Sample records for observation wells time

  1. Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories onFocus AreaDataBusPFAN)Change Assessment Model (GCAM) | OpenWells

  2. Category:Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd aMinutesMap Files JumpObservation

  3. A New Method For Robust High-Precision Time-Series Photometry From Well-Sampled Images: Application to Archival MMT/Megacam Observations of the Open Cluster M37

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, S -W; Hartman, J D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We introduce new methods for robust high-precision photometry from well-sampled images of a non-crowded field with a strongly varying point-spread function. For this work, we used archival imaging data of the open cluster M37 taken by MMT 6.5m telescope. We find that the archival light curves from the original image subtraction procedure exhibit many unusual outliers, and more than 20% of data get rejected by the simple filtering algorithm adopted by early analysis. In order to achieve better photometric precisions and also to utilize all available data, the entire imaging database was re-analyzed with our time-series photometry technique (Multi-aperture Indexing Photometry) and a set of sophisticated calibration procedures. The merit of this approach is as follows: we find an optimal aperture for each star with a maximum signal-to-noise ratio, and also treat peculiar situations where photometry returns misleading information with more optimal photometric index. We also adopt photometric de-trending based on ...

  4. X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and Englezos, P. , 2009. Gas hydrate formation in a variableDOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test WellFormation of natural gas hydrates in marine sediments. 1.

  5. Time changes in gradient and observed winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD DALE CARLSON Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillm=n of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE MAY 1972 Major Subject...: Meteorology TIME CHANGES IN GRADIENT AND OBSERVED WINDS A Thesis by RONALD D. CARLSON Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Co , ee) (Member) (Member) May 1972 ABSTRACT Time Changes in Gradient and Observed Winds. (May 1972) Ronald Dale...

  6. Direct observation of time reversal violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bernabeu, J. [Department of Theoretical Physics, University of Valencia, and IFIC, Joint Centre Univ. Valencia-CSIC (Spain)

    2013-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A direct evidence for Time Reversal Violation (TRV) means an experiment that, considered by itself, clearly shows TRV independent of, and unconnected to, the results for CP Violation. No existing result before the recent BABAR experiment with entangled neutral B mesons had demonstrated TRV in this sense. There is a unique opportunity for a search of TRV with unstable particles thanks to the Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) Entanglement between the two neutral mesons in B, and PHI, Factories. The two quantum effects of the first decay as a filtering measurement and the transfer of information to the still living partner allow performing a genuine TRV asymmetry with the exchange of 'in' and 'out' states. With four independent TRV asymmetries, BABAR observes a large deviation of T-invariance with a statistical significance of 14 standard deviations, far more than needed to declare the result as a discovery. This is the first direct observation of TRV in the time evolution of any system.

  7. The time to reach pseudosteady-state in horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Kahtani, Abdulghafour

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Engineers need to estimate the expected productivity of horizontal wells. We need to know how long it takes to reach pseudosteady-state to accept that estimation. When all boundaries influence the pressure distribution in the drainage area...

  8. Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischlin, Andreas

    Why are climate models reproducing the observed global surface warming so well? Reto Knutti1 global surface warming so well?, Geophys. Res. Lett., 35, L18704, doi:10.1029/ 2008GL034932. 1 models reproduce the observed surface warming better than one would expect given the uncertainties

  9. Observation of detection-dependent multi-photon coherence times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young-Sik Ra; Malte C. Tichy; Hyang-Tag Lim; Osung Kwon; Florian Mintert; Andreas Buchleitner; Yoon-Ho Kim

    2015-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The coherence time constitutes one of the most critical parameters that determines whether or not interference is observed in an experiment. For photons, it is traditionally determined by the effective spectral bandwidth of the photon. Here we report on multi-photon interference experiments in which the multi-photon coherence time, defined by the width of the interference signal, depends on the number of interfering photons and on the measurement scheme chosen to detect the particles. A theoretical analysis reveals that all multi-photon interference with more than two particles features this dependence, which can be attributed to higher-order effects in the mutual indistinguishability of the particles. As a striking consequence, a single, well-defined many-particle quantum state can exhibit qualitatively different degrees of interference, depending on the chosen observable. Therefore, optimal sensitivity in many-particle quantum interferometry can only be achieved by choosing a suitable detection scheme.

  10. Real time monitoring of multiple wells flowing under pseudosteady state condition by using Kalman filtering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Suresh

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This work develops a method for the real time monitoring of well performance by using Kalman filtering. A system of two or more wells draining the same reservoir under pseudo steady state condition is monitored simultaneously to estimate both...

  11. Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Laurence C.

    Melting of small Arctic ice caps observed from ERS scatterometer time series Laurence C. Smith,1 of melt onset can be observed over small ice caps, as well as the major ice sheets and multi-year sea ice for 14 small Arctic ice caps from 19922000. Interannual and regional variability in the timing of melt

  12. A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen In this paper we present DrillEdge - a commercial and award winning software system that monitors oil-well drilling operations in order to reduce non-productive time (NPT). DrillEdge utilizes case-based reasoning

  13. Evidence Estimation for Bayesian Partially Observed MRFs Yutian Chen Max Welling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Welling, Max

    (2006) use Langevin dynamics with approximate gradients, Welling and Parise (2006); Parise and Welling

  14. Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires and nanotubes December 1, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Eric Stach Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National...

  15. Observation of spin-dependent quantum well resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teixeira, J. M., E-mail: jmteixeira@fc.up.pt; Costa, J. D.; Ventura, J.; Sousa, J. B. [IFIMUP and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, and Departamento de Fisica e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Wisniowski, P. [Department of Electronics, AGH University of Science and Technology, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Freitas, P. P. [INESC-MN and IN-Institute of Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Rua Alves Redol, 9-1, 1000-029 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the observation of spin-dependent quantum well (QW) resonant tunneling in textured CoFeB free layers of single MgO magnetic tunnel junctions (MTJs). The inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy spectra clearly show the presence of resonant oscillations in the parallel configuration, which are related with the appearance of majority-spin ?{sub 1} QW states in the CoFeB free layer. To gain a quantitative understanding, we calculated QW state positions in the voltage-thickness plane using the so-called phase accumulation model (PAM) and compared the PAM solutions with the experimental resonant voltages observed for a set of MTJs with different CoFeB free layer thicknesses (t{sub fl}?=?1.55, 1.65, 1.95, and 3.0?nm). An overall good agreement between experiment and theory was obtained. An enhancement of the tunnel magnetoresistance with bias is observed in a bias voltage region corresponding to the resonant oscillations.

  16. Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullo, Francesco

    Continuous-Time Distributed Observers with Discrete Communication Florian D¨orfler, Fabio-permissions@ieee.org. This material is based upon work supported by NSF grants IIS-0904501 and CPS-1135819. Florian D¨orfler, Fabio, University of California, Santa Barbara, {dorfler,fabiopas,bullo}@engineering.ucsb.edu Distributed observers

  17. Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan, and Bjarne Foss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan flow systems is an area of increasing interest for the oil and gas industry. Oil wells with highly related to oil and gas wells exist, and in this study, unstable gas lifted wells will be the area

  18. Time evolution of observable properties of parametrized systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Hajicek

    1996-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A short review of some recent work on the problem of time and of observables for the reparametrization invariant systems is given. A talk presented at the Second Meeting on Constraint Dynamics and Quantum Gravity at Santa Marguerita Ligure, September 17--21 1996.

  19. Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems) Peter Bulychev1 , Franck is the computation of a subset of predicates sufficient for control and whose cost is minimal. Our solution avoids, Danish-Chinese Center for Cyber Physical Systems (IDEA4CPS) and VKR Center of Excellence MT-LAB. #12;The

  20. Observational constraints on late-time {lambda}(t) cosmology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carneiro, S.; Pigozzo, C. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador-BA, 40210-340 (Brazil); Dantas, M. A. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, 20921-400 (Brazil); Alcaniz, J. S. [Departamento de Astronomia, Observatorio Nacional, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, 20921-400 (Brazil); Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais/CRN, 59076-740, Natal-RN (Brazil)

    2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The cosmological constant {lambda}, i.e., the energy density stored in the true vacuum state of all existing fields in the Universe, is the simplest and the most natural possibility to describe the current cosmic acceleration. However, despite its observational successes, such a possibility exacerbates the well-known {lambda} problem, requiring a natural explanation for its small, but nonzero, value. In this paper we study cosmological consequences of a scenario driven by a varying cosmological term, in which the vacuum energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, {lambda}{proportional_to}H. We test the viability of this scenario and study a possible way to distinguish it from the current standard cosmological model by using recent observations of type Ia supernova (Supernova Legacy Survey Collaboration), measurements of the baryonic acoustic oscillation from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey, and the position of the first peak of the cosmic microwave background angular spectrum from the three-year Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe.

  1. Empirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    Empirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar & Michele Piana1,3 ABSTRACT We present electron images of an extended solar flare source, deduced from the impulsive phase of a solar flare typically appears in the form of accelerated electrons. In the generally

  2. University of Hawaii#Institute for Astronomy OBSERVING TIME REQUEST

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hibbard, John

    of the tidal features, and nuclear separation. By comparing the observed characteristics of such an optica

  3. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. V. TRANSIT TIMING VARIATION CANDIDATES IN THE FIRST SIXTEEN MONTHS FROM POLYNOMIAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Ragozzine, Darin; Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Barclay, Thomas; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Kinemuchi, Karen; Koch, David G.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Still, Martin; Tenenbaum, Peter [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Gautier, Thomas N. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Ibrahim, Khadeejah A.; Uddin, Kamal [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans, E-mail: eford@astro.ufl.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); and others

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Transit timing variations provide a powerful tool for confirming and characterizing transiting planets, as well as detecting non-transiting planets. We report the results of an updated transit timing variation (TTV) analysis for 1481 planet candidates based on transit times measured during the first sixteen months of Kepler observations. We present 39 strong TTV candidates based on long-term trends (2.8% of suitable data sets). We present another 136 weaker TTV candidates (9.8% of suitable data sets) based on the excess scatter of TTV measurements about a linear ephemeris. We anticipate that several of these planet candidates could be confirmed and perhaps characterized with more detailed TTV analyses using publicly available Kepler observations. For many others, Kepler has observed a long-term TTV trend, but an extended Kepler mission will be required to characterize the system via TTVs. We find that the occurrence rate of planet candidates that show TTVs is significantly increased ({approx}68%) for planet candidates transiting stars with multiple transiting planet candidates when compared to planet candidates transiting stars with a single transiting planet candidate.

  4. Well-posedness of the Space-Time Fractional Diffusion Problems ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ... and dynamics of a bead in polymer network, and so on. In this talk, we consider initial boundary value problems of the space-time fractional diffusion equation...

  5. Real-Time Evaluation of Stimulation and Diversion in Horizontal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabatabaei Bafruei, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    to determine acid placement and the effectiveness of diversion process, but determining the injection profile during a course of matrix acidizing still remains as a challenge. Recently distributed temperature sensing technology (DTS) has enabled us to observe...

  6. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VIII. CATALOG OF TRANSIT TIMING MEASUREMENTS OF THE FIRST TWELVE QUARTERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazeh, Tsevi; Nachmani, Gil; Holczer, Tomer; Sokol, Gil [School of Physics and Astronomy, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 Ellis Ave., Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Ford, Eric B.; Ragozzine, Darin [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Sanchis-Ojeda, Roberto [Department of Physics and Kavli Institute for Astrophysics and Space Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Lissauer, Jack J. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Zucker, Shay [Department of Geophysical, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Raymond and Beverly Sackler Faculty of Exact Sciences Tel Aviv University, 69978 Tel Aviv (Israel); Agol, Eric [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Carter, Joshua A. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Quintana, Elisa V. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Ave, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Welsh, William [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, 5500 Campanile Drive, San Diego, CA 92182 (United States)

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Following the works of Ford et al. and Steffen et al. we derived the transit timing of 1960 Kepler objects of interest (KOIs) using the pre-search data conditioning light curves of the first twelve quarters of the Kepler data. For 721 KOIs with large enough signal-to-noise ratios, we obtained also the duration and depth of each transit. The results are presented as a catalog for the community to use. We derived a few statistics of our results that could be used to indicate significant variations. Including systems found by previous works, we have found 130 KOIs that showed highly significant times of transit variations (TTVs) and 13 that had short-period TTV modulations with small amplitudes. We consider two effects that could cause apparent periodic TTVthe finite sampling of the observations and the interference with the stellar activity, stellar spots in particular. We briefly discuss some statistical aspects of our detected TTVs. We show that the TTV period is correlated with the orbital period of the planet and with the TTV amplitude.

  7. Real-time characterization of partially observed epidemics using surrogate models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Crary, David (Applied Research Associates, Arlington, VA); Sargsyan, Khachik; Cheng, Karen (Applied Research Associates, Arlington, VA)

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a statistical method, predicated on the use of surrogate models, for the 'real-time' characterization of partially observed epidemics. Observations consist of counts of symptomatic patients, diagnosed with the disease, that may be available in the early epoch of an ongoing outbreak. Characterization, in this context, refers to estimation of epidemiological parameters that can be used to provide short-term forecasts of the ongoing epidemic, as well as to provide gross information on the dynamics of the etiologic agent in the affected population e.g., the time-dependent infection rate. The characterization problem is formulated as a Bayesian inverse problem, and epidemiological parameters are estimated as distributions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, thus quantifying the uncertainty in the estimates. In some cases, the inverse problem can be computationally expensive, primarily due to the epidemic simulator used inside the inversion algorithm. We present a method, based on replacing the epidemiological model with computationally inexpensive surrogates, that can reduce the computational time to minutes, without a significant loss of accuracy. The surrogates are created by projecting the output of an epidemiological model on a set of polynomial chaos bases; thereafter, computations involving the surrogate model reduce to evaluations of a polynomial. We find that the epidemic characterizations obtained with the surrogate models is very close to that obtained with the original model. We also find that the number of projections required to construct a surrogate model is O(10)-O(10{sup 2}) less than the number of samples required by the MCMC to construct a stationary posterior distribution; thus, depending upon the epidemiological models in question, it may be possible to omit the offline creation and caching of surrogate models, prior to their use in an inverse problem. The technique is demonstrated on synthetic data as well as observations from the 1918 influenza pandemic collected at Camp Custer, Michigan.

  8. Revised timing and onset location of two isolated substorms observed by Time History of Events and Macroscale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    reconfigurations of the magne- tosphere involving solar wind energy storage in Earth's magnetotail and abruptRevised timing and onset location of two isolated substorms observed by Time History of Events by the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions During Substorms (THEMIS) spacecraft. During the 29

  9. Bayesian Estimation of a Continuous-Time Model for Discretely-Observed Panel Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boulton, Aaron Jacob

    2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous-time models are used in many areas of science. However, in psychology and related fields, continuous-time models are often difficult to apply because only a small number of repeated observations are typically ...

  10. Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    to observe the real-time nucleation and growth of the lithium fibers inside a nanoscale Li-ion battery. Our needed for safe and high power Li-ion batteries. VC 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi:10Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery Hessam

  11. Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

    2001-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

  12. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofof Multiple

  13. Energy relaxation during hot-exciton transport in quantum wells: Direct observation by spatially resolved phonon-sideband spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Kalt, Heinz

    2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the energy relaxation of excitons during the real-space transport in ZnSe quantum wells by using microphotoluminescence with spatial resolution enhanced by a solid immersion lens. The spatial evolution of ...

  14. Rank Tests for the Observability of Discrete-Time Jump Linear Systems with Inputs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rank Tests for the Observability of Discrete-Time Jump Linear Systems with Inputs Ehsan Elhamifar of rank tests on the parameters of the JLS when the discrete state sequence is arbitrary. Our key verify observ- ability by checking a number of rank tests that is only quadratic in the number

  15. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  16. Travel-time distribution from a finite line contamination source to an extraction well with regional flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    to an extraction well with regional flow Hongbin Zhan a,*, Dongmin Sun b a Department of Geology and Geophyscis

  17. Policies for the Telescope Time Review Board (TTRB): Repeating HST Observations, Changes to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sirianni, Marco

    in use of HST or a conflict of data rights. 1. The Process for Reviewing Program Changes Changes, but that is not important here. GTO time can be considered a special case of #1 since GTO observations are planned in Cycles

  18. Relativistic formulation of coordinate light time, Doppler and astrometric observables up to the second post-Minkowskian order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hees; S. Bertone; C. Le Poncin-Lafitte

    2014-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Given the extreme accuracy of modern space science, a precise relativistic modeling of observations is required. In particular, it is important to describe properly light propagation through the Solar System. For two decades, several modeling efforts based on the solution of the null geodesic equations have been proposed but they are mainly valid only for the first order Post-Newtonian approximation. However, with the increasing precision of ongoing space missions as Gaia, GAME, BepiColombo, JUNO or JUICE, we know that some corrections up to the second order have to be taken into account for future experiments. We present a procedure to compute the relativistic coordinate time delay, Doppler and astrometric observables avoiding the integration of the null geodesic equation. This is possible using the Time Transfer Function formalism, a powerful tool providing key quantities such as the time of flight of a light signal between two point-events and the tangent vector to its null-geodesic. Indeed we show how to compute the Time Transfer Functions and their derivatives (and thus range, Doppler and astrometric observables) up to the second post-Minkowskian order. We express these quantities as quadratures of some functions that depend only on the metric and its derivatives evaluated along a Minkowskian straight line. This method is particularly well adapted for numerical estimations. As an illustration, we provide explicit expressions in static and spherically symmetric space-time up to second post-Minkowskian order. Then we give the order of magnitude of these corrections for the range/Doppler on the BepiColombo mission and for astrometry in a GAME-like observation.

  19. Hanford wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

  20. Observation of time dependent dispersion in laboratory scale experiments with intact tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rundberg, R.S.; Triay, I.R.; Ott, M.A.; Mitchell, A.J.

