National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for observing system eos

  1. Transport properties of the solid polymer electrolyte system P(EO)nLiTFSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Properties of the Solid Polymer Electrolyte System P(EO)Properties of the Solid Polymer Electrolyte System P(EO)~Properties of the Solid Polymer Electrolyte System P(EO)~

  2. JPL D-28534 Earth Observing System (EOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .0 June 15, 2004 National Aeronautics and Space Administration Jet Propulsion Laboratory California . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 1.1.4 Zeeman Splitting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 1.2 Magnetic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 1.3 Tensor magnetic susceptibility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 2

  3. Airborne Fourier transform spectrometer observations in support of EOS Aura validation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ), Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS), and Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES) instruments aboard the EOS Aura measurements of gaseous constituents derived from the absorption of infrared solar radiation by the atmosphere here on comparisons with limb viewing measurements made by the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS) [Waters et

  4. EOS standards

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greeff, Carl W

    2011-01-12

    An approach to creating accurate EOS for pressure standards is described. Applications to Cu, Au, and Ta are shown. Extension of the method to high compressions using DFT is illustrated. Comparisons with modern functionals show promise.

  5. TOUGH2/EOS7CA

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003504MLTPL00 EOS7CA Version 1.0: TOUGH2 Module for Gas Migration in Shallow Subsurface Porous Media Systems   

  6. Occupational and patient exposure as well as image quality for full spine examinations with the EOS imaging system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Damet, J., E-mail: jerome.damet@chuv.ch; Fournier, P.; Monnin, P.; Sans-Merce, M.; Verdun, F. R.; Baechler, S. [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1007 (Switzerland)] [Institute of Radiation Physics, Lausanne University Hospital, Lausanne 1007 (Switzerland); Ceroni, D. [Department of Paediatrics, Division of paediatric orthopaedic, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)] [Department of Paediatrics, Division of paediatric orthopaedic, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland); Zand, T. [Department of Radiology, Division of paediatric radiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)] [Department of Radiology, Division of paediatric radiology, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva 1205 (Switzerland)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: EOS (EOS imaging S.A, Paris, France) is an x-ray imaging system that uses slot-scanning technology in order to optimize the trade-off between image quality and dose. The goal of this study was to characterize the EOS system in terms of occupational exposure, organ doses to patients as well as image quality for full spine examinations. Methods: Occupational exposure was determined by measuring the ambient dose equivalents in the radiological room during a standard full spine examination. The patient dosimetry was performed using anthropomorphic phantoms representing an adolescent and a five-year-old child. The organ doses were measured with thermoluminescent detectors and then used to calculate effective doses. Patient exposure with EOS was then compared to dose levels reported for conventional radiological systems. Image quality was assessed in terms of spatial resolution and different noise contributions to evaluate the detector's performances of the system. The spatial-frequency signal transfer efficiency of the imaging system was quantified by the detective quantum efficiency (DQE). Results: The use of a protective apron when the medical staff or parents have to stand near to the cubicle in the radiological room is recommended. The estimated effective dose to patients undergoing a full spine examination with the EOS system was 290?Sv for an adult and 200 ?Sv for a child. MTF and NPS are nonisotropic, with higher values in the scanning direction; they are in addition energy-dependent, but scanning speed independent. The system was shown to be quantum-limited, with a maximum DQE of 13%. The relevance of the DQE for slot-scanning system has been addressed. Conclusions: As a summary, the estimated effective dose was 290?Sv for an adult; the image quality remains comparable to conventional systems.

  7. A New Occlusion Device: Application of the ArtVentive Endoluminal Occlusion System (EOS)—First in Human Clinical Trial

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venbrux, Anthony C.; Rudakov, Leon; Plass, Andre Emmert, Maximilian Y.; Ebner, Adrian

    2013-05-24

    PurposeThe purpose of this study was to determine the safety and efficacy of a new endoluminal occlusion device, ArtVentive endoluminal occlusion system (EOS), to occlude the spermatic vein in symptomatic males with varicoceles.MethodsThe ArtVentive EOS device has been developed for percutaneous, peripheral occlusion of the peripheral arterial and venous vasculature. The system is comprised of an implantable occlusion device and a delivery catheter. At present, there are two device sizes: (a) size 1 for target vessels ranging between 3.5 and 5.5 mm in diameter, and (b) size 2 for target vessels 5.5–8.5 mm in diameter. The treatment group included six adult males, ages 22–34 years. Nine target vessels were occluded. A total of 20 devices were implanted in six subjects.ResultsThe acute occlusion rate at the end of the procedure was 100 % occurring in nine of nine vessels. The spermatic veins of all patients remained occluded on venography at 30 days follow-up. Pain scores related to varicoceles decreased in five of six patients.ConclusionsAlthough we recognize this study is limited, initial experience indicates that the ArtVentive EOS is a safe and effective new device for occlusion of vessels (varicoceles). The device has potential applications in other clinical conditions requiring occlusion of veins or arteries.

  8. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  9. Eos, Vol. 72, No. 9, February 26, 1991 0 2 4 6 8 W tz 14 16 ~18 20 22~

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    of the Earth Observing System (EOS), which is the centerpiece of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth change dem onstrates the program's strategy. Clouds can reflect incoming solar radiation and cool

  10. Observability of complex systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Yang-Yu

    A quantitative description of a complex system is inherently limited by our ability to estimate the system’s internal state from experimentally accessible outputs. Although the simultaneous measurement of all internal ...

  11. Improbability of DUrca process constraints EOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hao Tong; Qiu-he Peng

    2007-12-28

    According to recent observational and theoretical progresses, the DUrca process (direct Urca process) may be excluded from the category of neutron star cooling mechanisms. This result combined with the latest nuclear symmetry energy experiments, will provide us an independent way of testing the EOS (equation of state) for supranormal density. For example, soft EOSs such as FPS will probably be excluded.

  12. EOSDB: The Database for Nuclear EoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chikako Ishizuka; Takuma Suda; Hideyuki Suzuki; Akira Ohnishi; Kohsuke Sumiyoshi; Hiroshi Toki

    2014-09-29

    Nuclear equation of state (EoS) plays an important role in understanding the formation of compact objects such as neutron stars and black holes. The true nature of the EoS has been a matter of debate at any density range not only in the nuclear physics but also in the astronomy and astrophysics. We have constructed a database of EoSs by compiling data from the literature. Our database contains the basic properties of the nuclear EoS of symmetric nuclear matter and of pure neutron matter. It also includes the detailed information about the theoretical models, for example the adopted methods and assumptions in individual models. The novelty of the database is to consider new experimental probes such as the symmetry energy, its slope relative to the baryon density, and the incompressibility, which enables the users to check their model dependences. We demonstrate the performance of the EOSDB through the examinations of the model dependence among different nuclear EoSs. It is reveled that some theoretical EoSs, which is commonly used in astrophysics, do not satisfactorily agree with the experimental constraints.

  13. Eos,Vol. 85, No. 15, 13 April 2004 Fig.1.(a) SST and wind speed were observed by buoy 44014 (36.61N,74.84W) atVirginia Beach,Virginia,in July 2003.Averaged GOES SST (shaded)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sun, Donglian

    Eos,Vol. 85, No. 15, 13 April 2004 Fig.1.(a) SST and wind speed were observed by buoy 44014 (36 in the area [Kelly,2003].Satellite data,buoy observations,and weather maps were analyzed to investigate the anomalous cold water along the coast. The sea surface temperature (SST) observations made by buoy 44014 (0

  14. TRAVELING-WAVE MODULATOR USING A GELATIN-BASED EO POLYMER WAVEGUIDE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    TRAVELING-WAVE MODULATOR USING A GELATIN-BASED EO POLYMER WAVEGUIDE R. Shih, R. Chen, and Z. Z. Ho intensity modulator using a gelatin-based EO polymer waveguide has been built and characterized. This EO modulator is constructed from a nitrophenol/gelatin guest/host poled polymer system. V and "33 of 25 V

  15. Complete EOS for PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph S

    2009-10-08

    PBX 9502 is an insensitive plastic-bonded explosive based on triamino-trinitrobenzene (TATB). A complete equation of state (EOS) is constructed for unreacted PBX 9502 suitable for reactive burn models, i.e., high pressure regime in which material strength is unimportant. The PBX EOS is composed of two parts: a complete EOS for TATB and a porosity model which allows for variations in the initial PBX density. The TATB EOS is based on a cold curve and a thermal model for lattice vibrations. The heat capacity, and hence thermal model, is determined by the vibrational spectrum from Raman scattering. The cold curve is calibrated to diamond anvil cell data for isothermal compression using a two-piece Keane fitting form. Hugoniot data for PBX 9502 is used as a consistency check.

  16. Aerosol Observing System (AOS) Handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jefferson, A

    2011-01-17

    The Aerosol Observing System (AOS) is a suite of in situ surface measurements of aerosol optical and cloud-forming properties. The instruments measure aerosol properties that influence the earth’s radiative balance. The primary optical measurements are those of the aerosol scattering and absorption coefficients as a function of particle size and radiation wavelength and cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) measurements as a function of percent supersaturation. Additional measurements include those of the particle number concentration and scattering hygroscopic growth. Aerosol optical measurements are useful for calculating parameters used in radiative forcing calculations such as the aerosol single-scattering albedo, asymmetry parameter, mass scattering efficiency, and hygroscopic growth. CCN measurements are important in cloud microphysical models to predict droplet formation.

  17. Observability and Computability in Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhash Kak

    2012-06-26

    This paper considers the relevance of the concepts of observability and computability in physical theory. Observability is related to verifiability which is essential for effective computing and as physical systems are computational systems it is important even where explicit computation is not the goal. Specifically, we examine two problems: observability and computability for quantum computing, and remote measurement of time and frequency.

  18. A Performance Oriented Design Methodology for Large-Scale Distributed Data Intensive Information Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kerschberg, Larry

    -4444, USA Abstract The Earth Observing System (EOS) Data and In- formation System (EOSDIS) is perhaps one to the design of the EOSDIS Core System (ECS). Performance results, based on queuing network models of ECS-scale, geographically distributed, and handle very large volumes of data is the Earth Ob- serving System (EOS) Data

  19. E.O. Lawrence Awards

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sectorfor $1.14Dyneinscientists honored with E.O.

  20. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 05: 31 December 2014 Prepared Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  1. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 04: 30 September 2014 Prepared Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  2. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 30 January 2014 Prepared for: NOAA IOOS Association Coastal Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012 and ADCP assets lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality

  3. NOS Integrated Ocean Observations Systems (IOOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observing Assets After Hurricane Sandy NOAA Award No. NA14NOS4830003 Report 01: 30 April 2014 Prepared for Ocean Observing System when Hurricane Sandy passed through the region in October 2012. The objective lost during Sandy. The benefits of this work will increase the coverage and data quality of the surface

  4. Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Nu

    2006-01-01

    Partonic EoS in High-Energy Nuclear Collisions at RHIC Nu Xuproperties. In high-energy nuclear collisions, the term ?owthe early stage of high-energy nuclear collision, both the

  5. GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Epidemiology 3. Energy Management 4. Climate Variability & Change 5. Water Management 6. Weather Forecasting 7© GEO Secretariat Global Earth Observing System of Systems (GEOSS): Biodiversity, Ecosystems and GEO BON GEO Forest Monitoring Symposium 4 November 2008 Douglas M. Muchoney, Ph.D. U.S. Geological

  6. Rail gun development for EOS research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fowler, C.M.; Peterson, D.R.; Hawke, R.S.; Brooks, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The status of a railgun program for EOS research in progress at Los Alamos and Livermore National Laboratories is described. The operating principle of rail guns, the power supplies used to drive them, diagnostic techniques used to monitor their performance and initial efforts to develop projectiles suitable for EOS research are discussed. (WHK)

  7. The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

    2008-05-14

    We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

  8. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply, Distribution, or Use I am...

  9. Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    contained group of sensors and data gathering equipment that produces an automated weather observation * Weather observations support aviation, climate data, non government...

  10. Test, debug and development environment of Subaru Observation Software System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayashi, Saeko S.

    - 1/7 - Test, debug and development environment of Subaru Observation Software System Junichi have a computer system in Japan which simulates the network of the summit system in part. Software test, Japan ABSTRACT Subaru Observation Software System (SOSS) provides observers with so called high

  11. Ocean Observing System Simulation Experiments at AOML

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    criteria and rigorous validation methods developed for atmospheric OSSE systems* · Partnership with CIMAS The system has been rigorously validated to demonstrate that credible impact assessments are obtained without: Improve ocean analyses and forecasts for two applications · Predict transport and dispersion of oil spills

  12. DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DESIGN OF THE GREAT LAKES OBSERVING SYSTEM ENTERPRISE ARCHITECTURE T.J. Dekker1 , J.V. DePinto1 , S, collaborative, and consensus-based enterprise architecture design process was conducted under the direction that will achieve an integrated, comprehensive, and sustainable observing system enterprise for the Great Lakes

  13. Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    Seismic Observation Systems in Nagoya University and Publication of Data Nobuo Fukuwa,a) Jun Tobita,b) and Hiroaki Kojimac) This paper reports the current situation of the seismic monitoring program conducted by Nagoya University. First, the system for observing seismic ground motion in the Tokai Region is described

  14. Compact star constraints on the high-density EoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Grigorian; D. Blaschke; T. Klahn

    2006-11-19

    A new scheme for testing the nuclear matter (NM) equation of state (EoS) at high densities using constraints from compact star (CS) phenomenology is applied to neutron stars with a core of deconfined quark matter (QM). An acceptable EoS shall not to be in conflict with the mass measurement of 2.1 +/- 0.2 M_sun (1 sigma level) for PSR J0751+1807 and the mass-radius relation deduced from the thermal emission of RX J1856-3754. Further constraints for the state of matter in CS interiors come from temperature-age data for young, nearby objects. The CS cooling theory shall agree not only with these data, but also with the mass distribution inferred via population synthesis models as well as with LogN-LogS data. The scheme is applied to a set of hybrid EsoS with a phase transition to stiff, color superconducting QM which fulfills all above constraints and is constrained otherwise from NM saturation properties and flow data of heavy-ion collisions. We extrapolate our description to low temperatures and draw conclusions for the QCD phase diagram to be explored in heavy-ion collision experiments.

  15. EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk...

  16. EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    2898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations To focus Federal...

  17. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Statements of Energy Effects shall describe the effects of certain regulatory actions on energy supply, distribution, or use. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect...

  18. EO 11514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    1514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality EO 11514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality The Federal Government shall provide leadership in...

  19. Towards a new quark-nuclear matter EoS for applications in astrophysics and heavy-ion collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bastian, N -U

    2015-01-01

    The aim of our work is to develop a unified equation of state (EoS) for nuclear and quark matter for a wide range in temperature, density and isospin so that it becomes applicable for heavy-ion collisions as well as for the astrophysics of neutron stars, their mergers and supernova explosions. As a first step, we use improved EoS for the hadronic and quark matter phases and join them via Maxwell construction. We discuss the limitations of a 2-phase description and outline steps beyond it, towards the formulation of a unified quark-nuclear matter EoS on a more fundamental level by a cluster virial expansion.

  20. Rule-based system architecting of Earth observation satellite systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva Valero, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    System architecting is concerned with exploring the tradespace of early, high-level, system design decisions with a holistic, value-centric view. In the last few years, several tools and methods have been developed to ...

  1. Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems) Peter Bulychev1 , Franck, Danish-Chinese Center for Cyber Physical Systems (IDEA4CPS) and VKR Center of Excellence MT-LAB. #12;The iterations. We apply our approach to timed systems. We have developed a tool prototype and analyze

  2. Scavenging quantum information: Multiple observations of quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Rapcan; John Calsamiglia; Ramon Munoz-Tapia; Emilio Bagan; Vladimir Buzek

    2011-05-26

    Given an unknown state of a qudit that has already been measured optimally, can one still extract any information about the original unknown state? Clearly, after a maximally informative measurement, the state of the system `collapses' into a post-measurement state from which the {\\em{same}} observer cannot obtain further information about the original state of the system. However, the system still encodes a significant amount of information about the original preparation for a second observer who is unaware of the actions of the first one. We study how a series of independent observers can obtain, or scavenge, information about the unknown state of a system (quantified by the fidelity) when they sequentially measure it. We give closed-form expressions for the estimation fidelity, when one or several qudits are available to carry information about the single-qudit state, and study the `classical' limit when an arbitrarily large number of observers can obtain (nearly) complete information on the system. In addition to the case where all observers perform most informative measurements we study the scenario where a finite number of observers estimate the state with equal fidelity,regardless of their position in the measurement sequence; and the scenario where all observers use identical measurement apparata (up to a mutually unknown orientation) chosen so that a particular observer's estimation fidelity is maximized.

  3. Pole placement design for quantum systems via coherent observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zibo Miao; Matthew R. James; Valery A. Ugrinovskii

    2015-09-17

    We previously extended Luenberger's approach for observer design to the quantum case, and developed a class of coherent observers which tracks linear quantum stochastic systems in the sense of mean values. In light of the fact that the Luenberger observer is commonly and successfully applied in classical control, it is interesting to investigate the role of coherent observers in quantum feedback. As the first step in exploring observer-based coherent control, in this paper we study pole-placement techniques for quantum systems using coherent observers, and in such a fashion, poles of a closed-loop quantum system can be relocated at any desired locations. In comparison to classical feedback control design incorporating the Luenberger observer, here direct coupling between a quantum plant and the observer-based controller are allowed to enable a greater degree of freedom for the design of controller parameters. A separation principle is presented, and we show how to design the observer and feedback independently to be consistent with the laws of quantum mechanics. The proposed scheme is applicable to coherent feedback control of quantum systems, especially when the transient dynamic response is of interest, and this issue is illustrated in an example.

  4. Preprint, 9th Symposium on Integrated Observing and Assimilation Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Droegemeier, Kelvin K.

    innovative observing systems for high- resolution sensing of the lower atmosphere. The devel- opment of low-cost with polarimetric capabilities is one of the first goals. Such networks are to probe the lower atmos- phere

  5. Integrating spacecraft and aircraft in Earth Observation System architectures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suarez, Brandon H

    2011-01-01

    The Global Earth Observation System (GEOS) is the essential data gathering network that enables the advancement of Earth science. In recent years, efforts have been made to understand the major GEOS architectural tradeoffs. ...

  6. Control Landscapes for Observable Preparation with Open Quantum Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rebing Wu; Alexander Pechen; Herschel Rabitz; Michael Hsieh; Benjamin Tsou

    2007-08-16

    A quantum control landscape is defined as the observable as a function(al) of the system control variables. Such landscapes were introduced to provide a basis to understand the increasing number of successful experiments controlling quantum dynamics phenomena. This paper extends the concept to encompass the broader context of the environment having an influence. For the case that the open system dynamics are fully controllable, it is shown that the control landscape for open systems can be lifted to the analysis of an equivalent auxiliary landscape of a closed composite system that contains the environmental interactions. This inherent connection can be analyzed to provide relevant information about the topology of the original open system landscape. Application to the optimization of an observable expectation value reveals the same landscape simplicity observed in former studies on closed systems. In particular, no false sub-optimal traps exist in the system control landscape when seeking to optimize an observable, even in the presence of complex environments. Moreover, a quantitative study of the control landscape of a system interacting with a thermal environment shows that the enhanced controllability attainable with open dynamics significantly broadens the range of the achievable observable values over the control landscape.

  7. Supernova constraints on neutrino oscillation and EoS for proto-neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

    2014-05-02

    Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We here discuss how to determine the neutrino temperatures and propose a method to determine still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and ?{sub 13}, simultaneously. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with isotopic ratios of the light elements discovered in presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show that our method suggests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

  8. A digital video system for observing and recording occultations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barry, M A; Pavlov, Hristo; Hanna, William; McEwan, Alistair; Filipovic, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Stellar occultations by asteroids and outer solar system bodies can offer ground based observers with modest telescopes and camera equipment the opportunity to probe the shape, size, atmosphere and attendant moons or rings of these distant objects. The essential requirements of the camera and recording equipment are: good quantum efficiency and low noise, minimal dead time between images, good horological faithfulness of the image time stamps, robustness of the recording to unexpected failure, and low cost. We describe the Astronomical Digital Video occultation observing and recording System (ADVS) which attempts to fulfil these requirements and compare the system with other reported camera and recorder systems. Five systems have been built, deployed and tested over the past three years, and we report on three representative occultation observations: one being a 9 +/-1.5 second occultation of the trans-Neptunian object 28978 Ixion (mv=15.2) at 3 seconds per frame, one being a 1.51 +/-0.017 second occultation ...

  9. Development and validation of standard classroom observation systems for school practitioners: Ecobehavioral Assessment Systems Software (EBASS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, Charles R.; Carta, Judith J.; Kamps, Debra; Terry, Barbara; Delquadri, Joseph

    1994-01-01

    The development and validation of Ecobehavioral Assessment Systems Software (EBASS), a computer-assisted observational system for school practitioners, are described. Portable computers, used to support observational assessment, vastly improve...

  10. A cooperative control algorithm for camera based observational systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, Joseph G.

    2012-01-01

    Over the last several years, there has been considerable growth in camera based observation systems for a variety of safety, scientific, and recreational applications. In order to improve the effectiveness of these systems, we frequently desire the ability to increase the number of observed objects, but solving this problem is not as simple as adding more cameras. Quite often, there are economic or physical restrictions that prevent us from adding additional cameras to the system. As a result, we require methods that coordinate the tracking of objects between multiple cameras in an optimal way. In order to accomplish this goal, we present a new cooperative control algorithm for a camera based observational system. Specifically, we present a receding horizon control where we model the underlying optimal control problem as a mixed integer linear program. The benefit of this design is that we can coordinate the actions between each camera while simultaneously respecting its kinematics. In addition, we further improve the quality of our solution by coupling our algorithm with a Kalman filter. Through this integration, we not only add a predictive component to our control, but we use the uncertainty estimates provided by the filter to encourage the system to periodically observe any outliers in the observed area. This combined approach allows us to intelligently observe the entire region of interest in an effective and thorough manner.

  11. Circle criterion observer for a compression system Bjrnar Bhagen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gravdahl, Jan Tommy

    .gravdahl@itk.ntnu.no Abstract-- Observers for a compression system using turbo compressors are derived for a model that captures speed. Results are validated by simulations. I. MOTIVATION Compression systems using turbo compressors, centrifugal or axial, are exposed to the phenomenons of surge and rotating stall. Surge is an axisymmtrical

  12. OBSERVING LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS OF INFINITE-DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, William

    OBSERVING LYAPUNOV EXPONENTS OF INFINITE-DIMENSIONAL DYNAMICAL SYSTEMS WILLIAM OTT, MAURICIO A. RIVAS, AND JAMES WEST Abstract. Can the Lyapunov exponents of infinite-dimensional dynamical systems spaces generated by evolution partial differential equations. Contents 1. Introduction 1 1.1. Lyapunov

  13. Foulger, G.R., Microearthquake Analysis Techniques For Geothermal Applications, EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract S32B-02 (invited), 2009.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    urgency to develop renewable energy resources, including geothermal power, and in particular Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), has created a need for highly sophisticated microearthquake data processingFoulger, G.R., Microearthquake Analysis Techniques For Geothermal Applications, EOS Trans. AGU

  14. Data Management for Earth System Science Institute for Computational Earth System Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    imaging sensors on Earth-orbiting satellites, we find they have already populated several multi- terabyte- age on a daily or weekly basis. The advent of the advanced sensors on the Earth Observing System (EOS by some complex and incomplete encoding of semantic metadata into a file name. Most Earth system science c

  15. Formation of Double Neutron Star systems as implied by observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beniamini, Paz

    2015-01-01

    Double Neutron Stars (DNS) have to survive two supernovae and still remain bound. This sets strong limits on the nature of the second collapse in these systems. We consider the masses and orbital parameters of the DNS population and constrain the two distributions of mass ejection and kick velocities directly from observations with no a-priori assumptions regarding evolutionary models and/or the types of the supernovae involved. We show that there is strong evidence for two distinct types of supernovae in these systems, where the second collapse in the majority of the observed systems involved small mass ejection ($\\Delta M\\lesssim 0.5M_{\\odot}$) and a corresponding low-kick velocity ($v_{k}\\lesssim 30 km/sec$). This formation scenario is compatible, for example, with an electron capture supernova. Only a minority of the systems have formed via the standard SN scenario involving larger mass ejection of $\\sim 2.2 M_{\\odot}$ and kick velocities of up to $400$km/sec. Due to the typically small kicks in most DNS ...

  16. Towards the theory of control in observable quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V P Belavkin

    2004-08-02

    An operational description of the controlled Markov dynamics of quantum-mechanical system is introduced. The feedback control strategies with regard to the dynamical reduction of quantum states in the course of quantum real-time measurements are discribed in terms of quantum filtering of these states. The concept of sufficient coordinates for the description of the a posteriori quantum states from a given class is introduced, and it is proved that they form a classical Markov process with values in either state operators or state vector space. The general problem of optimal control of a quantum-mechanical system is discussed and the corresponding Bellman equation in the space of sufficient coordinates is derived. The results are illustrated in the example of control of the semigroup dynamics of a quantum system that is instantaneously observed at discrete times and evolves between measurement times according to the Schroedinger equation.

  17. Rule-Based System Architecting of Earth Observing Systems: Earth Science Decadal Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Selva, Daniel

    This paper presents a methodology to explore the architectural trade space of Earth observing satellite systems, and applies it to the Earth Science Decadal Survey. The architecting problem is formulated as a combinatorial ...

  18. Solar System Formation Deduced from Observations of Matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herndon, J M

    2004-01-01

    Aspects of our Solar System's formation are deduced from observations of the chemical nature of matter. Massive cores are indicative of terrestrial-planet-composition-similarity to enstatite chondrite meteorites, whose highly-reduced state of oxidation may be thermodynamically stable in solar matter only at elevated temperatures and pressures. Consistent with the formation of Earth as envisioned by Arnold Eucken, thermodynamic considerations lead to the deduction that the terrestrial planets formed by liquid-condensation, raining out from the central regions of hot, gaseous protoplanets. The mass of protoplanetary-Earth, estimated to be 275-305mE, is similar to the mass of Jupiter, 318mE. Solar primordial gases and volatile elements were separated from the terrestrial planets early after planet formation, presumably during some super-luminous solar event, perhaps even before Mercury had completely formed. The pre-super-luminosity-terrestrial-planet mass distribution appears to be more consistent with observat...

  19. Thermodynamic properties of mesoscale convective systems observed during BAMEX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correia, James; Arritt, R.

    2008-11-01

    Dropsonde observations from the Bow-echo and Mesoscale convective vortex EXperiment (BAMEX) are used to document the spatio-temporal variability of temperature, moisture and wind within mesoscale convective systems (MCSs). Onion type sounding structures are found throughout the stratiform region of MCSs but the temperature and moisture variability is large. Composite soundings were constructed and statistics of thermodynamic variability were generated within each sub-region of the MCS. The calculated air vertical velocity helped identify subsaturated downdrafts. We found that lapse rates within the cold pool varied markedly throughout the MCS. Layered wet bulb potential temperature profiles seem to indicate that air within the lowest several km comes from a variety of source regions. We also found that lapse rate transitions across the 0 C level were more common than isothermal, melting layers. We discuss the implications these findings have and how they can be used to validate future high resolution numerical simulations of MCSs.

  20. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Systems (September 2011) Vulnerability Analysis of Energy Delivery Control Systems - 2011 Lessons Learned from Cyber Security Assessments of SCADA and Energy Management Systems...

  1. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGasObservation of aof

  2. Constraints on binary neutron star merger product from short GRB observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gao, He; Lü, Hou-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Binary neutron star mergers are strong gravitational wave (GW) sources and the leading candidates to interpret short duration gamma-ray bursts (SGRBs). Under the assumptions that SGRBs are produced by double neutron star mergers, we use the statistical observational properties of {\\em Swift} SGRBs and the mass distribution of Galactic double neutron star systems to place constraints on the neutron star equation of state (EoS) and the properties of the post-merger product. We show that current observations already put following tight constraints: 1) A neutron star EoS with a maximum mass close to a parameterization of $M_{\\rm max} = 2.37\\,M_\\odot (1+1.58\\times10^{-10} P^{-2.84})$ is favored; 2) The fractions for the several outcomes of NS-NS mergers are as follows: $\\sim40\\%$ prompt BHs, $\\sim30\\%$ supra-massive NSs that collapse to BHs in a range of delay time scales, and $\\sim30\\%$ stable NSs that never collapse; 3) The initial spin of the newly born supra-massive NSs should be near the breakup limit ($P_i\\s...

  3. Explosive Products EOS: Adjustment for detonation speed and energy release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menikoff, Ralph

    2014-09-05

    Propagating detonation waves exhibit a curvature effect in which the detonation speed decreases with increasing front curvature. The curvature effect is due to the width of the wave profile. Numerically, the wave profile depends on resolution. With coarse resolution, the wave width is too large and results in a curvature effect that is too large. Consequently, the detonation speed decreases as the cell size is increased. We propose a modification to the products equation of state (EOS) to compensate for the effect of numerical resolution; i.e., to increase the CJ pressure in order that a simulation propagates a detonation wave with a speed that is on average correct. The EOS modification also adjusts the release isentrope to correct the energy release.

  4. Eos, Vol. 86, No. 44, 1 November 2005 U.S. Navy Sued Over Sonar Use The

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    Eos, Vol. 86, No. 44, 1 November 2005 U.S. Navy Sued Over Sonar Use The Natural Resources Defense.S. Navy over its use of mid-frequency sonar, the principle system used aboard U.S. naval ves- sels,including the Marine Mammals Protection Act.NRDC lawyer Andrew Wetzler said the goal of this suit is to compel the Navy

  5. Observations of designer behaviors in complex system design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Austin-Breneman, Jesse

    2011-01-01

    The design of large-scale engineering systems requires design teams to balance a complex set of considerations. Formal approaches for optimizing complex system design assume that designers behave in a rational, consistent ...

  6. First Report of Nectria galligena Causing European Canker of Apple Trees in Ontario. A. R. Biggs, Agriculture Canada Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario LOR 2EO. Plant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biggs, Alan R.

    First Report of Nectria galligena Causing European Canker of Apple Trees in Ontario. A. R. Biggs, Agriculture Canada Research Station, Vineland Station, Ontario LOR 2EO. Plant Disease 69:1007, 1985. Accepted galligena Bres. was first observed in Wentworth County, Ontario, Canada, in March 1985. The fungus had been

  7. EOS of North America, Inc. Material Pricing Order Placement: us.materialorders@eos-na.com or via fax: (248) 306-0298

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McGaughey, Alan

    conductivity, high-stiffness $62 9012-0029 Polyamide 12 Carbon Fiber Reinforced CarbonMide® Black, light) 306-0143 www.eos.info *Sold in 20 kilogram increments for plastics. **Sold in 10 kilogram increments, 2014 v13 EOS Materials Plastics Detailed material information, including data sheets, can be found

  8. Navigation System for Ground Vehicles using Temporally Interconnected Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    navigation technique for an automotive vehicle. This method involves several observers, each designed attitude measurements from an inertial measurement unit (IMU) is performed (at rest) on the launch platform

  9. S3: THE IBM SMART SURVEILLANCE SYSTEM: FROM TRANSACTIONAL SYSTEMS TO OBSERVATIONAL SYSTEMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Senior, Andrew

    sensor signals, indexing and searching sensor meta-data, data mining and scalability. In this paper we Computer Vision Group, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center ABSTRACT Pervasive sensor based systems. Enabling and building such systems also poses many technology challenges, extracting information from

  10. Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK AND WILLIAM R. COTTON

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Observational Analysis of the Predictability of Mesoscale Convective Systems ISRAEL L. JIRAK (Manuscript received 30 December 2005, in final form 4 October 2006) ABSTRACT Mesoscale convective systems of usefulness in operational forecasting. 1. Introduction Mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) frequently de

  11. System architecting of a campaign of earth observing satellites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colson, Justin M

    2008-01-01

    Given the current level of concern over anthropogenic climate change, and the ongoing debate worldwide regarding what action should be taken to reduce and reverse future warming, the ability to collect data on Earth system ...

  12. File:EO 13186.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New Pages Recent Changes AllApschem.pdf JumpLIQ.pdfshaleusa8.pdf Jump to:topfields.pdf JumpEO

  13. Algorithms, Protocols & Systems for Remote Observation Using Networked Robotic Cameras 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qin, Ni

    2010-01-16

    for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY Approved by: Chair of Committee, Dezhen Song Committee Members, Ricardo Gutierrez-Osuna Dmitri Loguinov Ergun Akleman Head of Department, Valerie E. Taylor May 2008 Major Subject: Computer Science iii ABSTRACT Algorithms... in remote observation using networked robotic cameras. v To my lovely cat Maomao, my dear family Yu and Amy, and my parents vi ACKNOWLEDGMENTS I would like to thank my committee chair, Dr. Dezhen Song, and my committee members, Dr. Gutierrez-Osuna, Dr...

  14. PREOPERATIVE OVARIAN CANCER DIAGNOSIS USING NEURO-FUZZY APPROACH E.O. Madu, V. Stalbovskaya, B. Hamadicharef, E.C. Ifeachor S. Van Huffel, D. Timmerman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PREOPERATIVE OVARIAN CANCER DIAGNOSIS USING NEURO-FUZZY APPROACH E.O. Madu, V. Stalbovskaya, B the Adaptive Network based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS). Our model predicts ovarian cancer malignancy using operating characteristic curve of 0.85. Keywords: ovarian cancer, medical diagnosis, neural networks, neuro

  15. NOAA's Integrated Observing System SSEC 50th Anniversary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    /NASA/DoD mission, is the country's first operational space weather mission providing data to NOAA's Space Weather;2 Supporting NOAA's Mission NOAA is a science-based services agency engaged with the entire Earth system science enterprise. Climate Adaptation & Mitigation Weather Ready Nation Resilient Coastal Communities

  16. NASA's Earth Observing System CloudsandtheEarth'sRa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Gary G. Gibson, Head of the Radiation and Aerosols Branch, and Bruce A. Wielicki, CERES for improving our scientific understanding of ongoing natural and human-induced global climate change's Radiant Energy System (CERES) experiment is one of the highest priority sci- entific satellite instruments

  17. Mathematical Foundations for Efficient Structural Controllability and Observability Analysis of Complex Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zufiria, Pedro J.

    The relationship between structural controllability and observability of complex systems is studied. Algebraic and graph theoretic tools are combined to prove the extent of some controller/observer duality results. Two ...

  18. Designing a Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer for Stochastic Linear and Nonlinear Impulsive Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayati, Moosa [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Alwan, Mohamad; Liu Xinzhi [Department of Applied Mathematics, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, Ontario (Canada); Khaloozadeh, Hamid [Faculty of Electrical and Computer Engineering, K. N. Toosi University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2011-11-30

    State observation (estimation) is a very important issue in system analysis and control. This paper develops a new observer called Stochastic Adaptive Impulsive Observer (SAIO) for the state estimation of impulsive systems. The proposed observer is applicable to linear and nonlinear stochastic impulsive systems. In addition, the effect of parametric uncertainty is considered and unknown parameters of the system are estimated by suitable adaptation laws. Impulsive system theory, particularly stochastic Lyapunov-like function, is used to analyze the stability and convergence of the state estimations. The main advantages of the proposed observer are: 1) it gives continuous estimation from discrete time measurements of the system output, and 2) it is useful for state estimation when continuous measurements are impossible or expensive. Simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed observer and we believe that it has many applications in control and estimation theories.

  19. Effects of EoS in viscous hydro+cascade model for the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpenko, Iu; Huovinen, P; Petersen, H

    2016-01-01

    A state-of-the-art 3+1 dimensional cascade + viscous hydro + cascade model vHLLE+UrQMD has been applied to heavy ion collisions in RHIC Beam Energy Scan range $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=7.7\\dots 200$ GeV. Based on comparison to available experimental data it was estimated that an effective value of shear viscosity over entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ in hydrodynamic stage has to decrease from $\\eta/s=0.2$ to $0.08$ as collision energy increases from $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 7.7$ to $39$ GeV, and to stay at $\\eta/s=0.08$ for $39\\le\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}\\le200$ GeV. In this work we show how an equation of state with first order phase transition affects the hydrodynamic evolution at those collision energies and changes the results of the model as compared to "default scenario" with a crossover type EoS from chiral model.

