteorology, CSIRO, EU programs and many universities.

  5. Domestication of the neotropical tree Chrysophyllum cainito from a geographically limited yet genetically diverse gene pool in Panama

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parker, Ingrid M.

    2014-01-01

    genetically diverse gene pool in Panama Jennifer J. Petersenincorporating a diverse gene pool. These results refute theof human influences on gene pools through selection and

  6. Plant phenology and life span influence soil pool dynamics: Bromus tectorum invasion of perennial C3–C4 grass communities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carol Adair, Elizabeth; Burke, Ingrid C.

    2010-01-01

    differences between soil pools beneath B. tectorum adjusteddifferences between soil pools beneath Bonferroni and nativegrass values indicate that pools were estimate statement).

  7. Cerrito Creek step-pools: An opportunity for restoration and education at Blake Garden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Behrends, Nathaniel

    2008-01-01

    and their affect on the step pool design. I also recommendfor Restoration of Step-Pool Streams. Not published Chin,The Self-Organization of Step-Pools in Mountain Streams.

  8. Regional calibration of coral-based climate reconstructions from Palau, West Pacific Warm Pool (WPWP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Osborne, Michael C; Dunbar, Robert B; Mucciarone, David A; Sanchez-Cabeza, Joan-Albert; Druffel, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    of the western Paci?c Warm Pool. Climate Dynamics 33, 565–of the Paci?c warm pool: implications for ENSO. Sciencein the western Paci?c warm pool. Coral Reefs 29, 413–418.

  9. Effects of Absolute Proximity Between Landmark and Platform in a Virtual Morris Pool Task with Humans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Artigas, A. A.; Aznar-Casanova, J. A.; Chamizo, V. D.

    2005-01-01

    overshadowing in a virtual pool: Simple guidance is a goodin the Morris swimming pool navigation task. Learning andand Platform in a Virtual Morris Pool Task with Humans A. A.

  10. Review: Dead Pool: Lake Powell, Global Warming, and the Future of Water in the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jenkins, David

    2009-01-01

    Review: Dead Pool: Lake Powell, Global Warming, and theJames Lawrence. Dead Pool: Lake Powell, Global Warming, andFortunately, too, Dead Pool is not simply about Glen Canyon

  11. Post-project appraisals of constructed vernal pools in Solano County, California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baraona, Maya; Ippolito, Teresa; Renz, Wendy

    2007-01-01

    listed plant taxa of vernal pool associations in California.California's Ephemeral Vernal Pools May Be a Good Model forDe Weese, J . M . 1998. Vernal Pool Construction Monitoring

  12. Methods of Separating Soil Carbon Pools Affect the Chemistry and Turnover Time of Isolated Fractions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Castanha, C.; Trumbore, S.; Amundson, R.

    2008-01-01

    2007. Mineral control of carbon pools in a volcanic soil ho-residence time of soil carbon pools: controlling factors andProceedings, “Meaningful Pools in Determining Soil Carbon

  13. Primary Policies The use of any pool is prohibited unless supervised by a lifeguard.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    , gum, or beverages are allowed on the pool deck except for water in unbreakable containers. Glass of water, urinating, defecating, or blowing the nose in the pool shall be strictly prohibited. Pool Rules

  14. Stacy Park Pool Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:SpillDavid,Energy Information Stacy Park Pool

  15. A pooled genome-wide association study of Asperger Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warrier, Varun; Chakrabarti, Bhismadev; Murphy, Laura; Chan, Allen; Craig, Ian; Mallya, Uma; Lakatošová, Silvia; Rehnstrom, Karola; Peltonen, Leena; Wheelwright, Sally; Allison, Carrie; Fisher, Simon E.; Baron-Cohen, Simon

    2015-01-01

    into consideration. The frequency of both the marker and the effect allele was 0.5 for the power calculation. SNPs were rejected if they had a minor allele frequency (MAF) below 0.01 in the Caucasian population according to the HapMap project... of the results from the pooling stage is provided in Fig. 2. Fig. 1: Manhattan plot of the SNPs tested in the pooled DNA association stage. Fig. 2: Quantile-quantile plot of the SNPs tested in the pooled DNA association stage. 12 Please insert Table...

  16. Origin of the northeastern basin and range seismic parabola: Thermal and mechanical effects of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anders, M.H. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States). Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory and Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-04-01

    Centered about the track of the Yellowstone hotspot is a parabolic pattern of seismicity encompassing a region of aseismicity. Recent studies have shown that this pattern has migrated in tandem with the hotspot. A one dimensional finite-difference thermomechanical model is developed which successfully accounts for the observed patterns of seismicity. The volume, chemistry and timing of magma intrusion used in the model are contained by several geophysical, geochemical and geochronological studies of the eastern Snake River Plain. In this model, mafic magmas are intruded into a lithosphere that is already extending. The intrusions heat the surrounding rock resulting in locally increased strain rates. As the intruded magmas solidify, the length of time required to return strain rates to their pre-intrusion level is then determined. The model assumes constant horizontal tectonic forces and maps strain rate as a function of yield strength and time since intrusion. Model parameters such as crustal thickness, initial geothermal gradient, and amount of magma intruded, are varied in order to assess how they affect turnaround time for strain rates. Off-axis seismicity (seismicity within the seismic parabola exclusive of Yellowstone) is accounted for by lower crustal flow. The lower crustal flow under the seismic parabola is driven by buoyancy forces generated by a sublithospheric plume. The shape of the seismic parabola is controlled by the combination of two irrotational fields; a radial flow field due to the plume and a constant velocity field corresponding to plate motion. In summation the author discusses several other models that have recently been proposed to explain the observed patterns of seismicity and late Cenozoic tectonism of the northeastern Basin and Range province.

  17. Effects of glacial ice on subsurface temperatures of hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming: Fluid-inclusion evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Fournier, R.O. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Hydrothermal quartz and fluorite crystals containing liquid-rich fluid inclusions (coexisting vapor-rich fluid inclusions were not observed) were found in drill cores from eight relatively shallow research holes drilled by the US Geological Survey in and near major geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park. Homogenization temperatures (T{sub h}) for mostly secondary fluid inclusions show variations in temperature that have occurred at give depths since precipitation of the host minerals. Within major hydrothermal upflow zones, fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values all were found to be equal to or higher (commonly 20-50 C and up to 155 C higher) than present temperatures at the depths sampled. During periods when thick glacial ice covered the Yellowstone National Park region, pore-fluid pressures in the underlying rock were increased in proportion to the weight of the overlying column of ice. Accordingly, theoretical reference boiling-point curves that reflect the maximum temperature attainable in a hot-water geothermal system at a given depth were elevated, and temperatures within zones of major hydrothermal upflow (drill holes Y-2, Y-3, Y-6, Y-11, Y-13, and upper part of Y-5) increased. The thicknesses of ice required to elevate boiling-point curves sufficiently to account for the observed fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values are within the ranges estimated by glacial geologic studies. At the margins of major hydrothermal upflow zones (drill holes Y-4 and Y-9), fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values at given depths range from 57 C lower to about the same as the current temperature measurements because of a previous decrease in the rate of discharge of warm water and/or an increase in the rate of recharge of cold water into the hydrothermal system.

  18. Pool boiling studies on nanotextured surfaces under highly subcooled conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2009-05-15

    Subcooled pool boiling on nanotextured surfaces is explored in this study. The experiments are performed in an enclosed viewing chamber. Two silicon wafers are coated with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT), 9 microns (Type-A) ...

  19. EA-1111: K Pool Fish Rearing, Hanford Site, Richland, Washington

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    This EA evaluates the environmental impacts of the proposal to enter into a use permit or lease agreement with the Yakama Indian Nation or other parties who would rear fish in the 100-K Area Pools.

  20. Fuel assembly transfer basket for pool type nuclear reactor vessels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fanning, Alan W. (San Jose, CA); Ramsour, Nicholas L. (San Jose, CA)

    1991-01-01

    A fuel assembly transfer basket for a pool type, liquid metal cooled nuclear reactor having a side access loading and unloading port for receiving and relinquishing fuel assemblies during transfer.

  1. Infrared thermometry study of nanofluid pool boiling phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig

    Abstract Infrared thermometry was used to obtain first-of-a-kind, time- and space-resolved data for pool boiling phenomena in water-based nanofluids with diamond and silica nanoparticles at low concentration (<0.1 vol.%). ...

  2. Determination of pool boiling Critical Heat Flux enhancement in nanofluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Truong, Bao H. (Bao Hoai)

    2007-01-01

    Nanofluids are engineered colloids composed of nano-size particles dispersed in common fluids such as water or refrigerants. Using an electrically controlled wire heater, pool boiling Critical Heat Flux (CHF) of Alumina ...

  3. Test Area North Pool Stabilization Project: Environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The Test Area North (TAN) Pool is located within the fenced TAN facility boundaries on the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL). The TAN pool stores 344 canisters of core debris from the March, 1979, Three Mile Island (TMI) Unit 2 reactor accident; fuel assemblies from Loss-of-Fluid Tests (LOFT); and Government-owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies. The LOFT and government owned commercial fuel rods and assemblies are hereafter referred to collectively as {open_quotes}commercial fuels{close_quotes} except where distinction between the two is important to the analysis. DOE proposes to remove the canisters of TMI core debris and commercial fuels from the TAN Pool and transfer them to the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for interim dry storage until an alternate storage location other than at the INEL, or a permanent federal spent nuclear fuel (SNF) repository is available. The TAN Pool would be drained and placed in an industrially and radiologically safe condition for refurbishment or eventual decommissioning. This environmental assessment (EA) identifies and evaluates environmental impacts associated with (1) constructing an Interim Storage System (ISS) at ICPP; (2) removing the TMI and commercial fuels from the pool and transporting them to ICPP for placement in an ISS, and (3) draining and stabilizing the TAN Pool. Miscellaneous hardware would be removed and decontaminated or disposed of in the INEL Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC). This EA also describes the environmental consequences of the no action alternative.

  4. Retail Demand Response in Southwest Power Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit; Heffner, Grayson; Goldman, Charles

    2009-01-30

    In 2007, the Southwest Power Pool (SPP) formed the Customer Response Task Force (CRTF) to identify barriers to deploying demand response (DR) resources in wholesale markets and develop policies to overcome these barriers. One of the initiatives of this Task Force was to develop more detailed information on existing retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs, program rules, and utility operating practices. This report describes the results of a comprehensive survey conducted by LBNL in support of the Customer Response Task Force and discusses policy implications for integrating legacy retail DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs into wholesale markets in the SPP region. LBNL conducted a detailed survey of existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs administered by SPP's member utilities. Survey respondents were asked to provide information on advance notice requirements to customers, operational triggers used to call events (e.g. system emergencies, market conditions, local emergencies), use of these DR resources to meet planning reserves requirements, DR resource availability (e.g. seasonal, annual), participant incentive structures, and monitoring and verification (M&V) protocols. Nearly all of the 30 load-serving entities in SPP responded to the survey. Of this group, fourteen SPP member utilities administer 36 DR programs, five dynamic pricing tariffs, and six voluntary customer response initiatives. These existing DR programs and dynamic pricing tariffs have a peak demand reduction potential of 1,552 MW. Other major findings of this study are: o About 81percent of available DR is from interruptible rate tariffs offered to large commercial and industrial customers, while direct load control (DLC) programs account for ~;;14percent. o Arkansas accounts for ~;;50percent of the DR resources in the SPP footprint; these DR resources are primarily managed by cooperatives. o Publicly-owned cooperatives accounted for 54percent of the existing DR resources among SPP members. For these entities, investment in DR is often driven by the need to reduce summer peak demand that is used to set demand charges for each distribution cooperative. o About 65-70percent of the interruptible/curtailable tariffs and DLC programs are routinely triggered based on market conditions, not just for system emergencies. Approximately, 53percent of the DR resources are available with less than two hours advance notice and 447 MW can be dispatched with less than thirty minutes notice. o Most legacy DR programs offered a reservation payment ($/kW) for participation; incentive payment levels ranged from $0.40 to $8.30/kW-month for interruptible rate tariffs and $0.30 to $4.60/kW-month for DLC programs. A few interruptible programs offered incentive payments which were explicitly linkedto actual load reductions during events; payments ranged from 2 to 40 cents/kWh for load curtailed.

  5. State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel Effective January 1, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel Effective January 1, 2010 Base Rental Charges Vehicle Class State Motor Pool Rental Contract Daily Rate* State Motor Pool Rental Contract Weekly Rate* State Motor Pool Rental Contract Monthly Rate* Compact 32 176 640 Mid-size/Intermediate 34 187 680

  6. Measure Guideline. Replacing Single-Speed Pool Pumps with Variable Speed Pumps for Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.; Easley, S.

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline evaluates potential energy savings by replacing traditional single-speed pool pumps with variable speed pool pumps, and provides a basic cost comparison between continued uses of traditional pumps verses new pumps. A simple step-by-step process for inspecting the pool area and installing a new pool pump follows.

  7. Measure Guideline: Replacing Single-Speed Pool Pumps with Variable Speed Pumps for Energy Savings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, A.; Easley, S.

    2012-05-01

    The report evaluates potential energy savings by replacing traditional single-speed pool pumps with variable speed pool pumps, and provide a basic cost comparison between continued uses of traditional pumps verses new pumps. A simple step-by-step process for inspecting the pool area and installing a new pool pump follows.

  8. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, Douglas M. (San Jose, CA)

    1996-01-01

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  9. Water inventory management in condenser pool of boiling water reactor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gluntz, D.M.

    1996-03-12

    An improved system for managing the water inventory in the condenser pool of a boiling water reactor has means for raising the level of the upper surface of the condenser pool water without adding water to the isolation pool. A tank filled with water is installed in a chamber of the condenser pool. The water-filled tank contains one or more holes or openings at its lowermost periphery and is connected via piping and a passive-type valve (e.g., squib valve) to a high-pressure gas-charged pneumatic tank of appropriate volume. The valve is normally closed, but can be opened at an appropriate time following a loss-of-coolant accident. When the valve opens, high-pressure gas inside the pneumatic tank is released to flow passively through the piping to pressurize the interior of the water-filled tank. In so doing, the initial water contents of the tank are expelled through the openings, causing the water level in the condenser pool to rise. This increases the volume of water available to be boiled off by heat conducted from the passive containment cooling heat exchangers. 4 figs.

  10. Initial surface deformations during impact on a liquid pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouwhuis, Wilco; van der Meer, Devaraj; Snoeijer, Jacco H

    2014-01-01

    A tiny air bubble can be entrapped at the bottom of a solid sphere that impacts onto a liquid pool. The bubble forms due to the deformation of the liquid surface by a local pressure buildup inside the surrounding gas, as also observed during the impact of a liquid drop on a solid wall. Here we perform a perturbation analysis to quantitatively predict the initial deformations of the free surface of the liquid pool as it is approached by a solid sphere. We study the natural limits where the gas can be treated as a viscous fluid (Stokes flow) or as an inviscid fluid (potential flow). For both cases we derive the spatio-temporal evolution of the pool surface, and recover some of the recently proposed scaling laws for bubble entrapment. When inserting typical values for drop impact, we find that the bubble volume is mainly determined by the effect of gas viscosity.

  11. Does carbon dioxide pool or stream in the subsurface?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cardoso, Silvana S S

    2014-01-01

    Pools of carbon dioxide are found in natural geological accumulations and in engineered storage in saline aquifers. It has been thought that once this CO2 dissolves in the formation water, making it denser, convection streams would transport it efficiently to depth, but this may not be so. Here, we assess the impact of natural chemical reactions between the dissolved CO2 and the rock formation on the convection streams in the subsurface. We show that, while in carbonate rocks the streaming of dissolved carbon dioxide persists, the chemical interactions in silicate-rich rocks may curb this transport drastically and even inhibit it altogether. New laboratory experiments confirm the curtailing of convection by reaction. Wide and narrow streams of dense carbon-rich water are shut-off gradually as reaction strength increases until all transport of the pooled carbon dioxide occurs by slow molecular diffusion. These results show that the complex fluid dynamic and kinetic interactions between pooled carbon dioxide an...

  12. Prediction of pool void fraction by new drift flux correlation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kataoka, I; Ishii, M

    1986-06-01

    A void fraction for a bubbling or boiling pool system is one of the important parameters in analyzing heat and mass transfer processes. Using the drift flux formulation, correlations for the pool void fraction have been developed in collaboration with a large number of experimental data. It has been found that the drift velocity in a pool system depends upon vessel diameter, system pressure, gas flux and fluid physical properties. The results show that the relative velocity and void fraction can be quite different from those predicted by conventional correlations. In terms of the rise velocity, four different regimes are identified. These are bubbly, churn-turbulent, slug and cap bubble regimes. The present correlations are shown to agree with the experimental data over wide ranges of parameters such as vessel diameter, system pressure, gas flux and physical properties. 39 refs., 41 figs.

  13. Investigation of cracking and leaking of nuclear reactor pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, William Bernard

    1965-01-01

    . Typical Gage Points on Pool Wall 12 8. s, . Locations of Leakage b. Locations of Leakage c. Locations of Leakage 13 14 15 9 ~ Structural Model 10. Creep Test 11. Shrinkage of Various Concrete Specimens (Dry ), 12. Permeability Test 16 26 28...'LLCS H. ~ Typi cB1 LCBkage T)n Q13gi'I th 8 PQol Wall ~ ln 196Q~ ax attempt was made to control tbe leakage by grani, in~ =". lean cemert, mix Under' high pressure into the cracks in tbe concrete pool vail in. an attempt, to fill the existing voids...

  14. Geoarchaeota: a new candidate phylum in the Archaea from high-temperature acidic iron mats in Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kozubal, Mark; Romine, Margaret F.; Jennings, Ryan; Jay, Z.; Tringe, Susannah G.; Rusch, Douglas B.; Beam, Jake; McCue, Lee Ann; Inskeep, William P.

    2013-03-01

    Geothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) provide an outstanding opportunity to understand the origin and evolution of metabolic processes necessary for life in extreme environments including low pH, high temperature, low oxygen and elevated concentrations of reduced iron. Previous phylogenetic studies of acidic ferric iron mats from YNP have revealed considerable diversity of uncultivated and undescribed archaea. The goal of this study was to obtain replicate de novo genome assemblies for a dominant archaeal population inhabiting acidic iron oxide mats in YNP. Detailed analysis of conserved ribosomal and informational processing genes indicate that the replicate assemblies represent a new phylum-level lineage referred to here as 'novel archaeal group 1 (NAG1)'. The NAG1 organisms contain pathways necessary for the catabolism of peptides and complex carbohydrates as well as a bacterial-like Form I CO dehydrogenase complex likely used for energy conservation. Moreover, this novel population contains genes involved in metabolism of oxygen including a Type A heme copper oxidase, a bd-type terminal oxidase and a putative oxygen sensing protoglobin. NAG1 has a variety of unique bacterial-like cofactor biosynthesis and transport genes and a Type3-like CRISPR system. Discovery of NAG1 is critical to our understanding of microbial community structure and function in extant thermophilic iron mats of YNP, and will provide insight regarding the evolution of Archaea in early Earth environments that may have important analogues active in YNP today.

  15. Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SCOTT, D.L.

    1999-02-08

    This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values.

  16. Pooled Energy Budgets: Resituating Human Energy Allocation Trade-offs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Karen L.

    Pooled Energy Budgets: Resituating Human Energy Allocation Trade-offs KAREN L. KRAMER AND PETER T assume that energy expended in activity (foraging effort) is proportional to body size, and that energy on food sharing, and cooperation in labor and childrearing, the ways by which energy is acquired

  17. Carbon Mineralization and Labile Organic Carbon Pools in the Sandy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grunwald, Sabine

    Carbon Mineralization and Labile Organic Carbon Pools in the Sandy Soils of a North Florida mineralization were best explained by TOC (62%) and hot-water- extractable C (59%), whereas acid-hydrolyzable C mineralization and clay content were directly linearly correlated, indicating a possible stimulatory effect

  18. An Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murawski, Andrzej

    , there are 19 nuclear power plants generating electricity for civilian use and 25 old power plants associated with nuclear power is the genera- tion of radioactive waste which must be managed and stored overAn Underwater Robotic Network for Monitoring Nuclear Waste Storage Pools Sarfraz Nawaz1 , Muzammil

  19. Condition Controlling and Monitoring of Indoor Swimming Pools 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nissinen, K.; Kauppinen, T.; Hekkanen, M.

    2004-01-01

    installations and the indoor air quality. Also the yearly running costs can be remarkable high. VTT has created the technical risk map for indoor swimming pool repairs. This risk map presents the most significant factors that must be taken into account in order...

  20. A NOVEL APPROACH TO SPENT FUEL POOL DECOMMISSIONING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. L. Demmer

    2011-04-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been at the forefront of developing methods to reduce the cost and schedule of deactivating spent fuel pools (SFP). Several pools have been deactivated at the INL using an underwater approach with divers. These projects provided a basis for the INL cooperation with the Dresden Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 SFP (Exelon Generation Company) deactivation. It represents the first time that a commercial nuclear power plant (NPP) SFP was decommissioned using this underwater coating process. This approach has advantages in many aspects, particularly in reducing airborne contamination and allowing safer, more cost effective deactivation. The INL pioneered underwater coating process was used to decommission three SFPs with a total combined pool volume of over 900,000 gallons. INL provided engineering support and shared project plans to successfully initiate the Dresden project. This report outlines the steps taken by INL and Exelon to decommission SFPs using the underwater coating process. The rationale used to select the underwater coating process and the advantages and disadvantages are described. Special circumstances are also discussed, such as the use of a remotely-operated underwater vehicle to visually and radiologically map the pool areas that were not readily accessible. A larger project, the INTEC-603 SFP in-situ (grouting) deactivation, is reviewed. Several specific areas where special equipment was employed are discussed and a Lessons Learned evaluation is included.

