Sample records for observatory nainital uttarkhand

  1. Integration Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bogart, Richard S.

    Hill, Stephen Wampler National Solar Observatory Piet Martens, Alisdair Davey Montana State University Joseph B. Gurman, George Dimitoglou Solar Data Analysis Center #12; VSO Overview 1 Perspective + From documents. ê Independent of platform and programming language + Three major components â Data encapsulation

  2. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop Evaluation Center (WTEC), Inc. 4800 Roland Avenue Baltimore, Maryland 21210 #12;In recent years

  3. Alexey Kuznetsov Armagh Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the high-energy electrons that are the key factor in development of the flares. Therefore, radio Observatory 8 Radiometers / radiopolarimeters Full-disk observations * + " + , ' - & . $ / $ 0 $ $ 0 $ $ 1 2 3

  4. Sommers-Bausch Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    Sommers-Bausch Observatory Handbook Ninth Edition, Fall 2013 DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICAL of the early years of SBO. Thanks also to the Denver Library for information and photos of Elmer Sommers, Ed here at Sommers-Bausch: Kelsey Johnson, Cori Krauss, John Weiss, James Roberts, Quyen Hart, Colin

  5. Sommers-Bausch Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stowell, Michael

    The Sommers-Bausch Observatory Handbook Eighth Edition, Fall 2012 DEPARTMENT OF ASTROPHYSICAL to the Denver Library for information and photos of Elmer Sommers, Ed Kosmicki of Summit Magazine for the 16 the educational mission here at Sommers-Bausch: Kelsey Johnson, Cori Krauss, John Weiss, James Roberts, Quyen Hart

  6. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hime, A.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A report is given on the status of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, presently under construction in the Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. Focus is upon the technical factors involving a measurement of the charged-current and neutral-current interactions of solar neutrinos on deuterium.

  7. The Green Computing Observatory: from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefvre, Laurent

    The Green Computing Observatory: from instrumentation to ontology Ccile Germain-Renaud1, Fredric a gateway Files in XML format Available from the Grid Observatory portal GreenDays@LyonThe Green Computing) n GreenDays@LyonThe Green Computing Observatory #12;The GRIF-LAL computing room Green

  8. The Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolinski, M. J. [Stanford University Physics Department, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

    2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The EXO Collaboration is actively pursuing both liquid-phase and gas-phase Xe detector technologies with scalability to the ton-scale. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe is especially attractive because of the possibility of tagging the resulting Ba daughter ion, eliminating all sources of background other than the two neutrino decay mode. EXO-200, the first phase of the project, is a liquid Xe time projection chamber with 200 kg of Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe. EXO-200, which does not include Ba-tagging, will begin taking data in 2009, with two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4x10{sup 25} years. This corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV.

  9. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; Gonzlez, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; Lpez, J A; Martnez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Nez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Prez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) in high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). WCD at high altitude offer a unique possibility of detecting low gamma fluxes in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV range. The status of the Observatory and data collected from 2007 to date will be presented.

  10. Boscovich and the Brera Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antonello, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the mid 18th century both theoretical and practical astronomy were cultivated in Milan by Barnabites and Jesuits. In 1763 R.G. Boscovich was appointed to the chair of mathematics of the University of Pavia in the Duchy of Milan, and the following year he designed an observatory for the Jesuit Collegium of Brera. The Specola was built in 1765 and it became quickly one of the main European observatories. We discuss the relation between Boscovich and Brera in the framework of a short biography. An account is given of the initial research activity in the Specola, of the departure of Boscovich from Milan in 1773 and his coming back just before his death.

  11. National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iye, Masanori

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    National Astronomical Observatory is an inter-university institute serving as the national center for ground based astronomy offering observational facilities covering the optical, infrared, radio wavelength domain. NAOJ also has solar physics and geo-lunar science groups collaborating with JAXA for space missions and a theoretical group with computer simulation facilities. The outline of NAOJ, its various unique facilities, and some highlights of recent science achievements are reviewed.

  12. Science with Virtual Observatory Tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory is now mature enough to produce cutting-edge science results. The exploitation of astronomical data beyond classical identification limits with interoperable tools for statistical identification of sources has become a reality. I present the discovery of 68 optically faint, obscured (i.e., type 2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates in the two GOODS fields using the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) prototype. Thirty-one of these sources have high estimated X-ray powers (>10^44 erg/s) and therefore qualify as optically obscured quasars, the so-called QSO 2. The number of these objects in the GOODS fields is now 40, an improvement of a factor > 4 when compared to the only 9 such sources previously known. By going ~ 3 magnitudes fainter than previously known type 2 AGN in the GOODS fields the AVO is sampling a region of redshift -- power space much harder to reach with classical methods. I also discuss the AVO move to our next phase, the EURO-VO, and our short-term plans to continue doing science with the Virtual Observatory.

  13. IATP | Trade Observatory | Headlines q What's new

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IATP | Trade Observatory | Headlines q Home q What's new q Geneva Update q Headlines q Library q Treaty Database q Related sites q About Trade Observatory Select a category to display: Archives August Industries Unite to Seek Free and Fair Trade Canada NewsWire July 8, 2003 Email this pageCanada News

  14. MT STROMLO OBSERVATORY VISITOR GUIDE & WALK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Botea, Adi

    to the Observatory and construction of a new Advanced Instrumentation and Technology Centre was begun. You can watch, the University of NSW, and the Faulkes Telescope Project. Mt Stromlo began operation as the Commonwealth Solar Optical Munitions Factory. After the war, the Observatory changed from solar to stellar astronomy

  15. The International Axion Observatory (IAXO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    I. G. Irastorza; F. T. Avignone; G. Cantatore; S. Caspi; J. M. Carmona; T. Dafni; M. Davenport; A. Dudarev; G. Fanourakis; E. Ferrer-Ribas; J. Galan; J. A. Garcia; T. Geralis; I. Giomataris; S. Gninenko; H. Gomez; D. H. H. Hoffmann; F. J. Iguaz; K. Jakovcic; M. Krcmar; B. Lakic; G. Luzon; A. Lindner; M. Pivovaroff; T. Papaevangelou; G. Raffelt; J. Redondo; A. Rodr?guez; S. Russenschuck; J. Ruz; I. Shilon; H. Ten Kate; A. Tomas; S. Troitsky; K. van Bibber; J. A. Villar; J. Vogel; L. Walckiers; K. Zioutas

    2012-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) is a new generation axion helioscope aiming at a sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling of a few 10$^{12}$ GeV$^{-1}$, i.e. 1 - 1.5 orders of magnitude beyond the one currently achieved by CAST. The project relies on improvements in magnetic field volume together with extensive use of x-ray focusing optics and low background detectors, innovations already successfully tested in CAST. Additional physics cases of IAXO could include the detection of electron-coupled axions invoked to solve the white dwarfs anomaly, relic axions, and a large variety of more generic axion-like particles (ALPs) and other novel excitations at the low-energy frontier of elementary particle physics. This contribution is a summary of our paper [1] to which we refer for further details.

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE R. Lacasse #12;NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia 140-ft CASSEGRAIN BAa

  17. astrophysical observatory letter: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observatory Network (AMON). AMON will link multiple current and future high-energy, multimessenger, and follow-up observatories together into a single network, enabling...

  18. astrophysical observatory cambridge: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Observatory Network (AMON). AMON will link multiple current and future high-energy, multimessenger, and follow-up observatories together into a single network, enabling...

  19. THE SAAO ASTRONOMICAL MUSEUM OBSERVATORY, CAPE TOWN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glass, Ian S.

    power came from the battery house next door. The batteries were charged by a steam-powered generator Observatory 1 #12;THE BUILDING The building which houses the museum is usually called the McClean, after its

  20. Recent results from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gascn, Alberto [Dpto. Fsica Terica y del Cosmos and CAFPE, Universidad de Granada (Spain); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory has been designed to investigate the origin and nature of Ultra High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR) using a hybrid detection technique. In this contribution we present some of the most recent results of the observatory, namely the upper-end of the spectrum of cosmic rays, state-of-the-art analyses on mass composition, the measurements of the proton-air cross-section, and the number of muons at ground.

  1. Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solar Observatory in China, and will explore collaboration with observatories in Canary Island to extendSynoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory Haimin Wang and Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA Abstract. New Jersey

  2. CHAPTER 3.4 Observatory mathematics in the nineteenth

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin, David

    of science was in fact inaugurated by a debate about Tycho Brahe's observatory (Hannaway 1986; Shackelford

  3. 3D Spectroscopy and the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bryan W. Miller

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Integral field, or 3D, spectroscopy is the technique of obtaining spectral information over a two-dimensional, hopefully contiguous, field of view. While there is some form of astronomical 3D spectroscopy at all wavelengths, there has been a rapid increase in interest in optical and near-infrared 3D spectroscopy. This has resulted in the deployment of a large variety of integral-field spectrographs on most of the large optical/infrared telescopes. The amount of IFU data available in observatory archives is large and growing rapidly. The complications of treating IFU data as both imaging and spectroscopy make it a special challenge for the virtual observatory. This article describes the various techniques of optical and near-infrared spectroscopy and some of the general needs and issues related to the handling of 3D data by the virtual observatory.

  4. Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Nmethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tmer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  5. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

    1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

  6. Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

  7. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UC OBSERVATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UC OBSERVATORIES POSTDOCTORAL SCHOLAR ­ EMPLOYEE The Inter Stellar+Galactic Medium Program of Studies (IMPS) at the University of California, Santa Cruz invites of funding. START DATE: October 2013 TO APPLY: Applicants should send curriculum vitae with list

  8. Neutrino Observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon; for the SNO Collaboration

    2001-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is a water imaging Cherenkov detector. Its usage of 1000 metric tons of D$_{2}$O as target allows the SNO detector to make a solar-model independent test of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis by simultaneously measuring the solar $\

  9. The endless mantra : innovation at the Keck Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobra, Monica Godha

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of historical, current, and future developments at the Keck Observatory revealed a thriving philosophy of innovation. Intended to defy obsoletion and keep the observatory competitive over long time scales, this ...

  10. "Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    /JPSS UAV Ocean optics, Biological Laser penetration New opportunity Insitu Sensors (Gliders"Towards Optics-Based Measurements in Ocean Observatories" "Ocean Observatories Contributions to Ocean Models and Data Assimilation For Ecosystems" Ocean Optics 2012 Glasgow Scotland Robert Arnone

  11. Operations of and Future Plans for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Performance and operation of the Surface Detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Extension of the Pierre Auger Observatory using high-elevation fluorescence telescopes (HEAT); (3) AMIGA - Auger Muons and Infill for the Ground Array of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Radio detection of Cosmic Rays at the southern Auger Observatory; (5) Hardware Developments for the AMIGA enhancement at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) A simulation of the fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory using GEANT 4; (7) Education and Public Outreach at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) BATATA: A device to characterize the punch-through observed in underground muon detectors and to operate as a prototype for AMIGA; and (9) Progress with the Northern Part of the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  12. Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory LI Hui( û), YOU Jianqi( ? ), WU Qindi( ¸Ð) and YU Xingfeng(åÐ ) Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008, China National Astronomical Observatories, CAS, Beijing 100012, China Email: lihui@mail.pmo.ac.cn Tel: 025

  13. Knowledge Discovery Framework for the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas, Brian; Huang, Zenping; Teuben, Peter

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a framework that allows a scientist-user to easily query for information across all Virtual Observatory (VO) repositories and pull it back for analysis. This framework hides the gory details of meta-data remediation and data formatting from the user, allowing them to get on with search, retrieval and analysis of VO data as if they were drawn from a single source using a science based terminology rather than a data-centric one.

  14. The Virtual Observatory and Grid in Spain

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. D. Santander-Vela

    2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory (VO) is nearing maturity, and in Spain the Spanish VO (SVO) exists since June 2004. There have also been numerous attempts at providing more or less encompassing grid initiatives at the national level, and finally Spain has an official National Grid Initiative (NGI). In this article we will show the VO and Grid development status of nationally funded initiatives in Spain, and we will hint at potential joint VO-Grid use-cases to be developed in Spain in the near future.

  15. auger observatory status: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory is presently under construction in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It combines two complementary air shower observation techniques; the detection of...

  16. auger observatory closes: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  17. auger observatory celebrates: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  18. auger observatory estudo: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  19. auger observatory surface: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The southern site of the Auger Observatory, now approaching completion in Mendoza, Argentina, features an array of 1600 water-Cherenkov surface detector stations covering 3000...

  20. auger observatory progress: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    part of the Auger Observatory, now under construction in the Province of Mendoza, Argentina, is well over half finished. Active detectors have been recording events for one and...

  1. auger observatory project: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  2. Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steve Dye

    2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

  3. Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory #

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    in solar flare [12] , which is # Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, NoUpdated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory # LI Hui(©¿), YOU Jianqi(?OŠ), WU Qindi(?,l) and YU Xingfeng(?lb) Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008, China

  4. Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Web Science Institute

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Ian Brown Web Science Institute University of Southampton University of Southampton Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK +44 (0)23 8059 5000 wh@soton.ac.uk Lisa Harris Web.j.harris@soton.ac.uk ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose an initial structure to support a taxonomy for Web Observatories (WO

  5. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo, Puerto Rico by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The general design concept was taken from previous receivers assembled at NRAO. S. Weinreb and N

  6. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Rep preformed by the Standard Receiver Section of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The following breakdown was used to divide the costs into various categories: (1) Emckajs.c1 . 1

  7. The Green Computing Observatory: status of acquisition and analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lefvre, Laurent

    The Green Computing Observatory: status of acquisition and analysis Ccile Germain-Renaud1, Julien, CNRS, INRIA 2: Laboratoire de l'Acclrateur Linaire, CNRS-IN2P3 #12; Previous GreenDays talks o GreenDays@Paris The Green Computing Observatory: plans and scientific challenges o GreenDays@Lyon The Green Computing

  8. Oceanography Vol.22, No.2128 Distributed Ocean Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    together for intensive multi-institutional experiments. RU COOL is now a core component of the National Partnership Program (NOPP), which transformed our predominantly academic endeavors of the early 1990s observatory and the international ocean observatory movement (Glenn et al., 2000a,b, 2004; Schofield et al

  9. Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

    2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

  10. Low Energy Investigations at Kamioka Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sekiya, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At Kamioka Observatory many activities for low energy rare event search are ongoing. Super-Kamiokande(SK), the largest water Cherenkov neutrino detector, currently continues data taking as the fourth phase of the experiment (SK-IV). In SK-IV, we have upgraded the water purification system and tuned water flow in the SK tank. Consequently the background level was lowered significantly. This allowed SK-IV to derive solar neutrino results down to 3.5MeV energy region. With these data, neutrino oscillation parameters are updated from global fit; $\\Delta m^2_{12}=7.44^{+0.2}_{-0.19}\\times10^{-5} {\\rm eV}^2$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}=0.304\\pm0.013$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}=0.030^{+0.017}_{-0.015}$. NEWAGE, the directional sensitive dark matter search experiment, is currently operated as "NEWAGE-0.3a" which is a $0.20\\times0.25\\times0.31$ m$^3$ micro-TPC filled with CF4 gas at 152 Torr. Recently we have developed "NEWAGE-0.3b". It was succeeded to lower the operation pressure down to 76 Torr and the threshold down to 50 keV (F...

  11. Low-multiplicity Burst Search at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    Results are reported from a search for low-multiplicity neutrino bursts in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Such bursts could indicate the detection of a nearby core-collapse supernova explosion. The data were taken from ...

  12. apache point observatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sky observatory's largest telescope is the versatile ARC 3.5-m, which Telescope, Dan LongAPO APOLLO and 3.5-m Observations One synoptic study is the APOLLO (Apache PointApache...

  13. auger southern observatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Auger Collaboration intends to extend the energy range of its southern observatory in Argentina for high quality data from 0.1 to 3 EeV. The extensions, described in accompanying...

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Elec-xonics Division Internal Report 140 MV The battery voltage as a function of temperature was also measured. The voltage was extremely

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report with the calculator. It is constructed from CMOS logic for lowest power consumption and has a NiCad battery back

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report an opposition battery, a DC Null Voltmeter and a recorder. With this set-up a variation in temperature of .02 C

  17. Full simulation of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory proportional counters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beltran, B.

    The third phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiment added an array of [superscript 3]He proportional counters to the detector. The purpose of this neutral-current detection (NCD) array was to observe ...

  18. Star Formation in the Era of the Three Great Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scott J. Wolk; Norbert Schulz; John Stauffer; Nancy Evans; Leisa Townsley; Tom Megeath; Dave Huenemoerder; Claus Leitherer; Ray Jayawardana

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes contributions and suggestions as presented at the Chandra Workshop Star Formation in the Era of Three Great Observatories conducted in July 2005. One of the declared goals of the workshop was to raise recognition within the star formation research community about the sensible future utilization of the space observatories Spitzer, Hubble, and Chandra in their remaining years of operation to tackle imminent questions of our understanding of stellar formation and the early evolution of stars. A white paper was generated to support the continuous and simultaneous usage of observatory time for star formation research. The contents of this paper have been presented and discussed at several other meetings during the course of 2005 and January 2006.

  19. UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF UC OBSERVATORIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ DEPARTMENT OF UC OBSERVATORIES Postdoctoral Scholar The Inter) and the University of California, Santa Cruz (UCSC) invites applications for the position of Postdoctoral Scholar: Postdoctoral Scholar - Employee SALARY: $51,776 ­ $55,128, commensurate with qualifications and experience

  20. Jose Groh (Geneva Observatory, Switzerland) Luminous Blue Variables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crowther, Paul

    Jose Groh (Geneva Observatory, Switzerland) Luminous Blue Variables: massive stars extremely close Groh - Luminous BlueVariables: massive stars extremely close to the Eddington limit JD2:Very massive Jose Groh - Luminous BlueVariables: massive stars extremely close to the Eddington limit JD2:Very

  1. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT the earth's axis and perpendic- ular to the Greenwich Meridian, call it the east-west plane. A telescope's rectangular cordinate components (x,y,z) are X = 882880.0208m Distance from the east-west plane, Greenwich

  2. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report which has been used on all systems mounted in the past at the 300-foot telescope. The East and West 14 are so made to allow the East and West 1410 MHz feeds to be positioned 2. 63, 5.24, 7.88 and 10. 52

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report (Polarization) Focus Declination Beam East on Sky (Feed West of Center) Beam North to West on Sky (Feed North to West on Sky) Feed moves down toward surface Beam South on Sky Position Read- out Sign 300-FOOT

  4. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No. 159 INTERFERENCE POTENTIAL FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA CRAIG ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA Craig R. Moore and James L. Dolan Introduction

  5. INDIA-BASED NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY INO/2005/01

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Udgaonkar, Jayant B.

    important developments have occurred recently in neutrino physics and neutrino astronomy. OscillationsINDIA-BASED NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY INO/2005/01 Interim Project Report Volume I I N O #12;#12;The INO of neutrinos and the inferred discovery that neutrinos have mass are likely to have far-reaching consequences

  6. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

  7. BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

  8. 11Chandra 'Sees' a Distant Planet Evaporating NASA's Chandra Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy. A simple model of this planet's interior suggests that its atmosphere might account for as much11Chandra 'Sees' a Distant Planet Evaporating NASA's Chandra Observatory has discovered that the star CoRot-2a is a powerful X-ray source. This is unfortunate because it is also known that a planet

  9. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  10. Supporting a Social Media Observatory with Customizable Index Structures --Architecture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    research activity in analysis of social media and micro- blogging data in recent years suggests media data. To support these "social media observatories" effectively, a storage platform must satisfy special requirements for loading and storage of multi-terabyte datasets, as well as efficient evaluation

  11. FIRST RESULTS FROM SUPER-KAMIOKANDE Kamioka Observatory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    FIRST RESULTS FROM SUPER-KAMIOKANDE Y. TOTSUKA Kamioka Observatory, Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Higashimozumi, Kamioka, Gifu, 506-12 Japan (for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration) A 50,000ton water Cerenkov detector, Super-Kamiokande, has been operational since April 1996

  12. Part I: Instrumentation The Chandra X-ray Observatory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -ray Observatory showing the HRMA, four sci- entific instruments (two types of gratings, HRC, and ACIS) and major://asc.harvard.edu. 2.2 Scientific Instruments 2.2.1 HRMA At energies above 10 eV, photons scatter at incident angles and (usually) prohibitively expensive endeavor. The High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) gives Chandra

  13. Part I: Instrumentation The Chandra Xray Observatory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the Chandra Xray Observatory showing the HRMA, four sci entific instruments (two types of gratings, HRC://asc.harvard.edu. 2.2 Scientific Instruments 2.2.1 HRMA At energies above 10 eV, photons scatter at incident angles and (usually) prohibitively expensive endeavor. The High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) gives Chandra

  14. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Design, Calibration, and Operation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; lvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Daz-Vlez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, L X; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Prez-Prez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory (HAWC) is under construction 4100 meters above sea level at Sierra Negra, Mexico. We describe the design and cabling of the detector, the characterization of the photomultipliers, and the timing calibration system. We also outline a next-generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique.

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report line. A 12 V stor- e battery may be attached to the battery connector with pin 1 ground and pin 2 +12 V DC nominal. When the primary power fails, the battery will supply power to the clock. About 1 1/2 amp

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE .:41; CLOCK INFORMATION FOR AST 286 COMPUTERS Ronald B. Weimer The battery backed clock is only read (which does not set the battery clock) the AST keeps time from a second crystal oscillator. A rough block

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report No. 109 BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD Michael Balister OCTOBER 1971 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD

  18. Early Science Results from SOFIA, the World's Largest Airborne Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De Buizer, James M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is the largest flying observatory ever built,consisting of a 2.7-meter diameter telescope embedded in a modified Boeing 747-SP aircraft. SOFIA is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und-Raumfahrt (DLR). By flying at altitudes up to 45000 feet, the observatory gets above 99.9 percent of the infrared-absorbing water vapor in the Earth's atmosphere. This opens up an almost uninterrupted wavelength range from 0.3-1600 microns that is in large part obscured from ground based observatories. Since its 'Initial Science Flight' in December 2010, SOFIA has flown several dozen science flights, and has observed a wide array of objects from Solar System bodies, to stellar nurseries, to distant galaxies. This paper reviews a few of the exciting new science results from these first flights which were made by three instruments: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and...

  19. NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

    2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

  20. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    not attempted to measure the electrical loss of the samples, nor have we tried plating the EDM'ed surfacesNATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE FOR SMALL WAVEGUIDE FABRICATION A. R. Kerr, J. W. Lamb, N. J. Bailey, M. Crawford, and N. Horner Electric

  1. Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration as a CUAHSI Hydrologic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tarboton, David

    1 Great Salt Lake Basin Hydrologic Observatory Prospectus Submitted to CUAHSI for consideration.S., the Great Salt Lake Basin provides the opportunity to observe climate and human-induced land-surface changes relationship between people and water across the globe and make the Great Salt Lake Basin a microcosm

  2. Identifying clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared satellite data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, Pedro; et al.,

    2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new method of identifying night-time clouds over the Pierre Auger Observatory using infrared data from the Imager instruments on the GOES-12 and GOES-13 satellites. We compare cloud identifications resulting from our method to those obtained by the Central Laser Facility of the Auger Observatory. Using our new method we can now develop cloud probability maps for the 3000 km^2 of the Pierre Auger Observatory twice per hour with a spatial resolution of ~2.4 km by ~5.5 km. Our method could also be applied to monitor cloud cover for other ground-based observatories and for space-based observatories.

  3. Measurement of Aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Y. BenZvi; F. Arqueros; R. Cester; M. Chiosso; B. M. Connolly; B. Fick; A. Filipcic; B. Garca; A. Grillo; F. Guarino; M. Horvat; M. Iarlori; C. Macolino; M. Malek; J. Matthews; J. A. J. Matthews; D. Melo; R. Meyhandan; M. Micheletti; M. Monasor; M. Mostaf; R. Mussa; J. Pallotta; S. Petrera; M. Prouza; V. Rizi; M. Roberts; J. R. Rodriguez Rojo; D. Rodrguez-Fras; F. Salamida; M. Santander; G. Sequeiros; P. Sommers; A. Tonachini; L. Valore; D. Verberic; E. Visbal; S. Westerhoff; L. Wiencke; D. Zavrtanik; M. Zavrtanik; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The air fluorescence detectors (FDs) of the Pierre Auger Observatory are vital for the determination of the air shower energy scale. To compensate for variations in atmospheric conditions that affect the energy measurement, the Observatory operates an array of monitoring instruments to record hourly atmospheric conditions across the detector site, an area exceeding 3,000 square km. This paper presents results from four instruments used to characterize the aerosol component of the atmosphere: the Central Laser Facility (CLF), which provides the FDs with calibrated laser shots; the scanning backscatter lidars, which operate at three FD sites; the Aerosol Phase Function monitors (APFs), which measure the aerosol scattering cross section at two FD locations; and the Horizontal Attenuation Monitor (HAM), which measures the wavelength dependence of aerosol attenuation.

  4. Managing Distributed Software Development in the Virtual Astronomical Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Janet D; Bonaventura, Nina; Busko, Ivo; Cresitello-Dittmar, Mark; D'Abrusco, Raffaele; Doe, Stephen; Ebert, Rick; Laurino, Omar; Pevunova, Olga; Refsdal, Brian; Thomas, Brian

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory (VAO) is a product-driven organization that provides new scientific research capabilities to the astronomical community. Software development for the VAO follows a lightweight framework that guides development of science applications and infrastructure. Challenges to be overcome include distributed development teams, part-time efforts, and highly constrained schedules. We describe the process we followed to conquer these challenges while developing Iris, the VAO application for analysis of 1-D astronomical spectral energy distributions (SEDs). Iris was successfully built and released in less than a year with a team distributed across four institutions. The project followed existing International Virtual Observatory Alliance inter-operability standards for spectral data and contributed a SED library as a by-product of the project. We emphasize lessons learned that will be folded into future development efforts. In our experience, a well-defined process that provides gu...

  5. US earthquake observatories: recommendations for a new national network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is the first attempt by the seismological community to rationalize and optimize the distribution of earthquake observatories across the United States. The main aim is to increase significantly our knowledge of earthquakes and the earth's dynamics by providing access to scientifically more valuable data. Other objectives are to provide a more efficient and cost-effective system of recording and distributing earthquake data and to make as uniform as possible the recording of earthquakes in all states. The central recommendation of the Panel is that the guiding concept be established of a rationalized and integrated seismograph system consisting of regional seismograph networks run for crucial regional research and monitoring purposes in tandem with a carefully designed, but sparser, nationwide network of technologically advanced observatories. Such a national system must be thought of not only in terms of instrumentation but equally in terms of data storage, computer processing, and record availability.

  6. Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  7. Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J. [and others

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  8. Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

    1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

  9. A 100-micron polarimeter for the Kuiper Airborne Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novak, G.; Gonatas, D.P.; Hildebrand, R.H.; Platt, S.R.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Consideration is given to the design and performance of the 100-micron polarimeter proposed for use on the NASA Kuiper Airborne Observatory. The polarimeter specifications are listed. The polarimeter design and data reduction techniques are based on the work of Hildebrand et al. (1984) and Dragovan (1986). The polarimeter has an improved signal-to-noise ratio and systematic measurement errors below 0.2 percent. 20 refs.

  10. High-energy Astrophysics and the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2005-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The Virtual Observatory (VO) will revolutionise the way we do Astronomy by allowing easy access to all astronomical data and by making the handling and analysis of datasets at various locations across the globe much simpler and faster. I report here on the need for the VO and its status in Europe, concentrating on the recently started EURO-VO project, and then give two specific applications of VO tools to high-energy astrophysics.

  11. A SURVEY OF EGRET SOURCES USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V. The third EGRET catalog contained 271 new gamma-ray sources with energies above 100 MeV. The 271 sources OBSERVATORY By Chuan Chen Very high energy gamma-rays can be used to understand some of the most pow- erful detected gamma-ray emission from 30 keV to 30 GeV. EGRET covered an energy range between 20 MeV and 30 Ge

  12. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Observations of Cosmic Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; lvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Daz-Vlez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, L X; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Prez-Prez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe measurements of GeV and TeV cosmic rays with the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma-Ray Observatory, or HAWC. The measurements include the observation of the shadow of the moon; the observation of small-scale and large-scale angular clustering of the TeV cosmic rays; the prospects for measurement of transient solar events with HAWC; and the observation of Forbush decreases with the HAWC engineering array and HAWC-30.

  13. EARLY SCIENCE WITH SOFIA, THE STRATOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY FOR INFRARED ASTRONOMY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, E. T.; Becklin, E. E.; De Buizer, J. M.; Andersson, B.-G.; Casey, S. C.; Helton, L. A. [SOFIA Science Center, Universities Space Research Association, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Marcum, P. M.; Roellig, T. L.; Temi, P. [NASA Ames Research Center, MS 232, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Herter, T. L. [Astronomy Department, 202 Space Sciences Building, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Guesten, R. [Max-Planck Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, Bonn (Germany); Dunham, E. W. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Rd., Flagstaff AZ 86001 (United States); Backman, D.; Burgdorf, M. [SOFIA Science Center, NASA Ames Research Center, MS 211-1, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Caroff, L. J.; Erickson, E. F. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Davidson, J. A. [School of Physics, The University of Western Australia (M013), 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Gehrz, R. D. [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street, S. E., University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Harper, D. A. [Yerkes Observatory, University of Chicago, 373 W. Geneva St., Williams Bay, WI (United States); Harvey, P. M. [Astronomy Department, University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); and others

    2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA) is an airborne observatory consisting of a specially modified Boeing 747SP with a 2.7 m telescope, flying at altitudes as high as 13.7 km (45,000 ft). Designed to observe at wavelengths from 0.3 {mu}m to 1.6 mm, SOFIA operates above 99.8% of the water vapor that obscures much of the infrared and submillimeter. SOFIA has seven science instruments under development, including an occultation photometer, near-, mid-, and far-infrared cameras, infrared spectrometers, and heterodyne receivers. SOFIA, a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fuer Luft und-Raumfahrt, began initial science flights in 2010 December, and has conducted 30 science flights in the subsequent year. During this early science period three instruments have flown: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and the occultation photometer HIPO. This Letter provides an overview of the observatory and its early performance.

  14. Aperture calculation of the Pierre Auger Observatory surface detector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Armengaud, E.; Aublin, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Chou, A.; Ghia, P.L.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Hamilton, J.C.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Medina, C.; Navarra, G.; Parizot, E.; Tripathi, A.

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We determine the instantaneous aperture and integrated exposure of the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory, taking into account the trigger efficiency as a function of the energy, arrival direction (with zenith angle lower than 60 degrees) and nature of the primary cosmic-ray. We make use of the so-called Lateral Trigger Probability function (or LTP) associated with an extensive air shower, which summarizes all the relevant information about the physics of the shower, the water tank Cherenkov detector, and the triggers.

  15. The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory to EURO-VO Transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Padovani

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) initiative, jointly funded by the European Commission and six European organisations, had the task of creating the foundations of a regional scale infrastructure by conducting a research and demonstration programme on the VO scientific requirements and necessary technologies. The AVO project is now formally concluded. I highlight AVO's main achievements and then describe its successor, the EURO-VO project. With its three new interlinked structures, the Data Centre Alliance, the Facility Centre, and the Technology Centre, the EURO-VO is the logical next step for the deployment of an operational VO in Europe.

  16. The Torino Observatory Parallax Program: White Dwarf Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. L. Smart; M. G. Lattanzi; B. Bucciarelli; G. Massone; R. Casalegno; G. Chiumiento; R. Drimmel; L. Lanteri; F. Marocco; A. Spagna

    2003-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We present parallax determinations for six white dwarf candidates in the Torino Observatory Parallax Program. The absolute parallaxes are found with precisions at the 2-3 milliarcsecond level. For WD 1126+185 we find a distance incompatible with being a white dwarf, implying an incorrect classification. For WD 2216+484 we find our distance is consistent with a simple DA white dwarf rather than a composite system as previously proposed in the literature. In general it is found that the published photometric distance is an overestimate of the distance found here.

  17. Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiina Suomijarvi for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory will consist of 1600 water Cherenkov tanks sampling ground particles of air showers produced by energetic cosmic rays. The arrival times are obtained from GPS and power is provided by solar panels. The construction of the array is nearly completed and a large number of detectors has been operational for more than three years. In this paper the performance of different components of the detectors are discussed. The accuracy of the signal measurement and the trigger stability are presented. The performance of the solar power system and other hardware, as well as the water purity and its long-term stability are discussed.

  18. Astrophysical Sources of Cosmic Rays and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Correlation of the highest energy cosmic rays with nearby extragalactic objects in Pierre Auger Observatory data; (2) Discriminating potential astrophysical sources of the highest energy cosmic rays with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Intrinsic anisotropy of the UHECR from the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Ultra-high energy photon studies with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) Limits on the flux of diffuse ultra high energy neutrinos set using the Pierre Auger Observatory; (6) Search for sidereal modulation of the arrival directions of events recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory; (7) Cosmic Ray Solar Modulation Studies in the Pierre Auger Observatory; (8) Investigation of the Displacement Angle of the Highest Energy Cosmic Rays Caused by the Galactic Magnetic Field; (9) Search for coincidences with astrophysical transients in Pierre Auger Observatory data; and (10) An alternative method for determining the energy of hybrid events at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  19. The Cosmic Ray Energy Spectrum and Related Measurements with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

    2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum above 10{sup 18} eV with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) The cosmic ray flux observed at zenith angles larger than 60 degrees with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Energy calibration of data recorded with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (4) Exposure of the Hybrid Detector of The Pierre Auger Observatory; and (5) Energy scale derived from Fluorescence Telescopes using Cherenkov Light and Shower Universality.

  20. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  1. Digital Elevation Model, 0.5-m, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Alaska, 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gangodagamage, Chandana; Wilson, Cathy; Rowland, Joel

    2013-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The dataset is a digital elevation model, DEM, of a 2km by 7km region in the vicinity of the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Ak.

  2. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Camacho; R. Chacon; G. Diaz; C. Guada; V. Hamar; H. Hoeger; A. Melfo; L. A. Nunez; Y. Perez; C. Quintero; M. Rosales; R. Torrens; the LAGO Collaboration

    2009-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulated data. This structure was generated by using the community, sub-community, collection, item model; available at the DSpace software. Each member institution-country of the project has the appropriate permissions on the system to publish information (descriptive metadata and associated data files). The platform can also associate multiple files to each item of data (data from the instruments, graphics, postprocessed-data, etc.).

  3. LAGOVirtual: A Collaborative Environment for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camacho, R; Diaz, G; Guada, C; Hamar, V; Hoeger, H; Melfo, A; Nunez, L A; Perez, Y; Quintero, C; Rosales, M; Torrens, R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the LAGOVirtual Project: an ongoing project to develop platform to collaborate in the Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO). This continental-wide observatory is devised to detect high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, by using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) at high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). This platform will allow LAGO collaboration to share data, and computer resources through its different sites. This environment has the possibility to generate synthetic data by simulating the showers through AIRES application and to store/preserve distributed data files collected by the WCD at the LAGO sites. The present article concerns the implementation of a prototype of LAGO-DR adapting DSpace, with a hierarchical structure (i.e. country, institution, followed by collections that contain the metadata and data files), for the captured/simulate...

  4. Effort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories Research Assitant, Institute of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    of Mechatronics Control Engineering, Zhejiang University Post-doctoral Research Fellow, Department of Ocean and Resources Engineering, University of Hawaii Abstract Cabled ocean observatory that enables abundant powerEffort on Developing Cabled Ocean Observatories in China Yanhu Chen Research Assitant, Institute

  5. Sophia E. Brumer Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sophia E. Brumer Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University Ocean and Climate Physics Graduate Research Fellow, Columbia University Department of Earth and Environmental Science (DEES. Gordon, A. Sobel Columbia University, Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory 2010--2011 J. Hirshi, A. Megann

  6. Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Progress on the 1.6-meter New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory C. Denkera, P. R, Newark, NJ 07102, U.S.A. bBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314, U.S.A. cSeoul National University, School of Earth and Environmental Science, Seoul, 151-742 Republic

  7. Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    Engineering in the service of science; construction of a cabled ocean observatory Mr. Peter Phibbs for maintenance can quickly make a system uneconomic. Peter Phibbs was project manager for the $75M construction ocean observatory, and went into operation fifteen months ago. The infrastructure demonstrates not only

  8. Thompson March 2003 -1STEREO -Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson ­ March 2003 - 1STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission STEREO GS PR STEREO Science Center (SSC) William T. Thompson STEREO Science Center Code 682, NASA-Goddard (William.T.Thompson@gsfc.nasa.gov 301-286-2040) #12;Thompson ­ March 2003 - 2STEREO - Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory Mission

  9. The Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    mirror (M1) and its alignment with the secondary mirror (M2) will be actively controlled. HighThe Telescope Control System of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory G. Yang*a, J of Technology, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd., Newark, NJ 07104; bBig Bear Solar Observatory, 40386 North Shore

  10. GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey J. M. MAZZARELLA,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Spoon, Henrik

    GOALS: The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey L. ARMUS,1 J. M. MAZZARELLA,2 A. S. EVANS,3,4 J. The Great Observatories All-Sky LIRG Survey (GOALS20 ) combines data from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope 200 low-redshift (z Luminous Infrared Galaxies (LIRGs). The LIRGs are a complete subset

  11. AVOCADO: A Virtual Observatory Census to Address Dwarfs Origins

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snchez-Janssen, Rubn

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dwarf galaxies are by far the most abundant of all galaxy types, yet their properties are still poorly understood -especially due to the observational challenge that their intrinsic faintness represents. AVOCADO aims at establishing firm conclusions on their formation and evolution by constructing a homogeneous, multiwavelength dataset for a statistically significant sample of several thousand nearby dwarfs (-18 < Mi < -14). Using public data and Virtual Observatory tools, we have built GALEX+SDSS+2MASS spectral energy distributions that are fitted by a library of single stellar population models. Star formation rates, stellar masses, ages and metallicities are further complemented with structural parameters that can be used to classify them morphologically. This unique dataset, coupled with a detailed characterization of each dwar's environment, allows for a fully comprehensive investigation of their origins and to track the (potential) evolutionary paths between the different dwarf types.