  20. Effects of EoS in viscous hydro+cascade model for the RHIC Beam Energy Scan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iu. Karpenko; M. Bleicher; P. Huovinen; H. Petersen

    2016-01-05

    A state-of-the-art 3+1 dimensional cascade + viscous hydro + cascade model vHLLE+UrQMD has been applied to heavy ion collisions in RHIC Beam Energy Scan range $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}=7.7\\dots 200$ GeV. Based on comparison to available experimental data it was estimated that an effective value of shear viscosity over entropy density ratio $\\eta/s$ in hydrodynamic stage has to decrease from $\\eta/s=0.2$ to $0.08$ as collision energy increases from $\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}} = 7.7$ to $39$ GeV, and to stay at $\\eta/s=0.08$ for $39\\le\\sqrt{s_{\\rm NN}}\\le200$ GeV. In this work we show how an equation of state with first order phase transition affects the hydrodynamic evolution at those collision energies and changes the results of the model as compared to "default scenario" with a crossover type EoS from chiral model.

  1. A climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth System model, J. Geophys System model Roman Olson,1 Ryan Sriver,1 Marlos Goes,2,3 Nathan M. Urban,4,5 H. Damon Matthews,6 MuraliA climate sensitivity estimate using Bayesian fusion of instrumental observations and an Earth

  2. Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Needs Related to the Regional Observing System in the Gulf of Maine RARGOM Report 05-1 Theme Session 6-7 July, 2005 Cliff House Ogunquit, Maine Convened by Regional Association for Research on the Gulf of Maine Gulf of Maine Census of Marine Life Gulf of Maine Ocean Observing System Coastal

  3. Cooling of neutron stars and hybrid stars with a stiff hadronic EoS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. Grigorian; D. Blaschke; D. N. Voskresensky

    2015-03-16

    Within the "nuclear medium cooling" scenario of neutron stars all reliably known temperature - age data, including those of the central compact objects in the supernova remnants of Cassiopeia A and XMMU-J1732, can be comfortably explained by a set of cooling curves obtained by variation of the star mass within the range of typical observed masses. The recent measurements of the high masses of the pulsars PSR J1614-2230 and PSR J0348-0432 on the one hand, and of the low masses for PSR J0737-3039B and the companion of PSR J1756-2251 on the other, provide independent proof for the existence of neutron stars with masses in a broad range from $\\sim 1.2$ to 2 $M_\\odot$. The values $M>2 M_{\\odot}$ call for sufficiently stiff equations of state for neutron star matter. We investigate the response of the set of neutron star cooling curves to a stiffening of the nuclear equation of state so that maximum masses of about $2.4 M_\\odot$ would be accessible and to a deconfinement phase transition from such stiff nuclear matter in the outer core to color superconducting quark matter in the inner core. Without readjustment of cooling inputs the mass range required to cover all cooling data for the stiff DD2 equation of state should include masses of $2.426 M_\\odot$ for describing the fast cooling of CasA while the existence of a quark matter core accelerates the cooling so that CasA cooling data are described with a hybrid star of mass $1.674 M_\\odot$.

  4. EOS Topical Meeting on Molecular Plasmonic Devices, Engelberg, Switzerland, April 2006 Plasmon excitation by the Gaussian-like core mode of a photonic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    EOS Topical Meeting on Molecular Plasmonic Devices, Engelberg, Switzerland, April 2006 Plasmon the #12;EOS Topical Meeting on Molecular Plasmonic Devices, Engelberg, Switzerland, April 2006 number

  5. Astrometrical Observations of Pluto - Charon System with the Automated Telescopes of Pulkovo Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devyatkin, Alexander V; Slesarenko, Vyacheslav Yu

    2015-01-01

    The space probe 'New Horizon' was launched on 19th of January 2006 in order to study Pluto and its moons. Spacecraft will fly by Pluto as close as 12500 km in the middle of July 2015 and will get the most detailed images of Pluto and its moon until this moment. At the same time, observation obtained by the ground-based telescopes may also be helpful for the research of such distant system. Thereby, the Laboratory of observational astrometry of Pulkovo Observatory of RAS made a decision to reprocess observations obtained during last decade. More than 350 positional observations of Pluto - Charon system were carried out with the mirror astrograph ZA-320M at Pulkovo and Maksutov telescope MTM-500M near Kislovodsk. These observations were processed by means of software system APEX-II developed in Pulkovo observatory and numerical simulation was performed to calculate the differences between positions of photocenter and barycenter of Pluto - Charon system.

  6. EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    i THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING SYSTEMS (ASOS PREPARED UNDER OUR SUPERVISION BY WENDY ANN BRAZENEC ENTITLED EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS;iii ABSTRACT OF THESIS EVALUATION OF ULTRASONIC SNOW DEPTH SENSORS FOR AUTOMATED SURFACE OBSERVING

  7. Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) for the Mid-Columbia Basin

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zack, J; Natenberg, E J; Knowe, G V; Waight, K; Manobianco, J; Hanley, D; Kamath, C

    2011-09-13

    The overall goal of this multi-phased research project known as WindSENSE is to develop an observation system deployment strategy that would improve wind power generation forecasts. The objective of the deployment strategy is to produce the maximum benefit for 1- to 6-hour ahead forecasts of wind speed at hub-height ({approx}80 m). In this phase of the project the focus is on the Mid-Columbia Basin region, which encompasses the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) wind generation area (Figure 1) that includes the Klondike, Stateline, and Hopkins Ridge wind plants. There are two tasks in the current project effort designed to validate the Ensemble Sensitivity Analysis (ESA) observational system deployment approach in order to move closer to the overall goal: (1) Perform an Observing System Experiment (OSE) using a data denial approach. The results of this task are presented in a separate report. (2) Conduct a set of Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSE) for the Mid-Colombia basin region. This report presents the results of the OSSE task. The specific objective is to test strategies for future deployment of observing systems in order to suggest the best and most efficient ways to improve wind forecasting at BPA wind farm locations. OSSEs have been used for many years in meteorology to evaluate the potential impact of proposed observing systems, determine tradeoffs in instrument design, and study the most effective data assimilation methodologies to incorporate the new observations into numerical weather prediction (NWP) models (Atlas 1997; Lord 1997). For this project, a series of OSSEs will allow consideration of the impact of new observing systems of various types and in various locations.

  8. Environmental Management Systems | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Management Systems The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is committed to implement sustainability into all aspects of operations. Executive Order (EO) 13423, Strengthening Federal...

  9. Capability of the penetrator seismometer system for lunar seismic event observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takeuchi, Nozomu

    Capability of the penetrator seismometer system for lunar seismic event observation R. Yamada a of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Sagamihara Penetrator Moonquake Lunar exploration Planetary seismology a b s t r a c t We developed a seismometer system

  10. time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20) may also cause). At this stage, the core of star A undergoes collapse, and the residual nuclear fuel is ignited to power aware that both tidal and general relativistic ef- fects will be important in this system

  11. Stochastic Modeling and Optimization for Robust Power Management in a Partially Observable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Qiu, Qinru

    -of-the- art system modules are capable of trading power for performance or being put into sleep or low powerStochastic Modeling and Optimization for Robust Power Management in a Partially Observable System As the hardware and software complexity grows, it is unlikely for the power management hardware/software to have

  12. Improved upper bounds on Kaluza-Klein gravity with current Solar System experiments and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue-Mei Deng; Yi Xie

    2015-10-10

    As an extension of previous works on classical tests of Kaluza-Klein (KK) gravity and as an attempt to find more stringent constraints on this theory, its effects on physical experiments and astronomical observations conducted in the Solar System are studied. We investigate the gravitational time delay at inferior conjunction caused by KK gravity, and use new Solar System ephemerides and the observation of \\textit{Cassini} to strengthen constraints on KK gravity by up to two orders of magnitude. These improved upper bounds mean that the fifth-dimensional space in the soliton case is a very flat extra dimension in the Solar System, even in the vicinity of the Sun.

  13. Accurately Estimating the State of a Geophysical System with Sparse Observations: Predicting the Weather

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhe An; Daniel Rey; Henry D. I. Abarbanel

    2014-05-11

    Utilizing the information in observations of a complex system to make accurate predictions through a quantitative model when observations are completed at time $T$, requires an accurate estimate of the full state of the model at time $T$. When the number of measurements $L$ at each observation time within the observation window is larger than a sufficient minimum value $L_s$, the impediments in the estimation procedure are removed. As the number of available observations is typically such that $L \\ll L_s$, additional information from the observations must be presented to the model. We show how, using the time delays of the measurements at each observation time, one can augment the information transferred from the data to the model, removing the impediments to accurate estimation and permitting dependable prediction. We do this in a core geophysical fluid dynamics model, the shallow water equations, at the heart of numerical weather prediction. The method is quite general, however, and can be utilized in the analysis of a broad spectrum of complex systems where measurements are sparse. When the model of the complex system has errors, the method still enables accurate estimation of the state of the model and thus evaluation of the model errors in a manner separated from uncertainties in the data assimilation procedure.

  14. Faculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scofield, John H.

    and Usage, a course that has evolved over the years into Introduction to Solar Energy and, this semesterFaculty Observations: John Scofield An Energy-Monitoring System for Stanford University's Leslie to make a major change in my research field. In graduate school and at Bell Labs I had studied noise

  15. Observation and Confirmation of Six Strong Lensing Systems in The Dark Energy Survey Science Verification Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nord, B; Lin, H; Diehl, H T; Helsby, J; Kuropatkin, N; Amara, A; Collett, T; Allam, S; Caminha, G; De Bom, C; Desai, S; Dúmet-Montoya, H; Pereira, M Elidaiana da S; Finley, D A; Flaugher, B; Furlanetto, C; Gaitsch, H; Gill, M; Merritt, K W; More, A; Tucker, D; Rykoff, E S; Rozo, E; Abdalla, F B; Agnello, A; Auger, M; Brunner, R J; Kind, M Carrasco; Castander, F J; Cunha, C E; da Costa, L N; Foley, R; Gerdes, D W; Glazebrook, K; Gschwend, J; Hartley, W; Kessler, R; Lagattuta, D; Lewis, G; Maia, M A G; Makler, M; Menanteau, F; Niernberg, A; Scolnic, D; Vieira, J D; Gramillano, R; Abbott, T M C; Banerji, M; Benoit-Lévy, A; Brooks, D; Burke, D L; Capozzi, D; Rosell, A Carnero; Carretero, J; D'Andrea, C B; Dietrich, J P; Doel, P; Evrard, A E; Frieman, J; Gaztanaga, E; Gruen, D; Honscheid, K; James, D J; Kuehn, K; Li, T S; Lima, M; Marshall, J L; Martini, P; Melchior, P; Miquel, R; Neilsen, E; Nichol, R C; Ogando, R; Plazas, A A; Romer, A K; Sako, M; Sanchez, E; Scarpine, V; Schubnell, M; Sevilla-Noarbe, I; Smith, R C; Soares-Santos, M; Sobreira, F; Suchyta, E; Swanson, M E C; Tarle, G; Thaler, J; Walker, A R; Wester, W; Zhang, Y

    2015-01-01

    We report the observation and confirmation of the first group- and cluster-scale strong gravitational lensing systems found in Dark Energy Survey (DES) data. Through visual inspection of data from the Science Verification (SV) season, we identified 53 candidate systems. We then obtained spectroscopic follow-up of 21 candidates using the Gemini Multi-Object Spectrograph (GMOS) at the Gemini South telescope and the Inamori-Magellan Areal Camera and Spectrograph (IMACS) at the Magellan/Baade telescope. With this follow-up, we confirmed six candidates as gravitational lenses: Three of the systems are newly discovered, and the remaining three were previously known. Of the 21 observed candidates, the remaining 15 were either not detected in spectroscopic observations, were observed and did not exhibit continuum emission (or spectral features), or were ruled out as lensing systems. The confirmed sample consists of one group-scale and five galaxy cluster-scale lenses. The lensed sources range in redshift z ~ 0.80-3.2...

  16. Strain and stress eld in Taiwan oblique convergent system: constraints from GPS observation and tectonic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Jian-Cheng

    Strain and stress ¢eld in Taiwan oblique convergent system: constraints from GPS observation, Taiwan b Institute of Geophysics, National Central University, Chungli 320, Taiwan c Laboratoire de Sciences, Academia Sinica, P.O. Box 1-55, Nankang, Taipei 115, Taiwan Received 20 January 2003; received

  17. High resolution remote sensing observations for missions to the Jovian system: Io as a case study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    High resolution remote sensing observations for missions to the Jovian system: Io as a case study Keywords: Io Remote sensing Instruments a b s t r a c t We present modeled images of Io at a variety objectives that could be achieved from missions engaged in long range remote-sensing of Io during

  18. DownloadedBy:[dbkaber@eos.ncsu.edu]At:19:3011June2007 Situation awareness and driving performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaber, David B.

    @eos.ncsu.edu Ergonomics Vol. 50, No. 8, August 2007, 1351­1364 Ergonomics ISSN 0014-0139 print/ISSN 1366-5847 online ª

  19. Autonomous Observing and Control Systems for PAIRITEL, a 1.3m Infrared Imaging Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. S. Bloom; Dan L. Starr; Cullen H. Blake; M. F. Skrutskie; Emilio E. Falco

    2005-11-30

    The Peters Automated Infrared Imaging Telescope (PAIRITEL) is the first meter-class telescope operating as a fully robotic IR imaging system. Dedicated in October 2004, PAIRITEL began regular observations in mid-December 2004 as part of a 1.5 year commissioning period. The system was designed to respond without human intervention to new gamma-ray burst transients: this milestone was finally reached on November 9, 2005 but the telescope had a number of semi-automated sub-10 minute responses throughout early commissioning. When not operating in Target of Opportunity mode, PAIRITEL performs a number of queue scheduled transient monitoring campaigns. To achieve this level of automation, we have developed communicating tools to connect the various sub-systems: an intelligent queue scheduling database, run-time configurable observation sequence software, a data reduction pipeline, and a master state machine which monitors and controls all functions within and affecting the observatory.

  20. EOS3nn: An iTOUGH2 module for non-Newtonian liquid and gasflow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Finsterle, Stefan; Pruess, Karsten

    2002-08-01

    This report documents the iTOUGH2 module EOS3nn, developed for modeling two-phase isothermal flow of a non-Newtonian liquid and a non-condensible gas in multidimensional, porous and fractured geologic media. This document supplements the TOUGH2 and iTOUGH2 user s guides and is therefore not a self-contained manual. It presents information on the physical processes modeled and the mathematical and numerical methods used. Also included are two sample problems for code testing and benchmarking. Modeling scenarios and approaches are discussed to illustrate problem setup and usage of the EOS3nn module.

  1. Optical observations of Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U. Kiziloglu; A. Baykal; N. Kiziloglu

    2006-08-05

    ROTSE-IIId observations of the Be/X-ray transient system KS 1947+300 obtained between September 2004 and December 2005 make it possible to study the correlation between optical and X-ray activity. The optical outburst of 0.1 mag was accompanied by an increase in X-ray flux in 2004 observations. Strong correlation between the optical and X-ray light curves suggests that neutron star directly accretes from the outflowing material of Be star. The nearly zero time lag between X-ray and optical light curves suggests a heating of the disk of Be star by X-rays. No optical brightening and X-ray enhancement was seen in 2005 observations. There is no indication of the orbital modulation in the optical light curve.

  2. Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed in the southern Great Plains

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niyogi, Dev

    Urban and land surface effects on the 30 July 2003 mesoscale convective system event observed/Atmosphere Mesoscale Prediction System (COAMPS 1 ) to investigate the impact of urban and land vegetation processes on the prediction of the mesoscale convective system (MCS) observed on 30 July 2003 in the vicinity of Oklahoma City

  3. Observation of transient gain without population inversion in a laser-cooled rubidium lambda system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. R. de Echaniz; Andrew D. Greentree; A. V. Durrant; D. M. Segal; J. P. Marangos; J. A. Vaccaro

    2001-05-17

    We have observed clear Rabi oscillations of a weak probe in a strongly driven three-level lambda system in laser-cooled rubidium for the first time. When the coupling field is non-adiabatically switched on using a Pockels cell, transient probe gain without population inversion is obtained in the presence of uncoupled absorptions. Our results are supported by three-state computations.

  4. Distribution of Phoxinus eos, Phoxinus neogaeus, and Their Asexually-Reproducing Hybrids (Pisces: Cyprinidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sokolowski, Marla

    Distribution of Phoxinus eos, Phoxinus neogaeus, and Their Asexually-Reproducing Hybrids (Pisces asexually reproducing vertebrates species. The distribution of hybrid Phoxinus among lakes in Algonquin Park, Ontario, was evaluated relative to the distribution of parental species and relative to physiochemical

  5. PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontoyiannis, Ioannis

    directly on remote sensing data in the compressed domain. 2. PRELIMINARIES We investigate both blockPROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES1 Vittorio, such as multispectral satellite scenes, com- pressed with wavelet-based or block-transform-based trans- formations

  6. PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kontoyiannis, Ioannis

    PROGRESSIVE CLASSIFICATION IN THE COMPRESSED DOMAIN FOR LARGE EOS SATELLITE DATABASES 1 Vittorio, such as multispectral satellite scenes, com­ pressed with wavelet­based or block­transform­based trans­ formations to a homo­ geneous block of pixels in the original image or to a hetero­ geneous block. In the first case

  7. Eos, Vol. 91, No. 30, 27 July 2010 Global ocean circulation is a primary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Susanto, R. Dwi

    , in addition to modify- ing marine ecosystems, primary productiv- ity, and seasonal fish migration. ThereforeEos, Vol. 91, No. 30, 27 July 2010 Global ocean circulation is a primary mechanism for transporting is important for verification of ocean circulation models and of primary interest to climate research

  8. Eos, Vol. 75, No. 40, October 4, 1994 At the same time, drilling can contribute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torsvik, Trond Helge

    Eos, Vol. 75, No. 40, October 4, 1994 At the same time, drilling can contribute to a number questions at optimal geological sites from around the world and should involve drilling and coring at a variety of depths. That is, the program should not be restricted to only deep or shallow drilling

  9. Eos, Vol. 88, No. 14, 3 April 2007 North Korea carried out a widely reported

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eos, Vol. 88, No. 14, 3 April 2007 North Korea carried out a widely reported nuclear explosion on 9 activity in this area suspected to be indicative of North Korea preparing to conduct nuclear tests? The answer was quickly shown to be affirmative based on seismic data. Second, was it really a nuclear test

  10. Reprinted from Eos, Vol. 92, No. 8, 8 February 2011, pg 48. Integrating Paleoecological Databases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Reprinted from Eos, Vol. 92, No. 8, 8 February 2011, pg 48. Integrating Paleoecological Databases Neotoma Consortium Workshop; Madison, Wisconsin, 23­26 September 2010 Paleoecology can contribute much climate change, and paleoclimate reconstruction, for example. However, while paleoecology is increasingly

  11. Eos, Vol. 79, No. 42, October 20, 1998 Volcanic Ash Can Pose

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Becker, Thorsten W.

    Eos, Vol. 79, No. 42, October 20, 1998 Volcanic Ash Can Pose Hazards to Air Traffic PAGES 505 and potentially deadly problems that can arise from volcanic ash clouds. The clouds can rise into the cruise the ash. The ash can ruin planes, and cause loss of thrust and even flameouts. It also can slicken runways

  12. Constraints on the progenitor system and the environs of SN 2014J from deep radio observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pérez-Torres, M. A.; Alberdi, A. [Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía, Glorieta de las Astronomía, s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Lundqvist, P.; Björnsson, C. I.; Fransson, C. [Department of Astronomy, AlbaNova University Center, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Beswick, R. J.; Muxlow, T. W. B.; Argo, M. K. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Paragi, Z. [Joint Institute for VLBI in Europe, Postbus 2, 7990 AA Dwingeloo (Netherlands); Ryder, S. [Australian Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 915, North Ryde, NSW 1670 (Australia); Marcaide, J. M.; Ros, E.; Guirado, J. C. [Departamento de Astronomía i Astrofísica, Universidad de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Martí-Vidal, I. [Onsala Space Observatory, Chalmers University of Technology, SE-43992 Onsala (Sweden)

    2014-09-01

    We report deep EVN and eMERLIN observations of the Type Ia SN 2014J in the nearby galaxy M82. Our observations represent, together with JVLA observations of SNe 2011fe and 2014J, the most sensitive radio studies of Type Ia SNe ever. By combining data and a proper modeling of the radio emission, we constrain the mass-loss rate from the progenitor system of SN 2014J to M-dot ?7.0×10{sup ?10} M{sub ?} yr{sup ?1} (for a wind speed of 100 km s{sup –1}). If the medium around the supernova is uniform, then n {sub ISM} ? 1.3 cm{sup –3}, which is the most stringent limit for the (uniform) density around a Type Ia SN. Our deep upper limits favor a double-degenerate (DD) scenario—involving two WD stars—for the progenitor system of SN 2014J, as such systems have less circumstellar gas than our upper limits. By contrast, most single-degenerate (SD) scenarios, i.e., the wide family of progenitor systems where a red giant, main-sequence, or sub-giant star donates mass to an exploding WD, are ruled out by our observations. (While completing our work, we noticed that a paper by Margutti et al. was submitted to The Astrophysical Journal. From a non-detection of X-ray emission from SN 2014J, the authors obtain limits of M-dot ?1.2×10{sup ?9} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1} (for a wind speed of 100 km s{sup –1}) and n {sub ISM} ? 3.5 cm{sup –3}, for the ??r {sup –2} wind and constant density cases, respectively. As these limits are less constraining than ours, the findings by Margutti et al. do not alter our conclusions. The X-ray results are, however, important to rule out free-free and synchrotron self-absorption as a reason for the radio non-detections.) Our estimates on the limits on the gas density surrounding SN2011fe, using the flux density limits from Chomiuk et al., agree well with their results. Although we discuss the possibilities of an SD scenario passing observational tests, as well as uncertainties in the modeling of the radio emission, the evidence from SNe 2011fe and 2014J points in the direction of a DD scenario for both.

  13. Sensor Configuration Selection for Discrete-Event Systems under Unreliable Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Tae-Sic Yoo; Humberto E. Garcia

    2010-08-01

    Algorithms for counting the occurrences of special events in the framework of partially-observed discrete event dynamical systems (DEDS) were developed in previous work. Their performances typically become better as the sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper addresses the problem of finding a sensor configuration that achieves an optimal balance between cost and the performance of the special event counting algorithm, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, a sensor optimization algorithm is developed using two greedy heuristics, one myopic and the other based on projected performances of candidate sensors. The two heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best sensor configurations. The developed algorithm is then applied to a sensor optimization problem for a multiunit- operation system. Results show that improved sensor configurations can be found that may significantly reduce the sensor configuration cost but still yield acceptable performance for counting the occurrences of special events.

  14. Transforming observational data and theoretical isochrones into the ACS/WFC Vega-mag system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luigi R. Bedin; Santi Cassisi; Fiorella Castelli; Giampaolo Piotto; Jay Anderson; Maurizio Salaris; Yazan Momany; Adriano Pietrinferni; .

    2004-12-14

    We propose a zero-point photometric calibration of the data from the ACS/WFC on board the Hubble Space Telescope, based on a spectrum of Vega and the most up to date in-flight transmission curves of the camera. This calibration is accurate at the level of a few hundredths of a magnitude. The main purpose of this effort is to transform the entire set of evolutionary models by Pietrinferni et al. (2004) into a simple observational photometric system for ACS/WFC data, and make them available to the astronomical community. We provide the zero points for the most used ACS/WFC bands, and give basic recipes for calibrating both the observed data and the models. We also present the Colour Magnitude Diagram (CMD) from ACS data of 5 Galactic globular clusters, spanning the metallicity range -2.2<[Fe/H]<-0.04, and provide fiducial points representing their sequences from several magnitudes below the turnoff to the red giant branch tip. The observed sequences are compared with the models in the newly defined photometric system.

  15. IRTF/SPEX Observations of the Unusual Kepler Lightcurve System KIC8462852

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lisse, C M; Marengo, M

    2015-01-01

    We have utilized the NASA IRTF 3m SpeX instrument's high resolution spectral mode (Rayner et al. 2003) to observe and characterize the near-infrared flux emanating from the unusual Kepler lightcurve system KIC8462852. By comparing the resulting 0.8 to 4.2 um spectrum to a mesh of model photospheric spectra, the 6 emission line analysis of the Rayner et al. 2009 catalogue, and the 25 system collection of debris disks we have observed to date using SpeX under the Near InfraRed Debris disk Survey (NIRDS; Lisse et al. 2016), we have been able to additionally characterize the system. Within the errors of our measurements, this star looks like a normal solar abundance main sequence F1V to F3V dwarf star without any obvious traces of significant circumstellar dust or gas. Using Connelley & Greene's (2014) emission measures, we also see no evidence of significant ongoing accretion onto the star nor any stellar outflow away from it. Our results are inconsistent with large amounts of static close-in obscuring mater...

  16. Observation of a phononic Mollow triplet in a hybrid spin-nanomechanical system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Benjamin Pigeau; Sven Rohr; Laure Mercier de Lépinay; Arnaud Gloppe; Vincent Jacques; Olivier Arcizet

    2015-02-25

    Reminiscent of the bound character of a qubit's dynamics confined on the Bloch sphere, the observation of a Mollow triplet in the resonantly driven qubit fluorescence spectrum represents one of the founding signatures of Quantum Electrodynamics. Here we report on its observation in a hybrid spin-nanomechanical system, where a Nitro-gen Vacancy spin qubit is magnetically coupled to the vibrations of a Silicon Carbide nanowire. A resonant microwave field turns the originally parametric hybrid interac-tion into a resonant process, where acoustic phonons are now able to induce transitions between the dressed qubit states, leading to synchronized spin-oscillator dynamics. We further explore the vectorial character of the hybrid coupling to the bidimensional de-formations of the nanowire. The demonstrated microwave assisted synchronization of the spin-oscillator dynamics opens novel perspectives for the exploration of spin-dependent forces, the key-ingredient for quantum state transfer.

  17. JWST observations of stellar occultations by solar system bodies and rings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santos-Sanz, P; Pinilla-Alonso, N; Stansberry, J; Lin, Z-Y; Zhang, Z-W; Vilenius, E; Müller, Th; Ortiz, J L; Braga-Ribas, F; Bosh, A; Duffard, R; Lellouch, E; Tancredi, G; Young, L

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we investigate the opportunities provided by the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) for significant scientific advances in the study of solar system bodies and rings using stellar occultations. The strengths and weaknesses of the stellar occultation technique are evaluated in light of JWST's unique capabilities. We identify several possible JWST occultation events by minor bodies and rings, and evaluate their potential scientific value. These predictions depend critically on accurate a priori knowledge of the orbit of JWST near the Sun-Earth Lagrange-point 2 (L2). We also explore the possibility of serendipitous stellar occultations by very small minor bodies as a by-product of other JWST observing programs. Finally, to optimize the potential scientific return of stellar occultation observations, we identify several characteristics of JWST's orbit and instrumentation that should be taken into account during JWST's development.

  18. Understanding and Improving CRM and GCM Simulations of Cloud Systems with ARM Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Xiaoqing

    2014-02-25

    The works supported by this ASR project lay the solid foundation for improving the parameterization of convection and clouds in the NCAR CCSM and the climate simulations. We have made a significant use of CRM simulations and ARM observations to produce thermodynamically and dynamically consistent multi-year cloud and radiative properties; improve the GCM simulations of convection, clouds and radiative heating rate and fluxes using the ARM observations and CRM simulations; and understand the seasonal and annual variation of cloud systems and their impacts on climate mean state and variability. We conducted multi-year simulations over the ARM SGP site using the CRM with multi-year ARM forcing data. The statistics of cloud and radiative properties from the long-term CRM simulations were compared and validated with the ARM measurements and value added products (VAP). We evaluated the multi-year climate simulations produced by the GCM with the modified convection scheme. We used multi-year ARM observations and CRM simulations to validate and further improve the trigger condition and revised closure assumption in NCAR GCM simulations that demonstrate the improvement of climate mean state and variability. We combined the improved convection scheme with the mosaic treatment of subgrid cloud distributions in the radiation scheme of the GCM. The mosaic treatment of cloud distributions has been implemented in the GCM with the original convection scheme and enables the use of more realistic cloud amounts as well as cloud water contents in producing net radiative fluxes closer to observations. A physics-based latent heat (LH) retrieval algorithm was developed by parameterizing the physical linkages of observed hydrometeor profiles of cloud and precipitation to the major processes related to the phase change of atmospheric water.

  19. ALMA observations of a misaligned binary protoplanetary disk system in Orion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Jonathan P.; Mann, Rita K.; Francesco, James Di; Johnstone, Doug; Matthews, Brenda; Andrews, Sean M.; Ricci, Luca; Hughes, A. Meredith; Bally, John

    2014-12-01

    We present Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array (ALMA) observations of a wide binary system in Orion, with projected separation 440 AU, in which we detect submillimeter emission from the protoplanetary disks around each star. Both disks appear moderately massive and have strong line emission in CO 3-2, HCO{sup +} 4-3, and HCN 3-2. In addition, CS 7-6 is detected in one disk. The line-to-continuum ratios are similar for the two disks in each of the lines. From the resolved velocity gradients across each disk, we constrain the masses of the central stars, and show consistency with optical-infrared spectroscopy, both indicative of a high mass ratio ?9. The small difference between the systemic velocities indicates that the binary orbital plane is close to face-on. The angle between the projected disk rotation axes is very high, ?72°, showing that the system did not form from a single massive disk or a rigidly rotating cloud core. This finding, which adds to related evidence from disk geometries in other systems, protostellar outflows, stellar rotation, and similar recent ALMA results, demonstrates that turbulence or dynamical interactions act on small scales well below that of molecular cores during the early stages of star formation.

  20. Observational Properties of Type Ib/c Supernova Progenitors in Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Hyun-Jeong; Koo, Bon-Chul

    2015-01-01

    In several recent observational studies on Type Ib/c supernovae (SNe Ib/c), the inferred ejecta masses have a peak value of 2.0 -- 4.0 $M_\\odot$, in favor of the binary scenario for their progenitors rather than the Wolf-Rayet star scenario. To investigate the observational properties of relatively low-mass helium stars in binary systems as SN Ib/c progenitors, we constructed atmospheric models with the non-LTE radiative transfer code CMFGEN, using binary star evolution models. We find that these helium stars can be characterized by relatively narrow helium emission lines if the mass-loss rate during the final evolutionary phase is significantly enhanced as implied by many SN Ib/c observations. The optical brightness of helium star progenitors can be meaningfully enhanced with a strong wind for $M \\gtrsim 4.4 M_\\odot$, but hardly affected or slightly weakened for relatively low-mass of $\\sim 3.0 M_\\odot$, compared to the simple estimate using blackbody approximation. We further confirm the previous suggestion...

  1. Transforming observational data and theoretical isochrones into the ACS/WFC Vega-mag system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bedin, L R; Castelli, F; Piotto, G; Anderson, J; Salaris, M; Momany, Y; Pietrinferni, A; Bedin, Luigi R.; Cassisi, Santi; Castelli, Fiorella; Piotto, Giampaolo; Anderson, Jay; Salaris, Maurizio; Momany, Yazan; Pietrinferni, Adriano

    2004-01-01

    We propose a zero-point photometric calibration of the data from the ACS/WFC on board the Hubble Space Telescope, based on a spectrum of Vega and the most up to date in-flight transmission curves of the camera. This calibration is accurate at the level of a few hundredths of a magnitude. The main purpose of this effort is to transform the entire set of evolutionary models by Pietrinferni et al. (2004) into a simple observational photometric system for ACS/WFC data, and make them available to the astronomical community. We provide the zero points for the most used ACS/WFC bands, and give basic recipes for calibrating both the observed data and the models. We also present the Colour Magnitude Diagram (CMD) from ACS data of 5 Galactic globular clusters, spanning the metallicity range -2.2<[Fe/H]<-0.04, and provide fiducial points representing their sequences from several magnitudes below the turnoff to the red giant branch tip. The observed sequences are compared with the models in the newly defined photom...

  2. 2.9 Programming and Platforms (PRO) CENS systems research strives to advance the state of the art in innovative in situ observing systems. To this end,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    in innovative in situ observing systems. To this end, our research efforts have focused on two critical themes that cut across our broad range of observing systems: the development of practical tools and platforms platform efforts have revolved around three activities: participatory sensing mobile to web platform

  3. A Saturn Ring Observer Mission Using Multi-Mission Radioisotope Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abelson, Robert D.; Spilker, Thomas R.; Shirley, James H. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Mail Stop 301-445W, Pasadena, CA 91109-8099 (United States)

    2006-01-20

    Saturn remains one of the most fascinating planets within the solar system. To better understand the complex ring structure of this planet, a conceptual Saturn Ring Observer (SRO) mission is presented that would spend one year in close proximity to Saturn's A and B rings, and perform detailed observations and measurements of the ring particles and electric and magnetic fields. The primary objective of the mission would be to understand ring dynamics, including the microphysics of individual particles and small scale (meters to a few kilometers) phenomena such as particle agglomeration behavior. This would be accomplished by multispectral imaging of the rings at multiple key locations within the A and B rings, and by ring-particle imaging at an unprecedented resolution of 0.5 cm/pixel. The SRO spacecraft would use a Venus-Earth-Earth-Jupiter Gravity Assist (VEEJGA) and be aerocaptured into Saturn orbit using an advanced aeroshell design to minimize propellant mass. Once in orbit, the SRO would stand off from the ring plane 1 to 1.4 km using chemical thrusters to provide short propulsive maneuvers four times per revolution, effectively causing the SRO vehicle to 'hop' above the ring plane. The conceptual SRO spacecraft would be enabled by the use of a new generation of multi-mission Radioisotope Power Systems (RPSs) currently being developed by NASA and DOE. These RPSs include the Multi-Mission Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generator (MMRTG) and Stirling Radioisotope Generator (SRG). The RPSs would generate all necessary electrical power ({>=}330 We at beginning of life) during the 10-year cruise and 1-year science mission ({approx}11 years total). The RPS heat would be used to maintain the vehicle's operating and survival temperatures, minimizing the need for electrical heaters. Such a mission could potentially launch in the 2015-2020 timeframe, with operations at Saturn commencing in approximately 2030.

  4. Eos, Vol. 90, No. 17, 26 April 2011 A 2-day climate change workshop was

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Earth system models. In par- ticular, there is a need to better under- stand the processes by which- eration Arctic ecosystem models and Earth system models? What are observations and experiments telling processes and thus shape how these events are ultimately represented in Earth system models. A science

  5. EO 13690: Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder Input

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On January 30, 2015, President Obama signed an Executive Order (E.O.) 13690, Establishing a Federal Flood Risk Management Standard and a Process for Further Soliciting and Considering Stakeholder...

  6. The system for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) as a measure of energy expenditure during classroom based physical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Leon; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time ...

  7. CLARREO shortwave observing system simulation experiments of the twenty-first century: Simulator design and implementation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feldman, D.R.; Algieri, C.A.; Ong, J.R.; Collins, W.D.

    2011-04-01

    Projected changes in the Earth system will likely be manifested in changes in reflected solar radiation. This paper introduces an operational Observational System Simulation Experiment (OSSE) to calculate the signals of future climate forcings and feedbacks in top-of-atmosphere reflectance spectra. The OSSE combines simulations from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth Assessment Report for the NCAR Community Climate System Model (CCSM) with the MODTRAN radiative transfer code to calculate reflectance spectra for simulations of current and future climatic conditions over the 21st century. The OSSE produces narrowband reflectances and broadband fluxes, the latter of which have been extensively validated against archived CCSM results. The shortwave reflectance spectra contain atmospheric features including signals from water vapor, liquid and ice clouds, and aerosols. The spectra are also strongly influenced by the surface bidirectional reflectance properties of predicted snow and sea ice and the climatological seasonal cycles of vegetation. By comparing and contrasting simulated reflectance spectra based on emissions scenarios with increasing projected and fixed present-day greenhouse gas and aerosol concentrations, we find that prescribed forcings from increases in anthropogenic sulfate and carbonaceous aerosols are detectable and are spatially confined to lower latitudes. Also, changes in the intertropical convergence zone and poleward shifts in the subsidence zones and the storm tracks are all detectable along with large changes in snow cover and sea ice fraction. These findings suggest that the proposed NASA Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission to measure shortwave reflectance spectra may help elucidate climate forcings, responses, and feedbacks.