    1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The migration of radionuclides through intact tuff was studied using tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada. The tuff samples were both highly zeolitized ash-fall tuff from the Calico Hills and densely welded devitrified tuff from the Topopah Springs member of the Paintbrush tuff. Tritiated water and pertechnetate were used as conservative tracers. The sorbing tracers {sup 85}Sr, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 133}Ba were used with the devitrified tuff only. Greater tailing in the elution curves of the densely welded tuff samples was observed that could be fit by adjusting the dispersion coefficient in the conventional Advection Dispersion Equation, ADE. The curves could be fit using time dependent dispersion as was previously observed for sediments and alluvium by Dieulin, Matheron, and de Marsily. The peak of strontium concentration was expected to arrive after 1.5 years based on the conventional ADE and assuming a linear K{sub d} of 26 ml/g. The observed elution had significant strontium in the first sample taken at 2 weeks after injection. The peak in the strontium elution occurred at 5 weeks. The correct arrival time for the strontium peak was achieved using a one dimensional analytic solution with time dependent dispersion. The dispersion coefficient as a function of time used to fit the conservative tracers was found to predict the peak arrival of the sorbing tracers. The K{sub d} used was the K{sub d} determined by the batch method on crushed tuff. 23 refs., 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Time Resolved Collapse of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollack, L.; Tate, M. W.; Finnefrock, A. C.; Kalidas, C.; Trotter, S.; Darnton, N. C.; Lurio, L.; Austin, R. H.; Batt, C. A.; Gruner, S. M. (and others)

    2001-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    High-intensity, ''pink'' beam from an undulator was used in conjunction with microfabricated rapid-fluid mixing devices to monitor the early events in protein folding with time resolved small angle x-ray scattering. This Letter describes recent work on the protein bovine {beta} -lactoglobulin where collapse from an expanded to a compact set of states was directly observed on the millisecond time scale. The role of chain collapse, one of the initial stages of protein folding, is not currently understood. The characterization of transient, compact states is vital in assessing the validity of theories and models of the folding process.

  2. High time resolution observations of the solar wind and backstreaming ions in the earth's foreshock region

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Formisano, V.; Orsini, S.; Bonifazi, C.; Egidi, A.; Moreno, G.

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The interaction of the solar wind with ions backstreaming from the earth's bow shock is studied at high time resolution. It turns out that the bulk velocity of the solar wind oscillates, both in magnitude and direction, with typical periods of approx.1 minute in presence of the 'diffuse' ion population. Oscillations of comparable periods are also observed in the angular distribution and energy spectrum of the diffuse ions.

  3. TIME DELAYS IN QUASI-PERIODIC PULSATIONS OBSERVED DURING THE X2.2 SOLAR FLARE ON 2011 FEBRUARY 15

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolla, L.; Marque, C.; Seaton, D. B.; Dominique, M.; Berghmans, D.; Cabanas, C.; De Groof, A.; Verdini, A.; West, M. J.; Zhukov, A. N. [Solar-Terrestrial Center of Excellence, Royal Observatory of Belgium, Avenue Circulaire 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Van Doorsselaere, T. [Centrum voor Plasma-Astrofysica, Department of Mathematics, KULeuven, Celestijnenlaan 200B bus 2400, B-3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schmutz, W. [Physikalisch-Meteorologisches Observatorium Davos, World Radiation Center, Davos Dorf (Switzerland); Zender, J., E-mail: dolla@sidc.be [European Space Agency, ESTEC, Keplerlaan 1, 2201 AZ Noordwijk (Netherlands)

    2012-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on timescale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the extreme-ultraviolet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) on board the Solar Dynamic Observatory. The zirconium and aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer on board the Project for On-Board Autonomy satellite and the soft X-ray (SXR) channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, where the channel at 1-8 A leads the 0.5-4 A channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to Almost-Equal-To 9 s. We identified at least two distinct time intervals during the flare impulsive phase, during which the QPPs were associated with two different sources in the Nobeyama RadioHeliograph at 17 GHz. The radio as well as the hard X-ray channels showed different lags during these two intervals. To our knowledge, this is the first time that time lags are reported between EUV and SXR fluctuations on these timescales. We discuss possible emission mechanisms and interpretations, including flare electron trapping.

  4. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: IV. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by Simple Physical Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /UC, Santa Cruz; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Moorhead, Althea V.; /Florida U.; Batalha, Natalie M.; /San Jose State U.; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames; Bryson, Steve; /NASA, Ames; Buchhave, Lars A.; /Bohr Inst. /Copenhagen U.; Christiansen, Jessie L.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames /Caltech

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present 4 sets of lightcurves from the Kepler spacecraft, which each show multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  5. Analytical and semi-analytical solutions of horizontal well capture times under no-ow and constant-head boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    for oil and gas production in the past decade [15,21]. Extensive studies on pressure anal- ysis with surface restrictions (e.g., land®lls, lagoons, buildings, wetlands, lakes, utility lines, tanks), (2 organic contaminants. Fluid and gas ¯ows to a horizontal well or trench have been studied before. An early

  6. Observation of room temperature optical absorption in InP/GaAs type-II ultrathin quantum wells and quantum dots

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, S. D., E-mail: devsh@rrcat.gov.in; Porwal, S.; Mondal, Puspen; Srivastava, A. K.; Mukherjee, C.; Dixit, V. K.; Sharma, T. K.; Oak, S. M. [Raja Ramanna Centre for Advanced Technology, Indore-452013, Madhya Pradesh (India)

    2014-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Room temperature optical absorption process is observed in ultrathin quantum wells (QWs) and quantum dots (QDs) of InP/GaAs type-II band alignment system using surface photovoltage spectroscopy technique, where no measurable photoluminescence signal is available. Clear signature of absorption edge in the sub band gap region of GaAs barrier layer is observed for the ultrathin QWs and QDs, which red shifts with the amount of deposited InP material. Movement of photogenerated holes towards the sample surface is proposed to be the main mechanism for the generation of surface photovoltage in type-II ultrathin QWs and QDs. QDs of smaller size are found to be free from the dislocations as confirmed by the high resolution transmission electron microscopy images.

  7. rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci-sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are sup-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    are combined to provide best practices for how to handle the current situation. Verdande Technology hasD rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells on the surface and downhole when drilling. The real-time analysis identifies symptoms of problems, which

  8. Effect of the energy dependence of the carrier scattering time on the thermoelectric power factor of quantum wells and nanowires

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anlage, Steven

    of Physics. [http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4729381] The efficiency of a thermoelectric material is deter- minedEffect of the energy dependence of the carrier scattering time on the thermoelectric power factor thermoelectric performance of solid solutions CuGa1-xInxTe2 (x=0­1.0) Appl. Phys. Lett. 100, 231903 (2012

  9. Temporal changes in gas hydrate mound topography and ecology: deep-sea time-lapse camera observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardaro, Michael Fredric

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    observed in the time-lapse record and recording the number of individuals and species in each image. 1,381 individual organisms representing 16 species were observed. Sediment resuspension and redistribution were regular occurrences during the deployment...

  10. BROADBAND, TIME-DEPENDENT, SPECTROSCOPY OF THE BRIGHTEST BURSTS OBSERVED BY BATSE LAD AND EGRET TASC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gonzalez, M. M.; Carrillo-Barragan, M. [Instituto de AstronomIa, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico 04510 (Mexico); Dingus, B. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Kaneko, Y. [Universities Space Research Association, NSSTC, Huntsville, AL 35805 (United States); Preece, R. D.; Briggs, M. S. [Physics Department, University of Alabama, Huntsville, AL 35899 (United States)

    2009-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The Energetic Gamma Ray Experiment Telescope (EGRET) calorimeter, Total Absorption Shower Counter (TASC), was triggered by the Burst And Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) and thus observed several bursts in the energy range of 1-200 MeV. The analysis of combined BATSE Large Area Detector and EGRET TASC data have been developed and discussed previously. Spectroscopy of GRB941017 based on this analysis uncovered an MeV component that would be hidden in the brightness of the synchrotron component in a time-integrated spectrum of the whole burst, while separation into shorter time intervals allowed a unique identification of a new component different from the synchrotron component. In this paper the spectral temporal evolution of the 68 brightest long BATSE bursts, in the broadest energy range yet reported, is studied using the analysis used for GRB941017. We consider the Band function to describe the spectra from keV to MeV energies. Only 21 of the 68 bursts showed MeV emission detectable by TASC. We observed three bursts that contained spectra with peak energy E {sub peak}>2 MeV.

  11. PROMPT Observations of the Early-Time Optical Afterglow of GRB 060607A

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nysewander, M; Crain, J A; Foster, A; Haislip, J; Ivarsen, K; Lacluyze, A; Trotter, A

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PROMPT (Panchromatic Robotic Optical Monitoring and Polarimetry Telescopes) observed the early-time optical afterglow of GRB 060607A and obtained a densely sampled multiwavelength light curve that begins only tens of seconds after the GRB. Located at Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, PROMPT is designed to observe the afterglows of gamma-ray bursts using multiple automated 0.4-m telescopes that image simultaneously in many filters when the afterglow is bright and may be highly variable. The data span the interval from 44 seconds after the GRB trigger to 3.3 hours in the Bgri filters. We observe an initial peak in the light curve at approximately three minutes, followed by rebrightenings peaking around 40 minutes and again at 66 minutes. Although our data overlap with the early Swift gamma-ray and x-ray light curves, we do not see a correlation between the optical and high-energy flares. We measure the early (t < 3 minutes) spectral index and find that it does not agree with the assumption th...

  12. The Value of PORTS to the Nation How Real-time Observations Improve Safety and Economic Efficiency of Maritime Commerce

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The Value of PORTS® to the Nation How Real-time Observations Improve Safety and Economic Efficiency. Credit: Steve O'Malley, Ocean Tech Services, LLC #12;Our lives depend on maritime commerce http://tidesandcurrents.noaa.gov/ports in accidents on the nation's waterways and major seaports. Real-time observations from PORTS®, or the Physical

  13. LATE-TIME SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY INTERACTING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF11kx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pan, Yen-Chen; Hook, Isobel M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    PTF11kx was a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) that showed time-variable absorption features, including saturated Ca II H and K lines that weakened and eventually went into emission. The strength of the emission component of H{alpha} gradually increased, implying that the SN was undergoing significant interaction with its circumstellar medium (CSM). These features, and many others, were blueshifted slightly and showed a P-Cygni profile, likely indicating that the CSM was directly related to, and probably previously ejected by, the progenitor system itself. These and other observations led Dilday et al. to conclude that PTF11kx came from a symbiotic nova progenitor like RS Oph. In this work we extend the spectral coverage of PTF11kx to 124-680 rest-frame days past maximum brightness. The late-time spectra of PTF11kx are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of full width at half-maximum intensity Almost-Equal-To 2000 km s{sup -1}), strong Ca II emission features ({approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} wide), and a blue 'quasi-continuum' due to many overlapping narrow lines of Fe II. Emission from oxygen, He I, and Balmer lines higher than H{alpha} is weak or completely absent at all epochs, leading to large observed H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios. The H{alpha} emission appears to increase in strength with time for {approx}1 yr, but it subsequently decreases significantly along with the Ca II emission. Our latest spectrum also indicates the possibility of newly formed dust in the system as evidenced by a slight decrease in the red wing of H{alpha}. During the same epochs, multiple narrow emission features from the CSM temporally vary in strength. The weakening of the H{alpha} and Ca II emission at late times is possible evidence that the SN ejecta have overtaken the majority of the CSM and agrees with models of other strongly interacting SNe Ia. The varying narrow emission features, on the other hand, may indicate that the CSM is clumpy or consists of multiple thin shells.

  14. Simulation of relaxation times and energy spectra of the CdTe/Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te/CdTe quantum well for variable valence band offset, well width, and composition x

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melezhik, E. O., E-mail: emelezhik@gmail.com; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Sizov, F. F. [National Academy of Sciences, Lashkariev Institute of Semiconductor Physics (Ukraine)

    2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dependences of relaxation times and energy spectrum of the CdTe/Hg{sub 1-x}Cd{sub x}Te/CdTe quantum well (QW) on its parameters were simulated in the cadmium molar fraction range 0 < x < 0.16. It was found that the x increase from 0 to 0.16 changes electron wave function localization in the QW. A criterion for determining the number of interface levels of localized electrons depending on QW parameters was obtained. The effect of a sharp (by two orders of magnitude) increase in the relaxation time of localized electrons was detected at small QW widths and x close to 0.16.

  15. Real-time observation of nanoscale topological transitions in epitaxial PbTe/CdTe heterostructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Groiss, H., E-mail: heiko.groiss@jku.at, E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Daruka, I., E-mail: heiko.groiss@jku.at, E-mail: istvan.daruka@jku.at; Springholz, G.; Schffler, F. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Linz 4040 (Austria); Koike, K.; Yano, M. [Nanomaterials Microdevices Research Center, Osaka Institute of Technology, Asahi-ku Ohmiya, Osaka 535-8585 (Japan); Hesser, G. [Center for Surface- and Nanoanalytics (ZONA), Johannes Kepler University, Linz 4040 (Austria); Zakharov, N.; Werner, P. [Max Planck Institute of Microstructure Physics, Halle 06120 (Germany)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The almost completely immiscible PbTe/CdTe heterostructure has recently become a prototype system for self-organized quantum dot formation based on solid-state phase separation. Here, we study by real-time transmission electron microscopy the topological transformations of two-dimensional PbTe-epilayers into, first, a quasi-one-dimensional percolation network and subsequently into zero-dimensional quantum dots. Finally, the dot size distribution coarsens by Ostwald ripening. The whole transformation sequence occurs during all stages in the fully coherent solid state by bulk diffusion. A model based on the numerical solution of the Cahn-Hilliard equation reproduces all relevant morphological and dynamic aspects of the experiments, demonstrating that this standard continuum approach applies to coherent solids down to nanometer dimensions. As the Cahn-Hilliard equation does not depend on atomistic details, the observed morphological transformations are general features of the model. To confirm the topological nature of the observed shape transitions, we developed a parameter-free geometric model. This, together with the Cahn-Hilliard approach, is in qualitative agreement with the experiments.

  16. "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) Herschel Observations of GSS30-IRS1 in Ophiuchus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Je, Hyerin; Lee, Seokho; Green, Joel D; Evans, Neal J

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As a part of the "Dust, Ice, and Gas In Time" (DIGIT) key program on Herschel, we observed GSS30-IRS1, a Class I protostar located in Ophiuchus (d = 120 pc), with Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS). More than 70 lines were detected within a wavelength range from 50 micron to 200 micron, including CO, H2O, OH, and two atomic [O I] lines at 63 and 145 micron. The [C II] line, known as a tracer of externally heated gas by the interstellar radiation field, is also detected at 158 micron. All lines, except [O I] and [C II], are detected only at the central spaxel of 9.4" X 9.4". The [O I] emissions are extended along a NE-SW orientation, and the [C II] line is detected over all spaxels, indicative of external PDR. The total [C II] intensity around GSS30 reveals that the far-ultraviolet radiation field is in the range of 3 to 20 G0, where G0 is in units of the Habing Field, 1.6 X 10^{-3} erg cm^{-2} s^{-1}. This enhanced external radiation field heats the envelope of GSS30-IRS1, causing the...

  17. The system for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) as a measure of energy expenditure during classroom based physical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Leon; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time ...

  18. Real-Time Observation of the Swelling and Hydrolysis of a Single Crystalline Cellulose Fiber Catalyzed by Cellulase 7B

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dutcher, John

    facilitate its application for the efficient and economical production of cellulosic ethanol. INTRODUCTIONReal-Time Observation of the Swelling and Hydrolysis of a Single Crystalline Cellulose Fiber Information ABSTRACT: The biodegradation of cellulose involves the enzymatic action of cellulases

  19. Energy time dispersion of a new class of magnetospheric ion events observed near the Earth's bow shock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Energy time dispersion of a new class of magnetospheric ion events observed near the Earth's bow of several energetic (³35 keV) ion events observed near the Earth's bow shock by the CCE/AMPTE and IMP-7 responsible for the detection of this new type of near bow shock magnetospheric ion events. The new class

  20. High-k shallow traps observed by charge pumping with varying discharging times

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ho, Szu-Han; Chen, Ching-En; Tseng, Tseung-Yuen [Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Chang, Ting-Chang, E-mail: tcchang@mail.phys.nsysu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Advanced Optoelectronics Technology Center, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Lu, Ying-Hsin; Lo, Wen-Hung; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Liu, Kuan-Ju [Department of Physics, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804, Taiwan (China); Wang, Bin-Wei; Cao, Xi-Xin [Department of Embedded System Engineering, Peking University, Beijing, P.R.China (China); Chen, Hua-Mao [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung; Chen, Tsai-Fu [Device Department, United Microelectronics Corporation, Tainan Science Park, Taiwan (China)

    2013-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we investigate the influence of falling time and base level time on high-k bulk shallow traps measured by charge pumping technique in n-channel metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors with HfO{sub 2}/metal gate stacks. N{sub T}-V{sub high} {sub level} characteristic curves with different duty ratios indicate that the electron detrapping time dominates the value of N{sub T} for extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps. N{sub T} is the number of traps, and I{sub cp} is charge pumping current. By fitting discharge formula at different temperatures, the results show that extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps at high voltage are in fact high-k bulk shallow traps. This is also verified through a comparison of different interlayer thicknesses and different Ti{sub x}N{sub 1?x} metal gate concentrations. Next, N{sub T}-V{sub high} {sub level} characteristic curves with different falling times (t{sub falling} {sub time}) and base level times (t{sub base} {sub level}) show that extra contribution of I{sub cp} traps decrease with an increase in t{sub falling} {sub time}. By fitting discharge formula for different t{sub falling} {sub time}, the results show that electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps first discharge to the channel and then to source and drain during t{sub falling} {sub time}. This current cannot be measured by the charge pumping technique. Subsequent measurements of N{sub T} by charge pumping technique at t{sub base} {sub level} reveal a remainder of electrons trapped in high-k bulk shallow traps.