  1. Update on use of mine pool water for power generation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veil, J. A.; Puder, M. G.; Environmental Science Division

    2006-09-30

    In 2004, nearly 90 percent of the country's electricity was generated at power plants using steam-based systems (EIA 2005). Electricity generation at steam electric plants requires a cooling system to condense the steam. With the exception of a few plants using air-cooled condensers, most U.S. steam electric power plants use water for cooling. Water usage occurs through once-through cooling or as make-up water in a closed-cycle system (generally involving one or more cooling towers). According to a U.S. Geological Survey report, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 136 billion gallons per day of fresh water in 2000 (USGS 2005). This is almost the identical volume withdrawn for irrigation purposes. In addition to fresh water withdrawals, the steam electric power industry withdrew about 60 billion gallons per day of saline water. Many parts of the United States are facing fresh water shortages. Even areas that traditionally have had adequate water supplies are reaching capacity limits. New or expanded steam electric power plants frequently need to turn to non-traditional alternate sources of water for cooling. This report examines one type of alternate water source-groundwater collected in underground pools associated with coal mines (referred to as mine pool water in this report). In 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) funded Argonne National Laboratory (Argonne) to evaluate the feasibility of using mine pool water in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. That report (Veil et al. 2003) identified six small power plants in northeastern Pennsylvania (the Anthracite region) that had been using mine pool water for over a decade. It also reported on a pilot study underway at Exelon's Limerick Generating Station in southeastern Pennsylvania that involved release of water from a mine located about 70 miles upstream from the plant. The water flowed down the Schuylkill River and augmented the natural flow so that the Limerick plant could withdraw a larger volume of river water. The report also included a description of several other proposed facilities that were planning to use mine pool water. In early 2006, NETL directed Argonne to revisit the sites that had previously been using mine pool water and update the information offered in the previous report. This report describes the status of mine pool water use as of summer 2006. Information was collected by telephone interviews, electronic mail, literature review, and site visits.

  2. Annual Energy Consumption Analysis and Energy Optimization of a Solar-Assisted Heating Swimming Pool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuo, Z.; Hu, W.; Meng, O.

    2006-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the energy efficiency calculations and optimization for an indoor solar-assisted heating swimming pool in GuangZhou. The heating energy requirements for maintaining the pool constant temperature ...

  3. Comparison of Community Climate System Model Simulations and Paleoclimate Data for the Western Pacific Warm Pool Climate during the Last Glacial Maximum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittman, Dustin

    2012-01-01

    Pacific Warm Pool . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Proxy datain and around the warm pool. Streamlines are coloredyears ago. CLIMAP found warm pool cooling of ?1 ? C during

  4. Numerical Simulations of Bubble Dynamics and Heat Transfer in Pool Boiling--Including the Effects of Conjugate Conduction, Level of Gravity, and Noncondensable Gas Dissolved in the Liquid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aktinol, Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Numerical Simulation of Pool Boiling: A Review. ” Journal ofBooth, W. (2012). “Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiments (NPBX)and Booth, W. , “ ,Nucleate Pool Boiling Experiments (NPBX)

  5. Request for Proposals for Final Energy Service Company Selection from Pre-Qualified Pool Documents

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Information and documents about the Request for Proposals to select an Energy Service Company from a pre-qualified pool.

  6. Basic Marketing of Texas Cotton: Forward Contracts, Cash Sales, Marketing Pools, and the USDA Loan Program 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robinson, John; Park, John; Smith, Jackie; Anderson, Carl

    2006-10-10

    This publication explains basic marketing alternatives for cotton producers, including forward contracts, cash sales, marketing pools and USDA loan programs....

  7. Constraining the propagation of bomb-radiocarbon through the dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool in the northeast Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beaupré, Steven R; Druffel, Ellen R.M.

    2009-01-01

    dissolved organic carbon (DOC) pool in the northeast Paci?c14 C has penetrated the DOC pool to depths of Z450 m, thoughDIC) suggest that the DOC pool in the CNP contains bomb- 14

  8. Impacts of Central America gap winds on the SST annual cycle in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Fengpeng; Yu, Jin-Yi

    2006-01-01

    the eastern Pacific warm pool, gap winds, thermocline dome,in the eastern Pacific warm pool Fengpeng Sun 1 and Jin-Yiin the eastern Pacific warm pool and its relation to Central

  9. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    are there trop- ical warm pools? , J. Clim. , 18, 5294–5331,P. J. Webster (1999), Warm pool SST variability in relationin the western Pacific warm pool, Bull. Am. Meteorol. Soc. ,

  10. Structure of genetic diversity in the two major gene pools of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., Fabaceae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kwak, Myounghai; Gepts, Paul

    2009-01-01

    AFLP analysis of gene pools of a wild bean core collection.in the two major gene pools of common bean (Phaseolusand Mesoamerican gene pools. Using a model-based approach,

  11. Longitudinal Genetic Characterization Reveals That Cell Proliferation Maintains a Persistent HIV Type 1 DNA Pool during Effective HIV Therapy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    Persistent HIV Type 1 DNA Pool During Effective HIV Therapyconstant HIV-1 DNA integrant pool that was geneticallydata on the change in the pool of HIV-1–integrated memory T

  12. U. C. Faculty Hiring: The Pool, Parity, and Progress -- Testimony to the Senate Select Committee on Government Oversight

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, M. R. C.

    2001-01-01

    however some data on the 1997 postdoctoral appointee pool.This pool is comprised of officially appointed fellows (29% females; the national Ph.D. pool is 39.3% female and UC

  13. Understanding wood-pool dynamics using long-term monitoring data from the Gualala River Watershed: What can we learn?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Church, Tamara

    2012-01-01

    large wood removal on pool habitat and salmonid density andSchmidt, and G. Pess. 1995. Pool spacing in forest channels.and its contribu-tion to pool formation in a coastal stream

  14. A retrospective study of ecosystem effects of the 1976/77 regime shift in the eastern Pacific warm pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vilchis, L. Ignacio

    2010-01-01

    of the eastern Pacific warm pool: Can community structure bein the eastern Pacific warm pool A dissertation submitted inthe eastern Pacific warm pool (5-20°N, 90-110°W). Values are

  15. Identification of Novel Positive-Strand RNA Viruses by Metagenomic Analysis of Archaea-Dominated Yellowstone Hot Springs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin Bolduc; Daniel P. Shaughnessy; Yuri I. Wolf; Eugene V. Koonin; Francisco F. Roberto; Mark Young

    2012-05-01

    There are no known RNA viruses that infect Archaea. Filling this gap in our knowledge of viruses will enhance our understanding of the relationships between RNA viruses from the three domains of cellular life and, in particular, could shed light on the origin of the enormous diversity of RNA viruses infecting eukaryotes. We describe here the identification of novel RNA viral genome segments from high-temperature acidic hot springs in Yellowstone National Park in the United States. These hot springs harbor low-complexity cellular communities dominated by several species of hyperthermophilic Archaea. A viral metagenomics approach was taken to assemble segments of these RNA virus genomes from viral populations isolated directly from hot spring samples. Analysis of these RNA metagenomes demonstrated unique gene content that is not generally related to known RNA viruses of Bacteria and Eukarya. However, genes for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp), a hallmark of positive-strand RNA viruses, were identified in two contigs. One of these contigs is approximately 5,600 nucleotides in length and encodes a polyprotein that also contains a region homologous to the capsid protein of nodaviruses, tetraviruses, and birnaviruses. Phylogenetic analyses of the RdRps encoded in these contigs indicate that the putative archaeal viruses form a unique group that is distinct from the RdRps of RNA viruses of Eukarya and Bacteria. Collectively, our findings suggest the existence of novel positive-strand RNA viruses that probably replicate in hyperthermophilic archaeal hosts and are highly divergent from RNA viruses that infect eukaryotes and even more distant from known bacterial RNA viruses. These positive-strand RNA viruses might be direct ancestors of RNA viruses of eukaryotes.

  16. IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS MODIFYING Hg MODULE ( NEW SH#1 REGION + Hg POOL LENGTH)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS MODIFYING Hg MODULE ( NEW SH#1 REGION + Hg POOL LENGTH) Nicholas CRYO#1 WAS DECIDED DURING THE LAST MEETING AND AN EXTENSION OF THE Hg POOL UPSTREAM UP TO ~ - 100 cm FROM SIMULATIONS WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL AND SH#1 REGION

  17. IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS INTRODUCING A DOUBLE WALL Hg POOL VESSSELAND Be WINDOW.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120j WITHOUT RESISTIVE MAGNETS INTRODUCING A DOUBLE WALL Hg POOL VESSSELAND Be WINDOW. SC#4 STUDIES FOR 20 cm GAPS SIZE FOR STST IN THE PLACE OF RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND REST OF VOLUME IN Hg POOL SHIELDING IN THE PLACE OF RESISTIVE MAGNETS AND IN THE REST OF VOLUME IN THE Hg POOL VESSEL

  18. La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and Water Quality Improvement Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elwany, Hany; Flick, Reinhard; Nichols, Jean; Lindquist, Anne-Lise

    1998-01-01

    LA JOLLA CHILDREN'S POOL BEACH MANAGEMENT AND WATER QUALITY98-9 La Jolla Children's Pool Beach Management and WaterHISTORY OF CHILDREN'S POOL B E A C H 3. B A S E L I N E S U

  19. Frog calls echo microsatellite phylogeography in the European pool frog (Rana lessonae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doran, Simon J.

    Frog calls echo microsatellite phylogeography in the European pool frog (Rana lessonae) Julia be informative about phylogeographic history. Microsatellite studies of the pool frog Rana lessonae have been of the pool frog was quanti®ed and the pattern observed was concordant with the differentiation of a distinct

  20. Improving Bounds on the Football Pool Problem via Symmetry Reduction and High-Throughput Computing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linderoth, Jeffrey T.

    Improving Bounds on the Football Pool Problem via Symmetry Reduction and High-Throughput Computing of Wisconsin-Madison, 1210 W. Dayton St., Madison, WI 53706, USA, gthain@cs.wisc.edu The Football Pool Problem theory. Key words: Football Pool Problem; High-Throughput Computing; Branch-and-Bound; Con- dor; Master

  1. Tunable molten oxide pool assisted plasma-melter vitrification systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Titus, Charles H. (Newtown Square, PA); Cohn, Daniel R. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Surma, Jeffrey E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention provides tunable waste conversion systems and apparatus which have the advantage of highly robust operation and which provide complete or substantially complete conversion of a wide range of waste streams into useful gas and a stable, nonleachable solid product at a single location with greatly reduced air pollution to meet air quality standards. The systems provide the capability for highly efficient conversion of waste into high quality combustible gas and for high efficiency conversion of the gas into electricity by utilizing a high efficiency gas turbine or an internal combustion engine. The solid product can be suitable for various commercial applications. Alternatively, the solid product stream, which is a safe, stable material, may be disposed of without special considerations as hazardous material. In the preferred embodiment, the arc plasma furnace and joule heated melter are formed as a fully integrated unit with a common melt pool having circuit arrangements for the simultaneous independently controllable operation of both the arc plasma and the joule heated portions of the unit without interference with one another. The preferred configuration of this embodiment of the invention utilizes two arc plasma electrodes with an elongated chamber for the molten pool such that the molten pool is capable of providing conducting paths between electrodes. The apparatus may additionally be employed with reduced use or without further use of the gases generated by the conversion process. The apparatus may be employed as a net energy or net electricity producing unit where use of an auxiliary fuel provides the required level of electricity production. Methods and apparatus for converting metals, non-glass forming waste streams and low-ash producing inorganics into a useful gas are also provided. The methods and apparatus for such conversion include the use of a molten oxide pool having predetermined electrical, thermal and physical characteristics capable of maintaining optimal joule heating and glass forming properties during the conversion process.

  2. Thermal Cooling Limits of Sbotaged Spent Fuel Pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Dr. Thomas F. Lin

    2010-09-10

    To develop the understanding and predictive measures of the post “loss of water inventory” hazardous conditions as a result of the natural and/or terrorist acts to the spent fuel pool of a nuclear plant. This includes the thermal cooling limits to the spent fuel assembly (before the onset of the zircaloy ignition and combustion), and the ignition, combustion, and the subsequent propagation of zircaloy fire from one fuel assembly to others

  3. Melozi Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop,SmwMeisterInformation Pool & Spa

  4. EA-98-H Western Systems Power Pool | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLC to exportEndureAuthorizing Western Systems Power Pool

  5. List of Solar Pool Heating Incentives | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History ViewInformationWindsCompressedList of RefuelingRoomList of Solar Pool

  6. IDS120hm GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING WITHOUT/WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120hm GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING WITHOUT: (m IS FOR) modified Hg pool vessel IN IDS120h. # WITHOUT AND WITH Hg IN THE POOL SIMULATIONS Hg POOL VESSEL AND SHIFTED Be WIDOW FROM 600 cm (0.6 cm THICK) TO 300 cm (1 cm THICK). MODIFIED Hg

  7. Isotopic dating of Lava Creek B tephra in terrace deposits along the Wind River, Wyoming--Implications for post 0. 6 Ma uplift of the Yellowstone hotspot

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izett, G.A.; Pierce, K.L.; Naeser, N.D. (U.S.G.S., Denver, CO (United States)); Jaworowski, C. (Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics)

    1992-01-01

    Along the Wind River near Kinnear (Pavillon quadrangle), a meter-thick tephra layer occurs near the middle of a main-stem gravel deposit about 100 m above the river. On Muddy Ridge 25 km east of Kinnear, a Lava Creek B tephra layer occurs at the base of a terrace deposit about 100 m above Muddy Creek. Another Lava Creek B tephra site 67 km northwest and upstream from Kinnear occurs within main-stem gravels of a terrace deposit 145 m above the river. This upstream increase of 45 m of the tephra horizon raises the concern that the two tephra layers might not be of the same age. All three tephras contain the same assemblage of phenocrysts as that in the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and the Lava Creek B volcanic ash bed of the Western U.S., and therefore they are arguably correlatives. The authors confirmed this petrographic correlation by isotopic dating of sanidine crystals recovered from cm-size pumice lapilli in the Kinnear tephra and from coarse-grained tephra at the Muddy Creek site. Laser total-fusion Ar-40-Ar-39 ages of sanidine from the two sites are coeval, 0.66[plus minus]0.01 Ma and 0.67[plus minus]0.01 Ma at Muddy Creek. Conventional K-Ar dating of sanidine from the tephra at the Cl453 site resulted in an age of 0.60[plus minus]0.02 Ma. Glass-mantled zircon crystals from the Cl453 site yielded a fission-track age of 0.67[plus minus]0.16 Ma. These isotopic ages are compatible with conventional K-Ar, Ar-40-Ar-39, and fission-track ages of the Lava Creek Tuff, Member B in Yellowstone National Park and other occurrences of Lava Creek B ash beds. The authors suggest that the terrace deposit that contains the Lava Creek B tephra rises from the Kinnear site northwest up the Wind River as a result of Quaternary uplift in the area of the Yellowstone hotspot.

  8. Compatibility of state assignments and pooling of information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Todd A. Brun; Min-Hsiu Hsieh; Christopher Perry

    2015-04-20

    We say that two (or more) state assignments for one and the same quantum system are compatible if they could represent the assignments of observers with differing information about the system. A criterion for compatibility was proposed in [Phys. Rev. A 65, 032315 (2002)]; however, this leaves unanswered the question of whether there are degrees of compatibility which could be represented by some quantitative measure, and whether there is a straightforward procedure whereby the observers can pool their information to arrive at a unique joint state assignment. We argue that such measures are only sensible given some assumption about what kind of information was used in making the state assignments in the first place, and that in general state assignments do not represent all of the information possessed by the observers. However, we examine one particular measure, and show that it has a straightforward interpretation, assuming that the information was acquired from a particular type of measurement, and that in this case there is a natural rule for pooling information. We extend this measure to compatibility of states for k observers, and show that the value is the solution to a semidefinite program. Similar compatibility measures can be defined for alternative notions of state compatibility, including Post-Peierls (PP) and Equal Support (ES) compatibility.

  9. Effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area, Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. Water Resources Investigation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1991-01-01

    A two-year study by the U.S. Geological Survey, in collaboration with the National Park Service, Argonne National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory was initiated in 1988 to determine the effects of potential geothermal development in the Corwin Springs Known Geothermal Resources Area (KGRA), Montana, on the thermal features of Yellowstone National Park. The study addressed three principal issues: (1) the sources of thermal water in the hot springs at Mammoth, La Duke, and Bear Creek; (2) the degree of subsurface connection between these areas; and (3) the effects of geothermal development in the Corwin Springs KGRA on the Park's thermal features. The authors investigations included, but were not limited to, geologic mapping, electrical geophysical surveys, chemical sampling and analyses of waters and rocks, determinations of the rates of discharge of various thermal springs, and hydrologic tracer tests.

  10. A Horizontal Well Program for the Upper Miocene 26R Pool, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. (Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); Kuespert, J.G. (Chevron U.S.A. Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)); McJannet, G.S. (USDOE, Tupman, CA (United States))

    1992-01-01

    The goals of this paper are to (1) summarize the complex geologic and reservoir characteristics of the 26R Pool, (2) note those characteristics and criteria that would make this Pool ideally suited for horizontal well technology, (3) discuss the evolution of horizontal drilling technology and our corresponding development of knowledge about the 26R Pool, and (4) discuss how our objectives have been achieved by utilizing horizontal wells. (VC)

  11. A Horizontal Well Program for the Upper Miocene 26R Pool, Elk Hills Field, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reid, S.A. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations, Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); Kuespert, J.G. [Chevron U.S.A. Inc., Tupman, CA (United States); McJannet, G.S. [USDOE, Tupman, CA (United States)

    1992-07-01

    The goals of this paper are to (1) summarize the complex geologic and reservoir characteristics of the 26R Pool, (2) note those characteristics and criteria that would make this Pool ideally suited for horizontal well technology, (3) discuss the evolution of horizontal drilling technology and our corresponding development of knowledge about the 26R Pool, and (4) discuss how our objectives have been achieved by utilizing horizontal wells. (VC)

  12. Correlation of gold in siliceous sinters with {sup 3}He/{sup 4}He in hot spring waters of Yellowstone National Park

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, R.O.; Thompson, J.M. [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States)] [Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kennedy, B.M. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States); Aoki, Masahiro [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)] [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1994-12-01

    Opaline sinter samples collected at Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were analyzed for gold by neutron activation and for other trace elements by the inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES) method. No correlation was found between Au and As, Sb, or total Fe in the sinters, although the sample containing the highest Au also contains the highest Sb. There also was no correlation of Au in the sinter with the H{sub 2}S concentration in the discharged hot spring water or with the estimated temperature of last equilibration of the water with the surrounding rock. The Au in rhyolitic tuffs and lavas at YNP found within the Yellowstone caldera show the same range in Au as do those outside the caldera, while thermal waters from within this caldera all have been found to contain relatively low dissolved Au and to deposit sinters that contain relatively little Au. Therefore, it is not likely that variations in Au concentrations among these sinters simply reflect differences in leachable Au in the rocks through which the hydrothermal fluids have passed. Rather, variations in [H{sub 2}S], the concentration of total dissolved sulfide, that result from different physical and chemical processes that occur in different parts of the hydrothermal system appear to exert the main control on the abundance of Au in these sinters. Hydrothermal fluids at YNP convect upward through a series of successively shallower and cooler reservoirs where water-rock chemical and isotopic reactions occur in response to changing temperature and pressure. In some parts of the system the fluids undergo decompressional boiling, and in other parts they cool conductively without boiling. Mixing of ascending water from deep in the system with shallow groundwaters is common. All three processes generally result in a decrease in [H{sub 2}S] and destabilize dissolved gold bisulfide complexes in reservoir waters in the YNP system.

  13. Dewitt C. Poole and America's intervention in Russia, 1918-1920 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briscoe, Charles Harry

    1972-01-01

    of the American diplomats on the scene. The first objective of this thesis is to look at the personality of DeWi tt Poole as reflected in his memoirs, letters, and official correspondence. One must understand who and what motivated his actions during...Witt Clinton Poole, Jr. was born October 28, 1885, at Vancouver Barracks, Washington, to Captain DeWi tt Clinton Poole and Naria Woodward Pettes Poole. He was named in honor of his paternal grandfather who had been an engineer on the Erie Canal. DeWi tt...

  14. DOE Publishes Notice of Proposed Rulemaking for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heater Test Procedures

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Energy has published a notice of proposed rulemaking regarding test procedures for direct heating equipment and pool heaters.

  15. Obsidian Cliff Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information Area (Warpinski, Et Al.,

  16. Antisocial pool rewarding does not deter public cooperation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Szolnoki, Attila

    2015-01-01

    Rewarding cooperation is in many ways expected behaviour from social players. However, strategies that promote antisocial behaviour are also surprisingly common, not just in human societies, but also among eusocial insects and bacteria. Examples include sanctioning of individuals who behave prosocially, or rewarding of freeriders who do not contribute to collective enterprises. We therefore study the public goods game with antisocial and prosocial pool rewarding in order to determine the potential negative consequences on the effectiveness of positive incentives to promote cooperation. Contrary to a naive expectation, we show that the ability of defectors to distribute rewards to their like does not deter public cooperation as long as cooperators are able to do the same. Even in the presence of antisocial rewarding the spatial selection for cooperation in evolutionary social dilemmas is enhanced. Since the administration of rewards to either strategy requires a considerable degree of aggregation, cooperators ...

  17. The Phoenix series large scale LNG pool fire experiments.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpson, Richard B.; Jensen, Richard Pearson; Demosthenous, Byron; Luketa, Anay Josephine; Ricks, Allen Joseph; Hightower, Marion Michael; Blanchat, Thomas K.; Helmick, Paul H.; Tieszen, Sheldon Robert; Deola, Regina Anne; Mercier, Jeffrey Alan; Suo-Anttila, Jill Marie; Miller, Timothy J.

    2010-12-01

    The increasing demand for natural gas could increase the number and frequency of Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) tanker deliveries to ports across the United States. Because of the increasing number of shipments and the number of possible new facilities, concerns about the potential safety of the public and property from an accidental, and even more importantly intentional spills, have increased. While improvements have been made over the past decade in assessing hazards from LNG spills, the existing experimental data is much smaller in size and scale than many postulated large accidental and intentional spills. Since the physics and hazards from a fire change with fire size, there are concerns about the adequacy of current hazard prediction techniques for large LNG spills and fires. To address these concerns, Congress funded the Department of Energy (DOE) in 2008 to conduct a series of laboratory and large-scale LNG pool fire experiments at Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) in Albuquerque, New Mexico. This report presents the test data and results of both sets of fire experiments. A series of five reduced-scale (gas burner) tests (yielding 27 sets of data) were conducted in 2007 and 2008 at Sandia's Thermal Test Complex (TTC) to assess flame height to fire diameter ratios as a function of nondimensional heat release rates for extrapolation to large-scale LNG fires. The large-scale LNG pool fire experiments were conducted in a 120 m diameter pond specially designed and constructed in Sandia's Area III large-scale test complex. Two fire tests of LNG spills of 21 and 81 m in diameter were conducted in 2009 to improve the understanding of flame height, smoke production, and burn rate and therefore the physics and hazards of large LNG spills and fires.