  8. Parameter Estimation of Systems Described by the Relation with Noisy Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of systems described by the equations [Bubnicki, 80a]. The problem of modeling and identification of systems

  9. SMA Observations of Class 0 Protostars: A High-Angular Resolution Survey of Protostellar Binary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Xuepeng; Zhang, Qizhou; Bourke, Tyler L; Launhardt, Ralf; Jorgensen, Jes K; Lee, Chin-Fee; Foster, Jonathan B; Dunham, Michael M; Pineda, Jaime E; Henning, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We present high angular resolution 1.3 mm and 850 um dust continuum data obtained with the Submillimeter Array toward 33 Class 0 protostars in nearby clouds (distance < 500 pc), which represents so far the largest survey toward protostellar binary/multiple systems. The median angular resolution in the survey is 2.5 arcsec, while the median linear resolution is approximately 600 AU. Compact dust continuum emission is observed from all sources in the sample. Twenty-one sources in the sample show signatures of binarity/multiplicity, with separations ranging from 50 to 5000 AU. The numbers of singles, binaries, triples, and quadruples in the sample are 12, 14, 5, and 2, respectively. The derived multiplicity frequency (MF) and companion star fraction (CSF) for Class 0 protostars are 0.64+/-0.08 and 0.91+/-0.05, respectively, with no correction for completeness. The derived MF and CSF in this survey are approximately two times higher than the values found in the binary surveys toward Class I YSOs, and approxima...

  10. Systems and Algorithms for Automated Collaborative Observation using Networked Robotic Cameras 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Yiliang

    2011-10-21

    The development of telerobotic systems has evolved from Single Operator Single Robot (SOSR) systems to Multiple Operator Multiple Robot (MOMR) systems. The relationship between human operators and robots follows the ...

  11. Dynamics of Satellites in Binary Near-Earth Asteroid Systems: A Study Based on Radar Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Shantanu

    2015-01-01

    Murray and S.F. Dermott. Solar System Dynamics. CambridgeMurray and S.F. Dermott. Solar System Dynamics. Cambridgea wide range of important solar system processes that shape

  12. Quantum Dynamical Effects as a Singular Perturbation for Observables in Open Quasi-Classical Nonlinear Mesoscopic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennady P. Berman; Fausto Borgonovi; Diego A. R. Dalvit

    2008-01-29

    We review our results on a mathematical dynamical theory for observables for open many-body quantum nonlinear bosonic systems for a very general class of Hamiltonians. We show that non-quadratic (nonlinear) terms in a Hamiltonian provide a singular "quantum" perturbation for observables in some "mesoscopic" region of parameters. In particular, quantum effects result in secular terms in the dynamical evolution, that grow in time. We argue that even for open quantum nonlinear systems in the deep quasi-classical region, these quantum effects can survive after decoherence and relaxation processes take place. We demonstrate that these quantum effects in open quantum systems can be observed, for example, in the frequency Fourier spectrum of the dynamical observables, or in the corresponding spectral density of noise. Estimates are presented for Bose-Einstein condensates, low temperature mechanical resonators, and nonlinear optical systems prepared in large amplitude coherent states. In particular, we show that for Bose-Einstein condensate systems the characteristic time of deviation of quantum dynamics for observables from the corresponding classical dynamics coincides with the characteristic time-scale of the well-known quantum nonlinear effect of phase diffusion.

  13. How do two observers pool their knowledge about a quantum system?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurt Jacobs

    2002-09-13

    In the theory of classical statistical inference one can derive a simple rule by which two or more observers may combine {\\em independently} obtained states of knowledge together to form a new state of knowledge, which is the state which would be possessed by someone having the combined information of both observers. Moreover, this combined state of knowledge can be found without reference to the manner in which the respective observers obtained their information. However, in this note we show that in general this is not possible for quantum states of knowledge; in order to combine two quantum states of knowledge to obtain the state resulting from the combined information of both observers, these observers must also possess information about how their respective states of knowledge were obtained. Nevertheless, we emphasize this does not preclude the possibility that a unique, well motivated rule for combining quantum states of knowledge without reference to a measurement history could be found. We examine both the direct quantum analogue of the classical problem, and that of quantum state-estimation, which corresponds to a variant in which the observers share a specific kind of prior information.

  14. Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR-E) sea surface temperature in the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth Observing System (AMSR; published 5 April 2006. [1] Satellite sea surface temperature (SST) measurements from Advanced Microwave. Sprintall, and C. Gentemann (2006), Validation of the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for the Earth

  15. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  16. Observations of prolific transient luminous event production above a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cummer, Steven A.

    in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil F. T. São Sabbas,1 M. J. Taylor,2 P.D. Pautet,2 M. Bailey convective system (MCS) over Argentina, as part of the third sprite campaign in Brazil. GOES infrared (IR a mesoscale convective system in Argentina during the Sprite2006 Campaign in Brazil, J. Geophys. Res., 115, A

  17. Connectivity of the Hexagonal, Cubic, and Isotropic Phases of the C$_{12}$EO$_6$/H$_2$O Lyotropic Mixture Investigated by Tracer Diffusion and X-ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doru Constantin; Patrick Oswald; Marianne Impéror-Clerc; Patrick Davidson; Paul Sotta

    2015-04-09

    The connectivity of the hydrophobic medium in the nonionic binary system C$_{12}$EO$_6$/H$_2$O is studied by monitoring the diffusion constants of tracer molecules at the transition between the hexagonal mesophase and the fluid isotropic phase. The increase in the transverse diffusion coefficient on approaching the isotropic phase reveals the proliferation of bridgelike defects connecting the surfactant cylinders. This suggests that the isotropic phase has a highly connected structure. Indeed, we find similar diffusion coefficients in the isotropic and cubic bicontinuous phases. The temperature dependence of the lattice parameter in the hexagonal phase confirms the change in connectivity close to the hexagonal-isotropic transition. Finally, an X-ray investigation of the isotropic phase shows that its structure is locally similar to that of the hexagonal phase.

  18. Observations on A Technology Roadmap for Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems: Technical Roadmap Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The development of advanced nuclear energy systems in the U.S. will depend greatly on the continued success of currently operating light water nuclear power plants and the ordering of new...

  19. Transport properties of the solid polymer electrolyte system P(EO)nLiTFSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of TransportationEfficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Transportation

  20. Transport properties of the solid polymer electrolyte system P(EO)nLiTFSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edman, L.

    2011-01-01

    Reddy, A.K.N. In Modern Electrochemistry 1 - Ionics, PlenumF.M. In Solid State Electrochemistry, Bruce, P.G. , Ed. ;

  1. Neutron resonances in few-body systems and the EOS of neutron star crust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Takibayev; K. Kato; M. Takibayeva; A. Sarsembayeva; D. Nasirova

    2012-12-03

    The effective interactions formed by neutron rescattering between the nuclei fixed in nodes of the crystalline lattice of neutron star crusts have been considered. In the case of two-body resonances in neutron-nucleus subsystems new neutron resonances of few-body nature come into existence in the overdense crystal under certain conditions. The energies and widths of new resonances get additional dependence on the lattice parameters. The effective interactions result in nonlinear correction to the equation of state determined by the balance of gravitational, Coulomb and nuclear resonance forces. This leads to resonant oscillations of density in the accordant layers of crusts that are accompanied by oscillations of gamma radiation. The phenomena may clarify some processes connected with few-body neutron resonances in neutron star crusts, that have influence on the microstructure of pulsar impulses.

  2. 3AK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OPERAiEO BY MARTIN MARIE,TA ENERGY SYSTEMS, INC.

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal Gas &SCE-SessionsSouth DakotaRobbins and Myers Co -VANaval Ordnance,:n5.5.8 , 'DOE(. -

  3. The MGGB equation-of-state for multifield applications: a numerical recipe for analytic expression of sesame EOS data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kashiwa, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    Abstract A thermodynamically consistent and fully general equation–of– state (EOS) for multifield applications is described. EOS functions are derived from a Helmholtz free energy expressed as the sum of thermal (fluctuational) and collisional (condensed–phase) contributions; thus the free energy is of the Mie–Gr¨uneisen1 form. The phase–coexistence region is defined using a parameterized saturation curve by extending the form introduced by Guggenheim,2 which scales the curve relative to conditions at the critical point. We use the zero–temperature condensed–phase contribution developed by Barnes,3 which extends the Thomas–Fermi–Dirac equation to zero pressure. Thus, the functional form of the EOS could be called MGGB (for Mie– Gr¨uneisen–Guggenheim–Barnes). Substance–specific parameters are obtained by fitting the low–density energy to data from the Sesame4 library; fitting the zero–temperature pressure to the Sesame cold curve; and fitting the saturation curve and latent heat to laboratory data,5 if available. When suitable coexistence data, or Sesame data, are not available, then we apply the Principle of Corresponding States.2 Thus MGGB can be thought of as a numerical recipe for rendering the tabular Sesame EOS data in an analytic form that includes a proper coexistence region, and which permits the accurate calculation of derivatives associated with compressibility, expansivity, Joule coefficient, and specific heat, all of which are required for multifield applications. 1

  4. Validating the Autonomous EO-1 Science Agent Benjamin Cichy, Steve Chien, Steve Schaffer, Daniel Tran, Gregg Rabideau, Rob Sherwood

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Steven

    Tran, Gregg Rabideau, Rob Sherwood Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology 4800 CPUs offer 25 MIPS and 128 MB RAM ­ far less than a typical personal computer. Our CPU allocation for ASE on EO-1 is 4 MIPS and 128MB RAM. 5. High stakes. A typical space mission costs hundreds

  5. Eos, Vol. 90, No. 22, 2 June 2009 It is unique in that its collection of tsunami

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    Eos, Vol. 90, No. 22, 2 June 2009 It is unique in that its collection of tsunami deposit information and DART® databases in forms suitable for tsunami modeling pur- poses is not available online anywhere else. Finally, the tsunami database is strength- ened through integration with the other NGDC

  6. A Fault Observant Real-Time Embedded Design for Network-on-Chip Control Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, R. Michael

    : (1) Cos- mic radiation, particularly during solar flares, (2) electric interfer- ence in harsh missions use radiation-hardened processors to avoid damage from solar radiation. An alternative approach was supported in part by NSF grants CNS-0720496 and CNS-0905181 modify logic or data in systems leading

  7. Tracking tropical cloud systems - Observations for the diagnosis of simulations by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogelmann, A.M.; Lin, W.; Cialella, A.; Luke, E.; Jensen, M.; Zhang, M.

    2010-03-15

    To aid in improving model parameterizations of clouds and convection, we examine the capability of models, using explicit convection, to simulate the life cycle of tropical cloud systems in the vicinity of the ARM Tropical Western Pacific sites. The cloud life cycle is determined using a satellite cloud tracking algorithm (Boer and Ramanathan, 1997), and the statistics are compared to those of simulations using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) Model. Using New York Blue, a Blue Gene/L supercomputer that is co-operated by Brookhaven and Stony Brook, simulations are run at a resolution comparable to the observations. Initial results suggest a computational paradox where, even though the size of the simulated systems are about half of that observed, their longevities are still similar. The explanation for this seeming incongruity will be explored.

  8. Observing Iceland's Eyjafjallajkull 2010 eruptions with the autonomous NASA Volcano Sensor Web

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Robert

    Observing Iceland's Eyjafjallajökull 2010 eruptions with the autonomous NASA Volcano Sensor Web, the Hyperion hyperspectral imager and Advanced Land Imager (ALI) on NASA's Earth Observing 1 (EO-1) spacecraft by using the autonomously operating NASA Volcano Sensor Web (VSW). The VSW incorporates notifications

  9. Observation of sub-Doppler absorption in the /Lambda-type three-level Doppler-broadened cesium system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Junmin Wang; Yanhua Wang; Shubin Yan; Tao Liu; Tiancai Zhang

    2003-12-31

    Thanks to the atomic coherence in coupling laser driven atomic system, sub-Doppler absorption has been observed in Doppler-broadened cesium vapor cell via the /Lambda-type three-level scheme. The linewidth of the sub-Doppler absorption peak become narrower while the frequency detuning of coupling laser increases. The results are in agreement with the theoretical prediction by G. Vemuri et al.[PRA,Vol.53(1996) p.2842].

  10. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric B.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Steffen, Jason H.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  11. Sequential Window Diagnoser for Discrete-Event Systems Under Unreliable Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; David Thorsley; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2009-09-01

    This paper addresses the issue of counting the occurrence of special events in the framework of partiallyobserved discrete-event dynamical systems (DEDS). Developed diagnosers referred to as sequential window diagnosers (SWDs) utilize the stochastic diagnoser probability transition matrices developed in [9] along with a resetting mechanism that allows on-line monitoring of special event occurrences. To illustrate their performance, the SWDs are applied to detect and count the occurrence of special events in a particular DEDS. Results show that SWDs are able to accurately track the number of times special events occur.

  12. Compositional trends of ?-induced optical changes observed in chalcogenide glasses of binary As-S system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shpotyuk, M.; Shpotyuk, O.; Golovchak, Roman; McCloy, John S.; Riley, Brian J.

    2014-01-23

    Compositional trends of ?-induced optical changes in chalcogenide glasses are studied with the binary As-S system. Effects of ?-irradiation and annealing are compared using the changes measured in the fundamental optical absorption edge region. It is shown that annealing near the glass transition temperature leads to bleaching of As-S glasses, while ?-irradiation leads to darkening; both depend on the glass composition and thermal history of the specimens. These results are explained in terms of competitive destruction–polymerization transformations and physical aging occurring in As-S chalcogenide glasses under the influence of ?-irradiation.

  13. EXTREME CONDITIONS IN A CLOSE ANALOG TO THE YOUNG SOLAR SYSTEM: HERSCHEL OBSERVATIONS OF ? ERIDANI

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greaves, J. S. [SUPA, Physics and Astronomy, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews, Fife KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Sibthorpe, B.; Holland, W. S. [UK Astronomy Technology Centre, Royal Observatory Edinburgh, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Acke, B.; Vandenbussche, B.; Blommaert, J. A. D. L. [Instituut voor Sterrenkunde, K. U. Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200D, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Pantin, E. E. [Laboratoire AIM, CEA/DSM-CNRS-Universit Paris Diderot, IRFU/Service dAstrophysique, Bat.709, CEA-Saclay, F-91191 Gif- sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Olofsson, G.; Brandeker, A.; De Vries, B. L. [Stockholm University Astrobiology Centre, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden); Dominik, C. [Astronomical Institute Anton Pannekoek, University of Amsterdam, P.O. Box 94249, 1090-GE Amsterdam (Netherlands); Barlow, M. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Bendo, G. J. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Dent, W. R. F. [ALMA SCO, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 763 0355, Santiago (Chile); Di Francesco, J. [Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics Programs, National Research Council of Canada, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, BC, V9E 2E7 (Canada); Fridlund, M. [ESA, SRE-SA, Keplerlaan 1, NL-2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands); Gear, W. K. [School of Physics and Astronomy, Cardiff University, Queens Buildings, The Parade, Cardiff CF24 3AA (United Kingdom); Harvey, P. M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712 (United States); Hogerheijde, M. R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300-RA Leiden (Netherlands); Ivison, R. J., E-mail: jsg5@st-andrews.ac.uk [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Blackford Hill, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-08-10

    Far-infrared Herschel images of the ? Eridani system, seen at a fifth of the Sun's present age, resolve two belts of debris emission. Fits to the 160 ?m PACS image yield radial spans for these belts of 12-16 and 54-68 AU. The south end of the outer belt is ?10% brighter than the north end in the PACS+SPIRE images at 160, 250, and 350 ?m, indicating a pericenter glow attributable to a planet ''c''. From this asymmetry and an upper bound on the offset of the belt center, this second planet should be mildly eccentric (e{sub c} ? 0.03-0.3). Compared to the asteroid and Kuiper Belts of the young Sun, the ? Eri belts are intermediate in brightness and more similar to each other, with up to 20 km sized collisional fragments in the inner belt totaling ?5% of an Earth mass. This reservoir may feed the hot dust close to the star and could send many impactors through the Habitable Zone, especially if it is being perturbed by the suspected planet ? Eri b, at semi-major axis ?3 AU.

  14. Standing Accretion Shocks in the Supernova Core: Effects of Convection and Realistic EOS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tatsuya Yamasaki; Shoichi Yamada

    2006-08-25

    We investigated the structure of the spherically symmetric accretion flows through the standing shock wave onto the proto-neutron star in the post-bounce phase of the collapse-driven supernova. We assume that the accretion flow is in a steady state controlled by the neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate that are kept constant. We obtain solutions of the steady Euler equations for a wide range of neutrino luminosity and mass accretion rate. We employ a realistic EOS and neutrino-heating rates. More importantly, we take into account the effect of convection phenomenologically. For each mass accretion rate, we find the critical neutrino luminosity, above which there exists no steady solution. These critical points are supposed to mark the onset of the shock revival. As the neutrino luminosity increases for a given mass accretion rate, there appears a convectively unstable region at some point before the critical value is reached. We introduce a phenomenological energy flux by convection so that the negative entropy gradient should be canceled out. We find that the convection lowers the critical neutrino luminosity substantially. We also consider the effect of the self-gravity. It is found that the self-gravity is important only when the neutrino luminosity is high. The critical luminosity, however, is little affected if the energy transport by convection is taken into account.

  15. Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pringle, James "Jamie"

    Earth Systems Science Earth Systems Science at UNH THE UNH Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space (EOS) Earth Systems Research Center is dedicated to understanding the Earth as an integrative scientists and students study the Earth's ecosystems, atmosphere, water, and ice using field measurements

  16. Aerosol Observing System Upgraded

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsiclouddenDVA N C E D B L O O D S TA I N P A T T E R N A NA LY S IDOE Office2 Aerosol

  17. Earth System Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansas Nuclear Profile 2010Mesoscopy andSaving onEarth Day Earth Day An error4

  18. Constraints on dark energy from new observations including Pan-STARRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Wei [Department of Physics, Nanjing University, Nanjing, 210093 China (China); Li, Si-Yu [Theoretical Physics Division, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918-4, Beijing, 100049 (China); Li, Hong; Xia, Jun-Qing [Key Laboratory of Particle Astrophysics, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, P.O. Box 918-3, Beijing, 100049 (China); Li, Mingzhe [Interdisciplinary Center for Theoretical Study, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230026 China (China); Lu, Tan, E-mail: physicsweiwei@gmail.com, E-mail: lisy@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: hongli@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: xiajq@ihep.ac.cn, E-mail: limz@ustc.edu.cn, E-mail: t.lu@pmo.ac.cn [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing, 210008 China (China)

    2014-08-01

    In this paper, we set the new limits on the equation of state parameter (EoS) of dark energy with the observations of cosmic microwave background radiation (CMB) from Planck satellite, the type Ia supernovae from Pan-STARRS and the baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO). We consider two parametrization forms of EoS: a constant w and time evolving w(a)=w{sub 0}+w{sub a}(1-a). The results show that with a constant EoS, w=-1.141±0.075 68% C.L.), which is consistent with ?CDM at about 2? confidence level. For a time evolving w(a) model, we get w{sub 0}=-1.09{sup +0.16}{sub -0.18} 1? C.L.), w{sub a}=-0.34{sup +0.87}{sub -0.51} 1? C.L.), and in this case ?CDM can be comparable with our observational data at 1? confidence level. In order to do the parametrization independent analysis, additionally we adopt the so called principal component analysis (PCA) method, in which we divide redshift range into several bins and assume w as a constant in each redshift bin (bin-w). In such bin-w scenario, we find that for most of the bins cosmological constant can be comparable with the data, however, there exists few bins which give w deviating from ?CDM at more than 2? confidence level, which shows a weak hint for the time evolving behavior of dark energy. To further confirm this hint, we need more data with higher precision.

  19. Re-visit of HST FUV observations of hot-Jupiter system HD 209458: No Si III detection and the need for COS transit observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ballester, G E

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of OI atoms and CII ions in the upper atmosphere of HD 209458b, made with the Hubble Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS) using the G140L grating, showed that these heavy species fill an area comparable to the planet's Roche lobe. The derived ~10% transit absorption depths require super-thermal processes and/or supersolar abundances. From subsequent Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) observations, CII absorption was reported with tentative velocity signatures, and absorption by SiIII ions was also claimed in disagreement with a negative STIS G140L detection. Here, we revisit the COS dataset showing a severe limitation in the published results from having contrasted the in-transit spectrum against a stellar spectrum averaged from separate observations, at planetary phases 0.27, 0.72, and 0.49. We find variable stellar SiIII and CII emissions that were significantly depressed not only during transit but also at phase 0.27 compared to phases 0.72 and 0.49. Their respective off-transit 7.5 and...

  20. Testing General Relativity using Bayesian model selection: Applications to observations of gravitational waves from compact binary systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; John Veitch; Alberto Vecchio

    2011-01-07

    Second generation interferometric gravitational wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, are expected to begin operation by 2015. Such instruments plan to reach sensitivities that will offer the unique possibility to test General Relativity in the dynamical, strong field regime and investigate departures from its predictions, in particular using the signal from coalescing binary systems. We introduce a statistical framework based on Bayesian model selection in which the Bayes factor between two competing hypotheses measures which theory is favored by the data. Probability density functions of the model parameters are then used to quantify the inference on individual parameters. We also develop a method to combine the information coming from multiple independent observations of gravitational waves, and show how much stronger inference could be. As an introduction and illustration of this framework - and a practical numerical implementation through the Monte Carlo integration technique of nested sampling - we apply it to gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of coalescing binary systems as predicted by General Relativity and a very simple alternative theory in which the graviton has a non-zero mass. This method can trivially (and should) be extended to more realistic and physically motivated theories.

  1. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison

  2. Dynamics of observables and exactly solvable quantum problems: Using time-dependent density functional theory to control quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdi Farzanehpour; I. V. Tokatly

    2015-06-29

    We use analytic (current) density-potential maps of time-dependent (current) density functional theory (TD(C)DFT) to inverse engineer analytically solvable time-dependent quantum problems. In this approach the driving potential (the control signal) and the corresponding solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation are parametrized analytically in terms of the basic TD(C)DFT observables. We describe the general reconstruction strategy and illustrate it with a number of explicit examples. First we consider the real space one-particle dynamics driven by a time-dependent electromagnetic field and recover, from the general TDDFT reconstruction formulas, the known exact solution for a driven oscillator with a time-dependent frequency. Then we use analytic maps of the lattice TD(C)DFT to control quantum dynamics in a discrete space. As a first example we construct a time-dependent potential which generates prescribed dynamics on a tight-binding chain. Then our method is applied to the dynamics of spin-1/2 driven by a time dependent magnetic field. We design an analytic control pulse that transfers the system from the ground to excited state and vice versa. This pulse generates the spin flip thus operating as a quantum NOT gate.

  3. Causes of variation in soil carbon simulations from CMIP5 Earth system models and comparison with observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    and benchmarks in Earth system models sitivity of the Amazonand benchmarks in Earth system models Thornton, P. E. ,and evaluation of an Earth-System model – HadGEM2, Geosci-

  4. Eos volume 92 number 20 17 mAY 2011 POSITIONS AVAILABLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fossen, Haakon

    to the potential decadal predictability of climate varia- tions using the community earth system model CESM

  5. 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved. Eos, Vol. 95, No. 31, 5 August 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robock, Alan

    countries. Results from 13 Earth system models are currently available. Continued analyses of simulated

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A COASTAL MARGIN OBSERVATION AND ASSESSMENT SYSTEM (CMOAS) TO CAPTURE THE EPISODIC EVENTS IN A SHALLOW BAY 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Islam, Mohammad S.

    2010-07-14

    in real-time monitoring of hydrodynamic, meteorological and water quality parameters in the bay. Three different platform types used for the installation of sensor systems are: 1) Fixed Robotic, 2) Mobile, and 3) Remote. An automated profiler system...

  7. Testing a Coupled Global-limited-area Data Assimilation System Using Observations from the 2004 Pacific Typhoon Season 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holt, Christina

    2012-10-19

    Tropical cyclone (TC) track and intensity forecasts have improved in recent years due to increased model resolution, improved data assimilation, and the rapid increase in the number of routinely assimilated observations ...

  8. New Observations of Extra-Disk Molecular Gas in Interacting Galaxy Systems, Including a Two-Component System in Stephan's Quintet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. J. Smith; C. Struck

    2000-11-03

    We present new CO (1 - 0) observations of eleven extragalactic tails and bridges in nine interacting galaxy systems, almost doubling the number of such features with sensitive CO measurements. Eight of these eleven features were undetected in CO to very low CO/HI limits, with the most extreme case being the NGC 7714/5 bridge. This bridge contains luminous H II regions and has a very high HI column density (1.6 X 10^21 cm^-2 in the 55" CO beam), yet was undetected in CO to rms T(R)* = 2.4 mK. The HI column density is higher than standard H2 and CO self-shielding limits for solar-metallicity gas, suggesting that the gas in this bridge is metal-poor and has an enhanced N(H2)/I(CO) ratio compared to the Galactic value. Only one of the eleven features in our sample was unambiguously detected in CO, a luminous HI-rich star formation region near an optical tail in the compact group Stephan's Quintet. We detect CO at two widely separated velocities in this feature, at ~6000 km/s and ~6700 km/s. Both of these components have HI and H-alpha counterparts. These velocities correspond to those of galaxies in the group, suggesting that this gas is material that has been removed from two galaxies in the group. The CO/HI/H-alpha ratios for both components are similar to global values for spiral galaxies.

  9. IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 11, NOVEMBER 1999 1529 Improving the Observability and Controllability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potkonjak, Miodrag

    IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF INTEGRATED CIRCUITS AND SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 11 design observability and controllability. To facilitate debugging, and in particular error diagnosis, we-based debugging for full design visibility and controllability. The new debugging approach introduces several

  10. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Welsh, William F.; /Caltech; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  11. Eos, Vol. 91, No. 21, 25 May 2010 neering (MAEE); others. (Mihail Garevski, Insti-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Jose-Luis

    of buildings, earthquake- resistant engineering structures, and early warning and tsunamis. Predicting how system by affecting clouds and precipitation patterns and altering the amount of sunlight

  12. 350 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON SYSTEMS, MAN, AND CYBERNETICS, VOL. SMC-17, NO. 3, MAY/JUNE 1987 Interpreting Observations of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbus, Kenneth D.

    , analyzing, debugging, and design- ing complex physical systems. A person operating a nuclear power plant . 2) domain-specific criteria are available for quantizing numerical data into an initial qualitative

  13. Eos, Vol. 92, No. 12, 22 March 2011 In commemoration of the fifth anni-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    February 2005, the Cassini magnetometer observed magnetic effects caused by Enceladus's plumes. Alerted are in the relevant fields of science: optical remote sensing, magnetic fields, magnetospheric plasma, and in situ effectively. --Dennis Matson,Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena,Calif.; E-mail: dmatson@jpl.nasa.gov; Juer

  14. Eos, Vol. 86, No. 29, 19 July 2005 With the ongoing development of ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    validation with observed transport variations forced by cold front passages,tropical cyclones,and other model estimates of the Florida Current (FC) volume transport are available,in real time,for cross to the south and east,re- spectively (Figure 1). Based on FC transport events that are due to the passage

  15. Department 8450 electrical overstress, EOS, and electrostatic discharge, ESD, damage control handbook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tockey, R.J.

    1989-04-01

    This Handbook prescribes requirements and procedures to be used when electrical overstress/electrostatic discharge vulnerable product is being handled, packaged, and/or processed. All employees of department 8450 are required to: (1) observe the requirements and procedures when involved in pertinent, in-house activities, and (2) insure that vulnerable material, for which 8450 is responsible, is not exposed to possibly damaging environments when it is in the hands of others. 4 figs.

  16. Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems -Beautiful Images and Perceptive Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowston, Kevin

    Collaborative Research: Focusing Attention to Improve the Performance of Citizen Science Systems unable to replicate the successes of human pattern recognition. The growth of citizen science on the web-computational citizen science platform that combines the efforts of human classifiers with those of computational

  17. EOS, TRANSACTIONS, AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION Seismology is the study of the propaga-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Dawn Jeannine

    assessment, nuclear test monitoring and treaty verifica- tion, volcano and tsunami warning systems, and mineral resources at depths of meters to a few kilometers. Detailed knowledge of the Earth's near sur- face is therefore a crucial part of managing a sustainable environment for civilization. One

  18. Eos,Vol.81,No.31, August 1,2000 VOLUME 81 NUMBER 31

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spudis, Paul D.

    . Lacking an atmospheric shield, the Moon's re- golith retains a record of the activity of solar wind over is crucial to future exploration of the solar system.The Moon preserves a record of the first billion years impact into early Earth. Lunar rocks provide evidence of early differen tiation and extraction of a crust

  19. Eos, Vol. 92, No. 51, 20 December 2011 About 40 researchers attended a confer-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Paul

    , confronting sci- entific hypotheses about the climate system with data, and using data from comprehen- sive models and reanalyses to perform math- ematically based diagnostic studies of cli- mate dynamics and University of California, Los Angeles), Chris Jones (Uni- versity of Warwick), Jonathan Rougier (Uni- versity

  20. Eos, Vol. 93, No. 35, 28 August 2012 2012. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Withers, Paul

    solar system atmo- spheres at orbital speeds, ablating as they decelerate (Figure 1a). They deposit the peak ionospheric density is 3 times greater at Venus than Mars. On Earth the effects of wind shear on the trans- port of plasma along inclined magnetic field lines are thought to be critical for layer for

  1. Eos, Vol. 93, No. 1, 3 January 2012 In a sustainable world, human needs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and engineering. In this arena, NSF recognizes its important role in support of the basic foundational disciplin developed a coordi- nated research and education framework, called the Science, Engineering, and Edu- cation at the nexus of environmental, energy and materials, and economic systems, including social and behavioral

  2. Eos, Vol. 88, No. 20, 15 May 2007 1215 August 2007 2007 New Zealand Min-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahowald, Natalie

    of water resources. Topics include hydrological and hydraulic systems, integrated urban water management measurements of noc- tilucent/polar mesospheric clouds and their cou- pled dynamical, thermal, chemical deposits and tec- tonic events. While the number of women in science is increasing in the United States

  3. CW1O.2.pdf CLEO:2013 Technical Digest OSA 2013 Printable EO-Polymer Modulators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ray

    methods, such as ink-jet printing or coating process, will enable the realization of a viable manufacturing technology. Such a roll-to-roll compatible process will not only enable high throughput manufacturing, but will also drive the cost of the system down considerably. In this work, a roll-to-roll

  4. A performance study of an electron-tracking Compton camera with a compact system for environmental gamma-ray observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tetsuya Mizumoto; Dai Tomono; Atsushi Takada; Toru Tanimori; Shotaro Komura; Hidetoshi Kubo; Yoshihiro Matsuoka; Yoshitaka Mizumura; Kiseki Nakamura; Shogo Nakamura; Makoto Oda; Joseph D. Parker; Tatsuya Sawano; Naoto Bando; Akira Nabetani

    2015-08-06

    An electron-tracking Compton camera (ETCC) is a detector that can determine the arrival direction and energy of incident sub-MeV/MeV gamma-ray events on an event-by-event basis. It is a hybrid detector consisting of a gaseous time projection chamber (TPC), that is the Compton-scattering target and the tracker of recoil electrons, and a position-sensitive scintillation camera that absorbs of the scattered gamma rays, to measure gamma rays in the environment from contaminated soil. To measure of environmental gamma rays from soil contaminated with radioactive cesium (Cs), we developed a portable battery-powered ETCC system with a compact readout circuit and data-acquisition system for the SMILE-II experiment. We checked the gamma-ray imaging ability and ETCC performance in the laboratory by using several gamma-ray point sources. The performance test indicates that the field of view (FoV) of the detector is about 1$\\;$sr and that the detection efficiency and angular resolution for 662$\\;$keV gamma rays from the center of the FoV is $(9.31 \\pm 0.95) \\times 10^{^-5}$ and $5.9^{\\circ} \\pm 0.6^{\\circ}$, respectively. Furthermore, the ETCC can detect 0.15$\\;\\mu\\rm{Sv/h}$ from a $^{137}$Cs gamma-ray source with a significance of 5$\\sigma$ in 13 min in the laboratory. In this paper, we report the specifications of the ETCC and the results of the performance tests. Furthermore, we discuss its potential use for environmental gamma-ray measurements.

  5. H.E.S.S. Observations of the Binary System PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 around the 2010/2011 Periastron Passage

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :,; Acero, F; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; Balenderan, S; Balzer, A; Barnacka, A; Becherini, Y; Tjus, J Becker; Bernlöhr, K; Birsin, E; Biteau, J; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Bordas, P; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Bulik, T; Carrigan, S; Casanova, S; Cerruti, M; Chadwick, P M; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Colafrancesco, S; Cologna, G; Conrad, J; Couturier, C; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; deWilt, P; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Ataï, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubus, G; Dutson, K; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fernandez, D; Fiasson, A; Fontaine, G; Förster, A; Füßling, M; Gajdus, M; Gallant, Y A; Garrigoux, T; Gast, H; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glück, B; Göring, D; Grondin, M -H; Grudzi?ska, M; Häffner, S; Hague, J D; Hahn, J; Hampf, D; Harris, J; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hillert, A; Hinton, J A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holler, M; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; Jahn, C; Jamrozy, M; Jung, I; Kastendieck, M A; Katarzy?ski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Khélifi, B; Klepser, S; Klochkov, D; Klu?niak, W; Kneiske, T; Kolitzus, D; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Krayzel, F; Krüger, P P; Laffon, H; Lamanna, G; Lefaucheur, J; Lemoine-Goumard, M; Lenain, J -P; Lennarz, D; Lohse, T; Lopatin, A; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, G; Maxted, N; Mayer, M; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Méhault, J; Menzler, U; Moderski, R; Mohamed, M; Moulin, E; Naumann, C L; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nguyen, N; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Wilhelmi, E de Oña; Opitz, B; Ostrowski, M; Oya, I; Panter, M; Parsons, R D; Arribas, M Paz; Pekeur, N W; Pelletier, G; Perez, J; Petrucci, P -O; Peyaud, B; Pita, S; Pühlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raab, S; Raue, M; Reimer, A; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Sahakian, V; Sanchez, D A; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schulz, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Sheidaei, F; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Spengler, G; Stawarz, ?; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Stycz, K; Sushch, I; Szostek, A; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tluczykont, M; Trichard, C; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Völk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Vorster, M; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; White, R; Wierzcholska, A; Wouters, D; Zacharias, M; Zajczyk, A; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2013-01-01

    Aim. In this paper we present very high energy (VHE; E>100 GeV) data from the \\gamma-ray binary system PSR B1259-63/LS 2883 taken around its periastron passage (15th of December 2010) with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) of Cherenkov Telescopes. We aim to search for a possible TeV counterpart of the GeV flare detected by the Fermi LAT. In addition, we aim to study the current periastron passage in the context of previous observations taken at similar orbital phases, testing the repetitive behavior of the source. Methods. Observations at VHE were conducted with H.E.S.S. from 9th to 16th of January 2011. The total dataset amounts to around 6 h of observing time. Results. The source is detected in the 2011 data at a significance level of 11.5\\sigma\\ revealing an averaged integral flux above 1 TeV of (1.01 \\pm 0.18_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys}) \\times 10^{-12} cm^{-2}s^{-1}. The differential energy spectrum follows a power-law shape with a spectral index \\Gamma = 2.92 \\pm 0.30_{stat} \\pm 0.20_{sys} and a ...