  1. Direct space-time observation of pulse tunneling in an electromagnetic band gap

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doiron, Serge; Hache, Alain [Department de physique et d'astronomie, Universite de Moncton, Moncton, New Brunswick, E1A 3E9 (Canada); Winful, Herbert G. [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Michigan, 1301 Beal Avenue, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109-2122 (United States)

    2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present space-time-resolved measurements of electromagnetic pulses tunneling through a coaxial electromagnetic band gap structure. The results show that during the tunneling process the field distribution inside the barrier is an exponentially decaying standing wave whose amplitude increases and decreases as it slowly follows the temporal evolution of the input pulse. At no time is a pulse maximum found inside the barrier, and hence the transmitted peak is not the incident peak that has propagated to the exit. The results support the quasistatic interpretation of tunneling dynamics and confirm that the group delay is not the traversal time of the input pulse peak.

  2. Chemical differences are observed in children's versus adults' laten fingerprints as a function of time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antoine, K.M.; Miller, L.; Mortazavi, S.; Miller, A.D.

    2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of aged latent fingerprints is often difficult, especially for those of children. To understand this phenomenon, the chemical composition of children's versus adults latent fingerprints was examined over time using Fourier transform infrared microscopy. Hierarchical cluster analysis revealed that children's and adults prints were distinguishable for up to 4 weeks after deposition, based on differences in sebum composition. Specifically, adults had a higher lipid content than children, but both decreased over time, attributable to the volatility of free fatty acids. The aliphatic CH{sub 3}, aliphatic CH{sub 2}, and carbonyl ester compositions changed differently in adults versus children over time, consistent with higher cholesterol and cholesteryl esters in children's prints and wax esters and glycerides in adults prints. Thus, fingerprint composition changes with time differently in children versus adults, making it a sensitive metric to estimate the age of an individual, especially when the age of the print is known.

  3. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. VI. POTENTIALLY INTERESTING CANDIDATE SYSTEMS FROM FOURIER-BASED STATISTICAL TESTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Ford, Eric B. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Jenkins, Jon M.; Koch, David G.; Sanderfer, Dwight T.; Seader, Shawn; Twicken, Joseph D. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Holman, Matthew J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Kjeldsen, Hans [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Aarhus University, DK-8000 Aarhus C (Denmark); Prsa, Andrej, E-mail: jsteffen@fnal.gov [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Villanova University, 800 East Lancaster Avenue, Villanova, PA 19085 (United States)

    2012-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through quarter six of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  4. First XMM-Newton observations of a Cataclysmic Variable I: Timing studies of OY Car

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gavin Ramsay; Tracey Poole; Keith Mason; France Cordova; William Priedhorsky; Alice Breeveld; Rudi Much; Julian Osborne; Dirk Pandel; Stephen Potter; Jennifer West; Peter Wheatley

    2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    We present XMM-Newton observations of the eclipsing, disc accreting, cataclysmic variable OY Car which were obtained as part of the performance verification phase of the mission. The star was observed 4 days after an outburst and then again 5 weeks later when it was in a quiescent state. There is a quasi-stable modulation of the X-rays at ~2240 sec, which is most prominent at the lowest energies. We speculate that this may be related to the spin period of the white dwarf. The duration of the eclipse ingress and egress in X-rays is 20--30 sec. This indicates that the bulk of the X-ray emission originates from the boundary layer which has a negligible height above the surface of the white dwarf. The eclipse profile implies a white dwarf of mass M_{1}=0.9-1.1Msun and a secondary star of M_{2}=0.08-0.11Msun.

  5. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Application of satellite observations for timely1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    for timely1 updates to global anthropogenic NOx emission2 inventories3 L. N. Lamsal, 1 R. V. Martin, 1, 2 A INVENTORIES Anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) can change rapidly due4 to economic growth, USA D R A F T February 1, 2011, 1:34pm D R A F T #12;LAMSAL ET AL.: UPDATING NOX EMISSION INVENTORIES

  6. "Real-Time Coastal Observing Systems for Ecosystem Dynamics and Harmful Algal Blooms" Resubmitted 4 March 2005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fabrikant, Sara Irina

    Initiation and Prediction in Large European Marine Ecosystems (HABILE) in the North Sea, Fisheries & Oceans"Real-Time Coastal Observing Systems for Ecosystem Dynamics and Harmful Algal Blooms" Resubmitted 4 ________________________________________________________________________ X.1 Introduction X X.2 Processes in the coastal ocean X X.2.1 Physical processes X X.2.2 Biological

  7. Spectral inhomogeneity induced by vacancies and thermal phonons and associated observables in time-and frequency-domain nonlinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apkarian, V. Ara

    Spectral inhomogeneity induced by vacancies and thermal phonons and associated observables in time by vacancies and thermally populated phonons, specializing to molecular iodine isolated in an Ar matrix. At experimentally relevant temperatures, for a vacancy concentration of 1.4%, both defect-induced and phonon

  8. Dimensions of Wellness Staying Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Eduardo

    to protect your physical health by eating a well-balanced diet, getting plenty of physical activity-evaluation and self-assessment. Wellness involves continually learning and making changes to enhance your state) A state in which your mind is engaged in lively interaction with the world around you. Intellectual

  9. Observational constraints on models of the Universe with time variable Gravitational and Cosmological constants along MOG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Khurshudyan; N. S. Mazhari; D. Momeni; R. Myrzakulov; M. Raza

    2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The subject of this paper is to investigate the weak regime covariant scalar-tensor-vector gravity (STVG) theory, known as the MOdified gravity (MOG) theory of gravity. First, we show that the MOG in the absence of scalar fields is converted into $\\Lambda(t),G(t)$ models. Time evolution of the cosmological parameters for a family of viable models have been investigated. Numerical results with the cosmological data have been adjusted. We've introduced a model for dark energy (DE) density and cosmological constant which involves first order derivatives of Hubble parameter. To extend this model, correction terms including the gravitational constant are added. In our scenario, the cosmological constant is a function of time. To complete the model,interaction terms between dark energy and dark matter (DM) manually entered in phenomenological form. Instead of using the dust model for DM, we have proposed DM equivalent to a barotropic fluid. Time evolution of DM is a function of other cosmological parameters. Using sophisticated algorithms, the behavior of various quantities including the densities, Hubble parameter, etc. have been investigated graphically. The statefinder parameters have been used for the classification of DE models. Consistency of the numerical results with experimental data of $SneIa+BAO+CMB$ are studied by numerical analysis with high accuracy.

  10. TIME SERIES MODELS OF THREE SETS OF RXTE OBSERVATIONS OF 4U 1543-47

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, C. [Department of Statistics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville, 7535 Cape (South Africa)] [Department of Statistics, University of the Western Cape, Private Bag X17, Bellville, 7535 Cape (South Africa)

    2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The X-ray nova 4U 1543-47 was in a different physical state (low/hard, high/soft, and very high) during the acquisition of each of the three time series analyzed in this paper. Standard time series models of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) family are fitted to these series. The low/hard data can be adequately modeled by a simple low-order model with fixed coefficients, once the slowly varying mean count rate has been accounted for. The high/soft series requires a higher order model, or an ARMA model with variable coefficients. The very high state is characterized by a succession of 'dips', with roughly equal depths. These seem to appear independently of one another. The underlying stochastic series can again be modeled by an ARMA form, or roughly as the sum of an ARMA series and white noise. The structuring of each model in terms of short-lived aperiodic and 'quasi-periodic' components is discussed.

  11. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  12. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  13. Distributional behavior of time averages of non-$L^1$ observables in one-dimensional intermittent maps with infinite invariant measures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takuma Akimoto; Soya Shinkai; Yoji Aizawa

    2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In infinite ergodic theory, two distributional limit theorems are well-known. One is characterized by the Mittag-Leffler distribution for time averages of $L^1(m)$ functions, i.e., integrable functions with respect to an infinite invariant measure. The other is characterized by the generalized arc-sine distribution for time averages of non-$L^1(m)$ functions. Here, we provide another distributional behavior of time averages of non-$L^1(m)$ functions in one-dimensional intermittent maps where each has an indifferent fixed point and an infinite invariant measure. Observation functions considered here are non-$L^1(m)$ functions which vanish at the indifferent fixed point. We call this class of observation functions weak non-$L^1(m)$ function. Our main result represents a first step toward a third distributional limit theorem, i.e., a distributional limit theorem for this class of observables, in infinite ergodic theory. To prove our proposition, we propose a stochastic process induced by a renewal process to mimic a Birkoff sum of a weak non-$L^1(m)$ function in the one-dimensional intermittent maps.

  14. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  15. L1448-MM OBSERVATIONS BY THE HERSCHEL KEY PROGRAM, ''DUST, ICE, AND GAS IN TIME'' (DIGIT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Jinhee; Lee, Jeong-Eun [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Kyung Hee University, Yongin-shi, Kyungki-do 449-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seokho [Astronomy Program, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Green, Joel D.; Evans, Neal J. II [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, 2515 Speedway, Stop C1400, Austin, TX 78712-1205 (United States); Choi, Minho [Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute, 776 Daedeokdaero, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-348 (Korea, Republic of); Kristensen, Lars [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, MS78, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Dionatos, Odysseas; Jrgensen, Jes K., E-mail: jeongeun.lee@khu.ac.kr [Centre for Star and Planet Formation, Natural History Museum of Denmark, University of Copenhagen, ster Voldgade 5-7, 1350 Copenhagen (Denmark); Collaboration: DIGIT Team

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Herschel/Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) observations of L1448-MM, a Class 0 protostar with a prominent outflow. Numerous emission lines are detected at 55 1000 K) environment, indicative of a shock origin. For OH, IR-pumping processes play an important role in the level population. The molecular emission in L1448-MM is better explained with a C-shock model, but the atomic emission of PACS [O I] and Spitzer/Infrared Spectrograph [Si II] emission is not consistent with C-shocks, suggesting multiple shocks in this region. Water is the major line coolant of L1448-MM in the PACS wavelength range, and the best-fit LVG models predict that H{sub 2}O and CO emit (50%-80%) of their line luminosity in the PACS wavelength range.

  16. Time delays in quasi-periodic pulsations observed during the X2.2 solar flare on 2011 February 15

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dolla, L; Seaton, D B; Van Doorsselaere, T; Dominique, M; Berghmans, D; Cabanas, C; De Groof, A; Schmutz, W; Verdini, A; West, M J; Zender, J; Zhukov, A N

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report observations of quasi-periodic pulsations (QPPs) during the X2.2 flare of 2011 February 15, observed simultaneously in several wavebands. We focus on fluctuations on time scale 1-30 s and find different time lags between different wavebands. During the impulsive phase, the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) channels in the range 25-100 keV lead all the other channels. They are followed by the Nobeyama RadioPolarimeters at 9 and 17 GHz and the Extreme Ultra-Violet (EUV) channels of the Euv SpectroPhotometer (ESP) onboard the Solar Dynamic Observatory (SDO). The Zirconium and Aluminum filter channels of the Large Yield Radiometer (LYRA) onboard the Project for On-Board Autonomy (PROBA2) satellite and the SXR channel of ESP follow. The largest lags occur in observations from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES), where the channel at 1-8 {\\AA} leads the 0.5-4 {\\AA} channel by several seconds. The time lags between the first and last channels is up to 9 ...

  17. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. IV. CONFIRMATION OF FOUR MULTIPLE-PLANET SYSTEMS BY SIMPLE PHYSICAL MODELS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fabrycky, Daniel C. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32111 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rowe, Jason F.; Christiansen, Jessie L. [SETI Institute, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Geary, John [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Steve; Haas, Michael R. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA, 94035 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A. [Department of Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Ciardi, David R. [NASA Exoplanet Science Institute/Caltech, Pasadena, CA 91126 (United States); Cochran, William D.; Endl, Michael [McDonald Observatory, The University of Texas, Austin TX 78730 (United States); Fanelli, Michael N. [Bay Area Environmental Research Institute/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Fischer, Debra [Astronomy Department, Yale University, New Haven, CT (United States); Hall, Jennifer R., E-mail: daniel.fabrycky@gmail.com [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); and others

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Eighty planetary systems of two or more planets are known to orbit stars other than the Sun. For most, the data can be sufficiently explained by non-interacting Keplerian orbits, so the dynamical interactions of these systems have not been observed. Here we present four sets of light curves from the Kepler spacecraft, each which of shows multiple planets transiting the same star. Departure of the timing of these transits from strict periodicity indicates that the planets are perturbing each other: the observed timing variations match the forcing frequency of the other planet. This confirms that these objects are in the same system. Next we limit their masses to the planetary regime by requiring the system remain stable for astronomical timescales. Finally, we report dynamical fits to the transit times, yielding possible values for the planets' masses and eccentricities. As the timespan of timing data increases, dynamical fits may allow detailed constraints on the systems' architectures, even in cases for which high-precision Doppler follow-up is impractical.

  18. Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:

  19. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie [Unit Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Universit Paris-Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France)] [Unit Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Universit Paris-Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); Metaxas, Peter J. [Unit Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Universit Paris-Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France) [Unit Mixte de Physique CNRS/Thales and Universit Paris-Sud 11, 1 Ave. A. Fresnel, 91767 Palaiseau (France); School of Physics, M013, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)] [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST) 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji [Process Development Center, Canon ANELVA Corporation, Kurigi 2-5-1, Asao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8550 (Japan)] [Process Development Center, Canon ANELVA Corporation, Kurigi 2-5-1, Asao, Kawasaki, Kanagawa 215-8550 (Japan)

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600?m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7}?A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (?1?ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  20. A long-range-corrected density functional that performs well for both ground-state properties and time-dependent density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Herbert, John

    and time-dependent density functional theory excitation energies, including charge-transfer excited states energies within time-dependent density functional theory, is systematically evaluated, and optimal values. THEORETICAL BACKGROUND Generalized gradient approximations GGAs in density functional theory DFT are quite

  1. The Bright Gamma-Ray Burst 991208 - Tight Constraints on Afterglow Models from Observations of the Early-Time Radio Evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. J. Galama; M. Bremer; F. Bertoldi; K. M. Menten; U. Lisenfeld; D. S. Shepherd; B. Mason; F. Walter; G. G. Pooley; D. A. Frail; R. Sari; S. R. Kulkarni; E. Berger; J. S. Bloom; A. J. Castro-Tirado; J. Granot

    2000-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The millimeter wavelength emission from GRB 991208 is the second brightest ever detected, yielding a unique data set. We present here well-sampled spectra and light curves over more than two decades in frequency for a two-week period. This data set has allowed us for the first time to trace the evolution of the characteristic synchrotron self-absorption frequency nu_a and peak frequency nu_m, and the peak flux density F_m: we obtain nu_a \\propto t^{-0.15 +- 0.12}, nu_m \\propto t^{-1.7 +- 0.4}, and $_m \\propto t^{-0.47 +- 0.11}. From the radio data we find that models of homogeneous or wind-generated ambient media with a spherically symmetric outflow can be ruled out. A model in which the relativistic outflow is collimated (a jet) can account for the observed evolution of the synchrotron parameters, the rapid decay at optical wavelengths, and the observed radio to optical spectral flux distributions that we present here, provided that the jet transition has not been fully completed in the first two weeks after the event. These observations provide additional evidence that rapidly decaying optical/X-ray afterglows are due to jets and that such transitions either develop very slowly or perhaps never reach the predicted asymptotic decay F(t) \\propto t^{-p}.

  2. XMM-Newton observations of OY Car III: OM light curve modelling, X-ray timing and spectral studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pasi Hakala; Gavin Ramsay

    2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We revisit the XMM-Newton observations of the dwarf nova OY Car taken in July 2000 which occured shortly after an outburst. Ramsay et al (2001a) found a prominent energy dependent modulation at a period of 2240 sec: this modulation was only seen for app. 1/3 of the observation duration. In our new analysis, we examine this time interval in greater detail. In addition to the 2240 sec period we find evidence for other periods, the most prominent being near 3500 sec. Both these modulations are most likely due to changes in photoelectric absorption over this period: this is supported by phase-resolved spectroscopy. This may indicate the presence of matter above the accretion disc or a presence of a magnetic accretion curtain. In this case the 2240 sec period could represent a spin period of the white dwarf and the 3500 sec period a beat period between the spin and orbital periods. We also model the B band and UV eclipse profiles and light curves using a new technique to map the spatial extent of the accretion disc. As a result we find that whilst the optical emission is dominated by both the emission close to the accretion disc boundary layer and the hot spot where the accretion stream hits the disc, the UV emission is mainly dominated by the inner disc/boundary layer only.

  3. TRANSIT TIMING OBSERVATIONS FROM KEPLER. II. CONFIRMATION OF TWO MULTIPLANET SYSTEMS VIA A NON-PARAMETRIC CORRELATION ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric B.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C. [Astronomy Department, University of Florida, 211 Bryant Space Sciences Center, Gainesville, FL 32611 (United States); Fabrycky, Daniel C. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Steffen, Jason H. [Fermilab Center for Particle Astrophysics, P.O. Box 500, MS 127, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Ragozzine, Darin; Charbonneau, David [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Lissauer, Jack J.; Rowe, Jason F.; Borucki, William J.; Bryson, Stephen T.; Burke, Christopher J.; Caldwell, Douglas A. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Welsh, William F. [Astronomy Department, San Diego State University, San Diego, CA 92182-1221 (United States); Allen, Christopher [Orbital Sciences Corporation/NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Batalha, Natalie M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, San Jose State University, San Jose, CA 95192 (United States); Buchhave, Lars A., E-mail: eford@astro.ufl.edu [Niels Bohr Institute, Copenhagen University, DK-2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Collaboration: Kepler Science Team; and others

    2012-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies is in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the TTVs of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple-planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  4. Harmonic Analysis of Time Variations Observed in the Solar Radio Flux Measured at 810 MHz from 1957 to 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zieba; J. Maslowski; A. Michalec; G. Michalek; A. Kulak

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-running measurements of the solar radio flux density at 810 MHz were processed. Based on the least-squares method and using modified periodograms and an iterative technique of fitting and subtracting sinusoids in the time domain, frequency, amplitude, and phase characteristics of any analyzed time series were obtained. Solar cycles 20, 21, and 22 and shorter segments around solar minima and maxima were examined separately. Also, dynamic studies with 405, 810, and 1620 day windows were undertaken. The harmonic representations obtained for all these time series indicate large differences among solar cycles and their segments. We show that the solar radio flux at 810 MHz violates the Gnevyshev-Ohl rule for the pair of cycles 22-23. Analyzing the period 1957-2004, the following spectral periods longer than 1350 days were detected: 10.6, 8.0, 28.0, 5.3, 55.0, 3.9, 6.0, 4.4, and 14.6 yr. For spectral periods between 270 and 1350 days the 11 yr cycle is not recognized. We think that these harmonics form ``impulses of activity'' or a quasi-biennial cycle defined in the Benevolenskaya model of the ``double magnetic cycle.'' The value of about 0.09 is proposed for the interaction parameter (between the low- and high-frequency components) of this model. We confirm the intermittent behavior of the periodicity near 155 days. Correlation coefficients between the radio emission at 810 MHz and sunspot numbers, as well as the radio emission at 2800 MHz calculated for 540 day intervals, depend on the solar cycle phase.