  12. The Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory: Cloud-Based Mock Galaxy Catalogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bernyk, Maksym; Tonini, Chiara; Hodkinson, Luke; Hassan, Amr H; Garel, Thibault; Duffy, Alan R; Mutch, Simon J; Poole, Gregory B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce the Theoretical Astrophysical Observatory (TAO), an online virtual laboratory that houses mock observations of galaxy survey data. Such mocks have become an integral part of the modern analysis pipeline. However, building them requires an expert knowledge of galaxy modelling and simulation techniques, significant investment in software development, and access to high performance computing. These requirements make it difficult for a small research team or individual to quickly build a mock catalogue suited to their needs. To address this TAO offers access to multiple cosmological simulations and semi-analytic galaxy formation models from an intuitive and clean web interface. Results can be funnelled through science modules and sent to a dedicated supercomputer for further processing and manipulation. These modules include the ability to (1) construct custom observer light-cones from the simulation data cubes; (2) generate the stellar emission from star formation histories, apply dust extinction, a...

  13. Optical calibration hardware for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. A. Moffat; R. J. Ford; F. A. Duncan; K. Graham; A. L. Hallin; C. A. W. Hearns; J. Maneira; P. Skensved; D. R. Grant

    2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The optical properties of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) heavy water Cherenkov neutrino detector are measured in situ using a light diffusing sphere ("laserball"). This diffuser is connected to a pulsed nitrogen/dye laser via specially developed underwater optical fibre umbilical cables. The umbilical cables are designed to have a small bending radius, and can be easily adapted for a variety of calibration sources in SNO. The laserball is remotely manipulated to many positions in the D2O and H2O volumes, where data at six different wavelengths are acquired. These data are analysed to determine the absorption and scattering of light in the heavy water and light water, and the angular dependence of the response of the detector's photomultiplier tubes. This paper gives details of the physical properties, construction, and optical characteristics of the laserball and its associated hardware.

  14. Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; ,

    2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

  15. VAMOS: a Pathfinder for the HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; lvarez, J D; ngeles, F; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Avila-Aroche, A; Solares, H A Ayala; Badillo, C; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Gonzalez, J Becerra; Belmont, E; Bentez, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Bernal, A; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Cabrera, I; Carramiana, A; Castaeda-Martnez, L; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Diaz-Azuara, A; Diaz-Cruz, L; Hernandez, R Diaz; Daz-Vlez, J C; Dingus, B L; Dultzin, D; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garca-Torales, G; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, A; Gonzlez, L X; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Guzmn-Cern, C; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hernndez-Cervantes, L; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Langarica, R; Lara, A; Lara, G; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garcia, R; Marinelli, A; Martnez, L A; Martnez, H; Martnez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Martos, M; Matthews, J A J; McEnery, J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Page, D P; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Prez-Prez, E G; Pretz, J; Ramrez, I; Renter, A; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Ruiz-Sala, F; Ruiz-Velasco, E L; Ryan, J; Sacahui, J R; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Suarez, F; Taboada, I; Tepe, A; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Tinoco, S; Ukwatta, T N; Galicia, J F Valds; Vanegas, P; Vzquez, A; Villaseor, L; Wall, W; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    VAMOS was a prototype detector built in 2011 at an altitude of 4100m a.s.l. in the state of Puebla, Mexico. The aim of VAMOS was to finalize the design, construction techniques and data acquisition system of the HAWC observatory. HAWC is an air-shower array currently under construction at the same site of VAMOS with the purpose to study the TeV sky. The VAMOS setup included six water Cherenkov detectors and two different data acquisition systems. It was in operation between October 2011 and May 2012 with an average live time of 30%. Besides the scientific verification purposes, the eight months of data were used to obtain the results presented in this paper: the detector response to the Forbush decrease of March 2012, and the analysis of possible emission, at energies above 30 GeV, for long gamma-ray bursts GRB111016B and GRB120328B.

  16. Introduction: Observatory Techniques in Nineteenth-Century Science and Society David Aubin, Charlotte Bigg, and H. Otto Sibum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubin, David

    >David Aubin, Charlotte Bigg, and H. Otto Sibum Observatories--Temples of the most sublime of the sciences

  17. Was Lepenski Vir an ancient Sun or Pleiades observatory?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pankovic, Vladan; Krmar, Miodrag

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we consider some old hypotheses according to which remarkable mesolithic village Lepenski Vir (9500 -- 5500 BC) at the right (nearly west) Danube riverside in the Iron gate in Serbia was an ancient (one of the oldest) Sun observatory. We use method recently suggested by A. C. Sparavigna, concretely we use "freely available software" or local Sun radiation direction simulation computer programs. In this way we obtain and discuss pictures of the sunrise in the Lepenski Vir during winter and summer solstice and spring and autumn equinox in relation to position of the mountains, especially Treskavac (Trescovat) and Kukuvija at left (nearly east) Danube riverside (in Romania). While mountain Kukuvija represents really the marker for the Sun in date of the winter solstice, mountain Treskavac, in despite to usual opinions, does not represent a real marker for the Sun in date of the summer solstice. Sun rises behind Treskavac, roughly speaking, between 22.April and 1. May. It corresponds to year period w...

  18. The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feroci, M; Bozzo, E; Barret, D; Brandt, S; Hernanz, M; van der Klis, M; Pohl, M; Santangelo, A; Stella, L; Watts, A; Wilms, J; Zane, S; Ahangarianabhari, M; Albertus, C; Alford, M; Alpar, A; Altamirano, D; Alvarez, L; Amati, L; Amoros, C; Andersson, N; Antonelli, A; Argan, A; Artigue, R; Artigues, B; Atteia, J -L; Azzarello, P; Bakala, P; Baldazzi, G; Balman, S; Barbera, M; van Baren, C; Bhattacharyya, S; Baykal, A; Belloni, T; Bernardini, F; Bertuccio, G; Bianchi, S; Bianchini, A; Binko, P; Blay, P; Bocchino, F; Bodin, P; Bombaci, I; Bidaud, J -M Bonnet; Boutloukos, S; Bradley, L; Braga, J; Brown, E; Bucciantini, N; Burderi, L; Burgay, M; Bursa, M; Budtz-Jrgensen, C; Cackett, E; Cadoux, F R; Cais, P; Caliandro, G A; Campana, R; Campana, S; Capitanio, F; Casares, J; Casella, P; Castro-Tirado, A J; Cavazzuti, E; Cerda-Duran, P; Chakrabarty, D; Chteau, F; Chenevez, J; Coker, J; Cole, R; Collura, A; Cornelisse, R; Courvoisier, T; Cros, A; Cumming, A; Cusumano, G; D'A, A; D'Elia, V; Del Monte, E; De Luca, A; De Martino, D; Dercksen, J P C; De Pasquale, M; De Rosa, A; Del Santo, M; Di Cosimo, S; Diebold, S; Di Salvo, T; 1), I Donnarumma; (32), A Drago; (33), M Durant; (107), D Emmanoulopoulos; (135), M H Erkut; (85), P Esposito; (1, Y Evangelista; 1b),; (24), A Fabian; (34), M Falanga; (25), Y Favre; (35), C Feldman; (128), V Ferrari; (3), C Ferrigno; (133), M Finger; (36), M H Finger; (35, G W Fraser; +),; (2), M Frericks; (7), F Fuschino; (125), M Gabler; (37), D K Galloway; (6), J L Galvez Sanchez; (6), E Garcia-Berro; (10), B Gendre; (62), S Gezari; (39), A B Giles; (40), M Gilfanov; (10), P Giommi; (102), G Giovannini; (102), M Giroletti; (4), E Gogus; (105), A Goldwurm; (86), K Goluchov; (16), D Gtz; (16), C Gouiffes; (56), M Grassi; (42), P Groot; (17), M Gschwender; (128), L Gualtieri; (32), C Guidorzi; (3), L Guy; (2), D Haas; (50), P Haensel; (29), M Hailey; (19), F Hansen; (42), D H Hartmann; (43), C A Haswell; (88), K Hebeler; (37), A Heger; (2), W Hermsen; (28), J Homan; (19), A Hornstrup; (23, R Hudec; 72),; (45), J Huovelin; (5), A Ingram; (2), J J M in't Zand; (27), G Israel; (20), K Iwasawa; (47), L Izzo; (2), H M Jacobs; (17), F Jetter; (118, T Johannsen; 127),; (2), H M Jacobs; (2), P Jonker; (126), J Jos; (49), P Kaaret; (123), G Kanbach; (23), V Karas; (6), D Karelin; (29), D Kataria; (49), L Keek; (29), T Kennedy; (17), D Klochkov; (50), W Kluzniak; (17), K Kokkotas; (45), S Korpela; (51), C Kouveliotou; (87), I Kreykenbohm; (2), L M Kuiper; (19), I Kuvvetli; (7), C Labanti; (52), D Lai; (53), F K Lamb; (2), P P Laubert; (105), F Lebrun; (8), D Lin; (29), D Linder; (54), G Lodato; (55), F Longo; (19), N Lund; (131), T J Maccarone; (14), D Macera; (8), S Maestre; (62), S Mahmoodifar; (17), D Maier; (56), P Malcovati; (120), I Mandel; (144), V Mangano; (50), A Manousakis; (7), M Marisaldi; (109), A Markowitz; (35), A Martindale; (59), G Matt; (107), I M McHardy; (60), A Melatos; (61), M Mendez; (85), S Mereghetti; (68), M Michalska; (20), S Migliari; (85, R Mignani; 108),; (62), M C Miller; (49), J M Miller; (57), T Mineo; (112), G Miniutti; (64), S Morsink; (65), C Motch; (13), S Motta; (66), M Mouchet; (8), G Mouret; (19), J Mula?ov; (1, F Muleri; 1b),; (140), T Muoz-Darias; (95), I Negueruela; (28), J Neilsen; (43), A J Norton; (28), M Nowak; (35), P O'Brien; (19), P E H Olsen; (102), M Orienti; (99, M Orio; 110),; (7), M Orlandini; (68), P Orleanski; (35), J P Osborne; (69), R Osten; (70), F Ozel; (1, L Pacciani; 1b),; (119), M Paolillo; (6), A Papitto; (20), J M Paredes; (83, A Patruno; 141),; (71), B Paul; (17), E Perinati; (115), A Pellizzoni; (47), A V Penacchioni; (136), M A Perez; (72), V Petracek; (10), C Pittori; (95), J Pons; (6), J Portell; (115), A Possenti; (73), J Poutanen; (122), M Prakash; (16), P Le Provost; (70), D Psaltis; (8), D Rambaud; (8), P Ramon; (76), G Ramsay; (1, M Rapisarda; 1b),; (77), A Rachevski; (77), I Rashevskaya; (78), P S Ray; (6), N Rea; (80), S Reddy; (113, P Reig; 81),; (63), M Reina Aranda; (28), R Remillard; (62), C Reynolds; (124), L Rezzolla; (20), M Ribo; (2), R de la Rie; (115), A Riggio; (138), A Rios; (82, P Rodrguez- Gil; 104),; (16), J Rodriguez; (3), R Rohlfs; (57), P Romano; (83), E M R Rossi; (50), A Rozanska; (29), A Rousseau; (84), F Ryde; (63), L Sabau-Graziati; (6), G Sala; (85), R Salvaterra; (61), A Sanna; (134), J Sandberg; (130), S Scaringi; (16), S Schanne; (86), J Schee; (87), C Schmid; (117), S Shore; (27), R Schneider; (88), A Schwenk; (89), A D Schwope; (114), J -Y Seyler; (90), A Shearer; (29), A Smith; (58), D M Smith; (29), P J Smith; (23), V Sochora; (1), P Soffitta; (61), P Soleri; (29), A Spencer

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Large Observatory For x-ray Timing (LOFT) was studied within ESA M3 Cosmic Vision framework and participated in the final down-selection for a launch slot in 2022-2024. Thanks to the unprecedented combination of effective area and spectral resolution of its main instrument, LOFT will study the behaviour of matter under extreme conditions, such as the strong gravitational field in the innermost regions of accretion flows close to black holes and neutron stars, and the supra-nuclear densities in the interior of neutron stars. The science payload is based on a Large Area Detector (LAD, 10 m 2 effective area, 2-30 keV, 240 eV spectral resolution, 1 deg collimated field of view) and a WideField Monitor (WFM, 2-50 keV, 4 steradian field of view, 1 arcmin source location accuracy, 300 eV spectral resolution). The WFM is equipped with an on-board system for bright events (e.g. GRB) localization. The trigger time and position of these events are broadcast to the ground within 30 s from discovery. In this paper we ...

  19. The Final Results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was a water Cherenkov detector dedicated to investigate elementary particles called neutrinos. It successfully took data between 1999 and 2006. The detector was unique in its use of heavy water as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of solar neutrino mixing. In fact, SNO conclusively showed that solar neutrinos oscillate on their way from the core of the Sun to the Earth. This groundbreaking observation was made during three independent phases of the experiment. Even if data taking ended, SNO is still in a mode of precise determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters because all along SNO had developed several methods to tell charged-current events apart from neutral-current events. This ability is crucial for the final and ultimate data analysis of all the phases. The physics reach of a combined three-phase solar analysis will be reviewed together with results and subtleties about solar neutrino physics.

  20. The 16N Calibration Source for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. R. Dragowsky; A. Hamer; Y. D. Chan; R. Deal; E. D. Earle; W. Frati; E. Gaudette; A. Hallin; C. Hearns; J. Hewett; G. Jonkmans; Y. Kajiyama; A. B. McDonald; B. A. Moffat; E. B. Norman; B. Sur; N. Tagg

    2001-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A calibration source using gamma-rays from 16N (t_1/2 = 7.13 s) beta-decay has been developed for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) for the purpose of energy and other calibrations. The 16N is produced via the (n,p) reaction on 16O in the form of CO2 gas using 14-MeV neutrons from a commercially available Deuterium-Tritium (DT) generator. The 16N is produced in a shielding pit in a utility room near the SNO cavity and transferred to the water volumes (D2O or H2O) in a CO2 gas stream via small diameter capillary tubing. The bulk of the activity decays in a decay/trigger chamber designed to block the energetic beta-particles yet permit the primary branch 6.13 MeV gamma-rays to exit. Detection of the coincident beta-particles with plastic scintillator lining the walls of the decay chamber volume provides a tag for the SNO electronics. This paper gives details of the production, transfer, and triggering systems for this source along with a discussion of the source gamma-ray output and performance.

  1. Milagro - A TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingus, B.L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory (United States)

    2004-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Milagro is a large field of view ({approx} 2 sr), high duty cycle ({approx}90%), ground-based observatory sensitive to gamma-rays above {approx}100 GeV. This unique detector is ideal for observing the highest energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays are attenuated by pair production with the extragalactic infrared background light, Milagro's sensitivity decreases rapidly for bursts with redshift > 0.5. While only 10 % of bursts have been measured to be within z=0.5, these bursts are very well studied at all wavelengths resulting in the most complete understanding of GRB phenomena. Milagro has sufficient sensitivity in units of E2 dN/dE to detect VHE luminosities lower than the observed luminosities at {approx} 100 keV for these nearby bursts. Therefore, the launch of SWIFT and its ability to localize and measure redshifts of many bursts points to great future possibilities.

  2. Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) as an advanced astronomical research enviroment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Shirasaki; M. Tanaka; S. Kawanomoto; S. Honda; M. Ohishi; Y. Mizumoto; N. Yasuda; Y. Masunaga; Y. Ishihara; J. Tsutsumi; H. Nakamoto; Y. Kobayashi; M. Sakamoto

    2006-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design and implementation of the Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) system. JVO is a portal site to various kinds of astronomical resources distributed all over the world. We have developed five components for constructing the portal: (1) registry, (2) data service, (3) workflow system, (4) data analysis service (5) portal GUI. Registry services are used for publishing and searching data services in the VO, and they are constructed using an OAI-PMH metadata harvesting protocol and a SOAP web service protocol so that VO standard architecture is applied. Data services are developed based on the Astronomical Data Query Language (ADQL) which is an international VO standard and an extension of the standard SQL. The toolkit for building the ADQL-based service is released to the public on the JVO web site. The toolkit also provides the protocol translation from a Simple Image Access Protocol (SIAP) to ADQL protocol, so that both the VO standard service can be constructed using our toolkit. In order to federate the distributed databases and analysis services, we have designed a workflow language which is described in XML and developed execution system of the workflow. We have succeeded to connect to a hundred of data resources of the world as of April 2006. We have applied this system to the study of QSO environment by federating a QSO database, a Subaru Suprim-Cam database, and some analysis services such a SExtractor and HyperZ web services. These experiences are described is this paper.

  3. Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2005-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is a 1600 water Cherenkov tank array on a triangular 1.5 km grid. The signals from each tank are read out using three 9'' photomultipliers and processed at a sampling frequency of 40 MHz, from which a local digital trigger efficiently selects shower candidates. GPS signals are used for time synchronization and a wireless communication system connects all tanks to the central data acquisition system. Power is provided by a stand-alone solar panel system. With large ambient temperature variations, that can reach over 20 degrees in 24 hours, high salinity, dusty air, high humidity inside the tank, and remoteness of access, the performance and reliability of the array is a challenge. Several key parameters are constantly monitored to ensure consistent operation. The Surface Array has currently over 750 detectors and has been in reliable operation since January 2004. Good uniformity in the response of different detectors and good long term stability is observed.

  4. Conceptual Design of the International Axion Observatory (IAXO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armengaud, E; Betz, M; Brax, P; Brun, P; Cantatore, G; Carmona, J M; Carosi, G P; Caspers, F; Caspi, S; Cetin, S A; Chelouche, D; Christensen, F E; Dael, A; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Derbin, A V; Desch, K; Diago, A; Dbrich, B; Dratchnev, I; Dudarev, A; Eleftheriadis, C; Fanourakis, G; Ferrer-Ribas, E; Galn, J; Garca, J A; Garza, J G; Geralis, T; Gimeno, B; Giomataris, I; Gninenko, S; Gmez, H; Gonzlez-Daz, D; Guendelman, E; Hailey, C J; Hiramatsu, T; Hoffmann, D H H; Horns, D; Iguaz, F J; Irastorza, I G; Isern, J; Imai, K; Jakobsen, A C; Jaeckel, J; Jakov?i?, K; Kaminski, J; Kawasaki, M; Karuza, M; Kr?mar, M; Kousouris, K; Krieger, C; Laki?, B; Limousin, O; Lindner, A; Liolios, A; Luzn, G; Matsuki, S; Muratova, V N; Nones, C; Ortega, I; Papaevangelou, T; Pivovaroff, M J; Raffelt, G; Redondo, J; Ringwald, A; Russenschuck, S; Ruz, J; Saikawa, K; Savvidis, I; Sekiguchi, T; Semertzidis, Y K; Shilon, I; Sikivie, P; Silva, H; Kate, H ten; Tomas, A; Troitsky, S; Vafeiadis, T; Bibber, K van; Vedrine, P; Villar, J A; Vogel, J K; Walckiers, L; Weltman, A; Wester, W; Yildiz, S C; Zioutas, K

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The International Axion Observatory (IAXO) will be a forth generation axion helioscope. As its primary physics goal, IAXO will look for axions or axion-like particles (ALPs) originating in the Sun via the Primakoff conversion of the solar plasma photons. In terms of signal-to-noise ratio, IAXO will be about 4-5 orders of magnitude more sensitive than CAST, currently the most powerful axion helioscope, reaching sensitivity to axion-photon couplings down to a few $\\times 10^{-12}$ GeV$^{-1}$ and thus probing a large fraction of the currently unexplored axion and ALP parameter space. IAXO will also be sensitive to solar axions produced by mechanisms mediated by the axion-electron coupling $g_{ae}$ with sensitivity $-$for the first time$-$ to values of $g_{ae}$ not previously excluded by astrophysics. With several other possible physics cases, IAXO has the potential to serve as a multi-purpose facility for generic axion and ALP research in the next decade. In this paper we present the conceptual design of IAXO, w...

  5. Preliminary systems engineering evaluations for the National Ecological Observatory Network.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, Perry J.; Kottenstette, Richard Joseph; Crouch, Shannon M.; Brocato, Robert Wesley; Zak, Bernard Daniel; Osborn, Thor D.; Ivey, Mark D.; Gass, Karl Leslie; Heller, Edwin J.; Dishman, James Larry; Schubert, William Kent; Zirzow, Jeffrey A.

    2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON) is an ambitious National Science Foundation sponsored project intended to accumulate and disseminate ecologically informative sensor data from sites among 20 distinct biomes found within the United States and Puerto Rico over a period of at least 30 years. These data are expected to provide valuable insights into the ecological impacts of climate change, land-use change, and invasive species in these various biomes, and thereby provide a scientific foundation for the decisions of future national, regional, and local policy makers. NEON's objectives are of substantial national and international importance, yet they must be achieved with limited resources. Sandia National Laboratories was therefore contracted to examine four areas of significant systems engineering concern; specifically, alternatives to commercial electrical utility power for remote operations, approaches to data acquisition and local data handling, protocols for secure long-distance data transmission, and processes and procedures for the introduction of new instruments and continuous improvement of the sensor network. The results of these preliminary systems engineering evaluations are presented, with a series of recommendations intended to optimize the efficiency and probability of long-term success for the NEON enterprise.

  6. SNO Data: Results from Experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was built 6800 feet under ground, in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO is a heavy-water Cherenkov detector that is designed to detect neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the sun. It uses 1000 tonnes of heavy water, on loan from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), contained in a 12 meter diameter acrylic vessel. Neutrinos react with the heavy water (D2O) to produce flashes of light called Cherenkov radiation. This light is then detected by an array of 9600 photomultiplier tubes mounted on a geodesic support structure surrounding the heavy water vessel. The detector is immersed in light (normal) water within a 30 meter barrel-shaped cavity (the size of a 10 story building!) excavated from Norite rock. Located in the deepest part of the mine, the overburden of rock shields the detector from cosmic rays. The detector laboratory is extremely clean to reduce background signals from radioactive elements present in the mine dust which would otherwise hide the very weak signal from neutrinos. (From http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/]

    The SNO website provides access to various datasets. See also the SNO Image Catalog at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/images/ and computer-generated images of SNO events at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/events/ and the list of published papers.

  7. MEASUREMENT OF THE 8 B SOLAR NEUTRINO ENERGY SPECTRUM AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    MEASUREMENT OF THE 8 B SOLAR NEUTRINO ENERGY SPECTRUM AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY Monica me everything from the fine details of signal extraction, iii #12; Fortran and C++ to bird watching

  8. Combined analysis of all three phases of solar neutrino data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    We report results from a combined analysis of solar neutrino data from all phases of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By exploiting particle identification information obtained from the proportional counters installed ...

  9. A measurement of the atmospheric neutrino flux and oscillation parameters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sonley, Thomas John

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Through-going muon events are analyzed as a function of their direction of travel through the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. Based on simulations and previous measurements, muons with a zenith angle of 1 < cos([theta]zenith) ...

  10. A Reusable Process Control System Framework for the Orbiting Carbon Observatory and NPP Sounder PEATE missions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mattmann, Chris

    PEATE missions Chris A. Mattmann, Dana Freeborn, Dan Crichton, Brian Foster, Andrew Hart, David Woollard missions: the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO), and NPP Sounder PEATE projects. 1 Introduction Data volume

  11. WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY and NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY APPLICATION FOR RARECATS PROGRAM Deadline for postmark of this application and supporting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY and NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY APPLICATION FOR RARECATS PROGRAM 604 Allen Hall, PO Box 6122 West Virginia University Morgantown, WV 26506-6122 #12;

  12. The Virtual Astronomical Observatory: Re-engineering Access to Astronomical Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hanisch, R J; Lazio, T J W; Bunn, S Emery; Evans, J; McGlynn, T A; Plante, R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Virtual Astronomical Observatory was a software infrastructure and development project designed both to begin the establishment of an operational Virtual Observatory (VO) and to provide the U.S. coordination with the international VO effort. The concept of the VO is to provide the means by which an astronomer is able to discover, access, and process data seamlessly, regardless of its physical location. This paper describes the origins of the VAO, including the predecessor efforts within the U.S. National Virtual Observatory, and summarizes its main accomplishments. These accomplishments include the development of both scripting toolkits that allow scientists to incorporate VO data directly into their reduction and analysis environments and high-level science applications for data discovery, integration, analysis, and catalog cross-comparison. Working with the international community, and based on the experience from the software development, the VAO was a major contributor to international standards ...

  13. Description of Atmospheric Conditions at the Pierre Auger Observatory using the Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahlers, M.; /Wisconsin U., Madison; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Almela, A.; /Natl. Tech. U., San Nicolas /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN /Santiago de Compostela U.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Atmospheric conditions at the site of a cosmic ray observatory must be known for reconstructing observed extensive air showers. The Global Data Assimilation System (GDAS) is a global atmospheric model predicated on meteorological measurements and numerical weather predictions. GDAS provides altitude-dependent profiles of the main state variables of the atmosphere like temperature, pressure, and humidity. The original data and their application to the air shower reconstruction of the Pierre Auger Observatory are described. By comparisons with radiosonde and weather station measurements obtained on-site in Malargue and averaged monthly models, the utility of the GDAS data is shown.

  14. The Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Instrument Description and First Detections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, TW; Adelberger, Eric G.; Battat, J.; Carey, LN; Hoyle, Charles D.; LeBlanc, P.; Michelsen, EL; Nordtvedt, K.; Orin, AE; Strasburg, Jana D.; Stubbs, CW; Swanson, HE; Williams, E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A next-generation lunar laser ranging apparatus using the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico has begun science operation. APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) has achieved one-millimeter range precision to the moon which should lead to aproximately one-orderof-magnitude improvements in the precision of several tests of fundamental properties of gravity. We briefly motivate the scientific goals, and then give a detailed discussion of the APOLLO instrumentation.

  15. APOLLO: the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation: Instrument Description and First Detections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. W. Murphy, Jr.; E. G. Adelberger; J. B. R. Battat; L. N. Carey; C. D. Hoyle; P. LeBlanc; E. L. Michelsen; K. Nordtvedt; A. E. Orin; J. D. Strasburg; C. W. Stubbs; H. E. Swanson; E. Williams

    2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A next-generation lunar laser ranging apparatus using the 3.5 m telescope at the Apache Point Observatory in southern New Mexico has begun science operation. APOLLO (the Apache Point Observatory Lunar Laser-ranging Operation) has achieved one-millimeter range precision to the moon which should lead to approximately one-order-of-magnitude improvements in the precision of several tests of fundamental properties of gravity. We briefly motivate the scientific goals, and then give a detailed discussion of the APOLLO instrumentation.

  16. AN INFRARED SPACE OBSERVATORY ATLAS OF BRIGHT SPIRAL GALAXIES1 George J. Bendo,2,3,4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph, Robert D.

    AN INFRARED SPACE OBSERVATORY ATLAS OF BRIGHT SPIRAL GALAXIES1 George J. Bendo,2,3,4 Robert D in a series we present an atlas of infrared images and photometry from 1.2 to 180 lm for a sample of bright galaxies. Using the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO), we have obtained 12 lm images and photometry at 60

  17. LamontDoherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth Institute at Columbia Univ

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    12 12 LamontDoherty Earth Observatory The Earth Institute at Columbia UniversityThe Earth-DOHERTYEARTHOBSERVATORYTHEEARTHINSTITUTEATCOLUMBIAUNIVERSITYBIENNIALREPORT20002002 #12;Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory is renowned in the internationLamont-Doherty Earth suc- cess and innovation in advancing understanding of Earth, for itcess and innovation in advancing

  18. The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON) M.W.E. Smith a,b,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Babu, G. Jogesh

    Gravitational radiation Neutrinos Cosmic rays Gamma-ray bursts Supernovae a b s t r a c t We summarize including the Swift [6] and Fermi [7] satellites, the HESS [8], VERITAS [9], and MAGIC [10] TeV gamma-ray telescopes, and the HAWC [11] TeV gamma-ray observatory. Collectively, these facilities promise the first

  19. SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY A Thesis Presented to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this thesis, a limit on the neutron anti-neutron (nnbar is sampled from the three phases of the SNO experiment to construct a three-phase blind analysis. The profile

  20. Prospects for and Status of CUORE ? The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norman, E B

    2009-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

    CUORE (Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events) is a next generation experiment designed to search for the neutrinoless DBD of {sup 130}Te using a bolometric technique. The present status of the CUORE is presented along with the latest results from its prototype, CUORICINO.

  1. Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Directions to the National Radio Astronomy Observatory Green Bank, West Virginia From Charleston Roanoke, VA: Via I-64 West, exit at White Sulphur Springs (Exit 181) and take Rt. 92 North to Green Bank, then take Rt. 92 South to Green Bank. From Washington DC: Via I-66 West to I-81 South. Option 1: Take I-81

  2. Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas-to-particle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacobson, Mark

    Size distributions of ionic aerosols measured at Waliguan Observatory: Implication for nitrate gas Plateau. Size-resolved ionic aerosols (NH4 + , Na+ , K+ , Ca2+ , Mg2+ , SO4 2 , Cl , NO3 CO3 2 , formate, acetate and oxalate), organic aerosols, black carbon and gaseous HNO3 and SO2 were measured

  3. MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    MilagroA TeV Observatory for Gamma Ray Bursts B.L. Dingus and the Milagro Collaboration Los energy gamma-rays from gamma-ray bursts. The highest energy gamma rays supply very strong constraints on the nature of gamma-ray burst sources as well as fundamental physics. Because the highest energy gamma-rays

  4. PRELIMINARY PARALLAXES OF 40 L AND T DWARFS FROM THE US NAVAL OBSERVATORY INFRARED ASTROMETRY PROGRAM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golimowski, David A.

    Observatory, Flagstaff Station, P.O. Box 1149, Flagstaff, AZ 86002; fjv@nofs.navy.mil, aah@nofs.navy.mil, cbl@nofs.navy.mil, guetter@nofs.navy.mil, jam@nofs.navy.mil, blaise@nofs.navy.mil A. J. Burgasser2 Division of Astronomy

  5. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    , active galactic nuclei (AGN), and gamma ray bursts (GRB). In addition, more exotic sources like Gamma Ray Observatory, located at an altitude of 8,600 feet in the Jemez Mountains of New Mexico for sources of TeV gamma rays. It is uniquely capable of search- ing for transient sources of VHE gamma rays

  6. Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    V emission from the galactic plane, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma ray bursts- clei (AGN), supernova remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high1 Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss a for the Milagro Collaboration

  7. PROFESSOR WILLIAM MENKE, F-AGU LAMONT-DOHERTY EARTH OBSERVATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Menke, William

    PROFESSOR WILLIAM MENKE, F-AGU LAMONT-DOHERTY EARTH OBSERVATORY OF COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY CONTACT Prof PREPARATION Ph.D. 1982, Department of Geological Sciences, Columbia University, Geological Sciences, Thesis of Geological Sciences, Columbia University. MS, BS 1976, Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences

  8. Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soil CO2 production and surface flux at four climate observatories in eastern Canada David Risk the climatic controls on soil respiration. We use subsurface CO2 concentrations, surface CO2 flux and detailed physical monitoring of the subsurface regime to examine physical controls on soil CO2 production. Results

  9. The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Thermal Control of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Observatory Angelo P. Verdonia and Carsten Denkera aNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar-Terrestrial Research, 323 Martin Luther King Blvd, Newark, NJ 07102, US ABSTRACT We present the basic design of the THermal Control System

  10. A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    A remote sensing observatory for hydrologic sciences: A genesis for scaling to continental hydrology Witold F. Krajewski,1 Martha C. Anderson,2 William E. Eichinger,1 Dara Entekhabi,3 Brian K arise primarily from an inadequate understanding of the hydrological cycle: on land, in oceans

  11. Nasmyth focus instrumentation of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    field stop and heat reflector (heat-stop), elliptical secondary mirror (SM) and diagonal flats. Figure 1Nasmyth focus instrumentation of the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory Wenda Caoab Coulterb, and Philip R. Goodeab aCenter for Solar-Terrestrial Research, New Jersey Institute of Technology

  12. 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference Hybrid Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    present the results for the hybrid performance of the Observatory, including trigger efficiency, energy 5005, Australia 2 Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304, (5613) Malargue, Mendoza design, in which ultra high energy cosmic rays are detected simultaneously by fluorescence telescopes

  13. Oceans. Europe2005 An Acoustically-Linked Deep-Ocean Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    to communications power efficiency and cost of the acoustic and satellite telemetry systems. The efficiency ship servicing. Solarcells on the buoy provide enough power for many hours of Iridium terminalHole Oceano a hicKnstitution A6slmei - A buoy-based observatory that uses acoustic communication to retrieve

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TITLE: A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TITLE: A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE #12;A REVISED VAX FARANT SPLOT ROUTINE AND RELATED APPLE II PLOTTING PROGRAM. The purpose of this report is to describe some upgrades made to the VAX 1 SPLOT" routine and the related Apple plotting

  15. Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tycho Brahe made observations of the motions of the planets from his great observatory,and understood the importance of random and systematic errors in his observations. In 1600Tycho Brahe employed such a diligent observer inTycho Brahe that his observations convicted this Ptolemaic calculation of an error of 8

  16. Double beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    nuclear laboratory for spectroscopic studies of neutrinos Neutrinos are key particles for new frontiers) are sensitive and realistic experiments for studying the Majorana nature of the neutrino and the absolute massDouble beta decays and solar neutrinos with 100 Mo MOON(Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos) May 24, 2005

  17. Infrared Imaging Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory Hui Li , Zhongyu Fan and Jianqi You

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Hui

    Infrared Imaging Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory Hui Li , Zhongyu Fan and Jianqi, Chinese Academy of Sciences Abstract. Since 1986, we have made some improvements to the multichannel solar to it a multichannel infrared imaging solar spectrograph. The original spectrograph can be used to observe

  18. Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) The SMT is the most accurate submillimeter astronomical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ziurys, Lucy M.

    Arizona Radio Observatory (ARO) The SMT is the most accurate submillimeter astronomical telescope-183 GHz range (2 and 3 mm windows), and the SMT supports 200-490 GHz receivers. Future instrumentation.I.T. Haystack. SMT Structure Geometry Main reflector: paraboloid D=10 m F/D=0.35. Subreflector: hyperboloid d=0

  19. FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY for approaching problems that I found to be more generally useful. Godwin Mayers, Chuck Alexander, Jim Cook and with me. v #12; ABSTRACT FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY

  20. Measurement of the cosmic ray energy spectrum using hybrid events of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mariangela Settimo; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays above 10$^{18}$ eV is measured using the hybrid events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory between November 2005 and September 2010. The large exposure of the Observatory allows the measurement of the main features of the energy spectrum with high statistics. Full Monte Carlo simulations of the extensive air showers (based on the CORSIKA code) and of the hybrid detector response are adopted here as an independent cross check of the standard analysis (Phys. Lett. B 685, 239 (2010)). The dependence on mass composition and other systematic uncertainties are discussed in detail and, in the full Monte Carlo approach, a region of confidence for flux measurements is defined when all the uncertainties are taken into account. An update is also reported of the energy spectrum obtained by combining the hybrid spectrum and that measured using the surface detector array.