  6. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  7. ARM - Surface Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendarPressExtendedPre-WorkshopListStratosphere

  8. ARM - Mobile Aerosol Observing System

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach HomepolarizationMeasurementsWarmingMethaneMission

  9. EO 13112: Invasive Species

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ, CA,EnergystudentThis document givesRedWHITE HOUSEthe3

  10. EO 11988: Floodplain Management

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEE Deer Creek

  11. EO 13287: Preserve America

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEEWHITE5 Federal710635

  12. E.O. Lawrence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalentLaboratory |Sectorfor $1.14Dynein

  13. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 4 P HY S I CA L REV I E W L E T T ER S 23 JULY 2001 Observation of the Quantum Zeno and AntiZeno Effects in an Unstable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in an unstable system. Cold sodium atoms are trapped in a far­detuned standing wave of light that is accelerated measurement­induced suppression of the dy­ namics of a two­state driven system has been observed [15 Zeno and Anti­Zeno Effects in an Unstable System M.C. Fischer, B. Gutiérrez­Medina, and M.G. Raizen

  14. Optimal core baseline design and observing strategy for probing the astrophysics of reionization with the SKA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greig, Bradley; Koopmans, Léon V E

    2015-01-01

    With the first phase of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA1) entering into its final pre-construction phase, we investigate how best to maximise its scientific return. Specifically, we focus on the statistical measurement of the 21 cm power spectrum (PS) from the epoch of reionization (EoR) using the low frequency array, SKA1-low. To facilitate this investigation we use the recently developed MCMC based EoR analysis tool 21CMMC (Greig & Mesinger). In light of the recent 50 per cent cost reduction, we consider several different SKA core baseline designs, changing: (i) the number of antenna stations; (ii) the number of dipoles per station; and also (iii) the distribution of baseline lengths. We find that a design with a reduced number of dipoles per core station (increased field of view and total number of core stations), together with shortened baselines, maximises the recovered EoR signal. With this optimal baseline design, we investigate three observing strategies, analysing the trade-off between lowering t...

  15. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali Leonid Reyzin November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such "physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  16. Observation of the Anomalously Slow (Power-Law) Relaxation of the System of Interacting Liquid Nanoclusters in the Disordered Confinement of a Random Porous Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Borman; A. A. Belogorlov; V. N. Tronin

    2015-05-20

    The time evolution of the system of water in the Libersorb 23 (L23) disordered nanoporous medium after the complete filling at excess pressure and the subsequent removal of excess pressure has been studied. It has been found that three stages can be identified in the relaxation of the L23-water system under study. At the first stage, a portion of water at the removal of excess pressure rapidly flows out in the pressure reduction time, i.e., following a decrease in the pressure. It has been shown that, at temperatures below the dispersion transition temperature $T pressure. At the second stage of relaxation, the degree of filling ${\\theta}$ varies slowly according to a power law ${\\theta} \\sim t^{-\\alpha}$ with the exponent ${\\alpha} 10^5$ s, the formed metastable state decays, which is manifested in the transition to a power-law dependence ${\\theta}(t)$ with a larger exponent. The extrusion-time distribution function of pores has been calculated along with the time dependence of the degree of filling, which qualitatively describes the observed anomalously slow relaxation and crossover of the transition to the stage of decay with a power-law dependence ${\\theta}(t)$ with a larger exponent. It has been shown that the relaxation and decay of the metastable state of the confined nonwetting liquid at ${\\theta}>{\\theta_c}$ are attributed to the appearance of local configurations of liquid clusters in confinement and their interaction inside the infinite percolation cluster of filled pores.

  17. Observables on Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatolij Dvure?enskij; Mária Kuková

    2012-04-29

    An observable on a quantum structure is any $\\sigma$-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel $\\sigma$-algebra into the quantum structure. We show that our partial information on an observable known only for all intervals of the form $(-\\infty,t)$ is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole observable defined on quantum structures like $\\sigma$-MV-algebras, $\\sigma$-effect algebras, Boolean $\\sigma$-algebras, monotone $\\sigma$-complete effect algebras with the Riesz Decomposition Property, the effect algebra of effect operators of a Hilbert space, and a system of functions, and an effect-tribe.

  18. Shedding Light on the EOS-Gravity Degeneracy and Constraining the Nuclear Symmetry Energy from the Gravitational Binding Energy of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Tao He; F. J. Fattoyev; Bao-An Li; W. G. Newton

    2015-10-14

    A thorough understanding of properties of neutron stars requires both a reliable knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) of super-dense nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity theories simultaneously. To provide information that may help break this EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of nuclear symmetry energy on the gravitational binding energy of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor subset of alternative gravity models. We focus on effects of the slope $L$ of nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density and the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy leads to large changes in the binding energy of neutron stars. The difference in predictions using the GR and the scalar-tensor theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and even then is significantly smaller than the difference resulting from variations in the symmetry energy.

  19. Shedding Light on the EOS-Gravity Degeneracy and Constraining the Nuclear Symmetry Energy from the Gravitational Binding Energy of Neutron Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Xiao-Tao; Li, Bao-An; Newton, W G

    2015-01-01

    A thorough understanding of properties of neutron stars requires both a reliable knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) of super-dense nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity theories simultaneously. To provide information that may help break this EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of nuclear symmetry energy on the gravitational binding energy of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor subset of alternative gravity models. We focus on effects of the slope $L$ of nuclear symmetry energy at saturation density and the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of nuclear symmetry energy leads to large changes in the binding energy of neutron stars. The difference in predictions using the GR and the scalar-tensor theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and even then is significantly smaller than the difference resulting from variations in the symmetry energy.

  20. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    This three-year project, in cooperation with Professor Bob Houze at University of Washington, has been successfully finished as planned. Both ARM (the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program) data and cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations were used to identify the water budgets of clouds observed in two international field campaigns. The research results achieved shed light on several key processes of clouds in climate change (or general circulation models), which are summarized below. 1. Revealed the effect of mineral dust on mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) Two international field campaigns near a desert and a tropical coast provided unique data to drive and evaluate CRM simulations, which are TWP-ICE (the Tropical Warm Pool International Cloud Experiment) and AMMA (the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis). Studies of the two campaign data were contrasted, revealing that much mineral dust can bring about large MCSs via ice nucleation and clouds. This result was reported as a PI presentation in the 3rd ASR Science Team meeting held in Arlington, Virginia in March 2012. A paper on the studies was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2013). 2. Identified the effect of convective downdrafts on ice crystal concentration Using the large-scale forcing data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP (the Southern Great Plains) and other field campaigns, Goddard CRM simulations were carried out in comparison with radar and satellite observations. The comparison between model and observations revealed that convective downdrafts could increase ice crystal concentration by up to three or four orders, which is a key to quantitatively represent the indirect effects of ice nuclei, a kind of aerosol, on clouds and radiation in the Tropics. This result was published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences (Zeng et al. 2011) and summarized in the DOE/ASR Research Highlights Summaries (see http://www.arm.gov/science/highlights/RMjY5/view). 3. Used radar observations to evaluate model simulations In cooperation with Profs. Bob Houze at University of Washington and Steven Rutledge at Colorado State University, numerical model results were evaluated with observations from W- and C-band radars and CloudSat/TRMM satellites. These studies exhibited some shortcomings of current numerical models, such as too little of thin anvil clouds, directing the future improvement of cloud microphysics parameterization in CRMs. Two papers of Powell et al (2012) and Zeng et al. (2013), summarizing these studies, were published in the Journal of the Atmospheric Sciences. 4. Analyzed the water budgets of MCSs Using ARM data from TWP-ICE, ARM-SGP and other field campaigns, the Goddard CRM simulations were carried out to analyze the water budgets of clouds from TWP-ICE and AMMA. The simulations generated a set of datasets on clouds and radiation, which are available http://cloud.gsfc.nasa.gov/. The cloud datasets were available for modelers and other researchers aiming to improve the representation of cloud processes in multi-scale modeling frameworks, GCMs and climate models. Special datasets, such as 3D cloud distributions every six minutes for TWP-ICE, were requested and generated for ARM/ASR investigators. Data server records show that 86,206 datasets were downloaded by 120 users between April of 2010 and January of 2012. 5. MMF simulations The Goddard MMF (multi-scale modeling framework) has been improved by coupling with the Goddard Land Information System (LIS) and the Goddard Earth Observing System Model, Version 5 (GOES5). It has also been optimized on NASA HEC supercomputers and can be run over 4000 CPUs. The improved MMF with high horizontal resolution (1 x 1 degree) is currently being applied to cases covering 2005 and 2006. The results show that the spatial distribution pattern of precipitation rate is well simulated by the MMF through comparisons with satellite retrievals from the CMOPRH and GPCP data sets. In addition, the MMF results were compared with three reanalyses (MERRA, ERA-Interim and CFSR). Although the MMF tends

  1. Advanced chemistry-transport modeling and observing systems allow daily air quality observations, short-term forecasts, and real-time analyses of air quality at the global and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menut, Laurent

    , French legislation has been adapted in such a way that the local authorities in charge of air pollution can now inform the public and take emergency decisions re- lated to air pollution control not onlyOLOGICAL SOCIETy | #12;air quality monitoring system. In case of a pollution episode, when concentrations exceed

  2. Quantum Mechanics Without Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Sulis

    2013-03-03

    The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

  3. Foulger, G.R., B.R. Julian and F.C. Monastero, Microearthquake characterisation of an artificially stimulated hydraulic fracture at the Coso geothermal area, California, EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract, 2006.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    stimulated hydraulic fracture at the Coso geothermal area, California, EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract, 2006. Microearthquake characterisation of an artificially stimulated hydraulic fracture it by injecting fluids under pressure. Instead, natural fractures were encountered at about 2,660 m depth

  4. The EOS is a fundamental descrip5on of nuclear ma7er. For isospin asymmetric ma7er the symmetry energy term is of prime importance. The density dependence of the symmetry energy impacts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Souza, Romualdo T.

    of the asymmetry term in three sets of calcu- lations provides a contribution to the symmetry energy per nucleonThe EOS is a fundamental descrip5on of nuclear ma7er. For isospin asymmetric ma7er the symmetry energy term is of prime importance. The density dependence

  5. Julian, B.R., G.R. Foulger, F.C. Monastero and K. Richards-Dinger, Four-dimensional tomography reveals changes in structure 1996 2002 at the Coso geothermal area, California, EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    reveals changes in structure 1996 ­ 2002 at the Coso geothermal area, California, EOS Trans. AGU, Fall - 2002 at the Coso geothermal area, California Gillian R. Foulger Dept. Earth Sciences, Durham University 94025 USA julian@usgs.gov Francis C. Monastero & Keith Richards-Dinger Geothermal Program Office, U. S

  6. Tkalcic, H., D.S. Dreger, G.R. Foulger, B.R. Julian, A. Fichtner, A seismological portrait of the anomalous 1996 Bardarbunga volcano, Iceland, earthquake (invited poster), EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl.,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foulger, G. R.

    of the anomalous 1996 Bardarbunga volcano, Iceland, earthquake (invited poster), EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl., Abstract S21B-1710, 2009. A Seismological Portrait of the Anomalous 1996 Bardarbunga Volcano, Iceland was recorded well by the regional-scale Iceland Hotspot Project seismic experiment. Several hypotheses were

  7. U.S. NO2 trends (2005–2013): EPA Air Quality System (AQS) data versus improved observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and, subsequently, atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO2) have decreased over the U.S. due to a combination of environmental policies and technological change. Consequently, NO2 levels have decreased by 30-40% in the last decade. We quantify NO2 trends (2005-2013) over the U.S. using surface measurements from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) and an improved tropospheric NO2 vertical column density (VCD) data product from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite.We demonstrate that the current OMI NO2 algorithm is of sufficient maturity to allow a favorable correspondence of trendsmore »and variations in OMI and AQS data. Our trend model accounts for the non-linear dependence of NO2 concentration on emissions associated with the seasonal variation of the chemical lifetime, including the change in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle associated with the significant change in NOx emissions that occurred over the last decade. The direct relationship between observations and emissions becomes more robust when one accounts for these non-linear dependencies. We improve the OMI NO2 standard retrieval algorithm and, subsequently, the data product by using monthly vertical concentration profiles, a required algorithm input, from a high-resolution chemistry and transport model (CTM) simulation with varying emissions (2005-2013). The impact of neglecting the time-dependence of the profiles leads to errors in trend estimation, particularly in regions where emissions have changed substantially. For example, trends calculated from retrievals based on time-dependent profiles offer 18% more instances of significant trends and up to 15% larger total NO2 reduction versus the results based on profiles for 2005. Using a CTM, we explore the theoretical relation of the trends estimated from NO2 VCDs to those estimated from ground-level concentrations. The model-simulated trends in VCDs strongly correlate with those estimated from surface concentrations (r -- 0.83, N -- 355). We then explore the observed correspondence of trends estimated from OMI and AQS data. We find a significant, but slightly weaker, correspondence (i.e., r -- 0.68, N -- 208) than predicted by the model and discuss some of the important factors affecting the relationship, including known problems (e.g., NOz interferents) associated with the AQS data. This significant correspondence gives confidence in trend and surface concentration estimates from OMI VCDs for locations, such as the majority of the U.S. and globe, that are not covered by surface monitoring networks. Using our improved trend model and our enhanced OMI data product, we find that both OMI and AQS data show substantial downward trends from 2005 to 2013, with an average reduction of 38% for each over the U.S. The annual reduction rates inferred from OMI and AQS measurements are larger (#3;-4.8 ± 1.9%/yr, #3;-3.7 ± 1.5%/yr) from 2005 to 2008 than 2010 to 2013 (-#3;1.2 ± 1.2%/yr, #3;-2.1 ± 1.4%/yr). We quantify NO2 trends for major U.S. cities and power plants; the latter suggest larger negative trend (#3;-4.0 ± 1.5%/yr) between 2005 and 2008 and smaller or insignificant changes (-#3;0.5 ± 1.2%/yr) during 2010-2013.« less

  8. U.S. NO? trends (2005–2013): EPA air quality system (AQS) data versus improved observations from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Lamsal, Lok N.; Duncan, Bryan N.; Yoshida, Yasuko; Krotkov, Nickolay A.; Pickering, Kenneth E.; Streets, David G.; Lu, Zifeng

    2015-06-01

    Emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) and, subsequently, atmospheric levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO?) have decreased over the U.S. due to a combination of environmental policies and technological change. Consequently, NO? levels have decreased by 30–40% in the last decade. We quantify NO? trends (2005–2013) over the U.S. using surface measurements from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Air Quality System (AQS) and an improved tropospheric NO? vertical column density (VCD) data product from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on the Aura satellite.We demonstrate that the current OMI NO? algorithm is of sufficient maturity to allow a favorable correspondence of trendsmore »and variations in OMI and AQS data. Our trend model accounts for the non-linear dependence of NO? concentration on emissions associated with the seasonal variation of the chemical lifetime, including the change in the amplitude of the seasonal cycle associated with the significant change in NOx emissions that occurred over the last decade. The direct relationship between observations and emissions becomes more robust when one accounts for these non-linear dependencies. We improve the OMI NO? standard retrieval algorithm and, subsequently, the data product by using monthly vertical concentration profiles, a required algorithm input, from a high-resolution chemistry and transport model (CTM) simulation with varying emissions (2005-2013). The impact of neglecting the time-dependence of the profiles leads to errors in trend estimation, particularly in regions where emissions have changed substantially. For example, trends calculated from retrievals based on time-dependent profiles offer 18% more instances of significant trends and up to 15% larger total NO? reduction versus the results based on profiles for 2005. Using a CTM, we explore the theoretical relation of the trends estimated from NO? VCDs to those estimated from ground-level concentrations. The model-simulated trends in VCDs strongly correlate with those estimated from surface concentrations (r = 0.83, N = 355). We then explore the observed correspondence of trends estimated from OMI and AQS data. We find a significant, but slightly weaker, correspondence (i.e., r = 0.68, N = 208) than predicted by the model and discuss some of the important factors affecting the relationship, including known problems (e.g., NOz interferents) associated with the AQS data. This significant correspondence gives confidence in trend and surface concentration estimates from OMI VCDs for locations, such as the majority of the U.S. and globe, that are not covered by surface monitoring networks. Using our improved trend model and our enhanced OMI data product, we find that both OMI and AQS data show substantial downward trends from 2005 to 2013, with an average reduction of 38% for each over the U.S. The annual reduction rates inferred from OMI and AQS measurements are larger (–4.8 ± 1.9%/yr, –3.7 ± 1.5%/yr) from 2005 to 2008 than 2010 to 2013 (–1.2 ± 1.2%/yr, –2.1 ± 1.4%/yr). We quantify NO? trends for major U.S. cities and power plants; the latter suggest larger negative trend (–4.0 ± 1.5%/yr) between 2005 and 2008 and smaller or insignificant changes (–0.5 ± 1.2%/yr) during 2010-2013.« less

  9. 1934 IEEE JOURNAL OF SELECTED TOPICS IN APPLIED EARTH OBSERVATIONS AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 6, NO. 4, AUGUST 2013 A Web-Based System for Classification of Remote

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    in many different fields. This paper describes a web-based system (available online: http://hypergim.ceta-ciemat

  10. Effect of Intrusion Detection and Response on Reliability of Cyber Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Ing-Ray

    within radio range Na b (t) Attacker strength detected at time t in Beta(, ) in Beta(, ) Number of ranging operations per node per TIDS Et Energy for transmission per node Er Energy for reception per node Ea Energy for analyzing data per node Es Energy for sensing per node Eo Initial system energy TIDS

  11. WORLD ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY Environmental History of Africa -Vimbai C. Kwashirai Encyclopedia of Life Support Systems (EOLSS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    U N ESC O ­ EO LSS SAM PLE C H APTER S WORLD ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY ­ Environmental History and conservation is central, given that the main axiom of world conservation strategy is that development depends and forest produce to the world capitalist system. A key feature of African environmental historiography lies

  12. Experimental Observation of Critical Phenomena in a Laser Light System Amir Rosen, Rafi Weill, Boris Levit, Vladimir Smulakovsky, Alexander Bekker, and Baruch Fischer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Baruch

    , Boris Levit, Vladimir Smulakovsky, Alexander Bekker, and Baruch Fischer Department of Electrical of gas-liquid and magnetic spin systems. The laser light modes provide a special nonthermodynamic many. Canonical examples are the gas-liquid-solid and magnetic spin systems. This work deals with a non

  13. What can U.S. dermatology learn from health care systems abroad? An observation of Taiwan’s system of clinical efficiency as a possible model for increased patient access to care and affordability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamangar, Faranak; Millsop, Jillian W; Tsai, Dino; Koo, John YM

    2015-01-01

    clinics operate very efficiently with a range of 30 patientsa model of a highly efficient system to deliver adequates system of clinical efficiency as a possible model for

  14. Analysis of Cloud-resolving Simulations of a Tropical Mesoscale Convective System Observed during TWP-ICE: Vertical Fluxes and Draft Properties in Convective and Stratiform Regions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.; Rio, Catherine; Fridlind, Ann; Ackerman, Andrew; Del Genio, Anthony D.; Pauluis, Olivier; Varble, Adam; Fan, Jiwen

    2012-10-02

    We analyze three cloud-resolving model simulations of a strong convective event observed during the TWP-ICE campaign, differing in dynamical core, microphysical scheme or both. Based on simulated and observed radar reflectivity, simulations roughly reproduce observed convective and stratiform precipitating areas. To identify the characteristics of convective and stratiform drafts that are difficult to observe but relevant to climate model parameterization, independent vertical wind speed thresholds are calculated to capture 90% of total convective and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes. Convective updrafts are fairly consistent across simulations (likely owing to fixed large-scale forcings and surface conditions), except that hydrometeor loadings differ substantially. Convective downdraft and stratiform updraft and downdraft mass fluxes vary notably below the melting level, but share similar vertically uniform draft velocities despite differing hydrometeor loadings. All identified convective and stratiform downdrafts contain precipitation below ~10 km and nearly all updrafts are cloudy above the melting level. Cold pool properties diverge substantially in a manner that is consistent with convective downdraft mass flux differences below the melting level. Despite differences in hydrometeor loadings and cold pool properties, convective updraft and downdraft mass fluxes are linearly correlated with convective area, the ratio of ice in downdrafts to that in updrafts is ~0.5 independent of species, and the ratio of downdraft to updraft mass flux is ~0.5-0.6, which may represent a minimum evaporation efficiency under moist conditions. Hydrometeor loading in stratiform regions is found to be a fraction of hydrometeor loading in convective regions that ranges from ~10% (graupel) to ~90% (cloud ice). These findings may lead to improved convection parameterizations.

  15. THE FIRST OBSERVATIONS OF LOW-REDSHIFT DAMPED Ly{alpha} SYSTEMS WITH THE COSMIC ORIGINS SPECTROGRAPH: CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES AND AFFILIATED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Battisti, A. J.; Meiring, J. D.; Tripp, T. M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA 01003 (United States); Prochaska, J. X.; Werk, J. K. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Observatories-Lick Observatory, UC Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Jenkins, E. B. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University Observatory, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Lehner, N. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Tumlinson, J.; Thom, C. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-01-10

    We present Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) measurements of metal abundances in eight 0.083 < z{sub abs} < 0.321 damped Ly{alpha} (DLA) and sub-DLA absorption systems serendipitously discovered in the COS-Halos survey. We find that these systems show a large range in metallicities, with -1.10 < [Z/H] < 0.31, similar to the spread found at higher redshifts. These low-redshift systems on average have subsolar metallicities, but do show a rise in metallicity over cosmic time when compared to higher-redshift systems. We find that the average sub-DLA metallicity is higher than the average DLA metallicity at all redshifts. Nitrogen is underabundant with respect to {alpha}-group elements in all but perhaps one of the absorbers. In some cases, [N/{alpha}] is significantly below the lowest nitrogen measurements in nearby galaxies. Systems for which depletion patterns can be studied show little, if any, depletion, which is characteristic of Milky Way halo-type gas. We also identify affiliated galaxies for three of the sub-DLAs using spectra obtained from a Keck/Low Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (LRIS). None of these sub-DLAs arise in the stellar disks of luminous galaxies; instead, these absorbers may exist in galaxy halos at impact parameters ranging from 38 to 92 kpc. Multiple galaxies are present near two of the sub-DLAs, and galaxy interactions may play a role in the dispersal of the gas. Many of these low-redshift absorbers exhibit simple kinematics, but one sub-DLA has a complicated mix of at least 13 components spread over 150 km s{sup -1}. We find three galaxies near this sub-DLA, which also suggests that galaxy interactions roil the gas. This study reinforces the view that DLAs have a variety of origins, and low-redshift studies are crucial for understanding absorber-galaxy connections.

  16. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; M. D'Agostino

    2006-11-09

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurational energy fluctuations, that may give important information on the heat capacity of the fragmenting system at the freeze out stage, are not fully compatible among different data sets and require further analysis to properly account for Coulomb effects and secondary decays. Some basic theoretical questions, concerning the interplay between the dynamics of the collision and the fragmentation process, and the cluster definition in dense and hot media, are still open and are addressed at the end of the paper. A comparison with realistic models and/or a quantitative analysis of the fluctuation properties will be needed to clarify in the next future the nature of the transition observed from compound nucleus evaporation to multi-fragment production.

  17. SNR G320.4-01.2 and PSR B1509-58: New radio observations of a complex interacting system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. M. Gaensler; K. T. S. Brazier; R. N. Manchester; S. Johnston; A. J. Green

    1999-01-20

    We describe radio continuum and spectral line observations of the source G320.4-01.2 (MSH 15-52) and the coincident young pulsar B1509-58 made with the Australia Telescope Compact Array. Based on a comparison between X-ray and radio observations, we argue that the two main radio components of G320.4-01.2 are a single supernova remnant (SNR), which HI absorption indicates is at a distance of 5.2+/-1.4 kpc. A high-resolution correspondence between radio and X-rays argues that the pulsar is interacting with the SNR via an opposed pair of collimated outflows. The outflow itself is seen as an elongated X-ray feature surrounded by a highly polarized radio sheath, while the interaction with the SNR manifests itself as a ring of radio/X-ray knots within the optical nebula RCW 89. We reject the hypothesis that the pulsar outflow powers the entire RCW 89 region. SNR G320.4-01.2 and PSR B1509-58 agree in distance and in rotation measure, and appear to be interacting. We thus conclude that the two objects are associated and have an age of energy or low-mass supernova which occurred near the edge of an elongated cavity. Such a model can account for the SNR's bilateral appearance, its large apparent age, the significant offset of the pulsar from the SNR's centre and the faintness of the pulsar-powered nebula at radio wavelengths.

  18. PRECISE ESTIMATES OF THE PHYSICAL PARAMETERS FOR THE EXOPLANET SYSTEM HD 17156 ENABLED BY HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE FINE GUIDANCE SENSOR TRANSIT AND ASTEROSEISMIC OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutzman, Philip; Charbonneau, David; Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gilliland, Ronald L.; McCullough, Peter R.; Nelan, Edmund P. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Christensen-Dalsgaard, Joergen; Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Brown, Timothy M., E-mail: pnutzman@cfa.harvard.edu [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States)

    2011-01-01

    We present observations of three distinct transits of HD 17156b obtained with the Fine Guidance Sensors on board the Hubble Space Telescope. We analyzed both the transit photometry and previously published radial velocities to find the planet-star radius ratio R{sub p} /R{sub *} = 0.07454 {+-} 0.00035, inclination i = 86.49{sup +0.24}{sub -0.20} deg, and scaled semimajor axis a/R{sub *} = 23.19{sup +0.32}{sub -0.27}. This last value translates directly to a mean stellar density determination {rho}{sub *} = 0.522{sup +0.021}{sub -0.018} g cm{sup -3}. Analysis of asteroseismology observations by the companion paper of Gilliland et al. provides a consistent but significantly refined measurement of {rho}{sub *} = 0.5308 {+-} 0.0040. We compare stellar isochrones to this density estimate and find M{sub *} = 1.275 {+-} 0.018 M{sub sun} and a stellar age of 3.37{sup +0.20}{sub -0.47} Gyr. Using this estimate of M{sub *} and incorporating the density constraint from asteroseismology, we model both the photometry and published radial velocities to estimate the planet radius R{sub p} = 1.0870 {+-} 0.0066 R{sub J} and the stellar radius R{sub *} = 1.5007 {+-} 0.0076 R{sub sun}. The planet radius is larger than that found in previous studies and consistent with theoretical models of a solar-composition gas giant of the same mass and equilibrium temperature. For the three transits, we determine the times of mid-transit to a precision of 6.2 s, 7.6 s, and 6.9 s, and the transit times for HD 17156 do not show any significant departures from a constant period. The joint analysis of transit photometry and asteroseismology presages similar studies that will be enabled by the NASA Kepler Mission.

  19. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali # Leonid Reyzin +

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali # Leonid Reyzin + November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such ``physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  20. COS OBSERVATIONS OF METAL LINE AND BROAD LYMAN-{alpha} ABSORPTION IN THE MULTI-PHASE O VI AND Ne VIII SYSTEM AT z = 0.20701 TOWARD HE 0226-4110

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, B. D. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 475 North Charter Street, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lehner, N. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, 225 Nieuwland Science Hall, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Narayanan, A. [Indian Institute of Space Science and Technology, Thiruvananthapuram 695547, Kerala (India)

    2011-12-20

    Observations of the QSO HE 0226-4110 (z{sub em} = 0.495) with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) from 1134 to 1796 A with a resolution of {approx}17 km s{sup -1} and signal-to-noise ratio (S/N) per resolution element of 20-40 are used to study the multi-phase absorption system at z = 0.20701 containing O VI and Ne VIII. The system was previously studied with lower S/N observations with Far-Ultraviolet Spectroscopic Explorer (FUSE) and Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS). The COS observations provide more reliable measures of the H I and metal lines present in the system and reveal the clear presence of broad Ly{alpha} (BLA) absorption with b = 72(+13, -6) km s{sup -1} and log N(H I) = 13.87 {+-} 0.08. Detecting BLAs associated with warm gas absorbers is crucial for determining the temperature, metallicity, and total baryonic content of the absorbers. The BLA is probably recording the trace amount of thermally broadened H I in the collisionally ionized plasma with log T {approx} 5.7 that also produces the O VI and Ne VIII absorption. The total hydrogen column in the collisionally ionized gas, log N(H) {approx} 20.1, exceeds that in the cooler photoionized gas in the system by a factor of {approx}22. The oxygen abundance in the collisionally ionized gas is [O/H] = -0.89 {+-} 0.08 {+-} 0.07. The absorber probably occurs in the circumgalactic environment (halo) of a foreground L = 0.25L{sub *} disk galaxy with an impact parameter of 109 h{sub 70}{sup -1} kpc identified by Mulchaey and Chen.

  1. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houze, Jr., Robert A.

    2013-11-13

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  2. http://www.epa.gov/fedrgstr/eo/eo13175.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers and Streamsyou collect data each

  3. EO 11988_as amended by EO 13690_2015

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEE Deer CreekE:

  4. What can U.S. dermatology learn from health care systems abroad? An observation of Taiwan’s system of clinical efficiency as a possible model for increased patient access to care and affordability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamangar, Faranak; Millsop, Jillian W; Tsai, Dino; Koo, John YM

    2015-01-01

    it behooves us to study the Taiwan system with respect andPMID: 18723242] 4. Cheng TM. Taiwan's new national health12757273] 5. Chiang TL. Taiwan's 1995 health care reform.

  5. Eos Climate | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,Power Corp Jump to: navigation,EnvirosEolianEon

  6. Eos Energia | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,Power Corp Jump to: navigation,EnvirosEolianEonEnergia

  7. EO 11990: Protection Of Wetlands

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEE Deer

  8. CHAPTER 4 NOAA PROCuREMENT, ACQuISITION, & CONSTRuCTION NOAA's Procurement, Acquisition, and Construction (PAC) account

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    leases in one sub-activity, Local Warnings and Forecasts; to transfer $810,000 and 4 FTEs from NESS $3,734/0 FtE nESS EoS & Advanced polar Data processing, Distribution & Archiving Systems Climate Systems $990/0 FtE nESS GoES-n Climate Service observations & Monitoring ­ Data Center Modernization $2

  9. Observations & Thoughts on Controller Assessment &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harris, Thomas J.

    & Assessment Design & interpretation of monitoring & assessment methods cannot be divorced from processObservations & Thoughts on Controller Assessment & Performance Monitoring T.J. Harris Queen's University harrist@post.queensu.ca Control Systems 2004 #12;Acknowledge Contributions of NSERC Imperial Oil

  10. The GAPS Programme with HARPS-N at TNG VIII: Observations of the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect and characterisation of the transiting planetary systems HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mancini, L; Covino, E; Raia, G; Southworth, J; Tregloan-Reed, J; Biazzo, K; Bonomo, A; Desidera, S; Lanza, A F; Maciejewski, G; Poretti, E; Sozzetti, A; Borsa, F; Bruni, I; Ciceri, S; Claudi, R; Cosentino, R; Gratton, R; Fiorenzano, A F Martinez; Lodato, G; Lorenzi, V; Marzari, F; Murabito, S; Affer, L; Bignamini, A; Bedin, L R; Boccato, C; Damasso, M; Henning, Th; Maggio, A; Micela, G; Molinari, E; Pagano, I; Piotto, G; Rainer, M; Scandariato, G; Smareglia, R; Sanchez, R Zanmar

    2015-01-01

    We determine the true and the projected obliquity of HAT-P-36 and WASP-11/HAT-P-10 systems, respectively, which are both composed of a relatively cool star and a hot-Jupiter planet. Thanks to the high-resolution spectrograph HARPS-N, we observed the Rossiter-McLaughlin effect for both the systems by acquiring precise radial-velocity measurements during planetary transit events. We also present photometric observations comprising six light curves covering five transit events, obtained using three medium-class telescopes and the telescope-defocussing technique. One transit of WASP-11/HAT-P-10 was followed contemporaneously from two observatories. The three transit light curves of HAT-P-36b show anomalies attributable to starspot complexes on the surface of the parent star, in agreement with the analysis of its spectra that indicate a moderate activity. By analysing the complete HATNet data set of HAT-P-36, we estimated the stellar rotation period by detecting a periodic photometric modulation in the light curve...

  11. Electromagnetic Observables in Few-Nucleon Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonia Bacca

    2012-10-10

    The electromagnetic probe is a very valuable tool to study the dynamics of few nucleons. It can be very helpful in shedding light on the not yet fully understood three-nucleon forces. We present an update on the theoretical studies of electromagnetic induced reactions, such as photo-disintegration and electron scattering off 4He. We will show that they potentially represent a tool to discriminate among three-nucleon forces. Then, we will discuss the charge radius and the nuclear electric polarizability of the 6He halo nucleus.

  12. SPACE WEATHER OBSERVING SYSTEMS: CURRENT CAPABILITIES AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schrijver, Karel

    Coordinator for Meteorology DR. JOHN HAYES* Department of Commerce DR. FRED LEWIS* Department of Defense MR. W. RANDALL BELL Department of Energy MS. ROBIN FINEGAN* Department of Homeland Security MR. JAMES F. DEVINE* Department of the Interior MR. KENNETH HODGKINS Department of State MS. VICTORIA COX* Department

  13. Invited Paper THE EARTH OBSERVING SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Jeff

    (with MISR). * Through their intake and emission of carbon dioxide, the primary anthropogenic greenhouse-8194-0600-7/91/$4.OO SPIE Vol. 1491 Remote Sensing of Atmospheric Chemistry(1991) / 117 Downloaded From gas, terrestrial and marine plants are a key part of the global carbon cycle. To better understand

  14. Networked Aquatic Microbial Observing Systems: An Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01

    waters • Sensor-equipped buoys, robotic boats and pier-and biological parameters. Buoy and robotic boat in KingCombined use of static buoy, mobile robotic boat and

  15. Glider and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Observing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    + H Energy consumption per unit distance Ratio Glider/Large AUV R=0.033 R3=0.0027 R=0.05 R=0 Mbyte per hour Yes 10 Mbits per sec surface short range J Sensors discussed later J Water sampling 50

  16. AN INTEGRATED GLOBAL OBSERVING SYSTEM FOR SEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and variability from observa- tional data, but it does not include attribution of the causes of climate change and Reynolds--NOAA/ National Climatic Data Center, Asheville, North Carolina; lumpkin several NOAA offices: theClimateProgramOffice(CPO)in SilverSpring,Maryland;theNational Climatic Data

  17. Glider and Autonomous Underwater Vehicle Observing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    .1 Performance metrics for AUV surveys Present-day limitations, for example in the energy available in autonomous of harmful algal blooms (HABs) that remains a challenge for the marine science community, not the technology changes occur over a range of time and space scales. A simple metric for estimating the information

  18. Anderson-Gregory; Constable-Steven; Orcutt-John; Staudigel-Hubert; Tolstoy-Maya; Wyatt-Frank-K, Observing seafloor tilt on Axial Segment, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Eos, Transactions, American Geophysical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    central volcano in northeastern Iceland, J. Vol. Geotherm. Res. 6, 197-212, 1979. Cannon-Ragnar, Mechanism of the 1991 eruption of Hekla from continuous borehole strain monitoring, Nature (London).365

  19. VOLUME 87, NUMBER 4 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 23 JULY 2001 Observation of the Quantum Zeno and Anti-Zeno Effects in an Unstable System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system. Our experiment consists of ultracold sodium atoms in an accelerated standing wave of light which measurement-induced suppression of the dy- namics of a two-state driven system has been observed [15 of the Quantum Zeno and Anti-Zeno Effects in an Unstable System M. C. Fischer, B. Gutiérrez-Medina, and M

  20. Spectrum of Controlling and Observing Complex Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yan, Gang; Barzel, Baruch; Slotine, Jean-Jacques; Liu, Yang-Yu; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    2015-01-01

    Observing and controlling complex networks are of paramount interest for understanding complex physical, biological and technological systems. Recent studies have made important advances in identifying sensor or driver nodes, through which we can observe or control a complex system. Yet, the observation uncertainty induced by measurement noise and the energy cost required for control continue to be significant challenges in practical applications. Here we show that the control energy cost and the observation uncertainty vary widely in different directions of the state space. In particular, we find that if all nodes are directly driven, control is energetically feasible, as the maximum energy cost increases sublinearly with the system size. If, however, we aim to control a system by driving only a single node, control in some directions is energetically prohibitive, increasing exponentially with the system size. For the cases in between, the maximum energy decays exponentially if we increase the number of driv...