  5. Why do mixed quantum-classical methods describe short-time dynamics through conical intersections so well? Analysis of geometric phase effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gherib, Rami; Izmaylov, Artur F

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Adequate simulation of non-adiabatic dynamics through conical intersection requires account for a non-trivial geometric phase (GP) emerging in electronic and nuclear wave-functions in the adiabatic representation. Popular mixed quantum-classical (MQC) methods, surface hopping and Ehrenfest, do not carry a nuclear wave-function to be able to incorporate the GP into nuclear dynamics. Surprisingly, the MQC methods reproduce ultra-fast interstate crossing dynamics generated with the exact quantum propagation so well as if they contained information about the GP. Using two-dimensional linear vibronic coupling models we unravel how the MQC methods can effectively mimic the most significant dynamical GP effects: 1) compensation for repulsive diagonal second order non-adiabatic couplings and 2) transfer enhancement for a fully cylindrically symmetric component of a nuclear distribution.

  6. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  7. Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    contribution to sea-level rise observed by GRACE withand ice caps to sea level rise, Nature, 482, 514518. King,ice sheets to sea level rise, Geophys. Res. Lett. , 38,

  8. Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observations, Science, 314, Peltier, W. R. (2004), Globalice history models (ICE5G [Peltier, 2004] and Fleming andfor Greenland; ICE5G [Peltier, 2004] and IJ05 [Ivins and

  9. 100 Times Faster and 3 Times Sharper: Background-Dominated Observations of Stellar Populations with an 8-meter Optical-UV Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    2002-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An 8 m successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) would make incredible gains in the study of stellar populations, especially in the Local Group. If diffraction-limited at 0.5 microns, the "Next HST" could produce high-resolution imaging of faint sources over a wide field in 1 percent of the time needed with the HST. With these capabilities, photometry of the ancient main sequence could be obtained for many sight-lines through Local Group galaxies, thus determining directly the ages of their structures and providing a formation history for the Local Group populations.

  10. A Real-Time Observer for UAV's Brushless Motors Mohamad Koteich, Thierry Le Moing, Alexandre Janot and Francois Defay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    been widely used in control of permanent magnet synchronous motors (PMSM). This technique requires to be implemented in order to estimate the rotor position. In this paper, we propose a new observer for PMSM the brushed DC motors and induction motors. The high torque-to-inertia ratio of PMSM makes it suitable for use

  11. X-ray observations of NGC 1365: time-resolved eclipse of the X-ray source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Risaliti

    2007-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an extraordinary variation of the X-ray spectrum of the obscured AGN in NGC 1365, which was observed by Chandra to change from Compton-thin to Compton-thick and back to Compton-thin in four days. This fast variation imply a a size of ~10^14 cm for the emitting region, and an extremely compact size (~10^16 cm) of the clumpy circumnuclear absorber.

  12. Energy Conversion in Lifting Mass Vertically using a DC Electric Motor by Observing Required Time to Lift Object for a Certain Height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viridi, Sparisoma; Permana, Sidik; Srigutomo, Wahyu; Susilawati, Anggie; Nuryadin, Bebeh Wahid; Nurhasan,

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In lifting mass vertically using a DC electric motor energy conversion from electric energy, through intermediate kinetic energy, to gravitation potential energy shows that time required {\\Delta}t to lift load mass m for height h is dependent quadratically to m. Several approaches to explain the experiment observation are discussed in this work, from ideal energy conversion to numerical solution from differential equation.

  13. The effect of task structure, practice schedule, and model type on the learning of relative and absolute timing by physical and observational practice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Charles Beyer

    2004-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Three experiments compared learning of relative and absolute timing of a sequential key-pressing task by physical and observational practice. Experiment 1 compared a task with a complex internal structure (goal proportions of 22.2, 44.4, 33...

  14. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  15. Real-time observation of Escherichia coli cells under irradiation with a 2-MeV H{sup +} microbeam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kato, Mikio [Department of Biological Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuencho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan); Meissl, Walter; Ikeda, Tokihiro; Yamazaki, Yasunori [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako 351-0198 (Japan); Umezawa, Kenji [Department of Physical Science, Graduate School of Science, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuencho, Naka-ku, Sakai 599-8531 (Japan)

    2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A high-energy H{sup +} microbeam generated by tapered glass capillary optics was applied to a single Escherichia coli cell, in order to evaluate the effects of irradiation on the activity of the flagellar motor and cell growth in real time. The flagellar motor of the tethered cells was stopped by irradiation with an average ion fluence of 2.0 x 10{sup 12} protons/cm{sup 2}. When a lower dose was applied to the cells attached to the substrate, an elongated cell, which seemed ready to divide, divided into two daughter cells; however, the daughter cells did not elongate, neither did further cell division occur.

  16. Observation of Discrete Oscillations in a Model-independent Plot of Cosmological Scale Factor vs. Lookback Time and a Scalar Field Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ringermacher, H I

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed damped longitudinal cosmological-scale oscillations in a unique model-independent plot of scale factor against lookback time for Type Ia supernovae data. We found several first-derivative relative maxima/minima spanning the range of reported transition-redshifts. These extrema comprise 2 full cycles with a period of approximately 0.15 Hubble times (H0=68 km/s/Mpc). This period corresponds to a fundamental frequency of approximately 7 cycles over the Hubble time. Transition-z values quoted in the literature generally fall near these minima and may explain the reported wide spread up to the predicted LCDM value of approximately z = 0.77. We also observe second and third harmonics of the fundamental. The scale factor data is analyzed several different ways including smoothing, Fourier transform and autocorrelation. We propose a cosmological scalar field harmonic oscillator model for the observation. On this time scale, for a quantum scalar field, the scalar field mass is extraordinarily small at...

  17. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2011ei: TIME-DEPENDENT CLASSIFICATION OF TYPE IIb AND Ib SUPERNOVAE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR THEIR PROGENITORS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milisavljevic, Dan; Margutti, Raffaella; Soderberg, Alicia M.; Chomiuk, Laura; Sanders, Nathan E. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)] [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pignata, Giuliano; Bufano, Filomena [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile)] [Departamento de Ciencias Fisicas, Universidad Andres Bello, Avda. Republica 252, Santiago (Chile); Fesen, Robert A.; Parrent, Jerod T. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Lab, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Dartmouth College, 6127 Wilder Lab, Hanover, NH 03755 (United States); Parker, Stuart [Parkdale Observatory, 225 Warren Road, RDl Oxford, Canterbury 7495 (New Zealand)] [Parkdale Observatory, 225 Warren Road, RDl Oxford, Canterbury 7495 (New Zealand); Mazzali, Paolo [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany)] [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 1, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Pian, Elena [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States)] [Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics, Kohn Hall, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106-4030 (United States); Pickering, Timothy; Buckley, David A. H.; Crawford, Steven M.; Gulbis, Amanda A. S.; Hettlage, Christian [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa)] [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); Hooper, Eric; Nordsieck, Kenneth H. [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); O'Donoghue, Darragh, E-mail: dmilisav@cfa.harvard.edu [Southern African Large Telescope, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa)] [Southern African Large Telescope, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present X-ray, UV/optical, and radio observations of the stripped-envelope, core-collapse supernova (SN) 2011ei, one of the least luminous SNe IIb or Ib observed to date. Our observations begin with a discovery within {approx}1 day of explosion and span several months afterward. Early optical spectra exhibit broad, Type II-like hydrogen Balmer profiles that subside rapidly and are replaced by Type Ib-like He-rich features on a timescale of one week. High-cadence monitoring of this transition suggests absorption attributable to a high-velocity ({approx}> 12, 000 km s{sup -1}) H-rich shell, which is likely present in many Type Ib events. Radio observations imply a shock velocity of v Almost-Equal-To 0.13 c and a progenitor star average mass-loss rate of M-dot {approx}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} (assuming wind velocity v{sub w} = 10{sup 3} km s{sup -1}). This is consistent with independent constraints from deep X-ray observations with Swift-XRT and Chandra. Overall, the multi-wavelength properties of SN 2011ei are consistent with the explosion of a lower-mass (3-4 M{sub Sun }), compact (R{sub *} {approx}< 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 11} cm), He-core star. The star retained a thin hydrogen envelope at the time of explosion, and was embedded in an inhomogeneous circumstellar wind suggestive of modest episodic mass loss. We conclude that SN 2011ei's rapid spectral metamorphosis is indicative of time-dependent classifications that bias estimates of the relative explosion rates for Type IIb and Ib objects, and that important information about a progenitor star's evolutionary state and mass loss immediately prior to SN explosion can be inferred from timely multi-wavelength observations.

  18. The time evolution of a vortex-flame interaction observed via planar imaging of CH and OH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Paul, P.H.

    1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence imaging diagnostics of OH and CH are used to examine a premixed laminar flame subjected to a strong line-vortex pair. Results are reported for a fuel-rcih lamiar CH{sub 4}-air-N{sub 2} rod-stabilized flame. The flow studied was highly reproducible, which enabled the use of phase-sampled imaging to provide time-resolved image sequences. Image sequences are shown for a condition sufficient to produce localized extinction of the primary flame. Results indicate that a breakage in the CH front is not preceded by any distinct change in the OH front. The structure of the CH and OH profiles during the transient leading up to, and through the breakage of the CH front do not appear to be consistent with the concept of a strained laminar flame.

  19. Real-Time Observation of Platinum Redispersion on Ceria-Based Oxide by In-situ Turbo-XAS in Fluorescence Mode

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagai, Yasutaka; Dohmae, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Toshitaka; Shinjoh, Hirofumi [TOYOTA Central R and D Labs., Inc., Nagakute, Aichi, 480-1192 (Japan); Takagi, Nobuyuki [TOYOTA Motor Corporation Higashi-fuji Technical Center, Shizuoka, 410-1193 (Japan); Ikeda, Yasuo [TOYOTA Motor Europe Technical Centre, Zaventem, B-1930 (Belgium); Guilera, Gemma; Pascarelli, Sakura; Newton, Mark [European Synchrotron Radiation Facility, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Matsumoto, Shin'ichi [TOYOTA Motor Corporation, Toyota, Aichi, 471-8572 (Japan)

    2007-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

    A real-time observation of the redispersion behavior of sintered Pt on ceria-based oxide was made possible by in-situ time-resolved Turbo-XAS in fluorescence mode. 2 wt% Pt/Ce-Zr-Y mixed oxide samples were prepared, and then treated under an aging condition. The average Pt particle size measured by CO absorption method after aging was 7 nm. Redispersion treatments of the previously aged catalyst were carried out at 600 deg. C within an in-situ XAS cell in a cyclical flow of reducing/oxidizing gases. Pt L3-edge XANES spectra were collected every 1.1 second under in-situ conditions. From a change in the XANES spectra, we observed that the Pt particle size of the aged catalyst decreased from 7 to 5 nm after 60 seconds and then to 3 nm after 1000 seconds.

  20. Well control procedures for extended reach wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gjorv, Bjorn

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    been found to be critical to the success of ERD are torque and drag, drillstring design, wellbore stability, hole cleaning, casing design, directional drilling optimization, drilling dynamics and rig sizing.4 Other technologies of vital importance... are the use of rotary steerable systems (RSS) together with measurement while drilling (MWD) and logging while drilling (LWD) to geosteer the well into the geological target.5 Many of the wells drilled at Wytch Farm would not have been possible to drill...

  1. Submitted to ApJS Preprint typeset using L ATEX style emulateapj v. 6/22/04 THERMONUCLEAR (TYPE-I) X-RAY BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan K. Galloway; Michael P. Muno; Jacob M. Hartman; Pavlin Savov; Dimitrios Psaltis; Deepto Chakrabarty

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a sample of 1035 thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts from observations of 45 accreting neutron stars by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer (RXTE), spanning more than nine years. This sample contains for the first time confirmed examples of burst ignition in each of the three regimes identified theoretically: H-ignition of mixed H/He fuel, He-ignition in pure He, and He-ignition in mixed H/He fuel. We combined bursts from multiple sources to investigate the variation of the burst rate, energetics, and time scale as a function of accretion rate. We found a peak burst rate of 0.20.3 hr ?1 for a normalised peak flux of ? ? 0.020.06, corresponding to a source luminosity of 0.32 10 37 ergs s ?1. For 35 sources with bursts exhibiting photospheric radius-expansion, we estimated the likely distance range arising from the possible range of the Eddington limit. We found that in general the peak flux of radius-expansion bursts from individual sources is not constant, varying with a fractional standard deviation of 14 % in the mean. We also examined the bursts with very short ( ? 30 min) recurrence times. We found evidence for two distinct populations of such bursts, one of faint bursts following a much stronger burst by 618 min, and another with comparable intensity bursts separated by 7 min or more. We describe the properties of bursts observed from 5 new bursters discovered by RXTE, as well as two new transient outbursts of previously known sources. Finally, we searched for burst oscillations at the known oscillation frequencies in 14 sources. We describe the distribution of the oscillation amplitudes as well as the stages of each burst in which the oscillations are detected.

  2. Regulations of Wells (Florida)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Department of Environmental Protection regulates the construction, repair, and abandonment of wells, as well as the persons and businesses undertaking such practices. Governing boards of water...

  3. Groundwater and Wells (Nebraska)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section describes regulations relating to groundwater protection, water wells, and water withdrawals, and requires the registration of all water wells in the state.

  4. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    . It is recommended that before you begin the process of plugging an aban- doned well that you seek advice from your local groundwater conservation district, a licensed water well driller in your area, or the Water Well Drillers Program with the Texas Department... hire a licensed water well driller or pump installer to seal and plug an abandoned well. Well contractors have the equipment and an understanding of soil condi- tions to determine how a well should be properly plugged. How can you take care...

  5. Observations of Ferrite/Austenite Transformations in the Heat Affected Zone of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel Spot Welds Using Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, T; Elmer, J; Babu, S

    2003-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Time Resolved X-Ray Diffraction (TRXRD) measurements are made in the Heat Affected Zone (HAZ) of 2205 Duplex Stainless Steel (DSS) spot welds. Both the {gamma} {yields} {delta} and {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformations are monitored as a function of time during the rapid spot weld heating and cooling cycles. These observations are then correlated with calculated thermal cycles. Where the peak temperatures are highest ({approx}1342 C), the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to completion, leaving a ferritic microstructure at the end of heating. With lower peak temperatures, the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation proceeds to only partial completion, resulting in a microstructure containing both transformed and untransformed austenite. Further analyses of the individual diffraction patterns show shifts in the peak positions and peak widths as a function of both time and temperature. In addition, these changes in the peak characteristics are correlated with measured changes in the ferrite volume fraction. Such changes in the peak positions and widths during the {gamma} {yields} {delta} transformation provide an indication of changes occurring in each phase. These changes in peak properties can be correlated with the diffusion of nitrogen and other substitutional alloying elements, which are recognized as the primary mechanisms for this transformation. Upon cooling, the {delta} {yields} {gamma} transformation is observed to proceed from both the completely and partially transformed microstructural regions in the TRXRD data. An examination of the resulting microstructures confirms the TRXRD observation as the evidence shows that austenite both nucleates and grows from the ferritic microstructure at locations closest to the fusion zone boundary and grows from untransformed austenite grains at locations further from this boundary.

  6. THE FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE ADIABATIC INDEX IN THE SOLAR CORONA USING TIME-DEPENDENT SPECTROSCOPY OF HINODE/EIS OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Doorsselaere, Tom; Wardle, Nick; Jansari, Kishan; Verwichte, Erwin; Nakariakov, Valery M. [CFSA, Physics Department, University of Warwick, Coventry CV4 7AL (United Kingdom); Del Zanna, Giulio, E-mail: Tom.VanDoorsselaere@wis.kuleuven.BE [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use observations of a slow magnetohydrodynamic wave in the corona to determine for the first time the value of the effective adiabatic index, using data from the Extreme-ultraviolet Imaging Spectrometer on board Hinode. We detect oscillations in the electron density, using the CHIANTI atomic database to perform spectroscopy. From the time-dependent wave signals from multiple spectral lines the relationship between relative density and temperature perturbations is determined, which allows in turn to measure the effective adiabatic index to be {gamma}{sub eff} = 1.10 {+-} 0.02. This confirms that the thermal conduction along the magnetic field is very efficient in the solar corona. The thermal conduction coefficient is measured from the phase lag between the temperature and density, and is shown to be compatible with Spitzer conductivity.

  7. Horizontal well IPR calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, L.K.; Todd, B.J.; Evans, C.E.; Pierson, R.G.

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents the calculation of near-wellbore skin and non-Darcy flow coefficient for horizontal wells based on whether the well is drilled in an underbalanced or overbalanced condition, whether the well is completed openhole, with a slotted liner, or cased, and on the number of shots per foot and phasing for cased wells. The inclusion of mechanical skin and the non-Darcy flow coefficient in previously published horizontal well equations is presented and a comparison between these equations is given. In addition, both analytical and numerical solutions for horizontal wells with skin and non-Darcy flow are presented for comparison.

  8. Underground Wells (Oklahoma)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Class I, III, IV and V injection wells require a permit issued by the Executive Director of the Department of Environmental Quality; Class V injection wells utilized in the remediation of...