  18. On Power Splitting Games in Distributed Computation: The Case of Bitcoin Pooled Mining

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    International Association for Cryptologic Research (IACR)

    On Power Splitting Games in Distributed Computation: The Case of Bitcoin Pooled Mining Loi Luu to the Internet to participate in a game in which he splits his computational power among a set of competing pools -- the game is called a computational power splitting game. We formally model this game and show its utility

  19. Policy Gradient Planning for Environmental Decision Making with Existing Mark Crowley and David Poole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poole, David

    Policy Gradient Planning for Environmental Decision Making with Existing Simulators Mark Crowley policies for sustainable harvest planning of a forest. Introduction In many environmental and natural and David Poole University of British Columbia crowley@cs.ubc.ca poole@cs.ubc.ca Abstract In environmental

  20. Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING AND AGENDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority NOTICE OF SPECIAL MEETING AND AGENDA Notice is hereby given that a special meeting of the Board of Directors of the Power and Water Resources Pooling Authority (PWRPA) will be held on November 25, 2013 at 10:00 a.m., at the Westlands Water District, 3130

  1. Common pool resource management and PES: Lessons and constraints for water PES in Tanzania

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vermont, University of

    Common pool resource management and PES: Lessons and constraints for water PES in Tanzania Brendan, Tanzania c World Wildlife Fund Tanzania Programme Office, Dar es Salaam PO Box 63117, Tanzania d services Common pool resources Payments for ecosystem services Water payments Tanzania Research into common

  2. Simulating Sediment Transport in a Flume with Forced Pool-Riffle Morphology: Examinations of Two

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Venditti, Jeremy G.

    Simulating Sediment Transport in a Flume with Forced Pool-Riffle Morphology: Examinations of Two. Dusterhoff4 ; William E. Dietrich5 ; and Leonard S. Sklar6 Abstract: One-dimensional numerical sediment sediment pulse dynamics in a physical model of forced pool-riffle morphology. Comparisons with measured

  3. Effects of sediment pulses on bed relief in bar-pool John P. P. Zunka,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tullos, Desiree

    Effects of sediment pulses on bed relief in bar-pool channels John P. P. Zunka,1 * Desiree D associated with sediment pulses in bar- pool channels, we analyze channel bed topographic data collected relief to sand and gravel sediment pulses is a function of initial relief and pulse magnitude. Modest

  4. IDS120h POWER DEPOSITION AND Hg POOL STUDIES Nicholas Souchlas (7/26/2011)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h POWER DEPOSITION AND Hg POOL STUDIES Nicholas Souchlas (7/26/2011) 1 #12;Power deposition;ENERGY DEPOSITED IN SC SOLENOIDS (SC#), SHIELDING (SH#). P12 OPTIMIZED POINT, POOL WALL CASES x=+/-6W DECREASE IN DP (BLUE AREA) SH#4~ SMALL INCREASE IN DP (YELLOW AREA) RS, BP~ SAME DP #12;HIGHLIGHTS : Power

  5. ORIGINAL PAPER Estimation of tree biomass, carbon pool and net primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    et al. 2008). Determination of carbon sequestration potential in terrestrial ecosystems throughORIGINAL PAPER Estimation of tree biomass, carbon pool and net primary production of an old Science+Business Media B.V. 2011 Abstract & Background The data on carbon pool and biomass distribution

  6. Controlling bubble motion over heated surface through evaporation momentum force to enhance pool boiling heat transfer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Controlling bubble motion over heated surface through evaporation momentum force to enhance pool://apl.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;Controlling bubble motion over heated surface through evaporation momentum force to enhance pool on the basis of this hypothesis to control the bubble trajectory for (i) enhancing the heat transfer

  7. Assessing urban logistics pooling sustainability via a hierarchic dashboard from a group decision perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Assessing urban logistics pooling sustainability via a hierarchic dashboard from a group decision to measure the sustainable performance of urban logistics pooling systems. To do this, we start by defining it, since the method is able to be replicated in any context of group decision in urban logistics

  8. Costs and benefits of logistics pooling for urban freight distribution: scenario

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Costs and benefits of logistics pooling for urban freight distribution: scenario simulation Collaborative transportation and logistics pooling are relatively new concepts in research, but are very popular in practice. In the last years, collaborative transportation seems a good city logistics alternative

  9. Use of pooled samples for the detection of Salmonella in feces by polymerase chain reaction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singer, Randall

    Use of pooled samples for the detection of Salmonella in feces by polymerase chain reaction Randall epidemiological studies of Salmonella rely on conventional bacteriological culture methods to detect Salmonella with a low prevalence of Salmonella. The objective of this study was to optimize a protocol that uses pooled

  10. Construction Supply Chain Improvements through Internet Pooled Procurement Proceedings IGLC-7 207

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tommelein, Iris D.

    to decrease waste and latency. The efforts of the Lean Construction Institute are an indication of the trendConstruction Supply Chain Improvements through Internet Pooled Procurement Proceedings IGLC-7 207 CONSTRUCTION SUPPLY CHAIN IMPROVEMENTS THROUGH INTERNET POOLED PROCUREMENT John Taylor1 and Hans Bjornsson2

  11. Assessment of simulation predictions of hydrocarbon pool fire tests.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luketa-Hanlin, Anay Josephine

    2010-04-01

    An uncertainty quantification (UQ) analysis is performed on the fuel regression rate model within SIERRA/Fuego by comparing to a series of hydrocarbon tests performed in the Thermal Test Complex. The fuels used for comparison for the fuel regression rate model include methanol, ethanol, JP8, and heptane. The recently implemented flamelet combustion model is also assessed with a limited comparison to data involving measurements of temperature and relative mole fractions within a 2-m diameter methanol pool fire. The comparison of the current fuel regression rate model to data without UQ indicates that the model over predicts the fuel regression rate by 65% for methanol, 63% for ethanol, 95% for JP8, and 15% for heptane. If a UQ analysis is performed incorporating a range of values for transmittance, reflectance, and heat flux at the surface the current model predicts fuel regression rates within 50% of measured values. An alternative model which uses specific heats at inlet and boiling temperatures respectively and does not approximate the sensible heat is also compared to data. The alternative model with UQ significantly improves the comparison to within 25% for all fuels except heptane. Even though the proposed alternative model provides better agreement to data, particularly for JP8 and ethanol (within 15%), there are still outstanding issues regarding significant uncertainties which include heat flux gauge measurement and placement, boiling at the fuel surface, large scale convective motion within the liquid, and semi-transparent behavior.

  12. Irradiation of Microbes from Spent Nuclear Fuel Storage Pool Environments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Breckenridge, C.R.; Watkins, C.S.; Bruhn, D.F.; Roberto, F.F.; Tsang, M.N.; Pinhero, P.J.; Brey, R.F.; Wright, R.N.; Windes, W.F.

    1999-09-03

    Microbes have been isolated and identified from spent nuclear fuel storage pools at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). Included among these are Corynebacterium aquaticum, Pseudomonas putida, Comamonas acidovorans, Gluconobacter cerinus, Micrococcus diversus, Rhodococcus rhodochrous, and two strains of sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB). We examined the sensitivity of these microbes to a variety of total exposures of radiation generated by a 6-MeV linear accelerator (LINAC). The advantage of using a LINAC is that it provides a relatively quick screen of radiation tolerance. In the first set of experiments, we exposed each of the aforementioned microbes along with four additional microbes, pseudomonas aeruginosa, Micrococcus luteus, Escherchia coli, and Deinococcus radiodurans to exposures of 5 x 10{sup 3} and 6 x 10{sup 4} rad. All microbial specimens withstood the lower exposure with little or no reduction in cell population. Upon exposing the microbes to the larger dose of 6 x 10{sup 4} rad, we observed two distinct groupings: microbes that demonstrate resistance to radiation, and microbes that display intolerance through a dramatic reduction from their initial population. Microbes in the radiation tolerant grouping were exposed to 1.1 x 10{sup 5} rad to examine the extent of their resistance. We observe a correlation between radiation resistance and gram stain. The gram-positive species we examined seem to demonstrate a greater radiation resistance.

  13. The application of expansion foam on liquefied natural gas (LNG) to suppress LNG vapor and LNG pool fire thermal radiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suardin, Jaffee Arizon

    2009-05-15

    Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) hazards include LNG flammable vapor dispersion and LNG pool fire thermal radiation. A large LNG pool fire emits high thermal radiation thus preventing fire fighters from approaching and extinguishing the fire. One...

  14. A very oligotrophic zone observed from space in the equatorial Pacific warm pool1 Marie-Hlne Radenaca

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    penetration of nutrient-rich water due to the following processes. 1/ The34 equatorial oligotrophic warm pool tropical Pacific, and especially the eastern part of the warm pool,51 is one of the world ocean regions

  15. Effects of Carbon Nanotube Coating on Bubble Departure Diameter and Frequency in Pool Boiling on a Flat, Horizontal Heater 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glenn, Stephen T.

    2011-08-08

    The effects of a carbon nanotube (CNT) coating on bubble departure diameter and frequency in pool boiling experiments was investigated and compared to those on a bare silicon wafer. The pool boiling experiments were performed at liquid subcooling...

  16. Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement over cylindrical tubes with water at atmospheric pressure, Part I: Experimental results

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    Pool boiling heat transfer enhancement over cylindrical tubes with water at atmospheric pressure online 4 May 2013 Keywords: Pool boiling Heat transfer enhancement Open microchannels Cylindrical tube boiling heat transfer over enhanced cylindrical microchannel test surfaces with water at atmospheric

  17. Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Energy Conservation Standards for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Request for Information

  18. Estimating population size of Pacific harbor seals (Phoca vitulina richardsi) at Children's Pool Beach in La Jolla, California, using photo-identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Traci A.

    2011-01-01

    the La Jolla Children’s Pool (La Jolla, California) andrichardsi) at Children's Pool Beach in La Jolla, California,of seals present at Children’s Pool Beach, La Jolla, CA…….

  19. Measurement of zinc stable isotope ratios in biogeochemical matrices by double-spike MC-ICPMS and determination of the isotope ratio pool available for plants from soil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-01

    of the isotope ratio pool available for plants from soil Timto characterize the Zn isotope pool available to plants in athe composition of the Zn pool available to the plants [21,

  20. Proapoptotic Bim regulates antigen-specific NK cell contraction and the generation of the memory NK cell pool after cytomegalovirus infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Min-Oo, G; Bezman, NA; Madera, S; Sun, JC; Lanier, LL; Lanier, LL

    2014-01-01

    responders from the memory pool. PLoS ONE. 8:e67363. http://us for diving into the memory pool? Immunol. Rev. 236:54–67.and Lanier, 2011). A small pool of Ly49H + NK cells persists

  1. "You Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": The Value of Networking and Community Building in California Community Colleges' Reading Apprenticeship Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Deborah Lea

    2014-01-01

    You Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": TheYou Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": Thejump  into  the  icy  pool  of  metacognition. ”  This  

  2. AMINO ACID SYNTHESIS IN PHOTO-SYNTHESIZING SPINACH CELLS. EFFECTS OF AMMONIA ON POOL SIZES AND RATES OF LABELING FROM 14co2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larsen, Peder Olesen

    2013-01-01

    EFFECTS OF AMMONIA ON POOL SIZES AND RATES OF LABELING FROMmetabolically active and passive pools of these amino acids.of added ammonia on ing, pool sizes, and specific activi pro

  3. \\THE POOL OF QUARKS AND GLUONS" The protons and neutrons, which make up nuclei, are not elementary objects but are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    \\THE POOL OF QUARKS AND GLUONS" The protons and neutrons, which make up nuclei, are not elementary in a simpli#12;ed way as a pool with three balls (quarks) of di#11;erent colours. Quarks cannot escape from the proton in the same way as balls are kept inside the pool by the boundaries. The quarks move freely except

  4. Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Los Angeles, University of

    Measurements of Vapor Flow Regimes in Liquid Metal Pools M.H. ANDERSON, M. L. CORRADINI, R. BONAZZA fractions within a pool of low-density liquid metal (NaK) during gas injection inside a horizontal magnetic of this magnetic field should not influence the vapor movement once it is outside the pool it may have

  5. IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING (P12 'POINT') WITH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING (P12 'POINT POWER DISTRIBUTION. Nicholas Souchlas, PBL (1/24/2012) 1 #12;IDS120hm: (m IS FOR) modified Hg pool 'POINT'). >GAUSSIAN PROFILE: x = y = 0.12 cm. 2 #12;3 IDS120hm GEOMETRY = IDS120h WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL

  6. Design report on SCDAP/RELAP5 model improvements - debris bed and molten pool behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allison, C.M.; Rempe, J.L.; Chavez, S.A.

    1994-11-01

    the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3 computer code is designed to describe the overall reactor coolant system thermal-hydraulic response, core damage progression, and in combination with VICTORIA, fission product release and transport during severe accidents. Improvements for existing debris bed and molten pool models in the SCDAP/RELAP5/MOD3.1 code are described in this report. Model improvements to address (a) debris bed formation, heating, and melting; (b) molten pool formation and growth; and (c) molten pool crust failure are discussed. Relevant data, existing models, proposed modeling changes, and the anticipated impact of the changes are discussed. Recommendations for the assessment of improved models are provided.

  7. Benefits of Research in Particle Physics Phil Allport, Barbara Camanzi, Marcus French, ,Nathan Hill, Mark Lancaster, Steve Lloyd, Jason McFall, Val O'Shea, Mike Poole,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Hill, Mark Lancaster, Steve Lloyd, Jason McFall, Val O'Shea, Mike Poole, Tim Short, Stephen Watts ........................................8 2.9. Professor Mike Poole: a Biography

  8. Evaluation of airborne geophysical surveys for large-scale mapping of contaminated mine pools: draft final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geosciences Division, National Energy Technology Laboratory, US Department of Energy, Pittsburgh, PA; Hammack, R.W.

    2006-12-28

    Decades of underground coal mining has left about 5,000 square miles of abandoned mine workings that are rapidly filling with water. The water quality of mine pools is often poor; environmental regulatory agencies are concerned because water from mine pools could contaminate diminishing surface and groundwater supplies. Mine pools are also a threat to the safety of current mining operations. Conversely, mine pools are a large, untapped water resource that, with treatment, could be used for a variety of industrial purposes. Others have proposed using mine pools in conjunction with heat pumps as a source of heating and cooling for large industrial facilities. The management or use of mine pool water requires accurate maps of mine pools. West Virginia University has predicted the likely location and volume of mine pools in the Pittsburgh Coalbed using existing mine maps, structure contour maps, and measured mine pool elevations. Unfortunately, mine maps only reflect conditions at the time of mining, are not available for all mines, and do not always denote the maximum extent of mining. Since 1999, the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) has been evaluating helicopter-borne, electromagnetic sensing technologies for the detection and mapping of mine pools. Frequency domain electromagnetic sensors are able to detect shallow mine pools (depth < 50 m) if there is sufficient contrast between the conductance of the mine pool and the conductance of the overburden. The mine pools (conductors) most confidently detected by this technology are overlain by thick, resistive sandstone layers. In 2003, a helicopter time domain electromagnetic sensor was applied to mined areas in southwestern Virginia in an attempt to increase the depth of mine pool detection. This study failed because the mine pool targets were thin and not very conductive. Also, large areas of the surveys were degraded or made unusable by excessive amounts of cultural electromagnetic noise that obscured the subtle mine pool anomalies. However, post-survey modeling suggested that thicker, more conductive mine pools might be detected at a more suitable location. The current study sought to identify the best time domain electromagnetic sensor for detecting mine pools and to test it in an area where the mine pools are thicker and more conductive that those in southwestern Virginia. After a careful comparison of all airborne time domain electromagnetic sensors (including both helicopter and fixed-wing systems), the SkyTEM system from Denmark was determined to be the best technology for this application. Whereas most airborne time domain electromagnetic systems were developed to find large, deep, highly conductive mineral deposits, the SkyTEM system is designed for groundwater exploration studies, an application similar to mine pool detection.

  9. Fuzzy cognitive mapping as a tool for analysing the sustainability of common-pool resources 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bosma, Charissa

    2014-11-27

    This dissertation consists of two parts. The first paper reviews the existing body of literature on the sustainability of common-pool resources and tries to find a theoretically based answer to the question: How can fuzzy ...

  10. Mechanism of nucleate pool boiling heat transfer to sodium and the criterion for stable boiling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shai, Isaac

    1967-01-01

    A comparison between liquid metals and other common fluids, like water, is made as regards to the various stages of nucleate pool boiling. It is suggested that for liquid metals the stage of building the thermal layer plays ...

  11. Headcut retreat resulting from plunge pool erosion in a 3D landscape evolution model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Flores Cervantes, Javier Homero, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    Headcut retreat produced by plunge pools is represented using existing concepts about this type of erosion. The model estimates retreat rates, given flow, height of the headcut, upstream slope and Manning's roughness, and ...

  12. The public goods game on homogeneous and heterogeneous networks: investment strategy according to the pool size

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zi-Gang Huang; Zhi-Xi Wu; Jian-Yue Guan; An-Cai Wu; Ying-Hai Wang

    2007-08-21

    We propose an extended public goods interaction model to study the evolution of cooperation in heterogeneous population. The investors are arranged on the well known scale-free type network, the Barab\\'{a}si-Albert model. Each investor is supposed to preferentially distribute capital to pools in its portfolio based on the knowledge of pool sizes. The extent that investors prefer larger pools is determined by investment strategy denoted by a tunable parameter $\\alpha$, with larger $\\alpha$ corresponding to more preference to larger pools. As comparison, we also study this interaction model on square lattice, and find that the heterogeneity contacts favors cooperation. Additionally, the influence of local topology to the game dynamics under different $\\alpha$ strategies are discussed. It is found that the system with smaller $\\alpha$ strategy can perform comparatively better than the larger $\\alpha$ ones.

  13. Calculation notes for surface leak resulting in pool, TWRS FSAR accident analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Surface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  14. Calculation Notes for Subsurface Leak Resulting in Pool, TWRS FSAR Accident Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, B.W.

    1996-09-25

    This document includes the calculations performed to quantify the risk associated with the unmitigated and mitigated accident scenarios described in the TWRS FSAR for the accident analysis titled: Subsurface Leaks Resulting in Pool.

  15. CityofSanDiego VVernalernalernalernalVernalVVernalV PPoolPoolP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bohonak, Andrew J.

    aggregated with other vernal pool inventories currently underway by the County of San Diego and Marine Corps is available in alternative formats upon request. Printed on recycled paper. #12;Table of Contents Section Page

  16. Experimental Observation and Measurements of Pool Boiling Heat Transfer using PIV, Shadowgraphy, RICM Techniques 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di, Yuan 1988-

    2012-12-05

    This present study seeks to contribute detailed visualization data on a pool boiling experiments using HFE-7000. Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) was used to measure the time resolved whole field liquid velocity. Bubble dynamic parameters...

  17. Decomposition algorithms for global solution of deterministic and stochastic pooling problems in natural gas value chains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armagan, Emre

    2009-01-01

    In this thesis, a Benders decomposition algorithm is designed and implemented to solve both deterministic and stochastic pooling problems to global optimality. Convergence of the algorithm to a global optimum is proved and ...

  18. Experimental & Numerical Investigation of Pool Boiling on Engineered Surfaces with Integrated Thin-flim Temperature Sensors 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sathyamurthi, Vijaykumar

    2011-02-22

    The objective of this investigation is to measure and analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling. The surface temperature fluctuations were recorded on silicon surfaces with and without multi-walled carbon ...

  19. Did English generators play cournot? : capacity withholding in the electricity pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Green, Richard

    2004-01-01

    Electricity generators can raise the price of power by withholding their plant from the market. We discuss two ways in which this could have affected prices in the England and Wales Pool. Withholding low-cost capacity which ...

  20. Substitution and price elasticity estimates using inter-country pooled data in a translog cost model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, Joyashree; Sanstad, Alan H.; Sathaye, Jayant A.; Khaddaria, Raman

    2006-01-01

    South Korea, and Brazil, and between labor and energy andTrends in Energy Intensive Industries in Brazil, India andPaper Brazil India Korea US Pooled Labor Energy Material

  1. Annual report, FY 1979 Spent fuel and fuel pool component integrity.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Bailey, W.J.; Schreiber, R.E.; Kustas, F.M.

    1980-05-01

    International meetings under the BEFAST program and under INFCE Working Group No. 6 during 1978 and 1979 continue to indicate that no cases of fuel cladding degradation have developed on pool-stored fuel from water reactors. A section from a spent fuel rack stand, exposed for 1.5 y in the Yankee Rowe (PWR) pool had 0.001- to 0.003-in.-deep (25- to 75-..mu..m) intergranular corrosion in weld heat-affected zones but no evidence of stress corrosion cracking. A section of a 304 stainless steel spent fuel storage rack exposed 6.67 y in the Point Beach reactor (PWR) spent fuel pool showed no significant corrosion. A section of 304 stainless steel 8-in.-dia pipe from the Three Mile Island No. 1 (PWR) spent fuel pool heat exchanger plumbing developed a through-wall crack. The crack was intergranular, initiating from the inside surface in a weld heat-affected zone. The zone where the crack occurred was severely sensitized during field welding. The Kraftwerk Union (Erlangen, GFR) disassembled a stainless-steel fuel-handling machine that operated for 12 y in a PWR (boric acid) spent fuel pool. There was no evidence of deterioration, and the fuel-handling machine was reassembled for further use. A spent fuel pool at a Swedish PWR was decontaminated. The procedure is outlined in this report.