  1. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  2. Observations of LSI+61303 with Swift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Holder; A. Falcone; D. Morris

    2007-09-18

    The TeV emitting high-mass X-ray binary system LSI+61303 was observed with the Swift satellite from early September 2006 to early January 2007. Many of these observations were contemporaneous with TeV observations. The data consist of observations on 24 separate days with durations ranging between 700s and 4700s, and partially cover 4.5 orbital periods of the binary system. We present here an analysis of the 0.2 to 10keV X-ray data from the Swift-XRT instrument. Contemporaneous optical data from UVOT are also available.

  3. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  4. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  5. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  6. Observing the next galactic supernova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, Scott M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Beacom, John F.; Stanek, K. Z. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Vagins, Mark R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan)

    2013-12-01

    No supernova (SN) in the Milky Way has been observed since the invention of the optical telescope, instruments for other wavelengths, neutrino detectors, or gravitational wave observatories. It would be a tragedy to miss the opportunity to fully characterize the next one. To aid preparations for its observations, we model the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions of a successful Galactic core-collapse supernova (ccSN), its shock breakout radiation, and its massive star progenitor. We find, at very high probability (? 100%), that the next Galactic SN will easily be detectable in the near-IR and that near-IR photometry of the progenitor star very likely (? 92%) already exists in the Two Micron All Sky Survey. Most ccSNe (98%) will be easily observed in the optical, but a significant fraction (43%) will lack observations of the progenitor due to a combination of survey sensitivity and confusion. If neutrino detection experiments can quickly disseminate a likely position (?3°), we show that a modestly priced IR camera system can probably detect the shock breakout radiation pulse even in daytime (64% for the cheapest design). Neutrino experiments should seriously consider adding such systems, both for their scientific return and as an added and internal layer of protection against false triggers. We find that shock breakouts from failed ccSNe of red supergiants may be more observable than those of successful SNe due to their lower radiation temperatures. We review the process by which neutrinos from a Galactic ccSN would be detected and announced. We provide new information on the EGADS system and its potential for providing instant neutrino alerts. We also discuss the distance, extinction, and magnitude probability distributions for the next Galactic Type Ia supernova (SN Ia). Based on our modeled observability, we find a Galactic ccSN rate of 3.2{sub ?2.6}{sup +7.3} per century and a Galactic SN Ia rate of 1.4{sub ?0.8}{sup +1.4} per century for a total Galactic SN rate of 4.6{sub ?2.7}{sup +7.4} per century is needed to account for the SNe observed over the last millennium, which implies a Galactic star formation rate of 3.6{sub ?3.0}{sup +8.3} M {sub ?} yr{sup –1}.

  7. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2014-11-25

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  8. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  9. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  10. If physics is an information science, what is an observer?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chris Fields

    2012-02-11

    Interpretations of quantum theory have traditionally assumed a "Galilean" observer, a bare "point of view" implemented physically by a quantum system. This paper investigates the consequences of replacing such an informationally-impoverished observer with an observer that satisfies the requirements of classical automata theory, i.e. an observer that encodes sufficient prior information to identify the system being observed and recognize its acceptable states. It shows that with reasonable assumptions about the physical dynamics of information channels, the observations recorded by such an observer will display the typical characteristics predicted by quantum theory, without requiring any specific assumptions about the observer's physical implementation.

  11. Improved Model of Isoprene Emissions in Africa using Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Satellite Observations of Formaldehyde: Implications for Oxidants and Particulate Matter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marais, E. A.; Jacob, D.; Guenther, Alex B.; Chance, K.; Kurosu, T. P.; Murphy, J. G.; Reeves, C. E.; Pye, H.

    2014-08-01

    We use a 2005-2009 record of isoprene emissions over Africa derived from OMI satellite observations of formaldehyde (HCHO) to better understand the factors controlling isoprene emission on the scale of the continent and evaluate the impact of isoprene emissions on atmospheric composition in Africa. OMI-derived isoprene emissions show large seasonality over savannas driven by temperature and leaf area index (LAI), and much weaker seasonality over equatorial forests driven by temperature. The commonly used MEGAN (version 2.1) global 31 isoprene emission model reproduces this seasonality but is biased high, particularly for 32 equatorial forests, when compared to OMI and relaxed-eddy accumulation measurements. 33 Isoprene emissions in MEGAN are computed as the product of an emission factor Eo, LAI, and 34 activity factors dependent on environmental variables. We use the OMI-derived emissions to 35 provide improved estimates of Eo that are in good agreement with direct leaf measurements from 36 field campaigns (r = 0.55, bias = -19%). The largest downward corrections to MEGAN Eo values are for equatorial forests and semi-arid environments, and this is consistent with latitudinal transects of isoprene over West Africa from the AMMA aircraft campaign. Total emission of isoprene in Africa is estimated to be 77 Tg C a-1, compared to 104 Tg C a-1 in MEGAN. Simulations with the GEOS-Chem oxidant-aerosol model suggest that isoprene emissions increase mean surface ozone in West Africa by up to 8 ppbv, and particulate matter by up to 1.5 42 ?g m-3, due to coupling with anthropogenic influences.

  12. Observer-based fault detection for nuclear reactors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qing, 1972-

    2001-01-01

    This is a study of fault detection for nuclear reactor systems. Basic concepts are derived from fundamental theories on system observers. Different types of fault- actuator fault, sensor fault, and system dynamics fault ...

  13. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  14. Exploring the effects of a double reconstruction on the geometrical parameters of coupled models, using observational data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solano, Freddy Cueva

    2015-01-01

    In this work we study the effects of the non-gravitational exchange energy (Q) between dark matter (DM) fluid and dark energy (DE) fluid on the background evolution of the cosmological parameters. A varying equation of state (EOS) parameter, {\\omega}, for DE is proposed. Considering an universe spatially flat, two distinct coupled models were examined to explore the main cosmological effects generated by the simultaneous reconstruction of Q and {\\omega} on the shape of the jerk parameter, j, through a slight enhancement or suppression of their amplitudes with respect to noncoupled scenarios, during its evolution from the past to the near future. In consequence, j could be used to distinguish any coupled DE models. Otherwise, the observational data were used to put stringent constraints on Q and {\\omega}, respectively. In such a way, we used our results as evidences to search possible deviations from the standard concordance model ({\\Lambda}CDM), examining their predictions and improving our knowledge of the c...

  15. Selecting Observation Platforms for Optimized Anomaly Detectability under Unreliable Partial Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen-Chiao Lin; Humberto E. Garcia; Tae-Sic Yoo

    2011-06-01

    Diagnosers for keeping track on the occurrences of special events in the framework of unreliable partially observed discrete-event dynamical systems were developed in previous work. This paper considers observation platforms consisting of sensors that provide partial and unreliable observations and of diagnosers that analyze them. Diagnosers in observation platforms typically perform better as sensors providing the observations become more costly or increase in number. This paper proposes a methodology for finding an observation platform that achieves an optimal balance between cost and performance, while satisfying given observability requirements and constraints. Since this problem is generally computational hard in the framework considered, an observation platform optimization algorithm is utilized that uses two greedy heuristics, one myopic and another based on projected performances. These heuristics are sequentially executed in order to find best observation platforms. The developed algorithm is then applied to an observation platform optimization problem for a multi-unit-operation system. Results show that improved observation platforms can be found that may significantly reduce the observation platform cost but still yield acceptable performance for correctly inferring the occurrences of special events.

  16. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  17. Observable primordial vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2004-06-04

    Primordial vector modes describe vortical fluid perturbations in the early universe. A regular solution exists with constant non-zero radiation vorticities on super-horizon scales. Baryons are tightly coupled to the photons, and the baryon velocity only decays by an order unity factor by recombination, leading to an observable CMB anisotropy signature via the Doppler effect. There is also a large B-mode CMB polarization signal, with significant power on scales larger than l~2000. This B-mode signature is distinct from that expected from tensor modes or gravitational lensing, and makes a primordial vector to scalar mode power ratio ~10^(-6) detectable. Future observations aimed at detecting large scale B-modes from gravitational waves will also be sensitive to regular vector modes at around this level.

  18. J. Parallel Distrib. Comput. 68 (2008) 93111 www.elsevier.com/locate/jpdc

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plaza, Antonio J.

    2008-01-01

    role in the design of high-performance systems for many on-going and planned remote sensing missions/security deployment, urban planning and Observing-1 (EO-1) satellite platform. The development of efficient techniques for extracting scientific

  19. Observations on European Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  20. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProductsObservations Projected

  1. Prod-Trees: Semantic Search for Earth Observation Products

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    of set of self-describing, machine-independent data formats and software libraries that support search- ing for EO products by selecting some high level categories (e.g., the mission from which and temporal filtering criteria. Although this might suit the needs of very advanced users that know exactly

  2. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Deepto Chakrabarty; John Chiu; Mark H. Finger; Danny T. Koh; Robert W. Nelson; Thomas A. Prince; Bradley C. Rubin; D. Matthew Scott; Mark Stollberg; Brian A. Vaughan; Colleen A. Wilson; Robert B. Wilson

    1997-07-22

    We summarize five years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered 5 new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A 0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619 and A 1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history of during outbursts of 6 of those transients whose orbital parameters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eight persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long time scales, blurring the conventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars, but uncorrelated, or even anticorrelated, in persistent sources.

  3. VLA multifrequency observations of RS CVn binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Garcia-Sanchez; J. M. Paredes; M. Ribo

    2003-03-21

    We present multiepoch Very Large Array (VLA) observations at 1.4 GHz, 4.9 GHz, 8.5 GHz and 14.9 GHz for a sample of eight RS CVn binary systems. Circular polarization measurements of these systems are also reported. Most of the fluxes observed are consistent with incoherent emission from mildly relativistic electrons. Several systems show an increase of the degree of circular polarization with increasing frequency in the optically thin regime, in conflict with predictions by gyrosynchrotron models. We observed a reversal in the sense of circular polarization with increasing frequency in three non-eclipsing systems: EI Eri, DM Uma and HD 8358. We find clear evidence for coherent plasma emission at 1.4 GHz in the quiescent spectrum of HD 8358 during the helicity reversal. The degrees of polarization of the other two systems could also be accounted for by a coherent emission process. The observations of ER Vul revealed two U-shaped flux spectra at the highest frequencies. The U-shape of the spectra may be accounted for by an optically thin gyrosynchrotron source for the low frequency part whereas the high frequency part is dominated by a thermal emission component.

  4. 27/10/2010 12:48AGU: Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave receiver systems Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/rs/rs1002/2009RS004215/2009RS004215.xml&t=

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulich, Thomas

    frequency radio wave receiver systems Page 1 of 2http://europa.agu.org/?view=article&uri=/journals/rs/rs1002/2009RS004215/2009RS004215.xml&t= Keywords radio waves induced currents geomagnetic Index Terms Ionosphere Abstract Highlatitude geomagnetically induced current events observed on very low frequency radio wave

  5. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  6. Numerical Model Construction with Closed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Dietrich; Gerta Köster; Hans-Joachim Bungartz

    2015-10-18

    Performing analysis, optimization and control using simulations of many-particle systems is computationally demanding when no macroscopic model for the dynamics of the variables of interest is available. In case observations on the macroscopic scale can only be produced via legacy simulator code or live experiments, finding a model for these macroscopic variables is challenging. In this paper, we employ time-lagged embedding theory to construct macroscopic numerical models from output data of a black box, such as a simulator or live experiments. Since the state space variables of the constructed, coarse model are dynamically closed and observable by an observation function, we call these variables closed observables. The approach is an online-offline procedure, as model construction from observation data is performed offline and the new model can then be used in an online phase, independent of the original. We illustrate the theoretical findings with numerical models constructed from time series of a two-dimensional ordinary differential equation system, and from the density evolution of a transport-diffusion system. Applicability is demonstrated in a real-world example, where passengers leave a train and the macroscopic model for the density flow onto the platform is constructed with our approach. If only the macroscopic variables are of interest, simulation runtimes with the numerical model are three orders of magnitude lower compared to simulations with the original fine scale model. We conclude with a brief discussion of possibilities of numerical model construction in systematic upscaling, network optimization and uncertainty quantification.

  7. Personal observations on interdisciplinarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, E. N.

    1999-10-11

    The author's assignment was to report on how I{sup 3} relates to professional societies and journals he has known, a not unreasonable request given past associations with the Materials Research Society (MRS) and its journal, JMR, particularly in their more formative years. Some recollections and some comments on current postures of MRS and JMR will be found in the section following. There are manifold anecdotes one might relate about overcoming (or not) barriers raised by disciplinary preconception and much revered institutional norms. But to what end? On recalling his own involvements and on trying to discern the common elements, the author concludes that lessons learned from such accounts are, at the detail level, too situation-specific to be generally useful while at the same time being easily generalized to a few tenets that most of us by now find obvious in principle but that provide no actionable roadmap for implementing I{sup 3} in a specific new arena. How can that be? Other contributors are submitting the I{sup 3}R challenge to scholarly analysis and reporting on significant impediments and enviable achievements. He notes that the common themes permeating the entire discussion reduce to a few fundamental aspects of human nature well known and ubiquitous not merely in the universe of science, technology and research, but in broader society. He feels it is important not to lose sight of this as one examines I{sup 3} problems and solutions, for it is often the larger context that rises to thwart the best of local intentions. He feels that humans are a risk averse species. This translates into resistance to change and thus to institutional inertia. When taken in concert with the subjective propensity to categorize and the objective need at any given stage of development to parse complex systems into manageable subunits, it becomes clear why rigid taxonomies are the rule. Be they definitions of departments on campus, political labels, or finding program classifications. It is fair to say that in the examples presented at this gathering, the origin of hurdles confronting introduction of an I{sup 3} approach in extant systems is the inevitable rigidity of existing structures. Similarly, successes seem to arise when one or more of a few criteria are met. Based on enlightened self-interest, the principal movers find the risk-reward calculus of success compelling enough to pay the price of breaking with tradition. This is often facilitated when the entrepreneurial venture does not risk the mainstay of the principals' vocations. Also, barriers are lowered considerably when the new I{sup 3} enterprise is green field i.e., not making a frontal assault on a preexisting structure. Otherwise, the organizations involved must offer some open avenues to change or at least to circumvent boundaries. Having the right-sized, well-positioned resources is certainly also necessary. Of course, it would be naive to underestimate the importance of the details underlying any and all I{sup 3} successes, but these must be devised in the milieu of the particular people and institutions involved. The author believes that no generic protocols for barrier reduction or for incentives that balance risk will fit differing circumstances. Attempts to map one successful formula onto a new situation are likely to disappoint. Likewise, general programs to promote I{sup 3} in a top down fashion may raise awareness and enthusiasm, but are always tested at the bench--just as in technology transfer, I{sup 3}R is a contact sport. Although not sufficient, it is nevertheless still clearly a necessary prerequisite to create and sustain genuine and practical inducements that mitigate the risk attendant to disturbing the status quo and blunt institutional disincentives.

  8. Designed for: Ocean Observing Demo: A collaboration between

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    effective low cost ocean observing system. This system was recently developed and deployed for offshore oil. The Fetch node was deployed in 550 feet of water to measure ocean temperature and pressure, and the Tsunami Observing Initiatives Pioneer Array. The Fetch will record pressure and temperatures at this site prior

  9. THEORY OF THE CONTROL OF OBSERVABLE QUANTUM V. P. BELAVKIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belavkin, Viacheslav P.

    . The general problem of optimal control of a quantum-mechanical system is discussed and the corre- sponding], of the dynamical observation and feedback control optimization problems for such systems has provided a means measurement and control of classical (i.e., non-quantum) Markov processes with quantum observation channels

  10. Apparatus for observing a hostile environment

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC); Boylston, Micah L. (Williston, SC); Robinson, Casandra W. (Trenton, SC); Sexton, William C. (Aiken, SC); Heckendorn, Frank M. (Aiken, SC)

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for observing a hostile environment, comprising a housing and a camera capable of insertion within the housing. The housing is a double wall assembly with an inner and outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. A housing for an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided, comprising a transparent, double wall assembly. The double wall assembly has an inner wall and an outer wall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The double wall assembly has an opening and a void area in communication with the opening. The void area of the housing is adapted to accommodate the optical system within said void area. An apparatus for protecting an optical system used to observe a hostile environment is provided comprising a housing; a tube positioned within the housing; and a base for supporting the housing and the tube. The housing comprises a double wall assembly having an inner wall and an outerwall with an hermetically sealed chamber therebetween. The tube is adapted to house the optical system therein.

  11. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lang, Jeffrey H. (Waltham, MA)

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  12. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and OilPublictearing

  13. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and

  14. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeeding access

  15. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  16. NS&T Management Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  17. Cosmological inference using gravitational wave observations alone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter Del Pozzo; Tjonnie G. F. Li; Chris Messenger

    2015-06-22

    Gravitational waves emitted during the coalescence of binary neutron star systems are self-calibrating signals. As such they can provide a direct measurement of the luminosity distance to a source without the need for a cosmic distance scale ladder. In general, however, the corresponding redshift measurement needs to be obtained electromagnetically since it is totally degenerate with the total mass of the system. Nevertheless, recent Fisher matrix studies has shown that if information about the equation of state of the neutron stars is available, it is indeed possible to extract redshift information from the gravitational wave signal alone. Therefore, measuring the cosmological parameters in pure gravitational wave fashion is possible. Furthermore, the huge number of sources potentially observable by the Einstein Telescope has led to speculations that the gravitational wave measurement is potentially competitive with traditional methods. The Einstein telescope is a conceptual study for a third generation gravitational wave detector which is designed to yield detections of $10^3-10^7$ binary neutron star systems per year. This study presents the first Bayesian investigation of the accuracy with which the cosmological parameters can be measured using observations of binary neutron star systems by the Einstein Telescope with the one year of observations. We find by direct simulation of $10^3$ detections of binary neutron stars that, within our simplifying assumptions, $H_0,\\Omega_m,\\Omega_\\Lambda,w_0$ and $w_1$ can be measured at the $95\\%$ level with an accuracy of $\\sim 8\\%,65\\%,39\\%,80\\%$ and $90\\%$, respectively. We also find, by extrapolation, that a measurement accuracy comparable with current measurements by Planck is reached for a number of observed events $O(10^{6-7})$

  18. Accelerated Expansion: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Polarski

    2001-09-20

    The present paradigm in cosmology is the usual Big-Bang Cosmology in which two stages of accelerated expansion are incorporated: the inflationary phase in the very early universe which produces the classical inhomogeneities observed in the universe, and a second stage of acceleration at the present time as the latest Supernovae observations seem to imply. Both stages could be produced by a scalar field and observations will strongly constrain the microscopic lagrangian of any proposed model.

  19. Laser-accelerated disks for EOS studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrach, R.J.; Szoke, A.

    1981-09-01

    An indirect method of laser-based equation of state studies, which utilizes shock waves generated by laser-accelerated projectiles rather than ablation shocks from direct laser irradiation of the sample under investigation, is proposed and examined theoretically. We derive simple formulas for the minimum thickness and maximum speed of laser-accelerated disks, comparing them with results of Nd-laser experiments conducted by the Naval Research Laboratory. Our calculations indicate that disks can be accelerated to velocities above 10/sup 7/ cm/s using a wide choice of laser parameters (pulse duration, energy, intensity, wavelength, etc.). The use of shorter wavelengths, e.g., a KrF(0.25 ..mu..m) laser rather than Nd (1.06 ..mu..m), allows thicker disks to be accelerated and faster velocities to be attained, approximately in the ratio (lambda/sub L/(Nd)/lambda/sub L/(KrF))/sup 1/3/ approx. = 1.6. One-dimensional Lasnex computer calculations indicate that the laser-accelerated disk constitutes a useful flyer plate even while disassembling under the force of the laser ablation shock. The calculations predict that the shockwave the projectile disk generates in a second (impact) disk located a suitable distance away has a greater amplitude than the laser shock and is considerably more steady, exhibiting little decay in propagating through the second disk.

  20. www.aspbs.com/eos Encyclopedia of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This chapter is a review of layered SAW devices for sensing applications. A conventional SAW device consists of a piezoelectric substrate with the inter-digital transducer (IDT) patterned on the surface. The layered devices long term stability. · Adding a piezoelectric or highly dielectric layer above the IDTs increases

  1. EO 13287: Preserve America | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLCConfidentialityOnline HostedIt is the policy of the

  2. EO Technics Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of the NationalDynetek Europe GmbHEDENERGY

  3. EO 13112: Invasive Species | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels DataEnergy Webinar:IAboutReubenPress Releases EM PressENERGY STAR® ENERGYEO

  4. Loop quantum gravity and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Barrau; J. Grain

    2015-10-28

    Quantum gravity has long been thought to be completely decoupled from experiments or observations. Although it is true that smoking guns are still missing, there are now serious hopes that quantum gravity phenomena might be tested. We review here some possible ways to observe loop quantum gravity effects either in the framework of cosmology or in astroparticle physics.

  5. Observational Study PAUL R. ROSENBAUM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George, Edward I.

    . Howell John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Chichester, 2005 #12;Observational Study Observational Studies Defined describing the subjects before treatment. As a consequence, random assignment tends to make the groups comparable both in terms of measured char- acteristics and characteristics that were not or could

  6. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  7. Observable signatures of general relativistic dynamics in compact binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lang, Ryan N. (Ryan Nathan)

    2009-01-01

    The effects of general relativity (GR) in astrophysical systems are often difficult to calculate, but they can have important consequences for observables. This thesis considers the impact of previously-ignored GR effects ...

  8. Observation of Magnetoelectric Multiferroicity in a Cubic Perovskite...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Observation of Magnetoelectric Multiferroicity in a Cubic Perovskite System:LaMn3Cr4O12 Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on August...

  9. Passive States for Essential Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Strich

    2008-01-23

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given in \\cite{bb99} and \\cite{bs04} which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g. $d$-dimensional Minkowski space-time for $d\\geq 3$). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer travelling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a KMS-state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also the modular objects associated to such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  10. Jet observables without jet algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolini, Daniele

    We introduce a new class of event shapes to characterize the jet-like structure of an event. Like traditional event shapes, our observables are infrared/collinear safe and involve a sum over all hadrons in an event, but ...

  11. Baryon Resonances Observed at BES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. S. Zou

    2008-02-01

    The $\\psi$ decays provide a novel way to explore baryon spectroscopy and baryon structure. The baryon resonances observed from $\\psi$ decays at BES are reviewed. The implications and prospects at upgraded BESIII/BEPCII are discussed.

  12. Mm/submm observations of symbiotic binary stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Mikolajewska; R. J. Ivison; A. Omont

    2002-10-22

    We present and discuss mm/submm observations of quiescent S-type symbiotic systems, and compare them with popular models proposed to account for their radio emission. We find that the M giant mass-loss rates derived from our observations are systematically higher than those reported for single M giants.

  13. General relativistic observables of the GRAIL mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turyshev, Slava G; Sazhin, Mikhail V

    2012-01-01

    We present a realization of astronomical relativistic reference frames in the solar system and its application to the GRAIL mission. We model the necessary spacetime coordinate transformations for light-trip time computations and address some practical aspects of the implementation of the resulting model. We develop all the relevant relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of the GRAIL spacecraft and to compute all observable quantities. We take into account major relativistic effects contributing to the dual one-way range observable, which is derived from one-way signal travel times between the two GRAIL spacecraft. We develop a general relativistic model for this fundamental observable of GRAIL, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m. We develop and present a relativistic model for another key observable of this experiment, the dual one-way range-rate, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m/s. The presented formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRAIL mission. It may also be ...

  14. General relativistic observables of the GRAIL mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slava G. Turyshev; Viktor T. Toth; Mikhail V. Sazhin

    2012-12-18

    We present a realization of astronomical relativistic reference frames in the solar system and its application to the GRAIL mission. We model the necessary spacetime coordinate transformations for light-trip time computations and address some practical aspects of the implementation of the resulting model. We develop all the relevant relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of the GRAIL spacecraft and to compute all observable quantities. We take into account major relativistic effects contributing to the dual one-way range observable, which is derived from one-way signal travel times between the two GRAIL spacecraft. We develop a general relativistic model for this fundamental observable of GRAIL, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m. We develop and present a relativistic model for another key observable of this experiment, the dual one-way range-rate, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m/s. The presented formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRAIL mission. It may also be used to further improve the already impressive results of this lunar gravity recovery experiment after the mission is complete. Finally, we present transformation rules for frequencies and gravitational potentials and their application to GRAIL.

  15. Observations of Solids in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrews, Sean M

    2015-01-01

    This review addresses the state of research that employs astronomical (remote sensing) observations of solids ("dust") in young circumstellar disks to learn about planet formation. The intention is for it to serve as an accessible, introductory, pedagogical resource for junior scientists interested in the subject. After some historical background and a basic observational primer, the focus is shifted to the three fundamental topics that broadly define the field: (1) demographics -- the relationships between disk properties and the characteristics of their environments and hosts; (2) structure -- the spatial distribution of disk material and its associated physical conditions and composition; and (3) evolution -- the signposts of key changes in disk properties, including the growth and migration of solids and the impact of dynamical interactions with young planetary systems. Based on the state of the art results in these areas, suggestions are made for potentially fruitful lines of work in the near future.

  16. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  17. Observability and Controllability of Nonlinear Networks: The Role of Symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew J. Whalen; Sean N. Brennan; Timothy D. Sauer; Steven J. Schiff

    2014-10-06

    Observability and controllability are essential concepts to the design of predictive observer models and feedback controllers of networked systems. For example, noncontrollable mathematical models of real systems have subspaces that influence model behavior, but cannot be controlled by an input. Such subspaces can be difficult to determine in complex nonlinear networks. Since almost all of the present theory was developed for linear networks without symmetries, here we present a numerical and group representational framework, to quantify the observability and controllability of nonlinear networks with explicit symmetries that shows the connection between symmetries and nonlinear measures of observability and controllability. We numerically observe and theoretically predict that not all symmetries have the same effect on network observation and control. Our analysis shows that the presence of symmetry in a network may decrease observability and controllability, although networks containing only rotational symmetries remain controllable and observable. These results alter our view of the nature of observability and controllability in complex networks, change our understanding of structural controllability, and affect the design of mathematical models to observe and control such networks.

  18. CHANGESINPERMEABILITYCAUSEDBYTRANSIENT STRESSES: FIELD OBSERVATIONS, EXPERIMENTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    to seal pores. Monitor- ing permeability in geothermal systems where there is abun- dant seismicity increase permeability and fluid mobility in geo- logic media. In natural systems, strain amplitudes, and enhance production from petroleum reservoirs. Enhanced permeability typically recovers to prestimulated

  19. Tailoring Strong Lensing Cosmographic Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linder, Eric V

    2015-01-01

    Strong lensing time delay cosmography has excellent complementarity with other dark energy probes, and will soon have abundant systems detected. We investigate two issues in the imaging and spectroscopic followup required to obtain the time delay distance. The first is optimization of spectroscopic resources. We develop a code to optimize the cosmological leverage under the constraint of constant spectroscopic time, and find that sculpting the lens system redshift distribution can deliver a 40% improvement in dark energy figure of merit. The second is the role of systematics, correlated between different quantities of a given system or model errors common to all systems. We show how the levels of different systematics affect the cosmological parameter estimation, and derive guidance for the fraction of double image vs quad image systems to follow as a function of differing systematics between them.

  20. A NEW PARAMETRIZATION OF OBSERVERS INGRID BLUMTHALER AND JOCHEN TRUMPF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trumpf, Jochen

    by inspection. 1. Problem formulation. We study plants (observed systems) of the form P = w1 w2 w3 Fw1+w order, matrix) differential operators and the plant P is a linear time-invariant continuous time system is that the signal module F is an injective cogenerator in the category of D-modules, cf. [1]. Following the ideas

  1. Objectivity of Quantum Measurement in Many-Observer World

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheng-Wen Li; C. Y. Cai; X. F. Liu; C. P. Sun

    2015-08-06

    The objectivity of quantum measurement is treated as an emergent phenomenon with $N$ observers who can agree to the same result of measurement, and meanwhile, they can identify their records with each other. In this many-observer world (MOW), an objective quantum measurement is dealt with as a multipartite [$(N+1)$-body] quantum correlation among the measured system and $N$ observers when its bipartite reductions are the same classical correlations. With this conceptual clarification, we find that, an objective quantum measurement is implemented if and only if the MOW is initially factorized in a pure state and then the total system can evolve into a generalized GHZ state with respect to the orthogonal basis preferred by each observer. Especially, such objective quantum measurement is recast in ideal classical correlation when the observer world is macroscopic for $N\\rightarrow\\infty$.

  2. The Case for Mobile Devices in Environmental Observing Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to interact with the embedded cyberinfrastructure, such as the sensor network. To bridge this gap, we argue devices such as PDAs and smart phones. We identify several key use cases and user bases, and explain how to be considered. We identify several key use case scenarios and user bases. In order to bridge this gap

  3. Observable behavior of dynamic systems: component reasoning for concurrent objects #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Einar Broch

    concurrent objects. # This research is partially funded by the EU project IST­33826 CREDO: Modeling and analysis of evolutionary structures for distributed services (http://credo.cwi.nl). 1 Email: johand

  4. Observable behavior of dynamic systems: component reasoning for concurrent objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnsen, Einar Broch

    concurrent objects. This research is partially funded by the EU project IST-33826 CREDO: Modeling and analysis of evolutionary structures for distributed services (http://credo.cwi.nl). 1 Email: johand

  5. On asymptotically efficient estimation in partially observed systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Di Girolami, Cristina

    Hemipshere's Autumn or Fall Equinox hasn't happened since 1662 and will not happen again until March 20, 2034 the March Equinox A total solar eclipse coinciding with Northern Hemisphere's Spring Equinox and Southern

  6. Disappearing Evidence: the Need for a Global Paleoclimate Observing System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Raymond S.

    are relatively rare in most reef areas of the world. Unfortu- nately, a significant number of these corals have, diatoms, cladocereans), isotopes, and other proxy measurements in lake and ocean sediments, corals coordinated effort, GPOS, designed to rescue endangered natural archives of past environ- mental variability

  7. AEROSOL OBSERVING SYSTEMS (AOS): NEW CAPABILITIES FOR ASR RESEARCHERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science ABSTRACT Three new AOS units, including.S. Department of Energy. The publisher by accepting the manuscript for publication acknowledges that the United States Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish

  8. Campaign-level science traceability for Earth observation system architecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seher, Theodore K. (Theodore Kimball)

    2009-01-01

    The Earth Sciences Decadal Survey of 2007 presented a comprehensive vision for the evolution of space-based Earth Science resources. The practical development of the Decadal campaign, however, has highlighted four challenges ...

  9. On the Observability of Linear Systems from Random, Compressive Measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanandaji, Borhan M.

    Efficiency and Renewable Energy Grant DE-FG36-08GO88100. we have yK = OKx0. (3) If OK has full column rank (i Property (RIP), which is central to much analysis in CS. We also illustrate our results with a simple case-0830320, DARPA Grant HR0011-08- 1-0078, NSF grant CNS-0931748 and Department of Energy, Office of Energy

  10. Automated Surface Observing System: Standby Power Options | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based Fuels Research atDepartmentAudits and6AuidtWorkplace

  11. Augmenting system reliability analyses with observation priors (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect AssessingBasinLecture)SciTechscales|

  12. Augmenting system reliability analyses with observation priors (Conference)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfate Reducing Bacteria (Technical Report) | SciTech Connect AssessingBasinLecture)SciTechscales||

  13. Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities Observed in Control System

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electric vehicle (PEV)Day-June 22, 2015OperationNonprofit| Department

  14. Observation on growth of bacteria 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-08-17

    3013and g2009g3009 are the gain of the bandpass function at frequencies of g1858g3030, g1858g3013 and g1858g3009, respectively. For typical bandpass filtering, g2009g3030 ? 1 (3.6) g2009g3013 = g2009g3009 < g2009g3030 . (3.7) Thus, it is always... Sequence of Bandpass System .................................. 33 3.6 Jitter Transfer Function of Bandpass System ................................................... 34 3.7 Jitter Transfer Functions of Bandpass Systems with Q over 3 ? 30...

  15. TV Meteor Observations from Modra J. Toth L. Kornos S. Gajdos D. Kalmancok

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veres, Peter

    results of single-station observation using the new fish-eye TV system, as well as double station TV observation of the Geminids 2006 shower. The fixed fish-eye TV system was developed for monitoring meteor the UFOAnalyser software. Keywords Fish-eye lenses Á Meteor shower Á TV meteor observations 1 Introduction

  16. X-ray Observations of Mrk 231

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Turner

    1998-08-10

    This paper presents new X-ray observations of Mrk 231, an active galaxy of particular interest due to its large infrared luminosity and the presence of several blueshifted broad absorption line (BAL) systems, a phenomenon observed in a small fraction of QSOs. A ROSAT HRI image of Mrk 231 is presented, this shows an extended region of soft X-ray emission, covering several tens of kpc, consistent with the extent of the host galaxy. An ASCA observation of Mrk 231 is also presented. Hard X-rays are detected but the data show no significant variability in X-ray flux. The hard X-ray continuum is heavily attenuated and X-ray column estimates range from ~ 2 x 10^{22} - 10^{23} cm^{-2} depending on whether the material is assumed to be neutral or ionized, and on the model assumed for the extended X-ray component. These ASCA data provide only the second hard X-ray spectrum of a BAL AGN presented to date. The broad-band spectral-energy-distribution of the source is discussed. While Mrk 231 is X-ray weak compared to Seyfert 1 galaxies, it has an optical-to-X-ray spectrum typical of a QSO.

  17. Chaos, Dirac observables and constraint quantization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bianca Dittrich; Philipp A. Hoehn; Tim A. Koslowski; Mike I. Nelson

    2015-08-08

    There is good evidence that full general relativity is non-integrable or even chaotic. We point out the severe repercussions: differentiable Dirac observables and a reduced phase space do not exist in non-integrable constrained systems and are thus unlikely to occur in a generic general relativistic context. Instead, gauge invariant quantities generally become discontinuous, thus not admitting Poisson-algebraic structures and posing serious challenges to a quantization. Non-integrability also renders the paradigm of relational dynamics cumbersome, thereby straining common interpretations of the dynamics. We illustrate these conceptual and technical challenges with simple toy models. In particular, we exhibit reparametrization invariant models which fail to be integrable and, as a consequence, can either not be quantized with standard methods or lead to sick quantum theories without a semiclassical limit. These troubles are qualitatively distinct from semiclassical subtleties in unconstrained quantum chaos and can be directly traced back to the scarcity of Dirac observables. As a possible resolution, we propose to change the method of quantization by refining the configuration space topology until the generalized observables become continuous in the new topology and can acquire a quantum representation. This leads to the polymer quantization method underlying loop quantum cosmology and gravity. Remarkably, the polymer quantum theory circumvents the problems of the quantization with smooth topology, indicating that non-integrability and chaos, while a challenge, may not be a fundamental obstruction for quantum gravity.

  18. Remote Sensing ISSN 2072-4292

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myneni, Ranga B.

    -Southern Oscillation EOS Earth Observing System ESM Earth System Models FFNN Feed-Forward Neural Network FPAR Fraction://lpvs.gsfc.nasa.gov/lai_in--tercomp.php. S2. Earth System Model LAI Simulations We used LAI simulated by 18 Earth System Models (Figure 7

  19. The University of Kansas Copyright 2002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    and Implementation of Data Models and Instrument Scheduling of Satellites in a Space Based Internet Emulation System Research Center #12;2 Earth-observing systems (EOS) are used to study the clouds, water and energy cycles an emulation system to test this prototype. The emulation system shall model satellites in an actual satellite

  20. Exploring the effects of a double reconstruction on the geometrical parameters of coupled models, using observational data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freddy Cueva Solano

    2015-04-19

    In this work we study the effects of the non-gravitational exchange energy (Q) between dark matter (DM) fluid and dark energy (DE) fluid on the background evolution of the cosmological parameters. A varying equation of state (EOS) parameter, {\\omega}, for DE is proposed. Considering an universe spatially flat, two distinct coupled models were examined to explore the main cosmological effects generated by the simultaneous reconstruction of Q and {\\omega} on the shape of the jerk parameter, j, through a slight enhancement or suppression of their amplitudes with respect to noncoupled scenarios, during its evolution from the past to the near future. In consequence, j could be used to distinguish any coupled DE models. Otherwise, the observational data were used to put stringent constraints on Q and {\\omega}, respectively. In such a way, we used our results as evidences to search possible deviations from the standard concordance model ({\\Lambda}CDM), examining their predictions and improving our knowledge of the cosmic evolution of the universe.