  9. Well drilling apparatus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prins, K.; Prins, R.K.

    1982-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A drill rig for drilling wells having a derrick adapted to hold and lower a conductor string and drill pipe string. A support frame is fixed to the derrick to extend over the well to be drilled, and a rotary table, for holding and rotating drill pipe strings, is movably mounted thereon. The table is displaceable between an active position in alignment with the axis of the well and an inactive position laterally spaced therefrom. A drill pipe holder is movably mounted on the frame below the rotary table for displacement between a first position laterally of the axis of the well and a second position in alignment with the axis of the well. The rotary table and said drill pipe holder are displaced in opposition to each other, so that the rotary table may be removed from alignment with the axis of the well and said drill pipe string simultaneously held without removal from said well.

  10. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  11. Geothermal well stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinclair, A.R.; Pittard, F.J.; Hanold, R.J.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    All available data on proppants and fluids were examined to determine areas in technology that need development for 300 to 500/sup 0/F (150/sup 0/ to 265/sup 0/C) hydrothermal wells. While fluid properties have been examined well into the 450/sup 0/F range, proppants have not been previously tested at elevated temperatures except in a few instances. The latest test data at geothermal temperatures is presented and some possible proppants and fluid systems that can be used are shown. Also discussed are alternative stimulation techniques for geothermal wells.

  12. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    drainage radii) ...see figure below. Copy the code into a new module. Inputs: In ArcMap, data frame named "Task 1" Well FC as first layer (layer 0). Output: Polygon feature class...

  13. Shock Chlorination of Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McFarland, Mark L.; Dozier, Monty

    2003-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Shock chlorination is a method of disinfecting a water well. This publication gives complete instructions for chlorinating with bleach or with dry chlorine. It is also available in Spanish as publication L-5441S...

  14. Isobaric groundwater well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

  15. X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    T. and Narita, H. , 2006. Methane hydrate crystal growth ina porous medium filled with methane-saturated liquid water.Kneafsey, T.J. et al. , 2007. Methane hydrate formation and

  16. Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2010-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

    To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

  17. Environment Induced Time Arrow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janos Polonyi

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The spread of the time arrows from the environment to an observed subsystem is followed within a harmonic model. A similarity is pointed out between irreversibility and a phase with spontaneously broken symmetry. The causal structure of interaction might be lost in the irreversible case, as well. The Closed Time Path formalism is developed for classical systems and shown to handle the time arrow problem in a clear and flexible manner. The quantum case is considered, as well, and the common origin of irreversibility and decoherence is pointed out.

  18. VIII. OBSERVATION WELLS TO MEET SPECIAL PERMIT CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , with flush-joint, internal-upset, threaded-type connec- tions. The hole packing material was 0.0100.020-in @@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@@ yyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy Screen 14.7' 3.8' Gravels, cobbles and claystone, with lenses of sand and gravel, dry; part of Puye Conglomerate over- lying basalt that outcrops

  19. Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Reeder, 1957) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen Energy1988)

  20. Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen

  1. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  2. Spacer for deep wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Klein, G. D.

    1984-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A spacer for use in a deep well that is to have a submersible pump situated downhole and with a string of tubing attached to the pump for delivering the pumped fluid. The pump is electrically driven, and power is supplied via an armored cable which parallels the string of tubing. Spacers are clamped to the cable and have the tubing running through an eccentrically located passage in each spacer. The outside dimensions of a spacer fit freely inside any casing in the well.

  3. Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

  4. Decontaminating Flooded Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    ER-011 6-06 Mark L. McFarland, Associate Professor and Extension Water Resources Specialist; Diane E. Boellstorff, Program Specialist Water Quality; Tony L. Provin, Associate Professor and Extension Soil Chemist; Monty C. Dozier, Assistant... and local hospitals may also test water samples for bacteria. The cost of the test ranges from $8 to $30, depending on the lab. Well disinfection does not eliminate hydrocarbons (fuels, oils), pesticides, heavy metals or other types of nonbiological...

  5. A new, community-based effort aims to transform hydrologic science by supporting new techniques to measure hydrologic processes at a wide range of time and space scales as well by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , New Hampshire; WENDROTH--Department of Plant and Soil Sciences, University of Kentucky, Lexington.g., groundwater, hydrome- teorology, surface water, etc.). Timely and emerging suites of technologies with new and existing research efforts. Here we present the consistent vision that emerged through

  6. ADVANCED CEMENTS FOR GEOTHERMAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SUGAMA,T.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using the conventional well cements consisting of the calcium silicate hydrates (CaO-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) and calcium aluminum silicate hydrates (CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-SiO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O system) for the integrity of geothermal wells, the serious concern confronting the cementing industries was their poor performance in mechanically supporting the metallic well casing pipes and in mitigating the pipe's corrosion in very harsh geothermal reservoirs. These difficulties are particularly acute in two geological regions: One is the deep hot downhole area ({approx} 1700 m depth at temperatures of {approx} 320 C) that contains hyper saline water with high concentrations of CO{sub 2} (> 40,000 ppm) in conjunction with {approx} 100 ppm H{sub 2}S at a mild acid of pH {approx} 5.0; the other is the upper well region between the well's surface and {approx} 1000 m depth at temperatures up to 200 C. The specific environment of the latter region is characterized by highly concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} (pH < 1.5) brine containing at least 5000 ppm CO{sub 2}. When these conventional cements are emplaced in these harsh environments, their major shortcoming is their susceptibility to reactions with hot CO{sub 2} and H{sub 2}SO4, thereby causing their deterioration brought about by CO{sub 2}-catalyzed carbonation and acid-initiated erosion. Such degradation not only reduced rapidly the strength of cements, lowering the mechanical support of casing pipes, but also increased the extent of permeability of the brine through the cement layer, promoting the rate of the pipe's corrosion. Severely carbonated and acid eroded cements often impaired the integrity of a well in less than one year; in the worst cases, casings have collapsed within three months, leading to the need for costly and time-consuming repairs or redrilling operations. These were the reasons why the geothermal well drilling and cementing industries were concerned about using conventional well cements, and further their deterioration was a major impediment in expediting the development of geothermal energy resources.

  7. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells At Salt Wells Area...

  8. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  9. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  10. New well control companies stress planning, engineering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, S.; Wright, R.

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology for capping a blowing well has not changed during the last 50 years. Still, operators are finding new ways of using well control companies' expertise to help avoid potentially disastrous situations. This trend is especially critical given the current environmentally sensitive and cost-cutting times facing the oil industry. While regulatory agencies world-wide continue to hinder well control efforts during an offshore event, well control companies are focusing on technologies to make their job easier. Some of the most exciting are the hydraulic jet cutter, which gained fame in Kuwait, and electromagnetic ranging for drilling more accurate relief wells. With the number of subsea wells increasing, subsea intervention is a major target for future innovations. Well control companies are experiencing a change in their role to the offshore oil industry. Well control professionals discuss this expanded responsibility as well as other aspects of offshore blowouts including regulatory hindrances, subsea intervention and future technologies.

  11. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic...

  12. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  13. INTEGRAL observations of HER X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; K. P. Postnov; N. I. Shakura; S. A. Potanin; C. Ferrigno; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2007-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

    First results of observations of the low mass X-ray binary Her X-1/HZ Her performed by the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005 are presented. A significant part of one 35 day main-on state was covered. The cyclotron line in the X-ray spectrum is well observed and its position and shape, as well as its variability with time and phase of the 1.24 s pulsation are explored. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy bands are studied throughout the observation. The pulse period is found to vary on short time scales revealing a dynamical spin-up/spin-down behavior. Results of simultaneous optical observations of HZ Her are also discussed.

  14. Well Permits (District of Columbia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Well permits are required for the installation of wells in private and public space. Wells are defined as any trest hole, shaft, or soil excavation created by any means including, but not limited...

  15. Observables of Macdonald processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexei Borodin; Ivan Corwin; Vadim Gorin; Shamil Shakirov

    2013-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a framework for computing averages of various observables of Macdonald processes. This leads to new contour--integral formulas for averages of a large class of multilevel observables, as well as Fredholm determinants for averages of two different single level observables.

  16. Observation of pi - B meson charge-flavor correlations and measurement of time dependent B{sup 0}Bbar{sup 0} mixing in p pbar collisions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P. Maksimovic

    1999-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of time dependent B{sup 0}-{anti B}{sup 0} mixing in p{anti p} collisions at 1.8 TeV using 110 pb{sup -1} collected with the CDF detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider. B mesons are partially reconstructed using the semileptonic decays B{sup 0}{yields}l{sup +}D{sup (*)-}X and B{sup +}{yields}l{sup +}{anti D}{sup 0}X (and their charge conjugates). B meson-charged pion correlations are used in order to determine the flavor of the B meson at t=0. Such correlations are expected to arise from pions produced in the fragmentation chain and also from B{sup **} decays. We measure the efficiency and purity of this flavor tagging method for both charged and neutral B mesons.

  17. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  18. One of the closest planet pairs to the 3:2 Mean Motion Resonance, confirmed with K2 observations and Transit Timing Variations: EPIC201505350

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, David J; Barros, Susana C C; Demangeon, Olivier; McCormac, James; Osborn, Hugh P; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Santerne, Alexandre; Tsantaki, Maria; Almenara, Jos-Manuel; Barrado, David; Boisse, Isabelle; Bonomo, Aldo S; Bouchy, Franois; Brown, David J A; Bruno, Giovanni; Cerda, Javiera Rey; Courcol, Bastien; Deleuil, Magali; Daz, Rodrigo F; Doyle, Amanda P; Hbrard, Guillaume; Kirk, James; Lam, Kristine W F; Pollacco, Don L; Rajpurohit, Arvind; Spake, Jessica; Walker, Simon R

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The K2 mission has recently begun to discover new and diverse planetary systems. In December 2014 Campaign 1 data from the mission was released, providing high-precision photometry for ~22000 objects over an 80 day timespan. We searched these data with the aim of detecting further important new objects. Our search through two separate pipelines led to the independent discovery of EPIC201505350, a two-planet system of Neptune sized objects (4.2 and 7.2 $R_\\oplus$), orbiting a K dwarf extremely close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. The two planets each show transits, sometimes simultaneously due to their proximity to resonance and alignment of conjunctions. We obtain further ground based photometry of the larger planet with the NITES telescope, demonstrating the presence of large transit timing variations (TTVs) of over an hour. These TTVs allows us to confirm the planetary nature of the system, and place a limit on the mass of the outer planet of $386M_\\oplus$.

  19. MULTI-WAVELENGTH OBSERVATIONS OF THE SPATIO-TEMPORAL EVOLUTION OF SOLAR FLARES WITH AIA/SDO. I. UNIVERSAL SCALING LAWS OF SPACE AND TIME PARAMETERS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aschwanden, Markus J. [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, Org. ADBS, Bldg. 252, 3251 Hanover St., Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States); Zhang, Jie; Liu, Kai, E-mail: aschwanden@lmsal.com, E-mail: jzhang7@gmu.edu [School of Physics, Astronomy and Computational Sciences, George Mason University, 4400 University Dr., MSN 6A2, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States)

    2013-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We extend a previous statistical solar flare study of 155 GOES M- and X-class flares observed with AIA/SDO to all seven coronal wavelengths (94, 131, 171, 193, 211, 304, and 335 ) to test the wavelength dependence of scaling laws and statistical distributions. Except for the 171 and 193 wavelengths, which are affected by EUV dimming caused by coronal mass ejections (CMEs), we find near-identical size distributions of geometric (lengths L, flare areas A, volumes V, and fractal dimension D{sub 2}), temporal (flare durations T), and spatio-temporal parameters (diffusion coefficient ?, spreading exponent ?, and maximum expansion velocities v{sub max}) in different wavelengths, which are consistent with the universal predictions of the fractal-diffusive avalanche model of a slowly driven, self-organized criticality (FD-SOC) system, i.e., N(L)?L {sup 3}, N(A)?A {sup 2}, N(V)?V {sup 5/3}, N(T)?T {sup 2}, and D{sub 2} = 3/2, for a Euclidean dimension d = 3. Empirically, we find also a new strong correlation ??L {sup 0.940.01} and the three-parameter scaling law L?? T {sup 0.1}, which is more consistent with the logistic-growth model than with classical diffusion. The findings suggest long-range correlation lengths in the FD-SOC system that operate in the vicinity of a critical state, which could be used for predictions of individual extreme events. We find also that eruptive flares (with accompanying CMEs) have larger volumes V, longer flare durations T, higher EUV and soft X-ray fluxes, and somewhat larger diffusion coefficients ? than confined flares (without CMEs)

  20. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  1. Potential hydrologic characterization wells in Amargosa Valley

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyles, B.; Mihevc, T.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    More than 500 domestic, agricultural, and monitoring wells were identified in the Amargosa Valley. From this list, 80 wells were identified as potential hydrologic characterization wells, in support of the US Department of Energy (DOE) Underground Test Area/Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (UGTA/RIFS). Previous hydrogeologic studies have shown that groundwater flow in the basin is complex and that aquifers may have little lateral continuity. Wells located more than 10 km or so from the Nevada Test Site (NTS) boundary may yield data that are difficult to correlate to sources from the NTS. Also, monitoring well locations should be chosen within the guidelines of a hydrologic conceptual model and monitoring plan. Since these do not exist at this time, recompletion recommendations will be restricted to wells relatively close (approximately 20 km) to the NTS boundary. Recompletion recommendations were made for two abandoned agricultural irrigation wells near the town of Amargosa Valley (previously Lathrop Wells), for two abandoned wildcat oil wells about 10 km southwest of Amargosa Valley, and for Test Well 5 (TW-5), about 10 km east of Amargosa Valley.

  2. Sampling for Bacteria in Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2001-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication will instruct you on the proper procedures for collecting a sample from a water well for bacteriological analysis....

  3. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  4. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

  5. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Peer Review Well Monitoring Systems for EGS Principal Investigator Randy Normann Perma Works LLC May 19, 2010 This presentation does not contain any proprietary confidential, or...

  6. Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion uponC2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2004-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of ethylene hydrogenation over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms resolution in the temperature range 323 to 473 K using various H2 flow rates (1 atm total gas pressure). Surface ethyl species (2870 and 1200 cm-1) were detected at all temperatures along with the gas phase ethane product (2954 and 2893 cm-1). The CH3CH2Pt growth was instantaneous on the time scale of 25ms under all experimental conditions. At 323 K, the decay time of surface ethyl (122 + 10 ms) coincides with the rise time of C2H6 (144 + 14 ms).This establishes direct kinetic evidence for surface ethyl as the kinetically relevant intermediate. Such a direct link between the temporal behavior of an observed intermediate and the final product growth in a heterogeneous catalytic system has not been demonstrated before to our knowledge. A fraction (10 percent) of the asymptotic ethane growth at 323 K is prompt, indicating that there are surface ethyl species that react much faster than the majority of the CH3CH2Pt intermediates. The dispersive kinetics is attributed to the varying strength of interaction of the ethyl species with the Pt surface caused by heterogeneity of the surface environment. At 473 K, the majority of ethyl intermediates are hydrogenated prior to the recording of the first time slice (24 ms), and a correspondingly large prompt growth of ethane is observed. The yield and kinetics of the surface ethylidyne are in agreement with the known spectator nature of this species.

  7. Visualizing Motion in Potential Wells* Pratibha Jolly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zollman, Dean

    , directly and plot the potential energy diagrams using a magnetic field sensor. The ease of measurement of potential #12;2 barriers and wells. The previous developers used a photo-interrupt and timing device for the sake of economy a single sensor was employed. Then, the experiment had to be repeated a large number

  8. Promoting Balance, Wellness & Fitness Creating healthier lives.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    in student recruitment and retention. Engagement ­ We provide opportunities for students and members of their leisure time. Participation in such activities also assists students in performing well in a demanding interpersonal conflicts, learn healthy life-style habits, provide first aid and emergency response services

  9. Accepted by ApJS Preprint typeset using L ATEX style emulateapj v. 10/09/06 THERMONUCLEAR (TYPE-I) X-RAY BURSTS OBSERVED BY THE ROSSI X-RAY TIMING EXPLORER

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duncan K. Galloway; Michael P. Muno; Jacob M. Hartman; Dimitrios Psaltis; Deepto Chakrabarty

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have assembled a sample of 1187 thermonuclear (type-I) X-ray bursts from observations of 48 accreting neutron stars by the Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, spanning more than ten years. The sample contains examples of two of the three theoretical ignition regimes (confirmed via comparisons with numerical models) and likely examples of the third. We present a detailed analysis of the variation of the burst profiles, energetics, recurrence times, presence of photospheric radius expansion, and presence of burst oscillations, as a function of accretion rate. We estimated the distance for 35 sources exhibiting radius-expansion bursts, and found that in general the peak flux of such bursts varies typically by 13%, We classified sources into two main groups based on the burst properties: both long and short bursts (indicating mixed H/He accretion), and consistently short bursts (primarily He accretion), and calculated the mean burst rate as a function of accretion rate for the two groups. The decrease in burst rate observed at> 0.06 ? MEdd ( ? 2 10 37 erg s ?1) is associated with a transition in the persistent spectral state and (as has been suggested previously) may be related to the increasing role of steady He-burning. We found many examples of bursts with recurrence times < 30 min, including burst triplets and even quadruplets.

  10. Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Double Well Atomic Josephson Junction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weatherall, J. O.; Search, C. P.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    observation of these Josephson junction resonances. 2.dressed Bose condensed Josephson junction Let us consider ain a Double Well Atomic Josephson Junction J.O. Weatherall

  11. Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach...

  12. Production-systems analysis for fractured wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hunt, J.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

    1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production-systems analysis has been in use for many years to design completion configurations on the basis of an expected reservoir capacity. The most common equations used for the reservoir calculations are for steady-state radial flow. Most hydraulically fractured wells require the use of an unsteady-state production simulator to predict the higher flow rates associated with the stimulated well. These high flow rates may present problems with excessive pressure drops through production tubing designed for radial-flow production. Therefore, the unsteady-state nature of fractured-well production precludes the use of steady-state radial-flow inflow performance relationships (IPR's) to calculate reservoir performance. An accurate prediction of fractured-well production must be made to design the most economically efficient production configuration. It has been suggested in the literature that a normalized reference curve can be used to generate the IPR's necessary for production-systems analysis. However, this work shows that the reference curve for fractured-well response becomes time-dependent when reservoir boundaries are considered. A general approach for constructing IPR curves is presented, and the use of an unsteady-state fractured-well-production simulator coupled with the production-systems-analysis approach is described. A field case demonstrates the application of this method to fractured wells.