  2. NSF/UNOLS Van Pool Electrical Requirements This page describes the electrical requirements for the vans in the West Coast pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    NSF/UNOLS Van Pool Electrical Requirements This page describes the electrical requirements onboard vessels. The van will be delivered with detailed electrical connection procedures which must electrical system. Each van is capable of operation from 208, 240 or 460 (440 to 480) V single-phase systems

  3. Rare earth element geochemistry of acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride geothermal systems from Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, A.J.; Palmer, M.R.; Kemp, A.J. [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom)] [Bristol Univ. (United Kingdom); Sturchio, N.C. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)] [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1997-02-01

    Rare earth element (REE) concentrations have been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS) in acid-sulphate and acid-sulphate-chloride waters and the associated sinters and volcanic rocks from the Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, geothermal system. REE concentrations in the volcanic rocks range from 222 to 347 ppm: their chondrite-normalised REE patterns are typical of upper continental crust, with LREE > HREE and negative Eu anomalies. Total REE concentrations in the fluids range from 3 to 1133 nmol kg{sup -1} ({ge}162 ppm), and {Sigma}REE concentrations in sinter are {ge}181 ppm. REE abundances and patterns in drill core material from YNP indicate some REE mobility. Relative to the host rocks the REE patterns of the fluids are variably depleted in HREEs and LREEs, and usually have a pronounced positive Eu anomaly. This decoupling of Eu from the REE suite suggests that (1) Eu has been preferentially removed either from the host rock glass or from the host rock minerals, or (2) the waters are from a high temperature or reducing environment where Eu{sup 2+} is more soluble than the trivalent REEs. Since the latter is inconsistent with production of acid-sulphate springs in a low temperature, oxidising near-surface environment, we suggest that the positive Eu anomalies in the fluids result from preferential dissolution of a Eu-rich phase in the host rock. Spatial and temporal variations in major element chemistry and pH of the springs sampled from Norris Geyser Basin and Crater Hills accompany variations in REE concentrations and patterns of individual geothermal springs. These are possibly related to changes in subsurface plumbing, which results in variations in mixing and dilution of the geothermal fluids and may have lead to changes in the extent and nature of REE complexing. 37 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. Method for determining molten metal pool level in twin-belt continuous casting machines

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaiser, Timothy D. (Colchester, VT); Daniel, Sabah S. (Pittsburgh, PA); Dykes, Charles D. (Milton, VT)

    1989-03-21

    A method for determining level of molten metal in the input of a continuous metal casting machine having at least one endless, flexible, revolving casting belt with a surface which engages the molten metal to be cast and a reverse, cooled surface along which is directed high velocity liquid coolant includes the steps of predetermining the desired range of positions of the molten metal pool and positioning at least seven heat-sensing transducers in bearing contact with the moving reverse belt surface and spaced in upstream-downstream relationship relative to belt travel spanning the desired pool levels. A predetermined temperature threshold is set, somewhat above coolant temperature and the output signals of the transducer sensors are scanned regarding their output signals indicative of temperatures of the moving reverse belt surface. Position of the molten pool is determined using temperature interpolation between any successive pair of upstream-downstream spaced sensors, which follows confirmation that two succeeding downstream sensors are at temperature levels exceeding threshold temperature. The method accordingly provides high resolution for determining pool position, and verifies the determined position by utilizing full-strength signals from two succeeding downstream sensors. In addition, dual sensors are used at each position spanning the desired range of molten metal pool levels to provide redundancy, wherein only the higher temperature of each pair of sensors at a station is utilized.

  5. ON THE INSTABILITY OF TROPICAL WESTERN PACIFIC WARM POOL DURING THE BOREAL WINTER AND SPRING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BARR-KUMARAKULASINGHE,S.A.

    1998-03-23

    A source of instability in the western Pacific warm pool is shown to be due to sea surface elevation variations caused by changes in the zonal sea-surface temperature (SST) gradient and the changes in the Pacific Ocean basin length in relation to the warm pool latitudinal location. The variation of the sea-surface elevation is measured by using the thermocline depth response calculated from a two-layer ocean. The warm pool is shown to be barely at equilibrium during the boreal late winter and early spring by comparing the measured thermocline at 110{degree}W, 0{degree}E with the calculated thermocline depth. Based on this analysis, a failure or reversal of the climatological zonal winds are apparently not a necessary precursor for the instability of the warm pool and initiation of a warm event. A warm event can be initiated by an increase in the size of the warm pool and/or an increase in zonal SST differences during the boreal/winter spring. This mechanism could be an alternate mechanism for El-Nino Southern Oscillation (ENSO) dynamics to that postulated by Bjeknes (1969).

  6. Well-characterized open pool experiment data and analysis for model validation and development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sundberg, David W.; Brown, Alexander L.; Blanchat, Thomas K.

    2006-12-01

    Four Well-Characterized Open Pool fires were conducted by Fire Science and Technology Department. The focus of the Well-Characterized Open Pool fire series was to provide environmental information for open pool fires on a physics first principal basis. The experiments measured the burning rate of liquid fuel in an open pool and the resultant heat flux to a weapon-sized object and the surrounding environment with well-characterized boundary and initial conditions. Results presented in this report include a general description of test observation (pre- and post-test), wind measurements, fire plume topology, average fuel recession and heat release rates, and incident heat flux to the pool and to the calorimeters. As expected, results of the experiments show a strong correlation between wind conditions, fuel vaporization (mass loss) rate, and incident heat flux to the fuel and ground surface and calorimeters. Numerical fire simulations using both temporally- and spatially-dependant wind boundary conditions were performed using the Vulcan fire code. Comparisons of data to simulation predictions showed similar trends; however, simulation-predicted incident heat fluxes were lower than measured.

  7. Development of INSPCT-S for inspection of spent fuel pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W.; Haghighat, A. [Nuclear Engineering Program, Mechanical Engineering Dept., Virginia Tech., Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Sitaraman, S.; Ham, Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, CA 94550 (United States)

    2011-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss an accurate and fast software tool (INSPCT-S, Inspection of Nuclear Spent fuel-Pool Calculation Tool, version Spreadsheet) developed for calculation of the response of fission chambers placed in a spent fuel pool, such as Atucha-I. INSPCT-S is developed for identification of suspicious regions of the pool that may have missing or substitute assemblies. INSPCT-S uses a hybrid algorithm based on the adjoint function methodology. The neutron source is comprised of spontaneous fission, ({alpha}, n) interactions, and subcritical multiplication. The former is evaluated using the ORIGEN-ARP code, and the latter is obtained with the fission matrix (FM) formulation. The FM coefficients are determined using the MCNP Monte Carlo code, and the importance function is determined using the PENTRAN 3-D parallel Sn code. Three databases for the neutron source, FM elements, and adjoint flux are prepared as functions of different parameters including burnup, cooling time, enrichment, and pool lattice size. INSPCT-S uses the aforementioned databases and systems of equations to calculate detector responses, which are subsequently compared with normalized experimental data. If this comparison is not satisfied, INSPCT-S utilizes color coding to identify the suspicious regions of a spent fuel pool. (authors)

  8. IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING (P12 'POINT')

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING (P12 'POINT (12/27/2011) 1 #12;IDS120hm: (m IS FOR) modified Hg pool vessel IN IDS120h. # 5E5 SIMULATIONS AND SHIFTED Be WIDOW FROM 600 cm (0.6 cm THICK) TO 300 cm (1 cm THICK). MODIFIED Hg POOL EXTENTS FROM 86 cm

  9. Analysis of pooling, equity capital and current assets of large producer marketing cooperatives with implications for export marketing 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tough, Cynthia H

    1985-01-01

    users. This study quantitatively analyzes the effect of cooperative pools on equity capital and total current assets of large cooperatives. Information on the potential long-term financial effect of pooling could aid cooperative managers and markers...ANALYSIS OF POOLING, EQUITY CAPITAL AND CURRENT ASSETS OF LARGE PRODUCER MARKETING COOPERATIVES WITH IMPLICATIONS FOR EXPORT MARKETING A Thesis by CYNTHIA HEATHER TOUGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial...

  10. Effect of power oscillations on suppression pool heating during ATWS (Anticipated Transients Without Scram) conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Mallen, A.N.

    1990-01-01

    Nine selected Anticipated Transients Without Scram (ATWS) have been simulated on the BNL Engineering Plant Analyzer (EPA), to determine how power and flow oscillations, similar to those that did or could have occurred at the LaSalle-2 boiling Water Reactor (BWR), could affect the rate of Pressure Suppression Pool heating. It has been determined that the pool can reach its temperature limit of 80{degree}C in 4.3 min. after Turbine Trip without Bypass, if the feedwater pumps are not tripped. The pool will not reach its limit, if Boron is injected, even when oscillations are encountered. Simultaneous turbine and recirculation pump trips, introduced under stable conditions, can lead to instability. 2 refs., 17 figs., 9 tabs.

  11. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N. A. , D. E. Parker, E.Temperature data set (HadISST) [Rayner et al. , 2003], which

  12. An efficient modeling method for thermal stratification simulation in a BWR suppression pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang; Hua Li; Walter Villanueva; Pavel Kudinov

    2012-09-01

    The suppression pool in a BWR plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as LOCA and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; and the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (Available Net Positive Suction Head) and therefore the performance of the pump which draws cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use 0-D lumped parameter methods to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool and therefore have large uncertainty in prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze realistic 3D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, therefore long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by 1-D transient partial differential equations and substructures such as free or wall jets are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to 3-D CFD modeling. The POOLEX experiments at Finland, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, are used for validation. GOTHIC lumped parameter models are used to obtain boundary conditions for BMIX++ code and CFD simulations. Comparison between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data is discussed in detail.

  13. Simulation of Thermal Stratification in BWR Suppression Pools with One Dimensional Modeling Method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Ling Zou; Hongbin Zhang

    2014-01-01

    The suppression pool in a boiling water reactor (BWR) plant not only is the major heat sink within the containment system, but also provides the major emergency cooling water for the reactor core. In several accident scenarios, such as a loss-of-coolant accident and extended station blackout, thermal stratification tends to form in the pool after the initial rapid venting stage. Accurately predicting the pool stratification phenomenon is important because it affects the peak containment pressure; the pool temperature distribution also affects the NPSHa (available net positive suction head) and therefore the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling System and Reactor Core Isolation Cooling System pumps that draw cooling water back to the core. Current safety analysis codes use zero dimensional (0-D) lumped parameter models to calculate the energy and mass balance in the pool; therefore, they have large uncertainties in the prediction of scenarios in which stratification and mixing are important. While three-dimensional (3-D) computational fluid dynamics (CFD) methods can be used to analyze realistic 3-D configurations, these methods normally require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, resulting in a long simulation time. For mixing in stably stratified large enclosures, the BMIX++ code (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) has been developed to implement a highly efficient analysis method for stratification where the ambient fluid volume is represented by one-dimensional (1-D) transient partial differential equations and substructures (such as free or wall jets) are modeled with 1-D integral models. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to multi-dimensional CFD modeling. One heat-up experiment performed at the Finland POOLEX facility, which was designed to study phenomena relevant to Nordic design BWR suppression pool including thermal stratification and mixing, is used for validation. Comparisons between the BMIX++, GOTHIC, and CFD calculations against the POOLEX experimental data are discussed in detail.

  14. Estimating Litter Decomposition Rate in Single-Pool Models Using Nonlinear Beta Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    Estimating Litter Decomposition Rate in Single-Pool Models Using Nonlinear Beta Regression Etienne the performance of nonlinear regression using the beta distribution, which is well-suited to bounded data and this type of heteroscedasticity, to standard nonlinear regression (normal errors) on simulated and real

  15. Comparison Between TRNSYS Software Simulation and F-Chart Program on Pool Heating System 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haberl, J. S.; Baltazar, J. C.; Mao, C.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to test the accuracy of TRNSYS simulation of Solar Pool Heating System by comparing with F-Chart program which is an authoritative tool to analyze solar system and was developed in 1970s. This report is organized...

  16. Modeling and Analysis of Thread-Pools ? in an Industrial Communication Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yi, Wang

    the use of the Credo tool suite in order to capture the various aspects of thread pools and provide a general framework for their analysis. The Credo tool suite offers a methodology for the top-down design by the EU-project IST-33826 Credo: Modeling and analysis of evolutionary structures for distributed services

  17. Resource Pooling in Network Virtualization and Heterogeneous Scenarios using Stochastic Petri Nets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanikomeroglu, Halim

    Resource Pooling in Network Virtualization and Heterogeneous Scenarios using Stochastic Petri Nets University, Canada {rs,halim}@sce.carleton.ca Abstract--Wireless cellular networks are undergoing severe by the network. While operators traditionally over-provisioned their own separate network capacity in order

  18. Preventing Disability Among Working Participants in Kansas’ High-risk Insurance Pool: Implications for Health Reform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.; Welch, Greg W.

    2011-01-01

    Health conditions that prevent individuals from working full time can restrict their access to health insurance. For people living in the 35 states that offer high-risk pools, coverage is available but premiums are 125–200% of standard rates...

  19. Mechanisms for the Interannual Variability of SST in the East Pacific Warm Pool KRISTOPHER B. KARNAUSKAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karnauskas, Kristopher

    with the western and equatorial Pacific Ocean, relatively little is known about the east Pacific warm pool (EPWP model (OGCM) of the tropical Pacific Ocean and various atmospheric and oceanic observations are used correlation between SST in the EPWP and eastern equatorial Pacific is therefore explained not by ocean

  20. In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel) FY 2013 - 2014 July 1, 2013 - June 30, 2014 Enterprise must be used for all in-state vehicle rentals. Corporate Discount # Website Reservations Phone # Base Rental Charges Rental Location Surcharges Vehicle

  1. In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel) FY 2011 - 2012 July 1, 2011 - June 30, 2012 Enterprise must be used for all in-state vehicle rentals. Corporate Discount # Website Reservations Phone # Base Rental Charges Rental Location Surcharges Vehicle

  2. In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel) FY 2010 - 2011 July 1, 2010 - June 30, 2011 Enterprise should be used for all in-state vehicle rentals. General Vehicle Rental Notes: Corporate Discount # · A valid driver's license and a major credit card (La

  3. In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harms, Kyle E.

    In-State Contract Vehicle Rental Rates (State Motor Pool Rental Contract for Business Travel) FY 2012 - 2013 July 1, 2012 - June 30, 2013 Enterprise must be used for all in-state vehicle rentals. Corporate Discount # Website Reservations Phone # Base Rental Charges Rental Location Surcharges Vehicle

  4. ETSU Office of Human Resources Checklist for Advertising, Certifying Applicant Pools, Interviewing, & Hiring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karsai, Istvan

    ETSU Office of Human Resources Checklist for Advertising, Certifying Applicant Pools, Interviewing the position before advertisement. PPP-32, Compensation Plan (http://www.etsu.edu/humanres/relations/PPP-32 the need to Pre-audit the position before advertisement. See HR on-line training, ETSU's Compensation Plan

  5. Impact of the Atlantic warm pool on United States landfalling hurricanes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Chunzai

    Impact of the Atlantic warm pool on United States landfalling hurricanes Chunzai Wang,1 Hailong Liu September 2011; published 7 October 2011. [1] The 2010 Atlantic hurricane season was extremely active, but no hurricanes made landfall in the United States, raising a question of what dictated the hurricane track. Here

  6. Security Automation Considered Harmful? W. Keith Edwards Erika Shehan Poole Jennifer Stoll

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Keith

    Security Automation Considered Harmful? W. Keith Edwards Erika Shehan Poole Jennifer Stoll School activity is focused on automated approaches to security. With these approaches, security decisions automation is potentially beneficial in theory, in practice it is not a panacea for end-user information

  7. Prediction of sediment transport in step-pool channels E. M. Yager,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirchner, James W.

    Prediction of sediment transport in step-pool channels E. M. Yager,1 W. E. Dietrich,2 J. W 2011; published 27 January 2012. [1] In mountainous drainage networks, sediment mobilized on hillslopes sediment transport equations overpredict sediment flux in steep streams by several orders of magnitude

  8. Optimal Power Market Participation of Plug-In Electric Vehicles Pooled by Distribution Feeder

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Caramanis, Michael

    Optimal Power Market Participation of Plug-In Electric Vehicles Pooled by Distribution Feeder : Power system markets, Power system economics Key Words: Load management, Electric vehicle grid Transactions on Power Systems #12;WORKING PAPER 1 Optimal Power Market Participation of Plug-In Electric

  9. Measuring the Potential to Adopt Self Governance for the Management of a Common Pool Resource 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Castillo, Sergio

    2012-02-14

    : overexploitation and low profit levels. Although there is a large amount of research devoted to investigate the common pool resources and self governance, there are two areas that represent a gap in the current research. One, what are the main variables related...

  10. Enhancement of pool boiling heat transfer with electrohydrodynamics and its fundamental study 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raghupathi, Sri Laxmi Priya

    1998-01-01

    The enhancement of heat transfer in the realm of pool boiling refrigerants, using the concepts of electrohydrodynamics(EHD), has been actively researched in the past decade. This research aims at studying the effect of EHD on new refrigerants (R-123...

  11. Efficiency evaluation for pooling resources in health care Peter T. Vanberkel1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boucherie, Richard J.

    Efficiency evaluation for pooling resources in health care Peter T. Vanberkel1 , Richard J has been challenged by the idea that higher quality of care and efficiency in service delivery can and patient group characteristics to determine the conditions where a centralized model is more efficient

  12. Low-salinity pools at Barbados, West Indies: Their origin, frequency, and variability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Low-salinity pools at Barbados, West Indies: Their origin, frequency, and variability Peter S-temperature recorders moored off the west coast of Barbados, West Indies, from May 1996 to November 1997 revealed radium 228/226 activity ratios of ~1, consistent with previous measurements in Barbados of water

  13. Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Drop impact into a deep pool: vortex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deegan, Robert

    Under consideration for publication in J. Fluid Mech. 1 Drop impact into a deep pool: vortex of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109, USA 2 Division of Physical Sciences and Engineering & Clean Combustion Arabia 3 Physics of Fluids Group, Faculty of Science and Technology, Mesa+ Institute, University

  14. On Trade-Wind Cumulus Cold Pools Paquita Zuidema & Zhujun Li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zuidema, Paquita

    On Trade-Wind Cumulus Cold Pools Paquita Zuidema & Zhujun Li Reg Hill, Ludovic Bariteau, Bob - but precipitation ~ mm/day not mm/hr and no wind shear stratocumulus `squall-line' Jensen et al. 2008 tropical deep rainrate `undisturbed' `disturbed' sensible/latent Tuesday, December 6, 2011 #12;`gust' winds faster than

  15. A deeper respired carbon pool in the glacial equatorial Pacific Ocean L.I. Bradtmiller a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sachs, Julian P.

    A deeper respired carbon pool in the glacial equatorial Pacific Ocean L.I. Bradtmiller a, , R in paleoceanography. We present evidence from ten equatorial Pacific Ocean sediment cores to show that the deep Pacific Ocean likely stored more carbon during the last glacial period than the Holocene

  16. INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF HEATING METHOD ON POOL BOILING HEAT TRANSFER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kandlikar, Satish

    INVESTIGATING THE EFFECT OF HEATING METHOD ON POOL BOILING HEAT TRANSFER Satish G. Kandlikar surfaces in laboratories to obtain the heat transfer coefficient data. In many process applications however, a fluid stream is employed as the heating medium. The heat transfer data generated with the electrically

  17. Numerical study of high heat ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maruyama, Shigeo

    Numerical study of high heat ¯ux pool boiling heat transfer Ying He a,*, Masahiro Shoji b , Shigeo simulation model of boiling heat transfer is proposed based on a numerical macrolayer model [S. Maruyama, M. Shoji, S. Shimizu, A numerical simulation of transition boiling heat transfer, in: Proceedings

  18. Groundwater is not a Common-Pool resource: Ordering sustainability issues of groundwater use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Groundwater is not a Common-Pool resource: Ordering sustainability issues of groundwater use linked to groundwater use. First, it shows that the debate on the traditional indicator to assess and ecological impacts happen before stock impacts that reduce availability of groundwater for current and future

  19. Original Research Article Early Reproductive Maturity Among Pume Foragers: Implications of a Pooled

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kramer, Karen L.

    of a Pooled Energy Model to Fast Life Histories KAREN L. KRAMER,1* RUSSELL D. GREAVES,2 AND PETER T. ELLISON1 regimes. This relationship, however, poses an unanswered question about energy allocation. In epidemiologically stressful envi- ronments, a greater proportion of energy is allocated to immune function

  20. APPLIED AND ENVIRONMENTAL MICROBIOLOGY, Feb. 2004, p. 845849 Vol. 70, No. 2 0099-2240/04/$08.00 0 DOI: 10.1128/AEM.70.2.845849.2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelley, Scott

    molecular surveys is the division OP11, first encountered in the Yellowstone hot spring Obsid- ian Pool (11. Am. Soc. Micro- biology, abstr. N-23, 1997) geothermal pools (12; Hugenholtz et al., 97th Gen. Meet

  1. Nanoscale modification of key surface parameters to augment pool boiling heat transfer and critical heat flux in water and dielectric fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Eric Christopher

    2009-01-01

    Surface effects on pool boiling heat transfer and the critical heat flux are well documented but poorly understood. This study investigates the pool boiling characteristics of various fluids, and demonstrates that surface ...

  2. ISSUANCE 2014-12-23: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Final Rule

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters, Final Rule

  3. ISSUANCE 2015-10-07: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings Regarding The Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Open Meetings Regarding The Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group

  4. New constraints on methane fluxes and rates of anaerobic methane oxidation in a Gulf of Mexico brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Girguis, Peter R.

    brine pool via in situ mass spectrometry Scott D. Wankel a , Samantha B. Joye b , Vladimir A. Samarkin b

  5. To: UniPark, M411 A parking/car pooling permit payroll authority may be cancelled for the following reasons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobar, Michael

    To: UniPark, M411 A parking/car pooling permit payroll authority may be cancelled for the following. the employee's circumstances have changed and a parking/car pooling permit is no longer required. Unless there are extenuating circumstances, an employee who has cancelled his/her parking/car pooling permit for reason 2. or 3

  6. Distinction between the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models of electric-field-stimulated carrier emission from deep levels in semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganichev, Sergey

    Distinction between the Poole-Frenkel and tunneling models of electric-field-stimulated carrier of the defects. However, only a limited number of defects can be satisfac- torily described by the Poole-Frenkel theory. An electric field dependence different from that expected from the Poole-Frenkel theory has been

  7. Experimental investigation of sedimentation of LOCA - generated fibrous debris and sludge in BWR suppression pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Souto, F.J.; Rao, D.V.

    1995-12-01

    Several tests were conducted in a 1:2.4 scale model of a Mark I suppression pool to investigate the behavior of fibrous insulation and sludge debris under LOCA conditions. NUKON{trademark} shreds, manually cut and tore up in a leaf shredder, and iron oxide particles were used to simulate fibrous and sludge debris, respectively. The suppression pool model included four downcomers fitted with pistons to simulate the steam-water oscillations during chugging expected during a LOCA. The study was conducted to provide debris settling velocity data for the models used in the BLOCKAGE computer code, developed to estimate the ECCS pump head loss due to clogging of the strainers with LOCA generated debris. The tests showed that the debris, both fibrous and particulate, remains fully mixed during chugging; they also showed that, during chugging, the fibrous debris underwent fragmentation into smaller sizes, including individual fibers. Measured concentrations showed that fibrous debris settled slower than the sludge, and that the settling behavior of each material is independent of the presence of the other material. Finally, these tests showed that the assumption of considering uniform debris concentration during strainer calculations is reasonable. The tests did not consider the effects of the operation of the ECCS on the transport of debris in the suppression pool.

  8. Fission matrix-based Monte Carlo criticality analysis of fuel storage pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farlotti, M.; Larsen, E. W.