  1. CX Lyrae 2008 Observing Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The Blazhko effect in CX Lyr has been reported for the first time by Le Borgne et al. (2007). The authors have pointed out that the Blazhko period was not evaluated accurately due to dataset scarcity. The possible period values announced were 128 or 227 days. A newly conducted four-month observing campaign in 2008 (fifty-nine observation nights) has provided fourteen times of maximum. From a period analysis of measured times of maximum, a Blazhko period of 62 +/- 2 days can be suggested. However, the present dataset is still not densely sampled enough to exclude that the measured period is still a modulation of the real Blazhko period. Indeed the shape of the (O-C) curve does not repeat itself exactly during the campaign duration.

  2. RHESSI observation of flare elements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo C. Grigis; Arnold O. Benz

    2006-02-14

    RHESSI observations of elementary flare bursts are presented. These solar flare elements are distinct emission peaks of a duration of some tens of seconds present in the hard X-ray light curves. They are characterized by consistent soft-hard-soft spectral behavior, which can be described in a quantitative way and compared which predictions from acceleration models. A detailed analysis of hard X-ray images for an M5 class flare shows that elementary flare bursts do not occur at distinct locations, but as twin X-ray sources move smoothly along an arcade of magnetic loops. This observation apparently contradicts the predictions of standard translation invariant 2.5-dimensional reconnection models.

  3. Complete measurements of quantum observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Juha-Pekka Pellonpää

    2012-06-12

    We define a complete measurement of a quantum observable (POVM) as a measurement of the maximally refined version of the POVM. Complete measurements give information from the multiplicities of the measurement outcomes and can be viewed as state preparation procedures. We show that any POVM can be measured completely by using sequential measurements or maximally refinable instruments. Moreover, the ancillary space of a complete measurement can be chosen to be minimal.

  4. Initial temperature and EoS of quark matter from direct photons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mate Csanad; Imre Majer

    2011-09-04

    The time evolution of the quark gluon plasma created in gold-gold collisions of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) can be described by hydrodynamical models. Distribution of hadrons reflects the freeze-out state of the matter. To investigate the time evolution one needs to analyze penetrating probes, such as direct photon spectra. Distributions of low energy photons was published in 2010 by PHENIX. In this paper we analyze a 3+1 dimensional solution of relativistic hydrodynamics and calculate momentum distribution of direct photons. Using earlier fits of this model to hadronic spectra, we compare photon calculations to measurements and find that the initial temperature of the center of the fireball is at least 519+-12 MeV, while for the equation of state we get c_s= 0.36+-0.02.

  5. http://ceq.hss.doe.gov/nepa/regs/eos/eo13212.html

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 Federal RegisterStorm1 34460/%2A en3

  6. Infrared Observations of Galaxy Clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Elbaz

    1997-11-28

    This short paper reviews some of the results obtained from ISO observations (ISOCAM and ISOPHOT) on galaxy clusters: Chap.1: "Intracluster dust": new evidence for the presence of dust outside galaxies. Chap.2:"Mid-Infrared Emission of Galaxies" origin of the mid-IR emission. Chap.3:"Star Formation in Nearby Clusters" correlation of the 7 and 15 microns fluxes with the SFR. Chap.4:"Star Formation in z=0.2 Galaxy clusters" Study of the mid-IR emission of A1732 and A1689. Chap.5:"Star Formation in z>0.4 Galaxy clusters" Preliminary.

  7. Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncInc JumpObamaObservation

  8. Magnetars: the physics behind observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turolla, Roberto; Watts, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Magnetars are the strongest magnets in the present universe and the combination of extreme magnetic field, gravity and density makes them unique laboratories to probe current physical theories (from quantum electrodynamics to general relativity) in the strong field limit. Magnetars are observed as peculiar, burst--active X-ray pulsars, the Anomalous X-ray Pulsars (AXPs) and the Soft Gamma Repeaters (SGRs); the latter emitted also three "giant flares," extremely powerful events during which luminosities can reach up to 10^47 erg/s for about one second. The last five years have witnessed an explosion in magnetar research which has led, among other things, to the discovery of transient, or "outbursting," and "low-field" magnetars. Substantial progress has been made also on the theoretical side. Quite detailed models for explaining the magnetars' persistent X-ray emission, the properties of the bursts, the flux evolution in transient sources have been developed and confronted with observations. New insight on neu...

  9. Laser frequency combs for astronomical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tilo Steinmetz; Tobias Wilken; Constanza Araujo-Hauck; Ronald Holzwarth; Theodor W. Hänsch; Luca Pasquini; Antonio Manescau; Sandro D'Odorico; Michael T. Murphy; Thomas Kentischer; Wolfgang Schmidt; Thomas Udem

    2008-09-09

    A direct measurement of the universe's expansion history could be made by observing in real time the evolution of the cosmological redshift of distant objects. However, this would require measurements of Doppler velocity drifts of about 1 centimeter per second per year, and astronomical spectrographs have not yet been calibrated to this tolerance. We demonstrate the first use of a laser frequency comb for wavelength calibration of an astronomical telescope. Even with a simple analysis, absolute calibration is achieved with an equivalent Doppler precision of approximately 9 meters per second at about 1.5 micrometers - beyond state-of-the-art accuracy. We show that tracking complex, time-varying systematic effects in the spectrograph and detector system is a particular advantage of laser frequency comb calibration. This technique promises an effective means for modeling and removal of such systematic effects to the accuracy required by future experiments to see direct evidence of the universe's putative acceleration.

  10. Interstellar water chemistry: from laboratory to observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Neufeld, David A

    2013-01-01

    Water is observed throughout the universe, from diffuse interstellar clouds to protoplanetary disks around young stars, and from comets in our own solar system and exoplanetary atmospheres to galaxies at high redshifts. This review summarizes the spectroscopy and excitation of water in interstellar space as well as the basic chemical processes that form and destroy water under interstellar conditions. Three major routes to water formation are identified: low temperature ion-molecule chemistry, high-temperature neutral-neutral chemistry and gas-ice chemistry. The rate coefficients of several important processes entering the networks are discussed in detail; several of them have been determined only in the last decade through laboratory experiments and theoretical calculations. Astronomical examples of each of the different chemical routes are presented using data from powerful new telescopes, in particular the Herschel Space Observatory. Basic chemical physics studies remain critically important to analyze ast...

  11. Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lochner, Michelle; Zwart, Jonathan T L; Smirnov, Oleg; Bassett, Bruce A; Oozeer, Nadeem; Kunz, Martin

    2015-01-01

    (Abridged) New telescopes like the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will push into a new sensitivity regime and expose systematics, such as direction-dependent effects, that could previously be ignored. Current methods for handling such systematics rely on alternating best estimates of instrumental calibration and models of the underlying sky, which can lead to inaccurate uncertainty estimates and biased results because such methods ignore any correlations between parameters. These deconvolution algorithms produce a single image that is assumed to be a true representation of the sky, when in fact it is just one realisation of an infinite ensemble of images compatible with the noise in the data. In contrast, here we report a Bayesian formalism that simultaneously infers both systematics and science. Our technique, Bayesian Inference for Radio Observations (BIRO), determines all parameters directly from the raw data, bypassing image-making entirely, by sampling from the joint posterior probability distribution. Thi...

  12. Comet tail formation: Giotto observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Johnstone, A.; Coates, A.; Heath, J.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.; Winningham, J.D.; Thomsen, M.; Bryant, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The process of mass loading of the solar wind by cometary ions, which forms comet tails, has been observed throughout the coma of comet Halley. Three distinct regimes were found where the nature of the energy and momentum coupling between solar wind and cometary ions is different. Outside the bow shock, where there is little angular scattering of the freshly ionized particles, the coupling is described by the simple pickup trajectory and the energy is controlled by the angle between the flow and the magnetic field. Just inside the bow shock, there is considerable scattering accompanied by another acceleration process which raises some particle energies well above the straightforward pickup value. Finally, closer to the nucleus, the amount of scattering decreases and the coupling is once more controlled by the magnetic field direction. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  13. Reported Significant Observation (RSO) studies. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eicher, R.W.

    1992-12-01

    The Reported Significant Observation (RSO) study used in the field of safety is an information-gathering technique where employee-participants describe situations they have personally witnessed involving good and bad practices and safe and unsafe conditions. This information is useful in the risk assessment process because it focuses on hazards and thereby facilitates their elimination. However, RSO cannot be the only component in a risk assessment program. Used by the Air Force in their aviation psychology program and further developed by John C. Flanagan, RSO is more commonly known as the ``Critical Incident Technique.`` However, the words ``Critical`` and ``Incident`` had other connotations in nuclear safety, prompting early users within the Aerojet Nuclear Company to coin the more fitting title of ``Reported Significant Observations.`` The technique spread slowly in the safety field primarily because the majority of users were researchers interested in after-the-fact data, with application to everyday problems and behavioral factors. RSO was formally recognized as a significant hazard reduction tool during the development of the Management Oversight and Risk Tree (MORT) program for the US Atomic Energy Commission. The Department of Energy (DOE) has, in turn, adopted MORT for its system safety program, and this has resulted in RSO being a modern and viable technique for DOE contractor safety programs.

  14. Unsuspected Pulmonary Embolism in Observation Unit Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limkakeng, Alexander T.; Glickman, Seth W; Cairns, Charles B; Chandra, Abhinav

    2009-01-01

    department observation unit. Emerg Med Clin North Am. 2001;ED) managed acute care unit on ED overcrowding and emergencyof a chest pain observation unit compared with routine care.

  15. Observed Communication in Distressed Couples' Interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baucom, Katherine Jane Williams

    2012-01-01

    A. (2011). Observed communication in couples two years afterA. (2011). Observed communication in couples two years afterA. (1996). The Communication Patterns Questionnaire: The

  16. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene Print Wednesday, 30 June 2010 00:00 An international team of scientists performing...

  17. Observational Tests and Predictive Stellar Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. A. Young; E. E. Mamajek; David Arnett; James Liebert

    2001-03-23

    We compare eighteen binary systems with precisely determined radii and masses from 23 to 1.1 M_sol, and stellar evolution models produced with our newly revised code TYCHO. ``Overshooting'' and rotational mixing were suppressed in order to establish a baseline for isolating these and other hydrodynamic effects. Acceptable coeval fits are found for sixteen pairs without optimizing for heavy element or helium abundance. The precision of these tests is limited by the accuracies of the observed effective temperatures. High dispersion spectra and detailed atmospheric modeling should give more accurate effective temperatures and heavy element abundances. PV Cas, a peculiar early A system, EK Cep B, a known post-T Tauri star, and RS Cha, a member of a young OB association, are matched by pre-main sequence models. Predicted mass loss agrees with upper limits from IUE for CW Cep A and B. Relatively poor fits are obtained for binaries having at least one component in the mass range 1.7 < M/M_sol <2.6, whose evolution is sensitive to mixing. These discrepancies are robust and consistent with additional mixing in real stars. The predicted apsidal motion implies that massive star models are systematically less centrally condensed than the real stars. If these effects are due to overshooting, then the overshooting parameter alpha_OV increases with stellar mass. The apsidal motion constants are controlled by radiative opacity under conditions close to those directly measured in laser experiments, making this test more stringent than possible before.

  18. Optical monitor for observing turbulent flow

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Albrecht, Georg F. (Livermore, CA); Moore, Thomas R. (Rochester, NY)

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides an apparatus and method for non-invasively monitoring turbulent fluid flows including anisotropic flows. The present invention uses an optical technique to filter out the rays travelling in a straight line, while transmitting rays with turbulence induced fluctuations in time. The output is two dimensional, and can provide data regarding the spectral intensity distribution, or a view of the turbulence in real time. The optical monitor of the present invention comprises a laser that produces a coherent output beam that is directed through a fluid flow, which phase-modulates the beam. The beam is applied to a temporal filter that filters out the rays in the beam that are straight, while substantially transmitting the fluctuating, turbulence-induced rays. The temporal filter includes a lens and a photorefractive crystal such as BaTiO.sub.3 that is positioned in the converging section of the beam near the focal plane. An imaging system is used to observe the filtered beam. The imaging system may take a photograph, or it may include a real time camera that is connected to a computer. The present invention may be used for many purposes including research and design in aeronautics, hydrodynamics, and combustion.

  19. ALASKA MARINE Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ALASKA MARINE MAMMAL PROGRAM 2012 #12;2012 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Observer Manual Contents Section 1: The Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program 1.0 Introduction 1.1 Marine Mammal Stock Program 1.5 Alaska Marine Mammal Observer Program Section 2: The Southeast Alaska Environment 2

  20. Supporting An Integrated Paper-Digital Workflow for Observational Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollan, Jim

    Supporting An Integrated Paper-Digital Workflow for Observational Research Nadir Weibel, Adam Fouse digital recording de- vices and storage facilities, is revolutionizing our ability to collect and analyze cognition and radically improve information-intensive work. In this paper we introduce a system to aid

  1. Biooptical observations of the 2004 Labrador Sea phytoplankton bloom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    showed an additional midJune peak in zooplankton biomass which was attributed to egglaying copepods increasingly important as these deployments become more commonplace via ocean observing systems. Moreover that during the bloom, 47 mmol C m-2 d-1 was assimilated into biomass and was rapidly exported, and that all

  2. Observability and Estimation Uncertainty Analysis for PMU Placement Alternatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollefeys, Marc

    Observability and Estimation Uncertainty Analysis for PMU Placement Alternatives Jinghe Zhang unit (PMU), developed in the 1980s, is considered to be one of the most important devices in the future of power systems. While PMU measurements currently cover fewer than 1% of the nodes in the U.S. power grid

  3. Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hengill geothermal volcanic complex (Iceland) characterized by integrated geophysical observations Cedex 02, France. 2 GeoForschungsZentrum Potsdam - Section 2.2, 14473 Potsdam, Germany. 3 Iceland GeoSurvey - ISOR , 108 Reykjavík, Iceland Abstract Structural features of volcanic and hydrothermal systems can

  4. Clusters in sedimentation equilibrium for an experimental hard-sphere-plus-dipolar Brownian colloidal system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugh D. Newman; Anand Yethiraj

    2015-07-30

    In this work, we use structure and dynamics in sedimentation equilibrium, in the presence of gravity, to examine, $via$ confocal microscopy, a Brownian colloidal system in the presence of an external electric field. The zero field equation of state (EOS) is hard sphere without any re-scaling of particle size, and the hydrodynamic corrections to the long-time self-diffusion coefficient are quantitatively consistent with the expected value for hard spheres. Care is taken to ensure that both the dimensionless gravitational energy, which is equivalent to a Peclet number $Pe_g$, and dipolar strength $\\Lambda$ are of order unity. In the presence of an external electric field, anisotropic chain-chain clusters form; this cluster formation manifests itself with the appearance of a plateau in the diffusion coefficient when the dimensionless dipolar strength $\\Lambda \\sim 1$. The structure and dynamics of this chain-chain cluster state is examined for a monodisperse system for two particle sizes.

  5. Validation of operational ozone profiles from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Validation of operational ozone profiles from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument M. Kroon,1 J. F. de we present the validation results of the operational vertical ozone profiles retrieved from the nadir observations by the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) aboard the NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) Aura

  6. The Arctic Lower Troposphere Observed Structure (ALTOS) Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Verlinde, J

    2010-10-18

    The ALTOS campaign focuses on operating a tethered observing system for routine in situ sampling of low-level (< 2 km) Arctic clouds. It has been a long-term hope to fly tethered systems at Barrow, Alaska, but it is clear that the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) will not permit in-cloud tether systems at Barrow, even if unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) operations are allowed in the future. We have provided the scientific rationale for long-term, routine in situ measurements of cloud and aerosol properties in the Arctic. The existing restricted air space at Oliktok offers an opportunity to do so.

  7. Radio emission from Colliding-Wind Binaries: Observations and Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Dougherty; J. M. Pittard; E. P. O'Connor

    2005-10-18

    We have developed radiative transfer models of the radio emission from colliding-wind binaries (CWB) based on a hydrodynamical treatment of the wind-collision region (WCR). The archetype of CWB systems is the 7.9-yr period binary WR140, which exhibits dramatic variations at radio wavelengths. High-resolution radio observations of WR140 permit a determination of several system parameters, particularly orbit inclination and distance, that are essential for any models of this system. A model fit to data at orbital phase 0.9 is shown, and some short comings of our model described.

  8. Observation of Entanglement-Dependent Two-Particle Holonomic Phase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. C. Loredo; M. A. Broome; D. H. Smith; A. G. White

    2015-06-18

    Holonomic phases---geometric and topological---have long been an intriguing aspect of physics. They are ubiquitous, ranging from observations in particle physics to applications in fault tolerant quantum computing. However, their exploration in particles sharing genuine quantum correlations lack in observations. Here we experimentally demonstrate the holonomic phase of two entangled-photons evolving locally, which nevertheless gives rise to an entanglement-dependent phase. We observe its transition from geometric to topological as the entanglement between the particles is tuned from zero to maximal, and find this phase to behave more resilient to evolution changes with increasing entanglement. Furthermore, we theoretically show that holonomic phases can directly quantify the amount of quantum correlations between the two particles. Our results open up a new avenue for observations of holonomic phenomena in multi-particle entangled quantum systems.

  9. A Wireless Internet-Based Observatory: The Real-time Coastal Observation Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Wireless Internet-Based Observatory: The Real-time Coastal Observation Network (ReCON) S. A community and educational institutions through the internet. A real-time database management system provides to the success of regional coastal ocean observing systems. The pervasiveness of wireless internet technology

  10. Constraining multiple systems with GAIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauvalet, L.

    GAIA will provide observations of some multiple asteroid and dwarf systems. These observations are a way to determine and improve the quantification of dynamical parameters, such as the masses and the gravity fields, in ...

  11. Delft University of Technology Master's Thesis in Embedded Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langendoen, Koen

    Delft University of Technology Freek van Polen, MSc Sense Observation Systems Andreas Loukas, MSc Delft

  12. Impact of the equation-of-state -- gravity degeneracy on constraining the nuclear symmetry energy from astrophysical observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xiao-Tao He; F. J. Fattoyev; Bao-An Li; W. G. Newton

    2014-12-16

    There is a degeneracy between the equation of state (EOS) of superdense neutron-rich nuclear matter and the strong-field gravity in understanding properties of neutron stars. While the EOS is still poorly known, there are also longstanding ambiguities in choosing General Relativity or alternative gravity theories in the not-so-well tested strong-field regime. Besides possible appearance of hyperons and new phases, the most uncertain part of the nucleonic EOS is currently the density dependence of nuclear symmetry energy. To provide information that may help break the EOS-gravity degeneracy, we investigate effects of symmetry energy within its uncertain range determined by terrestrial nuclear laboratory experiments on the gravitational binding energy and spacetime curvature of neutron stars within GR and the scalar-tensor (ST) theory of gravity. In particular, we focus on effects of the following parameters characterizing the EOS of neutron-rich nucleonic matter: (1) the incompressibility $K_0$ of symmetric nuclear matter, (2) the slope $L$ of symmetry energy at saturation density and (3) the high-density behavior of symmetry energy. We find that the variation of either the density slope $L$ or the high-density behavior of symmetry energy leads to large changes in both the binding energy and curvature of neutron stars while effects of varying the more constrained $K_0$ are negligibly small. The difference in predictions using the GR and the ST theory appears only for massive neutron stars, and is significantly smaller than the differences resulting from variations in the symmetry energy. We conclude that within the ST theory of gravity, the EOS-gravity degeneracy has been broken by the recent relativistic pulsar measurements, and that measurements of neutron star properties sensitive to the compactness constrain mainly the density dependence of the symmetry energy.

  13. An Approach to Spatially Distributed Modeling of Net Primary Production (NPP)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, David D.

    -de- rived inputs, for example, the planned Earth Observation System (EOS)-MODIS Land Science Team model" in some sense) of simpler, globally applied models. In this article, we 1) pro-system processes and fluxesAn Approach to Spatially Distributed Modeling of Net Primary Production (NPP) at the Landscape

  14. Meng Matt Wei July 22, 2010 Meng "Matt" Wei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sandwell, David T.

    Fault Creep Along the San Andreas Fault System · Advisor: Dr. David Sandwell 2000 ­ 2004 Peking Jolla, CA Ph.D., Geophysics, expected, March 2011 · Dissertation: Observations and Modeling of Shallow across the San Andreas Fault System: The Effects of Fault Dip, EOS Trans. AGU, Fall Meet. Suppl., S21B

  15. Observations of deep scattering layers in the Gulf of Mexico 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Ronald Curtis

    1971-01-01

    m 22 (N) Hld30 5 5 0 5 N(1/ IH) N3JAXO ID 0 I IJJ 0 CI OI IIJ ID o M CQ CII ID 0 oJ CJI 0 PI OI ? ll? UJ cD ID / / / I I \\ I I I / / IIJ ~ f I ? CJ IJ IJI ID X CL 0 O 0J K CJ 0I 4- O O. O 0J IC O QI... po po OI Cl m CI LIJ CI o IO oJ LIJ ~ C I ? V IJI IJI o 8 &3 I? 5 O I I O C C ILI Vl O tll C IO 'r o- O LII l- eo a. ID CI (W3) Hi&I30 CI CI &IJ 18 tD C) CJ (W) Hld30 Cl C) C) CI cI(1/1W) W39AXO QO O LCC C) e m 0...

  16. Observation of Bloch oscillations in molecular rotation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johannes Floß; Andrei Kamalov; Ilya Sh. Averbukh; Philip H. Bucksbaum

    2015-04-26

    The periodically kicked quantum rotor is known for non-classical effects such as quantum localisation in angular momentum space or quantum resonances in rotational excitation. These phenomena have been studied in diverse systems mimicking the kicked rotor, such as cold atoms in optical lattices, or coupled photonic structures. Recently, it was predicted that several solid state quantum localisation phenomena - Anderson localisation, Bloch oscillations, and Tamm-Shockley surface states - may manifest themselves in the rotational dynamics of laser-kicked molecules. Here, we report the first observation of rotational Bloch oscillations in a gas of nitrogen molecules kicked by a periodic train of femtosecond laser pulses. A controllable detuning from the quantum resonance creates an effective accelerating potential in angular momentum space, inducing Bloch-like oscillations of the rotational excitation. These oscillations are measured via the temporal modulation of the refractive index of the gas. Our results introduce room-temperature laser-kicked molecules as a new laboratory for studies of localisation phenomena in quantum transport.

  17. Discrimination of quantum observables using limited resources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mario Ziman; Teiko Heinosaari

    2008-02-18

    We address the problem of unambiguous discrimination and identification among quantum observables. We set a general framework and investigate in details the case of qubit observables. In particular, we show that perfect discrimination with two shots is possible only for sharp qubit observables (e.g. Stern-Gerlach apparatuses) associated with mutually orthogonal directions. We also show that for sharp qubit observables associated to nonorthogonal directions unambiguous discrimination with an inconclusive result is always possible.

  18. JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JAXA's Earth Observation Program Osamu Ochiai Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency #12;1 Disasters Health Energy Climate Water 1 Japanese Main Activities of Earth Observation Weather MTSAT (JMA) Eco Earth Observation Targets (JFY) 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

  19. Observation of diamond turned OFHC copper using Scanning Tunneling Microscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grigg, D.A.; Russell, P.E.; Dow, T.A.

    1988-12-01

    Diamond turned OFHC copper samples have been observed within the past few months using the Scanning Tunneling Microscope. Initial results have shown evidence of artifacts which may be used to better understand the diamond turning process. The STM`s high resolution capability and three dimensional data representation allows observation and study of surface features unobtainable with conventional profilometry systems. Also, the STM offers a better quantitative means by which to analyze surface structures than the SEM. This paper discusses findings on several diamond turned OFHC copper samples having different cutting conditions. Each sample has been cross referenced using STM and SEM.

  20. SPECKLE INTERFEROMETRY AT THE USNO FLAGSTAFF STATION: OBSERVATIONS OBTAINED IN 2008 AND NINE NEW ORBITS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartkopf, William I.; Mason, Brian D. E-mail: bdm@usno.navy.mil

    2011-08-15

    Results are presented for 299 speckle interferometric observations of double stars, obtained in 2008 at the USNO Flagstaff Station using the 1.55 m Kaj Strand Astrometric Reflector. Separations range from 0.''15 to 9.''88, with a median of 2.''22. This observing run concentrated on neglected systems, as well as systems in need of improved orbital elements; new orbital solutions have been determined for nine systems as a result.

  1. Multi-wavelength Observations of H 2356-309

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramowski, A; Aharonian, F; Akhperjanian, A G; Anton, G; de Almeida, U Barres; Bazer-Bachi, A R; Becherini, Y; Behera, B; Benbow, W; Bernloehr, K; Bochow, A; Boisson, C; Bolmont, J; Borrel, V; Brucker, J; Brun, F; Brun, P; Buehler, R; Bulik, T; Buesching, I; Boutelier, T; Chadwick, P M; Charbonnier, A; Chaves, R C G; Cheesebrough, A; Conrad, J; Chounet, L -M; Clapson, A C; Coignet, G; Costamante, L; Dalton, M; Daniel, M K; Davids, I D; Degrange, B; Deil, C; Dickinson, H J; Djannati-Atai, A; Domainko, W; Drury, L O'C; Dubois, F; Dubus, G; Dyks, J; Dyrda, M; Egberts, K; Eger, P; Espigat, P; Fallon, L; Farnier, C; Fegan, S; Feinstein, F; Fernandes, M V; Fiasson, A; Foerster, A; Fontaine, G; Fuessling, M; Gabici, S; Gallant, Y A; Gerard, L; Gerbig, D; Giebels, B; Glicenstein, J F; Glueck, B; Goret, P; Goering, D; Hampf, D; Hauser, M; Heinz, S; Heinzelmann, G; Henri, G; Hermann, G; Hinton, J A; Hoffmann, A; Hofmann, W; Hofverberg, P; Holleran, M; Hoppe, S; Horns, D; Jacholkowska, A; de Jager, O C; Jahn, C; Jung, I; Katarzynski, K; Katz, U; Kaufmann, S; Kerschhaggl, M; Khangulyan, D; Khelifi, B; Keogh, D; Klochkov, D; Kluzniak, W; Kneiske, T; Komin, Nu; Kosack, K; Kossakowski, R; Lamanna, G; Lenain, J -P; Lohse, T; Lu, C -C; Marandon, V; Marcowith, A; Masbou, J; Maurin, D; McComb, T J L; Medina, M C; Mehault, J; Moderski, R; Moulin, E; Naumann-Godo, M; de Naurois, M; Nedbal, D; Nekrassov, D; Nguyen, N; Nicholas, B; Niemiec, J; Nolan, S J; Ohm, S; Olive, J-F; Wilhelmi, E de Ona; Opitz, B; Orford, K J; Ostrowski, M; Panter, M; Arribas, M Paz; Pedaletti, G; Pelletier, G; Petrucci, P -O; Pita, S; Puehlhofer, G; Punch, M; Quirrenbach, A; Raubenheimer, B C; Raue, M; Rayner, S M; Reimer, O; Renaud, M; Reyes, R de los; Rieger, F; Ripken, J; Rob, L; Rosier-Lees, S; Rowell, G; Rudak, B; Rulten, C B; Ruppel, J; Ryde, F; Sahakian, V; Santangelo, A; Schlickeiser, R; Schoeck, F M; Schoenwald, A; Schwanke, U; Schwarzburg, S; Schwemmer, S; Shalchi, A; Sushch, I; Sikora, M; Skilton, J L; Sol, H; Stawarz, L; Steenkamp, R; Stegmann, C; Stinzing, F; Szostek, A; Tam, P H; Tavernet, J -P; Terrier, R; Tibolla, O; Tluczykont, M; Valerius, K; van Eldik, C; Vasileiadis, G; Venter, C; Venter, L; Vialle, J P; Viana, A; Vincent, P; Vivier, M; Voelk, H J; Volpe, F; Vorobiov, S; Wagner, S J; Ward, M; Zdziarski, A A; Zech, A; Zechlin, H -S

    2010-01-01

    AIMS: The properties of the broad-band emission from the high-frequency peaked BL Lac H 2356-309 (z=0.165) are investigated. METHODS: Very High Energy (VHE; E > 100 GeV) observations of H 2356-309 were performed with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) from 2004 through 2007. Simultaneous optical/UV and X-ray observations were made with the XMM-Newton satellite on June 12/13 and June 14/15, 2005. NRT radio observations were also contemporaneously performed in 2005. ATOM optical monitoring observations were also made in 2007. RESULTS: A strong VHE signal, ~13 sigma total, was detected by HESS after the four years HESS observations (116.8 hrs live time). The integral flux above 240 GeV is I(>240 GeV) = (3.06 +- 0.26 {stat} +- 0.61 {syst}) x 10^{-12} cm^{-2} s^{-1}, corresponding to ~1.6% of the flux observed from the Crab Nebula. A time-averaged energy spectrum is measured from 200 GeV to 2 TeV and is characterized by a power law (photon index of Gamma = 3.06 +- 0.15 {stat} +- 0.10 {syst}). Significant s...

  2. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore »on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  3. High speed imaging television system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wilkinson, William O. (Silver Spring, MD); Rabenhorst, David W. (Silver Spring, MD)

    1984-01-01

    A television system for observing an event which provides a composite video output comprising the serially interlaced images the system is greater than the time resolution of any of the individual cameras.

  4. Process Cooling Pumping Systems Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherman, C.

    2008-01-01

    An analysis of the mill water pumping systems at a North American manufacturing facility was conducted late las year and the following issues were observed: 1. Overpumping – Both systems were overpumped to a significant degree against...

  5. Filtering with Marked Point Process Observations via Poisson Chaos Expansion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Wei; Zeng Yong; Zhang Shu

    2013-06-15

    We study a general filtering problem with marked point process observations. The motivation comes from modeling financial ultra-high frequency data. First, we rigorously derive the unnormalized filtering equation with marked point process observations under mild assumptions, especially relaxing the bounded condition of stochastic intensity. Then, we derive the Poisson chaos expansion for the unnormalized filter. Based on the chaos expansion, we establish the uniqueness of solutions of the unnormalized filtering equation. Moreover, we derive the Poisson chaos expansion for the unnormalized filter density under additional conditions. To explore the computational advantage, we further construct a new consistent recursive numerical scheme based on the truncation of the chaos density expansion for a simple case. The new algorithm divides the computations into those containing solely system coefficients and those including the observations, and assign the former off-line.

  6. Anomalous transport and observable average in the standard map

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lydia Bouchara; Ouerdia Ourrad; Sandro Vaienti; Xavier Leoncini

    2015-09-02

    The distribution of finite time observable averages and transport in low dimensional Hamiltonian systems is studied. Finite time observable average distributions are computed, from which an exponent $\\alpha$ characteristic of how the maximum of the distributions scales with time is extracted. To link this exponent to transport properties, the characteristic exponent $\\mu(q)$ of the time evolution of the different moments of order $q$ related to transport are computed. As a testbed for our study the standard map is used. The stochasticity parameter $K$ is chosen so that either phase space is mixed with a chaotic sea and islands of stability or with only a chaotic sea. Our observations lead to a proposition of a law relating the slope in $q=0$ of the function $\\mu(q)$ with the exponent $\\alpha$.

  7. VERITAS Observations of the Nova in V407 Cygni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aliu, E; Arlen, T; Aune, T; Beilicke, M; Benbow, W; Bouvier, A; Bradbury, S M; Buckley, J H; Bugaev, V; Byrum, K; Cannon, A; Cesarini, A; Ciupik, L; Collins-Hughes, E; Connolly, M P; Cui, W; Decerprit, G; Dickherber, R; Duke, C; Dumm, J; Dwarkadas, V V; Errando, M; Falcone, A; Feng, Q; Finley, J P; Finnegan, G; Fortson, L; Furniss, A; Galante, N; Gall, D; Godambe, S; Griffin, S; Grube, J; Gyuk, G; Hanna, D; Holder, J; Huan, H; Hughes, G; Humensky, T B; Kaaret, P; Karlsson, N; Kertzman, M; Khassen, Y; Kieda, D; Krawczynski, H; Krennrich, F; Lang, M J; Lee, K; Maier, G; Majumdar, P; McArthur, S; McCann, A; Millis, J; Moriarty, P; Mukherjee, R; Nuñez, P D; Ong, R A; Orr, M; Otte, A N; Pandel, D; Park, N; Perkins, J S; Pohl, M; Prokoph, H; Quinn, J; Ragan, K; Reyes, L C; Reynolds, P T; Roache, E; Rose, H J; Ruppel, J; Saxon, D B; Schroedter, M; Sembroski, G H; Skole, C; Smith, A W; Staszak, D; Telezhinsky, I; Teši?, G; Theiling, M; Thibadeau, S; Tsurusaki, K; Tyler, J; Varlotta, A; Vincent, S; Vivier, M; Wakely, S P; Ward, J E; Weekes, T C; Weinstein, A; Weisgarber, T; Welsing, R; Williams, D A; Zitzer, B

    2012-01-01

    We report on very high energy (E > 100 GeV) gamma-ray observations of V407 Cygni, a symbiotic binary that underwent a nova outburst producing 0.1-10 GeV gamma rays during 2010 March 10-26. Observations were made with the Very Energetic Radiation Imaging Telescope Array System during 2010 March 19-26 at relatively large zenith angles, due to the position of V407 Cyg. An improved reconstruction technique for large zenith angle observations is presented and used to analyze the data. We do not detect V407 Cygni and place a differential upper limit on the flux at 1.6 TeV of 2.3 \\times 10^(-12) erg cm^(-2) s^(-1) (at the 95% confidence level). When considered jointly with data from Fermi-LAT, this result places limits on the acceleration of very high energy particles in the nova.

  8. Unrecognized redistributions of revenue in diagnosis-related group-based prospective payment systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kominski, GF; Williams, SV; Mays, RB; Pickens, GT

    1984-01-01

    I m 8% F 5 Noamoa I BN5 I m 898» mi. E» I .33. 3:05 wEo. _m ?woo wEwE>mm N 29 wEo. _n_ wumoo mEwE>mn_ N 99 _m:

  9. CCD Observing Manual 49 Bay State Road

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zallen, Richard

    Stars 5.6. Supernovae/Novae Patrols 5.7. Designing Your Own: Using AAVSO VSX 6.0 Observing Techniques 6

  10. EA-1964: National Ecological Observation Network (NEON)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) prepared an EA that evaluated potential environmental impacts of the proposed National Ecological Observation Network (NEON), a continental-scale network of...

  11. Observational Field Assessment of Invasiveness for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eucalyptus grandis observations..................................................... 13 Eucalyptus grandis), Eucalyptus grandis, African oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) and arboreal Leucaenas found on Oahu, Maui, Hawai

  12. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  13. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01

    during hydraulic fracturing of Bunter sandstones, Proc. NearSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  14. Cluster Observations with the South Pole Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plagge, Thomas Jeffrey

    2009-01-01

    The South Pole Telescope during the last stages ofwater vapor at the South Pole relative to two otherSZ Survey Instrument . 3 The South Pole Telescope Observing

  15. Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods and Observations from...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radioactivity in Precipitation: Methods & Observations from Savannah River Site Dennis Jackson P.E. & Timothy Jannik - Savannah River National Laboratory Teresa Eddy - Savannah...