  13. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  14. Project management improves well control events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oberlender, G.D. [Oklahoma State Univ., Stillwater, OK (United States); Abel, L.W. [Wild Well Control Inc., Spring, TX (United States)

    1995-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    During a well control operation, the efficient use of personnel and equipment, through good project management techniques, contributes to increased safety and ensures a quality project. The key to a successful blowout control project is to use all resources in the most efficient manner. Excessive use of resources leads to unnecessary expenditures and delays in bringing the project under control. The Kuwait well control project, which involved more than 700 blowouts, was accomplished in a much shorter time (8 months) than first estimated (5 years). This improvement partly resulted from the application of sound project management techniques. These projects were prime examples of the need for a formal project management approach to handling wild well projects. There are many examples of projects that were successful in controlling wells but were economic disasters. Only through the effective application of project management can complex well control projects be completed in reasonable time frames at reasonable cost. The paper describes team management, project scope, organizational structures, scheduling, tracking models, critical path method, and decision trees.

  15. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  16. A new well surveying tool

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

    1966-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    directional well was to tip the entire rig, then block up one side of the rotary table so as to incline the uppermost joint of the drill pipe. The accuracy obtained by this method left much to be desired. The technique of controlled directional drilling... by Surveying Device for S and 19 , N and 41 . 21 3. Comparison of Measured Angles and Angles Indicated by Surveying Device for NE snd 9 , W and 45 . . . . . . . ~ 22 ABSTRNl T Ever since the advent of rotary drilling the petroleum industry has been...

  17. System for stabbing well casing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McArthur, J.R.

    1984-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus for stabbing well casing to join casing sections to each other, includes a rotary table assembly for supporting a casing section in a well bore, a derrick over the rotary table assembly, a crown block at the top of the derrick, a first piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on one side of the derrick over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block for pivotation about a horizontal axis, a second piston and cylinder subassembly pivotally mounted on a second side of the derrick for pivotation about a horizontal axis. The second piston and cylinder subassembly is located over the rotary table assembly and below the crown block and extends substantially normal to the direction of extension of the first piston and cylinder subassembly. The cooperating casing clamping elements are carried on the piston rods of the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies, and counter balancing subassemblies are connected to the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies for pivoting the first and second piston and cylinder subassemblies to a vertically extending inoperative position.

  18. Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Saeid Ghamaty

    2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

  19. The relationship of time perspective to time allocation, recreation experience preferences, and wellness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shores, Kindal Alayne

    2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    s t ? 2005? M a j o r ? Subj ec t :? R ec r ea t i o n , ? Par k, ? an d? T o ur i s m ? Sc i e n ce s T HE ? R E L A T I ONSHIP ? OF ? T I M E ? PE R SP E C T I VE ? T O? T I M E ? A L L OC A T I ON, ? R E C R E A T I ON?E XPE R I E NC E ? PRE F E R E NC E... ? Wa tt s ? He ad? o f ? De part m e n t , ? J o s eph ? T . ? O? L ea r y? A ugu s t ? 2005? M a j o r ? Subj ec t :? R ec r ea t i o n , ? Par k, ? an d? T o ur i s m ? Sc i e n ce s iii? A B ST R AC T ? T h e? R e l at i o n s hi p? o f ? T i m e...

  20. Washington, observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Percival, Don

    at a given scale 7 #12; Wavelet­Based Analysis of Variance: I . consider `energy' in time series: #X# 2 = X T X = P N-1 t=0 X 2 t . energy preserved in MODWT coe#cients: #X# 2 = J 0 X j=1 # f W j # 2 + # e V J t essentially same as Allan variance # 2 Y (2, # j ) since # 2 Y (# j ) = 1 2 # 2 Y (2, # j ) . Q: `old wine

  1. The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational setting. It shall be demonstrated that when used properly, the real-time offsite measurements materially improve wind ramp capture and prediction statistics, when compared to traditional wind forecasting techniques and to a simple persistence model.

  2. Well performance under solutions gas drive

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Camacho-Velazquez, R.G.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fully implicit black-oil simulator was written to predict the drawdown and buildup responses for a single well under Solution Gas Drive. The model is capable of handling the following reservoir behaviors: Unfractured reservoir, Double-Porosity system, and Double Permeability-Double Porosity model of Bourdet. The accuracy of the model results is tested for both single-phase liquid flow and two-phase flow. The results presented here provide a basis for the empirical equations presented in the literature. New definitions of pseudopressure and dimensionless time are presented. By using these two definitions, the multiphase flow solutions correlate with the constant rate liquid flow solution for both transient and boundary-dominated flow. For pressure buildup tests, an analogue for the liquid solution is constructed from the drawdown pseudopressure, similar to the reservoir integral of J. Jones. The utility of using the producing gas-oil ration at shut in to compute pseudopressures and pseudotimes is documented. The influence of pressure level and skin factor on the Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) of wells producing solution gas drive systems is examined. A new definition of flow efficiency that is based on the structure of the deliverability equations is proposed. This definition avoids problems that result when the presently available methods are applied to heavily stimulated wells. The need for using pseudopressures to analyze well test data for fractured reservoirs is shown. Expressions to compute sandface saturations for fractured systems are presented.

  3. Water coning calculations for vertical and horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weiping

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Breakthrough Time WOR after Breakthrough RATE SENSITIVITY 8 12 13 16 WATER CONING CALCULATIONS FOR HIGH MOBILITY RATIOS . . 19 Method of Developing Correlations Correlations for a Vertical Well Correlations for a Horizontal Well Discussion 19 26... APPENDIX E: BASE CASE AND SIMULATION RUNS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS 98 APPENDIX F: TEST CASES AND RESULTS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS 100 APPENDIX G: ADDINGTON'S METHOD APPENDIX H: CALCULATION OF HEIGHT h~ APPENDIX I: BASE CASE AND SIMULATION RUN SUMMARY...

  4. Predicting horizontal well performance in solution-gas drive reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plahn, Sheldon Von

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these wells were located in France and the fourth was located in waters off the coast cf Italy. Horizontal sections over 1000 ft were drilled and well productivities of up to twenty times those of r eighboring ve !ical wel!s were reported In 1979, ARCO...

  5. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  6. Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness Taking care of your body Wellness Taking care of what's around you 2Health andWellness Guide for Students #12;Physical Wellness Communicate with your partner if you have questions or concerns Meet with a Health Care Provider on campus

  7. IMPROVED NATURAL GAS STORAGE WELL REMEDIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    James C. Furness; Donald O. Johnson; Michael L. Wilkey; Lynn Furness; Keith Vanderlee; P. David Paulsen

    2001-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the research conducted during Budget Period One on the project ''Improved Natural Gas Storage Well Remediation''. The project team consisted of Furness-Newburge, Inc., the technology developer; TechSavants, Inc., the technology validator; and Nicor Technologies, Inc., the technology user. The overall objectives for the project were: (1) To develop, fabricate and test prototype laboratory devices using sonication and underwater plasma to remove scale from natural gas storage well piping and perforations; (2) To modify the laboratory devices into units capable of being used downhole; (3) To test the capability of the downhole units to remove scale in an observation well at a natural gas storage field; (4) To modify (if necessary) and field harden the units and then test the units in two pressurized injection/withdrawal gas storage wells; and (5) To prepare the project's final report. This report covers activities addressing objectives 1-3. Prototype laboratory units were developed, fabricated, and tested. Laboratory testing of the sonication technology indicated that low-frequency sonication was more effective than high-frequency (ultrasonication) at removing scale and rust from pipe sections and tubing. Use of a finned horn instead of a smooth horn improves energy dispersal and increases the efficiency of removal. The chemical data confirmed that rust and scale were removed from the pipe. The sonication technology showed significant potential and technical maturity to warrant a field test. The underwater plasma technology showed a potential for more effective scale and rust removal than the sonication technology. Chemical data from these tests also confirmed the removal of rust and scale from pipe sections and tubing. Focusing of the underwater plasma's energy field through the design and fabrication of a parabolic shield will increase the technology's efficiency. Power delivered to the underwater plasma unit by a sparkplug repeatedly was interrupted by sparkplug failure. The lifecycle for the plugs was less than 10 hours. An electrode feed system for delivering continuous power needs to be designed and developed. As a result, further work on the underwater plasma technology was terminated. It needs development of a new sparking system and a redesign of the pulsed power supply system to enable the unit to operate within a well diameter of less than three inches. Both of these needs were beyond the scope of the project. Meanwhile, the laboratory sonication unit was waterproofed and hardened, enabling the unit to be used as a field prototype, operating at temperatures to 350 F and depths of 15,000 feet. The field prototype was extensively tested at a field service company's test facility before taking it to the field site. The field test was run in August 2001 in a Nicor Gas storage field observation well at Pontiac, Illinois. Segmented bond logs, gamma ray neutron logs, water level measurements and water chemistry samples were obtained before and after the downhole demonstration. Fifteen tests were completed in the field. Results from the water chemistry analysis showed an increase in the range of calcium from 1755-1984 mg/l before testing to 3400-4028 mg/l after testing. For magnesium, the range increased from 285-296 mg/l to 461-480 mg/l. The change in pH from a range of 3.11-3.25 to 8.23-8.45 indicated a buffering of the acidic well water, probably due to the increased calcium available for buffering. The segmented bond logs showed no damage to the cement bond in the well and the gamma ray neutron log showed no increase in the amount of hydrocarbons present in the formation where the testing took place. Thus, the gas storage bubble in the aquifer was not compromised. A review of all the field test data collected documents the fact that the application of low-frequency sonication technology definitely removes scale from well pipe. Phase One of this project took sonication technology from the concept stage through a successful ''proof-of-concept'' downhole application in a natural gas storage field

  8. Neural networks predict well inflow performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alrumah, Muhammad K.

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting well inflow performance relationship accurately is very important for production engineers. From these predictions, future plans for handling and improving well performance can be established. One method of predicting well inflow...

  9. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  10. New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Hongqiao

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    . The performance of new multilateral well in heterogeneous reservoirs is studied, and that is compared with vertical well architecture also. In order to study the productivity of new multilateral wells, we use a numerical simulation method to set up heterogeneous...

  11. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil, Gas, . . 81 and Geothermal Well Tests (abstract) W.has been testing geothermal wells for about three years, andof Oil, Gas, and Geothermal Well Tests W. E. Brigham

  12. Oil and Gas Wells: Regulatory Provisions (Kansas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    It shall be unlawful for any person, firm or corporation having possession or control of any natural gas well, oil well or coalbed natural gas well, whether as a contractor, owner, lessee, agent or...

  13. Capping of Water Wells for Future Use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    in determining the condition of your well, contact: S your local groundwater conservation dis- trict http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/permitting/ water_supply/groundwater/districts.html S a licensed water well driller in your area S the Water Well Drillers Program... are the steps in capping a well? The landowner, a licensed well driller or a licensed pump installer may cap a well. There are several steps involved. The well casing should extend above the ground surface to limit the risk of water entering the well...

  14. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Hall, R. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center); Colina, K. (Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center)

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The surveys purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  15. Prediction of future well performance, including reservoir depletion effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Poe, B.D. Jr.; Elbel, J.L.; Spath, J.B.; Wiggins, M.L.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In the past, the reservoir material balance (voidage) effects occurring between the end of the measured (known) production history and future Inflow Performance Relationship (IPR) time levels have been commonly ignored in the computation of the future IPR behavior. Neglecting the reservoir voidage that occurs during the time interval between the end of the known production history and the future IPR time levels results in erroneous estimates of the future IPR behavior. A detailed description is given of the mathematically rigorous technique that has been used in the development of a multilayer well performance simulator that properly accounts for the reservoir voidage effects. Some of the more significant results are also presented of an extensive effort to develop an accurate and computationally efficient well performance simulation model. The reservoir can be considered to be multilayered, with mixed reservoir layer completion types and outer boundary shapes, drainage areas and boundary conditions. The well performance model can be used to simulate performance in three different operating modes: (1) constant wellhead rate, (2) constant bottomhole pressure, and (3) constant wellhead pressure. The transient performance of vertical, vertically fractured and horizontal wells can be simulated with this well performance model. The well performance model uses mathematically rigorous transient solutions and not simply the approximate solutions for each of the well types, as do most of the other commercially available well performance models.

  16. Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

  17. Thank you for joining: 360WELLNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vertes, Akos

    shortly. If you are experiencing technical difficulties with Adobe Connect, please call 1 March 22, 2012 12 pm ­ 1pm ET #12;360° WELLNESS: Achieving Wellness At Work And At Home Workshop & Self-Assessment © Joe Rosenlicht, Certified Coach 3 #12;8 Wellness Areas Wellness Nutrition Brain Power Fitness Sleep

  18. Observations of Edge Turbulence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation ofofEdge Turbulence

  19. Hydrologic Tests at Characterization Well R-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. McLin; W. Stone

    2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well R-14 is located in Ten Site Canyon and was completed at a depth of 1316 ft below ground surface (bgs) in August 2002 within unassigned pumiceous deposits located below the Puye Formation (fanglomerate). The well was constructed with two screens positioned below the regional water table. Individual static depths measured for each isolated screen after the Westbay{trademark} transducer monitoring system was installed in mid-December 2002 were nearly identical at 1177 ft bgs, suggesting only horizontal subsurface flow at this time, location, and depth. Screen 1 straddles the geologic contact between the Puye fanglomerate and unassigned pumiceous deposits. Screen 2 is located about 50 ft deeper than screen 1 and is only within the unassigned pumiceous deposits. Constant-rate, straddle-packer, injection tests were conducted at screen 2, including two short tests and one long test. The short tests were 1 minute each but at different injection rates. These short tests were used to select an appropriate injection rate for the long test. We analyzed both injection and recovery data from the long test using the Theis, Theis recovery, Theis residual-recovery, and specific capacity techniques. The Theis injection, Theis recovery, and specific capacity methods correct for partial screen penetration; however, the Theis residual-recovery method does not. The long test at screen 2 involved injection at a rate of 10.1 gallons per minute (gpm) for 68 minutes and recovery for the next 85 minutes. The Theis analysis for screen 2 gave the best fit to residual recovery data. These results suggest that the 158-ft thick deposits opposite screen 2 have a transmissivity (T) equal to or greater than 143 ft{sup 2}/day, and correspond to a horizontal hydraulic conductivity (K) of at least 0.9 ft/day. The specific capacity method yielded a T value equal to or greater than 177 ft{sup 2}/day, and a horizontal K of at least 1.1 ft/day. Results from the injection and recovery phases of the test at screen 2 were similar to those from the residual-recovery portion of the test, but were lower by a factor of about two. The response to injection was typical for a partially penetrating well screen in a very thick aquifer.

  20. Extended Coherence Time with Atom-Number Squeezed Sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Li; Ari K. Tuchman; Hui-Chun Chien; Mark A. Kasevich

    2006-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherence properties of Bose-Einstein condensates offer the potential for improved interferometric phase contrast. However, decoherence effects due to the mean-field interaction shorten the coherence time, thus limiting potential sensitivity. In this work, we demonstrate increased coherence times with number squeezed states in an optical lattice using the decay of Bloch oscillations to probe the coherence time. We extend coherence times by a factor of 2 over those expected with coherent state BEC interferometry. We observe quantitative agreement with theory both for the degree of initial number squeezing as well as for prolonged coherence times.

  1. Well performance graph simplifies field calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    De Ghetto, G.

    1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphic Methods are widely employed in order to understand overall well behavior using only surface parameters. The authors propose a new graphic method, used successfully by Agip for oil and gas wells in Italy, Libya, Nigeria and Tunisia. The well performance graph helps solve many production problems, including estimation of: inflow performance relationship; causes of rate decline throughout well life; and production rate and bottomhole flowing pressure for various pressures upstream of the surface choke, and vice-versa. This method differs from others by using flow behavior through the choke for both critical and subcritical conditions. Equations describing flow through the formation, string and surface choke are also used. Results are quite reliable when these theoretical equations are calibrated with field data, either from the well concerned or from nearby wells producing the same fluid. This article describes the technique as it applies to oil wells. The methodology for gas wells is similar.

  2. RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

  3. Economic evaluation of smart well technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Omair, Abdullatif A.

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    comprehensive review of this technology has been discussed. The possible reservoir environments in which smart well technology could be used and also, the possible benefits that could be realized by utilizing smart well technology has been discussed...

  4. Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

  5. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Discharge Using Ground- Water Storage," Trans. , AGU (1935),of a well using ground-water storage: ~n. Geophys. Unionof a Well Using Ground-Water Storage," Trans. , AGU (1935),

  6. Well Owner's Guide To Water Supply

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fay, Noah

    's groundwater and guidelines, including national drinking water standards, to test well water to insure safe drinking water in private wells. National drinking water standards and common methods of home water .....................22 Contaminants in Water........................................23 Drinking Water Guidelines

  7. Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoading map...(Utility Company)ReferencesNuiqsut,Place,Oakmont,Obion County, Tennessee:Energy

  8. screened intervals (415421 m and 689695 m; Figure 2) in the observations wells will be useful

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sprintall, Janet

    studies.We thank Bayshore Concrete and Ray Otten of the Sustainable Technology Park for access Chesapeake Bay Crater,522 pp.,Springer-Verlag, New York. Rieke,H.H.,and G.V.Chilingarian (1974),Compaction.Edwards,and Jean M. Self-Trail,USGS,Reston,Va.; and Roger H.Morin, USGS,Lakewood,Colo. For additional information

  9. Observation Wells At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:Energy Information

  10. Observation Wells At East Brawley Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:Energy

  11. Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen Energy

  12. Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpen Energy1988) |

  13. Observation Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's HeatMexico:CommunityNorthwest BasinOahu, Hawaii:EnergyOpenThe Needles Area

  14. STIMULATION TECHNOLOGIES FOR DEEP WELL COMPLETIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring a Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies is conducting a project to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project is to assess U.S. deep well drilling & stimulation activity, review rock mechanics & fracture growth in deep, high pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. Phase 1 was recently completed and consisted of assessing deep gas well drilling activity (1995-2007) and an industry survey on deep gas well stimulation practices by region. Of the 29,000 oil, gas and dry holes drilled in 2002, about 300 were drilled in the deep well; 25% were dry, 50% were high temperature/high pressure completions and 25% were simply deep completions. South Texas has about 30% of these wells, Oklahoma 20%, Gulf of Mexico Shelf 15% and the Gulf Coast about 15%. The Rockies represent only 2% of deep drilling. Of the 60 operators who drill deep and HTHP wells, the top 20 drill almost 80% of the wells. Six operators drill half the U.S. deep wells. Deep drilling peaked at 425 wells in 1998 and fell to 250 in 1999. Drilling is expected to rise through 2004 after which drilling should cycle down as overall drilling declines.