    2013-07-01

    Standard Monte Carlo transport procedures experience difficulties in solving criticality problems in fuel storage pools. Because of the strong neutron absorption between fuel assemblies, source convergence can be very slow, leading to incorrect estimates of the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction. This study examines an alternative fission matrix-based Monte Carlo transport method that takes advantage of the geometry of a storage pool to overcome this difficulty. The method uses Monte Carlo transport to build (essentially) a fission matrix, which is then used to calculate the criticality and the critical flux. This method was tested using a test code on a simple problem containing 8 assemblies in a square pool. The standard Monte Carlo method gave the expected eigenfunction in 5 cases out of 10, while the fission matrix method gave the expected eigenfunction in all 10 cases. In addition, the fission matrix method provides an estimate of the error in the eigenvalue and the eigenfunction, and it allows the user to control this error by running an adequate number of cycles. Because of these advantages, the fission matrix method yields a higher confidence in the results than standard Monte Carlo. We also discuss potential improvements of the method, including the potential for variance reduction techniques. (authors)

  9. Heat removal characteristics of volume heated boiling pools with inclined boundaries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greene, G.A.; Jones, O.C. Jr.; Schwarz, C.E.; Abuaf, N.

    1980-04-01

    The state-of-the-art of heat transfer from boiling liquids having internal heat generation is reviewed. Considerable scatter is found in the existing data. Attempts to correlate these data have relied on both natural and forced convection concepts. This report describes a new series of experiments wherein the data scatter appears to have been improved by a factor of four to six from previous experiments when compared on the basis of standard deviation in correlation coefficients. Local heat transfer data to both vertical and inclined surfaces (up to 30/sup 0/ from vertical) are reported having maximum to minimum heat transfer ratios of up to 5:1. It is shown that with surface vapor fluxes up to twice the free bubble rise velocities given by Harmathy there are two distinct flow regimes: bubbly and churn-turbulent. In bubble flows, the pool is generally quiescent and surface temperature fluctuations negligible. In churn-turbulent flows, the pool is generally chaotic and three dimensional. The surface temperatures showed large fluctuations up to the maximum pool-to-wall difference indicating intermittent destruction and renewal of boundary layer. Heat transfer coefficients were more uniform, and the maximum was observed to be in the range .25-.30 cal/cm/sup 2/ s /sup 0/C. 26 refs., 18 figs., 9 tabs.

  10. VOLCANOLOGY The Yellowstone magmatic system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsai, Victor C.

    , University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112, USA. 2 Seismological Laboratory, California Institute the tectonic division of the Eastern Snake River Plain (ESRP). Yellow and thin dotted lines are the border area (red box) and the major tectonic boundaries (green lines) in the western United States. onMay17

  11. Yellowstone National Park folio, Wyoming 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hague, Arnold, 1840-1917.

    1896-01-01

    exposures in Lozier Canyon, Texas. Two conflicting hypotheses were proposed: 1) Sedimentary structures in Facies A are hummocky cross-stratification (HCS) and swaley cross-stratification (SCS), which indicates a shelfal depositional environment above...

  12. Yellowstone Capital | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan) Jump to: Name:XinjiangPupingYanyuanValley ElecCapital

  13. Health Care Behaviors and Decision-Making Processes Among Enrollees In A State High Risk Insurance Pool: Focus Group Findings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Carroll, Shawna L.; Moore, Janice M.

    2010-05-01

    Purpose-To better understand the relationship between health insurance coverage and health care behaviors of persons with potentially disabling conditions enrolled in a state high risk insurance pool. Approach or Design-Six ...

  14. A review of "Radical Religion from Shakespeare to Milton: Figures of Nonconformity in Early Modern England." by Kristen Poole 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elizabeth Sauer

    2002-01-01

    Poole. Radical Religion from Shakespeare to Milton: Figures of Nonconformity in Early Modern England. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000. xiii + 272 pp. $59.95. Review by ELIZABETH SAUER, BROCK UNIVERSITY. While early modern radical...

  15. Experimental investigation of the thermal-hydraulics of gas jet expansion In a two-dimensional liquid pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rothrock, Ray Alan

    1978-01-01

    Gas jet blowdown in a two-dimensional liquid pool has been experimentally investigated. Two sets of experiments were performed: a set of hydrodynamic experiments, where a non-condensible gas is injected into a subcooled ...

  16. A study of lightning activity over the warm pool western Pacific Ocean (TOGA-COARE region) for 1993 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rios, Luis Alberto

    1995-01-01

    The warm pool western Pacific Ocean is an area of the equatorial tropics characterized by strong and frequent convection, and vigorous lightning activity. However, it has been noted by various researchers that the vast oceanic expanses experience...

  17. The distinct behaviors of Pacific and Indian Ocean warm pool properties on seasonal and interannual time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Seon Tae; Yu, Jin-Yi; Lu, Mong-Ming

    2012-01-01

    the tropical Indian and Pacific Ocean regions, Mon. WeatherIndian Ocean and in the Pacific Ocean, J. Ocean Univ. China,KIM ET AL. : PACIFIC AND INDIAN OCEAN WARM POOL Rayner, N.

  18. One-Dimensional Analysis of Thermal Stratification in AHTR and SFR Coolant Pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Per F. Peterson

    2007-10-01

    Thermal stratification phenomena are very common in pool type reactor systems, such as the liquid-salt cooled Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR) and liquid-metal cooled fast reactor systems such as the Sodium Fast Reactor (SFR). It is important to accurately predict the temperature and density distributions both for design optimation and accident analysis. Current major reactor system analysis codes such as RELAP5 (for LWR’s, and recently extended to analyze high temperature reactors), TRAC (for LWR’s), and SASSYS (for liquid metal fast reactors) only provide lumped-volume based models which can only give very approximate results and can only handle simple cases with one mixing source. While 2-D or 3-D CFD methods can be used to analyze simple configurations, these methods require very fine grid resolution to resolve thin substructures such as jets and wall boundaries, yet such fine grid resolution is difficult or impossible to provide for studying the reactor response to transients due to computational expense. Therefore, new methods are needed to support design optimization and safety analysis of Generation IV pool type reactor systems. Previous scaling has shown that stratified mixing processes in large stably stratified enclosures can be described using one-dimensional differential equations, with the vertical transport by free and wall jets modeled using standard integral techniques. This allows very large reductions in computational effort compared to three-dimensional numerical modeling of turbulent mixing in large enclosures. The BMIX++ (Berkeley mechanistic MIXing code in C++) code was originally developed at UC Berkeley to implement such ideas. This code solves mixing and heat transfer problems in stably stratified enclosures. The code uses a Lagrangian approach to solve 1-D transient governing equations for the ambient fluid and uses analytical or 1-D integral models to compute substructures. By including liquid salt properties, BMIX++ code is extended to analyze liquid salt pool systems in the current AHTR design, to provide an example of its application. Similar analysis is possible for liquid-metal cooled reactors. The current AHTR baseline design uses a large buffer salt tank to provide more thermal inertial and safety margin. Reactor vessel, intermediate heat exchangers, pool reactor auxiliary cooling system heat exchangers (PHX), and direct reactor auxiliary cooling system heat exchangers (DHX) are all immerged in the buffer salt pool. These structures provide major driving sources for vertical mixing and thermal stratification. Predication of the temperature distribution within the buffer salt tank directly affects the major safety systems design, such as the PHX and DHX, safety analysis results, and structure thermal stresses analysis. The BMIX++ code is used to predict mixing and thermal stratification in this pool system. This example shows the potential of 1-D analysis methods and BMIX++ to be included in system analysis codes for pool type of Gen-IV reactor systems.

  19. Scaling up the 454 Titanium Library Construction and Pooling of Barcoded Libraries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phung, Wilson; Hack, Christopher; Shapiro, Harris; Lucas, Susan; Cheng, Jan-Fang

    2009-03-23

    We have been developing a high throughput 454 library construction process at the Joint Genome Institute to meet the needs of de novo sequencing a large number of microbial and eukaryote genomes, EST, and metagenome projects. We have been focusing efforts in three areas: (1) modifying the current process to allow the construction of 454 standard libraries on a 96-well format; (2) developing a robotic platform to perform the 454 library construction; and (3) designing molecular barcodes to allow pooling and sorting of many different samples. In the development of a high throughput process to scale up the number of libraries by adapting the process to a 96-well plate format, the key process change involves the replacement of gel electrophoresis for size selection with Solid Phase Reversible Immobilization (SPRI) beads. Although the standard deviation of the insert sizes increases, the overall quality sequence and distribution of the reads in the genome has not changed. The manual process of constructing 454 shotgun libraries on 96-well plates is a time-consuming, labor-intensive, and ergonomically hazardous process; we have been experimenting to program a BioMek robot to perform the library construction. This will not only enable library construction to be completed in a single day, but will also minimize any ergonomic risk. In addition, we have implemented a set of molecular barcodes (AKA Multiple Identifiers or MID) and a pooling process that allows us to sequence many targets simultaneously. Here we will present the testing of pooling a set of selected fosmids derived from the endomycorrhizal fungus Glomus intraradices. By combining the robotic library construction process and the use of molecular barcodes, it is now possible to sequence hundreds of fosmids that represent a minimal tiling path of this genome. Here we present the progress and the challenges of developing these scaled-up processes.

  20. Sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver on-sun test results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andraka, C E; Moreno, J B; Diver, R B; Moss, T A

    1992-06-01

    The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of a 75-kW{sub t} sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW{sub t} parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver thermal efficiency was about 90% when operated at full power and 800{degree}C. Stable sodium boiling was promoted by the addition of 35 equally spaced artificial cavities in the wetted absorber surface. High incipient boiling superheats following cloud transients were suppressed passively by the addition of small amounts of xenon gas to the receiver volume. Stable boiling without excessive incipient boiling superheats was observed under all operating conditions. The receiver developed a leak during performance evaluation, terminating the testing after accumulating about 50 hours on sun. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, infrared thermography, x-ray studies of the boiling behavior, and a postmortem analysis.

  1. The Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe NeedlesInformation Spa Pool & Spa

  2. Do surfaces with mixed hydrophilic and hydrophobic areas enhance pool boiling?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Betz, Amy; Qiu, Huihe; Attinger, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate that smooth and flat surfaces combining hydrophilic and hydrophobic patterns improve pool boiling performance. Compared to a hydrophilic surface with 7^\\circ wetting angle, the measured critical heat flux and heat transfer coefficients of the enhanced surfaces are up to respectively 65 and 100% higher. Different networks combining hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions are characterized. While all tested networks enhance the heat transfer coefficient, large enhancements of critical heat flux are typically found for hydrophilic networks featuring hydrophobic islands. Hydrophilic networks indeed are shown to prevent the formation of an insulating vapor layer.

  3. Identification of pool boiling heat transfer mechanisms in FC-72 using a single-photo method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ammerman, C.N.; You, S.M.; Hong, Y.S. [Univ. of Texas, Arlington, TX (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

    1995-10-01

    A unique method to determine the vapor flow rate above a boiling cylinder utilizing a single photograph is developed and discussed. This method is applied to a 75-{micro}m wire immersed in a saturated, highly wetting liquid (FC-72) to determine bubble departure diameter, frequency, and nucleation site density. Using the experimental results, an analysis is performed to evaluate individual heat flux contributions of the four pool boiling mechanisms: latent heat, natural convection, Marangoni flow, and micro-convection. Latent heat is identified as the dominant mechanism throughout most of the nucleate boiling regime.

  4. Supplementary neutron-flux calculations for the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maudlin, P.J.; Maerker, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    A three-dimensional Monte Carlo calculation using the MORSE code was performed to validate a procedure previously adopted in the ORNL discrete ordinate analysis of measurements made in the ORNL Pool Critical Assembly Pressure Vessel Facility. The results of these flux calculations agree, within statistical undertainties of about 5%, with those obtained from a discrete ordinate analysis employing the same procedure. This study therefore concludes that the procedure for combining several one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinate calculations into a three-dimensional flux is sufficiently accurate that it does not account for the existing discrepancies observed between calculations and measurements in this facility.

  5. Analysis of closed-pool boilup using the TRANSIT-HYDRO code. [LMFBR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Graff, D.L.

    1983-01-04

    The benign termination of the transition phase of a hypothetical LMFBR accident rests on the avoidance of highly energetic recriticalities prior to escape of bottled molten core materials from the active core region. In scenarios where molten fuel is trapped due to axial blockages, the maintenance of subcritical configurations until radial flow paths develop requires stable boil-up of the molten fuel/steel mixture. This paper describes the analysis of an experiment investigating the behavior of closed boiling pools using the two-fluid hydrodynamics module of TRANSIT-HYDRO, a deterministic transition-phase analysis code.

  6. The use of the probability distribution function to analyze surface temperature fluctuations in pool boiling 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tu, Chau Qui

    1976-01-01

    par t of his t ime and labor to assist in the welding of thermocoupl-. junctions to the copper disk. And to all of those directly connected and to many others who helped by givino words of suggestion, there will always remain a debt o.... DEDICATION. AC (QU OWL EDGI"IENT S. TABLE OF CONTENTS. L1ST OF TABLES. LIST OF F IGUR ES. vi vii 1x CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION. CHAPTER II MECHANISMS OF NUCLEATE POOL BOILING. . . . . Bubble agitation model. Vapor-liquid exchange model. 3. M...

  7. Fountain of Youth Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistar LLC Jump to:Energy Information Spa Pool

  8. Darrough Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstruments Inc JumpIowa: EnergyDark River,Energy Information Pool

  9. Miracle Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005Minnehaha County,Energy Information Pool & Spa

  10. Mystic Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver,Minnesota:Energy Information Pool & Spa Low

  11. Boulder Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformationBio-GasIllinois:EnergyIdahoTechnologyEnergy Information Pool

  12. Bronze Boot Spa Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine: EnergyEnergy Information Bronze Boot Spa Pool & Spa Low

  13. Circle Hot Springs Pool & Spa Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIRChurch Point, Louisiana: EnergyEnergy Information Pool &

  14. Pool scrubbing under jet injection regime: An enhancement of the SPARC90 code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herranz, L. E. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, Div. of Nuclear Fission, CIEMAT, Avda.Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Berna, C.; Escriva, A.; Munoz-Cobo, J. L. [Instituto de Ingenieria Energetica, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia UPV, Camino de Vera 14, 46022 Valencia (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    The SPARC90 code was developed to calculate the aerosol pool trapping during vent discharge processes, at low gas velocities. However, there are accident sequences, like SGTR core meltdown sequences, at which particle laden gases reach the aqueous ponds at very high velocities and new particle removal mechanisms become effective right at the inlet. As a result of the shearing off of roll wave water crests, water droplets are entrained in the gas core and sweep out aerosol particles, mainly by inertial impaction and interception. This paper summarizes the update of the SPARC90 code based on state-of-the-art equations for jet hydrodynamics and aerosol removal. Equations for variables like droplets population, size and velocity have been implemented. Based on the anticipated conditions in case of an SGTR severe accident sequence, comparisons of estimates from this new version (SPAR90-Jet) and the original one are set in terms of decontamination factor. Even though further work is still ahead, this work highlights how substantial particle retention at the pool inlet can reach under jet regime and how different aerosol removal mechanisms are with respect to the globule injection regime. (authors)

  15. A Bayesian approach to compatibility, improvement, and pooling of quantum states

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Leifer; R. W. Spekkens

    2011-10-05

    In approaches to quantum theory in which the quantum state is regarded as a representation of knowledge, information, or belief, two agents can assign different states to the same quantum system. This raises two questions: when are such state assignments compatible? and how should the state assignments of different agents be reconciled? In this paper, we address these questions from the perspective of the recently developed conditional states formalism for quantum theory [arXiv:1107.5849]. Specifically, we derive a compatibility criterion proposed by Brun, Finkelstein and Mermin from the requirement that, upon acquiring data, agents should update their states using a quantum generalization of Bayesian conditioning. We provide two alternative arguments for this criterion, based on the objective and subjective Bayesian interpretations of probability theory. We then apply the same methodology to the problem of quantum state improvement, i.e. how to update your state when you learn someone else's state assignment, and to quantum state pooling, i.e. how to combine the state assignments of several agents into a single assignment that accurately represents the views of the group. In particular, we derive a pooling rule previously proposed by Spekkens and Wiseman under much weaker assumptions than those made in the original derivation. All of our results apply to a much broader class of experimental scenarios than have been considered previously in this context.

  16. Suppression of pool fires with HRC-125 in a simulated engine nacelle.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, David R. (INS, Inc., Lexington Park, MD); Hewson, John C.

    2007-06-01

    CFD simulations are conducted to predict the distribution of fire suppressant in an engine nacelle and to predict the suppression of pool fires by the application of this suppressant. In the baseline configuration, which is based on an installed system, suppressant is injected through four nozzles at a rate fast enough to suppress all simulated pool fires. Variations that reduce the mass of the suppression system (reducing the impact of the suppression system on meeting mission needs) are considered, including a reduction in the rate of suppressant injection, a reduction in the mass of suppressant and a reduction in the number of nozzles. In general, these variations should work to reduce the effectiveness of the suppression system, but the CFD results point out certain changes that have negligible impact, at least for the range of phenomena considered here. The results are compared with measurements where available. Comparisons with suppressant measurements are reasonable. A series of twenty-three fire suppression tests were conducted to check the predictions. The pre-test predictions were generally successful in identifying the range of successful suppression tests. In two separate cases, each where one nozzle of the suppression system was capped, the simulation results did indicate a failure to suppress for a condition where the tests indicated successful suppression. When the test-suppressant discharge rate was reduced by roughly 25%, the tests were in agreement with the predictions. That is, the simulations predict a failure to suppress slightly before observed in these cases.

  17. Examination of Zircaloy-clad spent fuel after extended pool storage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradley, E.R.; Bailey, W.J.; Johnson, A.B. Jr.; Lowry, L.M.

    1981-09-01

    This report presents the results from metallurgical examinations of Zircaloy-clad fuel rods from two bundles (0551 and 0074) of Shippingport PWR Core 1 blanket fuel after extended water storage. Both bundles were exposed to water in the reactor from late 1957 until discharge. The estimated average burnups were 346 GJ/kgU (4000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0551 and 1550 GJ/kgU (18,000 MWd/MTU) for bundle 0074. Fuel rods from bundle 0551 were stored in deionized water for nearly 21 yr prior to examination in 1980, representing the world's oldest pool-stored Zircaloy-clad fuel. Bundle 0074 has been stored in deionized water since reactor discharge in 1964. Data from the current metallurgical examinations enable a direct assessment of extended pool storage effects because the metallurgical condition of similar fuel rods was investigated and documented soon after reactor discharge. Data from current and past examinations were compared, and no significant degradation of the Zircaloy cladding was indicated after almost 21 yr in water storage. The cladding dimensions and mechanical properties, fission gas release, hydrogen contents of the cladding, and external oxide film thicknesses that were measured during the current examinations were all within the range of measurements made on fuel bundles soon after reactor discharge. The appearance of the external surfaces and the microstructures of the fuel and cladding were also similar to those reported previously. In addition, no evidence of accelerated corrosion or hydride redistribution in the cladding was observed.

  18. Enhancing the actinide sciences in Europe through hot laboratories networking and pooling: from ACTINET to TALISMAN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourg, S.; Poinssot, C.

    2013-07-01

    Since 2004, Europe supports the strengthening of the European actinides sciences scientific community through the funding of dedicated networks: (i) from 2004 to 2008, the ACTINET6 network of excellence (6. Framework Programme) gathered major laboratories involved in nuclear research and a wide range of academic research organisations and universities with the specific aims of funding and implementing joint research projects to be performed within the network of pooled facilities; (ii) from 2009 to 2013, the ACTINET-I3 integrated infrastructure initiative (I3) supports the cost of access of any academics in the pooled EU hot laboratories. In this continuation, TALISMAN (Trans-national Access to Large Infrastructures for a Safe Management of Actinides) gathers now the main European hot laboratories in actinides sciences in order to promote their opening to academics and universities and strengthen the EU-skills in actinides sciences. Furthermore, a specific focus is set on the development of advanced cutting-edge experimental and spectroscopic capabilities, the combination of state-of-the art experimental with theoretical first-principle methods on a quantum mechanical level and to benefit from the synergy between the different scientific and technical communities. ACTINET-I3 and TALISMAN attach a great importance and promote the Education and Training of the young generation of actinides scientists in the Trans-national access but also by organizing Schools (general Summer Schools or Theoretical User Lab Schools) or by granting students to attend International Conference on actinide sciences. (authors)

  19. Entanglement generation in a system of two atomic quantum dots coupled to a pool of interacting bosons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anna Posazhennikova; Reinhard Birmuske; Martin Bruderer; Wolfgang Belzig

    2012-12-12

    We discuss entanglement generation in a closed system of one or two atomic quantum dots (qubits) coupled via Raman transitions to a pool of cold interacting bosons. The system exhibits rich entanglement dynamics, which we analyze in detail in an exact quantum mechanical treatment of the problem. The bipartite setup of only one atomic quantum dot coupled to a pool of bosons turns out to be equivalent to two qubits which easily get entangled being initially in a product state. We show that both the number of bosons in the pool and the boson-boson interaction crucially affect the entanglement characteristics of the system. The tripartite system of two atomic quantum dots and a pool of bosons reduces to a qubit-qutrit-qubit realization. We consider entanglement possibilities of the pure system as well as of reduced ones by tracing out one of the constituents, and show how the entanglement can be controlled by varying system parameters. We demonstrate that the qutrit, as expected, plays a leading role in entangling of the two qubits and the maximum entanglement depends in a nontrivial way on the pool characteristics.

  20. Study of void fraction and mixing of immiscible liquids in a pool configuration by an upward gas flow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casas, J.C.; Corradini, M.L. (Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison, Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics Dept., Madison, WI (US))

    1992-07-01

    In this paper, investigations are performed to study the mixing between immiscible liquids in a pool configuration due to an upward gas flow. A water-R113 system is sued in the bubbly/churn-turbulent regimes to determine the effects of the unagitated pool depth on layer mixing. The superficial gas velocity at which full mixing is attained is observed to increase with the pool depth, although it is concluded that this is a weak dependency. Mixing in the churn-turbulent regime is studied with Wood's metal-water and Wood's metal-silicone fluid (100 cS) as pairs of fluids. Additional past mixing data from six other fluids are also included in the data base. A criterion is proposed to determine if two liquids will entrain in bubbly or churn-turbulent flow. Correlations are derived that, for a set of given conditions, allow prediction of the mixing state (mixed or segregated) of a system. Because of the indirect method of measuring the mixed layer thickness, pool void fraction experiments are also performed. For the case of water and R113, the effect of unagitated pool depth on the void fraction is studied.