  16. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Matthew; Fritschel, Peter; Miller, John; Barsotti, Lisa; Martynov, Denis; Brooks, Aidan; Coyne, Dennis; Abbott, Rich; Adhikari, Rana; Arai, Koji; Bork, Rolf; Kells, Bill; Rollins, Jameson; Smith-Lefebvre, Nicolas; Vajente, Gabriele; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Derosa, Ryan; Effler, Anamaria; Kokeyama, Keiko; Betzweiser, Joseph; Frolov, Valera; Mullavey, Adam; O`Reilly, Brian; Dwyer, Sheila; Izumi, Kiwamu; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael; Sigg, Daniel; Ballmer, Stefan; Massinger, Thomas J; Staley, Alexa; Mueller, Chris; Grote, Hartmut; Ward, Robert; King, Eleanor; Blair, David; Ju, Li; Zhao, Chunnong

    2015-01-01

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale interferometer. In this work we describe the first observation of parametric instability in an Advanced LIGO detector, and the means by which it has been removed as a barrier to progress.

  17. theearthobserver National Aeronautics and Space Administration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    enjoy this compilation of Perspectives on EOS articles. --Alan Ward [Executive Editor, The Earth Observer] In this Issue The Earth Observer: 20 Years Chronicling the History of the EOS Program Alan B [Volume 22, Issue 1, pp. 4-6, 22]. 45 An International Perspective on EOS Lisa Shaffer, January

  18. Engineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 19 (2006) 787795 A statistical complement to deterministic algorithms for the retrieval

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vucetic, Slobodan

    2006-01-01

    to estimate the attenuation of solar energy as it passes through a column of atmosphere, a quantity commonlyEngineering Applications of Artificial Intelligence 19 (2006) 787­795 A statistical complement: Geophysical retrievals; Aerosols; Regression 1. Introduction NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) satellites

  19. CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS , W. Paul Menzel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jun

    6.4 CLOUD CLASSIFICATION AND CLOUD PROPERTY RETRIEVAL FROM MODIS AND AIRS Jun Li * , W. Paul Menzel Observing System's (EOS) Aqua satellite enable global monitoring of the distribution of clouds. The MODIS is able to provide at high spatial resolution (1 ~ 5km) a cloud mask, surface and cloud types, cloud phase

  20. Observed Cosmological Redshifts Support Contracting Accelerating Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-02

    The main argument that Universe is currently expanding is observed redshift increase by distance. However, this conclusion may not be correct, because cosmological redshift depends only on the scaling factors, the change in the size of the universe during the time of light propagation and is not related to the speed of observer or speed of the object emitting the light. An observer in expanding universe will measure the same redshift as observer in contracting universe with the same scaling. This was not taken into account in analysing the SN Ia data related to the universe acceleration. Possibility that universe may contract, but that the observed light is cosmologically redshifted allows for completely different set of cosmological parameters $\\Omega_M, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}$, including the solution $\\Omega_M=1, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0$. The contracting and in the same time accelerating universe explains observed deceleration and acceleration in SN Ia data, but also gives significantly larger value for the age of the universe, $t_0 = 24$ Gyr. This allows to reconsider classical cosmological models with $\\Lambda =0$. The contracting stage also may explain the observed association of high redshifted quasars to low redshifted galaxies.

  1. Quantum observables, Lie algebra homology and TQFT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Schwarz

    1999-04-25

    Let us consider a Lie (super)algebra $G$ spanned by $T_{\\alpha}$ where $T_{\\alpha}$ are quantum observables in BV-formalism. It is proved that for every tensor $c^{\\alpha_1...\\alpha_k}$ that determines a homology class of the Lie algebra $G$ the expression $c^{\\alpha_1...\\alpha_k}T_{\\alpha _1}...T_{\\alpha_k}$ is again a quantum observables. This theorem is used to construct quantum observables in BV sigma-model. We apply this construction to explain Kontsevich's results about the relation between homology of the Lie algebra of Hamiltonian vector fields and topological invariants of manifolds.

  2. Observation of Parametric Instability in Advanced LIGO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gras, Slawek

    Parametric instabilities have long been studied as a potentially limiting effect in high-power interferometric gravitational wave detectors. Until now, however, these instabilities have never been observed in a kilometer-scale ...

  3. Initial Helioseismic Observations by Hinode/SOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Sekii; Alexander G. Kosovichev; Junwei Zhao; Saku Tsuneta; Hiromoto Shibahashi; Thomas E. Berger; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Yukio Katsukawa; Bruce W. Lites; Shin'ichi Nagata; Toshifumi Shimizu; Richard A. Shine; Yoshinori Suematsu; Theodore D. Tarbell; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-12

    Results from initial helioseismic observations by Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode are reported. It has been demonstrated that intensity oscillation data from Broadband Filter Imager can be used for various helioseismic analyses. The k-omega power spectra, as well as corresponding time-distance cross-correlation function that promises high-resolution time-distance analysis below 6-Mm travelling distance, were obtained for G-band and CaII-H data. Subsurface supergranular patterns have been observed from our first time-distance analysis. The results show that the solar oscillation spectrum is extended to much higher frequencies and wavenumbers, and the time-distance diagram is extended to much shorter travel distances and times than they were observed before, thus revealing great potential for high-resolution helioseismic observations from Hinode.

  4. Derivation of evolutionary payoffs from observable behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigel, Alexander; Engel, Assaf

    2008-01-01

    Interpretation of animal behavior, especially as cooperative or selfish, is a challenge for evolutionary theory. Strategy of a competition should follow from corresponding Darwinian payoffs for the available behavioral options. The payoffs and decision making processes, however, are difficult to observe and quantify. Here we present a general method for the derivation of evolutionary payoffs from observable statistics of interactions. The method is applied to combat of male bowl and doily spiders, to predator inspection by sticklebacks and to territorial defense by lions, demonstrating animal behavior as a new type of game theoretical equilibrium. Games animals play may be derived unequivocally from their observable behavior, the reconstruction, however, can be subjected to fundamental limitations due to our inability to observe all information exchange mechanisms (communication).

  5. New York/Region Opinions Editorial Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    New York/Region Opinions Editorial Observer Grasping the Depth of Time as a First Step of us. The idea of such quantities of time is extremely new. Humans began to understand the true scale

  6. Observational learning in an uncertain world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Acemoglu, Daron

    We study a model of observational learning in social networks in the presence of uncertainty about agents' type distributions. Each individual receives a private noisy signal about a payoff-relevant state of the world, and ...

  7. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trott, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables...

  8. Emerging local warming signals in observational data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahlstein, Irina

    The global average temperature of the Earth has increased, but year-to-year variability in local climates impedes the identification of clear changes in observations and human experience. For a signal to become obvious in ...

  9. Observing motor learning produces somatosensory change Nicol F. Bernardi,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malfait, Nicole

    Observing motor learning produces somatosensory change Nicolò F. Bernardi,1,2 Mohammad Darainy,1, Darainy M, Bricolo E, Ostry DJ. Observing motor learning produces somatosensory change. J Neurophysiol 110 of others has been shown to affect motor learning, but does it have effects on sensory systems as well

  10. Observing Unit Test Maturity in the Wild Ilja Heitlager, Tobias Kuipers, Joost Visser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Joost

    1 1 Observing Unit Test Maturity in the Wild Ilja Heitlager, Tobias Kuipers, Joost Visser Software. Abstract This talk provides an anecdotal account of unit testing maturity and its evolution in Dutch were used to construct, and to test these systems. Unit testing, specifically, was observed by us

  11. Camera-based Observation of Football Games for Analyzing Multi-agent Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camera-based Observation of Football Games for Analyzing Multi-agent Activities Michael Beetz beetz-based observation system for foot- ball games that is used for the automatic analysis of football games and challenging domain in the multi-agent com- munity is football -- in particular in the context of the Robo

  12. Observation of an Interedge Magnetoplasmon Mode in a Degenerate Two-Dimensional Electron Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hohls, Frank

    detection of edge states in the quantum Hall regime. At filling factors close to 3 we observe two densities was experimentally observed up to now only in a classical system of surface electrons on helium [9 magnetoplasmons. Using selective detection of edge states we can distinguish two wave packets of edge excitations

  13. Observation of the 0-fs pulse

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zare, Richard N.

    Observation of the 0-fs pulse By W.H. Knox, R.S. Knox,J.F.Hoose, and R.N. Zare T he quest for the world's shor test laser pulse has led to a re markable pace of develop ment in ultrafast laser technology. Al though pulses of only a few cycles duration have been made, clearly the observation of a 0-fs

  14. Gamma-Ray Line Observations with RHESSI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David M. Smith

    2004-04-30

    The Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) has been observing gamma-ray lines from the Sun and the Galaxy since its launch in February 2002. Here I summarize the status of RHESSI observations of solar lines (nuclear de-excitation, neutron capture, and positron annihilation), the lines of $^{26}$Al and $^{60}$Fe from the inner Galaxy, and the search for positron annihilation in novae.

  15. Strangeness Production in Nuclear Matter and Expansion Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. D. Toneev; E. G. Nikonov; B. Friman; W. Noerenberg; K. Redlich

    2003-08-07

    Thermodynamical properties of hot and dense nuclear matter are analyzed and compared for different equation of state (EoS). It is argued that the softest point of the equation of state and the strangeness separation on the phase boundary can manifest themselves in observables. The influence of the EoS and the order of the phase transition on the expansion dynamics of nuclear matter and strangeness excitation function is analyzed. It is shown that bulk properties of strangeness production in A-A collisions depend only weakly on the particular form of the EoS. The predictions of different models are related with experimental data on strangeness production.

  16. Combustion of Cattle Manure in a Fluidized Bed Combustor 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annamalai, K.; Colaluca, M. A.; Ibrahim, M. Y.; Sweeten, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    from -ZO to +ZO percent while keeping bed temperature constant at 650 0 e (lZ00?F) and u/u mf - 1.5. The concentrations of eo z , eo, eH 4 , e H , and e H Z 4 3 6 diminished with the increase in percentage of excess air (Figure 4). Even though... there is increased production of eo due to oxidation of Z eo, eH 4 , etc., the air dilution effect had a tendency to reduce eo Z concentration. The eo and hydrocarbons appear to have decreased with more excess air. Similar results were observed and Madan [la...

  17. Antikaons in the extended relativistic mean-field models for neutron star

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gupta, Neha; Arumugam, P.

    2012-10-20

    We review the role of antikaons in recent versions of relativistic mean field models and focus on the interactions in which all parameters are obtained by fitting finite nuclear data and successfully applied to reproduce a variety of nuclear and neutron star (NS) properties. We show that the recently observed 1.97 solar mass NS can be explained in three ways: (i) A stiffer EoS with both antikaons (K{sup -}, K-bar {sup 0}), (ii) a relatively softer EoS with K{sup -} and (iii) a softer EoS with nucleon phase only.

  18. The Solar System as an Exoplanetary System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Rebecca G

    2015-01-01

    With the availability of considerably more data, we revisit the question of how special our Solar System is, compared to observed exoplanetary systems. To this goal, we employ a mathematical transformation that allows for a meaningful, statistical comparison. We find that the masses and densities of the giant planets in our Solar System are very typical, as is the age of the Solar System. While the orbital location of Jupiter is somewhat of an outlier, this is most likely due to strong selection effects towards short-period planets. The eccentricities of the planets in our Solar System are relatively small compared to those in observed exosolar systems, but still consistent with the expectations for an 8-planet system (and could, in addition, reflect a selection bias towards high-eccentricity planets). The two characteristics of the Solar System that we find to be most special are the lack of super-Earths with orbital periods of days to months and the general lack of planets inside of the orbital radius of Me...

  19. Braking system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Norgren, D.U.

    1982-09-23

    A balanced braking system comprising a plurality of braking assemblies located about a member to be braked. Each of the braking assemblies consists of a spring biased piston of a first material fitted into a body of a different material which has a greater contraction upon cooling than the piston material. The piston is provided with a recessed head portion over which is positioned a diaphragm and forming a space therebetween to which is connected a pressurized fluid supply. The diaphragm is controlled by the fluid in the space to contact or withdraw from the member to be braked. A cooling means causes the body within which the piston is fitted to contract more than the piston, producing a tight shrink fit therebetween. The braking system is particularly applicable for selectively braking an arbor of an electron microscope which immobilizes, for example, a vertically adjustable low temperature specimen holder during observation. The system provides balanced braking forces which can be easily removed and re-established with minimal disturbance to arbor location.

  20. Optical SETI Observations of the Anomalous Star KIC 8462852

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schuetz, Marlin; Shostak, Seth; Richards, Jon

    2015-01-01

    To explore the hypothesis that KIC 8462852's aperiodic dimming is caused by artificial megastructures in orbit (Wright et al. 2015), rather than a natural cause such as cometary fragments in a highly elliptical orbit (Marengo et al. 2015), we searched for electromagnetic signals from KIC 8462852 indicative of extraterrestrial intelligence. The primary observations were in the visible optical regime using the Boquete Optical SETI Observatory in Panama. In addition, as a preparatory exercise for the possible future detection of a candidate signal (Heidmann 1991), three of six observing runs simultaneously searched radio frequencies at the Allen Telescope Array in California. No periodic optical signals greater than 67 photons/m2 within a time frame of 25 ns were seen. This limit corresponds to isotropic optical pulses of 8E22 joules. If, however, any inhabitants of KIC 8462852 were targeting our solar system (Shostak & Villard 2004), the required energy would be reduced greatly. The limits on narrowband rad...

  1. Accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars observed with INTEGRAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurizio Falanga

    2007-11-07

    I review the properties of three X-ray accreting millisecond pulsars observed with INTEGRAL. Out of seven recently discovered accretion-powered pulsars (one discovered by INTEGRAL), three were observed with the INTEGRAL satellite up to 300 keV. Detailed timing and spectral results will be presented, including data obtained during the most recent outburst of the pulsar HETE J1900.1-2455. Accreting X-ray millisecond pulsars are key systems to understand the spin and accretion history of neutron stars. They are also a good laboratory in which to study the source spectra, pulse profile, and phase shift between X-ray pulses in different energy ranges which give additional information of the X-ray production processes and emission environment.

  2. OBSERVING CORONAL NANOFLARES IN ACTIVE REGION MOSS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola; DeLuca, Ed; Golub, Leon; Korreck, Kelly; Weber, Mark; De Pontieu, Bart; Martinez-Sykora, Juan; Title, Alan; Hansteen, Viggo; Cirtain, Jonathan; Winebarger, Amy; Kobayashi, Ken; Kuzin, Sergey; Walsh, Robert; DeForest, Craig

    2013-06-10

    The High-resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C) has provided Fe XII 193A images of the upper transition region moss at an unprecedented spatial ({approx}0.''3-0.''4) and temporal (5.5 s) resolution. The Hi-C observations show in some moss regions variability on timescales down to {approx}15 s, significantly shorter than the minute-scale variability typically found in previous observations of moss, therefore challenging the conclusion of moss being heated in a mostly steady manner. These rapid variability moss regions are located at the footpoints of bright hot coronal loops observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the 94 A channel, and by the Hinode/X-Ray Telescope. The configuration of these loops is highly dynamic, and suggestive of slipping reconnection. We interpret these events as signatures of heating events associated with reconnection occurring in the overlying hot coronal loops, i.e., coronal nanoflares. We estimate the order of magnitude of the energy in these events to be of at least a few 10{sup 23} erg, also supporting the nanoflare scenario. These Hi-C observations suggest that future observations at comparable high spatial and temporal resolution, with more extensive temperature coverage, are required to determine the exact characteristics of the heating mechanism(s).

  3. The physics of Reionization: processes relevant for SKA observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Semelin, Benoit

    2015-01-01

    The local intensity of the 21 cm signal emitted during the Epoch of Reionization that will be mapped by the SKA is modulated by the amount of neutral hydrogen. Consequently, understanding the process of reionization of the intergalactic medium (IGM) is crucial for predicting and interpreting the upcoming observations. After presenting the basic physics and most meaningful quantities pertaining to the process of reionization, we will review recent progress in our understanding of the production and escape of ionizing photons in primordial galaxies and of their absorption in the IGM especially in so-called minihalos and Lyman Limit Systems.

  4. Observations of Radio Giant Pulses with GAVRT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Radio giant pulses provide a unique opportunity to study the pulsar radio emission mechanism in exquisite detail. Previous studies have revealed a wide range of properties and phenomena, including extraordinarily high brightness temperatures, sub-nanosecond emission features, and banded dynamic spectra. New measurements of giant pulse characteristics can help guide and test theoretical emission models. To this end, an extensive observation campaign has begun which will provide more than 500 hours on the Crab with a 34-meter antenna located in California, USA. The observations are being done as part of an educational outreach program called the Goldstone-Apple Valley Radio Telescope (GAVRT). This antenna has a novel wide bandwidth receiver which provides up to 8 GHz of instantaneous bandwidth in the range of 2.5 to 14 GHz. These observations will provide detailed information about the variability, amplitude distribution, and detailed frequency structure of radio giant pulses. In addition, a database of pulses ...

  5. Recent Results from Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nishikawa, Ken-Ichi

    a wealth of new information on binary systems containing a magnetized neutron star accreting from a stellar companion. In particular, the all­sky monitoring capability of the BATSE instrument has allowed the first systems. These have given new insights into the processes by which mass and angular momentum are exchanged

  6. Black Holes: from Speculations to Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas W. Baumgarte

    2006-04-13

    This paper provides a brief review of the history of our understanding and knowledge of black holes. Starting with early speculations on ``dark stars'' I discuss the Schwarzschild "black hole" solution to Einstein's field equations and the development of its interpretation from "physically meaningless" to describing the perhaps most exotic and yet "most perfect" macroscopic object in the universe. I describe different astrophysical black hole populations and discuss some of their observational evidence. Finally I close by speculating about future observations of black holes with the new generation of gravitational wave detectors.

  7. Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar interferometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amelung, Falk

    Seasonal subsidence and rebound in Las Vegas Valley, Nevada, observed by synthetic aperture radar in the subsidence and rebound occurring over stressed aquifer systems, in conjunction with measurements, generally permanent aquifer system compaction and land subsidence at yearly and longer timescales, caused

  8. Local observability of state variables and parameters in nonlinear modeling quantified by delay reconstruction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parlitz, Ulrich; Luther, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Features of the Jacobian matrix of the delay coordinates map are exploited for quantifying the robustness and reliability of state and parameter estimations for a given dynamical model using an observed time series. Relevant concepts of this approach are introduced and illustrated for discrete and continuous time systems employing a filtered H\\'enon map and a R\\"ossler system.

  9. 3. Computing Observables Computer simulation methods are by now an established tool in many

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heermann, Dieter W.

    3. Computing Observables Computer simulation methods are by now an established tool in many branches of science. The motivations for computer simulations of physical systems are manifold. One-type approximation. With a computer simulation we have the ability to study systems not yet tractable with analytical

  10. Observables can be tailored to change the entanglement of any pure state

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harshman, N. L.; Ranade, Kedar S.

    2011-07-15

    We show that, for a finite-dimensional Hilbert space, there exist observables that induce a tensor product structure such that the entanglement properties of any pure state can be tailored. In particular, we provide an explicit, finite method for constructing observables in an unstructured d-dimensional system so that an arbitrary known pure state has any Schmidt decomposition with respect to an induced bipartite tensor product structure. In effect, this article demonstrates that, in a finite-dimensional Hilbert space, entanglement properties can always be shifted from the state to the observables and all pure states are equivalent as entanglement resources in the ideal case of complete control of observables.

  11. Library System Library System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cinabro, David

    Library System #12;Library System 5150 Anthony Wayne Drive David Adamany Undergraduate Library that for the current fiscal year, we've been given an additional $600,000 for our library materials budget. We're very subscriptions. The Wayne State University Libraries are deeply committed to providing our faculty and students

  12. Equivalences on Observable Processes Irek Ulidowski

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ulidowski, Irek

    and finitely observable. We define copy+refusal testing equivalence as indistinguishabil- ity by copy, provided their operational meaning is defined by realistically implementable transition rules. Process behaviour which can be established by so-called local testing but not global testing is called locally

  13. Experimental Observation of Bonding Electrons in Proteins*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Observation of Bonding Electrons in Proteins* (Received for publication, April 15 enables bonding details of electron distributions in proteins to be revealed experimentally for the first time. We move one step closer to imaging directly the fine details of the electronic structure on which

  14. Energy flow observables in hadronic collisions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Hautmann

    2012-05-24

    We present recent QCD calculations of energy flow distributions associated with the production of jets at wide rapidity separations in high-energy hadron collisions, and discuss the role of these observables to analyze contributions from parton showering and from multiple parton collisions.

  15. OH Maser Observations of Planetary Nebulae Precursors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. M. Deacon; J. M. Chapman; A. J. Green

    2004-06-08

    We present OH maser observations at 1612, 1665, 1667, and 1720 MHz for 86 post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) stars selected from a survey of 1612 MHz maser sources in the Galactic Plane. The observations were taken with the Parkes Telescope and the Australia Telescope Compact Array between 2002 September and 2003 August. Post-AGB stars are the precursors to planetary nebulae, the diverse morphological range of which is unexplained. The maser observations were taken to investigate the onset and incidence of wind asymmetries during the post-AGB phase. We re-detected all 86 sources at 1612 MHz while 27 sources were detected at 1665 and 45 at 1667 MHz. One source was re-detected at 1720 MHz. We present a classification scheme for the maser profiles and show that 25% of sources in our sample are likely to have asymmetric or bipolar outflows. From a comparison of the maser and far-infrared properties we find that there is a likely trend in the shape of the maser profiles with some sources evolving from double-peaked to irregular to fully bipolar profiles. A subset of higher-mass sources stand out as having almost no mainline emission and mostly double-peaked profiles. At least 25% of sources in the sample are variable at one or more of the frequencies observed. We also confirm a previously-noted 1667 MHz overshoot phenomenon.

  16. 8) Stratospheric equatorial variability a) Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lott, Francois

    speed. Phase lines inclined eastward when altitude increases indicating upward propation Signal field) Westward phase propagation but eastward group propagation Phase lines inclined westward Signal;5 Satellites wind observations (UARS, Swinbak et Ortland 1997) The Quasi-Biennial Oscillation (low stratosphere

  17. Uncertain Probabilistic Roadmaps with Observations Richard Dearden

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Xin

    Uncertain Probabilistic Roadmaps with Observations Richard Dearden School of Computer Science Science University of Birmingham Birmingham, B15 2TT, UK mlk@cs.bham.ac.uk Abstract Probabilistic roadmaps. Introduction Probabilistic Roadmaps (PRM) are a popular technique for path planning in high dimensional spaces

  18. Observation of D(0) ? K+pi-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ammar, Raymond G.; Ball, S.; Baringer, Philip S.; Bean, Alice; Besson, David Zeke; Coppage, Don; Copty, N.; Davis, Robin E. P.; Hancock, N.; Kelly, M.; Kwak, Nowhan; Lam, H.

    1994-03-01

    Using the CLEO II data sample, with an integrated luminosity of 1.8 fb-1 at and near the UPSILON(4S) resonance, we have observed a signal for D0 --> K+pi-, which could be due to either D0D0BAR mixing or doubly Cabibbo suppressed decay, or a...

  19. Timed Automata with Observers under Energy Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    of schedules given an initial energy level of one. For one-clock priced timed automata both the lowerTimed Automata with Observers under Energy Constraints Patricia Bouyer Lab. Spécification et@lsv.ens-cachan.fr ABSTRACT In this paper we study one-clock priced timed automata in which prices can grow linearly ( p = k

  20. On the consistent use of Constructed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michael Trott

    2015-01-17

    We define "constructed observables" as relating experimental measurements to terms in a Lagrangian while simultaneously making assumptions about possible deviations from the Standard Model (SM), in other Lagrangian terms. Ensuring that the SM effective field theory (EFT) is constrained correctly when using constructed observables requires that their defining conditions are imposed on the EFT in a manner that is consistent with the equations of motion. Failing to do so can result in a "functionally redundant" operator basis and the wrong expectation as to how experimental quantities are related in the EFT. We illustrate the issues involved considering the $\\rm S$ parameter and the off shell triple gauge coupling (TGC) verticies. We show that the relationships between $h \\rightarrow V \\bar{f} \\, f$ decay and the off shell TGC verticies are subject to these subtleties, and how the connections between these observables vanish in the limit of strong bounds due to LEP. The challenge of using constructed observables to consistently constrain the Standard Model EFT is only expected to grow with future LHC data, as more complex processes are studied.

  1. Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brennan, Sean

    Observability of Neuronal Network Motifs (Invited Paper) Andrew J. Whalen*t, Sean N. Brennan Engineering, + Engineering Science and Mechanics, Neurosurgery, and Physics, Penn State University, University) neuronal networks as a function of 1) the connection topology and sym metry, 2) the measured nodes, and 3

  2. Eos, Vol. 92, No. 18, 3 May 2011 Acknowledgments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montana, University of

    over the next cen- tury. Arctic tundra, boreal forests, and peat- lands are already undergoing major to regional and global climate in addition to affecting wildlife habitat and ecosystem resources available

  3. Eos, Vol. 87, No. 23, 6 June 2006 Acknowledgments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pichler, Thomas

    .The workshop was supported by the NSF (EAR-060162) and a grant from Exxon- Mobil for graduate student

  4. Earth & Space Science News Eos.org // 27 RESEARCH SPOTLIGHT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houze Jr., Robert A.

    . In a new study, Barnes and Houze catalog different types of "hydrometeors"--parti- cles of water and ice inflows travel laterally and gradually descend. This study shows how the formation of the liquid and ice

  5. E.O.13514 Federal Leadership in Environmental, Energy, and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Utility of Top 15 Buildings Status Quo Renovation Relocation LCCLA = CElec (1+d)t t=0 N + CNG (1+d)t t=0 cash flow to present value CElec =Annual Electricity Cost CNG =Annual Natural Gas Cost CWater =Annual

  6. Autonomous Science Agents and Sensor Webs: EO-1 and Beyond

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaffer, Steven

    will describe several technology infusions applications being developed. We will also describe how the software ................................................ 5 8. TECHNOLOGY INFUSION ...................................... 8 9. RELATED WORK & SUMMARY

  7. EOS 81: 580, November 28, 2000. MEETING EXPLORES SENSOR TECHNOLOGY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daly, Kendra L.

    , Denmark. The goal of the workshop was to exchange ideas on new experimental approaches and methodology, to define strategic themes, and to formulate specific recommendations related to sensor development. The 25 essential to foster information exchange and to provide advice on community priorities for sensor

  8. Comments on: Sandia Computational Mathematician Receives DOE's EO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11

  9. DOE Docket No. EO-05-01; September 2, 2005

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann Jackson About UsEnergyofSoftware EngineeringofClean

  10. E.O. 13693: Recent Developments, Implementation Updates, and Opportunities

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-in electricLaboratoryofNotices | DepartmentDepartment ofWorkingofThe dust|

  11. EO 13211: Regulations That Significantly Affect Energy Supply,

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy A plug-inPPL EnergyPlus, LLCConfidentialityOnline Hosted by(1904-AC04)Distribution,

  12. Reducing Regulatory Burden EO 13563 Fifth RFI | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergy AEnergyPresidentialThis 3-DMarch 9, 2015 Cumulative'' issued by the President on

  13. Reducing Regulatory Burden; Retrospective Review Under E.O. 13563 |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCED MANUFACTURINGEnergy BillsNo. 195 - Oct. 7,DOERTI |Service ofConditioning Filter |Burden

  14. http://www.epa.gov/greeningepa/practices/eo13423.htm

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield Municipal GasAdministration Medal01 Sandia4)9 FederalRivers and Streamsyou collect data eachThis

  15. EO 13089 -- Coral Reef Protection | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n cEnergy (AZ, CA,EnergystudentThis document givesRedWHITE HOUSEthe

  16. Microsoft Word - ALonEO13423Last.doc

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nAand DOE Safetyof MethaneMillionMicrosoft Word -Microsoft109Microsoft Word

  17. EO 11514: Protection and Enhancement of Environmental Quality

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEE Deer Creek Lodge514,

  18. EO 12088: Federal Compliance with Pollution Control Standards

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEE Deer2088-Federal

  19. EO 12114: Environmental Effects Abroad of Major Federal Actions |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEE

  20. EO 13123-Greening the Government Through Efficient Energy Management |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEEWHITE HOUSEDepartment

  1. EO 13186: Responsibilities of Federal Agencies To Protect Migratory Birds

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEEWHITE

  2. EO 13212: Actions To Expedite Energy-Related Projects

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based|DepartmentStatementof EnergyQuality'Lean'1401 LEEWHITE5 Federal7

  3. Floodplain Management Guidelines for Implementing E.O. 11988 | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12, 2015Executive Order14,EnergyFinancingWIPPFixed Monthly1Industryof

  4. Reducing Regulatory Burden - EO 13563 Retrospective Review | Department

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities » Pastams AG 2015ersedReducingof

  5. Reducing Regulatory Burden EO 13563 Third RFI Comment Extension |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities » Pastams AG

  6. Reducing Regulatory Burden EO 13563 Third RFI | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested PartiesBuildingBudgetFinancial Opportunities » Pastams AGReducing Regulatory

  7. Microsoft Word - Lochinvar Comments -EO 13563 Preliminary Plan.docx

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on DeliciousMathematicsEnergyInterested Parties - WAPAEnergy May2.docTechnicalBARACK OBAMA October 31,JuneJuly

  8. Los Alamos physicist honored with E.O. Lawrence Award

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesse BergkampCentermillion to local Unitedto STEMLANLTeamLos

  9. Sandia Energy - Sandia Computational Mathematician Receives DOE's EO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II)Geothermal EnergyRenewable EnergyWAvesLawrence Award Computational

  10. Observational constraints on Tachyon and DBI inflation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Sheng; Liddle, Andrew R., E-mail: sl277@sussex.ac.uk, E-mail: arl@roe.ac.uk [Astronomy Centre, University of Sussex, Brighton, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

    2014-03-01

    We present a systematic method for evaluation of perturbation observables in non-canonical single-field inflation models within the slow-roll approximation, which allied with field redefinitions enables predictions to be established for a wide range of models. We use this to investigate various non-canonical inflation models, including Tachyon inflation and DBI inflation. The Lambert W function will be used extensively in our method for the evaluation of observables. In the Tachyon case, in the slow-roll approximation the model can be approximated by a canonical field with a redefined potential, which yields predictions in better agreement with observations than the canonical equivalents. For DBI inflation models we consider contributions from both the scalar potential and the warp geometry. In the case of a quartic potential, we find a formula for the observables under both non-relativistic (sound speed c{sub s}{sup 2} ? 1) and relativistic behaviour (c{sub s}{sup 2} || 1) of the scalar DBI inflaton. For a quadratic potential we find two branches in the non-relativistic c{sub s}{sup 2} ? 1 case, determined by the competition of model parameters, while for the relativistic case c{sub s}{sup 2} ? 0, we find consistency with results already in the literature. We present a comparison to the latest Planck satellite observations. Most of the non-canonical models we investigate, including the Tachyon, are better fits to data than canonical models with the same potential, but we find that DBI models in the slow-roll regime have difficulty in matching the data.

  11. Equation of State Model Quality Study for Ti and Ti64.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wills, Ann Elisabet; Sanchez, Jason James

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and the titanium alloy Ti64 (6% aluminum, 4% vanadium and the balance ti- tanium) are materials used in many technologically important applications. To be able to computationally investigate and design these applications, accurate Equations of State (EOS) are needed and in many cases also additional constitutive relations. This report describes what data is available for constructing EOS for these two materials, and also describes some references giving data for stress-strain constitutive models. We also give some suggestions for projects to achieve improved EOS and constitutive models. In an appendix, we present a study of the 'cloud formation' issue observed in the ALEGRA code. This issue was one of the motivating factors for this literature search of available data for constructing improved EOS for Ti and Ti64. However, the study shows that the cloud formation issue is only marginally connected to the quality of the EOS, and, in fact, is a physical behavior of the system in question. We give some suggestions for settings in, and improvements of, the ALEGRA code to address this computational di culty.

  12. Sgr A* Observations with H.E.S.S. II

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parsons, R D; King, J; Lefranc, V; Moulin, E; Poon, H; Veh, J

    2015-01-01

    The Galactic Centre has been studied with the High Energy Stereoscopic System (H.E.S.S.) for over 10 years, revealing a bright, complex gamma-ray morphology. Besides a strong point-like very-high-energy gamma-ray source coincident with the supermassive black hole Sgr A*, pre- vious analyses also revealed a diffuse ridge of gamma-ray emission, indicative of a powerful cosmic-ray accelerator in this region. The addition of a fifth telescope with 600 m 2 mirror area to the centre of the H.E.S.S. array has increased the energy range accessible, allowing observations to take place down to 100 GeV and potentially below. This wider energy range allows an important overlap in observations with satellite instruments such as the Fermi-LAT gamma-ray telescope. We will present the results of new H.E.S.S observations of the Galactic Centre region and show a detailed analysis of the central source, including comparisons to results at other wavelengths.

  13. Observation of incomplete fusion reactions at l < l {sub crit}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yadav, Abhishek Sharma, Vijay R. Singh, Devendra P. Unnati,; Singh, B. P.; Prasad, R.; Singh, Pushpendra P.; Bala, Indu; Kumar, R.; Muralithar, S.; Singh, R. P.; Sharma, M. K.

    2014-08-14

    In order to understand the presence of incomplete fusion at low energies i.e. 4-7MeV/nucleon and also to study its dependence on various entrance-channel parameters, the two type of measurements (i) excitation function for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb, and (ii) forward recoil ranges for {sup 12}C+{sup 159}Tb systems have been performed. The experimentally measured excitation functions have been analyzed within the framework of compound nucleus decay using statistical model code PACE4. Analysis of data suggests the production of xn/px)n-channels via complete fusion, as these are found to be well reproduced by PACE4 predictions, while, a significant enhancement in the excitation functions of ?-emitting channels has been observed over the theoretical ones, which has been attributed due to the incomplete fusion processes. Further, the incomplete fusion events observed in case of forward recoil range measurements have been explained on the basis of the breakup fusion model, where these events may be attributed to the fusion of {sup 8}Be and/or {sup 4}He from {sup 12}C projectile to the target nucleus. In the present work, the SUMRULE model calculations are found to highly underestimate the observed incomplete fusion cross-sections which indicate that the l-values lower than l {sub crit} (limit of complete fusion) significantly contribute to the incomplete fusion reactions.

  14. RADIO OBSERVATIONS OF HD 80606 NEAR PLANETARY PERIASTRON

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazio, T. Joseph W.; Farrell, W. M.; Shankland, P. D.; Blank, D. L.

    2010-12-15

    This paper reports Very Large Array observations at 325 and 1425 MHz ({lambda}90 cm and {lambda}20 cm) during and near the periastron passage of HD 80606b on HJD 2454424.86 (2007 November 20). We obtain flux density limits (3{sigma}) of 1.7 mJy and 48 {mu}Jy at 325 and 1425 MHz, respectively, equivalent to planetary luminosity limits of 2.3 x 10{sup 24} erg s{sup -1} and 2.7 x 10{sup 23} erg s{sup -1}. Unfortunately, these are several orders of magnitude above the nominal Jovian value (at 40 MHz) of 2 x 10{sup 18} erg s{sup -1}. The motivation for these observations was that the planetary magnetospheric emission is driven by a stellar wind-planetary magnetosphere interaction so that the planetary luminosity would be elevated near periastron. We estimate that, near periastron, HD 80606b might be as much as 3000 times more luminous than Jupiter. Recent transit observations of HD 80606b provide reasonably stringent constraints on the planetary mass and radius, and, because of the planet's highly eccentric orbit, its rotation period is likely to be 'pseudo-synchronized' to its orbital period, allowing a robust estimate of the former. Consequently, we are able to make relatively robust estimates of the emission frequency of the planetary magnetospheric emission and find it to be around 60-90 MHz. While this is too low for our reported observations, we compare HD 80606b to other high-eccentricity systems and assess the detection possibilities for both near-term and more distant future systems. Of the known high-eccentricity planets, only HD 80606b is likely to be detectable, as the others (HD 20782B and HD 4113) are both lower mass and longer rotational periods, which imply weaker magnetic field strengths. We find that both the forthcoming 'EVLA low band' system, which will operate as low as 65 MHz, and the Low Frequency Array may be able to improve upon our planetary luminosity limits for HD 80606b, and do so at a more optimum frequency. If the low-frequency component of the Square Kilometre Array (SKA-lo) and a future lunar radio array are able to approach their thermal noise limits, they should be able to detect an HD 80606b-like planet, unless the amount by which the planet's luminosity increases is substantially less than the factor of 3000 that we estimate; for the SKA-lo, which is to be located in the southern hemisphere, future planetary surveys will have to find southern hemisphere equivalents of HD 80606b.