  15. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  16. Polymer-cement geothermal-well-completion materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zeldin, A.N.; Kukacka, L.E.

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A program to develop high-temperature polymer cements was performed. Several formulations based on organic and semi-inorganic binders were evaluated on the basis of mechanical and thermal stability, and thickening time. Two optimized systems exhibited properties exceeding those required for use in geothermal wells. Both systems were selected for continued evaluation at the National Bureau of Standards and contingent upon the results, for field testing in geothermal wells.

  17. Geological aspects of the first horizontal well drilled in Romania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baleanu, C.; Petrom, R.A. [Institute for Research and Technology, Prahova (Romania)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1979 on the Lebada Est field of the Romanian Offshore of the Black Sea between the Albian and the Eocene hydrocarbon accumulations, the Upper Cretaceous hydrocarbon accumulation was discovered. Situated in the Coniacian-Santonian and Turonian limey rocks, this accumulation cannot be produced efficiently by conventional wells. Some geological aspects which characterize the field such as: the physical properties of the reservoir rocks, the low effective thickness, heterogeneity, the vertical fissure and microfissure system and other production and economic aspects led to the conclusion that oil can be produced efficiently by horizontal wells or high angle wells. The benefits of horizontal well trajectory to produce the oil from the reservoir with this geometry are many and they were proved by the high rate of production as compared with the production tests of the vertical wells. After a long period of time when the reservoir was considered to be economically inefficient it can be finally produced.

  18. Coherent nanocavity structures for enhancement in internal quantum efficiency of III-nitride multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, T.; Liu, B.; Smith, R.; Athanasiou, M.; Gong, Y.; Wang, T., E-mail: t.wang@sheffield.ac.uk [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, University of Sheffield, Mappin Street, Sheffield S1 3JD (United Kingdom)

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    A coherent nanocavity structure has been designed on two-dimensional well-ordered InGaN/GaN nanodisk arrays with an emission wavelength in the green spectral region, leading to a massive enhancement in resonance mode in the green spectra region. By means of a cost-effective nanosphere lithography technique, we have fabricated such a structure on an InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well epiwafer and have observed the coherent nanocavity effect, which leads to an enhanced spontaneous emission (SE) rate. The enhanced SE rate has been confirmed by time resolved photoluminescence measurements. Due to the coherent nanocavity effect, we have achieved a massive improvement in internal quantum efficiency with a factor of 88, compared with the as-grown sample, which could be significant to bridge the green gap in solid-state lighting.

  19. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

    2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger--Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden and Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners previously provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have enhanced and streamlined our software, and we are beta-testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We have processed all well information and identified potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, the final technical report is almost finished and a draft version is being reviewed by Gary Covatch.

  20. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  1. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  2. Geothermal wells: a forecast of drilling activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, G.L.; Mansure, A.J.; Miewald, J.N.

    1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Numbers and problems for geothermal wells expected to be drilled in the United States between 1981 and 2000 AD are forecasted. The 3800 wells forecasted for major electric power projects (totaling 6 GWe of capacity) are categorized by type (production, etc.), and by location (The Geysers, etc.). 6000 wells are forecasted for direct heat projects (totaling 0.02 Quads per year). Equations are developed for forecasting the number of wells, and data is presented. Drilling and completion problems in The Geysers, The Imperial Valley, Roosevelt Hot Springs, the Valles Caldera, northern Nevada, Klamath Falls, Reno, Alaska, and Pagosa Springs are discussed. Likely areas for near term direct heat projects are identified.

  3. Stimulation Technologies for Deep Well Completions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Wolhart

    2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is sponsoring the Deep Trek Program targeted at improving the economics of drilling and completing deep gas wells. Under the DOE program, Pinnacle Technologies conducted a study to evaluate the stimulation of deep wells. The objective of the project was to review U.S. deep well drilling and stimulation activity, review rock mechanics and fracture growth in deep, high-pressure/temperature wells and evaluate stimulation technology in several key deep plays. This report documents results from this project.

  4. Wells, Borings, and Underground Uses (Minnesota)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This section regulates wells, borings, and underground storage with regards to protecting groundwater resources. The Commissioner of the Department of Health has jurisdiction, and can grant permits...

  5. Characterization Well R-22 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patrick Longmire

    2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for groundwater collected during four characterization-sampling rounds conducted at well R-22 from March 2001 through March 2002. Characterization well R-22 was sampled from March 6 through 13, 2001; June 19 through 26, 2001; November 30 through December 10, 2001; and February 27 through March 7, 2002. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine whether or not contaminants are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. A geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for the well is also presented in this report.

  6. Ocean Observing Ocean Observing Systems (OOS)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schladow, S. Geoffrey

    , national, and global scales. · Ocean Observing Systems serve: Fishing industry National security Coastal properties, such as salinity, temperature, and waves Satellite maps of sea surface temperature NATIONAL Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) 11 REGIONAL Systems, including: MANY LOCAL Systems

  7. SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinnamon, Gordon J.

    HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS Annual Report 2012-2013 #12;HEALTH, SAFETY & WELLNESS UPDATE ON SAFETY PROGRAMS The professionals working in the Health and Safety team and Rehabilitation Services group have had a very successful year in supporting individuals to take accountability for their own safety and health

  8. Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program: technology transfer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Each of the following types of well stimulation techniques are summarized and explained: hydraulic fracturing; thermal; mechanical, jetting, and drainhole drilling; explosive and implosive; and injection methods. Current stimulation techniques, stimulation techniques for geothermal wells, areas of needed investigation, and engineering calculations for various techniques. (MHR)

  9. Optimization of well length in waterflooding a five-spot pattern of horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jimenez, Zulay J.

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    for the horizontal wells and provide a good return on investment. Horizontal Wells in Waterflood Pr t A worldwide interest exists today in drilling horizontal wells to increase productivity, Horizontal wells can be used in any phase of reservoir recovery... efficiency7. Several investigatorss-ic have studied waterflooding using horizontal wells. droman et al, s reported a field application using horizontal wells in the Prudhoe Bay Unit where the main reservoir drive mechanism is gas cap expansion...

  10. The effect of perforation patterns upon well productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neale, John William

    1955-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    )ority of reservoirs it has been observed that the oil exists originally at or near its bubble point? llhen che pressure is reduoed at the well bore, oonsiderable quantities of gas are evolved The oreation of a free gas phase in the interstioes of the porous medium... the flow of oil into the well borea The use of a direot eleotrioal analogy beoomes someuhat more diffioult when dealing with sn oil not highly undersaturated, The oreation of a free gas phase oauses severe ohanges in the resistanoe to the flow of oil...

  11. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  12. Completion of Oil Wells May 4, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudge, John

    Completion of Oil Wells John Rudge May 4, 2003 1 Introduction After the initial drilling of an oil the small gap, lubrication theory can be used to study the flow. Non-dimensionalise all lengths on the gap

  13. Two-phase flow in horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ihara, Masaru [Japan National Oil Corp., Chiba (Japan); Yanai, Koji [Nippon Kokan Corp., Yokohama (Japan); Yanai, Koji

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow in horizontal wells and two-phase flow interaction with the reservoir were investigated experimentally and theoretically. Two-phase flow behavior has been recognized as one of the most important problems in production engineering. The authors designed and constructed a new test facility suitable for acquiring data on the relationship between pressure drop and liquid holdup along the well and fluid influx from the reservoir. For the theoretical work, an initial model was proposed to describe the flow behavior in a horizontal well configuration. The model uses the inflow-performance-relationship (IPR) approach and empirical correlations or mechanistic models for wellbore hydraulics. Although good agreement was found between the model and experimental data, a new IPR apart from the extension of Darcy`s law must be investigated extensively to aid in the proper design of horizontal wells.

  14. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Interpretation of Drill Stem Test M. F. Anderson Halliburtonby William value of drill-stem tests. Myron Dorfman dis-well development, drill-stem tests, direc- tional surveys,

  15. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  16. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

  17. Modeling well performance in compartmentalized gas reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yusuf, Nurudeen

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Predicting the performance of wells in compartmentalized reservoirs can be quite challenging to most conventional reservoir engineering tools. The purpose of this research is to develop a Compartmentalized Gas Depletion Model that applies not only...

  18. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  19. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  20. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  1. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A. [Institut Francais du Petrole, Pau (France)] [and others

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  2. PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

    1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

  3. Characterization Well R-7 Geochemistry Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    P.Longmire; F.Goff

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides analytical results for four groundwater-sampling rounds conducted at characterization well R-7. The goal of the characterization efforts was to assess the hydrochemistry and to determine if contaminants from Technical Area (TA)-2 and TA-21 of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL or the Laboratory) are present in the regional aquifer in the vicinity of the well. Figure 1.0-1 shows the well's location in the narrow upper part of Los Alamos Canyon, between the inactive Omega West reactor and the mouth of DP Canyon. Well R-7 is in an excellent location to characterize the hydrology and groundwater chemistry in both perched groundwater and the regional aquifer near sites of known Laboratory effluent release, including radionuclides and inorganic chemicals (Stone et al. 2002, 72717). The Risk Reduction and Environmental Stewardship-Remediation (RRES-R) Program (formerly the Environmental Restoration [ER] Project) installed well R-7 as part of groundwater investigations to satisfy requirements of the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599) and to support the Laboratory's ''Groundwater Protection Management Program Plan'' (LANL 1996, 70215). Well R-7 was designed primarily to provide geochemical or water quality and hydrogeologic data for the regional aquifer within the Puye Formation. This report also presents a geochemical evaluation of the analytical results for well R-7 and provides hydrogeochemical interpretations using analytical results for groundwater samples collected at the well. Discussion of other hydrogeochemical data collected within the east-central portion of the Laboratory, however, is deferred until they can be evaluated in the context of sitewide information collected from other RRES and Hydrogeologic Workplan characterization wells (R-8A, R-9, and R-9i). Once all deep groundwater investigations in the east-central portion of the Laboratory are completed, geochemical and hydrogeologic conceptual models for the Los Alamos Canyon watershed may be included in a groundwater risk analysis. These models will include an evaluation of potential contaminant transport pathways. Well R-7 was completed on March 9, 2001, with three screens (363.2 to 379.2 ft, 730.4 to 746.4 ft, and 895.5 to 937.4 ft). Screen No.2 was dry during characterization sampling. Four rounds of groundwater characterization samples, collected from a perched zone and the regional aquifer from depths of 378.0 ft (screen No.1) and 915.0 ft (screen No.3), were chemically characterized for radionuclides, metals and trace elements, major ions, high-explosive (HE) compounds, total organic carbon, dissolved organic carbon, organic compounds, and stable isotopes (H, N, and O). Although well R-7 is primarily a characterization well, its design and construction also meet the requirements of a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA)-compliant monitoring well as described in the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) document ''RCRA Groundwater Monitoring: Draft Technical Guidance,'' November 1992, EPA 530-R-93- 001. Incorporation of this well into a Laboratory-wide groundwater-monitoring program will be considered, and more specifically evaluated (e.g., sampling frequency, analytes, etc.), when the results of the well R-7 characterization activities are comprehensively evaluated in conjunction with other groundwater investigations in the ''Hydrogeologic Workplan'' (LANL 1998, 59599).

  4. Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Novosyadlyj, B; Shtanov, Yu; Zhuk, A

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

  5. An accounting manual for oil well servicing contractors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert, Curtis Dean

    1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , and bailing of' oil wells, These Jobs had previously been done by the oil companies them- selves, with a standard service rig set up over the well at the time of its completion. The more complicated. Jobs of deepening and work requiring rotary tools were..., with complete set of Rig 0 Lite vapox' proof wix ing, and three Hutoh- inson vapor pxoof floodlights, x One 1V" Emsco Gilbath rotary. Emsco NB?SO, enclosed, 4 sheave travel- ing block B Z. Tx'iplex hooki 60 ?on, 60 C Oilwell swivel, Two centrifugal water...

  6. Technical support for geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous recording microearthquake monitoring networks have been established around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal design wells in southwestern Louisiana and southeastern Texas since summer 1980 to assess the effects well development may have had on subsidence and growth-fault activation. This monitoring has shown several unusual characteristics of Gulf Coast seismic activity. The observed activity is classified into two dominant types, one with identifiable body phases (type 1) and the other with only surface-wave signatures (type 2). During this reporting period no type 1 or body-wave events were reported. A total of 230 type 2 or surface-wave events were recorded. Origins of the type 2 events are still not positively understood; however, little or no evidence is available to connect them with geopressured-geothermal well activity. We continue to suspect sonic booms from military aircraft or some other human-induced source. 37 refs., 16 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

  8. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

  9. Doppler maps and surface differential rotation of EI Eri from the MUSICOS 1998 observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zs. K?vri; A. Washuettl; B. H. Foing; K. Vida; J. Bartus; K. Olh; the MUSICOS 98 team

    2008-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We present time-series Doppler images of the rapidly-rotating active binary star EI Eri from spectroscopic observations collected during the MUSICOS multi-site campaign in 1998, since the critical rotation period of 1.947 days makes it impossible to obtain time-resolved images from a single site. From the surface reconstructions a weak solar-type differential rotation, as well as a tiny poleward meridional flow are measured.

  10. ADVANCED TECHNOLOGIES FOR STRIPPER GAS WELL ENHANCEMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Charles M. Boyer II; Ronald J. MacDonald P.G.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of Task 1 in Advanced Technologies for Stripper Gas Well Enhancement, Schlumberger-Holditch Reservoir Technologies (H-RT) has joined with two Appalachian Basin producers, Great Lakes Energy Partners, LLC, and Belden & Blake Corporation to develop methodologies for identification and enhancement of stripper wells with economic upside potential. These industry partners have provided us with data for more than 700 wells in northwestern Pennsylvania. Phase 1 goals of this project are to develop and validate methodologies that can quickly and cost-effectively identify wells with enhancement potential. We have continued to enhance and streamline our software, and we are testing the final stages of our new Microsoft{trademark} Access/Excel based software. We are continuing to process the information and are identifying potential candidate wells that can be used in Phase 2 to validate the new methodologies. In addition, preparation of the final technical report is underway. During this quarter, we have presented our project and discussed the software to numerous Petroleum Technology Transfer Council (PTTC) workshops located in various regions of the United States.

  11. Snubdrilling a new well in Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aasen, J.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new well was successfully drilled using a snubbing jack. The drill bit was rotated using a rotary table, downhole motors and combination of the two. Expected high-pressure zones prompted this use of ``snubdrilling.`` The primary objective was to drill a vertical well through underlying sands and gain information about formation pressures. This data would aid in the drilling of a relief well using a conventional drilling rig. The secondary objective was to relieve pressure by putting this new well on production. In addition to special high-pressure drilling jobs, there are other drilling applications where snubbing jacks are a feasible alternative to conventional rotary drilling rigs or coiled tubing units. Slimhole, underbalanced and flow drilling, and sidetracking of existing wells are excellent applications for snubdrilling. Advantages of snubdrilling vs. coiled tubing drilling, include ability to rotate drillstrings, use high-torque downhole motors, pump at high rates and pressures, apply significant overpull in case of stuck pipe, and run casing and liners without rigging down. Shortcomings of drilling with snubbing jacks compared to coiled tubing are the need to stop circulation while making new connections and inability to run continuous cable inside workstrings.

  12. Apparatus for stringing well pipe of casing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sexton, J.L.

    1984-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for use in running a string of threaded well pipe or casing in a vertical configuration in a deep well bore which is adapted to convert a top head drive drilling rig for use in running each length of pipe into the well bore. A drive spindle adaptor is provided which may be securely attached in a removably mounted manner to the rotary drive spindle or sub of a top head drive drilling rig. The drive spindle includes a pair of opposing, outwardly extending lugs disposed at a right angle to the axial direction of the spindle and a true centering guide means. A collar is included which is provided with frictional gripping members for removably securing the collar to one end of a length of conventional pipe and a pair of axially extending, spaced ears which cooperate upon engagement with said lugs on said spindle adaptor to transfer rotary motion of said spindle to said length of pipe.

  13. Apparatus for rotating and reciprocating well pipe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Davis, K.D.

    1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes an apparatus for simultaneously rotating and reciprocating well pipe, having an upper end, and mechanically utilizing a rotary table attached to a drilling rig, comprising: a rotating pipe clamp assembly having an irregular cross-sectional mid-member and clamp members for releasably gripping the well pipe connected to the ends of the mid-member for rotation therewith; a square block for fitting to the rotary table square and having a selected grooved interior configuration; a torque transmitting means fitted into the grooves having openings therethrough having the same irregular cross-section as the mid-member cross-section; and a torque limiting means connecting the torque transmitting means and the block for limiting torque applied through the well pipe via the clamp assembly and the torque transmitting means.