  1. Reconstruction of inclined air showers detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; A. Aab; P. Abreu; M. Aglietta; M. Ahlers; E. J. Ahn; I. Al Samarai; I. F. M. Albuquerque; I. Allekotte; J. Allen; P. Allison; A. Almela; J. Alvarez Castillo; J. Alvarez-Muiz; R. Alves Batista; M. Ambrosio; A. Aminaei; L. Anchordoqui; S. Andringa; C. Aramo; F. Arqueros; H. Asorey; P. Assis; J. Aublin; M. Ave; M. Avenier; G. Avila; A. M. Badescu; K. B. Barber; J. Buml; C. Baus; J. J. Beatty; K. H. Becker; J. A. Bellido; C. Berat; X. Bertou; P. L. Biermann; P. Billoir; F. Blanco; M. Blanco; C. Bleve; H. Blmer; M. Boh?ov; D. Boncioli; C. Bonifazi; R. Bonino; N. Borodai; J. Brack; I. Brancus; P. Brogueira; W. C. Brown; P. Buchholz; A. Bueno; M. Buscemi; K. S. Caballero-Mora; B. Caccianiga; L. Caccianiga; M. Candusso; L. Caramete; R. Caruso; A. Castellina; G. Cataldi; L. Cazon; R. Cester; A. G. Chavez; S. H. Cheng; A. Chiavassa; J. A. Chinellato; J. Chudoba; M. Cilmo; R. W. Clay; G. Cocciolo; R. Colalillo; L. Collica; M. R. Coluccia; R. Conceio; F. Contreras; M. J. Cooper; S. Coutu; C. E. Covault; A. Criss; J. Cronin; A. Curutiu; R. Dallier; B. Daniel; S. Dasso; K. Daumiller; B. R. Dawson; R. M. de Almeida; M. De Domenico; S. J. de Jong; J. R. T. de Mello Neto; I. De Mitri; J. de Oliveira; V. de Souza; L. del Peral; O. Deligny; H. Dembinski; N. Dhital; C. Di Giulio; A. Di Matteo; J. C. Diaz; M. L. D\\'\\iaz Castro; P. N. Diep; F. Diogo; C. Dobrigkeit; W. Docters; J. C. D'Olivo; P. N. Dong; A. Dorofeev; Q. Dorosti Hasankiadeh; M. T. Dova; J. Ebr; R. Engel; M. Erdmann; M. Erfani; C. O. Escobar; J. Espadanal; A. Etchegoyen; P. Facal San Luis; H. Falcke; K. Fang; G. Farrar; A. C. Fauth; N. Fazzini; A. P. Ferguson; M. Fernandes; B. Fick; J. M. Figueira; A. Filevich; A. Filip?i?; B. D. Fox; O. Fratu; U. Frhlich; B. Fuchs; T. Fuji; R. Gaior; B. Garc\\'\\ia; S. T. Garcia Roca; D. Garcia-Gamez; D. Garcia-Pinto; G. Garilli; A. Gascon Bravo; F. Gate; H. Gemmeke; P. L. Ghia; U. Giaccari; M. Giammarchi; M. Giller; C. Glaser; H. Glass; F. Gomez Albarracin; M. Gmez Berisso; P. F. Gmez Vitale; P. Gonalves; J. G. Gonzalez; B. Gookin; A. Gorgi; P. Gorham; P. Gouffon; S. Grebe; N. Griffith; A. F. Grillo; T. D. Grubb; Y. Guardincerri; F. Guarino; G. P. Guedes; P. Hansen; D. Harari; T. A. Harrison; J. L. Harton; A. Haungs; T. Hebbeker; D. Heck; P. Heimann; A. E. Herve; G. C. Hill; C. Hojvat; N. Hollon; E. Holt; P. Homola; J. R. Hrandel; P. Horvath; M. Hrabovsk; D. Huber; T. Huege; A. Insolia; P. G. Isar; K. Islo; I. Jandt; S. Jansen; C. Jarne; M. Josebachuili; A. Kp; O. Kambeitz; K. H. Kampert; P. Kasper; I. Katkov; B. Kgl; B. Keilhauer; A. Keivani; E. Kemp; R. M. Kieckhafer; H. O. Klages; M. Kleifges; J. Kleinfeller; R. Krause; N. Krohm; O. Krmer; D. Kruppke-Hansen; D. Kuempel; N. Kunka; G. La Rosa; D. LaHurd; L. Latronico; R. Lauer; M. Lauscher; P. Lautridou; S. Le Coz; M. S. A. B. Leo; D. Lebrun; P. Lebrun; M. A. Leigui de Oliveira; A. Letessier-Selvon; I. Lhenry-Yvon; K. Link; R. Lpez; A. Lopez Agra; K. Louedec; J. Lozano Bahilo; L. Lu; A. Lucero; M. Ludwig; H. Lyberis; M. C. Maccarone; M. Malacari; S. Maldera; J. Maller; D. Mandat; P. Mantsch; A. G. Mariazzi; V. Marin; I. C. Mari?; G. Marsella; D. Martello; L. Martin; H. Martinez; O. Mart\\'\\inez Bravo; D. Martraire; J. J. Mas\\'\\ias Meza; H. J. Mathes; S. Mathys; A. J. Matthews; J. Matthews; G. Matthiae; D. Maurel; D. Maurizio; E. Mayotte; P. O. Mazur; C. Medina; G. Medina-Tanco; M. Melissas; D. Melo; E. Menichetti; A. Menshikov; S. Messina; R. Meyhandan; S. Mi?anovi?; M. I. Micheletti; L. Middendorf; I. A. Minaya; L. Miramonti; B. Mitrica; L. Molina-Bueno; S. Mollerach; M. Monasor; D. Monnier Ragaigne; F. Montanet; C. Morello; J. C. Moreno; M. Mostaf; C. A. Moura; M. A. Muller; G. Mller; M. Mnchmeyer; R. Mussa; G. Navarra; S. Navas; P. Necesal; L. Nellen; A. Nelles; J. Neuser; D. Newton; M. Niechciol; L. Niemietz; T. Niggemann; D. Nitz; D. Nosek; V. Novotny; L. Noka; L. Ochilo; A. Olinto; M. Oliveira; V. M. Olmos-Gilbaja; M. Ortiz; N. Pacheco; D. Pakk Selmi-Dei; M. Palatka; J. Pallotta; N. Palmieri; P. Papenbreer; G. Parente; A. Parra; S. Pastor; T. Paul; M. Pech; J. P?kala; R. Pelayo; I. M. Pepe; L. Perrone; R. Pesce; E. Petermann; C. Peters; S. Petrera; A. Petrolini; Y. Petrov; R. Piegaia; T. Pierog; P. Pieroni; M. Pimenta; V. Pirronello; M. Platino; M. Plum; A. Porcelli; C. Porowski; P. Privitera; M. Prouza; V. Purrello; E. J. Quel; S. Querchfeld; S. Quinn; J. Rautenberg; O. Ravel; D. Ravignani; B. Revenu; J. Ridky; S. Riggi; M. Risse; P. Ristori; V. Rizi; J. Roberts; W. Rodrigues de Carvalho; I. Rodriguez Cabo; G. Rodriguez Fernandez; J. Rodriguez Rojo; M. D. Rodr\\'\\iguez-Fr\\'\\ias; G. Ros; J. Rosado; T. Rossler; M. Roth; E. Roulet; A. C. Rovero; C. Rhle; S. J. Saffi; A. Saftoiu; F. Salamida; H. Salazar; F. Salesa Greus

    2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe the method devised to reconstruct inclined cosmic-ray air showers with zenith angles greater than $60^\\circ$ detected with the surface array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The measured signals at the ground level are fitted to muon density distributions predicted with atmospheric cascade models to obtain the relative shower size as an overall normalization parameter. The method is evaluated using simulated showers to test its performance. The energy of the cosmic rays is calibrated using a sub-sample of events reconstructed with both the fluorescence and surface array techniques. The reconstruction method described here provides the basis of complementary analyses including an independent measurement of the energy spectrum of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using very inclined events collected by the Pierre Auger Observatory.

  2. Upper limit on the primary photon fraction from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Risse, Markus; /Karlsruhe, Forschungszentrum

    2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Auger Observatory, an upper limit on the cosmic-ray photon fraction of 26% (at 95% confidence level) is derived for primary energies above 10{sup 19} eV. Additional observables recorded with the surface detector array, available for a sub-set of the data sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favoured.

  3. The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO): System overview R.J. Weryk a,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiegert, Paul

    The Canadian Automated Meteor Observatory (CAMO): System overview R.J. Weryk a, , M.D. Campbell-Brown a,b , P.A. Wiegert a,b , P.G. Brown a,b , Z. Krzeminski a , R. Musci a a Dept. of Physics and Brown, 2012, 2013) using the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) and a number of Gen-III image

  4. A Search for Astrophysical Burst Signals at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Aharmim; S. N. Ahmed; A. E. Anthony; N. Barros; E. W. Beier; A. Bellerive; B. Beltran; M. Bergevin; S. D. Biller; K. Boudjemline; M. G. Boulay; B. Cai; Y. D. Chan; D. Chauhan; M. Chen; B. T. Cleveland; G. A. Cox; X. Dai; H. Deng; J. A. Detwiler; M. DiMarco; M. D. Diamond; P. J. Doe; G. Doucas; P. -L. Drouin; F. A. Duncan; M. Dunford; E. D. Earle; S. R. Elliott; H. C. Evans; G. T. Ewan; J. Farine; H. Fergani; F. Fleurot; R. J. Ford; J. A. Formaggio; N. Gagnon; J. TM. Goon; K. Graham; E. Guillian; S. Habib; R. L. Hahn; A. L. Hallin; E. D. Hallman; P. J. Harvey; R. Hazama; W. J. Heintzelman; J. Heise; R. L. Helmer; A. Hime; C. Howard; M. Huang; P. Jagam; B. Jamieson; N. A. Jelley; M. Jerkins; K. J. Keeter; J. R. Klein; L. L. Kormos; M. Kos; C. Kraus; C. B. Krauss; A. Krueger; T. Kutter; C. C. M. Kyba; R. Lange; J. Law; I. T. Lawson; K. T. Lesko; J. R. Leslie; I. Levine; J. C. Loach; R. MacLellan; S. Majerus; H. B. Mak; J. Maneira; R. Martin; N. McCauley; A. B. McDonald; S. R. McGee; M. L. Miller; B. Monreal; J. Monroe; B. G. Nickel; A. J. Noble; H. M. O'Keeffe; N. S. Oblath; R. W. Ollerhead; G. D. Orebi Gann; S. M. Oser; R. A. Ott; S. J. M. Peeters; A. W. P. Poon; G. Prior; S. D. Reitzner; K. Rielage; B. C. Robertson; R. G. H. Robertson; M. H. Schwendener; J. A. Secrest; S. R. Seibert; O. Simard; J. J. Simpson; D. Sinclair; P. Skensved; T. J. Sonley; L. C. Stonehill; G. Tesic; N. Tolich; T. Tsui; R. Van Berg; B. A. VanDevender; C. J. Virtue; B. L. Wall; D. Waller; H. Wan Chan Tseung; D. L. Wark; P. J. S. Watson; J. Wendland; N. West; J. F. Wilkerson; J. R. Wilson; J. M. Wouters; A. Wright; M. Yeh; F. Zhang; K. Zuber

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) has confirmed the standard solar model and neutrino oscillations through the observation of neutrinos from the solar core. In this paper we present a search for neutrinos associated with sources other than the solar core, such as gamma-ray bursters and solar flares. We present a new method for looking for temporal coincidences between neutrino events and astrophysical bursts of widely varying intensity. No correlations were found between neutrinos detected in SNO and such astrophysical sources.

  5. Detection of Inclined and Horizontal Showers in the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elewyck, V. van [Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304 (5613) Malarguee (Argentina)

    2006-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory can detect with high efficiency the air showers induced by ultra-high energy cosmic rays incident at large zenith angles {theta} > 60 deg. We describe here the specific characteristics of inclined and horizontal showers, as well as the characteristics of their signal in the surface detector. We point out their relevance both to extend the potential of the detector, and in the context of the detection of high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

  6. Radial Velocity Jitter in Stars from the California and Carnegie Planet Search at Keck Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Wright

    2005-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    I present an empirical model for predicting a star's radial velocity jitter from its B-V color, activity level, and absolute magnitude. This model is based on observations of 450 well- observed stars from Keck Observatory for the California and Carnegie Planet Search Program. The model includes noise from both astrophysical sources and systematic errors, and describes jitter as generally increasing with a star's activity and height above the main sequence.

  7. Looking for matter enhanced neutrino oscillations via day v. night asymmetries in the NCD phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ott, Richard Anthony, III

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To measure the regeneration of electron neutrinos during passage through the Earth via the MSW effect, the difference in electron neutrino flux between day and night is measured at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ...

  8. Atlantis 11-32 Report Page 1 Update on Experiments Associated with CORK Subseafloor Observatories installed during IODP

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    ) replacement of data loggers at Holes 1026B, 1301A, and 1301B and installation of a supplemental battery associated with other CORK observatories, microbiological sampling, and in-situ analysis

  9. Low-energy-threshold analysis of the Phase I and Phase II data sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Monroe, Jocelyn

    Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is Teff=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved ...

  10. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 773 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Implementation of the first level trigger for the auger observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (Suomijarvi, 2001) powered by solar panels. The station electronics communicates with the observatory delivery schedule, power consump- tion, functionality, and cost goals. This paper discusses the trigger

  11. Observatory Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    . Gaudette, G. Milton, B.Sur Chalk River Laboratories, AECL Research, Chalk River, Ontario K0J 1J0 CANADA 2 J

  12. The Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics cosmic ray veto system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crisler, M.; Hall, J.; Ramberg, E.; Kiper, T.; /Fermilab

    2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A photomultiplier (PMT) readout system has been designed for use by the cosmic ray veto systems of two warm liquid bubble chambers built at Fermilab by the Chicagoland Observatory Underground for Particle Physics (COUPP) collaboration. The systems are designed to minimize the infrastructure necessary for installation. Up to five PMTs can be daisy-chained on a single data link using standard Category 5 network cable. The cables is also serve distribute to low voltage power. High voltage is generated locally on each PMT base. Analog and digital signal processing is also performed locally. The PMT base and system controller design and performance measurements are presented.

  13. Calibration of Muon Reconstruction Algorithms Using an External Muon Tracking System at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SNO Collaboration

    2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

    To help constrain the algorithms used in reconstructing high-energy muon events incident on the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO), a muon tracking system was installed. The system consisted of four planes of wire chambers, which were triggered by scintillator panels. The system was integrated with SNO's main data acquisition system and took data for a total of 95 live days. Using cosmic-ray events reconstructed in both the wire chambers and in SNO's water Cherenkov detector, the external muon tracking system was able to constrain the uncertainty on the muon direction to better than 0.6 degrees.

  14. Proposal for a quantity based data model in the Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brian Thomas; Edward Shaya

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose the beginnings of a data model for the Virtual Observatory (VO) built up from simple ``quantity'' objects. In this paper we present how an object-oriented, domain (or namespace)-scoped simple quantity may be used to describe astronomical data. Our model is designed around the requirements that it be searchable and serve as a transport mechanism for all types of VO data and meta-data. In this paper we describe this model in terms of an OWL ontology and UML diagrams. An XML schema is available online.

  15. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Sensitivity to Steady and Transient Sources of Gamma Rays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; lvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Daz-Vlez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, L X; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Prez-Prez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) Gamma-Ray Observatory is designed to record air showers produced by cosmic rays and gamma rays between 100 GeV and 100 TeV. Because of its large field of view and high livetime, HAWC is well-suited to measure gamma rays from extended sources, diffuse emission, and transient sources. We describe the sensitivity of HAWC to emission from the extended Cygnus region as well as other types of galactic diffuse emission; searches for flares from gamma-ray bursts and active galactic nuclei; and the first measurement of the Crab Nebula with HAWC-30.

  16. The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Dark Matter, Cosmology, and Fundamental Physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; lvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Daz-Vlez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, L X; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Prez-Prez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory (HAWC) is designed to perform a synoptic survey of the TeV sky. The high energy coverage of the experiment will enable studies of fundamental physics beyond the Standard Model, and the large field of view of the detector will enable detailed studies of cosmologically significant backgrounds and magnetic fields. We describe the sensitivity of the full HAWC array to these phenomena in five contributions shown at the 33rd International Cosmic Ray Conference in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil (July 2013).

  17. Inverse diffraction for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Torre, Gabriele; Benvenuto, Federico; Massone, Anna Maria; Piana, Michele

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Atmospheric Imaging Assembly in the Solar Dynamics Observatory provides full Sun images every 1 seconds in each of 7 Extreme Ultraviolet passbands. However, for a significant amount of these images, saturation affects their most intense core, preventing scientists from a full exploitation of their physical meaning. In this paper we describe a mathematical and automatic procedure for the recovery of information in the primary saturation region based on a correlation/inversion analysis of the diffraction pattern associated to the telescope observations. Further, we suggest an interpolation-based method for determining the image background that allows the recovery of information also in the region of secondary saturation (blooming).

  18. The Fluorescence Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory - a Calorimeter for UHECR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keilhauer, B. [Universitaet Karlsruhe, Institut fuer Experimentelle Kernphysik, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany); Observatorio Pierre Auger, Av. San Martin Norte 304, 5613 Malarguee (Argentina)

    2006-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a hybrid detector for ultrahigh energy cosmic rays (UHECR) with energies above 1018.5 eV. Currently the first part of the Observatory nears completion in the southern hemisphere in Argentina. One detection technique uses over 1600 water Cherenkov tanks at ground where samples of secondary particles of extensive air showers (EAS) are detected. The second technique is a calorimetric measurement of the energy deposited by EAS in the atmosphere. Charged secondary particles of EAS lose part of their energy in the atmosphere via ionization. The deposited energy is converted into excitation of molecules of the air and afterwards partly emitted as fluorescence light mainly from nitrogen in the wavelength region between 300 and 400 nm. This light is observed with 24 fluorescence telescopes in 4 stations placed at the boundary of the surface array. This setup provides a combined measurement of the longitudinal shower development and the lateral particle distribution at ground of the same event. Details on the fluorescence technique and the necessary atmospheric monitoring will be presented, as well as first physics results on UHECR.

  19. HAWC (High Altitude Water Cherenkov) Observatory for Surveying the TeV Sky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dingus, Brenda L. [Los Alamos National Lab, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The HAWC observatory is a proposed, large field of view ({approx}2 sr), high duty cycle (>95%) TeV gamma-ray detector which uses a large pond of water (150 m x 150 m) located at 4300 m elevation. The pond contains 900 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) to observe the relativistic particles and secondary gamma lays in extensive air showers. This technique has been used successfully by the Milagro observatory to detect known, as well as new, TeV sources. The PMTs and much of the data acquisition system of Milagro will be reused for HAWC, resulting in a cost effective detector ({approx}6M$) that can be built quickly in 2-3 years. The improvements of HAWC will result in {approx}15 times the sensitivity of Milagro. HAWC will survey 2{pi} sr of the sky every day with a sensitivity of the Crab flux at a median energy of 1 TeV. After five years of operation half of the sky will be surveyed to 20 mCrab. This sensitivity will likely result in the discovery of new sources as well as allow the identification of which GLAST sources extend to higher energies.

  20. The exposure of the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is a detector for ultra-high energy cosmic rays. It consists of a surface array to measure secondary particles at ground level and a fluorescence detector to measure the development of air showers in the atmosphere above the array. The 'hybrid' detection mode combines the information from the two subsystems. We describe the determination of the hybrid exposure for events observed by the fluorescence telescopes in coincidence with at least one water-Cherenkov detector of the surface array. A detailed knowledge of the time dependence of the detection operations is crucial for an accurate evaluation of the exposure. We discuss the relevance of monitoring data collected during operations, such as the status of the fluorescence detector, background light and atmospheric conditions, that are used in both simulation and reconstruction.

  1. SSALMON - The Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wedemeyera, S; Brajsa, R; Barta, M; Hudson, H; Fleishman, G; Loukitcheva, M; Fleck, B; Kontar, E; De Pontieu, B; Tiwari, S; Kato, Y; Soler, R; Yagoubov, P; Black, J H; Antolin, P; Gunar, S; Labrosse, N; Benz, A O; Nindos, A; Steffen, M; Scullion, E; Doyle, J G; Zaqarashvili, T; Hanslmeier, A; Nakariakov, V M; Heinzel, P; Ayres, T; Karlicky, M

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Solar Simulations for the Atacama Large Millimeter Observatory Network (SSALMON) was initiated in 2014 in connection with two ALMA development studies. The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is a powerful new tool, which can also observe the Sun at high spatial, temporal, and spectral resolution. The international SSALMONetwork aims at coordinating the further development of solar observing modes for ALMA and at promoting scientific opportunities for solar physics with particular focus on numerical simulations, which can provide important constraints for the observing modes and can aid the interpretation of future observations. The radiation detected by ALMA originates mostly in the solar chromosphere - a complex and dynamic layer between the photosphere and corona, which plays an important role in the transport of energy and matter and the heating of the outer layers of the solar atmosphere. Potential targets include active regions, prominences, quiet Sun regions, flares. Here, we give a...

  2. The sensitivity of the ICAL detector at India-based Neutrino Observatory to neutrino oscillation parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaur, Daljeet; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) will host a 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector that will be able to detect muon tracks and hadron showers produced by Charged-Current muon neutrino interactions in the detector. The ICAL experiment will be able to determine the precision of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters and neutrino mass hierarchy using atmospheric muon neutrinos through earth matter effect. In this paper, we report on the sensitivity for the atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters ($\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$) for the ICAL detector using the reconstructed neutrino energy and muon direction as observables. We apply realistic resolutions and efficiencies obtained by the ICAL collaboration with a GEANT4-based simulation to reconstruct neutrino energy and muon direction. Our study shows that using neutrino energy and muon direction as observables for a $\\chi^{2}$ analysis, ICAL detector can measure $\\sin^{2}\\theta_{23}$ and $|\\Delta m^{2}_{32}|$ with 13% and 4%...

  3. Simulation for Iron Calorimeter prototype detector of India-based Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghosh, Tapasi; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) collaboration is proposing to build a 50 kton magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector in an underground laboratory to be located in South India. As a first step towards building the ICAL detector, a 35 ton prototype of the same design has been set up on the surface to track cosmic ray muons. This paper discusses the prototype detector geometry simulation by GEANT4, and the detector response to the cosmic muons. We have developed a track fitting procedure based on the Kalman Filter technique for the prototype detector when the detector is exposed to single muon tracks. The relevant track parameters i.e., momentum, direction and charge are reconstructed and analyzed. Finally we show the resolution of reconstructed momenta.

  4. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abbasi, R.; Takai, H.; Allen, C.; Beard, L.; Belz, J.; Besson, D.; Byrne, M.; Abou Bakr Othman, M.; Farhang-Boroujeny, B.; Gardner, A.; et al

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest conventional cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe themoredesign and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.less

  5. Anisotropy studies around the Galactic Centre at EeV energies with the Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; Aramo, C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, IAFE /Buenos Aires, CONICET /Pierre Auger Observ. /La Plata U. /Natl. Tech. U., San Rafael /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo U.; ,

    2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data from the Pierre Auger Observatory are analyzed to search for anisotropies near the direction of the Galactic Centre at EeV energies. The exposure of the surface array in this part of the sky is already significantly larger than that of the fore-runner experiments. Our results do not support previous findings of localized excesses in the AGASA and SUGAR data. We set an upper bound on a point-like flux of cosmic rays arriving from the Galactic Centre which excludes several scenarios predicting sources of EeV neutrons from Sagittarius A. Also the events detected simultaneously by the surface and fluorescence detectors (the ''hybrid'' data set), which have better pointing accuracy but are less numerous than those of the surface array alone, do not show any significant localized excess from this direction.

  6. Search for Very High Energy Emission from Satellite-triggered GRBs with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parkinson, P M S; Atkins, R; Benbow, W; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Gisler, G; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; Lansdell, C P; Linnemann, J T; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Nmethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Saz-Parkinson, P M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Wilson, M E; Xu, X W; Yodh, G B

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro gamma-ray observatory employs a water Cherenkov detector to observe extensive air showers produced by high energy particles interacting in the Earth's atmosphere. Milagro has a wide field of view (2 sr) and high duty cycle (> 90%) making it an ideal all-sky monitor of the northern hemisphere in the 100 GeV to 100 TeV energy range. More than 45 satellite-triggered gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have occurred in the field of view of Milagro since January 2000, with the rate of bursts increasing significantly with the launch of Swift. We discuss the most recent results of a search for very high energy (VHE) emission from these GRBs.

  7. Goals and strategies in the global control design of the OAJ Robotic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yanes-Daz, A; Antn, J L; Rueda-Teruel, F; Moles, M; Cenarro, A J; Marn-Franch, A; Ederoclite, A; Gruel, N; Varela, J; Cristbal-Hornillos, D; Chueca, S; Daz-Martn, M C; Guilln, L; Luis-Simoes, R; Macas, N; Lamadrid, J L; Lpez-Sainz, A; Hernndez-Fuertes, J; Valdivielso, L; de Oliveira, C Mendes; Penteado, P; Schoenell, W; Kanaan, A

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    There are many ways to solve the challenging problem of making a high performance robotic observatory from scratch. The Observatorio Astrof\\'isico de Javalambre (OAJ) is a new astronomical facility located at the Sierra de Javalambre (Teruel, Spain) whose primary role will be to conduct all-sky astronomical surveys. The OAJ control system has been designed under a global point of view including not only astronomical subsystems but also infrastructure and other facilities. Three main factors have been considered in the design of a global control system for the robotic OAJ: quality, reliability and efficiency. We propose CIA (Control Integrated Architecture) design and OEE (Overall Equipment Effectiveness) as a key performance indicator in order to improve operation processes, minimizing resources and obtain high cost reduction maintaining quality requirements. The OAJ subsystems considered for the control integrated architecture are the following: two wide-field telescopes and their instrumentation, active opt...

  8. New method for atmospheric calibration at the Pierre Auger Observatory using FRAM, a robotic astronomical telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Segev BenZvi; Martina Bohacova; Brian Connolly; Jiri Grygar; Miroslav Hrabovsky; Tatiana Karova; Dusan Mandat; Petr Necesal; Dalibor Nosek; Libor Nozka; Miroslav Palatka; Miroslav Pech; Michael Prouza; Jan Ridky; Petr Schovanek; Radomir Smida; Petr Travnicek; Primo Vitale; Stefan Westerhoff; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    FRAM - F/(Ph)otometric Robotic Atmospheric Monitor is the latest addition to the atmospheric monitoring instruments of the Pierre Auger Observatory. An optical telescope equipped with CCD camera and photometer, it automatically observes a set of selected standard stars and a calibrated terrestrial source. Primarily, the wavelength dependence of the attenuation is derived and the comparison between its vertical values (for stars) and horizontal values (for the terrestrial source) is made. Further, the integral vertical aerosol optical depth can be obtained. A secondary program of the instrument, the detection of optical counterparts of gamma-ray bursts, has already proven successful. The hardware setup, software system, data taking procedures, and first analysis results are described in this paper.

  9. Telescope Array Radar (TARA) Observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abbasi, R. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Takai, H. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Allen, C. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Beard, L. [Purdue Univ., West Lafayette, IN (United States); Belz, J. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Besson, D. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States). Moscow Engineering and Physics Inst. (Russian Federation); Byrne, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Abou Bakr Othman, M. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Farhang-Boroujeny, B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gardner, A. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Gillman, W.H. [Gillman and Associates, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hanlon, W. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hanson, J. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Jayanthmurthy, C. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Kunwar, S. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Larson, S. L. [Utah State Univ., Logan, UT (United States); Myers, I. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Prohira, S. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Ratzlaff, K. [Univ. of Kansas, Lawrence, KS (United States); Sokolsky, P. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Thomson, G. B. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Von Maluski, D. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Construction was completed during summer 2013 on the Telescope Array RAdar (TARA) bi-static radar observatory for Ultra-High Energy Cosmic Rays (UHECR). TARA is co-located with the Telescope Array, the largest conventional cosmic ray detector in the Northern Hemisphere, in radio-quiet Western Utah. TARA employs an 8 MW Effective Radiated Power (ERP) VHF transmitter and smart receiver system based on a 250 MS/s data acquisition system in an effort to detect the scatter of sounding radiation by UHECR-induced atmospheric ionization. TARA seeks to demonstrate bi-static radar as a useful new remote sensing technique for UHECRs. In this report, we describe the design and performance of the TARA transmitter and receiver systems.

  10. Probing low-x QCD with cosmic neutrinos at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anchordoqui, Luis A.; /Northeastern U. /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda M.; /Oxford U.; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Sarkar, Subir; /Oxford U.

    2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The sources of the observed ultra-high energy cosmic rays must also generate ultra-high energy neutrinos. Deep inelastic scattering of these neutrinos with nucleons on Earth probe center-of-mass energies {radical}s {approx} 100 TeV, well beyond those attainable at terrestrial colliders. By comparing the rates for two classes of observable events, any departure from the benchmark (unscreened perturbative QCD) neutrino-nucleon cross-section can be constrained. Using the projected sensitivity of the Pierre Auger Observatory to quasi-horizontal showers and Earth-skimming tau neutrinos, we show that a ''Super-Auger'' detector can thus provide an unique probe of strong interaction dynamics.

  11. Ultra-stable performance of an underground-based laser interferometer observatory for gravitational waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Sato; S. Miyoki; S. Telada; D. Tatsumi; A. Araya; M. Ohashi; Y. Totsuka; M. Fukushima; M. -K. Fujimoto

    2004-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to detect the rare astrophysical events that generate gravitational wave (GW) radiation, sufficient stability is required for GW antennas to allow long-term observation. In practice, seismic excitation is one of the most common disturbances effecting stable operation of suspended-mirror laser interferometers. A straightforward means to allow more stable operation is therefore to locate the antenna, the ``observatory'', at a ``quiet'' site. A laser interferometer gravitational wave antenna with a baseline length of 20m (LISM) was developed at a site 1000m underground, near Kamioka, Japan. This project was a unique demonstration of a prototype laser interferometer for gravitational wave observation located underground. The extremely stable environment is the prime motivation for going underground. In this paper, the demonstrated ultra-stable operation of the interferometer and a well-maintained antenna sensitivity are reported.

  12. Solving the Solar Neutrino Problem 2 km Underground -- the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. W. P. Poon; for the SNO Collaboration

    2003-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) is capable of measuring simultaneously the flux of electron-type neutrinos and the total flux of all active flavours of neutrinos originating from the Sun. A model-independent test of neutrino flavour transformation was performed by comparing these two measurements. Assuming an undistorted neutrino energy spectrum, this transformation has been definitively demonstrated in the pure D2O phase of the SNO experiment. In the second phase with dissolved NaCl in the D2O, the total active solar neutrino flux was measured without any assumption on the energy dependence of flavour transformation. In this talk, results from these measurements, their physics implications and the current status of the SNO experiment are presented.

  13. Operating Water Cherenkov Detectors in high altitude sites for the Large Aperture GRB Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; Gonzlez, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; Lpez, J A; Martnez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Nez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Prez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) are efficient detectors for detecting GRBs in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV energy range using the single particle technique, given their sensitivity to low energy secondary photons produced by high energy photons when cascading in the atmosphere. The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) operates arrays of WCD in high altitude sites (above 4500 m a.s.l.) in Bolivia, Mexico and Venezuela, with planned extension to Peru. Details on the operation and stability of these WCD in remote sites with high background rates of particles will be detailed, and compared to simulations. Specific issues due to operation at high altitude, atmospheric effects and solar activity, as well as possible hardware enhancements will also be presented.

  14. Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Generation region of pulsating aurora obtained simultaneously by the FAST satellite and a Syowa 2004; published 7 October 2004. [1] We have carried out a direct comparison of pulsating auroras), with reference to simultaneous data obtained by a Syowa-Iceland conjugate pair of observatories. The aurora

  15. Proceedings of ICRC 2001: 1 c Copernicus Gesellschaft 2001 Background Rejection in the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    in the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory C. Sinnis for the Milagro Collaboration Los Alamos National Laboratory Abstract. Recent advances in TeV gamma ray astronomy are a result of the ability to differentiate between extensive air showers generated by gamma rays and hadronic cosmic rays. Air Cherenkov telescopes have

  16. Design of a telescope pointing and tracking subsystem for the Big Bear Solar Observatory New Solar Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the design of the TPTS. Modern control systems for medium-sized telescopes are generally distributed systems Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory will use a distributed system to control the telescope, dome dome opening with the telescope optical axis. Keywords: NST, software, telescope, control system, solar

  17. Kenya International Radio Observatory Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi,Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kenya International Radio Observatory (KIRO) Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi,Joseph Otieno Malo, University of Nairobi, KenyaKenya Bo Thide, Uppsala University, SwedenBo Thide, Uppsala.environmental, and communications research. Located in northern Kenya, on the geomagnetic equator,Located in northern Kenya

  18. 53Estimating the Diameter of the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    with a mass of 120 solar masses. Can it escape or remain where it is? Space Math http, as well as NASA's Swift, the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed been observed. This behavior and the X-ray spectrum, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support

  19. First Light of the 1.6 meter off-axis New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -axis configurations, the NST adopts a unique off-axis optical design. Since the Secondary Mirror (SM) and SM supportFirst Light of the 1.6 meter off-axis New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory Wenda Caoab, Nicolas Gorceixb, Roy Coulterb, Aaron Coulterb, Philip R. Goodeab aCenter for Solar-Terrestrial Research

  20. Giant Liquid Argon Observatory for Proton Decay, Neutrino Astrophysics and CP-violation in the Lepton Sector (GLACIER)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Badertscher, A; Degunda, U; Epprecht, L; Horikawa, S; Knecht, L; Lazzaro, C; Lussi, D; Marchionni, A; Natterer, G; Otiougova, P; Resnati, F; Rubbia, A; Strabel, C; Ulbricht, J; Viant, T

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GLACIER (Giant Liquid Argon Charge Imaging ExpeRiment) is a large underground observatory for proton decay search, neutrino astrophysics and CP-violation studies in the lepton sector. Possible underground sites are studied within the FP7 LAGUNA project (Europe) and along the JPARC neutrino beam in collaboration with KEK (Japan). The concept is scalable to very large masses.

  1. BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean acoustic tomography, sensor webs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Jannette B.

    . NIHOUS Associate Professor, PhD 1983, UC Berkeley. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC), marineFaculty BRUCE HOWE Chair and Professor , PhD 1986, UC San Diego. Ocean observatories, ocean in the ocean, atmospheric and ionospheric tomography. KWOK FAI CHEUNG Professor , PhD 1991, British Columbia

  2. Measurement of radium concentration in water with Mn-coated beads at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. C. Andersen

    2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a method to measure the concentration of 224Ra and 226Ra in the heavy water target used to detect solar neutrinos at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and in the surrounding light water shielding. A water volume of (50-400) m^3 from the detector is passed through columns which contain beads coated with a compound of manganese oxide onto which the Ra dissolved in the water is adsorbed. The columns are removed, dried, and mounted below an electrostatic chamber into which the Rn from the decay of trapped Ra is continuously flowed by a stream of nitrogen gas. The subsequent decay of Rn gives charged Po ions which are swept by the electric field onto a solid-state alpha counter. The content of Ra in the water is inferred from the measured decay rates of 212Po, 214Po, 216Po, and 218Po. The Ra extraction efficiency is >95%, the counting efficiency is 24% for 214Po and 6% for 216Po, and the method can detect a few atoms of 224Ra per m^3 and a few tens of thousands of atoms of 226Ra per m^3. Converted to equivalent equilibrium values of the topmost elements of the natural radioactive chains, the detection limit in a single assay is a few times 10^(-16) g Th or U/cm^3. The results of some typical assays are presented and the contributions to the systematic error are discussed.

  3. LIMITS ON THE STOCHASTIC GRAVITATIONAL WAVE BACKGROUND FROM THE NORTH AMERICAN NANOHERTZ OBSERVATORY FOR GRAVITATIONAL WAVES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Demorest, P. B.; Ransom, S. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States)] [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Ferdman, R. D.; Kaspi, V. M. [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue Universite, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada)] [Department of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue Universite, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Gonzalez, M. E.; Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, BC V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Nice, D. [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Lafayette College, Easton, PA 18042 (United States); Arzoumanian, Z. [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology and X-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)] [Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology and X-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 662, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Brazier, A.; Cordes, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Burke-Spolaor, S.; Lazio, J. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States)] [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91106 (United States); Chamberlin, S. J.; Ellis, J.; Giampanis, S. [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States)] [Center for Gravitation, Cosmology and Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, P.O. Box 413, Milwaukee, WI 53201 (United States); Finn, L. S. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Freire, P. [Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fur Radioastronomie, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Jenet, F. [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States)] [Center for Gravitational Wave Astronomy, University of Texas at Brownsville, Brownsville, TX 78520 (United States); Lommen, A. N. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Franklin and Marshall College, P.O. Box 3003, Lancaster, PA 17604 (United States); McLaughlin, M. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States)] [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, P.O. Box 6315, Morgantown, WV 26505 (United States); and others

    2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an analysis of high-precision pulsar timing data taken as part of the North American Nanohertz Observatory for Gravitational Waves (NANOGrav) project. We have observed 17 pulsars for a span of roughly five years using the Green Bank and Arecibo radio telescopes. We analyze these data using standard pulsar timing models, with the addition of time-variable dispersion measure and frequency-variable pulse shape terms. Sub-microsecond timing residuals are obtained in nearly all cases, and the best rms timing residuals in this set are {approx}30-50 ns. We present methods for analyzing post-fit timing residuals for the presence of a gravitational wave signal with a specified spectral shape. These optimally take into account the timing fluctuation power removed by the model fit, and can be applied to either data from a single pulsar, or to a set of pulsars to detect a correlated signal. We apply these methods to our data set to set an upper limit on the strength of the nHz-frequency stochastic supermassive black hole gravitational wave background of h{sub c} (1 yr{sup -1}) < 7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -15} (95%). This result is dominated by the timing of the two best pulsars in the set, PSRs J1713+0747 and J1909-3744.

  4. Effects of mode degeneracy in the LIGO Livingston Observatory recycling cavity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andri M. Gretarsson; Erika D'Ambrosio; Valery Frolov; Brian O'Reilly; Peter K. Fritschel

    2007-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the electromagnetic fields in a Pound-Drever-Hall locked, marginally unstable, Fabry-Perot cavity as a function of small changes in the cavity length during resonance. More specifically, we compare the results of a detailed numerical model with the behavior of the recycling cavity of the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO) detector that is located in Livingston, Louisiana. In the interferometer's normal mode of operation, the recycling cavity is stabilized by inducing a thermal lens in the cavity mirrors with an external CO2 laser. During the study described here, this thermal compensation system was not operating, causing the cavity to be marginally optically unstable and cavity modes to become degenerate. In contrast to stable optical cavities, the modal content of the resonating beam in the uncompensated recycling cavity is significantly altered by very small cavity length changes. This modifies the error signals used to control the cavity length in such a way that the zero crossing point is no longer the point of maximum power in the cavity nor is it the point where the input beam mode in the cavity is maximized.

  5. An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for theSudbury Neutrino Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amsbaugh, J.F.; Anaya, J.M.; Banar, J.; Bowles, T.J.; Browne,M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Dai, X.; H.Deng,X.; Di Marco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Esch, E.-I.; Fergani, H.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Franklin, J.E.; Geissbuehler, P.; Germani, J.V.; Goldschmidt, A.; Guillian, E.; Hallin, A.L.; Harper, G.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heise, J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Kormos, L.L.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko,K.T.; Loach, J.C.; Majerus, S.; Manor, J.; McGee, S.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, G.G.; Morissette, B.; Myers, A.; Oblath, N.S.; O'Kee, H.M.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner,S.D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Skensved, P.; Smith, A.R.; Smith,M.W.E.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill,L.C.; Thornewell, P.M.; Tolich, N.; VanDevender, B.A.; VanWechel, T.D.; Wall, B.L.; Tseung, H.W.C.; Wendland,J.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wouters, J.M.

    2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An array of Neutral-Current Detectors (NCDs) has been builtin order to make a unique measurement of the total active ux of solarneutrinos in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Data in the thirdphase of the SNO experiment were collected between November 2004 andNovember 2006, after the NCD array was added to improve theneutral-current sensitivity of the SNO detector. This array consisted of36 strings of proportional counters lled with a mixture of 3He and CF4gas capable of detecting the neutrons liberated by the neutrino-deuteronneutral current reaction in the D2O, and four strings lled with a mixtureof 4He and CF4 gas for background measurements. The proportional counterdiameter is 5 cm. The total deployed array length was 398 m. The SNO NCDarray is the lowest-radioactivity large array of proportional countersever produced. This article describes the design, construction,deployment, and characterization of the NCD array, discusses theelectronics and data acquisition system, and considers event signaturesand backgrounds.