  15. Observables in Strongly Coupled Anisotropic Theories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dimitrios Giataganas

    2013-12-30

    We review certain anisotropic gauge/gravity dualities, focusing more on a theory with space dependent axion term. Then we discuss and also present some new results for several observables: the static potential and force, the imaginary part of the static potential, the quark dipole in the plasma wind, the drag force and diffusion time, the jet quenching of heavy and light quarks, the energy loss of rotating quarks, the photon production and finally the violation of the holographic viscosity over entropy bound. The corresponding weakly coupled results are also discussed. Finally we investigate the bounds of the parameters of the current strongly coupled anisotropic theories attempting to match them with the observed quark-gluon plasma and report the problems appear.

  16. Fermi Observations of Gamma-ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohno, Masanori [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan)

    2010-10-15

    The gamma-ray emission mechanism of Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are still unknown. Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope successfully detected high-energy (> 100 MeV) emission from 17 GRBs since its launch. Fermi revealed the distinct temporal behaviors and extra spectral component from high-energy emission. These new observational results are driving many theoretical implications, such as leptonic, hadronic and afterglow origin. The highest energy photon detected by Fermi gives a constraint on the bulk Lorentz factor of the ultra-relativistic jets of GRBs. The impact of the Fermi GRB observations extends not only to the GRB-related issues but also to the outside GRB physics, such as quantum gravity and model of the extra galactic background light.

  17. First direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Adamson, P.

    2011-07-05

    This letter reports the first direct observation of muon antineutrino disappearance. The MINOS experiment has taken data with an accelerator beam optimized for ??? production, accumulating an exposure of 1.71 x 1020 protons on target. In the Far Detector, 97 charged current ??? events are observed. The no-oscillation hypothesis predicts 156 events and is excluded at 6.3?. The best fit to oscillation yields |?m?2| = (3.36-0.40 +0.46(stat.) ± 0.06(syst.)) x 10-3 eV2, sin2(2 ??) = 0.86-0.12+0.11 (stat.) ± 0.01(syst.). The MINOS ?? and ??? measurements are consistent at the 2.0% confidence level, assuming identical underlying oscillation parameters.

  18. Observational constraints on braneworld chaotic inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew R Liddle; Anthony J Smith

    2003-08-13

    We examine observational constraints on chaotic inflation models in the Randall-Sundrum Type II braneworld. If inflation takes place in the high-energy regime, the perturbations produced by the quadratic potential are further from scale-invariance than in the standard cosmology, in the quartic case more or less unchanged, while for potentials of greater exponent the trend is reversed. We test these predictions against a data compilation including the WMAP measurements of microwave anisotropies and the 2dF galaxy power spectrum. While in the standard cosmology the quartic potential is at the border of what the data allow and all higher powers excluded, we find that in the high-energy regime of braneworld inflation even the quadratic case is under strong observational pressure. We also investigate the intermediate regime where the brane tension is comparable to the inflationary energy scale, where the deviations from scale-invariance prove to be greater.

  19. APS DPP, Savannah 2004 Tomographic Observation ofTomographic Observation of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    -formed FRC, or generate a FRC from a pre-ionized plasma The TCS chamber is constructed of a 40-cm radiusAPS DPP, Savannah 2004 Tomographic Observation ofTomographic Observation of FRC Rotational Modes and Stabilization byFRC Rotational Modes and Stabilization by Various RMF Antenna Geometries in TCSVarious RMF

  20. LNG Observer: Second Qatargas train goes onstream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-01-01

    The January-February, 1997 issue of the LNG Observer is presented. The following topics are discussed: second Qatargas train goes onstream; financing for the eighth Indonesian liquefaction train; Koreans take stakes in Oman LNG; US imports and exports of LNG in 1996; A 60% increase in proved reserves on the North West Shelf; proposals for Indian LNG terminal CEDIGAZ forecasts world LNG trade by 2010; growth for North African gas production and exports; and new forecast sees strong growth for Asian gas.

  1. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2007-09-13

    The self-potential (SP) response during hydraulic fracturing of intact Sierra granite was investigated in the laboratory. Excellent correlation of pressure drop and SP suggests that the SP response is created primarily by electrokinetic coupling. For low pressures, the variation of SP with pressure drop is linear, indicating a constant coupling coefficient (Cc) of -200 mV/MPa. However for pressure drops >2 MPa, the magnitude of the Cc increases by 80% in an exponential trend. This increasing Cc is related to increasing permeability at high pore pressures caused by dilatancy of micro-cracks, and is explained by a decrease in the hydraulic tortuosity. Resistivity measurements reveal a decrease of 2% prior to hydraulic fracturing and a decrease of {approx}35% after fracturing. An asymmetric spatial SP response created by injectate diffusion into dilatant zones is observed prior to hydraulic fracturing, and in most cases this SP variation revealed the impending crack geometry seconds before failure. At rupture, injectate rushes into the new fracture area where the zeta potential is different than in the rock porosity, and an anomalous SP spike is observed. After fracturing, the spatial SP distribution reveals the direction of fracture propagation. Finally, during tensile cracking in a point load device with no water flow, a SP spike is observed that is caused by contact electrification. However, the time constant of this event is much less than that for transients observed during hydraulic fracturing, suggesting that SP created solely from material fracture does not contribute to the SP response during hydraulic fracturing.

  2. Rayleigh lidar observations of mesosphere temperature structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meriwether, J.W.; Dao, P.D.; Mcnutt, R.T.; Klemetti, W.; Moskowitz, W.; Davidson, G. [Hanscom Air Force Base, MA (United States)]|[PhotoMetrics, Inc., Woburn, MA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Ground-based observations of atmospheric density profiles to 92 km were obtained for four successive seasons between summer 1989 and spring 1990. These results were obtained with a powerful Rayleigh lidar facility located at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (Dayton, Ohio). This instrument combined a 14-W XeF laser transmitter with a 2.54-m receiver mirror to observe returns from altitudes between 40 and 95 km. Analysis of the scale height dependence of the density profiles produced temperatures with a measurement error of about 5 K (approximately 2.5%) at 90 km when the lidar data was averaged for 20 min. and smoothed in height over 2.7 km. Examination of these profiles for the total of 18 nights showed that there often existed in the mesophere a layer of enhanced temperatures when compared with the U.S. standard profile. The layer centroid height was about 85 km for summer and 70 to 75 km for winter. Data obtained for the equinoctial periods showed the amplitude of these layers to be weak. The winter temperature profiles showed evidence for long-period waves passing through the region of the thermal anomaly while the equinox profiles revealed more sporadic wave activity with shorter vertical wavelengths. Both the winter and summer temperature data displayed regions where the observed lapse rate approached the adiabatic lapse rate. In the summer the wave activity near the iversion layer was weak.

  3. Infrared Freezing of Euclidean QCD observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paul M. Brooks; C. J. Maxwell

    2006-08-22

    We consider the leading one-chain term in a skeleton expansion for QCD observables and show that for energies Q^2>\\Lambda^2, where Q^2=\\Lambda^2 is the Landau pole in the coupling, the skeleton expansion result is equivalent to the standard Borel integral representation, with ambiguities related to infrared (IR) renormalons. For Q^2freezing behaviour, vanishing at Q^2=0. Finiteness at Q^2=\\Lambda^2 implies specific relations between the residues of IR and UV renormalons in the Borel plane. These relations, only one of which has previously been noted (though it remained unexplained) are shown to follow from the continuity of the characteristic function in the skeleton expansion. By considering the compensation of non-perturbative and perturbative ambiguities we are led to a result for the Q^2 dependence of these observables at all Q^2, in which there is a single undetermined non-perturbative parameter, and which involves the skeleton expansion characteristic function. The observables freeze to zero in the infrared. We briefly consider the freezing behaviour of the Minkowskian R_{e+e-} ratio.

  4. Observational consequencies of baryonic gaseous dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shchekinov, Yu A

    1998-01-01

    Possible observational consequencies of dark matter in the Galaxy in the form of dense molecular gas clouds -- clumpuscules of masses $M_c\\sim 10^{-3}~\\msun$ and radii $R_c\\sim 3\\times 10^{13}$ cm -- are considered. Recent models of the extreme scattering events -- refraction of radio-waves from quasars in dense plasma clumps in the Galactic halo -- definitely show on such clouds as possible dark matter candidate. We arugue that collisions of such clumpuscules are quite frequent: around $1-10~\\msun$ a year can be ejected in the intestellar medium due to collisions. Optical continuum and 21 cm emissions from post-collisional gas are found to be observable. We show that clumpuscules can form around O stars HII regions of sizes $R\\sim 30$ pc and emission measure $EM\\simeq 20$ cm$^{-6}$ pc, and can also be observable in $H_\\alpha$ emission. Evaporation of clumpuscules by external ionising radiation can be a substantial mass source. From requirement that the total mass input on the Hubble time cannot exceed the lu...

  5. Observational consequences of baryonic gaseous dark matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. A. Shchekinov

    1998-12-03

    Possible observational consequences of dark matter in the Galaxy in the form of dense molecular gas clouds - clumpuscules of masses $M_c\\sim 10^{-3} \\msun$ and radii $R_c\\sim 3\\times 10^{13}$ cm - are considered. Recent models of the extreme scattering events - refraction of radio-waves from quasars in dense plasma clumps in the Galactic halo - definitely show on such clouds as possible dark matter candidate. We argue that collisions of such clumpuscules are quite frequent: around $1-10 \\msun$ a year can be ejected in the interstellar medium due to collisions. Optical continuum and 21 cm emissions from post-collisional gas are found to be observable. We show that clumpuscules can form around O stars HII regions of sizes $R\\sim 30$ pc and emission measure $EM\\simeq 20 cm^{-6}$ pc, and can also be observable in $H_\\alpha$ emission. Evaporation of clumpuscules by external ionizing radiation can be a substantial mass source. From requirement that the total mass input on the Hubble time cannot exceed the luminous mass in the Galaxy, typical radius of clouds is constrained as $R_c energy of the gas ejected by such clouds can be an efficient energy source for the Galactic halo.

  6. Global and regional emissions of HFC-125 (CHF[subscript 2]CF[subscript 3]) from in situ and air archive atmospheric observations at AGAGE and SOGE observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Doherty, S.

    High-frequency, in situ observations from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and System for Observation of halogenated Greenhouse gases in Europe (SOGE) networks for the period 1998 to 2008, combined ...

  7. Direct observation of SU(N) orbital magnetism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, X; Bromley, S L; Kraus, C V; Safronova, M S; Zoller, P; Rey, A M; Ye, J

    2014-01-01

    Symmetries play a fundamental role in the laws of nature. SU(N) symmetry can emerge in a quantum system with N single-particle spin states when the spin degree of freedom is decoupled from interactions. Such a system is anticipated to exhibit large degeneracy and exotic many-body behaviors. Owing to the strong decoupling between electronic-orbital and nuclear-spin degrees of freedom, alkaline-earth atoms (AEAs), prepared in the two lowest electronic states (clock states), are predicted to obey an accurate SU(N=2I+1) symmetry arising from the nuclear spin (I). So far, only indirect evidence for this symmetry exists, and the scattering parameters remain largely unknown. Here we report the first direct observation of SU(N=10) symmetry in 87Sr (I=9/2) using the state-of-the-art measurement precision offered by an ultra-stable laser. By encoding the electronic orbital degree of freedom in the two clock states, while keeping the system open to all 10 nuclear spin sublevels, we probe the non-equilibrium two-orbital ...

  8. Quasiprobability distributions in open quantum systems: spin-qubit systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kishore Thapliyal; Subhashish Banerjee; Anirban Pathak; S. Omkar; V. Ravishankar

    2015-04-08

    Quasiprobability distributions (QDs) in open quantum systems are investigated for $SU(2)$, spin like systems, having relevance to quantum optics and information. In this work, effect of both quantum non-demolition (QND) and dissipative open quantum systems, on the evolution of a number of spin QDs are investigated. Specifically, compact analytic expressions for the $W$, $P$, $Q$, and $F$ functions are obtained for some interesting single, two and three qubit states, undergoing general open system evolutions. Further, corresponding QDs are reported for an N qubit Dicke model and a spin-1 system. The existence of nonclassical characteristics are observed in all the systems investigated here. The study leads to a clear understanding of quantum to classical transition in a host of realistic physical scenarios. Variation of the amount of nonclassicality observed in the quantum systems, studied here,are also investigated using nonclassical volume.

  9. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SS 433 JETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, Herman L.; Canizares, Claude R.; Schulz, Norbert S.; Nowak, Michael [Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hillwig, Todd [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Valparaiso University, Valparaiso, IN 46383 (United States); Mioduszewski, Amy; Rupen, Michael [NRAO, P.O. Box 2, Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Heinz, Sebastian, E-mail: hermanm@space.mit.edu, E-mail: crc@space.mit.edu, E-mail: nss@space.mit.edu, E-mail: mnowak@space.mit.edu, E-mail: todd.hillwig@valpo.edu, E-mail: amiodusz@nrao.edu, E-mail: mrupen@aoc.nrao.edu, E-mail: heinzs@astro.wisc.edu [Astronomy Department, 5408 Sterling Hall, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-09-20

    We present observations of the SS 433 jets using the Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer with contemporaneous optical and Very Long Baseline Array observations. The X-ray and optical emission line regions are found to be related but not coincident as the optical line emission persists for days while the X-ray emission lines fade in less than 5000 s. The line Doppler shifts from the optical and X-ray lines match well, indicating that they are less than 3 × 10{sup 14} cm apart. The jet Doppler shifts show aperiodic variations that could result from shocks in interactions with the local environment. These perturbations are consistent with a change in jet direction but not jet speed. The proper motions of the radio knots match the kinematic model only if the distance to SS 433 is 4.5 ± 0.2 kpc. Observations during eclipse show that the occulted emission is very hard, seen only above 2 keV and rising to comprise >50% of the flux at 8 keV. The soft X-ray emission lines from the jet are not blocked, constraining the jet length to ?> 2 × 10{sup 12} cm. The base jet density is in the range 10{sup 10-13} cm{sup –3}, in contrast to our previous estimate based on the Si XIII triplet, which is likely to have been affected by UV de-excitation. There is a clear overabundance of Ni by a factor of about 15 relative to the solar value, which may have resulted from an unusual supernova that formed the compact object.

  10. Direct Observation of Paramagnons in Palladium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doubble, R.; Hayden, S M.; Dai, Pengcheng; Mook Jr, Herbert A; Thompson, James R; Frost, C.

    2010-01-01

    We report an inelastic neutron scattering study of the spin fluctuations in the nearly ferromagnetic element palladium. Dispersive over-damped collective magnetic excitations or 'paramagnons' are observed up to 128 meV. We analyze our results in terms of a Moriya-Lonzarich-type spin-fluctuation model and estimate the contribution of the spin fluctuations to the low-temperature heat capacity. In spite of the paramagnon excitations being relatively strong, their relaxation rates are large. This leads to a small contribution to the low-temperature electronic specific heat.

  11. VLBI polarimetric observations of 3C147

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Rossetti; F. Mantovani; D. Dallacasa

    2004-12-29

    We present multi-frequency VLBI observations of the Compact Steep-spectrum Quasar 3C147 (0538+498) made with the VLBA at the four frequencies in the available 5 GHz band and at 8.4 GHz (still under analysis), from which we derived millarcsecond-resolution images of the total intensity, polarization, and rotation measure distributions. The source shows a core-jet structure, with a compact feature and a jet, extending about 200 mas to the South-West. We detect polarized emission in two bright features in the inner jet; the rotation measure of this features (aprox -1630 rad m(-2), aprox -540 rad m(-2)).

  12. Gamma-Ray Burst observations with Fermi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bissaldi, Elisabetta; Omodei, Nicola; Vianello, Giacomo; von Kienlin, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    After seven years of science operation, the Fermi mission has brought great advances in the study of Gamma-ray Bursts (GRBs). Over 1600 GRBs have been detected by the Gamma-ray Burst Monitor, and more than 100 of these are also detected by the Large Area Telescope above 30 MeV. We will give an overview of these observations, presenting the common properties in the GRB temporal and spectral behavior at high energies. We will also highlight the unique characteristics of some individual bursts. The main physical implications of these results will be discussed, along with open questions regarding GRB modeling in their prompt and temporally-extended emission phases.

  13. William Herschel, the First Observational Cosmologist

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Lemonick, Michael [Princeton University and Time Magazine, Princeton, New Jersey, United States

    2010-01-08

    In the late 1700s, a composer, orchestra director and soloist named William Herschel became fascinated with astronomy, and, having built his own reflecting telescope, went out in his garden in Bath, England, one night and discovered Uranus?the first planet in human history ever found by an individual. The feat earned him a lifetime pension from King George III. But Herschel considered the discovery to be relatively unimportant in comparison to his real work: understanding the composition, structure and evolution of the universe. In pursuing that work, he became the first observational cosmologist.

  14. Superconductivity observed in platinum-silicon interface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuo, Pai-Chia, E-mail: paichia@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Research Program on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Chen, Chun-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei 10617, Taiwan (China); Lee, Ku-Pin; Shiue, Jessie, E-mail: yshiue@phys.sinica.edu.tw [Research Program on Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-26

    We report the discovery of superconductivity with an onset temperature of ?0.6?K in a platinum-silicon interface. The interface was formed by using a unique focused ion beam sputtering micro-deposition method in which the energies of most sputtered Pt atoms are ?2.5?eV. Structural and elemental analysis by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy reveal a???7?nm interface layer with abundant Pt, which is the layer likely responsible for the superconducting transport behavior. Similar transport behavior was also observed in a gold-silicon interface prepared by the same technique, indicating the possible generality of this phenomenon.

  15. Operationalization of Basic Observables in Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hartmann, Bruno

    2015-01-01

    This novel approach to the foundation of the physical theory begins with thought experiments on measurement practice like Einstein for relativistic Kinematics. For a similar foundation of Dynamics one can start from Hermann von Helmholtz analysis of basic measurements. We define energy, momentum and mass from elemental ordering relations for "capability to execute work" and "impact" in a collision and apply Helmholtz program for quantification. From simple pre-theoretic (principle of inertia, impossibility of Perpetuum Mobile, relativity principle) and measurement methodical principles we derive all fundamental equations of Mechanics. We explain the mathematical formalism from the operationalization of basic observables.

  16. Observation of ?cJ decays to ??¯¯¯????

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ablikim, M.; Achasov, M. N.; Ambrose, D. J.; An, F. F.; An, Q.; An, Z. H.; Bai, J. Z.; Ban, Y.; Becker, J.; Bennett, J. V.; et al

    2012-09-13

    Decays of the ?cJ states (J=0, 1, 2) to ??¯¯¯????, including processes with intermediate ?(1385), are studied through the E1 transition ?'???cJ using 106×10? ?' events collected with the BESIII detector at BEPCII. This is the first observation of ?cJ decays to the final state ??¯¯¯????. The branching ratio of the intermediate process ?cJ??(1385)±?¯¯¯(1385)? is also measured for the first time, and the results agree with the theoretical predictions based on the color-octet effect.

  17. Inflation models, spectral index and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laura Covi

    2000-03-30

    We have evaluated the observational constraints on the spectral index $n$, in the context of a $\\Lambda$CDM model. For $n$ scale-independent, as predicted by most models of inflation, present data require $n\\simeq 1.0 \\pm 0.1$ at the 2-$\\sigma$ level. We have also studied the two-parameter scale-dependent spectral index, predicted by running-mass inflation models. Present data allow significant variation of $n$ in this case, within the theoretically preferred region of parameter space.

  18. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGasObservation of

  19. ARM - PI Product - Niamey Dust Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSAProductsMerged and corrected 915Dust Observations

  20. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  1. First Observation of Plasmarons in Graphene

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HABFES OctoberEvanServices »First Observation of Plasmarons inFirst

  2. Category:Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia:GeothermalNEPA Environmental AnalysisObservation

  3. Observations and simulations improve space weather models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformationJesseworkSURVEY UNIVERSEHowScientific andComplex Oak RidgeObservation of

  4. Efficiency and Sensitivity Analysis of Observation Networks for Atmospheric Inverse Modelling with Emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xueran; Jacob, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    The controllability of advection-diffusion systems, subject to uncertain initial values and emission rates, is estimated, given sparse and error affected observations of prognostic state variables. In predictive geophysical model systems, like atmospheric chemistry simulations, different parameter families influence the temporal evolution of the system.This renders initial-value-only optimisation by traditional data assimilation methods as insufficient. In this paper, a quantitative assessment method on validation of measurement configurations to optimize initial values and emission rates, and how to balance them, is introduced. In this theoretical approach, Kalman filter and smoother and their ensemble based versions are combined with a singular value decomposition, to evaluate the potential improvement associated with specific observational network configurations. Further, with the same singular vector analysis for the efficiency of observations, their sensitivity to model control can be identified by deter...

  5. Suzaku Observations of Four Heavily Absorbed HMXBs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Morris; R. K. Smith; C. B. Markwardt; R. F. Mushotzky; J. Tueller; T. R. Kallman; K. S. Dhuga

    2008-08-22

    We report on Suzaku observations of four unidentified sources from the INTEGRAL and Swift BAT Galactic plane surveys. All the sources have a large neutral hydrogen column density and are likely members of an emerging class of heavily absorbed high mass X-ray binary (HMXB) first identified in INTEGRAL observations. Two of the sources in our sample are approximately constant flux sources, one source shows periodic variation and one source exhibited a short, bright X-ray outburst. The periodicity is transient, suggesting it is produced by a neutron star in an elliptical orbit around a stellar wind source. We analyze the flaring source in several segments to look for spectral variation and discuss the implications of the findings for the nature of the source. We conclude that all four sources in our sample can be identified with the emerging class of highly absorbed HMXBs, that one is a newly identified transient X-ray pulsar and that at least one is a newly identified supergiant fast X-ray transient (SFXT).

  6. New Interpretation of the Observational Matter Asymmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, R G; Li, X Q; Wang, X; Cai, Rong-Gen; Li, Tong; Li, Xue-Qian; Wang, Xun

    2006-01-01

    Motivated by the AMS project, we assume that due to some reason which is not known so far, after the Big Bang or inflation epoch, antimatter was repelled onto one brane which is separated from our brane where all the observational matter resides. We suppose that there is a potential barrier at the brane boundary, which is similar to the surface tension for water membrane. The barrier prevents the mater particles to enter the space between two branes and jump from one brane to another. However, by the quantum tunnelling, a sizable anti-matter flux may come to our brane and be observed by the Alpha-Magnetic-Spectrometer (AMS). The matter and antimatter on the two branes attract each other via gravitational force. Following literature we consider a possibility that a scalar field existing in the space between the branes causes a Casimir effect which results in a repulsive force against the gravitation. We find that the Casimir force is much stronger than the gravitational force, as long as the separation of the ...

  7. Swift observations of GRB050904: the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Cusumano; V. Mangano; G. Chincarini; A. Panaitescu; D. N. Burrows; V. La Parola; T. Sakamoto; S. Campana; T. Mineo; G. Tagliaferri; L. Angelini; S. D. Barthelemy; A. P. Beardmore; P. T. Boyd; L. Cominsky; C. Gronwall; E. E. Fenimore; N. Gehrels; P. Giommi; M. Goad; K. Hurley; S. Immler; J. A. Kennea; K. O. Mason; F. Marshall; P. Meszaros; J. A. Nousek; J. P. Osborne; D. M. Palmer; P. W. A. Roming; A. Wells; N. E. White; B. Zhang

    2006-11-08

    Swift discovered the high redshift (z=6.29) GRB050904 with the Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) and began observing with its narrow field instruments 161 s after the burst onset. This gamma-ray burst is the most distant cosmic explosion ever observed. Because of its high redshift, the X-ray Telescope (XRT) and BAT simultaneous observations provide 4 orders of magnitude of spectral coverage (0.2-150 keV; 1.4-1090 keV in the source rest frame) at a very early source-frame time (22 s). GRB050904 was a long, multi-peaked, bright GRB with strong variability during its entire evolution. The light curve observed by the XRT is characterized by the presence of a long flaring activity lasting up to 1-2 hours after the burst onset in the burst rest frame, with no evidence of a smooth power-law decay following the prompt emission as seen in other GRBs. However, the BAT tail extrapolated to the XRT band joins the XRT early light curve and the overall behavior resembles that of a very long GRB prompt. The spectral energy distribution softens with time, with the photon index decreasing from -1.2 during the BAT observation to -1.9 at the end of the XRT observation. The dips of the late X-ray flares may be consistent with an underlying X-ray emission arising from the forward shock and with the properties of the optical afterglow reported by Tagliaferri et al. (2005b). We interpret the BAT and XRT data as a single continuous observation of the prompt emission from a very long GRB. The peculiarities observed in GRB050904 could be due to its origin within one of the first star-forming regions in the Universe; very low metallicities of the progenitor at these epochs may provide an explanation.

  8. MULTIWAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF A0620-00 IN QUIESCENCE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froning, Cynthia S.; France, Kevin; Khargharia, Juthika [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, University of Colorado, 593 UCB, Boulder, CO 80309-0593 (United States); and others

    2011-12-10

    We present contemporaneous X-ray, ultraviolet, optical, near-infrared, and radio observations of the black hole binary system, A0620-00, acquired in 2010 March. Using the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph on the Hubble Space Telescope, we have obtained the first FUV spectrum of A0620-00 as well as NUV observations with the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph. The observed spectrum is flat in the FUV and very faint (with continuum fluxes {approx_equal} 1e - 17 erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} A{sup -1}). The UV spectra also show strong, broad (FWHM {approx} 2000 km s{sup -1}) emission lines of Si IV, C IV, He II, Fe II, and Mg II. The C IV doublet is anomalously weak compared to the other lines, which is consistent with the low carbon abundance seen in NIR spectra of the source. Comparison of these observations with previous NUV spectra of A0620-00 shows that the UV flux has varied by factors of 2-8 over several years. We compiled the dereddened, broadband spectral energy distribution (SED) of A0620-00 and compared it to previous SEDs as well as theoretical models. The SEDs show that the source varies at all wavelengths for which we have multiple samples. Contrary to previous observations, the optical-UV spectrum does not continue to drop to shorter wavelengths, but instead shows a recovery and an increasingly blue spectrum in the FUV. We created an optical-UV spectrum of A0620-00 with the donor star contribution removed. The non-stellar spectrum peaks at {approx_equal}3000 A. The peak can be fit with a T = 10,000 K blackbody with a small emitting area, probably originating in the hot spot where the accretion stream impacts the outer disk. However, one or more components in addition to the blackbody are needed to fit the FUV upturn and the red optical fluxes in the optical-UV spectrum. By comparing the mass accretion rate determined from the hot spot luminosity to the mean accretion rate inferred from the outburst history, we find that the latter is an order of magnitude smaller than the former, indicating that {approx}90% of the accreted mass must be lost from the system if the predictions of the disk instability model and the estimated interoutburst interval are correct. The mass accretion rate at the hot spot is 10{sup 5} the accretion rate at the black hole inferred from the X-ray luminosity. To reconcile these requires that outflows carry away virtually all of the accreted mass, a very low rate of mass transfer from the outer cold disk into the inner hot region, and/or radiatively inefficient accretion. We compared our broadband SED to two models of A0620-00 in quiescence: the advection-dominated accretion flow model and the maximally jet-dominated model. The comparison suggests that strong outflows may be present in the system, indicated by the discrepancies in accretion rates and the FUV upturn in flux in the SED.

  9. Transition redshift in $f(T)$ cosmology and observational constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salvatore Capozziello; Orlando Luongo; Emmanuel N. Saridakis

    2015-06-18

    We extract constraints on the transition redshift $z_{tr}$, determining the onset of cosmic acceleration, predicted by an effective cosmographic construction, in the framework of $f(T)$ gravity. In particular, employing cosmography we obtain bounds on the viable $f(T)$ forms and their derivatives. Since this procedure is model independent, as long as the scalar curvature is fixed, we are able to determine intervals for $z_{tr}$. In this way we guarantee that the Solar-System constraints are preserved and moreover we extract bounds on the transition time and the free parameters of the scenario. We find that the transition redshifts predicted by $f(T)$ cosmology, although compatible with the standard $\\Lambda$CDM predictions, are slightly smaller. Finally, in order to obtain observational constraints on $f(T)$ cosmology, we perform a Monte Carlo fitting using supernova data, involving the most recent union 2.1 data set.

  10. EVLA Observations of OH Masers in ON 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vincent L. Fish

    2007-10-05

    This Letter reports on initial Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) observations of the 6035 MHz masers in ON 1. The EVLA data are of good quality, lending confidence in the new receiver system. Nineteen maser features, including six Zeeman pairs, are detected. The overall distribution of 6035 MHz OH masers is similar to that of the 1665 MHz OH masers. The spatial resolution is sufficient to unambiguously determine that the magnetic field is strong (~ -10 mG) at the location of the blueshifted masers in the north, consistent with Zeeman splitting detected in 13441 MHz OH masers in the same velocity range. Left and right circularly polarized ground-state features dominate in different regions in the north of the source, which may be due to a combination of magnetic field and velocity gradients. The combined distribution of all OH masers toward the south is suggestive of a shock structure of the sort previously seen in W3(OH).

  11. Observation of a narrow structure in 1 H( ? , KS0 ) X via interference with ? -meson production

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Amaryan, M. J.; Gavalian, G.; Nepali, C.; Polyakov, M. V.; Azimov, Ya.; Briscoe, W. J.; Dodge, G. E.; Hyde, C. E.; Klein, F.; Kuznetsov, V.; et al

    2012-03-01

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ?1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width ? = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction ? + p ? pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the ?(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the ?-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3?.

  12. Understanding Cognitive and Collaborative Work: Observations in an Electric Transmission Operations Control Center

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Obradovich, Jodi H.

    2011-09-30

    This paper describes research that is part of an ongoing project to design tools to assist in the integration of renewable energy into the electric grid. These tools will support control room dispatchers in real-time system operations of the electric power transmission system which serves much of the Western United States. Field observations comprise the first phase of this research in which 15 operators have been observed over various shifts and times of day for approximately 90 hours. Findings describing some of the cognitive and environmental challenges of managing the dynamically changing electric grid are presented.

  13. Deep z-band observations of the coolest Y dwarf

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kopytova, Taisiya G.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Deacon, Niall R.; Brandner, Wolfgang; Buenzli, Esther; Bayo, Amelia; Schlieder, Joshua E.; Manjavacas, Elena; Kopon, Derek; Biller, Beth A.

    2014-12-10

    WISE J085510.83-071442.5 (hereafter, WISE 0855-07) is the coolest Y dwarf known to date and is located at a distance of 2.31 ± 0.08 pc, giving it the fourth largest parallax of any known star or brown dwarf system. We report deep z-band observations of WISE 0855-07 using FORS2 on UT1/Very Large Telescope. We do not detect any counterpart to WISE 0855-07 in our z-band images and estimate a brightness upper limit of AB mag > 24.8 (F {sub ?} < 0.45 ?Jy) at 910 ± 65 nm with 3? confidence. We combine our z-band upper limit with previous near- and mid-infrared photometry to place constraints on the atmospheric properties of WISE 0855-07 via comparison to models which implement water clouds in the atmospheres of T {sub eff} < 300 K substellar objects. We find that none of the available models that implement water clouds can completely reproduce the observed spectral energy distribution of WISE 0855-07. Every model significantly disagrees with the (3.6 ?m/4.5 ?m) flux ratio and at least one other bandpass. Since methane is predicted to be the dominant absorber at 3-4 ?m, these mismatches might point to an incorrect or incomplete treatment of methane in current models. We conclude that (a) WISE0855-07 has T {sub eff} ? 200-250 K, (b) <80% of its surface is covered by clouds, and (c) deeper observations, and improved models of substellar evolution, atmospheres, clouds, and opacities will be necessary to better characterize this object.

  14. Representing liquid-vapor equilibria of Ternary systems using neural networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Swisher, Mathew M

    2015-01-01

    We develop a method based on neural networks for efficiently interpolating equations of state (EOS) for liquid-vapor equilibria of ternary mixtures. We investigate the performance of neural networks both when experimental ...

  15. Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Novosyadlyj; V. Pelykh; Yu. Shtanov; A. Zhuk

    2015-02-14

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

  16. Observables from a relativistic hydro solution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Csanad, Mate

    2009-01-01

    In the last several years it has been revealed that the matter produced in the collisions of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) is a nearly perfect fluid, i.e. it can be described with perfect fluid hydrodynamics. There was a long search for exact hydrodynamic models (solutions of the partial differential equations of hydrodynamics) and several models proved to be applicable. There are 1+3 dimensional models, as well as relativistic models - but no 1+3 dimensional and relativistic model has been tested yet. In this paper we extract observables from the relativistic, ellipsoidally symmetric model of Csorgo et al. We calculate momentum distribution, elliptic flow and correlation radii and compare them to RHIC data.

  17. Physics Beyond the Single Top Quark Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heinson, A.P.; Collaboration, for the DZero

    2010-10-01

    In March 2009, the D0 Collaboration first observed the electroweak production of single top quarks at 5{sigma} significance. We measured the cross section for the combined s-channel and t-channel production modes, and set a lower limit on the CKM matrix element |V{sub tb}|. Since then, we have used the same dataset to measure the t-channel production mode independently, the combined cross section in the hadronically-decaying tau lepton final state, and the width and lifetime of the top quark, and we have set upper limits on contributions from anomalous flavor-changing neutral currents. This paper describes these new measurements, as presented at the 3rd International Workshop on Top Quark Physics, held in Brugge, Belgium, May 31-June 4, 2010.

  18. Astronomical Observations of Volatiles on Asteroids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivkin, Andrew S; Emery, Joshua P; Howell, Ellen S; Licandro, Javier; Takir, Driss; Vilas, Faith

    2015-01-01

    We have long known that water and hydroxyl are important components in meteorites and asteroids. However, in the time since the publication of Asteroids III, evolution of astronomical instrumentation, laboratory capabilities, and theoretical models have led to great advances in our understanding of H2O/OH on small bodies, and spacecraft observations of the Moon and Vesta have important implications for our interpretations of the asteroidal population. We begin this chapter with the importance of water/OH in asteroids, after which we will discuss their spectral features throughout the visible and near-infrared. We continue with an overview of the findings in meteorites and asteroids, closing with a discussion of future opportunities, the results from which we can anticipate finding in Asteroids V. Because this topic is of broad importance to asteroids, we also point to relevant in-depth discussions elsewhere in this volume.

  19. Head Observation Organizer (HObO)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven Predmore

    2008-03-06

    The Head Observation Organizer, HObO, is a computer program that stores and manages measured ground-water levels. HObO was developed to help ground-water modelers compile, manage, and document water-level data needed to calibrate ground-water models. Well-construction and water-level data from the U.S. Geological Survey National Water Database (NWIS) easily can be imported into HObO from the NWIS web site (NWISWeb). The water-level data can be flagged to determine which data will be included in the calibration data set. The utility program HObO_NWISWeb was developed to simplify the down loading of well and water-level data from NWISWeb. An ArcGIS NWISWeb Extension was developed to retrieve site information from NWISWeb. A tutorial is presented showing the basic elements of HObO.

  20. First observation of doubly charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. A. Moinester et al.

    2003-09-25

    The SELEX experiment (E781) at Fermilab has observed two statistically compelling high mass states near 3.6 GeV/c{sup 2}, decaying to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. These final states are Cabibbo-allowed decay modes of doubly charmed baryons {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} and {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++}, respectively. The masses are in the range expected from theoretical considerations, but the spectroscopy is surprising. SELEX also has weaker preliminary evidence for a state near 3.8 GeV/c{sup 2}, a high mass state decaying to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}, possibly an excited {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} (ccu*). Data are presented and discussed.