  1. Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    conceptual model has been developed for the southwestern portion of the Salton Sea geothermal system, the region encompasing CalEnergy Operating Company's imnent 'Unit 6'...

  2. Procurement at the Chivay obsidian Source, Arequipa, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; Mackay, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Peru Nicholas Tripcevich and Alex Mackay Nicholas Tripcevich and Alex Mackay speci?c evidence for the social and symbolic power

  3. Procurement at the Chivay obsidian Source, Arequipa, Peru

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; Mackay, Alex

    2011-01-01

    Archaeology and Paleoecology of an Andean Civilization, Vol.Archaeology and Paleoecology of an Andean Civilization, Vol.

  4. IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING (P11/P12 'POINTS') (CONT.)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Kirk

    IDS120h GEOMETRY WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL SIMULATIONS FOR 60% W + 40% He SHIELDING (P11/P12hm: (m IS FOR) modified Hg pool vessel IN IDS120h. # 1E5 AND 5E5 SIMULATIONS COMPARISON = y = 0.12 cm. 2 #12;3 IDS120hm GEOMETRY = IDS120h WITH MODIFIED Hg POOL VESSEL AND SHIFTED Be WIDOW

  5. Saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen under magnetically-enhanced effective gravity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. A. Corcovilos; M. E. Turk; D. M. Strayer; N. N. Asplund; N. -C. Yeh

    2007-02-01

    We investigate the effect of enhancing gravity on saturated nucleate pool boiling of oxygen for effective gravities of 1g, 6.0g, and 16g (g=9.8 m/s^2) at a saturation pressure of 760 torr and for heat fluxes of 10 ~ 3000 W/m^2. The effective gravity on the oxygen is increased by applying a magnetic body force generated by a superconducting solenoid. We measure the heater temperature (expressed as a reduced superheat) as a function of heat flux and fit this data to a piecewise power-law/linear boiling curve. At low heat flux (<400 W/m^2) the superheat is proportional to the cube root of the heat flux. At higher heat fluxes, the superheat is a linear function of the heat flux. To within statistical uncertainties, which are limited by variations among experimental runs, we find no variation of the boiling curve over our applied gravity range.

  6. Plasma effect on weld pool surface reconstruction by shape-from-polarization analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coniglio, N.; Mathieu, A.

    2014-03-31

    The polarimetric state of the thermal radiations emitted by the weld metal contains geometric information about the emitting surface. Even though the analysed thermal radiation has a wavelength corresponding to a blind spectral window of the arc plasma, the physical presence of the arc plasma itself interferes with the rays radiated by the weld pool surface before attaining the polarimeter, thus modifying the geometric information transported by the ray. In the present work, the effect of the arc plasma-surrounding zone on the polarimetric state and propagation direction of the radiated ray is analyzed. The interaction with the arc plasma zone induces a drop in ray intensity and a refraction of ray optical path.

  7. Energy Storage for Power Systems Applications: A Regional Assessment for the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kintner-Meyer, Michael CW; Balducci, Patrick J.; Jin, Chunlian; Nguyen, Tony B.; Elizondo, Marcelo A.; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Guo, Xinxin; Tuffner, Francis K.

    2010-04-01

    Wind production, which has expanded rapidly in recent years, could be an important element in the future efficient management of the electric power system; however, wind energy generation is uncontrollable and intermittent in nature. Thus, while wind power represents a significant opportunity to the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), integrating high levels of wind resources into the power system will bring great challenges to generation scheduling and in the provision of ancillary services. This report addresses several key questions in the broader discussion on the integration of renewable energy resources in the Pacific Northwest power grid. More specifically, it addresses the following questions: a) how much total reserve or balancing requirements are necessary to accommodate the simulated expansion of intermittent renewable energy resources during the 2019 time horizon, and b) what are the most cost effective technological solutions for meeting load balancing requirements in the Northwest Power Pool (NWPP).

  8. Pool boiler reflux solar receiver for Stirling dish-electric systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of competitive, modular bulk electric power from the sun may be greatly enhanced by the use of a reflux heat pipe receiver to combine a heat engine such as Stirling with a paraboloidal dish concentrator. This combination represents a potential improvement over previous successful demonstrations of dish-electric technology in terms of enhanced performance, lower cost, longer life, and greater flexibility in engine design. There are, however, important issues and unknowns which must be addressed to determine engineering feasibility of these devices. In the pool boiler reflux receiver, concentrated solar radiation causes liquid metal (sodium or potassium) to boil. The vapor flows to the engine heater heads, where it condenses and releases the latent heat. The condensate is returned to the receiver absorber pool by gravity (refluxing). This is essentially an adaptation of heat pipe technology to the peculiar requirements of concentrated solar flux, and provides many advantages over conventional heated tube receiver technology. Boiling theory indicates that long-term stable boiling of liquid metal may be difficult to achieve. Laboratory scale experiments have been performed. Initial tests confirmed that boiling is unstable in a baseline boiler. Boiling stability was established after the addition of ''artificial cavities'' to the heated surface, and successful boiling of sodium was demonstrated for 100 hours. Other stabilizing influences may have been present, and will be discussed. The flux and geometry closely simulated a real receiver. The results of these tests are presented, along with the design of a full scale receiver for on-sun testing and considerations for long term operation. 15 refs., 10 figs.

  9. The Case for Oueen's lJnrversitv Divestment of the Pooled Endowment Fund from the Fossil Fuel Industrv

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fletcher, Robin

    The Case for Oueen's lJnrversitv Divestment of the Pooled Endowment Fund from the Fossil Fuel. The Case for the Fossil Fuel Industry Causing Social Injury 4. Divestment as a Moral Imperative 5 organization and institutions to divest from fossil fuels across Canada and the world. 3 #12;r.20 - oals

  10. The terrestrial carbon inventory on the Savannah River Site: Assessing the change in Carbon pools 1951-2001.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dai, Zhaohua; Trettin, Carl, C.; Parresol, Bernard, R.

    2011-11-30

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) has changed from an agricultural-woodland landscape in 1951 to a forested landscape during that latter half of the twentieth century. The corresponding change in carbon (C) pools associated land use on the SRS was estimated using comprehensive inventories from 1951 and 2001 in conjunction with operational forest management and monitoring data from the site.

  11. Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard a,d,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pedersen, Tom

    Subarctic Pacific evidence for a glacial deepening of the oceanic respired carbon pool S.L. Jaccard of the overturning circulation. Volumetrically the Pacific Ocean dominates the world ocean (it is three times larger of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, USA c Department of Geosciences, Princeton

  12. Metagenomes from High-Temperature Chemotrophic Systems Reveal Geochemical Controls on Microbial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ha, Taekjip

    The Yellowstone caldera contains the most numerous and diverse geothermal systems on Earth, yielding an extensiveC) chemotrophic microbial communities sampled from geothermal springs (or pools) in Yellowstone National Park (YNP in geothermal environments often results in considerably less microbial diversity than other terrestrial

  13. A comparison of three turbulence models with an application to the West Pacific Warm Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anne-Claire Bennis; Macarena Gomez Marmol; Roger Lewandowski; Tomas Chacon Rebollo; Françoise Brossier

    2007-07-16

    In this work, we compare three turbulence models used to parameterize the oceanic boundary layer. These three models depend on the bulk Richardson number, which is coherent with the studied region, the West Pacific Warm Pool, because of the large mean shear associated with the equatorial undercurrent. One of these models, called R224, is new and the others are Pacanowski and Philander's model (R213 model) and Gent's model (R23 model). The numerical implementation is based on a non-conservative numerical scheme. The following (three criteria) are used to compare the models: the surface current intensity, the pycnocline's form and the mixed layer depth. We initialize the code with realistic velocity and density profiles thanks the TOGA-TAO array (McPhaden, 1995). In case of static instability zone on the initial density profile, only the R224 model gives realistic results. Afterwards, we study a mixed layer induced by the wind stress. In this case, the R224 results and the Pacanowski and Philander's results are similar. Furthermore, we simulate a long time case. We obtain a linear solution for all models that is in agreement with Bennis and al.

  14. Mixed-Valent Fe Films ('Schwimmeisen') on the Surface of Reduced Ephemeral Pools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grathoff, Georg H.; Baham, John E.; Easterly, Heather R.; Gassman, Paul L.; Hugo, Rick C.

    2007-12-01

    Floating, mixed-valent Fe films have been observed worldwide in wetlands, ferrous iron rich seeps, and in seasonally reduced soils, but are usually misidentified as oil or biofilms. Little characterization or explanation to their formation has taken place. Along the Oregon coast such films were found on ephemeral pools where Fe(II) rich groundwater (~ 100 ?M Fe) discharged at the base of Pleistocene sand dunes. Fe(II) oxidized to Fe(III) at the air-water interface to form ~ 100 to 300nm thick films. Analyses indicated that the films contained both Fe(III) and Fe(II) in a ratio of 3:1. Si was the other main cation, OH was the main anion and some C was identified as well. The film morphology was flat, under optical and electron microscopy with some attached floccules having a stringlike morphology. Energy filtered electron diffraction patterns (EFED) showed three diffraction rings at 4.5, 2.6, and 1.4 Å in some places and 2 rings (2.6 and 1.4 Å) in others. Upon further oxidation the films became 2-line ferrihydrite. We are proposing the name „Schwimmeisen“ for the floating, mixed-valent Fe film.

  15. Enhancement of Heat Transfer with Pool and Spray Impingement Boiling on Microporous and Nanowire Surface Coatings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thiagarajan, S. J.; Wang, W.; Yang, R.; Narumanchi, S.; King, C.

    2010-09-01

    The DOE National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is leading a national effort to develop next-generation cooling technologies for hybrid vehicle electronics. The goal is to reduce the size, weight, and cost of power electronic modules that convert direct current from batteries to alternating current for the motor, and vice versa. Aggressive thermal management techniques help to increase power density and reduce weight and volume, while keeping chip temperatures within acceptable limits. The viability of aggressive cooling schemes such as spray and jet impingement in conjunction with enhanced surfaces is being explored. Here, we present results from a series of experiments with pool and spray boiling on enhanced surfaces, such as a microporous layer of copper and copper nanowires, using HFE-7100 as the working fluid. Spray impingement on the microporous coated surface showed an enhancement of 100%-300% in the heat transfer coefficient at a given wall superheat with respect to spray impingement on a plain surface under similar operating conditions. Critical heat flux also increased by 7%-20%, depending on flow rates.

  16. EXPERIMENTAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE ROLES OF CADMIUM POOL IN MARK-IV ELECTROREFINER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SHELLY X. LI

    2008-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have developed and demonstrated a pyroprocessing technology for the Department of Energy to reprocess spent nuclear fuel. One of the key steps in the pyroprocessing was electrorefining the spent fuel in a metal form in a molten LiCl-KCl-UCl3/liquid cadmium system using an engineering scale electrorefiner (Mark-IV ER). This article summarizes experimental observations and engineering aspects for the roles of the liquid cadmium for electrorefining of the spent fuel in the Mark-IV ER. It was found that the liquid cadmium pool acted as an intermediate electrode during the electrorefining process. The cadmium level gradually decreased due to its high vapor pressure at the ER operating temperature. The low cadmium level caused the anode assembly to electrically short with the ER vessel hardware, which resulted in difficulty determining the endpoint of uranium dissolution from the anode baskets and reducing the current efficiency. A reflux cadmium vapor trap has successfully prevented the cadmium level from decreasing and mitigated cadmium vapor deposition on cold metal surface inside the ER.

  17. Placing Recruitment Advertisements with Inside Higher Ed When you have a job to fill you want three things: a great candidate from a diverse pool at an affordable price. Inside Higher Ed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stuart, Steven J.

    three things: a great candidate from a diverse pool at an affordable price. Inside Higher Ed delivers

  18. Presented diploma thesis concerns the chrysophyte flora and its seasonal periodicity of two floodplain pools of river Luznice in the Southern Bohemia and one pond in the Eastern Bohemia.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    floodplain pools of river Luznice in the Southern Bohemia and one pond in the Eastern Bohemia. The samples (2002) and from pond Rokytnický (2003). In addition, the samples from 11 floodplain pools of river, whereas M. caudata was the most dominant in pond. Species composition changed in time of year. In pools

  19. The Kansas Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment: Preventing or Forestalling Disability Among Participants in the Kansas High Risk Insurance Pool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.

    2008-12-01

    Participants in the Kansas High Risk Insurance Pool Number 11 • December 2008 By Jean P. Hall, Ph.D. & Jan M. Moore, M.A., M.B.A., M.S.W. The Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (TWWIIA) was passed to address employment and health care... and enhanced health services to employed individuals with potentially disabling conditions enrolled in the State high risk health insurance pool. Historically, people in this pool have transitioned to federal disability programs at a rate eight times...

  20. Review of the England and Wales trading arrangements: The proposal to cure the ills by euthanasia of the pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neushloss, J.; Woolf, F.

    1999-12-01

    Rather than the extreme remedy that has been proposed, some fairly simple changes might go a long way toward reducing the possibilities of gaming, exercise of market power, and the problems associated with the interplay between gas and electricity markets. This article briefly describes the Pool and OFGEM's proposals. The authors then examine OFGEM's assertion that the suggested new trading arrangements will lead to better results and ask whether these arrangements are the only way to achieve the desired outcomes.

  1. Aerosol generation from sparging of molten pools of corium by gases released from core-concrete interactions. [PWR; BWR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginsberg, T.

    1983-02-01

    A model for calculation of the aerosol generation rate resulting from surface bubble rupture during molten core-concrete interactions is discussed. One aspect of the model, based upon previous work in the literature, considers that film rupture occurs due to growth of film oscillation disturbances in the surface liquid film. Calculations are presented for molten pools with liquid properties in the range of prototypic interest.

  2. Splashing phenomena of room temperature liquid metal droplet striking on the pool of the same liquid under ambient air environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haiyan Li; Shengfu Mei; Lei Wang; Yunxia Gao; Jing Liu

    2013-09-04

    In this article, the fluid dynamics of room temperature liquid metal (RTLM) droplet impacting onto a pool of the same liquid in ambient air was investigated. A series of experiments were conducted in order to disclose the influence of the oxidation effect on the impact dynamics. The droplet shape and impact phenomenology were recorded with the aid of a high-speed digital camera. The impact energy stored in the splash structures was estimated via a theoretical model and several morphological parameters obtained from instantaneous images of the splash. It was observed that the droplet shape and the splashing morphology of RTLM were drastically different from those of water, so was the impact dynamics between room temperature LM pool and high temperature LM pool. The energy analysis disclosed that the height of the jet is highly sensitive to the viscosity of the fluid, which is subjected to the oxidation effect and temperature effect simultaneously, and thus perfectly explained the phenomena. These basic findings are important for the application of RTLM in a series of newly emerging technologies such as liquid metal based spray cooling, ink-jet printed electronics, interface material painting and coating, metallurgy, and 3D packages, etc.

  3. Reflux pool-boiler as a heat-transport device for Stirling engines: On-sun test program results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Andraka, C.E.; Moreno, J.B.; Diver, R.B.; Ginn, W.C.; Dudley, V.; Rawlinson, K.S.

    1990-01-01

    The efficient operation of a Stirling engine requires the application of a high heat flux to the relatively small area occupied by the heater head tubes. Previous attempts to couple solar energy to Stirling engines generally involved directly illuminating the heater head tubes with concentrated sunlight. In this study, operation of 75-kW, sodium reflux pool-boiler solar receiver has been demonstrated and its performance characterized on Sandia's nominal 75-kW parabolic-dish concentrator, using a cold-water gas-gap calorimeter to simulate Stirling engine operation. The pool boiler (and more generally liquid-metal reflux receivers) supplies heat to the engine in the form of latent heat released from condensation of the metal vapor on the heater head tubes. The advantages of the pool boiler include uniform tube temperature, leading to longer life and higher temperature available to the engine, and decoupling of the design of the solar absorber from the engine heater head. The two-phase system allows high input thermal flux, reducing the receiver size and losses, therefore improving system efficiency. The receiver design is reported here along with test results including transient operations, steady-state performance evaluation, operation at various temperatures, and x-ray studies of the boiling behavior. Also reported are a fist-order cost analysis, plans for future studies, and the integration of the receiver with a Stirling Thermal Motors STM4-120 Stirling engine. 19 refs., 11 figs.

  4. DOE: Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Daniel, EPRI; Tuohy, Aidan, EPRI; Deb, Sidart, LCG Consulting; Jampani, Srinivas, LCG Consulting; Kirby, Brendan, Consultant; King, Jack, Consultant

    2011-11-29

    Wind power development in the United States is outpacing previous estimates for many regions, particularly those with good wind resources. The pace of wind power deployment may soon outstrip regional capabilities to provide transmission and integration services to achieve the most economic power system operation. Conversely, regions such as the Southeastern United States do not have good wind resources and will have difficulty meeting proposed federal Renewable Portfolio Standards with local supply. There is a growing need to explore innovative solutions for collaborating between regions to achieve the least cost solution for meeting such a renewable energy mandate. The DOE-funded project 'Integrating Southwest Power Pool Wind Energy into Southeast Electricity Markets' aims to evaluate the benefits of coordination of scheduling and balancing for Southwest Power Pool (SPP) wind transfers to Southeastern Electric Reliability Council (SERC) Balancing Authorities (BAs). The primary objective of this project is to analyze the benefits of different balancing approaches with increasing levels of inter-regional cooperation. Scenarios were defined, modeled and investigated to address production variability and uncertainty and the associated balancing of large quantities of wind power in SPP and delivery to energy markets in the southern regions of the SERC. The primary analysis of the project is based on unit commitment (UC) and economic dispatch (ED) simulations of the SPP-SERC regions as modeled for the year 2022. The UC/ED models utilized for the project were developed through extensive consultation with the project utility partners, to ensure the various regions and operational practices are represented as accurately as possible realizing that all such future scenario models are quite uncertain. SPP, Entergy, Oglethorpe Power Company (OPC), Southern Company, and the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) actively participated in the project providing input data for the models and review of simulation results and conclusions. While other SERC utility systems are modeled, the listed SERC utilities were explicitly included as active participants in the project due to the size of their load and relative proximity to SPP for importing wind energy. The analysis aspects of the project comprised 4 primary tasks: (1) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with only 7 GW of installed wind capacity in SPP for internal SPP consumption with no intended wind exports to SERC. This model is referred to as the 'Non-RES' model as it does not reflect the need for the SPP or SERC BAs to meet a federal Renewable Energy Standard (RES). (2) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of the Non-RES model for the year 2022 to provide project stakeholders with confidence in the model and analytical framework for a scenario that is similar to the existing system and more easily evaluated than the high-wind transfer scenarios that are analyzed subsequently. (3) Development of SCUC/SCED model of the SPP-SERC footprint for the year 2022 with sufficient installed wind capacity in SPP (approximately 48 GW) for both SPP and the participating SERC BAs to meet an RES of 20% energy. This model is referred to as the 'High-Wind Transfer' model with several different scenarios represented. The development of the High-Wind Transfer model not only included identification and allocation of SPP wind to individual SERC BAs, but also included the evaluation of various methods to allow the model to export the SPP wind to SERC without developing an actual transmission plan to support the transfers. (4) Analysis of hourly-resolution simulation results of several different High-Wind Transfer model scenarios for the year 2022 to determine balancing costs and potential benefits of collaboration among SPP and SERC BAs to provide the required balancing.

  5. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S.; Shiflett, D.W.; Deutsch, H.A.

    1996-12-31

    The {open_quotes}A{close_quotes} sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the {open_quotes}N Point{close_quotes} stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  6. Reservoir compartmentalization caused by mass transport deposition Northwest Stevens pool, Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserves, California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milliken, M.D.; McJannet, G.S. ); Shiflett, D.W. ); Deutsch, H.A. )

    1996-01-01

    The [open quotes]A[close quotes] sands of the Northwest Stevens Pool consist of six major subdivisions (A1-A6) and numerous sublayers. These sands are above the [open quotes]N Point[close quotes] stratigraphic marker, making them much younger than most other Stevens sands at Elk Hills. Cores show the A1-A3 sands to be possibly mass transport deposition, primarily debris flows, slumps, and sand injection bodies. The A4-A6 sands are characterized by normally graded sheet-like sand bodies Hospital of traditional outer fan turbidite lithofacies. Most current production from the A1-A2 interval comes from well 373A-7R, are completed waterflood wells that came on line in 1992 at 1400 BOPD. Well 373A-7R is an anomaly in the A1-A2 zone, where average production from the other ten wells is 200 BOPD. Other evidence for compartmentalization in the A1-A2 interval includes sporadic oil-water contacts and drawdown pressures, difficult log correlations, and rapid thickness changes. In 1973, well 362-7R penetrated 220 ft of wet Al sand. The well was redrilled updip and successfully completed in the A1, where the oil-water contact is more than 130 ft lower than the original hole and faulting is not apparent. In 1992, horizontal well 323H-7R unexpectedly encountered an entirely wet Al wedge zone. Reevaluation of the A1-A3 and other sands as mass transport origin is important for modeling initialization and production/development strategies.

  7. Historical Disability Outcomes of Enrollees in the Kansas High Risk Pool: A White Paper presented to CMS by the Kansas DMIE Project January, 2006

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.; Moore, Janice M.

    2006-01-01

    This white paper reports the historical rates of disability outcomes (e.g., transition to Social Security disability status) for people enrolled in Kansas' state high-risk health insurance pool....

  8. Investigation of the pool boiling heat transfer enhancement of nano-engineered fluids by means of high-speed infrared thermography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerardi, Craig Douglas

    2009-01-01

    A high-speed video and infrared thermography based technique has been used to obtain detailed and fundamental time- and space-resolved information on pool boiling heat transfer. The work is enabled by recent advances in ...

  9. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2004-01-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  10. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2002-12-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  11. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2003-07-30

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  12. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2003-10-31

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  13. System for reducing heat losses from indoor swimming pools by use of automatic covers. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    This final report is an account of the principal activities of Lof Energy Systems, Inc. in a two-year project funded by the Energy Related Inventions Program (ERIP) of the U.S. Department of Energy. The primary objective has been the development of a fully practical and economical system for saving energy in indoor swimming pools by use of motorized covers. The goal is wide-spread use of a fully developed product, in institutional swimming pools. Four major tasks, depicted in the accompanying Performance Schedule, have been completed, and one other has been initiated and its completion committed. Principal accomplishments have been the selection and improvement of cover materials and designs, lengthening and strengthening of reels and improvements in motorized components and their control, design and installation of pool covers in full scale demonstration and evaluation of fully developed commercial system, preparation and dissemination of manuals and reports, finalization of arrangements for Underwriters Laboratory certification of products, and final report preparation and submission. Of greatest significance has been the successful demonstration of the fully developed system and the verification and reporting by an energy consultant of the large savings resulting from pool cover use. Probably the best evidence of success of the DOE-ERIP project in advancing this invention to a commercial stage is its acceptance for sale by the Lincoln Equipment Company, a national distributor of swimming pool supplies and equipment. A copy of the relevant page in the Lincoln catalog is included in this report as Annex A. Representatives of that company now offer Tof motorized pool cover systems to their pool owner customers. In addition to the plans for securing UL certification the company expects to continue making design improvements that can increase system reliability, durability, and cost-effectiveness.