  6. The Data Reduction Pipeline for the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nidever, David L; Prieto, Carlos Allende; Beland, Stephane; Bender, Chad; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Burton, Adam; Desphande, Rohit; Fleming, Scott W; Perez, Ana Elia Garcia; Hearty, Fred R; Majewski, Steven R; Meszaros, Szabolcs; Muna, Demitri; Nguyen, Duy; Schiavon, Ricardo P; Shetrone, Matthew; Skrutskie, Michael F; Wilson, John C

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), part of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey III, explores the stellar populations of the Milky Way using the Sloan 2.5-m telescope linked to a high resolution (R~22,500), near-infrared (1.51-1.70 microns) spectrograph with 300 optical fibers. For over 100,000 predominantly red giant branch stars that APOGEE targeted across the Galactic bulge, disks and halo, the collected high S/N (>100 per half-resolution element) spectra provide accurate (~0.1 km/s) radial velocities, stellar atmospheric parameters, and precise (~0.1 dex) chemical abundances for about 15 chemical species. Here we describe the basic APOGEE data reduction software that reduces multiple 3D raw data cubes into calibrated, well-sampled, combined 1D spectra, as implemented for the SDSS-III/APOGEE data releases (DR10 and DR12). The processing of the near-IR spectral data of APOGEE presents some challenges for reduction, including automated sky subtraction and telluric correction over a ...

  7. Constraints on Type IIn Supernova Progenitor Outbursts from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bilinski, Christopher; Li, Weidong; Williams, G Grant; Zheng, WeiKang; Filippenko, Alexei V

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We searched through roughly 12 years of archival survey data acquired by the Katzman Automatic Imaging Telescope (KAIT) as part of the Lick Observatory Supernova Search (LOSS) in order to detect or place limits on possible progenitor outbursts of Type IIn supernovae (SNe~IIn). The KAIT database contains multiple pre-SN images for 5 SNe~IIn (plus one ambiguous case of a SN IIn/imposter) within 50 Mpc. No progenitor outbursts are found using the false discovery rate (FDR) statistical method in any of our targets. Instead, we derive limiting magnitudes (LMs) at the locations of the SNe. These limiting magnitudes (typically reaching $m_R \\approx 19.5\\,\\mathrm{mag}$) are compared to outbursts of SN 2009ip and $\\eta$ Car, plus additional simulated outbursts. We find that the data for SN 1999el and SN 2003dv are of sufficient quality to rule out events $\\sim40$ days before the main peak caused by initially faint SNe from blue supergiant (BSG) precursor stars, as in the cases of SN 2009ip and SN 2010mc. These SNe~IIn...

  8. New superconducting toroidal magnet system for IAXO, the international AXion observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shilon, I.; Dudarev, A.; Silva, H.; Wagner, U.; Kate, H. H. J. ten [European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), CH-1211, Genve 23 (Switzerland)

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Axions are hypothetical particles that were postulated to solve one of the puzzles arising in the standard model of particle physics, namely the strong CP (Charge conjugation and Parity) problem. The new International AXion Observatory (IAXO) will incorporate the most promising solar axions detector to date, which is designed to enhance the sensitivity to the axion-photon coupling by one order of magnitude beyond the limits of the current state-of-the-art detector, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST). The IAXO detector relies on a high-magnetic field distributed over a very large volume to convert solar axions into X-ray photons. Inspired by the successful realization of the ATLAS barrel and end-cap toroids, a very large superconducting toroid is currently designed at CERN to provide the required magnetic field. This toroid will comprise eight, one meter wide and twenty one meter long, racetrack coils. The system is sized 5.2 m in diameter and 25 m in length. Its peak magnetic field is 5.4 T with a stored energy of 500 MJ. The magnetic field optimization process to arrive at maximum detector yield is described. In addition, materials selection and their structure and sizing has been determined by force and stress calculations. Thermal loads are estimated to size the necessary cryogenic power and the concept of a forced flow supercritical helium based cryogenic system is given. A quench simulation confirmed the quench protection scheme.

  9. On the sensitivity of the HAWC observatory to gamma-ray bursts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Aguilar, S; Alfaro, R; Almaraz, E; lvarez, C; lvarez-Romero, J de D; lvarez, M; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Badillo, C; Barber, A; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; Bentez, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Bernal, A; Bonamente, E; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R; Cabrera, I; Carramiana, A; Carrasco, L; Castillo, M; Chambers, L; Conde, R; Condreay, P; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; D'Olivo, J C; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; Delay, S; Delepine, D; DeYoung, T; Diaz, L; Diaz-Cruz, L; Dingus, B L; Duvernois, M A; Edmunds, D; Ellsworth, R W; Fick, B; Fiorino, D W; Flandes, A; Fraija, N I; Galindo, A; Garca-Luna, J L; Garca-Torales, G; Garfias, F; Gonzlez, L X; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Guzmn-Ceron, C; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harris, T; Hays, E; Hernandez-Cervantes, L; Hntemeyer, P H; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Jimenez, J J; Karn, P; Kelley-Hoskins, N; Kieda, D; Langarica, R; Lara, A; Lauer, R; Lee, W H; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garca, R; Martnez, H; Martnez, J; Martnez, L A; Martnez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Martos, M; Matthews, J; McEnery, J E; Medina-Tanco, G; Mendoza-Torres, J E; Miranda-Romagnoli, P A; Montaruli, T; Moreno, E; Mostafa, M; Napsuciale, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Tapia, A Olmos; Orozco, V; Prez, V; Prez-Prez, E G; Perkins, J S; Pretz, J; Ramirez, C; Ramrez, I; Rebello, D; Rentera, A; Reyes, J; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Rosado, A; Ryan, J M; Sacahui, J R; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Shoup, A; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, W; Surez, F; Suarez, N; Taboada, I; Tellez, A F; Tenorio-Tagle, G; Tepe, A; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Valdes-Galicia, J; Vanegas, P; Vasileiou, V; Vzquez, O; Vzquez, X; Villaseor, L; Wall, W; Walters, J S; Warner, D; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the sensitivity of HAWC to Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs). HAWC is a very high-energy gamma-ray observatory currently under construction in Mexico at an altitude of 4100 m. It will observe atmospheric air showers via the water Cherenkov method. HAWC will consist of 300 large water tanks instrumented with 4 photomultipliers each. HAWC has two data acquisition (DAQ) systems. The main DAQ system reads out coincident signals in the tanks and reconstructs the direction and energy of individual atmospheric showers. The scaler DAQ counts the hits in each photomultiplier tube (PMT) in the detector and searches for a statistical excess over the noise of all PMTs. We show that HAWC has a realistic opportunity to observe the high-energy power law components of GRBs that extend at least up to 30 GeV, as it has been observed by Fermi LAT. The two DAQ systems have an energy threshold that is low enough to observe events similar to GRB 090510 and GRB 090902b with the characteristics observed by Fermi LAT. HAWC will prov...

  10. Physics Potential of the ICAL detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The ICAL Collaboration; Shakeel Ahmed; M. Sajjad Athar; Rashid Hasan; Mohammad Salim; S. K. Singh; S. S. R. Inbanathan; Venktesh Singh; V. S. Subrahmanyam; Shiba Prasad Behera; Vinay B. Chandratre; Nitali Dash; Vivek M. Datar; V. K. S. Kashyap; Ajit K. Mohanty; Lalit M. Pant; Animesh Chatterjee; Sandhya Choubey; Raj Gandhi; Anushree Ghosh; Deepak Tiwari; Ali Ajmi; S. Uma Sankar; Prafulla Behera; Aleena Chacko; Sadiq Jafer; James Libby; K. Raveendrababu; K. R. Rebin; D. Indumathi; K. Meghna; S. M. Lakshmi; M. V. N. Murthy; Sumanta Pal; G. Rajasekaran; Nita Sinha; Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla; Amina Khatun; Poonam Mehta; Vipin Bhatnagar; R. Kanishka; A. Kumar; J. S. Shahi; J. B. Singh; Monojit Ghosh; Pomita Ghoshal; Srubabati Goswami; Chandan Gupta; Sushant Raut; Sudeb Bhattacharya; Suvendu Bose; Ambar Ghosal; Abhik Jash; Kamalesh Kar; Debasish Majumdar; Nayana Majumdar; Supratik Mukhopadhyay; Satyajit Saha; B. S. Acharya; Sudeshna Banerjee; Kolahal Bhattacharya; Sudeshna Dasgupta; Moon Moon Devi; Amol Dighe; Gobinda Majumder; Naba K. Mondal; Asmita Redij; Deepak Samuel; B. Satyanarayana; Tarak Thakore; C. D. Ravikumar; A. M. Vinodkumar; Gautam Gangopadhyay; Amitava Raychaudhuri; Brajesh C. Choudhary; Ankit Gaur; Daljeet Kaur; Ashok Kumar; Sanjeev Kumar; Md. Naimuddin; Waseem Bari; Manzoor A. Malik; Jyotsna Singh; S. Krishnaveni; H. B. Ravikumar; C. Ranganathaiah; Swapna Mahapatra; Saikat Biswas; Subhasis Chattopadhyay; Rajesh Ganai; Tapasi Ghosh; Y. P. Viyogi

    2015-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The upcoming 50 kt magnetized iron calorimeter (ICAL) detector at the India-based Neutrino Observatory (INO) is designed to study the atmospheric neutrinos and antineutrinos separately over a wide range of energies and path lengths. The primary focus of this experiment is to explore the Earth matter effects by observing the energy and zenith angle dependence of the atmospheric neutrinos in the multi-GeV range. This study will be crucial to address some of the outstanding issues in neutrino oscillation physics, including the fundamental issue of neutrino mass hierarchy. In this document, we present the physics potential of the detector as obtained from realistic detector simulations. We describe the simulation framework, the neutrino interactions in the detector, and the expected response of the detector to particles traversing it. The ICAL detector can determine the energy and direction of the muons to a high precision, and in addition, its sensitivity to multi-GeV hadrons increases its physics reach substantially. Its charge identification capability, and hence its ability to distinguish neutrinos from antineutrinos, makes it an efficient detector for determining the neutrino mass hierarchy. In this report, we outline the analyses carried out for the determination of neutrino mass hierarchy and precision measurements of atmospheric neutrino mixing parameters at ICAL, and give the expected physics reach of the detector with 10 years of runtime. We also explore the potential of ICAL for probing new physics scenarios like CPT violation and the presence of magnetic monopoles.

  11. 54X-rays from Hot Gases Near the SN1979C Black Hole The Chandra X-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is in solar mass units, and R is in kilometers. Problem 1 - Combining these equations using the method-Newton and the German ROSAT observatory revealed a bright source of X-rays that has remained steady for the 12 years, or distribution of X-rays with energy, support the idea that the object in SN 1979C is a black hole being fed

  12. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross-Section at ?(s) = 57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abrue, P

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [50522(stat)-36+28(syst)]??mb is found.

  13. Measurement of the Proton-Air Cross Section at ?s=57 TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almeda, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; et al

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [50522(stat)+28-36(syst)] mb is found.

  14. Weather induced effects on extensive air showers observed with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carla Bleve; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The rate of events measured with the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is found to be modulated by the weather conditions. This effect is due to the increasing amount of matter traversed by the shower as the ground pressure increases and to the inverse proportionality of the Moliere radius to the air density near ground. Air-shower simulations with different realistic profiles of the atmosphere support this interpretation of the observed effects.

  15. Measurement of the ?[subscript e] and total [superscript 8]B solar neutrino fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory phase-III data set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Formaggio, Joseph A.

    This paper details the solar neutrino analysis of the 385.17-day phase-III data set acquired by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). An array of [superscript 3]He proportional counters was installed in the heavy-water ...

  16. URBAN ATMOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY (UAO) FIRST PLANNING WORKSHOP, JANUARY 27-28-2003. WORKSHOP SUMMARY.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    REYNOLDS,R.M.; LEE,H.N.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Urban Atmospheric Observatory (UAO) First Planning Workshop was held on 27-28 January 2003 at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML) in downtown Manhattan, New York City. The meeting was well attended by local, state, and national administrators, as well as scientists and engineers from the national laboratories and academia. The real-time intensive UAO is a necessary step toward the development and validation of new technologies in support of the New York City emergency management and anti-terrorism effort. The real-time intensive UAO will be a dense array of meteorological instrumentation, remote sensing and satellite products and model output, as well as radiation detection, gamma spectrometer and aerosol measurements focused onto a small area in the heart of Manhattan. Such a test-bed, developed in a somewhat homogeneous urban area, and with a well-developed communication and data collection backbone, will be of immense utility for understanding how models of all scales can be improved and how they can best be integrated into the city's emergency program. The goal of the First Planning Workshop was to bring together a small group of experts in the fields of urban meteorology, modeling from mesoscale to fine-mesh computational fluid dynamics, instrumentation, communications and visualization, in order to (1) establish the importance of the observational program, (2) define the most efficient and cost-effective design for the program, (3) define needed intensive observational efforts and establish a schedule, and (4) define the importance of the UAO in emergency operations. The workshop achieved its goals with the enthusiastic participation of over forty persons. There was a synthesis of ideas towards a world-class facility that would benefit both immediate emergency management activities and, over an extended time, the entire field of urban meteorology and contaminant dispersion modeling.

  17. EMERGING DIMMINGS OF ACTIVE REGIONS OBSERVED BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang Jun; Yang Shuhong [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100012 (China); Liu Yang; Sun Xudong, E-mail: zjun@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: shuhongyang@nao.cas.cn, E-mail: yliu@sun.stanford.edu, E-mail: xudong@sun.stanford.edu [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305-4085 (United States)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the observations from the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, we statistically investigate the emerging dimmings (EDs) of 24 isolated active regions (IARs) from 2010 June to 2011 May. All the IARs show EDs in lower-temperature lines (e.g., 171 A) at their early emerging stages. Meanwhile, in higher temperature lines (e.g., 211 A), the ED regions brighten continuously. There are two types of EDs: fan-shaped and halo-shaped. There are 19 fan-shaped EDs and 5 halo-shaped ones. The EDs appear to be delayed by several to more than ten hours relative to the first emergence of the IARs. The shortest delay is 3.6 hr and the longest is 19.0 hr. The EDs last from 3.3 hr to 14.2 hr, with a mean duration of 8.3 hr. Before the appearance of the EDs, the emergence rate of the magnetic flux of the IARs is between 1.2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx hr{sup -1} to 1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} Mx hr{sup -1}. The larger the emergence rate is, the shorter the delay time is. While the dimmings appear, the magnetic flux of the IARs ranges from 8.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 19} Mx to 1.3 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 21} Mx. These observations imply that the reconfiguration of the coronal magnetic fields due to reconnection between the newly emerging flux and the surrounding existing fields results in a new thermal distribution which leads to a dimming for the cooler channel (171 A) and brightening in the warmer channels.

  18. Luminous AGB stars in nearby galaxies. A study using Virtual Observatory tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Tsalmantza; E. Kontizas; L. Cambresy; F. Genova; A. Dapergolas; M. Kontizas

    2005-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims. This study focuses on very luminous Mbol1.5 mag and H-Ks>0.4 mag in the LMC, SMC, M31, and M33 from 2MASS data. Methods.The data were taken from the 2MASS All-Sky Point Source catalogue archive. We used Virtual Observatory tools and took advantage of its capabilities at various stages in the analysis. Results. It is well known that stars with the colors we selected correspond mainly to carbon stars. Although the most luminous AGBs detected here contain a large number of carbon stars,they are not included in existing catalogues produced from data in the optical domain, where they are not visible since they are dust-enshrouded. A comparison of the AGB stars detected with combined near and mid-infrared data from MSX and 2MASS in the LMC shows that 10% of the bright AGB stars are bright carbon stars never detected before and that the other 50% are OH/IR oxygen rich stars, whereas the 40% that remain were not cross-matched. Conclusions. The catalogues of the most luminous AGB stars compiled here are an important complement to existing data. In the LMC, these bright AGB stars are centrally located, whereas they are concentrated in an active star-formation ring in M31. In the SMC and M33, there are not enough of them to draw definite conclusions, although they tend to be centrally located. Their luminosity functions are similar for the four galaxies we studied.

  19. THE GREAT OBSERVATORIES ALL-SKY LIRG SURVEY: COMPARISON OF ULTRAVIOLET AND FAR-INFRARED PROPERTIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Howell, Justin H.; Armus, Lee; Surace, Jason A.; Petric, Andreea; Bridge, Carrie; Haan, Sebastian; Inami, Hanae [Spitzer Science Center, MS 220-6, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Mazzarella, Joseph M.; Chan, Ben H. P.; Madore, Barry F. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, Aaron S.; Kim, Dong-Chan [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Sanders, David B. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Appleton, Phil; Frayer, David T.; Lord, Steven; Schulz, Bernhard [NASA Herschel Science Center, IPAC, MS 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Bothun, Greg [Department of Physics, University of Oregon, Eugene, OR 97403 (United States); Charmandaris, Vassilis [University of Crete, Department of Physics, Heraklion 71003 (Greece); Melbourne, Jason, E-mail: jhhowell@ipac.caltech.ed [Caltech Optical Observatories, Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Mail Stop 320-47, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Great Observatories All-sky LIRG Survey (GOALS) consists of a complete sample of 202 luminous infrared galaxies (LIRGs) selected from the IRAS Revised Bright Galaxy Sample (RBGS). The galaxies span the full range of interaction stages, from isolated galaxies to interacting pairs to late stage mergers. We present a comparison of the UV and infrared properties of 135 galaxies in GOALS observed by GALEX and Spitzer. For interacting galaxies with separations greater than the resolution of GALEX and Spitzer ({approx}2''-6''), we assess the UV and IR properties of each galaxy individually. The contribution of the FUV to the measured star formation rate (SFR) ranges from 0.2% to 17.9%, with a median of 2.8% and a mean of 4.0% {+-} 0.4%. The specific star formation rate (SSFR) of the GOALS sample is extremely high, with a median value (3.9 x 10{sup -10} yr{sup -1}) that is comparable to the highest SSFRs seen in the Spitzer Infrared Nearby Galaxies Survey sample. We examine the position of each galaxy on the IR excess-UV slope (IRX-{beta}) diagram as a function of galaxy properties, including IR luminosity and interaction stage. The LIRGs on average have greater IR excesses than would be expected based on their UV colors if they obeyed the same relations as starbursts with L{sub IR} < 10{sup 11} L{sub sun} or normal late-type galaxies. The ratio of L{sub IR} to the value one would estimate from the IRX-{beta} relation published for lower luminosity starburst galaxies ranges from 0.2 to 68, with a median value of 2.7. A minimum of 19% of the total IR luminosity in the RBGS is produced in LIRGs and ultraluminous infrared galaxies with red UV colors ({beta}>0). Among resolved interacting systems, 32% contain one galaxy which dominates the IR emission while the companion dominates the UV emission. Only 21% of the resolved systems contain a single galaxy which dominates both wavelengths.

  20. Observations of comet ISON (C/2012 S1) from Lowell observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knight, Matthew M. [Lowell Observatory, 1400 W. Mars Hill Rd., Flagstaff, AZ 86001 (United States); Schleicher, David G., E-mail: knight@lowell.edu [Visiting Scientist at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, 11100 Johns Hopkins Rd., Laurel, MD 20723 (United States)

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We observed the dynamically new sungrazing comet ISON (C/2012 S1) extensively at Lowell Observatory throughout 2013 in order to characterize its behavior prior to perihelion. ISON had typical abundances for an Oort Cloud comet. Its dust production, as measured by Af?, remained nearly constant during the apparition but its CN gas production increased by ?50 . The minimum active area necessary to support observed water production rates exceeded the likely surface area of the nucleus and suggests a population of icy grains in the coma. Together with the flattening of the dust radial profile over time, this is consistant with ejection of a large quantity of slow moving dust and icy grains in the coma at large heliocentric distance. The dust morphology was dominated by the tail, but a faint sunward dust fan was detected in March, April, May, and September. We imaged multiple gas species in September, October, and November. All gas species were more extended than the dust coma, although only CN had sufficient signal-to-noise for detailed morphological study. Excess CN signal was observed in the sunward hemisphere in September and early October. In November the excess CN signal was in the tailward hemisphere and two faint CN features appeared approximately orthogonal to the tail with position angles varying by about 20 from night to night. Using numerical modeling, we best reproduced the orientation and shape of these features as well as the bulk brightness with a pole oriented approximately toward the Sun and a single source located within ?35 of the equator. Variations in position angle and relative brightness of the CN features from night to night suggest a rotation period shorter than 24 hr. The production rates and coma morphology suggest a nucleus that was active over nearly its entire sunward facing hemisphere in September and October but which underwent a significant mass loss event, potentially including fragmentation, shortly before November 1. Significant subsequent mass loss likely continued at the same site over subsequent days/weeks and may have catastrophically weakened the nucleus prior to perihelion.

  1. Observations of roAp stars at the Mt. Dushak-Erekdag station of Odessa Astronomical Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. N. Dorokhova; N. I. Dorokhov

    1998-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Since 1992, observations of roAp stars have been carried out using the dual-channel photometer attached to the 0.8m telescope, which is situated in Central Asia, at the Mt. Dushak-Erekdag station of Odessa Astronomical Observatory. Some results of observations of gamma Equ and of HD 134214 are presented. 5 stars were investigated as roAp candidates. The Fourier spectra of 4 stars did not show any variability in the high-frequency region. The Fourier spectrum of HD 99563 revealed a peak at a frequency f=128.9 c/d and with a semi-amplitude of 3.98 mmag.

  2. The Pierre Auger Observatory scaler mode for the study of solar activity modulation of galactic cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin Observ. /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Balseiro Inst., San Carlos de Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples; Aminaei, A.; /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; Anchordoqui, L.; /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee /Lisbon, LIFEP /Lisbon, IST

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since data-taking began in January 2004, the Pierre Auger Observatory has been recording the count rates of low energy secondary cosmic ray particles for the self-calibration of the ground detectors of its surface detector array. After correcting for atmospheric effects, modulations of galactic cosmic rays due to solar activity and transient events are observed. Temporal variations related with the activity of the heliosphere can be determined with high accuracy due to the high total count rates. In this study, the available data are presented together with an analysis focused on the observation of Forbush decreases, where a strong correlation with neutron monitor data is found.

  3. Origin of atmospheric aerosols at the Pierre Auger Observatory using studies of air mass trajectories in South America

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curci, Gabriele

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Observatory is making significant contributions towards understanding the nature and origin of ultra-high energy cosmic rays. One of its main challenges is the monitoring of the atmosphere, both in terms of its state variables and its optical properties. The aim of this work is to analyze aerosol optical depth $\\tau_{\\rm a}(z)$ values measured from 2004 to 2012 at the observatory, which is located in a remote and relatively unstudied area of the Pampa Amarilla, Argentina. The aerosol optical depth is in average quite low - annual mean $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.04$ - and shows a seasonal trend with a winter minimum - $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.03$ -, and a summer maximum - $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.06$ -, and an unexpected increase from August to September - $\\tau_{\\rm a}(3.5~{\\rm km})\\sim 0.055$). We computed backward trajectories for the years 2005 to 2012 to interpret the air mass origin. Winter nights with low aerosol concentrations show air masses originating from t...

  4. Re-evaluation of total and Umkehr ozone data from NOAA-CMDL Dobson spectrophotometer observatories. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komhyr, W.D.; Quincy, D.M.; Grass, R.D.; Koenig, G.L. [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States)] [Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States); [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Lab.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work to improve the quality of total ozone and Umkehr data obtained in the past at the NOAA Climate Monitoring and Diagnostics Laboratory and the Dobson spectrophotometer ozone observatories. The authors present results of total ozone data re-evaluations for ten stations: Byrd, Antarctica; Fairbanks, Alaska; Hallett, Antarctica; Huancayo, Peru; Haute Provence, France; Lauder, New Zealand; Perth, Australia; Poker Flat, Alaska; Puerto Montt, Chile; and South Pole, Antarctica. The improved data will be submitted in early 1996 to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) World Ozone Data Center (WODC), and the Atmospheric Environment Service for archiving. Considerable work has been accomplished, also, in reevaluating Umkehr data from seven of the stations, viz., Huancayo, Haute Provence, Lauder, Perth, Poker Flat, Boulder, Colorado; and Mauna Loa, Hawaii.

  5. A Virtual Observatory Census to Address Dwarfs Origins. AVOCADO - I. Science goals, sample selection and analysis tools

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Snchez-Janssen, R; Garca-Vargas, M; Gomes, J M; Huertas-Company, M; Jimnez-Esteban, F; Moll, M; Papaderos, P; Prez-Montero, E; Rodrigo, C; Almeida, J Snchez; Solano, E

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (Abridged) AVOCADO aims at establishing firm conclusions on the formation and evolution of dwarf galaxies by constructing and analysing a homogeneous, multiwavelength dataset for a statistically significant sample of approximately 6500 nearby dwarfs (M_i > -18 mag). We present the sample selection criteria and describe the suite of analysis tools, some of them developed in the framework of the Virtual Observatory. We make use of optical spectra and UV-to-NIR imaging of the dwarf sample to derive SFRs, stellar masses, ages and metallicities - which are further supplemented with structural parameters that are used to classify them morphologically. This dataset, coupled with a detailed characterisation of each dwarf's environment, allows for a fully comprehensive investigation of their origins and to track the potential evolutionary paths between the different dwarf types. We characterise the local environment of all dwarfs in our sample, paying special attention to trends with current star formation activity. W...

  6. Planck Intermediate Results. XXXVI. Optical identification and redshifts of Planck SZ sources with telescopes in the Canary Islands Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ade, P A R; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Barrena, R; Bartolo, N; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoit-Lvy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bikmaev, I; Bhringer, H; Bonaldi, A; Bonavera, L; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Burenin, R; Burigana, C; Calabrese, E; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chon, G; Christensen, P R; Clements, D L; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Comis, B; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Dahle, H; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Dor, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Elsner, F; Enlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Ferragamo, A; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Fromenteau, S; Galeotta, S; Galli, S; Ganga, K; Gnova-Santos, R T; Giard, M; Gjerlw, E; Gonzlez-Nuevo, J; Grski, K M; Gruppuso, A; Hansen, F K; Harrison, D L; Hempel, A; Hernndez-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Hurier, G; Jaffe, T R; Keihnen, E; Keskitalo, R; Khamitov, I; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Lattanzi, M; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; Len-Tavares, J; Levrier, F; Lietzen, H; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vrnle, M; Lpez-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macas-Prez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Martin, P G; Martnez-Gonzlez, E; Masi, S; Matarrese, S; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Miville-Deschnes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Oxborrow, C A; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Perdereau, O; Pettorino, V; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Pratt, G W; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Renzi, A; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Rossetti, M; Roudier, G; Rubio-Martn, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savelainen, M; Savini, G; Scott, D; Stolyarov, V; Streblyanska, A; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tramonte, D; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Wehus, I K; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of approximately three years of observations of Planck Sunyaev-Zeldovich (SZ) sources with telescopes at the Canary Islands observatories, as part of the general optical follow-up programme undertaken by the Planck collaboration. In total, 78 SZ sources are discussed. Deep imaging observations were obtained for most of those sources; spectroscopic observations in either in long-slit or multi-object modes were obtained for many. We found optical counterparts for 73 of the 78 candidates. This sample includes 53 spectroscopic redshifts determinations, 20 of them obtained with a multi-object spectroscopic mode. The sample contains new redshifts for 27 Planck clusters that were not included in the first Planck SZ source catalogue (PSZ1).

  7. Ocean pC02 Data from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, 1994 - 2009

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Takahashi, T.

    The Earth Institute of Columbia University has, as an overarching goal, to help achieve sustainable development primarily by expanding the world's understanding of Earth as one integrated system. The Earth Institute encompasses centers of excellence with an established reputation for groundbreaking research, including the renowned Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory (LDEO), home to more than 200 researchers who study Earth and its systems. The Carbon Dioxide Research Group, led by Dr. Taro Takahashi, studies pCO2 in seawater, carbon sequestration models related to deep aquifers, and air-sea CO2 flux. Datasets from ocean cruises in the years 1994 to the present are made available from this website, along with a list of publications, and cruise maps.

  8. Infrared Spectroscopic Data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), SDSS-III Data Release 10

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) Data Release 10 is the first spectroscopic release from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), including spectra and derived stellar parameters for more than 50,000 stars. APOGEE is an ongoing survey of ~100,000 stars accessing all parts of the Milky Way. By operating in the infrared (H-band) portion of the electromagnetic spectrum, APOGEE is better able to detect light from stars lying in dusty regions of the Milky Way than surveys conducted in the optical, making this survey particularly well-suited for exploring the Galactic disk and bulge. APOGEE's high resolution spectra provide detailed information about the stellar atmospheres; DR10 provides derived effective temperatures, surface gravities, overall metallicities, and information on the abundances of several chemical elements. [copied from http://www.sdss3.org/dr10/irspec/

  9. Search for signatures of magnetically-induced alignment in the arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Buenos Aires, CONICET; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of an analysis of data recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory in which we search for groups of directionally-aligned events (or ''multiplets'') which exhibit a correlation between arrival direction and the inverse of the energy. These signatures are expected from sets of events coming from the same source after having been deflected by intervening coherent magnetic fields. The observation of several events from the same source would open the possibility to accurately reconstruct the position of the source and also measure the integral of the component of the magnetic field orthogonal to the trajectory of the cosmic rays. We describe the largest multiplets found and compute the probability that they appeared by chance from an isotropic distribution. We find no statistically significant evidence for the presence of multiplets arising from magnetic deflections in the present data.

  10. The GONG++ DATA Processing Pipeline F. Hill,, J. Bolding, C. Toner, T. Corbard, S. Wampler, B. Goodrich, J. Goodrich, P. Eliason National Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corbard, Thierry

    The GONG++ DATA Processing Pipeline F. Hill,, J. Bolding, C. Toner, T. Corbard, S. Wampler, B. Goodrich, J. Goodrich, P. Eliason­ National Solar Observatory Introduction The GONG++ data processing pipeline is currently under construction. This system will produce the GONG++ science data products

  11. An overview by Professor Ian Robson, Director The Royal Observatory, at the bottom of the picture, is located on Blackford Hill, from

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittley, Eric

    milestones, traffic lights, weekly meetings Project costs use of historical costings to estimate better technology " Comprises 85 staff scientists, engineers, support Focused on the strategic role: project and construction of new astronomical telescopes and instruments for the world's great observatories we are world

  12. First Detection of CO in a Low Surface Brightness Galaxy 1 Arecibo Observatory, NAIC/Cornell University, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Neil, Karen

    /Cornell University, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612 P. Hofner Physics Department, University of Puerto Rico at Rio Piedras, P.O. Box 23343, San Juan, Puerto Rico 00931 and Arecibo Observatory, NAIC/Cornell University, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, Puerto Rico 00612 E. Schinnerer California Institute of Technology

  13. TeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    to search the entire northern hemisphere for such objects. The search for short bursts of TeV gamma rays hasTeV GAMMA-RAY SURVEY OF THE NORTHERN HEMISPHERE SKY USING THE MILAGRO OBSERVATORY R. Atkins,1,2 W) are presented. The data have been searched for steady point sources of TeV gamma rays between declinations of 1

  14. An improved limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aab, Alexander; Aglietta, Marco; Ahn, Eun-Joo; Samarai, Imen Al; Albuquerque, Ivone; Allekotte, Ingomar; Allison, Patrick; Almela, Alejandro; Castillo, Jesus Alvarez; Alvarez-Muiz, Jaime; Batista, Rafael Alves; Ambrosio, Michelangelo; Aminaei, Amin; Anchordoqui, Luis; Andringa, Sofia; Aramo, Carla; Aranda, Victor Manuel; Arqueros, Fernando; Arsene, Nicusor; Asorey, Hernn Gonzalo; Assis, Pedro; Aublin, Julien; Ave, Maximo; Avenier, Michel; Avila, Gualberto; Awal, Nafiun; Badescu, Alina Mihaela; Barber, Kerri B; Buml, Julia; Baus, Colin; Beatty, Jim; Becker, Karl Heinz; Bellido, Jose A; Berat, Corinne; Bertaina, Mario Edoardo; Bertou, Xavier; Biermann, Peter; Billoir, Pierre; Blaess, Simon G; Blanco, Alberto; Blanco, Miguel; Bleve, Carla; Blmer, Hans; Boh?ov, Martina; Boncioli, Denise; Bonifazi, Carla; Borodai, Nataliia; Brack, Jeffrey; Brancus, Iliana; Bridgeman, Ariel; Brogueira, Pedro; Brown, William C; Buchholz, Peter; Bueno, Antonio; Buitink, Stijn; Buscemi, Mario; Caballero-Mora, Karen S; Caccianiga, Barbara; Caccianiga, Lorenzo; Candusso, Marina; Caramete, Laurentiu; Caruso, Rossella; Castellina, Antonella; Cataldi, Gabriella; Cazon, Lorenzo; Cester, Rosanna; Chavez, Alan G; Chiavassa, Andrea; Chinellato, Jose Augusto; Chudoba, Jiri; Cilmo, Marco; Clay, Roger W; Cocciolo, Giuseppe; Colalillo, Roberta; Coleman, Alan; Collica, Laura; Coluccia, Maria Rita; Conceio, Ruben; Contreras, Fernando; Cooper, Mathew J; Cordier, Alain; Coutu, Stephane; Covault, Corbin; Cronin, James; Dallier, Richard; Daniel, Bruno; Dasso, Sergio; Daumiller, Kai; Dawson, Bruce R; de Almeida, Rogerio M; de Jong, Sijbrand J; De Mauro, Giuseppe; Neto, Joao de Mello; De Mitri, Ivan; de Oliveira, Jaime; de Souza, Vitor; del Peral, Luis; Deligny, Olivier; Dembinski, Hans; Dhital, Niraj; Di Giulio, Claudio; Di Matteo, Armando; Diaz, Johana Chirinos; Castro, Mary Lucia Daz; Diogo, Francisco; Dobrigkeit, Carola; Docters, Wendy; D'Olivo, Juan Carlos; Dorofeev, Alexei; Hasankiadeh, Qader Dorosti; Dova, Maria Teresa; Ebr, Jan; Engel, Ralph; Erdmann, Martin; Erfani, Mona; Escobar, Carlos O; Espadanal, Joao; Etchegoyen, Alberto; Falcke, Heino; Fang, Ke; Farrar, Glennys; Fauth, Anderson; Fazzini, Norberto; Ferguson, Andrew P; Fernandes, Mateus; Fick, Brian; Figueira, Juan Manuel; Filevich, Alberto; Filip?i?, Andrej; Fox, Brendan; Fratu, Octavian; Freire, Martn Miguel; Fuchs, Benjamin; Fujii, Toshihiro; Garca, Beatriz; Garcia-Pinto, Diego; Gate, Florian; Gemmeke, Hartmut; Gherghel-Lascu, Alexandru; Ghia, Piera Luisa; Giaccari, Ugo; Giammarchi, Marco; Giller, Maria; G?as, Dariusz; Glaser, Christian; Glass, Henry; Golup, Geraldina; Berisso, Mariano Gmez; Vitale, Primo F Gmez; Gonzlez, Nicols; Gookin, Ben; Gordon, Jacob; Gorgi, Alessio; Gorham, Peter; Gouffon, Philippe; Griffith, Nathan; Grillo, Aurelio; Grubb, Trent D; Guardincerri, Yann; Guarino, Fausto; Guedes, Germano; Hampel, Matas Rolf; Hansen, Patricia; Harari, Diego; Harrison, Thomas A; Hartmann, Sebastian; Harton, John; Haungs, Andreas; Hebbeker, Thomas; Heck, Dieter; Heimann, Philipp; Herve, Alexander E; Hill, Gary C; Hojvat, Carlos; Hollon, Nicholas; Holt, Ewa; Homola, Piotr; Hrandel, Jrg; Horvath, Pavel; Hrabovsk, Miroslav; Huber, Daniel; Huege, Tim; Insolia, Antonio; Isar, Paula Gina; Jandt, Ingolf; Jansen, Stefan; Jarne, Cecilia; Johnsen, Jeffrey A; Josebachuili, Mariela; Kp, Alex; Kambeitz, Olga; Kampert, Karl Heinz; Kasper, Peter; Katkov, Igor; Kgl, Balazs; Keilhauer, Bianca; Keivani, Azadeh; Kemp, Ernesto; Kieckhafer, Roger; Klages, Hans; Kleifges, Matthias; Kleinfeller, Jonny; Krause, Raphael; Krohm, Nicole; Krmer, Oliver; Kuempel, Daniel; Kunka, Norbert; LaHurd, Danielle; Latronico, Luca; Lauer, Robert; Lauscher, Markus; Lautridou, Pascal; Coz, Sandra Le; Lebrun, Didier; Lebrun, Paul; de Oliveira, Marcelo Augusto Leigui; Letessier-Selvon, Antoine; Lhenry-Yvon, Isabelle; Link, Katrin; Lopes, Luis; Lpez, Rebeca; Casado, Aida Lpez; Louedec, Karim; Lu, Lu; Lucero, Agustin; Malacari, Max; Maldera, Simone; Mallamaci, Manuela; Maller, Jennifer; Mandat, Dusan; Mantsch, Paul; Mariazzi, Analisa; Marin, Vincent; Mari?, Ioana; Marsella, Giovanni; Martello, Daniele; Martin, Lilian; Martinez, Humberto; Bravo, Oscar Martnez; Martraire, Diane; Meza, Jimmy Masas; Mathes, Hermann-Josef; Mathys, Sebastian; Matthews, James; Matthews, John; Matthiae, Giorgio; Maurel, Detlef; Maurizio, Daniela; Mayotte, Eric; Mazur, Peter; Medina, Carlos; Medina-Tanco, Gustavo; Meissner, Rebecca; Mello, Victor; Melo, Diego; Menshikov, Alexander; Messina, Stefano

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Neutrinos in the cosmic ray flux with energies near 1 EeV and above are detectable with the Surface Detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. We report here on searches through Auger data from 1 January 2004 until 20 June 2013. No neutrino candidates were found, yielding a limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos that challenges the Waxman-Bahcall bound predictions. Neutrino identification is attempted using the broad time-structure of the signals expected in the SD stations, and is efficiently done for neutrinos of all flavors interacting in the atmosphere at large zenith angles, as well as for "Earth-skimming" neutrino interactions in the case of tau neutrinos. In this paper the searches for downward-going neutrinos in the zenith angle bins $60^\\circ-75^\\circ$ and $75^\\circ-90^\\circ$ as well as for upward-going neutrinos, are combined to give a single limit. The $90\\%$ C.L. single-flavor limit to the diffuse flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos with an $E^{-2}$ spectrum in the energy ra...

  15. A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P; Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D

    2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associatedmoresystematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE -7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV 20 eV.less

  16. RESULTS OF THE LICK OBSERVATORY SUPERNOVA SEARCH FOLLOW-UP PHOTOMETRY PROGRAM: BVRI LIGHT CURVES OF 165 TYPE Ia SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ganeshalingam, Mohan; Li Weidong; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Anderson, Carmen; Foster, Griffin; Griffith, Christopher V.; Joubert, Niels; Leja, Joel; Macomber, Brent; Pritchard, Tyler; Thrasher, Patrick; Winslow, Dustin [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gates, Elinor L.; Grigsby, Bryant J.; Lowe, Thomas B. [Lick Observatory, P.O. Box 85, Mount Hamilton, CA 95140 (United States)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present BVRI light curves of 165 Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia) from the Lick Observatory Supernova Search follow-up photometry program from 1998 through 2008. Our light curves are typically well sampled (cadence of 3-4 days) with an average of 21 photometry epochs. We describe our monitoring campaign and the photometry reduction pipeline that we have developed. Comparing our data set to that of Hicken et al., with which we have 69 overlapping supernovae (SNe), we find that as an ensemble the photometry is consistent, with only small overall systematic differences, although individual SNe may differ by as much as 0.1 mag, and occasionally even more. Such disagreement in specific cases can have significant implications for combining future large data sets. We present an analysis of our light curves which includes template fits of light-curve shape parameters useful for calibrating SNe Ia as distance indicators. Assuming the B - V color of SNe Ia at 35 days past maximum light can be presented as the convolution of an intrinsic Gaussian component and a decaying exponential attributed to host-galaxy reddening, we derive an intrinsic scatter of {sigma} = 0.076 {+-} 0.019 mag, consistent with the Lira-Phillips law. This is the first of two papers, the second of which will present a cosmological analysis of the data presented herein.

  17. Characterizing the Habitable Zones of Exoplanetary Systems with a Large Ultraviolet/Visible/Near-IR Space Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    France, Kevin; Linsky, Jeffrey; Roberge, Aki; Ayres, Thomas; Barman, Travis; Brown, Alexander; Davenport, James; Desert, Jean-Michel; Domagal-Goldman, Shawn; Fleming, Brian; Fontenla, Juan; Fossati, Luca; Froning, Cynthia; Hallinan, Gregg; Hawley, Suzanne; Hu, Renyu; Kaltenegger, Lisa; Kasting, James; Kowlaski, Adam; Loyd, Parke; Mauas, Pablo; Miguel, Yamila; Osten, Rachel; Redfield, Seth; Rugheimer, Sarah; Schneider, Christian; Segura, Antigona; Stocke, John; Tian, Feng; Tumlinson, Jason; Vieytes, Mariela; Walkowicz, Lucianne; Wood, Brian; Youngblood, Allison

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding the surface and atmospheric conditions of Earth-size, rocky planets in the habitable zones (HZs) of low-mass stars is currently one of the greatest astronomical endeavors. Knowledge of the planetary effective surface temperature alone is insufficient to accurately interpret biosignature gases when they are observed in the coming decades. The UV stellar spectrum drives and regulates the upper atmospheric heating and chemistry on Earth-like planets, is critical to the definition and interpretation of biosignature gases, and may even produce false-positives in our search for biologic activity. This white paper briefly describes the scientific motivation for panchromatic observations of exoplanetary systems as a whole (star and planet), argues that a future NASA UV/Vis/near-IR space observatory is well-suited to carry out this work, and describes technology development goals that can be achieved in the next decade to support the development of a UV/Vis/near-IR flagship mission in the 2020s.

  18. Precovery of near-Earth asteroids by a citizen-science project of the Spanish Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solano, E; Pulido, R; Carry, B

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes a citizen-science project conducted by the Spanish Virtual Observatory (SVO) to improve the orbits of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs) using data from astronomical archives. The list of NEAs maintained at the Minor Planet Center (MPC) is checked daily to identify new objects or changes in the orbital parameters of already catalogued objects. Using NEODyS we compute the position and magnitude of these objects at the observing epochs of the 938 046 images comprising the Eigth Data Release of the Sloan Digitised Sky Survey (SDSS). If the object lies within the image boundaries and the magnitude is brighter than the limiting magnitude, then the associated image is visually inspected by the project's collaborators (the citizens) to confirm or discard the presence of the NEA. If confirmed, accurate coordinates and, sometimes, magnitudes are submitted to the MPC. Using this methodology, 3,226 registered users have made during the first fifteen months of the project more than 167,000 measurements wh...

  19. Search for gamma-rays from the unusually bright GRB 130427A with the HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velzquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; BenZvi, S Y; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De Len, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Harding, J P; Hui, C M; Hntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H Len; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-Garca, R; Malone, K; Marinelli, A; Marinelli, S S; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martnez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Torres, E Mendoza; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostaf, M; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T O; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Ponce, E; Pretz, J; Prez-Prez, E G; Rivire, C; Rosa-Gonzlez, D; Salazar, H; Greus, F Salesa; Sandoval, A; Schneider, M; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Woodle, K Sparks; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H; lvarez, J D

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The long gamma-ray burst (GRB) 130427A was the most powerful burst ever detected with a redshift $z\\lesssim0.5$, featuring the highest energy photon so far detected from a GRB and the longest lasting emission above 100 MeV. The HAWC Gamma-ray Observatory is a new extensive air shower detector currently under construction in central Mexico. It features two data acquisition (DAQ) systems - one designed to readout full air-shower events (main DAQ) and the other one counting the signals in each photomultiplier tube (scaler DAQ). The burst occurred at a zenith angle of $57^\\circ$, when HAWC was running 10% of the final detector and collecting data with the scaler DAQ only. Based on the observed light curve at MeV-GeV energies, 8 different time periods have been searched for prompt and delayed emission from this GRB. In all cases, no statistically significant excess of counts has been found and upper limits have been placed. It is shown that a similar GRB close to zenith would be easily detected by the full HAWC de...

  20. A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P [LIP, Coimbra; Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D

    2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE -7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV 20 eV.

  1. THREE-MINUTE OSCILLATIONS ABOVE SUNSPOT UMBRA OBSERVED WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY/ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY AND NOBEYAMA RADIOHELIOGRAPH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reznikova, V. E.; Shibasaki, K. [Nobeyama Solar Radio Observatory/NAOJ, Nagano 384-1305 (Japan); Sych, R. A. [Key Laboratory of Solar Activity, NAOC, Beijing 100012 (China); Nakariakov, V. M., E-mail: reznik@nro.nao.ac.jp [Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Three-minute oscillations over a sunspot's umbra in AR 11131 were observed simultaneously in UV/EUV emission by the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO)/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) and in radio emission by the Nobeyama Radioheliograph (NoRH). We use 24 hr series of SDO and 8 hr series of NoRH observations to study spectral, spatial, and temporal variations of pulsations in the 5-9 mHz frequency range at different layers of the solar atmosphere. High spatial and temporal resolution of SDO/AIA in combination with long-duration observations allowed us to trace the variations of the cutoff frequency and spectrum of oscillations across the umbra. We found that higher frequency oscillations are more pronounced closer to the umbra's center, while the lower frequencies concentrate on the peripheral parts. We interpreted this discovery as a manifestation of variation of the magnetic field inclination across the umbra at the level of temperature minimum. Possible implications of this interpretation for the diagnostics of sunspot atmospheres are discussed.

  2. Measurement of the proton-air cross-section at $\\sqrt{s}=57$ TeV with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Collaboration, Auger

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report a measurement of the proton-air cross section for particle production at the center-of-mass energy per nucleon of 57 TeV. This is derived from the distribution of the depths of shower maxima observed with the Pierre Auger Observatory: systematic uncertainties are studied in detail. Analyzing the tail of the distribution of the shower maxima, a proton-air cross section of [505 {+-} 22(stat){sub -36}{sup +28}(syst)] mb is found.

  3. Smallholder farmer welfare in a time of changing climate: the role of cropping decisions in local food security in the Nainital District of Uttarakhand, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Marena

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    trees ?12. Do more water harvesting ?13. Do more off-farmtrees 4.1 Do more water harvesting 4.1 Do more off-farma lesser degree, doing more water harvesting and livelihood

  4. Smallholder farmer welfare in a time of changing climate: the role of cropping decisions in local food security in the Nainital District of Uttarakhand, India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Marena

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Climate change and Indian agriculture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .of climate change on Chinas agriculture. Agricultural1 Introduction Climate change and Indian agriculture Recent

  5. A search for anisotropy in the arrival directions of ultra high energy cosmic rays recorded at the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; ,

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations of cosmic ray arrival directions made with the Pierre Auger Observatory have previously provided evidence of anisotropy at the 99% CL using the correlation of ultra high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) with objects drawn from the Veron-Cetty Veron catalog. In this paper we report on the use of three catalog independent methods to search for anisotropy. The 2pt-L, 2pt+ and 3pt methods, each giving a different measure of self-clustering in arrival directions, were tested on mock cosmic ray data sets to study the impacts of sample size and magnetic smearing on their results, accounting for both angular and energy resolutions. If the sources of UHECRs follow the same large scale structure as ordinary galaxies in the local Universe and if UHECRs are deflected no more than a few degrees, a study of mock maps suggests that these three methods can efficiently respond to the resulting anisotropy with a P-value = 1.0% or smaller with data sets as few as 100 events. Using data taken from January 1, 2004 to July 31, 2010 we examined the 20, 30, ..., 110 highest energy events with a corresponding minimum energy threshold of about 51 EeV. The minimum P-values found were 13.5% using the 2pt-L method, 1.0% using the 2pt+ method and 1.1% using the 3pt method for the highest 100 energy events. In view of the multiple (correlated) scans performed on the data set, these catalog-independent methods do not yield strong evidence of anisotropy in the highest energy cosmic rays.

  6. CONSTRAINTS ON THE HEATING OF HIGH-TEMPERATURE ACTIVE REGION LOOPS: OBSERVATIONS FROM HINODE AND THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P. [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States); Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Winebarger, Amy R. [NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, VP 62, Huntsville, AL 35812 (United States)

    2011-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of high-temperature emission in the core of a solar active region using instruments on Hinode and the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). These multi-instrument observations allow us to determine the distribution of plasma temperatures and follow the evolution of emission at different temperatures. We find that at the apex of the high-temperature loops the emission measure distribution is strongly peaked near 4 MK and falls off sharply at both higher and lower temperatures. Perhaps most significantly, the emission measure at 0.5 MK is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude from the peak at 4 MK. We also find that the temporal evolution in broadband soft X-ray images is relatively constant over about 6 hr of observing. Observations in the cooler SDO/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) bandpasses generally do not show cooling loops in the core of the active region, consistent with the steady emission observed at high temperatures. These observations suggest that the high-temperature loops observed in the core of an active region are close to equilibrium. We find that it is possible to reproduce the relative intensities of high-temperature emission lines with a simple, high-frequency heating scenario where heating events occur on timescales much less than a characteristic cooling time. In contrast, low-frequency heating scenarios, which are commonly invoked to describe nanoflare models of coronal heating, do not reproduce the relative intensities of high-temperature emission lines and predict low-temperature emission that is approximately an order of magnitude too large. We also present an initial look at images from the SDO/AIA 94 A channel, which is sensitive to Fe XVIII.

  7. Overview of the Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory: site description and selected science results from 2008 to 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ortega, John; Turnipseed, A.; Guenther, Alex B.; Karl, Thomas G.; Day, D. A.; Gochis, David; Huffman, J. A.; Prenni, Anthony J.; Levin, E. J.; Kreidenweis, Sonia M.; DeMott, Paul J.; Tobo, Y.; Patton, E. G.; Hodzic, Alma; Cui, Y. Y.; Harley, P.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Apel, E. C.; Monson, Russell K.; Eller, A. S.; Greenberg, J. P.; Barth, Mary; Campuzano-Jost, Pedro; Palm, B. B.; Jiminez, J. L.; Aiken, A. C.; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Geron, Chris; Offenberg, J.; Ryan, M. G.; Fornwalt, Paula J.; Pryor, S. C.; Keutsch, Frank N.; DiGangi, J. P.; Chan, A. W.; Goldstein, Allen H.; Wolfe, G. M.; Kim, S.; Kaser, L.; Schnitzhofer, R.; Hansel, A.; Cantrell, Chris; Mauldin, R. L.; Smith, James N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Bio-hydro-atmosphere interactions of Energy, Aerosols, Carbon, H2O, Organics & Nitrogen (BEACHON) project seeks to understand the feedbacks and interrelationships between hydrology, biogenic emissions, carbon assimilation, aerosol properties, clouds and associated feedbacks within water-limited ecosystems. The Manitou Experimental Forest Observatory (MEFO) was established in 2008 by the National Center for Atmospheric Research to address many of the BEACHON research objectives, and it now provides a fixed field site with significant infrastructure. MEFO is a mountainous, semi-arid ponderosa pine-dominated forest site that is normally dominated by clean continental air but is periodically influenced by anthropogenic sources from Colorado Front Range cities. This article summarizes the past and ongoing research activities at the site, and highlights some of the significant findings that have resulted from these measurements. These activities include soil property measurements; hydrological studies; measurements of high-frequency turbulence parameters; eddy covariance flux measurements of water, energy, aerosols and carbon dioxide through the canopy; determination of biogenic and anthropogenic volatile organic compound emissions and their influence on regional atmospheric chemistry; aerosol number and mass distributions; chemical speciation of aerosol particles; characterization of ice and cloud condensation nuclei; trace gas measurements; and model simulations using coupled chemistry and meteorology. In addition to various long-term continuous measurements, three focused measurement campaigns with state-of-the-art instrumentation have taken place since the site was established, and two of these studies are the subjects of this special issue: BEACHON-ROCS (Rocky Mountain Organic Carbon Study, 2010) and BEACHON-RoMBAS (Rocky Mountain Biogenic Aerosol Study, 2011).

  8. Mid-Infrared Observations of Normal Star-Forming Galaxies: The Infrared Space Observatory Key Project Sample

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel A. Dale; Nancy A. Silbermann; George Helou

    2000-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present mid-infrared maps and preliminary analysis for 61 galaxies observed with the ISOCAM instrument aboard the Infrared Space Observatory. Many of the general features of galaxies observed at optical wavelengths---spiral arms, disks, rings, and bright knots of emission---are also seen in the mid-infrared, except the prominent optical bulges are absent at 6.75 and 15 microns. In addition, the maps are quite similar at 6.75 and 15 microns, except for a few cases where a central starburst leads to lower 6.75/15 ratios in the inner region. We also present infrared flux densities and mid-infrared sizes for these galaxies. The mid-infrared color 6.75/15 shows a distinct trend with the far-infrared color 60/100. The quiescent galaxies in our sample (60/100 < 0.6) show 6.75/15 near unity, whereas this ratio drops significantly for galaxies with higher global heating intensity levels. Azimuthally-averaged surface brightness profiles indicate the extent to which the mid-infrared flux is centrally concentrated, and provide information on the radial dependence of mid-infrared colors. The galaxies are mostly well resolved in these maps: almost half of them have < 10% of their flux in the central resolution element. A comparison of optical and mid-infrared isophotal profiles indicates that the optical flux at 4400 Angstroms near the optical outskirts of the galaxies is approximately eight (seven) times that at 6.75 microns (15 microns), comparable with observations of the diffuse quiescent regions of the Milky Way.

  9. Glenn Schneider Steward Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    of Colonel Millis that the TOP of the airship could be used as a platform for apparatus and observers... Much as a serious scientific undertaking..." - F. B. Little, USN #12;TSE: 24 January 1925 US Navy Airship "Los

  10. European Southern Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    , materials and processes, from design to operations Max. reliance on serial production or standard parts Max

  11. HAWC ?-Ray Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the financial support of several Mexican institutions such as the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnologa (CONACYT), the Universidad Nacional Autnoma de Mxico (UNAM), and...

  12. OBSERVATORY SNO INSTITUTE MEMBERS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abolmaesumi, Purang

    neutrino telescope, the size of a ten-storey building, two kilometers underground in Inco's Creighton Mine their properties. For many years, the number of solar neutrinos measured by other underground detectors has been of the SNO detector to measure all three types of neutrinos to determine that solar neutrinos are changing

  13. European Southern Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    ? These objects may be visible through their supernovae/hypernovae or their surrounding ionization zones. How many

  14. MEASURING THE COOLING OF THE NEUTRON STAR IN CASSIOPEIA A WITH ALL CHANDRA X-RAY OBSERVATORY DETECTORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elshamouty, K. G.; Heinke, C. O.; Sivakoff, G. R. [Department of Physics, University of Alberta, CCIS 4-181, Edmonton AB T6G 2E1 (Canada); Ho, W. C. G. [School of Mathematics, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Shternin, P. S.; Yakovlev, D. G. [Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, Politekhnicheskaya 26, 194021 St Petersburg (Russian Federation); Patnaude, D. J.; David, L., E-mail: alshamou@ualberta.ca [Harvard-Smithsonian Centre for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The thermal evolution of young neutron stars (NSs) reflects the neutrino emission properties of their cores. Heinke and Ho measured a 3.6% 0.6% decay in the surface temperature of the Cassiopeia A (Cas A) NS between 2000 and 2009, using archival data from the Chandra X-ray Observatory ACIS-S detector in Graded mode. Page et al. and Shternin et al. attributed this decay to enhanced neutrino emission from a superfluid neutron transition in the core. Here we test this decline, combining analysis of the Cas A NS using all Chandra X-ray detectors and modes (HRC-S, HRC-I, ACIS-I, ACIS-S in Faint mode, and ACIS-S in Graded mode) and adding a 2012 May ACIS-S Graded mode observation, using the most current calibrations (CALDB 4.5.5.1). We measure the temperature changes from each detector separately and test for systematic effects due to the nearby filaments of the supernova remnant. We find a 0.92%-2.0% decay over 10 yr in the effective temperature, inferred from HRC-S data, depending on the choice of source and background extraction regions, with a best-fit decay of 1.0% 0.7%. In comparison, the ACIS-S Graded data indicate a temperature decay of 3.1%-5.0% over 10 yr, with a best-fit decay of 3.5% 0.4%. Shallower observations using the other detectors yield temperature decays of 2.6% 1.9% (ACIS-I), 2.1% 1.0% (HRC-I), and 2.1% 1.9% (ACIS-S Faint mode) over 10 yr. Our best estimate indicates a decline of 2.9% 0.5%{sub stat} 1.0{sub sys}% over 10 yr. The complexity of the bright and varying supernova remnant background makes a definitive interpretation of archival Cas A Chandra observations difficult. A temperature decline of 1%-3.5% over 10 yr would indicate extraordinarily fast cooling of the NS that can be regulated by superfluidity of nucleons in the stellar core.

  15. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 10**19-eV from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abraham, J.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allison, P.; Alvarez, C.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.; Anjos, J.C.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche /Buenos Aires, CONICET /La Plata U. /Pierre Auger Observ. /CNEA, San Martin /Adelaide U. /Catholic U. of Bolivia, La Paz /Bolivia U. /Sao Paulo U. /Campinas State U. /UEFS, Feira de Santana; ,

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An upper limit of 16% (at 95% c.l.) is derived for the photon fraction in cosmic rays with energies above 10{sup 19} eV, based on observations of the depth of shower maximum performed with the hybrid detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This is the first such limit on photons obtained by observing the fluorescence light profile of air showers. This upper limit confirms and improves on previous results from the Haverah Park and AGASA surface arrays. Additional data recorded with the Auger surface detectors for a subset of the event sample, support the conclusion that a photon origin of the observed events is not favored.

  16. HYDRATE RESEARCH ACTIVITIES THAT BOTH SUPPORT AND DERIVE FROM THE MONITORING STATION/SEA-FLOOR OBSERVATORY, MISSISSIPPI CANYON 118, NORTHERN GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutken, Carol

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A permanent observatory has been installed on the seafloor at Federal Lease Block, Mississippi Canyon 118 (MC118), northern Gulf of Mexico. Researched and designed by the Gulf of Mexico Hydrates Research Consortium (GOM-HRC) with the geological, geophysical, geochemical and biological characterization of in situ gas hydrates systems as the research goal, the site has been designated by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management as a permanent Research Reserve where studies of hydrates and related ocean systems may take place continuously and cooperatively into the foreseeable future. The predominant seafloor feature at MC118 is a carbonate-hydrate complex, officially named Woolsey Mound for the founder of both the GOM-HRC and the concept of the permanent seafloor hydrates research facility, the late James Robert Bob Woolsey. As primary investigator of the overall project until his death in mid-2008, Woolsey provided key scientific input and served as chief administrator for the Monitoring Station/ Seafloor Observatory (MS-SFO). This final technical report presents highlights of research and accomplishments to date. Although not all projects reached the status originally envisioned, they are all either complete or positioned for completion at the earliest opportunity. All Department of Energy funds have been exhausted in this effort but, in addition, leveraged to great advantage with additional federal input to the project and matched efforts and resources. This report contains final reports on all subcontracts issued by the University of Mississippi, Administrators of the project, Hydrate research activities that both support and derive from the monitoring station/sea-floor Observatory, Mississippi Canyon 118, northern Gulf of Mexico, as well as status reports on the major components of the project. All subcontractors have fulfilled their primary obligations. Without continued funds designated for further project development, the Monitoring Station/Seafloor Observatory is in danger of lapsing into disuse. However, for the present, interest in the site on the continental slope is healthy and The Center for Marine Resources and Environmental Technology continues to coordinate all activity at the MS/SFO as arranged through the BOEM in 2005. Field and laboratory research projects and findings are reviewed, new technologies and tests described. Many new sensors, systems and two custom ROVs have been developed specifically for this project. Characteristics of marine gas hydrates are dramatically more refined than when the project was initiated and include appear in sections entitled Accomplishments, Products and Publications.

  17. LARGE-SCALE CORONAL PROPAGATING FRONTS IN SOLAR ERUPTIONS AS OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORYAN ENSEMBLE STUDY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nitta, Nariaki V.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M.; Liu, Wei [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Dept/A021S, B/252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents a study of a large sample of global disturbances in the solar corona with characteristic propagating fronts as intensity enhancement, similar to the phenomena that have often been referred to as Extreme Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (EIT) waves or extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves. Now EUV images obtained by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory provide a significantly improved view of these large-scale coronal propagating fronts (LCPFs). Between 2010 April and 2013 January, a total of 171 LCPFs have been identified through visual inspection of AIA images in the 193 channel. Here we focus on the 138 LCPFs that are seen to propagate across the solar disk, first studying how they are associated with flares, coronal mass ejections (CMEs), and type II radio bursts. We measure the speed of the LCPF in various directions until it is clearly altered by active regions or coronal holes. The highest speed is extracted for each LCPF. It is often considerably higher than EIT waves. We do not find a pattern where faster LCPFs decelerate and slow LCPFs accelerate. Furthermore, the speeds are not strongly correlated with the flare intensity or CME magnitude, nor do they show an association with type II bursts. We do not find a good correlation either between the speeds of LCPFs and CMEs in a subset of 86 LCPFs observed by one or both of the Solar and Terrestrial Relations Observatory spacecraft as limb events.

  18. Observatory -New Materials, Called MOFs, May Aid in Capture of Carbon -NYTimes.com http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/08/science/08obgas.html?_r=2&ref=science[12/8/2009 9:38:13 AM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M.

    Observatory - New Materials, Called MOFs, May Aid in Capture of Carbon - NYTimes.com http The New York Times OBSERVATORY New Materials May Aid in Capturing Carbon By HENRY FOUNTAIN Published, or MOFs, hold promise for carbon capture. In a paper in The Proceedings of the National Academy

  19. The Enigma of Lithium: from CP Stars to K Giants. First Results of CP Star Observations Obtained at Mount Stromlo Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. S. Polosukhina; N. A. Drake; M. Hack; R. de la Reza; P. R. Wood; A. V. Shavrina

    2003-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of the observations of some roAp stars made at Mount Stromlo Observatory during 17 nights in 2001 September-October. This long observing run permitted us to obtain a good phase-rotation coverage. In chemically peculiar magnetic stars, the Li I 6708 A spectral line presents very anomalous behaviour: in some stars it is a strong feature, in others, with similar atmospheric parameters, it is invisible. Interesting results were obtained for the roAp star HD 3980 which presents variations of the profile and position of the Li I line with the rotation period. These new observational results should serve as a base for the development of atmospheric models of ``Li-spotted'' roAp stars.

  20. LARGE-SCALE DISTRIBUTION OF ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF COSMIC RAYS DETECTED ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV AT THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade de Sao Paulo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Universidad Tecnologica Nacional, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Alvarez Castillo, J. [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D. F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [IFGW, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is presented. This search is performed as a function of both declination and right ascension in several energy ranges above 10{sup 18} eV, and reported in terms of dipolar and quadrupolar coefficients. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Assuming that any cosmic-ray anisotropy is dominated by dipole and quadrupole moments in this energy range, upper limits on their amplitudes are derived. These upper limits allow us to test the origin of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV from stationary Galactic sources densely distributed in the Galactic disk and predominantly emitting light particles in all directions.

  1. CONSTRAINTS ON THE ORIGIN OF COSMIC RAYS ABOVE 10{sup 18} eV FROM LARGE-SCALE ANISOTROPY SEARCHES IN DATA OF THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; Andringa, S. [LIP and Instituto Superior Tecnico, Technical University of Lisbon (Portugal); Aglietta, M. [Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (INAF), Universita di Torino and Sezione INFN, Torino (Italy); Ahlers, M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Ahn, E. J. [Fermilab, Batavia, IL (United States); Albuquerque, I. F. M. [Universidade de Sao Paulo, Instituto de Fisica, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Allard, D. [Laboratoire AstroParticule et Cosmologie (APC), Universite Paris 7, CNRS-IN2P3, Paris (France); Allekotte, I. [Centro Atomico Bariloche and Instituto Balseiro (CNEA-UNCuyo-CONICET), San Carlos de Bariloche (Argentina); Allen, J. [New York University, New York, NY (United States); Allison, P. [Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Almela, A. [Universidad Tecnologica Nacional - Facultad Regional Buenos Aires, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Castillo, J. Alvarez [Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Alvarez-Muniz, J. [Universidad de Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Alves Batista, R. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, IFGW, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Ambrosio, M.; Aramo, C. [Universita di Napoli 'Federico II' and Sezione INFN, Napoli (Italy); Aminaei, A. [IMAPP, Radboud University Nijmegen (Netherlands); Anchordoqui, L. [University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Antici'c, T. [Rudjer Boskovi'c Institute, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Arganda, E. [IFLP, Universidad Nacional de La Plata and CONICET, La Plata (Argentina); Collaboration: Pierre Auger Collaboration; and others

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thorough search for large-scale anisotropies in the distribution of arrival directions of cosmic rays detected above 10{sup 18} eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory is reported. For the first time, these large-scale anisotropy searches are performed as a function of both the right ascension and the declination and expressed in terms of dipole and quadrupole moments. Within the systematic uncertainties, no significant deviation from isotropy is revealed. Upper limits on dipole and quadrupole amplitudes are derived under the hypothesis that any cosmic ray anisotropy is dominated by such moments in this energy range. These upper limits provide constraints on the production of cosmic rays above 10{sup 18} eV, since they allow us to challenge an origin from stationary galactic sources densely distributed in the galactic disk and emitting predominantly light particles in all directions.

  2. Reconstructing Past Solar Activity using Meridian Solar Observations: the Case of the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy (1833-1840)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vaquero, J M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar meridian observations have been used to evaluate the solar activity of the past. Some important examples are the solar meridian observations made at the Basilica of San Petronio in Bologna by several astronomers and the observations made by Hevelius published in his book Machina Coelestis. However, we do not know whether these observations, which were not aimed to estimate the solar activity, are reliable for evaluating solar activity. In this paper, we present the marginal notes about sunspots that are included in the manuscripts of the meridian solar observations made at the Royal Observatory of the Spanish Navy during the period 1833-1840. We compare these observations with other solar activity indices such as sunspot area and number. Our conclusion is that solar meridian observations should be used with extreme caution to evaluate past solar activity.

  3. Day-night asymmetry of high and low energy solar neutrino events in Super-Kamiokande and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

    2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

    In the context of solar neutrino oscillations among active states, we briefly discuss the current likelihood of Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which appear to be currently favored at large mixing, where small Earth regeneration effects might still be observable in Super-Kamiokande (SK) and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). We point out that, since such effects are larger at high (low) solar neutrino energies for high (low) values of the mass square difference \\delta m^2, it may be useful to split the night-day rate asymmetry in two separate energy ranges. We show that the difference \\Delta of the night-day asymmetry at high and low energy may help to discriminate the two large-mixing solutions at low and high \\delta m^2 through a sign test, both in SK and in SNO, provided that the sensitivity to \\Delta can reach the (sub)percent level.

  4. The effect of the geomagnetic field on cosmic ray energy estimates and large scale anisotropy searches on data from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P.; /Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M.; /IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E.J.; /Fermilab; Albuquerque, I.F.M.; /Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D.; /APC, Paris; Allekotte, I.; /Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J.; /New York U.; Allison, P.; /Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; /Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M.; /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /Nijmegen U., IMAPP; ,

    2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a comprehensive study of the influence of the geomagnetic field on the energy estimation of extensive air showers with a zenith angle smaller than 60{sup o}, detected at the Pierre Auger Observatory. The geomagnetic field induces an azimuthal modulation of the estimated energy of cosmic rays up to the {approx} 2% level at large zenith angles. We present a method to account for this modulation of the reconstructed energy. We analyse the effect of the modulation on large scale anisotropy searches in the arrival direction distributions of cosmic rays. At a given energy, the geomagnetic effect is shown to induce a pseudo-dipolar pattern at the percent level in the declination distribution that needs to be accounted for. In this work, we have identified and quantified a systematic uncertainty affecting the energy determination of cosmic rays detected by the surface detector array of the Pierre Auger Observatory. This systematic uncertainty, induced by the influence of the geomagnetic field on the shower development, has a strength which depends on both the zenith and the azimuthal angles. Consequently, we have shown that it induces distortions of the estimated cosmic ray event rate at a given energy at the percent level in both the azimuthal and the declination distributions, the latter of which mimics an almost dipolar pattern. We have also shown that the induced distortions are already at the level of the statistical uncertainties for a number of events N {approx_equal} 32 000 (we note that the full Auger surface detector array collects about 6500 events per year with energies above 3 EeV). Accounting for these effects is thus essential with regard to the correct interpretation of large scale anisotropy measurements taking explicitly profit from the declination distribution.

  5. EVIDENCE FOR THE WAVE NATURE OF AN EXTREME ULTRAVIOLET WAVE OBSERVED BY THE ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY ON BOARD THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen Yuandeng; Liu Yu, E-mail: ydshen@ynao.ac.cn [Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming 650011 (China)

    2012-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) waves have been found for about 15 years. However, significant controversy remains over their physical natures and origins. In this paper, we report an EUV wave that was accompanied by an X1.9 flare and a partial halo coronal mass ejection (CME). Using high temporal and spatial resolution observations taken by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and the Solar-TErrestrial RElations Observatory, we are able to investigate the detailed kinematics of the EUV wave. We find several arguments that support the fast-mode wave scenario. (1) The speed of the EUV wave (570 km s{sup -1}) is higher than the sound speed of the quiet-Sun corona. (2) Significant deceleration of the EUV wave (-130 m s{sup -2}) is found during its propagation. (3) The EUV wave resulted in the oscillations of a loop and a filament along its propagation path, and a reflected wave from the polar coronal hole is also detected. (4) Refraction or reflection effect is observed when the EUV wave was passing through two coronal bright points. (5) The dimming region behind the wavefront stopped to expand when the wavefront started to become diffuse. (6) The profiles of the wavefront exhibited a dispersive nature, and the magnetosonic Mach number of the EUV wave derived from the highest intensity jump is about 1.4. In addition, triangulation indicates that the EUV wave propagated within a height range of about 60-100 Mm above the photosphere. We propose that the EUV wave observed should be a nonlinear fast-mode magnetosonic wave that propagated freely in the corona after it was driven by the CME expanding flanks during the initial period.

  6. Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over specific intervals

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Making an Energy Histogram Using Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Detector Data Histogram A histogram is essentially a graphical representation of the frequency or distribution of a variable over energies. Before you start you should know that: o This set of instructions only assumes a very minimal

  7. The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at SIRTA Atmospheric Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chiriaco, M.; Vautard, R.; Chepfer, H.; Haeffelin, M.; Wanherdrick, Y.; Morille, Y.; Protat, A.; Dudhia, J.

    2005-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Ice clouds play a major role in the radiative energy budget of the Earth-atmosphere system (Liou 1986). Their radiative effect is governed primarily by the equilibrium between their albedo and greenhouse effects. Both macrophysical and microphysical properties of ice clouds regulate this equilibrium. For quantifying the effect of these clouds onto climate and weather systems, they must be properly characterized in atmospheric models. In this paper we use remote-sensing measurements from the SIRTA ground based atmospheric observatory (Site Instrumental de Recherche par Teledetection Atmospherique, http://sirta.lmd.polytechnique.fr). Lidar and radar observations taken over 18 months are used, in order to gain statistical confidence in the model evaluation. Along this period of time, 62 days are selected for study because they contain parts of ice clouds. We use the ''model to observations'' approach by simulating lidar and radar signals from MM5 outputs. Other more classical variables such as shortwave and longwave radiative fluxes are also used. Four microphysical schemes, among which that proposed by Reisner et al. (1998) with original or modified parameterizations of particle terminal fall velocities (Zurovac-Jevtic and Zhang 2003, Heymsfield and Donner 1990), and the simplified Dudhia (1989) scheme are evaluated in this study.

  8. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration; Alexander Aab; Pedro Abreu; Marco Aglietta; Eun-Joo Ahn; Imen Al Samarai; Ivone Albuquerque; Ingomar Allekotte; Patrick Allison; Alejandro Almela; Jesus Alvarez Castillo; Jaime Alvarez-Muiz; Rafael Alves Batista; Michelangelo Ambrosio; Amin Aminaei; Luis Anchordoqui; Sofia Andringa; Carla Aramo; Victor Manuel Aranda; Fernando Arqueros; Nicusor Arsene; Hernn Gonzalo Asorey; Pedro Assis; Julien Aublin; Maximo Ave; Michel Avenier; Gualberto Avila; Nafiun Awal; Alina Mihaela Badescu; Kerri B Barber; Julia Buml; Colin Baus; Jim Beatty; Karl Heinz Becker; Jose A Bellido; Corinne Berat; Mario Edoardo Bertaina; Xavier Bertou; Peter Biermann; Pierre Billoir; Simon G Blaess; Alberto Blanco; Miguel Blanco; Carla Bleve; Hans Blmer; Martina Boh?ov; Denise Boncioli; Carla Bonifazi; Nataliia Borodai; Jeffrey Brack; Iliana Brancus; Ariel Bridgeman; Pedro Brogueira; William C Brown; Peter Buchholz; Antonio Bueno; Stijn Buitink; Mario Buscemi; Karen S Caballero-Mora; Barbara Caccianiga; Lorenzo Caccianiga; Marina Candusso; Laurentiu Caramete; Rossella Caruso; Antonella Castellina; Gabriella Cataldi; Lorenzo Cazon; Rosanna Cester; Alan G Chavez; Andrea Chiavassa; Jose Augusto Chinellato; Jiri Chudoba; Marco Cilmo; Roger W Clay; Giuseppe Cocciolo; Roberta Colalillo; Alan Coleman; Laura Collica; Maria Rita Coluccia; Ruben Conceio; Fernando Contreras; Mathew J Cooper; Alain Cordier; Stephane Coutu; Corbin Covault; James Cronin; Richard Dallier; Bruno Daniel; Sergio Dasso; Kai Daumiller; Bruce R Dawson; Rogerio M de Almeida; Sijbrand J de Jong; Giuseppe De Mauro; Joao de Mello Neto; Ivan De Mitri; Jaime de Oliveira; Vitor de Souza; Luis del Peral; Olivier Deligny; Hans Dembinski; Niraj Dhital; Claudio Di Giulio; Armando Di Matteo; Johana Chirinos Diaz; Mary Lucia Daz Castro; Francisco Diogo; Carola Dobrigkeit; Wendy Docters; Juan Carlos D'Olivo; Alexei Dorofeev; Qader Dorosti Hasankiadeh; Maria Teresa Dova; Jan Ebr; Ralph Engel; Martin Erdmann; Mona Erfani; Carlos O Escobar; Joao Espadanal; Alberto Etchegoyen; Heino Falcke; Ke Fang; Glennys Farrar; Anderson Fauth; Norberto Fazzini; Andrew P Ferguson; Mateus Fernandes; Brian Fick; Juan Manuel Figueira; Alberto Filevich; Andrej Filip?i?; Brendan Fox; Octavian Fratu; Martn Miguel Freire; Benjamin Fuchs; Toshihiro Fujii; Beatriz Garca; Diego Garcia-Pinto; Florian Gate; Hartmut Gemmeke; Alexandru Gherghel-Lascu; Piera Luisa Ghia; Ugo Giaccari; Marco Giammarchi; Maria Giller; Dariusz G?as; Christian Glaser; Henry Glass; Geraldina Golup; Mariano Gmez Berisso; Primo F Gmez Vitale; Nicols Gonzlez; Ben Gookin; Jacob Gordon; Alessio Gorgi; Peter Gorham; Philippe Gouffon; Nathan Griffith; Aurelio Grillo; Trent D Grubb; Fausto Guarino; Germano Guedes; Matas Rolf Hampel; Patricia Hansen; Diego Harari; Thomas A Harrison; Sebastian Hartmann; John Harton; Andreas Haungs; Thomas Hebbeker; Dieter Heck; Philipp Heimann; Alexander E Herve; Gary C Hill; Carlos Hojvat; Nicholas Hollon; Ewa Holt; Piotr Homola; Jrg Hrandel; Pavel Horvath; Miroslav Hrabovsk; Daniel Huber; Tim Huege; Antonio Insolia; Paula Gina Isar; Ingolf Jandt; Stefan Jansen; Cecilia Jarne; Jeffrey A Johnsen; Mariela Josebachuili; Alex Kp; Olga Kambeitz; Karl Heinz Kampert; Peter Kasper; Igor Katkov; Balazs Kgl; Bianca Keilhauer; Azadeh Keivani; Ernesto Kemp; Roger Kieckhafer; Hans Klages; Matthias Kleifges; Jonny Kleinfeller; Raphael Krause; Nicole Krohm; Oliver Krmer; Daniel Kuempel; Norbert Kunka; Danielle LaHurd; Luca Latronico; Robert Lauer; Markus Lauscher; Pascal Lautridou; Sandra Le Coz; Didier Lebrun; Paul Lebrun; Marcelo Augusto Leigui de Oliveira; Antoine Letessier-Selvon; Isabelle Lhenry-Yvon; Katrin Link; Luis Lopes; Rebeca Lpez; Aida Lpez Casado; Karim Louedec; Lu Lu; Agustin Lucero; Max Malacari; Simone Maldera; Manuela Mallamaci; Jennifer Maller; Dusan Mandat; Paul Mantsch; Analisa Mariazzi; Vincent Marin; Ioana Mari?; Giovanni Marsella; Daniele Martello; Lilian Martin; Humberto Martinez; Oscar Martnez Bravo; Diane Martraire; Jimmy Masas Meza; Hermann-Josef Mathes; Sebastian Mathys; James Matthews; John Matthews; Giorgio Matthiae; Detlef Maurel; Daniela Maurizio; Eric Mayotte; Peter Mazur; Carlos Medina; Gustavo Medina-Tanco; Rebecca Meissner; Victor Mello; Diego Melo; Alexander Menshikov; Stefano Messina; Rishi Meyhandan; Maria Isabel Micheletti; Lukas Middendorf; Ignacio A Minaya; Lino Miramonti; Bogdan Mitrica; Laura Molina-Bueno; Silvia Mollerach; Franois Montanet; Carlo Morello; Miguel Mostaf; Celio A Moura; Marcio Aparecido Muller; Gero Mller; Sarah Mller

    2015-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than $60^{\\circ}$ detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above $5.3{\\times}10^{18}$ eV, the "ankle", the flux can be described by a power law $E^{-\\gamma}$ with index $\\gamma=2.70 \\pm 0.02 \\,\\text{(stat)} \\pm 0.1\\,\\text{(sys)}$ followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy ($E_\\text{s}$) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find $E_\\text{s}=(5.12\\pm0.25\\,\\text{(stat)}^{+1.0}_{-1.2}\\,\\text{(sys)}){\\times}10^{19}$ eV.