  14. High-resolution imaging of selenium in kidneys: a localized selenium pool associated with glutathione peroxidase 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinouski, M.; Kehr, S.; Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; Carlson, B.A.; Seravalli, J.; Jin, R.; Handy, D.E.; Park, T.J.; Loscalzo, J.; Hatfield, D.L.; Gladyshev, V.N.

    2012-04-17

    Recent advances in quantitative methods and sensitive imaging techniques of trace elements provide opportunities to uncover and explain their biological roles. In particular, the distribution of selenium in tissues and cells under both physiological and pathological conditions remains unknown. In this work, we applied high-resolution synchrotron X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM) to map selenium distribution in mouse liver and kidney. Liver showed a uniform selenium distribution that was dependent on selenocysteine tRNA{sup [Ser]Sec} and dietary selenium. In contrast, kidney selenium had both uniformly distributed and highly localized components, the latter visualized as thin circular structures surrounding proximal tubules. Other parts of the kidney, such as glomeruli and distal tubules, only manifested the uniformly distributed selenium pattern that co-localized with sulfur. We found that proximal tubule selenium localized to the basement membrane. It was preserved in Selenoprotein P knockout mice, but was completely eliminated in glutathione peroxidase 3 (GPx3) knockout mice, indicating that this selenium represented GPx3. We further imaged kidneys of another model organism, the naked mole rat, which showed a diminished uniformly distributed selenium pool, but preserved the circular proximal tubule signal. We applied XFM to image selenium in mammalian tissues and identified a highly localized pool of this trace element at the basement membrane of kidneys that was associated with GPx3. XFM allowed us to define and explain the tissue topography of selenium in mammalian kidneys at submicron resolution.

  15. Analysis of HLA-DP association with beryllium disease susceptibility in pooled exposed populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cesare Saltini, Massimo Amicosante

    2009-12-19

    Berylliosis or Chronic Beryllium Disease is a chronic granulomatous disorder primarily involving the lung associated with the exposition to low doses of Beryllium (Be) in the workplace. Berylliosis risk has been associated with the presence of a glutamate at position 69 of the HLA-DP beta chain (HLA-DPbetaGlu69) that is expressed in about 97% of disease cases and in 27% of the unaffected Be-exposed controls (p<0.0001) (Richeldi et al. Science 1993; 262: 242-244.12). Since this first observation of an immunogenetic association between berylliosis and HLA-DPbetaGlu69 a number of studies have confirmed the role of this marker as the primary gene of susceptibility of berylliosis (Richeldi et al Am J Ind Med. 1997; 32:337-40; Wang et al J. Immunol. 1999; 163: 1647-53; Saltini et al Eur Respir J. 2001 18:677-84; Rossman et al Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 165:788-94). Moreover, a structure/function interaction between HLA-DP molecules carrying Glu69 and beryllium in driving and developing the immune response against beryllium itself has been observed as: (1) Be-specific T-cells clones obtained from berylliosis patients recognize beryllium as antigen only when presented in the context of the HLA-DP{beta}Glu69 molecules but not in the context of HLA-DP allelic variants carrying Lys69 (Lombardi G et al. J Immunol 2001; 166: 3549-3555), and (2) beryllium presents an affinity for the HLA-DP2, carrying the berylliosis marker of susceptibility HLA-DPGlu69, from 40 to 100 times higher that the HLA-DP molecule carrying Lys69 (Amicosante M. et al Hum. Immunol. 2001; 62: 686-93). However, although the immunogenetic studies performed have been addressed a number of different questions about the genetic association between berylliosis and/or beryllium sensitization, exposure levels to beryllium and HLA markers, a number of questions are still open in the field mainly due to the limitation imposed by the low number of subjects carrying berylliosis or beryllium sensitization enrolled in each immunogenetic study. In this context, the populations of the study already performed in this field by the University of Modena and Rome (by Prof. C. Saltini) and the University of Pennsylvania (by Prof. M. Rossman) have been evaluated by using similar HLA molecular typing methodologies and that both populations have now been followed up for a period of 4 to 7 years. The general objective of this study has to generate a larger data base comprising the two population with which analyze gene disease association with greater statistical power and ascertain the effect of lesser common gener variants which may be missed when analyzing associations on small populations. In particular addressing the role suggested in previous study such as: (1) the role of HLA-DP rare alleles and polymorphisms, and (2) the role of the HLA markers in disease progression from sensitization. The two populations from the already published studies (Saltini et al Eur Respir J. 2001 18:677-84; Rossman et al Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2002 165:788-94) present similar aspects about: ethnicity, type and length of exposure to Be dust, a broadly similar association between beryllium related abnormalities and HLA. The two population have been pooled and evaluated using common criteria of diagnosis (Sensitized subject: at least 2 positive BeLPT tests each with 2 positive wells; CBD-affected subject: identification of well formed non-caseating granulomas on biopsy), follow up and HLA typing technique (complete HLA-DRB, DQB, DPB high resolution typing using amplification with sequence specific primers or sequence based typing). The two populations included 137 subjects with Beryllium hypersensitized (BH) and 155 Be-exposed controls. Inclusion criteria were met by one hundred and six subjects with Be-hypersensitivity of whom 55 were affected by CBD (age 52 {+-} 11 years; 50 caucasians, 2 African-Americans 2 Hispanics and 1 Asian; 46 males and 9 females; mean duration of Be-exposure 15 {+-} 9 years) and 51 showed Be-sensitization without lung granulomas detected by trans-bronchial biopsy (ag

  16. ISSUANCE 2015-04-29: Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters Notice of petition to extend test procedure compliance date and request for comment

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Energy Conservation Program for Consumer Products: Test Procedures for Direct Heating Equipment and Pool Heaters; Notice of petition to extend test procedure compliance date and request for comment.

  17. Methodology and Determination of Field of View of Neutron and Gamma Detectors in the Atucha Spent Fuel Storage Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walters, W; Wenner, M; Haghighat, A; Sitaraman, S; Ham, Y S

    2009-06-15

    In this paper we seek to create a model by determining the field of view (FOV) of a detector (i.e. which assemblies contribute to the detector response) in the Atucha-I spent fuel pool. The FOV is determined by solving the adjoint transport equation using the 3-D, parallel PENTRAN (Parallel Environment Neutral-particle TRANsport) Sn code, with the detector cross section as the adjoint source. If this adjoint function is coupled with the source spectrum, then the contribution to the detector from each assembly can be determined. First, the reactor criticality was modeled using the MCNP5 (Monte Carlo N-Particle) Monte Carlo code in order to determine the power distribution in each assembly. Using the power distribution data, the assemblies were divided and homogenized into 8 axial and 3 radial zones for burnup analysis. Depletion calculations were performed for each zone using the ORIGEN-ARP (Automatic Rapid Processing) utility from the SCALE 5.1 (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code package. Spent fuel pool and detector were modeled in 2-D in PENTRAN as the detector plus 3 fuel assemblies along both x and y axes. Using the resulting adjoint function combined with the source spectrum, they have determined the FOVs of the fission chamber neutron detector that was used at Atucha, and concluded that 2 assemblies along x and y axes are needed for both cases (i.e. the 4 adjacent assemblies plus the next surrounding 12). For the neutron detector, 88% of the response comes from the nearest 4 assemblies, with 99% from the nearest 16. Results for a uniformly sensitive gamma detector indicate that 2 assemblies in both directions are also needed, with 89% of the response coming from the adjacent assemblies. A Monte Carlo calculation using MCNP was performed to benchmark the neutron result, giving a similar result (87% MCNP vs. 88% PENTRAN). Based on these studies, we have developed a database of FOVs as a function of burnup and decay conditions for different detector types, and a methodology/algorithm which uses this database to analyze the response of a detector placed in a spent fuel pool with the aim of detecting gross defects.

  18. Realizing Health Reform’s Potential: Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Jean P.

    2014-12-01

    and register to receive email alerts. Commonwealth Fund pub. 1792 Vol. 31 Why a National High-Risk Insurance Pool Is Not a Workable Alternative to the Marketplace Jean P. Hall Abstract The Pre-Existing Condition Insurance Plan (PCIP) was a national high...-risk pool established under the Affordable Care Act (ACA) to provide coverage for individuals with preexisting conditions who had been uninsured for at least six months. It was intended to be a temporary program: PCIPs opened in 2010 and closed in April...

  19. Aerosol generation by liquid breakup resulting from sparging of molten pools of corium by gases released during core/concrete interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ginsberg, T.

    1985-01-01

    Aerosol release is expected from a pool of molten corium that is agitated by gases that would emerge from concrete during the core/concrete interactions phase of a core meltdown accident in a light water reactor. A corium flow-regime-dependent model is developed for aerosol generation by mechanical breakup of the melt by the flowing vapors. Previous work reported in the literature is used to identify the dominant corium gas/liquid flow regimes and to formulate the flow/regime transition criteria. Models are presented for the calculation of an aerosol entrainment rate under conditions of bubbly- and churn-turbulent, two-phase pool conditions.

  20. ADVANCED OIL RECOVERY TECHNOLOGIES FOR IMPROVED RECOVERY FROM SLOPE BASIN CLASTIC RESERVOIRS, NASH DRAW BRUSHY CANYON POOL, EDDY COUNTY, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2002-09-30

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry. This is the twenty-eighth quarterly progress report on the project. Results obtained to date are summarized.

  1. Computational Study of the Hydrodynamic Behavior during Air Discharge through a Sparger Submerged in the Condensation Pool

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahn, Hyung-Joon; Bang, Young-Seok; Kim, In-Goo; Kim, Hho-Jung; Lee, Byeong-Eun; Kwon, Soon-Bum

    2002-07-01

    The In-containment Refueling Water Storage Tank (IRWST) has the function of heat sink when steam is released from the pressurizer. The hydrodynamic behaviors occurring at the sparger are very complex because of the wide variety of operating conditions and the complex geometry. Hydrodynamic behavior when air is discharged through a sparger in a condensation pool is investigated using CFD techniques in the present study. The effect of pressure acting on the sparger header during both water and air discharge through the sparger is studied. In addition, pressure oscillation occurring during air discharge through the sparger is studied for a better understanding of mechanisms of air discharge and a better design of the IRWST, including sparger. (authors)

  2. New shark pool marks Seymour Center's 10th anniversary on Sunday, Public celebration on "10-10-10" includes opening of hands-on shark and ray exhibit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    New shark pool marks Seymour Center's 10th anniversary on Sunday, October 10 Public celebration on "10-10-10" includes opening of hands-on shark and ray exhibit SANTA CRUZ, CA--The Seymour Center's classrooms will be open for demonstrations and self-guided activities. The Seymour Marine Discovery Center

  3. Free energy surface of ST2 water near the liquid-liquid phase transition Peter H. Poole, Richard K. Bowles, Ivan Saika-Voivod, and Francesco Sciortino

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sciortino, Francesco

    Free energy surface of ST2 water near the liquid-liquid phase transition Peter H. Poole, Richard K://jcp.aip.org/about/rights_and_permissions #12;THE JOURNAL OF CHEMICAL PHYSICS 138, 034505 (2013) Free energy surface of ST2 water near umbrella sampling Monte Carlo simulations to evaluate the free energy surface of the ST2 model of water

  4. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-02-24

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico is a cost-shared field demonstration project in the US Department of Energy Class II Program. A major goal of the Class III Program is to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques are being used at the Nash Draw project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geologic, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description is being used as a risk reduction tool to identify ''sweet spots'' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well simulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir.

  5. Low power zinc-oxide based charge trapping memory with embedded silicon nanoparticles via poole-frenkel hole emission

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    El-Atab, Nazek; Nayfeh, Ammar; Ozcan, Ayse; Alkis, Sabri; Okyay, Ali K.; Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, 06800 Ankara

    2014-01-06

    A low power zinc-oxide (ZnO) charge trapping memory with embedded silicon (Si) nanoparticles is demonstrated. The charge trapping layer is formed by spin coating 2?nm silicon nanoparticles between Atomic Layer Deposited ZnO steps. The threshold voltage shift (?V{sub t}) vs. programming voltage is studied with and without the silicon nanoparticles. Applying ?1?V for 5?s at the gate of the memory with nanoparticles results in a ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V, and the memory window can be up to 8?V with an excellent retention characteristic (>10 yr). Without nanoparticles, at ?1?V programming voltage, the ?V{sub t} is negligible. In order to get ?V{sub t} of 3.4?V without nanoparticles, programming voltage in excess of 10?V is required. The negative voltage on the gate programs the memory indicating that holes are being trapped in the charge trapping layer. In addition, at 1?V the electric field across the 3.6?nm tunnel oxide is calculated to be 0.36 MV/cm, which is too small for significant tunneling. Moreover, the ?V{sub t} vs. electric field across the tunnel oxide shows square root dependence at low fields (E??2.7 MV/cm). This indicates that Poole-Frenkel Effect is the main mechanism for holes emission at low fields and Phonon Assisted Tunneling at higher fields.

  6. Diagnostic development for determining the joint temperature/soot statistics in hydrocarbon-fueled pool fires : LDRD final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casteneda, Jaime N.; Frederickson, Kraig; Grasser, Thomas W.; Hewson, John C.; Kearney, Sean Patrick; Luketa, Anay Josephine

    2009-09-01

    A joint temperature/soot laser-based optical diagnostic was developed for the determination of the joint temperature/soot probability density function (PDF) for hydrocarbon-fueled meter-scale turbulent pool fires. This Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) effort was in support of the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program which seeks to produce computational models for the simulation of fire environments for risk assessment and analysis. The development of this laser-based optical diagnostic is motivated by the need for highly-resolved spatio-temporal information for which traditional diagnostic probes, such as thermocouples, are ill-suited. The in-flame gas temperature is determined from the shape of the nitrogen Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) signature and the soot volume fraction is extracted from the intensity of the Laser-Induced Incandescence (LII) image of the CARS probed region. The current state of the diagnostic will be discussed including the uncertainty and physical limits of the measurements as well as the future applications of this probe.

  7. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment TWP-ICE Cloud and rain characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    May, P.T., Jakob, C., and Mather, J.H.

    2004-05-31

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them.

  8. Pastures to Prairies to Pools: An Update on Natural Resource Damages Settlement Projects at the Fernald Preserve - 13198

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, Jane [Fernald Preserve Site Manager, DOE Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States)] [Fernald Preserve Site Manager, DOE Office of Legacy Management, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Schneider, Tom [Fernald Project Manager, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Dayton, Ohio (United States)] [Fernald Project Manager, Ohio Environmental Protection Agency, Dayton, Ohio (United States); Hertel, Bill [Project Manager, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)] [Project Manager, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States); Homer, John [Environmental Scientist, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)] [Environmental Scientist, S.M. Stoller Corporation, Harrison, Ohio (United States)

    2013-07-01

    The DOE Office of Legacy Management oversees implementation and monitoring of two ecological restoration projects at the Fernald Preserve, Fernald, Ohio, that are funded through a CERCLA natural resource damage settlement. Planning and implementation of on-property ecological restoration projects is one component of compensation for natural resource injury. The Paddys Run Tributary Project involves creation of vernal pool wetland habitat with adjacent forest restoration. The Triangle Area Project is a mesic tall-grass prairie establishment, similar to other efforts at the Fernald Preserve. The goal of the Fernald Natural Resource Trustees is to establish habitat for Ambystomatid salamander species, as well as grassland birds. Field implementation of these projects was completed in May 2012. Herbaceous cover and woody vegetation survival was determined in August and September 2012. Results show successful establishment of native vegetation. Additional monitoring will be needed to determine whether project goals have been met. As with the rest of the Fernald Preserve, ecological restoration has helped turn a DOE liability into a community asset. (authors)

  9. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, NM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark B. Murphy

    2005-09-30

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool in Eddy County New Mexico was a cost-shared field demonstration project in the U.S. Department of Energy Class III Program. A major goal of the Class III Program was to stimulate the use of advanced technologies to increase ultimate recovery from slope-basin clastic reservoirs. Advanced characterization techniques were used at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP) project to develop reservoir management strategies for optimizing oil recovery from this Delaware reservoir. The objective of the project was to demonstrate that a development program, which was based on advanced reservoir management methods, could significantly improve oil recovery at the NDP. Initial goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to other oil and gas producers. Analysis, interpretation, and integration of recently acquired geological, geophysical, and engineering data revealed that the initial reservoir characterization was too simplistic to capture the critical features of this complex formation. Contrary to the initial characterization, a new reservoir description evolved that provided sufficient detail regarding the complexity of the Brushy Canyon interval at Nash Draw. This new reservoir description was used as a risk reduction tool to identify 'sweet spots' for a development drilling program as well as to evaluate pressure maintenance strategies. The reservoir characterization, geological modeling, 3-D seismic interpretation, and simulation studies have provided a detailed model of the Brushy Canyon zones. This model was used to predict the success of different reservoir management scenarios and to aid in determining the most favorable combination of targeted drilling, pressure maintenance, well stimulation, and well spacing to improve recovery from this reservoir. An Advanced Log Analysis technique developed from the NDP project has proven useful in defining additional productive zones and refining completion techniques. This program proved to be especially helpful in locating and evaluating potential recompletion intervals, which has resulted in low development costs with only small incremental increases in lifting costs. To develop additional reserves at lower costs, zones behind pipe in existing wells were evaluated using techniques developed for the Brushy Canyon interval. These techniques were used to complete uphole zones in thirteen of the NDP wells. A total of 14 recompletions were done: four during 1999, four during 2000, two during 2001, and four during 2002-2003. These workovers added reserves of 332,304 barrels of oil (BO) and 640,363 MCFG (thousand cubic feet of gas) at an overall weighted average development cost of $1.87 per BOE (barrel of oil equivalent). A pressure maintenance pilot project in a developed area of the field was not conducted because the pilot area was pressure depleted, and the reservoir in that area was found to be compartmentalized and discontinuous. Economic analyses and simulation studies indicated that immiscible injection of lean hydrocarbon gas for pressure maintenance was not warranted at the NDP and would need to be considered for implementation in similar fields very soon after production has started. Simulation studies suggested that the injection of miscible carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) could recover significant quantities of oil at the NDP, but a source of low-cost CO{sub 2} was not available in the area. Results from the project indicated that further development will be under playa lakes and potash areas that were beyond the regions covered by well control and are not accessible with vertical wells. These areas, covered by 3-D seismic surveys that were obtained as part of the project, were accessed with combinations of deviated/horizontal wells. Three directional/horizontal wells have been drilled and completed to develop reserves under surface-restricted areas and potash mines. The third

  10. Swimming Pool (Indoors) 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    This paper presents preliminary results of an analysis of measured comfort conditions for a Habitat for humanity house in central Texas. In the case study house indoor-outdoor temperature, humidity and C02 levels have been monitored in an attempt...

  11. POPSCI.COM38 POPULAR SCIENCE NOVEMBER 2010 SEPTEMBER 8 Personal-robotics company Willow Garage begins selling the PR2, a $400,000 open-platform robot that can fold laundry, play pool, and fetch beer.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    POPSCI.COM38 POPULAR SCIENCE NOVEMBER 2010 THEDIYMRI SEPTEMBER 8 Personal-robotics company Willow Garage begins selling the PR2, a $400,000 open-platform robot that can fold laundry, play pool, and fetch

  12. ISSUANCE 2015-08-19: Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Appliance Standards and Rulemaking Federal Advisory Committee: Notice of Intent to Establish the Dedicated Purpose Pool Pumps Working Group to Negotiate a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking (NOPR) for Energy Conservation Standards

  13. Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE): Cloud and Rain Characteristics in the Australian Monsoon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PT May; C Jakob; JH Mather

    2004-05-30

    The impact of oceanic convection on its environment and the relationship between the characteristics of the convection and the resulting cirrus characteristics is still not understood. An intense airborne measurement campaign combined with an extensive network of ground-based observations is being planned for the region near Darwin, Northern Australia, during January-February, 2006, to address these questions. The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) will be the first field program in the tropics that attempts to describe the evolution of tropical convection, including the large scale heat, moisture, and momentum budgets, while at the same time obtaining detailed observations of cloud properties and the impact of the clouds on the environment. The emphasis will be on cirrus for the cloud properties component of the experiment. Cirrus clouds are ubiquitous in the tropics and have a large impact on their environment but the properties of these clouds are poorly understood. A crucial product from this experiment will be a dataset suitable to provide the forcing and testing required by cloud-resolving models and parameterizations in global climate models. This dataset will provide the necessary link between cloud properties and the models that are attempting to simulate them. The experiment is a collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program, the Bureau of Meteorology (BoM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), the European Commission DG RTD-1.2, and several United States, Australian, Canadian, and European Universities. This experiment will be undertaken over a 4-week period in early 2006. January and February corresponds to the wet phase of the Australia monsoon. This season has been selected because, despite Darwin’s coastal location, the convection that occurs over and near Darwin at this time is largely of maritime origin with a large fetch over water. Based on previous experiments, the convection appears typical of maritime convection with widespread convection that has complex organization, but is not as deep or as intense as continental or coastal convection. Therefore, it is expected that the convection and cloud characteristics will be representative of conditions typical for wide areas of the tropics.

  14. Prolactin receptor attenuation induces zinc pool redistribution through ZnT2 and decreases invasion in MDA-MB-453 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bostanci, Zeynep; Alam, Samina; Soybel, David I.; Kelleher, Shannon L.