  9. Measurement of the cosmic ray spectrum above $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV using inclined events detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A measurement of the cosmic-ray spectrum for energies exceeding $4{\\times}10^{18}$ eV is presented, which is based on the analysis of showers with zenith angles greater than $60^{\\circ}$ detected with the Pierre Auger Observatory between 1 January 2004 and 31 December 2013. The measured spectrum confirms a flux suppression at the highest energies. Above $5.3{\\times}10^{18}$ eV, the "ankle", the flux can be described by a power law $E^{-\\gamma}$ with index $\\gamma=2.70 \\pm 0.02 \\,\\text{(stat)} \\pm 0.1\\,\\text{(sys)}$ followed by a smooth suppression region. For the energy ($E_\\text{s}$) at which the spectral flux has fallen to one-half of its extrapolated value in the absence of suppression, we find $E_\\text{s}=(5.12\\pm0.25\\,\\text{(stat)}^{+1.0}_{-1.2}\\,\\text{(sys)}){\\times}10^{19}$ eV.

  10. The Study of TeV Variability and Duty Cycle of Mrk 421 from 3 Years of Observations with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdo, A A; Allen, B T; Aune, T; Barber, A S; Berley, D; Braun, J; Chen, C; Christopher, G E; Delay, R S; DeYoung, T; Dingus, B L; Ellsworth, R W; Fraija, N; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Hntemeyer, P H; Imran, A; Kolterman, B E; Linnemann, J T; Marinelli, A; McEnery, J E; Morgan, T; Mincer, A I; Nemethy, P; Patricelli, B; Pretz, J; Ryan, J M; Parkinson, P M Saz; Schneider, M; Shoup, A; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Vasileiou, V; Walker, G P; Williams, D A; Yodh, G B

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TeV flaring activity with time scales as short as tens of minutes and an orphan TeV flare have been observed from the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421). The TeV emission from Mrk 421 is believed to be produced by leptonic synchrotron self-Compton (SSC) emission. In this scenario, correlations between the X-ray and the TeV fluxes are expected, TeV orphan flares are hardly explained and the activity (measured as duty cycle) of the source at TeV energies is expected to be equal or less than that observed in X-rays if only SSC is considered. To estimate the TeV duty cycle of Mrk 421 and to establish limits on its variability at different time scales, we continuously observed Mrk 421 with the Milagro observatory. Mrk 421 was detected by Milagro with a statistical significance of 7.1 standard deviations between 2005 September 21 and 2008 March 15. The observed spectrum is consistent with previous observations by VERITAS. We estimate the duty cycle of Mrk 421 for energies above 1 TeV for different hypothesis of the bas...

  11. Searches for HCl and HF in comets 103P/Hartley 2 and C/2009 P1 (Garradd) with the Herschel space observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bockele-Morvan, D; Crovisier, J; Lis, D C; Hartogh, P; Moreno, R; de Val-Borro, M; Blake, G A; Szutowicz, S; Boissier, J; Cernicharo, J; Charnley, S B; Combi, M; Cordiner, M A; de Graauw, T; Encrenaz, P; Kidger, M; Kppers, M; Milam, S N; Mller, H S P; Phillips, T G; Rengel, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HCl and HF are expected to be the main reservoirs of fluorine and chlorine wherever hydrogen is predominantly molecular. They are found to be strongly depleted in dense molecular clouds, suggesting freeze-out onto grains in such cold environments. We can then expect that HCl and HF were also the major carriers of Cl and F in the gas and icy phases of the outer solar nebula, and were incorporated into comets. We aimed to measure the HCl and HF abundances in cometary ices as they can provide insights on the halogen chemistry in the early solar nebula. We searched for the J(1-0) lines of HCl and HF at 626 and 1232 GHz, respectively, using the HIFI instrument on board the Herschel Space Observatory. HCl was searched for in comets 103P/Hartley 2 and C/2009 P1 (Garradd), whereas observations of HF were conducted in comet C/2009 P1. In addition, observations of H$_2$O and H$_2^{18}$O lines were performed in C/2009 P1 to measure the H$_2$O production rate. Three lines of CH$_3$OH were serendipitously observed in the ...

  12. HINODE/EIS SPECTROSCOPIC VALIDATION OF VERY HOT PLASMA IMAGED WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY IN NON-FLARING ACTIVE REGION CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Testa, Paola [Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, 60 Garden street, MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Reale, Fabio, E-mail: ptesta@cfa.harvard.edu [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Palermo, Piazza del Parlamento 1, 90134 Palermo (Italy)

    2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use coronal imaging observations with the Solar Dynamics Observatory/Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA), and Hinode/Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) spectral data to explore the potential of narrowband EUV imaging data for diagnosing the presence of hot (T {approx}> 5 MK) coronal plasma in active regions. We analyze observations of two active regions (AR 11281, AR 11289) with simultaneous AIA imaging and EIS spectral data, including the Ca XVII line (at 192.8 A), which is one of the few lines in the EIS spectral bands sensitive to hot coronal plasma even outside flares. After careful co-alignment of the imaging and spectral data, we compare the morphology in a three-color image combining the 171, 335, and 94 A AIA spectral bands, with the image obtained for Ca XVII emission from the analysis of EIS spectra. We find that in the selected active regions the Ca XVII emission is strong only in very limited areas, showing striking similarities with the features bright in the 94 A (and 335 A) AIA channels and weak in the 171 A band. We conclude that AIA imaging observations of the solar corona can be used to track hot plasma (6-8 MK), and so to study its spatial variability and temporal evolution at high spatial and temporal resolution.

  13. NEW Fe IX LINE IDENTIFICATIONS USING SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY/SOLAR ULTRAVIOLET MEASUREMENT OF EMITTED RADIATION AND HINODE/EIS JOINT OBSERVATIONS OF THE QUIET SUN

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landi, E.; Young, P. R. [Naval Research Laboratory, Space Science Division, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2009-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work, we study joint observations of Hinode/EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) and Solar and Heliospheric Observatory/Solar Ultraviolet Measurement of Emitted Radiation of Fe IX lines emitted by the same level of the high energy configuration 3s {sup 2}3p {sup 5}4p. The intensity ratios of these lines are dependent on atomic physics parameters only and not on the physical parameters of the emitting plasma, so that they are excellent tools to verify the relative intensity calibration of high-resolution spectrometers that work in the 170-200 A and 700-850 A wavelength ranges. We carry out extensive atomic physics calculations to improve the accuracy of the predicted intensity ratio, and compare the results with simultaneous EIS-SUMER observations of an off-disk quiet Sun region. We were able to identify two ultraviolet lines in the SUMER spectrum that are emitted by the same level that emits one bright line in the EIS wavelength range. Comparison between predicted and measured intensity ratios, wavelengths and energy separation of Fe IX levels confirms the identifications we make. Blending and calibration uncertainties are discussed. The results of this work are important for cross-calibrating EIS and SUMER, as well as future instrumentation.

  14. OBSERVATIONS AND MODELING OF THE EMERGING EXTREME-ULTRAVIOLET LOOPS IN THE QUIET SUN AS SEEN WITH THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chitta, L. P.; Van Ballegooijen, A. A.; DeLuca, E. E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-15, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Kariyappa, R.; Hasan, S. S. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Hanslmeier, A. [Institut fuer Physik, IGAM, Universitaet Graz, Universitaetsplatz 5, A-8010 Graz (Austria)

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We used data from the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) to study coronal loops at small scales, emerging in the quiet Sun. With HMI line-of-sight magnetograms, we derive the integrated and unsigned photospheric magnetic flux at the loop footpoints in the photosphere. These loops are bright in the EUV channels of AIA. Using the six AIA EUV filters, we construct the differential emission measure (DEM) in the temperature range 5.7-6.5 in log T (K) for several hours of observations. The observed DEMs have a peak distribution around log T Almost-Equal-To 6.3, falling rapidly at higher temperatures. For log T < 6.3, DEMs are comparable to their peak values within an order of magnitude. The emission-weighted temperature is calculated, and its time variations are compared with those of magnetic flux. We present two possibilities for explaining the observed DEMs and temperatures variations. (1) Assuming that the observed loops are composed of a hundred thin strands with certain radius and length, we tested three time-dependent heating models and compared the resulting DEMs and temperatures with the observed quantities. This modeling used enthalpy-based thermal evolution of loops (EBTEL), a zero-dimensional (0D) hydrodynamic code. The comparisons suggest that a medium-frequency heating model with a population of different heating amplitudes can roughly reproduce the observations. (2) We also consider a loop model with steady heating and non-uniform cross-section of the loop along its length, and find that this model can also reproduce the observed DEMs, provided the loop expansion factor {gamma} {approx} 5-10. More observational constraints are required to better understand the nature of coronal heating in the short emerging loops on the quiet Sun.

  15. Okayama Astrophysical Observatory, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Combes; J. Palous; Kiuchi G; Sawicki M

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract. The development of large ground-based telescopes and sensitive large format detectors, as well as the develepment of various techniques for the selection of high-z galaxies enabled us to construct large samples of galaxies in the early universe, as reported in the many contributions in this proceedings. The next major step for the comprehensive understanding of the galaxy evolution would be to explore the relationship of galaxies selected with different criteria at different epochs and find links between them. In this contribution we present the properties of Lyman break galaxies (LBGs) at z ? 5 obtained by deep and wide blank field surveys, and through the comparison with samples at lower redshift ranges we discuss the evolution of star-forming galaxies in the early universe.

  16. Solar & Heliospheric Observatory The SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martens, Petrus C.

    of international cooperation be­ tween ESA (the EUROPEAN SPACE AGENCY) and NASA to study the Sun, from its deep core to the outer corona, and the solar wind. SOHO was launched on De­ cember 2, 1995, on top of an Atlas/Centaur combina­ tion, from Cape Canaveral Air­Force Base in Florida. It reached its operating

  17. Data Center Observatory General Schematic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 1U Rack 1 3U Air FM40 Air FM40 Campuschilledwaterloop PUMP ROOM (FMS BUILDING) CICBUILDING ZONE 1 · High density enclosure (HDE) · 12 racks · Heat contained within HDE · Exterior room air is 72 degrees system · Distance-read sub-floor leak detection system PUMP ROOM · Redundant heat exchangers and pumps

  18. Data Center Observatory General Schematic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2 1U Rack 1 3U Air FM40 Air FM40 Campuschilledwaterloop PUMP ROOM (FMS BUILDING) CICBUILDING · High-action sprinkler system · Distance-read sub-floor leak detection system PUMP ROOM · Redundant heat exchangers Density Enclosures (HDE) · Zone1: 12 Racks · Zone2: 11 Racks · Heat contained within HDE · Exterior room

  19. The Armagh Observatory and Planetarium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Statement of recognised gains and losses 45 Balance sheet 46 Cash flow statement 47 Notes to the financial and losses 62 Balance sheet 63 Cash flow statement 64 Notes to the financial statements 65 76 #12;Armagh's primary function is to attract visitors, disseminate scientific and technical knowledge regarding a wide

  20. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic Engine GyroSolé(tm) engine5977BobHAWC

  1. HAWC Observatory captures first image

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed-MTBEJobs in15, 201127,19,text of

  2. HAWC γ-Ray Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist.NewofGeothermal Heaton Armed-MTBEJobs in15, 201127,19,text ofHAWC

  3. Searches for Large-Scale Anisotropy in the Arrival Directions of Cosmic Rays Detected above Energy of $10^{19}$ eV at the Pierre Auger Observatory and the Telescope Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aab, Alexander; et al,

    2014-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Spherical harmonic moments are well-suited for capturing anisotropy at any scale in the flux of cosmic rays. An unambiguous measurement of the full set of spherical harmonic coefficients requires full-sky coverage. This can be achieved by combining data from observatories located in both the northern and southern hemispheres. To this end, a joint analysis using data recorded at the Telescope Array and the Pierre Auger Observatory above 1019 eV is presented in this work. The resulting multipolar expansion of the flux of cosmic rays allows us to perform a series of anisotropy searches, and in particular to report on the angular power spectrum of cosmic rays above 1019 eV. No significant deviation from isotropic expectations is found throughout the analyses performed. Upper limits on the amplitudes of the dipole and quadrupole moments are derived as a function of the direction in the sky, varying between 7% and 13% for the dipole and between 7% and 10% for a symmetric quadrupole.

  4. DIRECT IMAGING OF QUASI-PERIODIC FAST PROPAGATING WAVES OF {approx}2000 km s{sup -1} IN THE LOW SOLAR CORONA BY THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY ATMOSPHERIC IMAGING ASSEMBLY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu Wei; Title, Alan M.; Schrijver, Carolus J.; Aschwanden, Markus J.; De Pontieu, Bart; Tarbell, Theodore D. [Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory, Building 252, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhao Junwei [W. W. Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Ofman, Leon [Catholic University of America and NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, 8800 Greenbelt Road, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Quasi-periodic propagating fast mode magnetosonic waves in the solar corona were difficult to observe in the past due to relatively low instrument cadences. We report here evidence of such waves directly imaged in EUV by the new Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory. In the 2010 August 1 C3.2 flare/coronal mass ejection event, we find arc-shaped wave trains of 1%-5% intensity variations (lifetime {approx}200 s) that emanate near the flare kernel and propagate outward up to {approx}400 Mm along a funnel of coronal loops. Sinusoidal fits to a typical wave train indicate a phase velocity of 2200 {+-} 130 km s{sup -1}. Similar waves propagating in opposite directions are observed in closed loops between two flare ribbons. In the k-{omega} diagram of the Fourier wave power, we find a bright ridge that represents the dispersion relation and can be well fitted with a straight line passing through the origin. This k-{omega} ridge shows a broad frequency distribution with power peaks at 5.5, 14.5, and 25.1 mHz. The strongest signal at 5.5 mHz (period 181 s) temporally coincides with quasi-periodic pulsations of the flare, suggesting a common origin. The instantaneous wave energy flux of (0.1-2.6) x 10{sup 7} erg cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} estimated at the coronal base is comparable to the steady-state heating requirement of active region loops.

  5. Bishop's University Astronomical Observatory October 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a smaller carbon footprint. This is part of the multi-million dollar Energy Services Contract initiative

  6. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    of operating 135 cryogenic receivers on the VIA. First, a review of recent progress in cryogenically-cooled have been developed for use in a new radio astronomy system [1]. This new system is called the Very other frequencies utilize HEMT amplifiers cooled to 13 K in separate dewars at the Cassegrain focus

  7. New observatory studies universe's most energetic phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of supermassive black holes at the center of some galaxies-as well as tracking gamma ray bursts and other large explosions. In addition, the researchers will try to determine...

  8. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    understood. It is generally agreed at present that both size and self-heating limit the performance, salient physics of operation, and self-heating effects. The paper concludes by establishing new directions

  9. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    . NO. 136 Title: Correlation Function to Power Spectrum Transformations Author: S. Weinreb Date: March;Correlation Function to Power Spectrum Transformations S. Weinreb I. Introduction The true power spectrum, P the transformation to meet other criteria given below. #12;2) Imperfections in the sampler tend to produce a large

  10. State Lands Management Plan Rosemary Hill Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    resources . . . . . . . . . 21. Plans for Non-renewable Natural and Cultural Resources . . . . 22 and Improvements . . . . . . . . . 4. Proximity to Significant Public Resources . . . . . . . . . . . 5 RESOURCES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8. Resources Listed in the Florida Natural Areas Inventory . . . . 9

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    is engaged it supplies the various power supplies, cooling fans, and output receptacles with power DISTRIBUTION A master circuit breaker is supplied on the bottom front panel of the cabinet. The circuit breaker conductor cable supplies the necessary 110 volts single phase alternating current. When the circuit breaker

  12. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Colonization of subsurface microbial observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Andrew

    Toner5 , C Geoffrey Wheat6 and Katrina J Edwards1 1 University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA and the lithosphere (Fisher and Wheat, 2010). Circulation of fluid within oceanic crust and redox reactions are known-moderate temperatures (0­40 1C) on ridge flanks (Wheat et al., 2003). Considerin

  13. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, WV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    - frequency front-ends, the mixers will be preceded by cryogenic low-noise amplifiers (LNA), critical-diode mixer would put an enormous burden on the amplifier's dynamic range. The constrained design to an independent receiver element. The design of corporate power dividers is well known and straightforward, which

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE) VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    engineers to design low-noise amplifiers and low ground-radiation pickup antennas to take advantage No. 220 ULTRA LOW-NOISE, 1.24.7 GHz COOLED GASFET AMPLIFIERS S. WEINREB D. FENSTERMACHER R. HARRIS SEPTEMBER 1981 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;ULTRA LOW-NOISE, 1.2 - 1.7 GHz COOLED GASFET AMPLIFIER Table

  15. SMITHSONIAN ASTROPHYSICAL OBSERVATORY VISITING COMMITTEE REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    's greatest strengths is its high-energy astrophysics group. While the Chandra satellite will likely continue of astrophysics research and prioritize SAO's major new initiatives (e.g., playing a major role in GMT). The VC. Scientific Research Program High Energy Astrophysics The high-energy astrophysics group at CfA is arguably

  16. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    . It is programed in BASIC and has been implemented on the VAX -11 as well as the HP 9845A desktop computer. Using Optimization to Solve Constrained-Variable and III. FARANT on the VAX-11 and the HP 9845A . · · · . · * . 37 1. Using the Apple Computer as a VAX Terminal · . · · · . 37 2. Peculiarities of VAX BASIC

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    .2.13.4 Miscellaneous Routines · · · · · 0 0 0 0 0 . 36 2.3 Setup and Environment in VAX · . · · . · · · · . 36 2.3.1 Pieces of FARANT in VAX · ·· · · 0 · 0 0 0 · 37 2.3.2 Running of FARANT in VAX . · 38· · .· · · · · · 2 . · · · · 66 3.4.3 Miscellaneous · · · · · 0 · · · · ·0 0 0 . 0 67 3.5 HP 9845 BASIC And VAX FORTRAN

  18. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE) VA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    /D . · · · · · · · · · · · · · . . . 9 VAX · . . . . . . . . . .· · · · · · · · . . . 9 VAX.B. . 9· · . · · · · · · · · . . . Automated. . · · . . · · · . · · · · . . .· . · · · · · · ·· · · · . . 9 CCS A/D . · · · · · · · · · · · · · . . . 9 VAX · . . . . . . . . . .· · · · · · · · . . . 9 VAX in a telephone-linked DEC VAX computer. The intention is to document some of the programs and conventions which

  19. Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Agra-Monenco, Canatom,The heavy water was loaned by AECL with the cooperation of

  20. nuclex/9910016 The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    .T.H. Clifford, R. Deal, E.D. Earle, E. Gaudette, G. Milton, B.Sur Chalk River Laboratories, AECL Research, Chalk

  1. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Cu OUTPUT WAVEGUIDE INPUT WAVEGUIDE CIRCULARCHOKE NON--CONTAC11NG MOVABLESHORTINPUTMESHORT OUTPUTTEESHORT

  2. Crossing the Transition Region High Altitude Observatory,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : enhanced emission at TR temperatures Much lower density in umbra and plume: (log(Ne/cm 3)=10 Lyman line profiles not reversed in umbra and plume TR above sunspots is higher and probably more extended than in the surrounding plage region ------plage -.-.-.penumbra ......umbra ____plume #12;Outline Recent observations

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE, VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Series Resistance . . . 6 c) Self Heating Effect Kitt Peak telescope. Measurements of saturation power and bandwidth are described. Self-heating effects. J. FELDMAN* APRIL 1987 * DEPARTMENT OF ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING, UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA

  4. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    J. Coe J. Davis H. Hvatum R. Lacasse P. Lilie C. Moore P. Napier J. Payne R. Widene Libraries (CV GB be burned off with a soldering iron and is bonded into a red/green pair of wires (bifilar) with polyvinyl

  5. JOHN W. ARCHER NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    , in conjunction with computer-aided analysis of the behavior of the non-linear varactor imped- ance, were used circuit requirements for the implementation of efficient frequency multi- pliers, then relates, the measured performance of the frequency multipliers is presented. ImPLEMENTATION Any non-linear impedance

  6. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Charlottesville, Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    shown is the expression TOS = 0.03 + 0.009x + 0.004x3 , where x = T1 - 6. This expression is a good fit), were corrected by the smaller amount TOS (typically ± 0.02 K). The term thermal resistance as used scale. Also shown is the expression TOS = 0.03 + 0.009x + 0.004x3 , where x = T1 - 6 (right scale). Fig

  7. The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory The SNO Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    , University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 CANADA2 C. Alexander, E.W. Beier, J.C. Cook, D.F. Cowen, E designed to determine whether the currently observed solar neutri

  8. SIMULTANEOUS OBSERVATIONS OF COMET C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) WITH THE BERKELEY-ILLINOIS-MARYLAND ASSOCIATION AND OWENS VALLEY RADIO OBSERVATORY INTERFEROMETERS: HCN AND CH{sub 3}OH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogerheijde, Michiel R. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands); Qi Chunhua [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); De Pater, Imke; Wright, M. C. H. [Department of Astronomy, 601 Campbell Hall, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Blake, Geoffrey A. [Division of Geophysics and Planetary Science, MS 150-21, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Friedel, D. N.; Snyder, L. E. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Forster, J. R. [Hat Creek Radio Observatory, 42231 Bidwell Road, Hat Creek, CA 96040 (United States); Palmer, Patrick [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Remijan, Anthony J. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Rd, Charlottesville, VA 22901 (United States)], E-mail: michiel@strw.leidenuniv.nl

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present observations of HCN J = 1-0 and CH{sub 3}OH J(K{sub a} , K{sub c} ) = 3(1, 3)-4(0, 4) A{sup +} emission from comet C/2002 T7 (LINEAR) obtained simultaneously with the Owens Valley Radio Observatory (OVRO) and Berkeley-Illinois-Maryland Association (BIMA) millimeter interferometers. We combined the data from both arrays to increase the (u, v) sampling and signal to noise of the detected line emission. We also report the detection of CH{sub 3}OH J(K{sub a} , K{sub c} ) = 8(0, 8)-7(1, 7) A{sup +} with OVRO data alone. Using a molecular excitation code that includes the effects of collisions with water and electrons, as well as pumping by the Solar infrared photons (for HCN alone), we find a production rate of HCN of 2.9 x 10{sup 26} s{sup -1} and for CH{sub 3}OH of 2.2 x 10{sup 27} s{sup -1}. Compared to the adopted water production rate of 3 x 10{sup 29} s{sup -1}, this corresponds to an HCN/H{sub 2}O ratio of 0.1% and a CH{sub 3}OH/H{sub 2}O ratio of 0.7%. We critically assess the uncertainty of these values due to the noise ({approx}10%), the uncertainties in the adopted comet model ({approx}50%), and the uncertainties in the adopted collisional excitation rates (up to a factor of 2). Pumping by Solar infrared photons is found to be a minor effect for HCN, because our 15'' synthesized beam is dominated by the region in the coma where collisions dominate. Since the uncertainties in the derived production rates are at least as large as one-third of the differences found between comets, we conclude that reliable collision rates and an accurate comet model are essential. Because the collisionally dominated region critically depends on the water production rate, using the same approximate method for different comets may introduce biases in the derived production rates. Multiline observations that directly constrain the molecular excitation provide much more reliable production rates.

  9. THE 2011 FEBRUARY 15 X2 FLARE, RIBBONS, CORONAL FRONT, AND MASS EJECTION: INTERPRETING THE THREE-DIMENSIONAL VIEWS FROM THE SOLAR DYNAMICS OBSERVATORY AND STEREO GUIDED BY MAGNETOHYDRODYNAMIC FLUX-ROPE MODELING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schrijver, Carolus J.; Title, Alan M. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, 3251 Hanover Street, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Aulanier, Guillaume; Pariat, Etienne; Delannee, Cecile, E-mail: schrijver@lmsal.com, E-mail: title@lmsal.com, E-mail: guillaume.aulanier@obspm.fr, E-mail: etienne.pariat@obspm.fr, E-mail: ceaulanier@voila.fr [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The 2011 February 15 X2.2 flare and associated Earth-directed halo coronal mass ejection were observed in unprecedented detail with high resolution in spatial, temporal, and thermal dimensions by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) on the Solar Dynamics Observatory, as well as by instruments on the two STEREO spacecraft, then at near-quadrature relative to the Sun-Earth line. These observations enable us to see expanding loops from a flux-rope-like structure over the shearing polarity-inversion line between the central {delta}-spot groups of AR 11158, developing a propagating coronal front ('EIT wave'), and eventually forming the coronal mass ejection moving into the inner heliosphere. The observations support the interpretation that all of these features, including the 'EIT wave', are signatures of an expanding volume traced by loops (much larger than the flux rope only), surrounded by a moving front rather than predominantly wave-like perturbations; this interpretation is supported by previously published MHD models for active-region and global scales. The lateral expansion of the eruption is limited to the local helmet-streamer structure and halts at the edges of a large-scale domain of connectivity (in the process exciting loop oscillations at the edge of the southern polar coronal hole). The AIA observations reveal that plasma warming occurs within the expansion front as it propagates over quiet Sun areas. This warming causes dimming in the 171 A (Fe IX and Fe X) channel and brightening in the 193 and 211 A (Fe XII-XIV) channels along the entire front, while there is weak 131 A (Fe VIII and Fe XXI) emission in some directions. An analysis of the AIA response functions shows that sections of the front running over the quiet Sun are consistent with adiabatic warming; other sections may require additional heating which MHD modeling suggests could be caused by Joule dissipation. Although for the events studied here the effects of volumetric expansion are much more obvious than true wave phenomena, we discuss how different magnetic environments within and around the erupting region can lead to the signatures of either or both of these aspects.

  10. The Storminess Record from Armagh Observatory, N. Ireland 17962002. Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of the difficulties in asse bling such chronologies, even fro one site. The weather diary record from 1796

  11. Observatory, 125, 319322, 2005 EARTH IN THE COSMIC SHOOTING GALLERY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    University, Chelyabinsk, 454080, Russia 3Cardiff Centre for Astrobiology, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    : August 1967 DISTRIBUTION: GB CV TU VLA GB Library ER Library Library-Downtown AOC Library G. Anderson IR Library Library-Mountain D. Bagri E. Childers R. Bradley G. Behrens L. Ben_ R. Fisher C. Burgess M and a photograph is shown in Figure 2. The receiver can accept input signals of 3 types: 1) A detected signal of 1

  13. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Bpi D - GND ELCO CONNECTOR ON BACK " R E ' 1;7;1 N S 0 -- S2-404-1 CHART AMPLITUDE NATIONAL RADIO 1200M +v -v FA5T + SLOW- PEAK DETECTOR 4 1C2 DRAIN CASE/ suBSTRATE C3 MOS-FET BOT.VIEW 2N435I, 2N4352OcwK El c z 1,- EZ 2 4 19A2 BACK OFF CHART AMPLITUDE BACK OFF POT ON FRONT PNL. 2N4393 JUNCTION FET 20K 10

  14. The ING Instrumentation Conference Discussion, Options for a Competitive Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. A. Walton; S. J. Smartt

    2000-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An expert panel initiated discussion on a number of key questions facing the role of 4-m and small telescopes in the new era of 8-m telescopes. The panel and audience agreed that the 4-m class telescope role would necessarily evolve, but would still be important in the coming years. The need for an active development programme of competitive instrumentation for 4-m class telescopes, and in particular the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) was stressed. In conjunction with this, the need to de-commission instrumentation made redundant by 8-m class telescopes was noted. New operational modes, including greater emphasis on survey programmes, and possibly queue scheduling, coupled with changes to the procedures for allocating time were seen as desirable. The panel and audience supported the Isaac Newton Group's emphasis on the development of instrumentation to exploit its imminent deployment of the WHT's facility Adaptive Optics system.

  15. HAWC Observatory to study universe's most energetic phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of supermassive black holes at the center of some galaxies-as well as tracking gamma ray bursts and other large explosions. The researchers will also work to determine the...

  16. Department of Astronomy Astronomy Observatory -14" Telescope Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, J. Patrick

    controller, go to the Objects menu. Select from the cataloged deep space objects (M for Messier, NGC), solar the camera, dew heaters and mount are bundled and were setup to stay out of the way. They have gotten loose

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    to the conduction through the hydrogen heat switch, conduction in the JT structure, and radiative loading. #12;H =7 .,_. valve .53 / I \\\\., low p IP, L___. valve \\ compressor gas volumes It is clear that if an initial

  18. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    con- stituents: non-resonant 0 2 , resonant 0 2 ( 0.5 cm), resonant water vapor (1.34 cm), residual water vapor (composite line wings), and condensed water. Below 15 GHz the main contributors are non-resonant 02 which is nearly inde- pendent of frequency and condensed water which is very frequency, bulk

  19. Mechanical Design of the Magdalena Ridge Observatory Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, John

    and transporter, fast tip-tilt system, beam relay system, delay line system, beam compressor, automated alignment and testing inside the integration hall at Advanced Mechanical and Optical System (AMOS) test facility

  20. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Electronics Division Internal Report No. 62

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    the relay turns the noise tube off. #12;. Tests The prototype unit has been subjected to a test consisting reads 0-200 mA. The tube may be fired remotely by a 28 V relay so arranged so that energi- zing of the test. No tests have been made on the temperature performance. For good per- formance over a wide

  1. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    tests made on the 750 Mc and the 1410 Mc systems which were installed on the 300-foot telescope transition, 7 1/2 feet of : RG--9 coaxial cable, and a RF Products 48 VDC coaxial relay), were installed LAC-3 mixer- preamplifier. Test results of the parametric amplifier are covered in Internal Report No

  2. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK/ WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    -End Instrumentation Chassis .......... . 4 1. Constant Current Power Supplies for GaAs FET's 4 2. Solid State Relay .. 6 LAB TEST DATA Gain Measurements ........ . ...... -- 4. .0 0... 7 Noise Tem erature Measurements ..... Impedance Measurements TELESCOPE TEST DATA Gain Measurements Noise Tem erature

  3. Extrasolar planet transit photometry at Wallace Astrophysical Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fong, Wen-fai

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Extrasolar planet transit photometry is a relatively new astronomical technique developed over the past decade. Transit photometry is the measurement of a star's brightness as an orbiting planet passes in front of the star ...

  4. atmospheric observatory uao: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of a 1 kiloton heavy water Cherenkov detector able to detect and reconstruct high-energy muons created from cosmic ray showers and atmospheric neutrino interactions. By...

  5. A realtime observatory for laboratory simulation of planetary flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ravela, Srinivas (Sai)

    Motivated by the large-scale circulation of the atmosphere and ocean, we develop a system that uses

  6. The Magdalena Ridge Observatory interferometer: 2014 status update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Creech-Eakman, M. J.; Romero, V.; Payne, I.; Haniff, C. A.; Buscher, D. F.; Dahl, C.; Farris, A.; Fisher, M.; Jurgenson, C.; Klinglesmith, D.; McCracken, T.; Napolitano, M.; Olivares, A.; Riker, J.; Rochelle, S.; Salcido, C.; Santoro, F.; Schmidt, L.; Selina, R.; Seneta, E. B.; Shtromberg, A.; Sun, X.; Wilson, D. M. A.; Young, J. S.

    2014-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    the full complement of 10 telescope beams of the MROI. The design enables ICoNN to detect and track the interferometer fringe phase at either the H or Ks infrared bandpasses for any distribution of neighboring telescopes. It is a dedicated fringe... -mechanical stability even when tested in a university laboratory environment with no temperature or vibration control. Previous proceedings (Jurgenson et al. 2008 and McCracken et al. 2012, Santoro et al. 2012) have detailed the design and plans for laboratory...

  7. Sandia Energy - Sandia's Frontier Observatory for Research In...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    site potentially indicates the presence of high subsurface temperature with little fluid and permeable rock at depth. Sandia and its partnering national laboratory, government...

  8. SCIENTIFIC HIGHLIGHTS FROM THE SOLAR AND HELIOSPHERIC OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martens, Petrus C.

    scientific results from the ESA/NASA SOHO mission, with a special emphasis on remote sensing observations are \\Gamma to study the solar interior, using the techniques of helioseismology, \\Gamma to study the heating to investigate the solar wind and its acceleration processes, again by remote sensing, and by in situ particle

  9. 1.PutyourWebappintheCloud 2.VirtualObservatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams, Roy

    ^calOp^cal+Xray OpenSkyQuery WebEnabledSourceIden^fica^on withCrossMatching(WESIX) Uploadimagesto^onsofsmall,carefullyselectedsamples Towarda"newastronomy" Mul^wavelengthdataformillionsofobjects DataMining,Outliers,Correla^ons,etc TheoryvsExperiment Towarda"newastronomy" Tools Visualiza^on DataMining #12;5/30/09 4 Virtual

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    an Ellis and Watts Company Model LCAH-23 chilled water system and a proportion- ally controlled heater OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO 7 Temperature Control Circuit OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO ......... .... 7 Heater Current) CABIN CONTROL SIGNAL TEMP CONTROLLER 208V, 30 HEATER TEMP MONITOR [-- RETURN LIQUID CHILLER

  11. Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurapov, Alexander

    . Global Scale Nodes (GSN) Autonomous moored buoy platforms at four deep water, high-latitude locations spanning multiple geological and oceanographic features and processes. The RSN also provides power

  12. Acoustic Communications for Regional Undersea Observatories Lee Freitag, Milica Stojanovic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojanovic, Milica

    different scientific disciplines will located at each node and along the branches. The fiber optic and power that use surface buoys and satellite telemetry. Examples of buoy-based efforts in- clude a Japanese project advanced power and optical commu- nication technology will allow the long cables to circle the Juan de Fuca

  13. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    square law for low voltage and current. At high current the resistance of the diode and the load re function. The curve for Rx 1. 5 K ohm follows the square law curve for outputs from 10 millivolts to 150 millivolts. The Rx = 1. 5 K ohm curve starts near the one-diode curve and ap- proaches the two-diode curve

  14. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    diodes and provides a fairly wide square law range. The curve is adjusted by varying the DC load that the load changed the shape of the error curve as well as the tilt. It appeared to be an indirect method of curve control. In the process of experimenting with the circuit it was discovered that source impedance

  15. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE NO 113

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    the Apple II for Graphics Output from VAX FA AUTHOR(S): Stowe Keller DATE: August 3, 1982 Distribution: J;USING THE APPLE II FOR GRAPHICS OUTPUT FROM VAX FARANT Stowe Keller I. Introduction FARANT, a program design. It has been implemented on the HP-9845A desktop computer and the VAX 11. The HP-9845A offers

  16. NOAA Satellite and Information Service Deep Space Climate Observatory (DSCOVR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    infrastructure system, including transportation systems, power grids, telecommunications and GPS. NOAA such as the commercial airline, electric power and GPS industries. Our national security and economic well-being, which to a recent report by the National Academies,1 geomagnetic storm-disabled electric power grids and collateral

  17. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    TU VLA GB Library ER Library Library Downtown VIA Library R. Lacasse IR Library Library Mountain P to weather information, 16 bits of digital input and output were provided. In order to provide isolation Ch 7 64 Digital Output, 16 Bits DO Alarm, output a 1 to close a contact D1-D3 Spare output contact

  18. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    DISTRIBUTION: GB CV TU VLA GB Library ER Library Library Downtown VLA Library R. Norrod IR Library Library by NRAO to convert the voltage produced by the continuum square law detector to a digital signal due to digitization allowed It will be assumed that the counter is enabled and disabled by pulse edges

  19. The Photomultiplier Tube Calibration of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the advice of Steve Biller. Nick West has provided a constant model of good programming practice and near and presents the results of investigations into its performance. The PMT calibration is found to perform well for their help in completing this thesis. Foremost is my advisor, Dave Wark. He has been a constant source

  20. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Power Supply Schematic - - - - - Fig. 21 Isolation Transformer Module Schematic Fig. 1 Interferometer OF CONTENTS 2.0 IF PROCESSING COMPONENTS Fig. 7 - Interferometer System Time Delays 2.1 IF Cable Equalizers Module - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2.6 HP 460AR IF Amplifier 2.7 Total Power Module 2.8 TP/AGC DC

  1. REGION, IDENTITY AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT FOR AN ECONOMIC REGIONAL OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    ________________________________________________________________ Marie-Hlne DE SEDE-MARCEAU, Alexandre MOINE Professors of geography alexandre.moine@univ-fcomte.fr, marie-helene.de-sede-marceau@univ-fcomte.fr Professional address CERSOT-ThMA, UMR-6049 (CNRS

  2. Wales Observatory on Human Rights of Children and Young People

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harman, Neal.A.

    for Communities & Tackling Poverty, Jeff Cuthbert AM Anita Tiesen, UNICEF UK Professor Barbara Bennett Woodhouse Reid, Children are Unbeatable Disability Children's Commissioner Children and Poverty Pat Dunmore

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Oreen Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    -Figure Measurement 6 Amplifier Saturation-Input Power vs. Output Power 7 Gain-Bandpass Using Ratiometer and X, va- ractor testing and replacement, and power supply troubles are also covered. #12;2 Measurement - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 Measurements of Gain-Bandpass Characteristic A. Sweep-Frequency Method

  4. aperture grb observatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    short burst GRB 040924. We find that the limited data are consistent with a low medium density environment which is consistent with the pre-concept of the compact-star...

  5. Formation flying for a Fresnel lens observatory mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Krizmanic; Gerry Skinner; Neil Gehrels

    2006-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The employment of a large area Phase Fresnel Lens (PFL) in a gamma-ray telescope offers the potential to image astrophysical phenomena with micro-arcsecond angular resolution. In order to assess the feasibility of this concept, two detailed studies have been conducted of formation flying missions in which a Fresnel lens capable of focussing gamma-rays and the associated detector are carried on two spacecraft separated by up to 10$^6$ km. These studies were performed at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center Integrated Mission Design Center (IMDC) which developed spacecraft, orbital dynamics, and mission profiles. The results of the studies indicated that the missions are challenging but could be accomplished with technologies available currently or in the near term. The findings of the original studies have been updated taking account of recent advances in ion thruster propulsion technology.

  6. NASA/TP--2006214434 Examination of the Armagh Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by NASA-sponsored contractors and grantees. CONFERENCE PUBLICATION. Collected papers from scientific

  7. Scottish Observatory for Work and Health University of Glasgow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glasgow, University of

    .3% in 2008. (On flow rates are expressed as percent of the WAP not on IB). 5. The off flow rates are more

  8. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    No 101 THE 108-CHANNEL MULTIPLEXER FOR USE WITH THE HONEYWELL 316 SPECTRAL LINE PROCESSOR John M. Payne WITH THE HONEYWELL 316 SPECTRAL LINE PROCESSOR John M. Payne TABLE OF CONTENTS Page 1 2. 0 Mode of Operation O 0 0 to the Honeywell 316 11 Reference Generator Block Diagram 12 Reference Generator Circuit Diagram #12;THE 108

  9. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, W ES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Calculations Some simple calculations of the expected heat load through the windows were made to assess Lamb 23 April ,1992 INFRARED FILTERS FOR CRYOGENIC RECEIVERS Introduction To reduce the heat loading of the filter and some experimental results of heat load tests. 22 Selection of Material Ibruegger [1] has

  10. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    radiation from the room temperature dewar walls to the internal surfaces is typically the largest heat load with equation 6 allows calculation of the net heat flow from the simplified gray body equation when T INTERNAL REPORT NO. 323 On Radiation Loading in Cryogenic Dewars and Emissivity Measurements

  11. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE NO . 108

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    ATION RFI IN RADIOMETER SYSTEMS AUTHOR (S) William D. Brundage Distribution: GB Library CV Library VLA Library TU Libraries: J. Payne P. Napier R. Thompson M. Balister S. Weinreb G. Behrens C. Brockway J. Coe by inter modulation within a radio eter system has occurred at Green Bank. Only occasionally has the cause

  12. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    . At a later date, the data may be derived from the NRAO solar clock. SID information contains record name No. 31 DIGITAL OUTPUT UNIT FOR THE LUNAR OCCULTATION RECEIVERS Nigel J. Keen JUNE 1964 NUMBER OF COPIES: 75 #12;DIGITAL OUTPUT UNIT F It THE LUNAR OCCULTATION RECEIVERS Nigel J. Keen General The outputs

  13. ICRC 2007: Mrida, Mexico Highlights from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and side-by- side." V.H.Hess, Nobel Lecture, December 1936 #12;2 Argentina Australia Brasil Bolivia* Mexico (stereo low N) ~ 0.2 ~ 1 - 2 ~ 3 - 5 Flat with energy AND E, A, spectral mass and model (M) free slope and M dependent A and M free A and M A and M free dependent Angular Resolution Aperture Energy #12

  14. James Cronin, CP Violation, and the Pierre Auger Observatory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is Your Home as Ready for Summer asJacob BarhenJames Craw James

  15. Experiment Profile: COUPP NAME: Chicagoland Observatory for Underground Particle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOEThe Bonneville Power AdministrationField8,Dist. Category UC-l 1,Energy Consumers | Department ofaExpedited

  16. The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2Uranium Transferon theTed Donat About UsTheDepartmentCompetition

  17. Los Alamos observatory fingers cosmic ray 'hot spots'

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated Codes |Is YourAwardspublicexceeds waste

  18. HAWC Observatory to study universe's most energetic phenomena

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm) Harmonic Engine GyroSolé(tm) engine5977BobHAWCHAWC

  19. Sandia Energy - Sandia's Frontier Observatory for Research In

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiationImplementing Nonlinear757KelleyEffects of Wave-EnergyIvanpahto StudyGeothermal

  20. The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) invites application for the following Mitaka-based staff of the NAOJ Chile Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Atsushi

    astronomy 4. Duties and responsibilities: The East Asian Project Scientist (EA-PS) mainly has the following to collect and summarize science demand in the East Asian community of researchers. For new enhancement communication skills to build and maintain good collaborative relationship are of critical importance. The EA

  1. Undergraduate Honors Research Projects Assessing Flat Field Quality at the University of Maryland Observatory, David Blankenship,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    , Brett M. Morris, (Derek Richardson) 2012. Neutron Star Radii: Theoretical Tests of Frequency Scattering using HNBody, James Keane, (Douglas P. Hamilton) 2011 Measurements of the Mass and Radius of the Neutron Star 4U 1636-53 Using Millisecond Brightness Oscillations during Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts, Ryan

  2. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY POST OFFICE BOX 2 GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA 24944-0002

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    Library ER Library Library Downtown VIA Library R. Lacasse IR Library Library Mountain P. Napier R. Weimer the last couple of years working with optical fibers. Fibers Two types of fiber are used on site. Both. A Fiber type 50/125 graded index - multimode. 6 6 dB/km attenuation. Bandwidth - 200 MHz - km. Wavelength

  3. Arecibo Observatory Technical Memo AOTM 200001 THE LBW FEED: THE MUELLER MATRIX IN 1999 AND 2000

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of MA+F ; there are only six independent elements. We present five below; the sixth element m QUANTITIES: TWO YEARS, TWO FREQUENCIES Quantity Mar99, 1420.4 Mar00, 1420.4 Mar00, 1665.3 mQI 0 \\Sigma 0:0004 0 \\Sigma 0:0007 0 \\Sigma 0:0005 mUI 0:0112 \\Sigma 0:0002 0:0065 \\Sigma 0:0007 0:0044 \\Sigma 0:0006 m

  4. An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    constructed by Deep Ocean Engineering, Inc. 9 to operate in1 cm diameter Deep Ocean Engineering, San Leandro, CA, URL:

  5. Simulations for the India based Neutrino Observatory (INO) Tarak Thakore1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    (INO) is a proposed experiment designed to study neutrino oscillation parameters using atmospheric neutrinos measurement of the atmospheric oscillation parameters (sin2 223, |m2 32|) and to determine the neutrino mass for the muon reconstruction and the sensitivity to neutrino oscillation parameters and the mass hierarchy

  6. The Sierra Nevada-San Joaquin Hydrologic Observatory (SNSJHO): a WATERS network test bed

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Jason; Meng, Xiande; Rice, Robert; Butler, Chris; Harmon, T C; Bales, Roger

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    provide flood control, hydropower, seasonal water deliveryirrigation demand and hydropower operations have a very

  7. 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608-262-3581 / www.lafollette.wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    is that carbon prices generate large benefits for conventional oil producers--making a climate backstop unappealing for them. Unilateral investment does become more likely under: stringent carbon policy, social stage investment is inexpensive and could provide a hedge against such developments, particularly

  8. 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608-262-3581 / www.lafollette.wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    the period after 1997 are discussed, including the saving-investment approach, the intertemporal approach Classification Nos.: F32, F41 Keywords: Current account; net foreign assets; saving glut; investment drought States ran enormous current account deficits. China, the rest of East Asia, and the oil exporting

  9. 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608-262-3581 / www.lafollette.wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    . In many cases, Chinese aggregate imports actually rise in response to a RMB depreciation and decline when we allow for different import intensities for different components of aggregate demand elasticity is sensitive to the treatment of time trends. Estimates of aggregate imports are more problematic

  10. Radio background measurements at the Pierre Auger Observatory J. Lamblin , O. Ravel for the CODALEMA collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 shows the experimental setup. The short dipole powered by a battery was linked to the acquisition), the site of the CODALEMA experiment [2]. II) Measurement setup and data analysis procedure. To carry out system by 300 m of optical fiber. The optical receiver converted the optical signal into electrical

  11. Abstract B44A02: A Strategy for Global Phenological Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoffman, Forrest M.

    developed clusters based on a wavelet-filtered subset of the 1982­1999 global Pathfinder Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Land (PAL) Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) dataset, a global 10. Oak Ridge National Laboratory is managed by UT-Battelle, LLC, for the U.S. Department of Energy under

  12. The Armagh Observatory was founded and endowed by Archbishop Richard Robinson, who wished to establish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , into public walk-ways (now the Mall). In 1789, at more than 80 years of age, he commenced the construction watched Comet Hale-Bopp with it. Calver Telescope The Calver telescope was originally made for an English research interests lie in solar system astronomy and the dynamics of bodies such as comets and asteroids

  13. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    of capital moving in search of the highest return (and in this example, there is no risk in nominal terms to enter into an agreement this period to exchange currencies k periods hence at a forward rate F known) is termed "uncovered interest rate parity". This expression holds when investors do not require compensation

  14. Position angle of the VSOP antenna feed. National Radio Astronomy Observatory, Socorro, New Mexico, USA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    , including antenna and solar panels, is shown in Fig. 1. We define a right hand coordinate system fixed about which the solar panels can be rotated. The solar panels are pointed at the Sun by rotation the source and the Sun, there are two possible orientations of the satellite and the solar panels

  15. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    take several forms. Some are concerned that cheap imports, for example of textiles, from lower wage study approach to examine the impact of globalization and internationalization on domestic policy policy to environmental protection that were once domestic in character. Globalization results from

  16. 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608-262-3581 / www.lafollette.wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    solar panels. On a larger scale, general purpose technologies such as the steam engine, electric power natural gas power plants; ad- vances in ball bearings and tires for bicycles enabled development of auto

  17. Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal Observatories" and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boss, Emmanuel S.

    Summer Courses in Ocean Optics and Biogeochemistry: "Monitoring the Oceans with Coastal integration of optical approaches into oceanographic research in general. OBJECTIVES These two courses created and optical oceanography and ocean color remote sensing to learn the fundamentals of optics in a coastal

  18. Investigations of the cascade of Langmuir wave turbulence over HAARP Observatory in Gakona, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burton, Laura M

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates the cascade lines from Langmuir wave turbulence as a result of Parametric Decay Instability (PDI) in the ionosphere. This effect is studied using a high-frequency (HF) heater located at the NSF/DoD ...

  19. 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608-262-3581 / www.lafollette.wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ://www.lafollette.wisc.edu/publications/workingpapers U.S. Health Care Reform: A Primer and an Assessment Robert Haveman La Follette School of Public at the University of Wisconsin-Madison August 19, 2010 #12;1 US Health Care Reform: A Primer and an Assessment presidents and numerous Senators and Congressional Representatives, a comprehensive health care reform bill

  20. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    .S. health care system does not effectively promote and utilize evidence- based research. Despite the failings of current governance arrangements in the health care system, few researchers have focused of the current health reform proposals will depend critically on the governance arrangements they employ, we have

  1. A Search for TeV Emission from Active Galaxies using the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    that observes very high energy gamma rays (100 GeV to 100 TeV) using the water-Cerenkov technique Mexico, Milagro observes most of the Northern Hemisphere over the course of a day. The high duty cycleV candidates. Active galaxies have been observed to be highly variable at TeV energies. To test for episodic

  2. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ). The market model relies on financial incentives and performance measures to control behavior, and has been extrinsic incentives crowd out intrinsic incentives such as public service motivation. The limitations, the market model adds a behavioral framework from economic theory explicitly based on assumptions of self

  3. Testing the Extensional Detachment Paradigm: A Borehole Observatory in the Sevier Desert Basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christie-Blick, Nicholas

    Scientific Drilling, No. 8, September 2009 57 doi:10.2204/iodp.sd.8.09.2009 Low-angle normal faults of forty-seven scientists and drilling experts from five countries met for four days on 1518 July 2008 was held at two venues in Utah (the Utah Department of Natural Resources in Salt Lake City, and Solitude

  4. Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, China email: youfenwang@shao.ac.cn University Of Hertfordshire, UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joergens, Viki

    dwarfs are expected to be brown dwarfs, e.g. do not reach the hydrogen burning phase. Brown dwarf are carried out via the standard LT pipeline. These z band images suffer from strong fringing. We do among 56 frames of the 2M1807+5015 field in Figure 1. 3.Parallax and proper motions Pipeline used: We

  5. The Wave-Front Correction System for the Sunrise Balloon-Borne Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berkefeld, T; Soltau, D; Bell, A; Doerr, H P; Feger, B; Friedlein, R; Gerber, K; Heidecke, F; Kentischer, T; Lhe, O v d; Sigwarth, M; Wlde, E; Barthol, P; Deutsch, W; Gandorfer, A; Germerott, D; Grauf, B; Meller, R; Alvarez-Herrero, A; Knlker, M; Pillet, V Martinez; Solanki, S K; Title, A M

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes the wave-front correction system developed for the Sunrise balloon telescope, and provides information about its in-flight performance. For the correction of low-order aberrations, a Correlating Wave-Front Sensor (CWS) was used. It consisted of a six-element Shack-Hartmann wave-front sensor (WFS), a fast tip-tilt mirror for the compensation of image motion, and an active telescope secondary mirror for focus correction. The CWS delivered a stabilized image with a precision of 0.04 arcsec (rms), whenever the coarse pointing was better than 90 arcsec peak-to-peak. The automatic focus adjustment maintained a focus stability of 0.01 waves in the focal plane of the CWS. During the 5.5 day flight, good image quality and stability was achieved during 33 hours, containing 45 sequences that lasted between 10 and 45 minutes.

  6. EUV multilayer coatings for the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly instrument aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soufli, R; Windt, D L; Robinson, J C; Baker, S L; Spiller, E; Dollar, F J; Aquila, A L; Gullikson, E M; Kjonrattanawanich, B; Seely, J F; Golub, L

    2006-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Multilayer coatings for the 7 EUV channels of the AIA have been developed and completed successfully on all AIA flight mirrors. Mo/Si coatings (131, 171, 193.5, 211 {angstrom}) were deposited at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Mg/SiC (304, 335 {angstrom}) and Mo/Y (94 {angstrom}) coatings were deposited at Columbia University. EUV reflectance of the 131/335 {angstrom}, 171 {angstrom}, 193.5/211 {angstrom} primary and secondary flight mirrors and the 94/304 {angstrom} secondary flight mirror was measured at beamline 6.3.2. of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) at LBNL. EUV reflectance of the 94/304 {angstrom} primary and secondary flight mirrors was measured at beamline X24C of the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Lab. Preliminary EUV reflectance measurements of the 94, 304 and 335 {angstrom} coatings were performed with a laser plasma source reflectometer located at Columbia University. Prior to multilayer coating, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) characterization and cleaning of all flight substrates was performed at LLNL.

  7. More about SOHO --SOHO (The Solar and Heliospheric Observatory) is a joint international space mission carried

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the internal structure of the Sun, the heating of its extensive outer atmosphere, and the origin of the solar Flap Flap Flap Flap Fold Fold #12;B EAFD G Glue this to solar panel, Side A with black boxes lined up of communications dish and the "x" at bottom of blue solar panels. Extend it if inserting in something like a clay

  8. Adaptive optics system for the IRSOL solar observatory Renzo Ramelli a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . It is convenient to use it also for scanning or for choosing the limb distance in limb tracking mode. The SP movement is controlled by a step motor or manually. The Lens L1 focus the pupil on the micro lens array. Astrophys. 422, 703 708 (2004). [3] Ramelli, R., Balemi, S., Bianda, M., Defilippis, I., Gamma, L

  9. Solar neutrino measurement in SK and larger detector a Kamioka observatory, ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tokyo, University of

    will refer this pe- riod as SK-I. The second phase of SK (SK-II) has started since 2002 with 5182 PMTs, which

  10. Design and Deployment of the Bonne Bay Observatory (B2O) B. de Young

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    a multidisciplinary team, the instrument array is diverse, including acoustic sensors to determine currents, bubble for temperature, salinity, chlorophyll fluorescence, carbon dioxide, oxygen, inorganic nutrient concentrations water property measurements, acoustic sensors for determination of currents, bubble distribution

  11. Development of Regional Coastal Ocean Observatories and the Potential Benefits to Marine Sanctuaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moline, Mark

    impacted on global and mesoscale processes in marine ecosystems through fishing, eutrophication, commercial marine sanctuaries, we must elucidate the synergistic interactions between global, mesoscale, and local

  12. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    problems that cross national boundaries and demand a multi-actor response. At the same time, traditional performance regimes work best. Instead, they must work in the context of a disarticulated state, with policy and the complexity of modern governance, identifying implications and questions for research and practice

  13. Grid-Based Galaxy Morphology Analysis for the National Virtual Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deelman, Ewa

    Information Sciences Institute, University of Southern California, Marina Del Rey, CA 90202 (ISI), deelman@isi.edu Raymond Plante National Center for Supercomputing Applications, Champaign, IL 61820 rplante California, Marina Del Rey, CA 90292 (ISI), {carl, gurmeet, mei}@isi.edu Gretchen Greene, Robert Hanisch

  14. Prospects for Localization of Gravitational Wave Transients by the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    LIGO Scientific Collaboration; Virgo Collaboration; J. Aasi; J. Abadie; B. P. Abbott; R. Abbott; T. D. Abbott; M. Abernathy; T. Accadia; F. Acernese; C. Adams; T. Adams; P. Addesso; R. X. Adhikari; C. Affeldt; M. Agathos; O. D. Aguiar; P. Ajith; B. Allen; A. Allocca; E. Amador Ceron; D. Amariutei; S. B. Anderson; W. G. Anderson; K. Arai; M. C. Araya; C. Arceneaux; S. Ast; S. M. Aston; P. Astone; D. Atkinson; P. Aufmuth; C. Aulbert; L. Austin; B. E. Aylott; S. Babak; P. Baker; G. Ballardin; S. Ballmer; Y. Bao; J. C. Barayoga; D. Barker; F. Barone; B. Barr; L. Barsotti; M. Barsuglia; M. A. Barton; I. Bartos; R. Bassiri; M. Bastarrika; A. Basti; J. Batch; J. Bauchrowitz; Th. S. Bauer; M. Bebronne; B. Behnke; M. Bejger; M. G. Beker; A. S. Bell; C. Bell; G. Bergmann; J. M. Berliner; A. Bertolini; J. Betzwieser; N. Beveridge; P. T. Beyersdorf; T. Bhadbade; I. A. Bilenko; G. Billingsley; J. Birch; S. Biscans; M. Bitossi; M. A. Bizouard; E. Black; J. K. Blackburn; L. Blackburn; D. Blair; B. Bland; M. Blom; O. Bock; T. P. Bodiya; C. Bogan; C. Bond; F. Bondu; L. Bonelli; R. Bonnand; R. Bork; M. Born; V. Boschi; S. Bose; L. Bosi; B. Bouhou; J. Bowers; C. Bradaschia; P. R. Brady; V. B. Braginsky; M. Branchesi; J. E. Brau; J. Breyer; T. Briant; D. O. Bridges; A. Brillet; M. Brinkmann; V. Brisson; M. Britzger; A. F. Brooks; D. A. Brown; D. D. Brown; F. Brueckner; K. Buckland; T. Bulik; H. J. Bulten; A. Buonanno; J. Burguet-Castell; D. Buskulic; C. Buy; R. L. Byer; L. Cadonati; G. Cagnoli; E. Calloni; J. B. Camp; P. Campsie; K. Cannon; B. Canuel; J. Cao; C. D. Capano; F. Carbognani; L. Carbone; S. Caride; A. D. Castiglia; S. Caudill; M. Cavagli; F. Cavalier; R. Cavalieri; G. Cella; C. Cepeda; E. Cesarini; T. Chalermsongsak; S. Chao; P. Charlton; E. Chassande-Mottin; X. Chen; Y. Chen; A. Chincarini; A. Chiummo; H. S. Cho; J. Chow; N. Christensen; Q. Chu; S. S. Y. Chua; C. T. Y. Chung; G. Ciani; F. Clara; D. E. Clark; J. A. Clark; F. Cleva; E. Coccia; P. -F. Cohadon; C. N. Colacino; A. Colla; M. Colombini; M. Constancio Jr; A. Conte; D. Cook; T. R. Corbitt; M. Cordier; N. Cornish; A. Corsi; C. A. Costa; M. Coughlin; J. -P. Coulon; S. Countryman; P. Couvares; D. M. Coward; M. Cowart; D. C. Coyne; K. Craig; J. D. E. Creighton; T. D. Creighton; A. Cumming; L. Cunningham; E. Cuoco; K. Dahl; M. Damjanic; S. L. Danilishin; S. D'Antonio; K. Danzmann; V. Dattilo; B. Daudert; H. Daveloza; M. Davier; G. S. Davies; E. J. Daw; T. Dayanga; R. De Rosa; G. Debreczeni; J. Degallaix; W. Del Pozzo; E. Deleeuw; T. Denker; T. Dent; V. Dergachev; R. DeRosa; R. DeSalvo; S. Dhurandhar; L. Di Fiore; A. Di Lieto; I. Di Palma; A. Di Virgilio; M. Daz; A. Dietz; F. Donovan; K. L. Dooley; S. Doravari; M. Drago; S. Drasco; R. W. P. Drever; J. C. Driggers; Z. Du; J. -C. Dumas; S. Dwyer; T. Eberle; M. Edwards; A. Effler; P. Ehrens; S. S. Eikenberry; G. Endrczi; R. Engel; R. Essick; T. Etzel; K. Evans; M. Evans; T. Evans; M. Factourovich; V. Fafone; S. Fairhurst; Q. Fang; B. F. Farr; W. Farr; M. Favata; D. Fazi; H. Fehrmann; D. Feldbaum; I. Ferrante; F. Ferrini; F. Fidecaro; L. S. Finn; I. Fiori; R. P. Fisher; R. Flaminio; S. Foley; E. Forsi; L. A. Forte; N. Fotopoulos; J. -D. Fournier; J. Franc; S. Franco; S. Frasca; F. Frasconi; M. Frede; M. A. Frei; Z. Frei; A. Freise; R. Frey; T. T. Fricke; D. Friedrich; P. Fritschel; V. V. Frolov; M. -K. Fujimoto; P. J. Fulda; M. Fyffe; J. Gair; M. Galimberti; L. Gammaitoni; J. Garcia; F. Garufi; M. E. Gspr; N. Gehrels; G. Gelencser; G. Gemme; E. Genin; A. Gennai; L. . Gergely; S. Ghosh; J. A. Giaime; S. Giampanis; K. D. Giardina; A. Giazotto; S. Gil-Casanova; C. Gill; J. Gleason; E. Goetz; G. Gonzlez; N. Gordon; M. L. Gorodetsky; S. Gossan; S. Goler; R. Gouaty; C. Graef; P. B. Graff; M. Granata; A. Grant; S. Gras; C. Gray; R. J. S. Greenhalgh; A. M. Gretarsson; C. Griffo; H. Grote; K. Grover; S. Grunewald; G. M. Guidi; C. Guido; E. K. Gustafson; R. Gustafson; D. Hammer; G. Hammond; J. Hanks; C. Hanna; J. Hanson; K. Haris; J. Harms; G. M. Harry; I. W. Harry; E. D. Harstad; M. T. Hartman; K. Haughian; K. Hayama; J. Heefner; A. Heidmann; M. C. Heintze; H. Heitmann; P. Hello; G. Hemming; M. A. Hendry; I. S. Heng; A. W. Heptonstall; M. Heurs; M. Hewitson; S. Hild; D. Hoak; K. A. Hodge; K. Holt; M. Holtrop; T. Hong; S. Hooper; J. Hough; E. J. Howell; V. Huang; E. A. Huerta; B. Hughey; S. H. Huttner; M. Huynh; T. Huynh-Dinh; D. R. Ingram; R. Inta; T. Isogai; A. Ivanov; B. R. Iyer; K. Izumi; M. Jacobson; E. James; H. Jang; Y. J. Jang; P. Jaranowski; E. Jesse; W. W. Johnson; D. Jones; D. I. Jones; R. Jones; R. J. G. Jonker; L. Ju; P. Kalmus; V. Kalogera; S. Kandhasamy; G. Kang; J. B. Kanner; M. Kasprzack; R. Kasturi; E. Katsavounidis; W. Katzman; H. Kaufer; K. Kawabe; S. Kawamura; F. Kawazoe; D. Keitel; D. Kelley; W. Kells; D. G. Keppel; A. Khalaidovski; F. Y. Khalili; E. A. Khazanov

    2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a possible observing scenario for the Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo gravitational wave detectors over the next decade, with the intention of providing information to the astronomy community to facilitate planning for multi-messenger astronomy with gravitational waves. We determine the expected sensitivity of the network to transient gravitational-wave signals, and study the capability of the network to determine the sky location of the source. For concreteness, we focus primarily on gravitational-wave signals from the inspiral of binary neutron star (BNS) systems, as the source considered likely to be the most common for detection and also promising for multimessenger astronomy. We find that confident detections will likely require at least 2 detectors operating with BNS sensitive ranges of at least 100 Mpc, while ranges approaching 200 Mpc should give at least ~1 BNS detection per year even under pessimistic predictions of signal rates. The ability to localize the source of the detected signals depends on the geographical distribution of the detectors and their relative sensitivity, and can be as large as thousands of square degrees with only 2 sensitive detectors operating. Determining the sky position of a significant fraction of detected signals to areas of 5 sq deg to 20 sq deg will require at least 3 detectors of sensitivity within a factor of ~2 of each other and with a broad frequency bandwidth. Should one of the LIGO detectors be relocated in India as expected, many gravitational-wave signals will be localized to a few square degrees by gravitational-wave observations alone.

  15. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    ://www.lafollette.wisc.edu/publications/workingpapers Choose Your Weapon: International Trade Agreements and Exchange Rate Policy Choice Mark S. Copelovitch La@uchicago.edu #12;CHOOSE YOUR WEAPON: INTERNATIONAL TRADE AGREEMENTS AND EXCHANGE RATE POLICY CHOICE Mark S in their nominal effective exchange rates during this period and this relationship is also conditional

  16. Measurement of the UHECR energy spectrum from hybrid data of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lorenzo Perrone; for the the Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2007-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

    More than two years of fluorescence detector data collected in coincidence with at least one station of the surface detector array (``hybrid data'') are used to measure the flux and energy spectrum of cosmic rays above about 10$^{18}$ eV. The hybrid measurement extends towards lower energies the spectrum measured with the surface detector data only, and provides a cross-check with an independent data set. The determination of the fluorescence detector aperture and of its live-time, which is the major aspect of this measurement, is illustrated in detail. Our current estimate of the corresponding systematic uncertainties are given.

  17. The Chandra Xray Observatory (Chandra) and the Xray Multimirror Mirror telescope (XMM)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    ://cxc.harvard.edu/ 2.2 High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) Hardware: 4 nested paraboloidhyperboloid (Wolter Type 1 of the HRMA. Effective area: 800 cm 2 below 2 keV and about 200 cm 2 at 6.6 keV. Encircled energy: 80% within transmission gratings that can be inserted into the beam between the HRMA and HRCS. Spectral range: 1.7 to 170

  18. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton $\\gamma$-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Briggs, M S; Kippen, R M; Preece, R D; Kouveliotou, C; Van Paradijs, J; Share, G H; Murphy, R J; Matz, S M; Connors, A; Winkler, C; McConnell, M L; Ryan, J M; Williams, O R; Young, C A; Dingus, B L; Catelli, J R; Wijers, R A M J

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the CGRO detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations, and the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fit by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared to this function is observed below ~15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the nu f_nu spectrum, E_p, reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 +/- 110 keV, and then falls to consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4...

  19. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Atkins, R; Berley, D; Blaufuss, E; Bussons, J; Coyne, D G; De Young, T R; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Gonzlez, M M; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hays, E; Hoffman, C M; Kelley, L A; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Nmethy, P; Noyes, D; Ryan, J M; Samuelson, F W; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Williams, D A; Westerhoff, S; Wilson, M E; Xu, X; Yodh, G B

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro telescope monitors the northern sky for 100 GeV to 100 TeV transient emission through continuous very high energy wide-field observations. The large effective area and ~100 GeV energy threshold of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity than previous instruments and a fluence sensitivity at VHE energies comparable to that of dedicated gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE observations can place important constraints on gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor and emission models. We present limits on the VHE flux of 40 s -- 3 h duration transients nearby to earth, as well as sensitivity distributions which have been corrected for gamma-ray absorption by extragalactic background light and cosmological effects. The sensitivity distributions suggest that the typical intrinsic VHE fluence of GRBs is similar or weaker than the keV -- MeV emission, and we demonstrate how these sensitivit...

  20. Robust Signal Extraction Methods and Monte Carlo Sensitivity Studies for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waltham, Chris

    +. An important part of the SNO+ physics program will be a search for neutrinoless double beta decay, carried out a reasonable choice for the 150 Nd neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element, these half lives correspond are competitive with those expected from all other near-term neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. ii #12

  1. The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey: The Multi-Telescope Robotic Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. J. Lehner; C. -Y. Wen; J. -H. Wang; S. L. Marshall; M. E. Schwamb; Z. -W. Zhang; F. B. Bianco; J. Giammarco; R. Porrata; C. Alcock; T. Axelrod; Y. -I. Byun; W. P. Chen; K. H. Cook; R. Dave; S. -K. King; T. Lee; H. -C. Lin; S. -Y. Wang

    2009-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The Taiwanese-American Occultation Survey (TAOS) operates four fully automatic telescopes to search for occultations of stars by Kuiper Belt Objects. It is a versatile facility that is also useful for the study of initial optical GRB afterglows. This paper provides a detailed description of the TAOS multi-telescope system, control software, and high-speed imaging.

  2. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  3. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  4. Benchmarking the power of amateur observatories for the TTV exoplanets detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baluev, Roman V; Shaidulin, Vakhit Sh; Sokova, Iraida A; Jones, Hugh R A; Tuomi, Mikko; Anglada-Escud, Guillem; Benni, Paul; Colazo, Carlos A; Schneiter, Matias E; D'Angelo, Carolina S Villarreal; Burdanov, Artem Yu; Fernndez-Lajs, Eduardo; Ba?trk, zgr; Hentunen, Veli-Pekka; Shadick, Stan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform an analysis of ~80000 photometric measurements for the following 10 stars hosting transiting planets: WASP-2, -4, -5, -52, Kelt-1, CoRoT-2, XO-2, TrES-1, HD 189733, GJ 436. Our analysis includes mainly transit lightcurves from the Exoplanet Transit Database, public photometry from the literature, and some proprietary photometry privately supplied by other authors. Half of these lightcurves were obtained by amateurs. From this photometry we derive 306 transit timing measurements, as well as improved planetary transit parameters. Additionally, for 5 of these 10 stars we present a set of radial velocity measurements obtained from the spectra stored in the HARPS and HARPS-N archives using the HARPS-TERRA pipeline. Our analysis of these TTV and RV data did not reveal significant hints of additional orbiting bodies in almost all of the cases. In the WASP-4 case, we found hints of marginally significant TTV signals having amplitude 10-20 sec, although their parameters are model-dependent and uncertain, wh...

  5. Limits on Very High Energy Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the Milagro Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Milagro Collaboration; R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; E. Blaufuss; J. Bussons; D. G. Coyne; T. DeYoung; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; M. M. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; E. Hays; C. M. Hoffman; L. A. Kelley; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; D. Noyes; J. M. Ryan; F. W. Samuelson; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; D. A. Williams; S. Westerhoff; M. E. Wilson; X. Xu; G. B. Yodh

    2004-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The Milagro telescope monitors the northern sky for 100 GeV to 100 TeV transient emission through continuous very high energy wide-field observations. The large effective area and ~100 GeV energy threshold of Milagro allow it to detect very high energy (VHE) gamma-ray burst emission with much higher sensitivity than previous instruments and a fluence sensitivity at VHE energies comparable to that of dedicated gamma-ray burst satellites at keV to MeV energies. Even in the absence of a positive detection, VHE observations can place important constraints on gamma-ray burst (GRB) progenitor and emission models. We present limits on the VHE flux of 40 s -- 3 h duration transients nearby to earth, as well as sensitivity distributions which have been corrected for gamma-ray absorption by extragalactic background light and cosmological effects. The sensitivity distributions suggest that the typical intrinsic VHE fluence of GRBs is similar or weaker than the keV -- MeV emission, and we demonstrate how these sensitivity distributions may be used to place observational constraints on the absolute VHE luminosity of gamma-ray bursts for any GRB emission and progenitor model.

  6. Observations of GRB 990123 by the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Briggs; D. L. Band; R. M. Kippen; R. D. Preece; C. Kouveliotou; J. van Paradijs; G. H. Share; R. J. Murphy; S. M. Matz; A. Connors; C. Winkler; M. L. McConnell; J. M. Ryan; O. R. Williams; C. A. Young; B. Dingus; J. R. Catelli; R. A. M. J. Wijers

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    GRB 990123 was the first burst from which simultaneous optical, X-ray and gamma-ray emission was detected; its afterglow has been followed by an extensive set of radio, optical and X-ray observations. We have studied the gamma-ray burst itself as observed by the CGRO detectors. We find that gamma-ray fluxes are not correlated with the simultaneous optical observations, and the gamma-ray spectra cannot be extrapolated simply to the optical fluxes. The burst is well fit by the standard four-parameter GRB function, with the exception that excess emission compared to this function is observed below ~15 keV during some time intervals. The burst is characterized by the typical hard-to-soft and hardness-intensity correlation spectral evolution patterns. The energy of the peak of the nu f_nu spectrum, E_p, reaches an unusually high value during the first intensity spike, 1470 +/- 110 keV, and then falls to \\~300 keV during the tail of the burst. The high-energy spectrum above ~MeV is consistent with a power law with a photon index of about -3. By fluence, GRB 990123 is brighter than all but 0.4% of the GRBs observed with BATSE, clearly placing it on the -3/2 power-law portion of the intensity distribution. However, the redshift measured for the afterglow is inconsistent with the Euclidean interpretation of the -3/2 power-law. Using the redshift value of >= 1.61 and assuming isotropic emission, the gamma-ray fluence exceeds 10E54 ergs.

  7. Coronal Oscillations above Sunspots? Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG, N. Ireland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that the sunspot oscillations are prominent in transition region lines above the umbra (Maltby et al. 2001 that the oscillation amplitude above the umbra increases with increasing temperature, reaches a maximum

  8. 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706 608-262-3581 / www.lafollette.wisc.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    surveys. Others include income, education, and political views. While valuation methods and survey types

  9. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    subsidies. We modeled their effects on the future costs of a low-carbon energy technology-carbon energy technology Gregory F. Nemet La Follette School of Public Affairs and the Nelson Institute-commercial low-carbon energy technology Gregory F. Nemet1 and Erin Baker2 April 9, 2008 Abstract We combined

  10. TIME SERIES ANALYSIS FOR THE CF SOURCE IN SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 The Theory Leading to the Californium Time . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 2.1.3 A Typical Event Chronology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 2.2 The Survival Function . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 2.2.1 The Survival Function for a Single

  11. GEODETIC AND ASTRONOI{ICAL COORDINATES OF TIIE CERRO TOLOLO INTER-ATI{ERTCAN OBSERVATORY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mamajek, Eric E.

    and solar panels for power sources, and has four strobe units which insure almost uniform apparent flash

  12. Progress Report on the Berkeley/Anglo-Australian Observatory High-Redshift Supernova Search

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldhaber, G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    photometry curve for type Ia supernovae and the redshift vsdistributions for observed supernovae. Figure 5 from Millermain efforts related to supernovae in progress at Berkeley.

  13. amma-catch gourma observatory: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2.8Angpix and 3.6Angpix. Our spectra include all the important Sodium and Mercury light pollution lines and span a wide interval of azimuth and observing conditions, essential to...