    2014-02-15

    Prolactin receptor (PRL-R) activation regulates cell differentiation, proliferation, cell survival and motility of breast cells. Prolactin (PRL) and PRL-R over-expression are strongly implicated in breast cancer, particularly contributing to tumor growth and invasion in the more aggressive estrogen-receptor negative (ER?) disease. PRL-R antagonists have been suggested as potential therapeutic agents; however, mechanisms through which PRL-R antagonists exert their actions are not well-understood. Zinc (Zn) is a regulatory factor for over 10% of the proteome, regulating critical cell processes such as proliferation, cell signaling, transcription, apoptosis and autophagy. PRL-R signaling regulates Zn metabolism in breast cells. Herein we determined effects of PRL-R attenuation on cellular Zn metabolism and cell function in a model of ER-, PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-453). PRL-R attenuation post-transcriptionally increased ZnT2 abundance and redistributed intracellular Zn pools into lysosomes and mitochondria. ZnT2-mediated lysosomal Zn sequestration was associated with reduced matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP-2) activity and decreased invasion. ZnT2-mediated Zn accumulation in mitochondria was associated with increased mitochondrial oxidation. Our results suggest that PRL-R antagonism in PRL-R over-expressing breast cancer cells may reduce invasion through the redistribution of intracellular Zn pools critical for cellular function. - Highlights: • PRL-R attenuation increased ZnT2 expression. • PRL-R attenuation increased lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn accumulation. • PRL-R attenuation decreased MMP-2 and invasion. • PRL-R antagonists may modulate lysosomal and mitochondrial Zn pools.

  15. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2000-10-25

    The Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool (NDP) is southeast New Mexico is one of the nine projects selected in 1995 by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) for participation in the Class III Reservoir Field Demonstration Program. The goals of the DOE cost-shared Class Program are to: (1) extend economic production, (2) increase ultimate recovery, and (3) broaden information exchange and technology application. Reservoirs in the Class III Program are focused on slope-basin and deep-basin clastic depositional types.

  16. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    2002-01-16

    The overall objective of this project was to demonstrate that a development program-based on advanced reservoir management methods-can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan included developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals were (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  17. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Mark B.

    1999-11-01

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  18. Advanced Oil Recovery Technologies for Improved Recovery from Slope Basin Clastic Reservoirs, Nash Draw Brushy Canyon Pool, Eddy County, New Mexico, Class III

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, Michael B.

    2002-02-21

    The overall objective of this project is to demonstrate that a development program based on advanced reservoir management methods can significantly improve oil recovery at the Nash Draw Pool (NDP). The plan includes developing a control area using standard reservoir management techniques and comparing its performance to an area developed using advanced reservoir management methods. Specific goals are (1) to demonstrate that an advanced development drilling and pressure maintenance program can significantly improve oil recovery compared to existing technology applications and (2) to transfer these advanced methodologies to oil and gas producers in the Permian Basin and elsewhere throughout the U.S. oil and gas industry.

  19. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the Chivay Obsidian Source Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; MacKay, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Variations in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the ChivayVariations in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the Chivayof widely cir- culated raw materials provides an opportunity

  20. Spatial and Temporal Variation in Stone Raw Material Provisioning in the Chivay Obsidian Source Area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas; MacKay, Alex

    2012-01-01

    Peru and its effects upon human use of the landscape. Quaternary International 2005 Preludes to power

  1. Exotic Goods, Chivay Obsidian, and Sociopolitical Change in the South-Central Andes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tripcevich, Nicholas

    2010-01-01

    archaeology and paleoecology of an Andean civilization, vol.archaeology and paleoecology of an Andean civilization, vol.archaeology and paleoecology of an Andean civilization, vol.

  2. Geology And A Working Conceptual Model Of The Obsidian Butte (Unit 6)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway1997) | OpenRaft river valley, Idaho |

  3. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al., 2003)

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005MinnehahaElectricInformation2008)| Open Energy|

  4. Thermal Gradient Holes At Obsidian Cliff Area (Hulen, Et Al., 2003) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/WindEnergyOpen EnergyInformationEnergyEnergy

  5. Assessing the Effect of Timing of Availability for Carbon Dioxide Storage in the Largest Oil and Gas Pools in the Alberta Basin: Description of Data and Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dahowski, Robert T.; Bachu, Stefan

    2007-03-05

    Carbon dioxide capture from large stationary sources and storage in geological media is a technologically-feasible mitigation measure for the reduction of anthropogenic emissions of CO2 to the atmosphere in response to climate change. Carbon dioxide (CO2) can be sequestered underground in oil and gas reservoirs, in deep saline aquifers, in uneconomic coal beds and in salt caverns. The Alberta Basin provides a very large capacity for CO2 storage in oil and gas reservoirs, along with significant capacity in deep saline formations and possible unmineable coal beds. Regional assessments of potential geological CO2 storage capacity have largely focused so far on estimating the total capacity that might be available within each type of reservoir. While deep saline formations are effectively able to accept CO2 immediately, the storage potential of other classes of candidate storage reservoirs, primarily oil and gas fields, is not fully available at present time. Capacity estimates to date have largely overlooked rates of depletion in these types of storage reservoirs and typically report the total estimated storage capacity that will be available upon depletion. However, CO2 storage will not (and cannot economically) begin until the recoverable oil and gas have been produced via traditional means. This report describes a reevaluation of the CO2 storage capacity and an assessment of the timing of availability of the oil and gas pools in the Alberta Basin with very large storage capacity (>5 MtCO2 each) that are being looked at as likely targets for early implementation of CO2 storage in the region. Over 36,000 non-commingled (i.e., single) oil and gas pools were examined with effective CO2 storage capacities being individually estimated. For each pool, the life expectancy was estimated based on a combination of production decline analysis constrained by the remaining recoverable reserves and an assessment of economic viability, yielding an estimated depletion date, or year that it will be available for CO2 storage. The modeling framework and assumptions used to assess the impact of the timing of CO2 storage resource availability on the region’s deployment of CCS technologies is also described. The purpose of this report is to describe the data and methodology for examining the carbon dioxide (CO2) storage capacity resource of a major hydrocarbon province incorporating estimated depletion dates for its oil and gas fields with the largest CO2 storage capacity. This allows the development of a projected timeline for CO2 storage availability across the basin and enables a more realistic examination of potential oil and gas field CO2 storage utilization by the region’s large CO2 point sources. The Alberta Basin of western Canada was selected for this initial examination as a representative mature basin, and the development of capacity and depletion date estimates for the 227 largest oil and gas pools (with a total storage capacity of 4.7 GtCO2) is described, along with the impact on source-reservoir pairing and resulting CO2 transport and storage economics. The analysis indicates that timing of storage resource availability has a significant impact on the mix of storage reservoirs selected for utilization at a given time, and further confirms the value that all available reservoir types offer, providing important insights regarding CO2 storage implementation to this and other major oil and gas basins throughout North America and the rest of the world. For CCS technologies to deploy successfully and offer a meaningful contribution to climate change mitigation, CO2 storage reservoirs must be available not only where needed (preferably co-located with or near large concentrations of CO2 sources or emissions centers) but also when needed. The timing of CO2 storage resource availability is therefore an important factor to consider when assessing the real opportunities for CCS deployment in a given region.

  6. 0-7803-XXXX-X/06/$20.00 2009 IEEE 25th IEEE SEMI-THERM Symposium Sub-Atmospheric Pressure Pool Boiling of Water on a Screen-Laminate Enhanced Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wirtz, Richard A.

    structures having wide ranging porosity and pore size. When deployed as a surface enhancement in a boiling pool-boiling experiments at one atmosphere and sub-atmospheric pressure assess the utility of fine factor of lamination [dimensionless] CHF = critical heat flux [W/cm2 ] Dh = pore hydraulic diameter [µm

  7. Does Preinterventional Flat-Panel Computer Tomography Pooled Blood Volume Mapping Predict Final Infarct Volume After Mechanical Thrombectomy in Acute Cerebral Artery Occlusion?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, Marlies, E-mail: marlies.wagner@kgu.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Kyriakou, Yiannis, E-mail: yiannis.kyriakou@siemens.com [Siemens AG, Health Care Sector (Germany); Mesnil de Rochemont, Richard du, E-mail: mesnil@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany); Singer, Oliver C., E-mail: o.singer@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Department of Neurology (Germany); Berkefeld, Joachim, E-mail: berkefeld@em.uni-frankfurt.de [Hospital of Goethe University, Institute of Neuroradiology (Germany)

    2013-08-01

    PurposeDecreased cerebral blood volume is known to be a predictor for final infarct volume in acute cerebral artery occlusion. To evaluate the predictability of final infarct volume in patients with acute occlusion of the middle cerebral artery (MCA) or the distal internal carotid artery (ICA) and successful endovascular recanalization, pooled blood volume (PBV) was measured using flat-panel detector computed tomography (FPD CT).Materials and MethodsTwenty patients with acute unilateral occlusion of the MCA or distal ACI without demarcated infarction, as proven by CT at admission, and successful Thrombolysis in cerebral infarction score (TICI 2b or 3) endovascular thrombectomy were included. Cerebral PBV maps were acquired from each patient immediately before endovascular thrombectomy. Twenty-four hours after recanalization, each patient underwent multislice CT to visualize final infarct volume. Extent of the areas of decreased PBV was compared with the final infarct volume proven by follow-up CT the next day.ResultsIn 15 of 20 patients, areas of distinct PBV decrease corresponded to final infarct volume. In 5 patients, areas of decreased PBV overestimated final extension of ischemia probably due to inappropriate timing of data acquisition and misery perfusion.ConclusionPBV mapping using FPD CT is a promising tool to predict areas of irrecoverable brain parenchyma in acute thromboembolic stroke. Further validation is necessary before routine use for decision making for interventional thrombectomy.

  8. West Yellowstone, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy ResourcesTurin, New York: EnergyWareham,(BLM)

  9. Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    section of the 0.6-Ma Lava Creek ash-flow tuff. In this core, the degree of welding appears to be responsible for most of the variations in porosity, matrix...

  10. 1714(1) Winter 2006 Yellowstone Science NY ECOSYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    things (plants, animals, etc.)andnon-livingthings (rocks, soil, water, etc.) in a given geographic area at this time. Once photosynthesis converts light energy into biomass, many other organisms, including animals in any of these ecosystems. One of the most important of these exchanged materials is energy. When we

  11. GSATODAY|2012SEPTEMBER Future volcanism at Yellowstone caldera

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    intracaldera rhyolitic magmas using quartz petrography, geochemistry, and geobarometry. We propose that magma

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE [FeFe]-hydrogenase in Yellowstone National Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is an important source of energy for the maintenance and growth of microbial populations (Wolin, 1982; Morita and is the basis for many syntrophic interactions that commonly occur in microbial communities. Little is known diversity of organisms which produce H2 in microbial communities. In this study, we examined the [Fe

  13. Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis, and VNIR spectroscopy. Samples of hot spring deposits, geyser deposits, and soil were also collected. Analysis of ASTER data provided broad scale characteristics of the...

  14. Intensive Sampling Of Noble Gases In Fluids At Yellowstone- I...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    < 3 times the air value. Authors B. M. Kennedy, M. A. Lynch, J. H. Reynolds and S. P. Smith Published Journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, 1985 DOI 10.1016...

  15. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References B. M. Kennedy, J. H. Reynolds, S. P. Smith (1988) Noble Gas Geochemistry In Thermal Springs Additional References Retrieved from...

  16. Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    hotspot track from 17 Ma to 2 Ma. The Ruby, Beaverhead, Big Hole, Deer Lodge, Medicine Lodge-Grasshopper, Three Forks, Canyon Ferry, Jefferson, Melrose, Wise River, and...

  17. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    October 2001 - 30 September 2004). These solutes were chosen because they are likely derived in part, from the magmatic volatiles CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF (Symonds et al., 2001)....

  18. Stratigraphic Record Of The Yellowstone Hotspot Track, Neogene Sixmile

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek Formation Grabens, Southwest Montana

  19. Teleseismic-Seismic Monitoring At Yellowstone Region (Chatterjee, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Open Energy Information DixieGeothermal Area1985) | Open

  20. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone National Park Commits to

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane Texas LawCase

  1. Alternative Fuels Data Center: Yellowstone Park Recycles Vehicle Batteries

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TAPropane Texas LawCasefor Solar Power

  2. Hyperspectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock JumpEnergy

  3. High-Resolution Aeromagnetic Mapping Of Volcanic Terrain, Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources Jump to:Hershey, Pennsylvania:HiddenTemperature

  4. Fluid Inclusion Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban Transport JumpFlowood, Mississippi:Open(Sasada, 1988) |

  5. Geodetic Survey At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpenTechniques Jump2004)2005) |

  6. Geothermal Literature Review At Yellowstone Region (Sears, Et Al., 2009) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:Bore Technologies IncEnergy2002)Open Energy Information

  7. Geothermometry At Yellowstone Region (Fournier, 1979) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky:BoreOpen Energy InformationOpen EnergyRocher, 2005)

  8. Evidence For Gas And Magmatic Sources Beneath The Yellowstone Volcanic

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative Coolers Jump to:WindEverguard

  9. Mid-Yellowstone Elec Coop, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec 2005 WindPRO isMickeyWest Energy Jump to: navigation,Elec

  10. Modeling-Computer Simulations At Yellowstone Region (Laney, 2005) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy ResourcesDec(Pritchett, 2004) | Open Energy Information

  11. Multispectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: EnergyInformationOliver, Pennsylvania:(CTI PFAN)OpenEnergyEnergyEnergy

  12. Isotopic Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Sturchio, Et Al., 1990) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8,Open Energy Information Laney, 2005) JumpEnergy

  13. Isotopic Analysis-Fluid At Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region (1977) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder at 8,Open Energy Information1996)Al.,EnergyOpen Energy

  14. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:NewOver CoreOxford SolarOhio:

  15. Reflection Survey At Yellowstone Region (Morgan, Et Al., 2003) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b < RAPID‎WindRecycleBank|JemezLaney,SodaEnergy

  16. Yellowstone County, Montana: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton Jump to:Wylie, Texas: EnergyYBR Solar

  17. Microsoft Word - LBNL-52550 Jart Yellowstone,Dobson.doc

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLED Street LightingFrom Structural analysisSIMULATION OF

  18. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open(Evans, Et Al., 2002) || Open Energy

  19. Lamar Buffalo Ranch, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming | Department of

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safety StandardsLabor Relations Act

  20. Lower Yellowstone R E A, Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource HistoryScenarios Towards 2050 Jump to: navigation, search ToolWells andLowerIncInc

  1. Aeromagnetic Survey At Yellowstone Region (Finn & Morgan, 2002) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: Energy Resources JumpAdelan1986) | OpenEnergy Information

  2. Analysis Of Hot Springs And Associated Deposits In Yellowstone National

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to:Hempsteadtemporal momentAnadarkoPark Using

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump(Thompson, 1985)(Laney, 2005) | Open

  4. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Kennedy, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercial Jump(Thompson, 1985)(Laney, 2005) | Open1988) |

  5. Diachroneity of Basin and Range Extension and Yellowstone Hotspot Volcanism

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower VenturesInformation9)ask queries TypeDeveloper|Winds Wind Farm

  6. Porosity, Permeability, And Fluid Flow In The Yellowstone Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, Blue MountainSchoolPrairiePonder, Texas:I

  7. Energy-pooling collisions in cesium: 6PJ 6PJ~6S ,,nl 7P,6D,8S,4F... Z. J. Jabbour,* R. K. Namiotka, and J. Huennekens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huennekens, John

    Energy-pooling collisions in cesium: 6PJ 6PJ~6S ,,nl 7P,6D,8S,4F... Z. J. Jabbour,* R. K. Namiotka and Lazarenko 1 reported that when cesium vapor was resonantly excited to the 6P levels, fluorescence from the 6 of previous alkali-metal work has con- centrated on sodium, 2­4 there has been little work on cesium following

  8. Interactive Effects of Climate Change and Decomposer Communities on the Stabilization of Wood-Derived Carbon Pools: Catalyst for a New Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Resh, Sigrid C. [Michigan Technological University

    2014-11-17

    Globally, forest soils store ~two-thirds as much carbon (C) as the atmosphere. Although wood makes up the majority of forest biomass, the importance of wood contributions to soil C pools is unknown. Even with recent advances in the mechanistic understanding of soil processes, integrative studies tracing C input pathways and biological fluxes within and from soils are lacking. Therefore, our research objectives were to assess the impact of different fungal decay pathways (i.e., white-rot versus brown-rot)—in interaction with wood quality, soil temperature, wood location (i.e., soil surface and buried in mineral soil), and soil texture—on the transformation of woody material into soil CO2 efflux, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), and soil C pools. The use of 13C-depleted woody biomass harvested from the Rhinelander, WI free-air carbon dioxide enrichment (Aspen-FACE) experiment affords the unique opportunity to distinguish the wood-derived C from other soil C fluxes and pools. We established 168 treatment plots across six field sites (three sand and three loam textured soil). Treatment plots consisted of full-factorial design with the following treatments: 1. Wood chips from elevated CO2, elevated CO2 + O3, or ambient atmosphere AspenFACE treatments; 2. Inoculated with white rot (Bjerkandera adusta) or brown rot (Gloeophyllum sepiarium) pure fungal cultures, or the original suite of endemic microbial community on the logs; and 3. Buried (15cm in soil as a proxy for coarse roots) or surface applied wood chips. We also created a warming treatment using open-topped, passive warming chambers on a subset of the above treatments. Control plots with no added wood (“no chip control”) were incorporated into the research design. Soils were sampled for initial ?13C values, CN concentrations, and bulk density. A subset of plots were instrumented with lysimeters for sampling soil water and temperature data loggers for measuring soil temperatures. To determine the early pathways of decomposition, we measured soil surface CO2 efflux, dissolved organic C (DOC), and DO13C approximately monthly over two growing seasons from a subsample of the research plots. To determine the portion of soil surface CO2 efflux attributable to wood-derived C, we used Keeling plot techniques to estimate the associated ?13C values of the soil CO2 efflux. We measured the ?13CO2 once during the peak of each growing season. Initial values for soil ?13C values and CN concentrations averaged across the six sites were -26.8‰ (standard error = 0.04), 2.46% (se = 0.11), and 0.15% (se = 0.01), respectively. The labeled wood chips from the Aspen FACE treatments had an average ?13C value of -39.5‰ (se 0.10). The >12 ‰ isotopic difference between the soil and wood chip ?13C values provides the basis for tracking the wood-derived C through the early stages of decomposition and subsequent storage in the soil. Across our six research sites, average soil surface CO2 efflux ranged from 1.04 to 2.00 g CO2 m-2 h-1 for the first two growing seasons. No wood chip controls had an average soil surface CO2 efflux of 0.67 g CO2 m-2 h-1 or about half of that of the wood chip treatment plots. Wood-derived CO2 efflux was higher for loam textured soils relative to sands (0.70 and 0.54 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; p = 0.045)), for surface relative to buried wood chip treatments (0.92 and 0.39 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; p < 0.001), for warmed relative to ambient temperature treatments (0.99 and 0.78 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; 0.004), and for natural rot relative to brown and white rots (0.93, 0.82, and 0.78 g CO2 m-2 h-1, respectively; p = 0.068). Our first two growing seasons of soil surface CO2 efflux data show that wood chip location (i.e., surface vs. buried chip application) is very important, with surface chips loosing twice the wood-derived CO2. The DOC data support this trend for greater loss of ecosystem C from surface chips. This has strong implications for the importance of root and buried wood for ecosystem C retention. This strong chip location effect

  9. The Separation of Thermal and Chemical Effects in Evaluating Geothermal Influences on Aquatic Biota

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resh, Vincent H; Lamberti, Gary A; McElravy, Eric P; Wood, John R

    1983-01-01

    River (Yellowstone Park) below geothermal effluents.geothermal habitats been most intensively studied in Yellowstone

  10. Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole Signature of Robert Poole

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4) August 20123/%2A en Signature of

  11. The Obsidian Blade Sequence at El Ujuxte, a Late Preclassic Site on the South Coast of Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    C. Roger Nance; Jan de Leeuw

    2011-01-01

    Industries of Pacific Guatemala and El Salvador: The PacificSociety in Pacific Guatemala: Settlements and Chronologyof the Río Naranjo, Guatemala. Papers of the New World

  12. The Obsidian Blade Sequence at El Ujuxte, a Late Preclassic Site on the South Coast of Guatemala

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nance, C. Roger; de Leeuw, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Industries of Pacific Guatemala and El Salvador: The PacificSociety in Pacific Guatemala: Settlements and Chronologyof the Río Naranjo, Guatemala. Papers of the New World

  13. Going with the Flow: The Impact of Holocene Fissure Eruptions on Obsidian Source Use in Southeastern Idaho

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Henrikson, L. Suzann

    2008-01-01

    Fluted Points from the Snake River Plain. In Clovis: OriginsMobility on Idaho's Snake River Plain. Ph.D. dissertation.Structures on the Snake River Plain. Paper presented at the

  14. Archaeology of the Colonial Period Gulf of Fonseca, Eastern El Salvador

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomez, Esteban

    2010-01-01

    characterization. EDXRF analysis is a geochemical method for determining obsidian composition and subsequent geological

  15. Technical support document: Energy efficiency standards for consumer products: Room air conditioners, water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, kitchen ranges and ovens, pool heaters, fluorescent lamp ballasts and television sets. Volume 1, Methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-01

    The Energy Policy and Conservation Act (P.L. 94-163), as amended, establishes energy conservation standards for 12 of the 13 types of consumer products specifically covered by the Act. The legislation requires the Department of Energy (DOE) to consider new or amended standards for these and other types of products at specified times. DOE is currently considering amending standards for seven types of products: water heaters, direct heating equipment, mobile home furnaces, pool heaters, room air conditioners, kitchen ranges and ovens (including microwave ovens), and fluorescent light ballasts and is considering establishing standards for television sets. This Technical Support Document presents the methodology, data, and results from the analysis of the energy and economic impacts of the proposed standards. This volume presents a general description of the analytic approach, including the structure of the major models.

  16. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    Yellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermal

  17. 'Taking in the waters' at LaDuke Hot Springs Resort: Early 20th century medical tourism in Montana

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Porter, Benjamin W.; Porter, Athna May

    2008-01-01

    would have on Yellowstone’s geothermal system, introduced aYellowstone National Park are only one small part of a complex geothermal

  18. FY01 Supplemental Science and Performance Analysis: Volume 1, Scientific Bases and Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, G.S.; Dobson, David

    2001-01-01

    Fluid Flow in the Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming. ”examination of the Yellowstone geothermal system and a tuffSelf-Sealing at the Yellowstone Geothermal System Mineral

  19. Endolithic Microbial Ecosystems: Molecular Phylogenetic Composition,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pace, Norman

    in Yellowstone geothermal environments. Electron microscopic analysis indicated Yellowstone communities three distinct areas: the Rocky Mountain region and Yellowstone National Park of the USA, and Shark Bay

  20. Natural analogue synthesis report, TDR-NBS-GS-000027 rev00 icn 02

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2002-01-01

    Fluid Flow in the Yellowstone Geothermal System, Wyoming."11-26 11.3.2 Introduction to the Yellowstone Geothermalidentified the Yellowstone geothermal system as particularly