  14. Remote sensing-based characterization, 2-m, Plant Functional Type Distributions, Barrow Environmental Observatory, 2010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zachary Langford; Forrest Hoffman; Jitendra Kumar

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  15. Remote sensing-based characterization of plant functional type distributions at the Barrow Environmental Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Hoffman, Forrest M.

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Arctic ecosystems have been observed to be warming faster than the global average and are predicted to experience accelerated changes in climate due to global warming. Arctic vegetation is particularly sensitive to warming conditions and likely to exhibit shifts in species composition, phenology and productivity under changing climate. Mapping and monitoring of changes in vegetation is essential to understand the effect of climate change on the ecosystem functions. Vegetation exhibits unique spectral characteristics which can be harnessed to discriminate plant types and develop quantitative vegetation indices. We have combined high resolution multi-spectral remote sensing from the WorldView 2 satellite with LIDAR-derived digital elevation models to characterize the tundra landscape on the North Slope of Alaska. Classification of landscape using spectral and topographic characteristics yields spatial regions with expectedly similar vegetation characteristics. A field campaign was conducted during peak growing season to collect vegetation harvests from a number of 1m x 1m plots in the study region, which were then analyzed for distribution of vegetation types in the plots. Statistical relationships were developed between spectral and topographic characteristics and vegetation type distributions at the vegetation plots. These derived relationships were employed to statistically upscale the vegetation distributions for the landscape based on spectral characteristics. Vegetation distributions developed are being used to provide Plant Functional Type (PFT) maps for use in the Community Land Model (CLM).

  16. New gamma-ray observatory begins operations at Sierra Negra volcano in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC)Integrated CodesTransparencyDOE Project Taps HPCNew User and DataNewstate of Puebla,

  17. Robert M. La Follette School of Public Affairs 1225 Observatory Drive, Madison, Wisconsin 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    Energy had won an award. In interpreting what follows, we note that the readership and/or market niche groups or questionnaires, we use a market-based empirical measure to indicate important issues conclusions here and provide additional details below. Figure 1 provides a visual summary of our findings

  18. ``STUDIES OF THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY DETECTOR AND SONOLUMINESCENCE USING A SONOLUMINESCENT SOURCE''

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    contraptions used in the experiments. Godwin Mayers helped out with many electronics tasks. Jim Cook, Chuck heavy water Cerenkov solar neutrino detector. 1000 metric tonnes of heavy water is used as a neutrino target and detection medium. SNO is designed to measure the flux and energy spectrum of high energy solar

  19. The Environmental Data Acquisition System (EDAS) developed at the Royal Observatory of Belgium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beauducel, Franois

    conditions due to thermal waves were met. Similar equipment (EDAS) was also experimented on during the solar in this paper. The transducer's qualification is carried out in a laboratory where the admittance of various

  20. GLAST Observatory Renamed for Fermi, Reveals Entire Gamma-Ray Sky |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33 1112011 Strategic2 OPAM Flash2011-12 OPAM RevisedFunding Opportunities1GENESIS GENESIS

  1. New gamma-ray observatory begins operations at Sierra Negra volcano in the

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible for Renewable Energy:Nanowire Solar541,9337, 2011RNew Visible toNew app

  2. DOE Announces Notice of Intent for EGS Observatory | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels DataDepartment of Energy Your Density Isn't Your Destiny: Theof"Wave theJuly 30,CraftyChair'sAnnounces Dates forTraining

  3. Cosmic-ray physics with the milagro gamma-ray observatory | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem Not Found Item Not Found The itemAIR57451 Clean Energy Technologies589 CorrosionName

  4. The Princeton Tritium Observatory for Light, Early Universe, Massive Neutrino Yield (PTOLEMY) Prototype

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742 33Frequently AskedEnergyIssuesEnergy Solar Decathlon2001Competitivenessconvened theandPrinceton

  5. Observatory of Renewable Energy for Latin America and the Caribbean | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup |JilinLuOpenNorth AmericaNorthwestOakdale Electric CoopWells Jump

  6. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  7. Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    depend only upon neutrino and nuclear physics. We have com-everything from the physics of neutrino interactions, to theB neutrino ?ux. Included here are details of the SNO physics

  8. An upper limit to the photon fraction in cosmic rays above 1019 from the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barbosa, Henrique

    .S. Gold bx , F. Gomez Albarracin e , M. Gomez Berisso a , R. Gomez Herrero bd , M. Goncalves do Amaral

  9. A Collaborative Portal for Ocean Observatories Michael A Godin*, James G Bellingham*, Kanna Rajan*, Naomi Leonard, Yi Chao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leonard, Naomi

    *, Naomi Leonard, Yi Chao *Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) 7700 Sandholdt Rd, Moss Landing

  10. The Thermal Environment of the Fiber Glass Dome for the New Solar Telescope at Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. P. Verdoni; C. Denker; J. R. Varsik; S. Shumko; J. Nenow; R. Coulter

    2007-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Solar Telescope (NST) is a 1.6-meter off-axis Gregory-type telescope with an equatorial mount and an open optical support structure. To mitigate the temperature fluctuations along the exposed optical path, the effects of local/dome-related seeing have to be minimized. To accomplish this, NST will be housed in a 5/8-sphere fiberglass dome that is outfitted with 14 active vents evenly spaced around its perimeter. The 14 vents house louvers that open and close independently of one another to regulate and direct the passage of air through the dome. In January 2006, 16 thermal probes were installed throughout the dome and the temperature distribution was measured. The measurements confirmed the existence of a strong thermal gradient on the order of 5 degree Celsius inside the dome. In December 2006, a second set of temperature measurements were made using different louver configurations. In this study, we present the results of these measurements along with their integration into the thermal control system (ThCS) and the overall telescope control system (TCS).

  11. Regional study of the Archean to Proterozoic crust at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO+), Ontario: Predicting the geoneutrino flux

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yu; Mantovani, Fabio; Shirey, Steven B; Rudnick, Roberta L; McDonough, William F

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The SNO+ detector, a new kiloton scale liquid scintillator detector capable of recording geoneutrino events, will define the strength of the Earth radiogenic heat. A detailed 3-D model of the regional crust, centered at SNO+ and based on compiled geological, geophysical and geochemical information, was used to characterize the physical and chemical attributes of crust and assign uncertainties to its structure. Monte Carlo simulations were used to predict the U and Th abundances and uncertainties in crustal lithologies and to model the regional crustal geoneutrino signal originating from the at SNO+.

  12. EUROPEAN ULTRAVIOLET-VISIBLE OBSERVATORY "Building galaxies, stars, planets and the ingredients for life between the stars"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tai, Yu-Chong

    for life between the stars" The UV sky from GALEX All Sky Survey Spokesperson: Ana Ins Gmez de Castro;3 Executive summary: The growth of luminous structures and the building blocks of life in the Universe began

  13. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P; Aglietta, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D; Allekotte, I; Allen, J; Allison, P; Alvarez Castillo, J; Alvarez-Muniz, J; et al

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrativemorevalues of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.less

  14. Blazars Astroph. with BeppoSAX and other Observatories 1 Broadband Spectra and Variability of BL Lacertae in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boettcher, Markus

    Lacertae in 2000 M. B OTTCHER 1 \\Lambda\\Lambda , H. D. ALLER 2 , M. F. ALLER, 2 , O. MANG, 3 , C. M extending out to 10 keV during that time. At higher energies, the onset of the hard powerlaw commonly

  15. Anisotropy and chemical composition of ultra-high energy cosmic rays using arrival directions measured by the Pierre Auger Observatory

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Abreu, P [Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M [IFSI, Turin; Ahn, E J [Fermilab; Albuquerque, I F.M. [Sao Paulo U.; Allard, D [APC, Paris; Allekotte, I [Centro Atomico Bariloche; Allen, J [New York U.; Allison, P [Ohio State U.; Alvarez Castillo, J [Mexico U., ICN; Alvarez-Muniz, J [Santiago de Compostela U.; Ambrosio, M [Napoli Seconda U.; INFN, Naples; Nijmegen U., IMAPP

    2011-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration has reported evidence for anisotropy in the distribution of arrival directions of the cosmic rays with energies E > Eth = 5.5 x 1019 eV. These show a correlation with the distribution of nearby extragalactic objects, including an apparent excess around the direction of Centaurus A. If the particles responsible for these excesses at E > Eth are heavy nuclei with charge Z, the proton component of the sources should lead to excesses in the same regions at energies E/Z. We here report the lack of anisotropies in these directions at energies above Eth/Z (for illustrative values of Z = 6,13,26). If the anisotropies above Eth are due to nuclei with charge Z, and under reasonable assumptions about the acceleration process, these observations imply stringent constraints on the allowed proton fraction at the lower energies.

  16. 1024 1024 HgCdTe CMOS Camera for Infrared Imaging Magnetograph of Big Bear Solar Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In order to minimize background radiation and read-out noise, the liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooling system are written in the Interactive Data Language (IDL) of Research Systems Inc.. From Oct. 7 to Oct. 30, 2003. Caoab, Y. Xua, C. Denkerab, H. Wangab aNew Jersey Institute of Technology, Center for Solar

  17. Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory J.F. McCullough 1 for the Milagro Collaboration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in the mountains of northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between #24; 250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high­energy ­ray emission

  18. Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    were checked by re- running the signal-loss measurement withrunningis not used for solar neutrino analysis. Other losses

  19. Research | Training | Policy | Practice 3412 William H. Sewell Social Sciences Building | 1180 Observatory Drive | Madison, WI 53706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liblit, Ben

    Time on February 1, 2013) Purpose The Institute for Research on Poverty (IRP) seeks to fund research shaping IRP's research agenda as a National Poverty Research Center. IRP anticipates funding up to five grantees will present their draft paper--with other senior poverty scholars. Background IRP is a university

  20. Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 518 (2004) 775798 CUORE: a cryogenic underground observatory for rare events

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -67010 Assergi (L'Aquila), Italy f Laboratorio de Fisica Nuclear y Altas Energias, Universid"ad de of 130 Te (33.8% abundance), cold dark matter, solar axions, and rare nuclear decays. A preliminary

  1. 32ND INTERNATIONAL COSMIC RAY CONFERENCE, BEIJING 2011 Atmospheric "Super Test Beam" for the Pierre Auger Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . CALHOUN1 , B. CARANDE1 , M. COCO1,5 , J. CLAUS1 , L. EMMERT1 , S. ESQUIBEL1 , L. HAMILTON1 , T.J. HEID1

  2. 29th International Cosmic Ray Conference Pune (2005) 00, 101106 Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory Surface Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -alone solar panel system. With large ambient temperature variations, that can reach over 20 degrees in 24 via a custom built wireless communication system. Two solar panels charging two 12 V batteries provide is obtained by a GPS Motorola unit, and communication to the Central Data Acquisition System (CDAS) is done

  3. NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY TITLE: USE OF THE VAX-11 FARANT MICROWAVE DESIGN PROGRAM FROM GREEN BANK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    GREEN BANK AUTHOR(S): R. Norrod DATE: September 27, 1982 DISTRIBUTION: GB Library CV Library VLA Library TU Libraries: J. Payne P. Napier H. Hvatum M. Balister S. Weinreb C. Burgess P. Napier R. Lacasse W #12;USE OF THE VAX-il FARANT MICROWAVE DESIGN PROGRAM FROM GREEN BANK R. Norrod Recently, I have

  4. Coronal Response of Bi-directional Jets Armagh Observatory, College Hill, Armagh BT61 9DG, N. Ireland

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of phenomena charac- terizing the solar transition region. Using simultaneously obtained SUMER obser- vations the wider frame-work of the upper solar atmosphere is still uncertain. These dynamic events were #12;rst counterparts to bi-directional jets were presented by Dere (1994), Moses & Cook (1994) and Teriaca, Madjarska

  5. D. Barret, F. Casoli, T. Contini, G. Lagache, A. Lecavelier, and L. Pagani (eds) THE PIERRE AUGER OBSERVATORY: STATUS AND RECENT RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    to objects like active galactic nuclei, gamma-ray bursts or galaxy clusters (Nagano & Watson 2000). In more of primary photons is expected in the exotic UHECR production models. Hence, sensitive UHECR composition from the particle density at the ground (AGASA), or from the fluorescence (HiRes) or Cherenkov (Yakutsk

  6. X-ray Properties of Young Stellar Objects in OMC-2 and OMC-3 from the Chandra X-ray Observatory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; K. Koyama; Y. Tsuboi; M. Goto; N. Kobayashi

    2001-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We report X-ray results of the Chandra observation of Orion Molecular Cloud 2 and 3. A deep exposure of \\sim 100 ksec detects \\sim 400 X-ray sources in the field of view of the ACIS array, providing one of the largest X-ray catalogs in a star forming region. Coherent studies of the source detection, time variability, and energy spectra are performed. We classify the X-ray sources into class I, class II, and class III+MS based on the J, H, and K-band colors of their near infrared counterparts and discuss the X-ray properties (temperature, absorption, and time variability) along these evolutionary phases.

  7. Dept. of Sol Science, UW-Madison/UW-Extension, 1525 Observatory Dr., Madison, WI 53706/608-262-0485 November 2010 Issue #2 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    /608-262-0485 ____________________________________________________________________________________ November 2010 Issue #2 2010 Using Flue Gas Desulfurization (FGD) Gypsum in Wisconsin Dick Wolkowski, Birl plants burn low S coal and some have installed flue gas scrubbers to reduce sulfur emissions. Use of a wet scrubber results in the byproduct flue gas desulfurization (FGD) gypsum. FGD gypsum is created

  8. The Tenth Data Release of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey: First Spectroscopic Data from the SDSS-III Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahn, Christopher P.; Alexandroff, Rachael; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Anders, Friedrich; Anderson, Scott F.; Anderton, Timothy; Andrews, Brett H.; Aubourg, ric; Bailey, Stephen; Bastien, Fabienne A.; Bautista, Julian E.; Beers, Timothy C.; Beifiori, Alessandra; Bender, Chad F.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Beutler, Florian; Bhardwaj, Vaishali; Bird, Jonathan C.; Bizyaev, Dmitry; Blake, Cullen H.; Blanton, Michael R.; Blomqvist, Michael; Bochanski, John J.; Bolton, Adam S.; Borde, Arnaud; Bovy, Jo; Bradley, Alaina Shelden; Brandt, W. N.; Brauer, Dorothe; Brinkmann, J.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Busca, Nicols G.; Carithers, William; Carlberg, Joleen K.; Carnero, Aurelio R.; Carr, Michael A.; Chiappini, Cristina; Chojnowski, S. Drew; Chuang, Chia-Hsun; Comparat, Johan; Crepp, Justin R.; Cristiani, Stefano; Croft, Rupert A. C.; Cuesta, Antonio J.; Cunha, Katia; da Costa, Luiz N.; Dawson, Kyle S.; De Lee, Nathan; Dean, Janice D. R.; Delubac, Timothe; Deshpande, Rohit; Dhital, Saurav; Ealet, Anne; Ebelke, Garrett L.; Edmondson, Edward M.; Eisenstein, Daniel J.; Epstein, Courtney R.; Escoffier, Stephanie; Esposito, Massimiliano; Evans, Michael L.; Fabbian, D.; Fan, Xiaohui; Favole, Ginevra; Femena Castell, Bruno; Fernndez Alvar, Emma; Feuillet, Diane; Filiz Ak, Nurten; Finley, Hayley; Fleming, Scott W.; Font-Ribera, Andreu; Frinchaboy, Peter M.; Galbraith-Frew, J. G.; Garca-Hernndez, D. A.; Garca Prez, Ana E.; Ge, Jian; Gnova-Santos, R.; Gillespie, Bruce A.; Girardi, Lo; Gonzlez Hernndez, Jonay I.; Gott, J. RIchard III; Gunn, James E.; Guo, Hong; Halverson, Samuel; Harding, Paul; Harris, David W.; Hasselquist, Sten; Hawley, Suzanne L.; Hayden, Michael; Hearty, Frederick R.; Herrero Dav, Artemio; Ho, Shirley; Hogg, David W.; Holtzman, Jon A.; Honscheid, Klaus; Huehnerhoff, Joseph; Ivans, Inese I.; Jackson, Kelly M.; Jiang, Peng; Johnson, Jennifer A.; Kinemuchi, K.; Kirkby, David; Klaene, Mark A.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Koesterke, Lars; Lan, Ting-Wen; Lang, Dustin; Le Goff, Jean-Marc; Leauthaud, Alexie; Lee, Khee-Gan; Lee, Young Sun; Long, Daniel C.; Loomis, Craig P.; Lucatello, Sara; Lupton, Robert H.; Ma, Bo; Mack, Claude E. III; Mahadevan, Suvrath; Maia, Marcio A. G.; Majewski, Steven R.; Malanushenko, Elena; Malanushenko, Viktor; Manchado, A.; Manera, Marc; Maraston, Claudia; Margala, Daniel; Martell, Sarah L.; Masters, Karen L.; McBride, Cameron K.; McGreer, Ian D.; McMahon, Richard G.; Mnard, Brice; Mszros, Sz.; Miralda-Escud, Jordi; Miyatake, Hironao; Montero-Dorta, Antonio D.; Montesano, Francesco; More, Surhud; Morrison, Heather L.; Muna, Demitri; Munn, Jeffrey A.; Myers, Adam D.; Nguyen, Duy Cuong; Nichol, Robert C.; Nidever, David L.; Noterdaeme, Pasquier; Nuza, Sebastin E.; O'Connell, Julia E.; O'Connell, Robert W.; O'Connell, Ross; Olmstead, Matthew D.; Oravetz, Daniel J.; Owen, Russell; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pan, Kaike; Parejko, John K.; Parihar, Prachi; Pris, Isabelle; Pepper, Joshua; Percival, Will J.; Prez-Rfols, Ignasi; Perottoni, Hlio Dotto; Petitjean, Patrick; Pieri, Matthew M.; Pinsonneault, M. H.; Prada, Francisco; Price-Whelan, Adrain M.; Raddick, M. Jordan; Rahman, Mubdi; Rebolo, Rafael; Reid, Beth A.; Richards, Jonathan C.; Riffel, Rogrio; Robin, Annie C.; Rocha-Pinto, H. J.; Rockosi, Constance M.; Roe, Natalie A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Ross, Nicholas P.; Rossi, Graziano; Roy, Arpita; Rubio-Martin, J. A.; Sabiu, Cristiano G.; Snchez, Ariel G.; Santiago, Baslio; Sayres, Conor; Schiavon, Ricardo P.; Schlegel, David J.; Schlesinger, Katharine J.; Schmidt, Sarah J.; Schneider, Donald P.; Schultheis, Mathias; Sellgren, Kris; Seo, Hee-Jong; Shen, Yue; Shetrone, Matthew; Shu, Yiping; Simmons, Audrey E.; Skrutskie, M. F.; Slosar, Ane; Smith, Verne V.; Snedden, Stephanie A.; Sobeck, Jennifer S.; Sobreira, Flavia; Stassun, Keivan G.; Steinmetz, Matthias; Strauss, Michael A.; Streblyanska, Alina; Suzuki, Nao; Swanson, Molly E. C.; Terrien, Ryan C.; Thakar, Aniruddha R.; Thomas, Daniel; Thompson, Benjamin A.; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Tojeiro, Rita; Troup, Nicholas W.; Vandenberg, Jan; Vargas Magaa, Mariana; Viel, Matteo; Vogt, Nicole P.; Wake, David A.; Weaver, Benjamin A.; Weinberg, David H.; Weiner, Benjamin J.; White, Martin; White, Simon D. M.; Wilson, John C.; Wisniewski, John P.; Wood-Vasey, W. M.; Yche, Christophe; York, Donald G.; Zamora, O.; Zasowski, Gail; Zehavi, Idit; Zhao, Gong-Bo; Zheng, Zheng; Zhu, Guangtun

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    ?a Perez31, Jian Ge48, R. Genova-Santos3,4, Bruce A. Gillespie2,17, Leo Girardi49,29, Jonay I. Gonzalez Hernandez3, J. Richard Gott, III30, James E. Gunn30, Hong Guo1, Samuel Halverson15, Paul Harding50, David W. Harris1, Sten Hasselquist18, Suzanne... L. Hawley7, Michael Hayden18, Frederick R. Hearty31, Artemio Herrero Davo3,4, Shirley Ho37, David W. Hogg20, Jon A. Holtzman18, Klaus Honscheid51,52, Joseph Huehnerhoff17, Inese I. Ivans1, Kelly M. Jackson47,53, Peng Jiang54,48, Jennifer A. Johnson8...

  9. SOHO, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, is a project of international cooperation between ESA and NASA to study the Sun, from its deep core to the outer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    cooperation between ESA and NASA to study the Sun, from its deep core to the outer corona, and the solar wind and dynamics of the solar interior? Why does the solar corona exist and how is it heated to the extremely

  10. WHAM South Sky Survey The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) was first located at Ki: Peak Na>onal Observatory in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wisconsin at Madison, University of

    WHAM South Sky Survey The Wisconsin H-Alpha Mapper (WHAM) was first-thirds of the sky in the WHAM Northern Sky Survey. Then, to gather data on the remaining, and fiYng an atmospheric template for subtrac>on. Once everything is fit

  11. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) -Automated Lunar and Meteor Observatory (ALaMO) -Candidate lunar impact observation database NASA Meteoroid Environment Office (MEO)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waliser, Duane E.

    .4 Newtonian T 119 StellaCam EX Sony GV-D800 MSFC 4487 Suggs and Swift http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005.4 Newtonian T 119 StellaCam EX Sony GV-D800 MSFC ALAMO Moser and McNamara http 19.1 25.4 Newtonian T 119 StellaCam EX Sony GV-D800 MSFC ALAMO Swift, Hollon, & Altstatt 105 21-Jun

  12. VIRTUAL OBSERVATORY: Plate Content Digitization, Archive Mining & Image Sequence Processing edited by M. Tsvetkov, V. Golev, F. Murtagh, and R. Molina, Heron Press, Soa, 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    over the Internet. We report on progress in the design and construction of a high resolution, large digitizing the catalog of plates, constructing an automatic pipeline to make the scanned images useful

  13. Quasi-periodic Slipping Magnetic Reconnection During an X-class Solar Flare Observed by the Solar Dynamics Observatory and Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Ting

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We firstly report the quasi-periodic slipping motion of flare loops during an eruptive X-class flare on 2014 September 10. The slipping motion was investigated at a specific location along one of the two ribbons and can be observed throughout the impulsive phase of the flare. The apparent slipping velocity was 20-110 km/s and the associated period was 3$-$6 min. The footpoints of flare loops appeared as small-scale bright knots observed in 1400 {\\AA}, corresponding to fine structures of the flare ribbon. These bright knots were observed to move along the southern part of the longer ribbon and also exhibited a quasi-periodic pattern. The Si IV 1402.77 {\\AA} line was redshifted by 30-50 km/s at the locations of moving knots with a ~ 40-60 km/s line width, larger than other sites of the flare ribbon. We suggest that the quasi-periodic slipping reconnection is involved in this process and the redshift at the bright knots is probably indicative of reconnection downflow. The emission line of Si IV at the northern p...

  14. SOLAR MERIDIONAL CIRCULATION FROM DOPPLER SHIFTS OF THE Fe I LINE AT 5250 A AS MEASURED BY THE 150-FOOT SOLAR TOWER TELESCOPE AT THE MT. WILSON OBSERVATORY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ulrich, Roger K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095-1562 (United States)

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Doppler shifts of the Fe I spectral line at 5250 A from the full solar disk obtained over the period 1986 to 2009 are analyzed to determine the circulation velocity of the solar surface along meridional planes. Simultaneous measurements of the Zeeman splitting of this line are used to obtain measurements of the solar magnetic field that are used to select low field points and impose corrections for the magnetically induced Doppler shift. The data utilized is from a new reduction that preserves the full spatial resolution of the original observations so that the circulation flow can be followed to latitudes of 80{sup 0} N/S. The deduced meridional flow is shown to differ from the circulation velocities derived from magnetic pattern movements. A reversed circulation pattern is seen in polar regions for three successive solar minima. A surge in circulation velocity at low latitudes is seen during the rising phases of cycles 22 and 23.

  15. NICMOS Imaging of Candidate ExtraSolar Planetary Systems Glenn Schneider (Steward Observatory, U. of Arizona) and the NICMOS IDT/EONS* Teams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schneider, Glenn

    of HD 98800 (7232). Here we present a sampling of results from our NICMOS coronagraphic imaging surveys

  16. Dept. of Soil Science, UW-Madison/UW-Extension, 1525 Observatory Dr., Madison, WI 53706/608-262-0485 November 2010 Issue #1 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Teri C.

    /608-262-0485 _____________________________________________________________________________ November 2010 Issue #1 2010 Land Applying Municipal Biosolids in Wisconsin Richard P. Wolkowski and Fred Hegeman 1/ Introduction Municipal biosolids are the product of the treatment of domestic wastewater. There are three methods for handling biosolids, which include land-filling, incineration, and land application

  17. Global and regional emissions of HFC-125 (CHF[subscript 2]CF[subscript 3]) from in situ and air archive atmospheric observations at AGAGE and SOGE observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Doherty, S.

    High-frequency, in situ observations from the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE) and System for Observation of halogenated Greenhouse gases in Europe (SOGE) networks for the period 1998 to 2008, combined ...

  18. Curriculum vitae Amaya Moro-Martn

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moro-Martin, Amaya

    /05/2001 Research Experience for Undergraduates (REU) Intern Maria Mitchel Observatory (Nantucket, MA, USA) Start Perkins Scholarship, Maria Mitchell Observatory (REU), Nantucket, MA (USA). 1994 ISEP (International

  19. THE NEW GLOBAL HIGHRESOLUTION H NETWORK: FIRST OBSERVATIONS AND FIRST RESULTS M. Steinegger1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ¨ohe Solar Observatory (KSO) in Aus- tria, and Yunnan Astronomical Observatory (YNAO) in China. 2. NETWORK , A. Hanslmeier3 , G. Luo4 , D. Chen4 , and Q. Zhang4 1 Big Bear Solar Observatory, NJIT, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314, U.S.A. 2 Kanzelh¨ohe Solar Observatory, A­9521 Treffen, Austria 3

  20. First Epoch Observations of 3-Helium with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balser, Dana S.

    DEPARTMENT UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY INSTITUTO DE ASTRONOMIA, GEOFISICA E

  1. Computer code for double beta decay QRPA based calculations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertulani, Carlos A. - Department of Physics and Astronomy, Texas A&M University

    . The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays

  2. The Journal of the European Association of Studies on Australia, Vol.3. No.2, 2012, ISSN 1988-5946 under the auspices of Coolabah Observatori: Centre d'Estudis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Universit de

    both in electronic form and in hard copy, provided that the author and journal are properly cited rights; Ranger; Olympic Dam Introduction [T]he government has decided that further mining and export important reserves of oil, gas, and most of all coal, Australia was not planning on having its own

  3. The Royal Observatory Edinburgh comprises the UK Astronomy Technology Centre of the Science and Technology Facilities Council, the Institute for Astronomy of the University of Edinburgh and the ROE Visitor Centre.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tittley, Eric

    for designing and building the spectrometer pre-optics sub-system, which includes a set of four image slicers a hexagonal primary mirror with a collecting area of 25 square metres, passively cooled to 40K and placed, ranging from the first luminous glows after the Big Bang, to the formation of solar systems capable

  4. Imaging polarimetry of Comet C/2013 V1 (Boattini) and Comet 290P/Jager before and after perihelion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roy, P Deb; Das, H S; Medhi, B J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results obtained from the optical polarimetric study of the light scattered by Comet C/2013 V1 (Boattini) and Comet 290P/Jager at lower phase angles. The polarimetric observations of two comets have been performed with the 1.04-metre Sampurnanand telescope of ARIES near Nainital in India on 4th \\& 5th of December, 2013 and on 24th April, 2014 using R photometric band ($\\lambda$ = 630 nm, $\\Delta$$\\lambda$ =120nm). We covered observations in both the pre and post perihelion passage of Comet C/2013 V1 (Boattini) and Comet 290P/Jager at two phase angles $\\sim$ 13$^\\circ$ and 27$^\\circ$. The degree of polarization changes from ($-1.4$$\\pm 0.3$)\\% to (+2.8$\\pm 0.5$)\\% for Comet C/2013 V1 (Boattini) and ($-1.6$$\\pm 0.5$)\\% to (+2.5$\\pm 0.5$)\\% for Comet 290P/Jager at phase angles $\\sim$ 13$^\\circ$ and 27$^\\circ$ respectively. The change in the physical properties of cometary dust is being well studied from the polarization maps obtained for both the period of observations. It is found that the ape...

  5. Genetic algorithms in astronomy and astrophysics Vinesh Rajpaul1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masci, Frank

    , South Africa 2 South African Astronomical Observatory, PO Box 9, Observatory, 7935, South Africa E on the context, cost functions are also referred to as energy functions or objective functions. 2 Maximisation

  6. A ring system detected around the minor planet (10199) F. Braga-Ribas1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demoulin, Pascal

    , Montevideo, Uruguay. 20. Dpto. Astronomia, Facultad Ciencias, Uruguay. 21. Observatorio El Catalejo, Santa´on, Uruguay. 25. National Astronomical Observatories/Yunnan Observatory. 26. Key Laboratory for the Structure

  7. Planar feasibility study for primary mirror control of large imaging space systems using binary actuators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Seung Jae, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The greatest discoveries in astronomy have come with advancements in ground-based observatories and space telescopes. Latest trends in ground-based observatories have been ever increasing size of the primary mirror, providing ...

  8. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000--000 (0000) Printed 11 September 2002 (MN L A T E X style file v2.2) A new class of transNeptunian objects in higheccentricity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .J. Asher 2 and M.E. Bailey 2 1 South Ural University, Chelyabinsk, 454080, Russia 2 Armagh Observatory

  9. Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 000, 000{000 (0000) Printed 15 January 2004 (MN L A T E X style le v2.2) High-eccentricity trans-Neptunian objects as a source of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .J. Asher 2 and M.E. Bailey 2 1 South Ural University, Chelyabinsk, 454080, Russia 2 Armagh Observatory

  10. The CUORE and CUORE-0 Experiments at Gran Sasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giachero, A; Avignone, F T; Azzolini, O; Balata, M; Banks, T I; Bari, G; Beeman, J; Bellini, F; Bersani, A; Biassoni, M; Brofferio, C; Bucci, C; Cai, X Z; Camacho, A; Caminata, A; Canonica, L; Cao, X G; Capelli, S; Cappelli, L; Carbone, L; Cardani, L; Casali, N; Cassina, L; Chiesa, D; Chott, N; Clemenza, M; Copello, S; Cosmelli, C; Cremonesi, O; Creswick, R J; Cushman, J S; Dafinei, I; Dally, A; Datskov, V; Dell'Oro, S; Deninno, M M; Di Domizio, S; di Vacri, M L; Drobizhev, A; Ejzak, L; Fang, D Q; Farach, H A; Faverzani, M; Fernandes, G; Ferri, E; Ferroni, F; Fiorini, E; Franceschi, M A; Freedman, S J; Fujikawa, B K; Gironi, L; Giuliani, A; Gorla, P; Gotti, C; Gutierrez, T D; Haller, E E; Han, K; Heeger, K M; Hennings-Yeomans, R; Hickerson, K P; Huang, H Z; Kadel, R; Kazkaz, K; Keppel, G; Kolomensky, Yu G; Li, Y L; Ligi, C; Lim, K E; Liu, X; Ma, Y G; Maiano, C; Maino, M; Martinez, M; Maruyama, R H; Mei, Y; Moggi, N; Morganti, S; Napolitano, T; Nastasi, M; Nisi, S; Nones, C; Norman, E B; Nucciotti, A; O'Donnell, T; Orio, F; Orlandi, D; Ouellet, J L; Pagliarone, C E; Pallavicini, M; Pattavina, L; Pavan, M; Pedretti, M; Pessina, G; Pettinacci, V; Piperno, G; Pira, C; Pirro, S; Pozzi, S; Previtali, E; Rampazzo, V; Rosenfeld, C; Rusconi, C; Sala, E; Sangiorgio, S; Scielzo, N D; Sisti, M; Smith, A R; Taffarello, L; Tenconi, M; Terranova, F; Tian, W D; Tomei, C; Trentalange, S; Ventura, G; Vignati, M; Wang, B S; Wang, H W; Wielgus, L; Wilson, J; Winslow, L A; Wise, T; Woodcraft, A; Zanotti, L; Zarra, C; Zhang, G Q; Zhu, B X; Zucchelli, S

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Cryogenic Underground Observatory for Rare Events (CUORE) is an experiment to search for neutrinoless double beta decay ($0\

  11. PROCEEDINGS OF 1976 SUMMER WORKSHOP ON AN ENERGY EXTENSION SERVICE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    energy audits of individual homes, as has the Urban Observatory in San Diego. A number of colleges and universities,

  12. A Semantically Enabled Service Architecture for Mashups over Streaming and Stored Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Koubarakis, Manolis

    independently deployed sensor networks--the Channel Coastal Observatory (cco)5 and WaveNet6 --as well

  13. advanced propulsion research: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sciences Websites Summary: *National Radio Astronomy Observatory 12;First European Conference on Research and Advanced Technologies of bibliographic data, abstracts,...

  14. A BRIEF INTRODUCTION TO INTERNAL WAVES AND THE CHASING THEREOF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , DOX, CHL, TURBIDITY Monday, October 21, 13 #12;NEMO: A NEW COASTAL OBSERVATORY Monday, October 21, 13

  15. GTC visitor information Version: May 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    minutes to drive from the airport to the observatory. Make sure you have sufficient petrol or diesel

  16. THE NEW GLOBAL HIGHRESOLUTION H NETWORK: PRELIMINARY RESULTS ON THE CHROMOSPHERIC DIFFERENTIAL ROTATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , H. Freislich2 , A. Hanslmeier3 , G. Luo4 , D. Chen4 , and Q. Zhang4 1 Big Bear Solar Observatory, NJIT, 40386 North Shore Lane, Big Bear City, CA 92314, U. S. A. 2 Kanzelh¨ohe Solar Observatory, A­9521 Graz, Austria 4 Yunnan Astronomical Observatory, P. O. Box 110, Kunming 650011, P. R. China ABSTRACT

  17. The 11 th Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun ASP Conference Series, Vol. 223, 2001

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linsky, Jeffrey L.

    The 11 th Cool Stars, Stellar Systems and the Sun ASP Conference Series, Vol. 223, 2001 R. J. Garc of telescope time and computing power (i.e. by applying the \\Doppler-imaging" technique). Only National Observatory Lick 3-m Lick Observatory McD 2.1-m McDonald Observatory NOT 2.4-m Nordic Optical

  18. Analysis of a reversed deep seismic refraction profile in the Atlantic Ocean, northeast of Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janakiramaiah, Bollapragada

    1961-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Geology and Geo- physics of the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas, for his advice and encouragement, to Mr, John Hennion of the Lamont Geological Observatory, Columbia University, and the Lamont Observatory for re- leasing the geophysical... the corresponding geologic structure, The seismic measurements used were part of a larger seismic refraction program conducted in the Atlantic Ocean northeast of Puerto Rico in October, 1959, by a group from the Lamont Geological Observatory, Columbia University...

  19. ag-fe system japanese: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Eero 92 Japanese Virtual Observatory (JVO) as an advanced astronomical research enviroment Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: We present the design and implementation of the...

  20. A Semantically Enabled Service Architecture for Mashups over Streaming and Stored Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandes, Alvaro A. A.

    Observatory (cco)1 and WaveNet2 --as well as meteorological data from the MetOffice3 . More broadly, data from

  1. advocacy survey final: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    triples the number of H-band spectra of stars as part of the Apache Point Observatory (APO) Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE), and includes repeated accurate radial...

  2. auger electron-emitting estrogens: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and results Astrophysics (arXiv) Summary: The Pierre Auger Observatory, a hybrid detector for the study of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), is now approaching...

  3. Code for Largest Cosmological Simulations Ever on GPUs Is Gordon...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Advancements to instruments in observatories and satellites can stretch the eye of the observer billions of light-years away to the fringes of the observable universe....

  4. auger emitter sb-119: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  5. anamalous npp auger: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  6. auger snails terebridae: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  7. auger mining: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  8. auger surface detector: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The southern site of the Auger Observatory, now approaching completion in Mendoza, Argentina, features an array of 1600 water-Cherenkov surface detector stations covering 3000...

  9. auger miner safety: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  10. augers: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

  11. advanced vacuum plasma: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of particle and nuclear physics, magnetic confinement of high-temperature plasmas for thermonuclear fusion research, and gravity wave observatories based on laser...

  12. advanced research vacuum: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of particle and nuclear physics, magnetic confinement of high-temperature plasmas for thermonuclear fusion research, and gravity wave observatories based on laser...

  13. A&A 518, L8 (2010) DOI: 10.1051/0004-6361/201014581

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baes, Maarten

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , C/Vía Láctea s/n, 38200 La Laguna, Spain 11 National Radio Astronomy Observatory, PO Box 2, Green

  14. alpha-class extreme ultraviolet: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Vacuum Society. S0734-211X 00 02506-3 I. INTRODUCTION EUV lithography optics require 5 Solar Dynamics Observatory Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Geosciences Websites...

  15. 6, 1300113025, 2006 cross-tropopause

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    layer and climate change. Half of increase in stratospheric water vapour is attributed to changes and CNRS, Toulouse, France 2 Central Aerological Observatory, Dolgoprudny, Russia 3 Institute

  16. Energy Department Announces Up to $31 Million for Initial Phases...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Up to 31 Million for Initial Phases of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Field Observatory Energy Department Announces Up to 31 Million for Initial Phases of Enhanced Geothermal...

  17. auf dem prfstand: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by spicules. We use spectral data from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on-board the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) covering the...

  18. auf dem boden: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by spicules. We use spectral data from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on-board the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) covering the...

  19. auf dem weg: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by spicules. We use spectral data from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on-board the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) covering the...

  20. auf dem dach: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by spicules. We use spectral data from the Solar Ultraviolet Measurements of Emitted Radiation (SUMER) spectrometer on-board the Solar Heliospheric Observatory (SoHO) covering the...