  14. Numerical simulation of an energy storage well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ebeling, Lynn Louis

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ Isothera aap oC ~ at the end of 0. 25 yr. of in]ectiou. . ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ . ~ . ~ ~ . ~ 48 7 ~ Isobar aap, Rilopascals, after 0. 25 yr. of storaqe. 49 8. Isothera aap, oC ~ after 0 25 yr. of stozaqe. . . . ~ 50 9 Isobar nap. Rilopascal, after 0 ~ 25 yr...-recovery schedules to insure an economical operation and to prevent theraal pollution of the aquifer. Sa~iaal 511~I mayer and Todd (1973) did preliminary calculations for a well in a 33 a thick confined aquifer of 25 percent poros- ity. The well received 99o...

  15. Pressure buildup characteristics in Austin Chalk wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claycomb, Eddy

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    20 40 60 60 Mr lee IOOKrlemelere EEKAR 6 UA SALMI' WILSON LAVACA hrAVERICK ZAVA' A FRIG ATAECOSA KARNES DE WITT 0 0 IMMIT LA SALLE ~CO o& @g'v Figure I ? Austin Chalk Trend in Texas Early in the development of Clayton W, Williams, Jr..., Henry J. , Jr. : "Well- Test Analysis for Vertically Fractured Wells, " J. Pet. Tech. (Aug. 1972) 1014-1020; Trans. , AINE, 253. VITA Name: Eddy Claycomb Birth Date: March 18, 1956 Birthplace: Tyler, Texas Parents: Mr. and Mrs. Tom Claycomb, Jr...

  16. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetism and superconductivity exist in harmony Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony Physicists have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase,...

  17. Entropic Time

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caticha, Ariel [Department of Physics, University at Albany-SUNY, Albany, NY 12222 (United States)

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The formulation of quantum mechanics within the framework of entropic dynamics includes several new elements. In this paper we concentrate on one of them: the implications for the theory of time. Entropic time is introduced as a book-keeping device to keep track of the accumulation of changes. One new feature is that, unlike other concepts of time appearing in the so-called fundamental laws of physics, entropic time incorporates a natural distinction between past and future.

  18. Observed Impacts of Marcellus Shale Drilling on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pollution Prevention #12;Site Restoration Mandatory stockpiling of topsoil at time of well pad construction Department of City & Regional Planning Cornell University #12;Why Bradford County, PA? Small Industrial Towns) #12;Typical Well Pad ·Hydraulic Fracturing Phase #12;Storm Water Pollution Prevention Well pads

  19. Interpretation of well log response in the Austin chalk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hinds, Gregory Scott

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Regional Structure Sedimentology . Diagenesis Petrophysical Properties . PRODUCTION CHARACTERISTICS Introduction . Production and Completion Methods Decline Curve Analysis . Methods . ORGANIC CONTENT Introduction . Source Rock Zonation Oil Types...-1956, technological advances such as acidizing and hydraulic fracturing created renewed interest in Pearsall field. However, oil prices were low ($2 per barrel) at the time and ultimate recoveries of approximately 30, 000 bbls per well were not economical. The Arab...

  20. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does...

  1. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    gravel pack (GP) and high rate water pack (HRWP) completions over high-permeability fracturing (HPF), known in the vernacular as a frac&pack (FP) for very high rate wells. While a properly designed GP completion may prevent sand production, it does...

  2. T2WELL/ECO2N

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html

  3. FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness n EARLY BIRD SWIM Monday, Wednesday & Friday Sept. 16-Dec. 6, 7, Seniors: $58 n SWIMMER'S SPECIAL (Participate in 36 swims of your choice of Early Bird or Evening Swim Education fasttrac for 55+ ASTRONOMY ­ OUR SOLAR SYSTEM AND BEYOND This basic introductory course

  4. FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    deYoung, Brad

    FOR THE ACTIVE Health and Wellness n EARLY BIRD SWIM Monday, Wednesday & Friday Sept. 16-Dec. 6, 7, Seniors: $58 n SWIMMER'S SPECIAL (Participate in 36 swims of your choice of Early Bird or Evening Swim Education fasttrac for 55+ ASTRONOMY ­ Our Solar System and Beyond This basic introductory course

  5. Fracturing pressures and near-well fracture geometry of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Z.; Economides, M.J.

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydraulic fracturing of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is made challenging by the far more complicated near-well fracture geometry compared to that of conventional vertical wells. This geometry is important both for hydraulic fracture propagation and the subsequent post-treatment well performance. Fracture tortuosity of arbitrarily oriented and horizontal wells is likely to cause large initiation pressures and reduction in the fracture widths. This paper presents a comprehensive study of the effects of important variables, including the principal stresses, wellbore orientation, and perforation configuration on fracture geometry. Initiation pressures, the contact between arbitrarily oriented wells and the fracture plane, and the near-well fracture geometry are determined and discussed. This study also shows that because of the near-well stress concentration the fracture width at the wellbore is always smaller than the maximum fracture width. This can have important consequences during hydraulic fracturing.

  6. Observation of the negative muonium ion in vacuum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuang, Yunan

    1989-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The negative muonium ion (M/sup /minus//), which is the bound system of a positive muon and two electrons, has been produced and observed for the first time. Its counterpart H/sup /minus// is well known, and spectroscopy and collision studies with H/sup /minus// have yielded many fruitful results. Noteworthy are recent investigations of the photoionization of a relativistic H/sup /minus// beam. The negative positronium ion has also been formed and observed. The discovery of M/sup /minus// provides us with a new leptonic system for spectroscopy and collision studies, which may reveal interesting physics associated with mass effects. Since M/sup /minus// is a charged particle, it can also be used to produce a beam of exotic atoms with a small phase space. This dissertation is a detailed account of the observation of M/sup /minus//. 93 refs., 54 figs., 18 tabs.

  7. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  8. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  9. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  10. Efficiency limits of quantum well solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Connolly, J P; Barnham, K W J; Bushnell, D B; Tibbits, T N D; Roberts, J S

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The quantum well solar cell (QWSC) has been proposed as a flexible means to ensuring current matching for tandem cells. This paper explores the further advantage afforded by the indication that QWSCs operate in the radiative limit because radiative contribution to the dark current is seen to dominate in experimental data at biases corresponding to operation under concentration. The dark currents of QWSCs are analysed in terms of a light and dark current model. The model calculates the spectral response (QE) from field bearing regions and charge neutral layers and from the quantum wells by calculating the confined densities of states and absorption coefficient, and solving transport equations analytically. The total dark current is expressed as the sum of depletion layer and charge neutral radiative and non radiative currents consistent with parameter values extracted from QE fits to data. The depletion layer dark current is a sum of Shockley-Read-Hall non radiative, and radiative contributions. The charge neu...

  11. Consortium for Petroleum & Natural Gas Stripper Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joel L. Morrison; Sharon L. Elder

    2007-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pennsylvania State University, under contract to the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), established a national industry-driven Stripper Well Consortium (SWC) that is focused on improving the production performance of domestic petroleum and/or natural gas stripper wells. The SWC represents a partnership between U.S. petroleum and natural gas producers, trade associations, state funding agencies, academia, and the NETL. This document serves as the twelfth quarterly technical progress report for the SWC. Key activities for this reporting period included: (1) Drafting and releasing the 2007 Request for Proposals; (2) Securing a meeting facility, scheduling and drafting plans for the 2007 Spring Proposal Meeting; (3) Conducting elections and announcing representatives for the four 2007-2008 Executive Council seats; (4) 2005 Final Project Reports; (5) Personal Digital Assistant Workshops scheduled; and (6) Communications and outreach.

  12. Boise geothermal injection well: Final environmental assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The City of Boise, Idaho, an Idaho Municipal Corporation, is proposing to construct a well with which to inject spent geothermal water from its hot water heating system back into the geothermal aquifer. Because of a cooperative agreement between the City and the US Department of Energy to design and construct the proposed well, compliance to the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) is required. Therefore, this Environmental Assessment (EA) represents the analysis of the proposed project required under NEPA. The intent of this EA is to: (1) briefly describe historical uses of the Boise Geothermal Aquifer; (2) discuss the underlying reason for the proposed action; (3) describe alternatives considered, including the No Action Alternative and the Preferred Alternative; and (4) present potential environmental impacts of the proposed action and the analysis of those impacts as they apply to the respective alternatives.

  13. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers...

  14. Energy loss rate in disordered quantum well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, P.; Ashraf, S. S. Z. [Centre of Excellence in Nanomaterials, Faculty of Engineering and Technology, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh-202002 (India); Hasan, S. T. [Physics Department, Faculty of Science, The M.S. University of Baroda, Vadodara-390002 (India); Sharma, A. C. [Physics Department, Sibli National College, Azamgarh-276128 (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the effect of dynamically screened deformation potential on the electron energy loss rate in disordered semiconductor quantum well. Interaction of confined electrons with bulk acoustic phonons has been considered in the deformation coupling. The study concludes that the dynamically screened deformation potential coupling plays a significant role as it substantially affects the power dependency of electron relaxation on temperature and mean free path.

  15. Gas well operation with liquid production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lea, J.F.; Tighe, R.E.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prediction of liquid loading in gas wells is discussed in terms of intersecting tubing or system performance curves with IPR curves and by using a more simplified critical velocity relationship. Different methods of liquid removal are discussed including such methods as intermittent lift, plunger lift, use of foam, gas lift, and rod, jet, and electric submersible pumps. Advantages, disadvantages, and techniques for design and application of the methods of liquid removal are discussed.

  16. Oscillation dynamics of multi-well condensates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Mossmann; C. Jung

    2006-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new approach to the macroscopic dynamics of three-well Bose-Einstein condensates, giving particular emphasis to self-trapping and Josephson oscillations. Although these effects have been studied quite thoroughly in the mean-field approximation, a full quantum description is desirable, since it avoids pathologies due to the nonlinear character of the mean-field equations. Using superpositions of quantum eigenstates, we construct various oscillation and trapping scenarios.

  17. Geothermal Well Completion Tests | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation, searchGeaugaInformation Mexico - A Survey of Work to DateWell

  18. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R. [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)] [Washington Closure Hanford, 2620 Fermi, Richland, Washington 99354 (United States)

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  19. Program solves for gas well inflow performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engineer, R. [AERA Energy LLC, Bakersfield, CA (United States); Grillete, G. [Bechtel Petroleum Operations Inc., Tupman, CA (United States)

    1997-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A Windows-based program, GasIPR, can solve for the gas well inflow performance relationship (IPR). The program calculates gas producing rates at various pressures and is applicable for both turbulent and non-turbulent flow. It also has the following capabilities: computes PVT properties {gamma}{sub g}, P{sub c}, T{sub c}, heating value, Z, {mu}{sub g}, B{sub g}, and {rho}{sub g} from input gas composition data; calculates the Reynolds number (N{sub Re}) and shows the gas flow rates at the sandface at which the turbulence effect must be considered; helps the user to optimize the net perforation interval (h{sub p}) so that the turbulence effect can be minimized; and helps the user to evaluate the sensitivity of formation permeability on gas flow rate for a new play. IPR is a critical component in forecasting gas well deliverability. IPRs are used for sizing optimum tubing configurations and compressors, designing gravel packs, and solving gas well loading problems. IPR is the key reference for nodal analysis.

  20. Bitumen production through a horizontal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livesey, D.B.; Toma, P.

    1987-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent describes a method for thermal stimulation and production of a viscous hydrocarbon from a reservoir having a productive layer which retains the hydrocarbon until the latter is made flowable by contact with a hot stimulating medium. The method includes the steps of: forming a borehole having a substantially horizontal segment which transverses the productive layer, registering a well completion in the borehole which includes; an elongated perforate well liner, a fluid conduit extending through the liner and having a discharge end, and a well head at the liner upper end communicated with the fluid conduit, positioning a variable length flow diverter in the liner adjacent to the fluid conduit discharge end, whereby to define a quasi-barrier in the liner which is pervious to passage of the hot stimulating medium, and which divides the liner into injection and production segments respectively, heating the productive layer about the substantially horizontal segment of the elongated liner, introducing a pressurized stream of the hot stimulant through the fluid conduit and into the liner injection segment, and producing hydrocarbon emulsion which flows into the liner production segment.

  1. Method of drilling and casing a well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyadjieff, G.I.; Campbell, A.B.

    1983-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A well drilling rig having a rotary table for driving a drill string rotatively and having jacking mechanism for lowering casing into the well after drilling, with the jacking mechanism including fluid pressure actuated piston and cylinder means which may be left in the rig during drilling and which are positioned low enough in the rig to avoid interference with operation of the rotary table. The jacking mechanism also includes a structure which is adapted to be connected to the piston and cylinder means when the casing or other well pipe is to be lowered and which is actuable upwardly and downwardly and carries one of two pipe gripping units for progressively jacking the pipe downwardly by vertical reciprocation of that structure. The reciprocating structure may take the form of a beam extending between two pistons and actuable thereby, with a second beam being connected to cylinders within which the pistons are contained and being utilized to support the second gripping element. In one form of the invention, the rotary table when in use is supported by this second beam.

  2. Recompletion Report for Well UE-10j

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Existing Well UE-10j was deepened and recompleted for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. The well was originally drilled to a total depth of 725.4 meters in 1965 for use as a hydrologic test hole in the northern portion of Yucca Flat in Area 8 of the Nevada Test Site. The well is located up-gradient of the Yucca Flat underground test area and penetrates deep into the Paleozoic rocks that form the lower carbonate aquifer of the NTS and surrounding areas. The original 24.4-centimeter-diameter borehole was drilled to a depth of 725.4 meters and left uncompleted. Water-level measurements were made periodically by the U.S. Geological Survey, but access to the water table was lost between 1979 and 1981 due to hole sloughing. In 1993, the hole was opened to 44.5 centimeters and cased off to a depth of 670.0 meters. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 796.4 meters. The depth to water in the open borehole was measured at 658.7 meters on March 18, 1993.

  3. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  4. In-well pumped mid-infrared PbTe/CdTe quantum well vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khiar, A., E-mail: amir.khiar@jku.at; Witzan, M.; Hochreiner, A.; Eibelhuber, M.; Springholz, G. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); Volobuev, V. [Institute of Semiconductor and Solid State Physics, Johannes Kepler University, Altenbergerstr. 69, A-4040 Linz (Austria); National Technical University Kharkiv Polytechnic Institute, Frunze str. 21, 61002 Kharkiv (Ukraine)

    2014-06-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical in-well pumped mid-infrared vertical external cavity surface emitting lasers based on PbTe quantum wells embedded in CdTe barriers are realized. In contrast to the usual ternary barrier materials of lead salt lasers such as PbEuTe of PbSrTe, the combination of narrow-gap PbTe with wide-gap CdTe offers an extremely large carrier confinement, preventing charge carrier leakage from the quantum wells. In addition, optical in-well pumping can be achieved with cost effective and readily available near infrared lasers. Free carrier absorption, which is a strong loss mechanism in the mid-infrared, is strongly reduced due to the insulating property of CdTe. Lasing is observed from 85?K to 300?K covering a wavelength range of 3.34.2??m. The best laser performance is achieved for quantum well thicknesses of 20?nm. At low temperature, the threshold power is around 100 mW{sub P} and the output power more than 700 mW{sub P}. The significance of various charge carrier loss mechanisms are analyzed by modeling the device performance. Although Auger losses are quite low in IVVI semiconductors, an Auger coefficient of C{sub A}?=?3.5??10{sup ?27} cm{sup 6} s{sup ?1} was estimated for the laser structure, which is attributed to the large conduction band offset.

  5. ASYMPTOTIC OBSERVERS FOR DISCRETE-TIME SWITCHED LINEAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egerstedt, Magnus

    - essary. 2 In Alessandri and Coletta (2001), it was 2 The example at the end of this paper illustrates

  6. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: Laboratory studies Mathematical modeling Sonic tool design and development Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

  7. Apparatus for use in rejuvenating oil wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warnock, C.E. Sr.

    1983-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub incorporating a check valve is connected into the lower end of a well pipestring. This valve will pass hot steam injected down the pipestring to the formations to loosen up the thick crude oil. The check valve prevents back flow and thus will hold the high pressure steam. To resume production, the production pump can then be lowered through the pipestring. The pump itself is provided with an extended probe member which will unseat the check valve when the pump is in proper position so that production pumping can resume.

  8. Decline curve analysis for horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Min-Yu

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    support kept me from losing sight of my goals. Thanks to Sam Hou, Joseph Wang, Robert Liau, James Wang, and Shou for their company and in particular to Li Fan and Mrs. Shou-Lee Chang for their caring and delicious meals when I forgot my dinner. Thanks... Pressure (L/2xe= 0. 2) Composite Dimensionless Flow Rate Integral and Flow Rate Integral Derivative Functions Type Curve for an Infinite-Conductivity Horizontal Well Located in the Center of a Square Drainage Area, Producing at Constant Bottomhole...

  9. RMOTC - Field Information - Wells and Production

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassive Solar HomePromising Science for1 20115, 2001Data sets Notice: As ofOnlineWells

  10. Well Log Techniques | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformationSEDSWawarsing,Webb County,Energy Information 2001)Al.,Well

  11. Salt Wells Geothermal Project | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExplorationUT-g Grant ofRichardton Abbey Wind Farm(CTIhinderProject SmartSalt Wells

  12. Willow Well Geothermal Area | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 South Place:ReferenceEdit JumpWill County, Illinois: Facility WillowWell

  13. Wells Rural Electric Co | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,Save EnergyGlouster,Winside,WarrenWells Rural Electric Co Place:

  14. Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin: EnergyBostonFacilityCascadeJump to:Lists Jump to:PoliticalProduction Wells

  15. abandoned wells: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Lesson Topics WhatisDiabetes? Nutrition-FirstSteptoDiabetesManagement...

  16. abandoning wells working: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Websites Summary: Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Do Well, Be Well with Diabetes Lesson Topics WhatisDiabetes? Nutrition-FirstSteptoDiabetesManagement...

  17. Monitoring polymer properties in production wells of Chateaurenard oilfield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Putz, A.G. (Elf Aquitaine, Avenue Larribau, Pau (FR)); Lecourtier, J. (Inst. Francais du Petrole, Avenue Bois-Preau, 92500 Rueil-Malmaison (FR))

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A polymer flooding test was conducted in the Chateaurenard field (France) from 1985 to 1989. The test was run on a ten-acre inverted five-spot. A total of 240,000 m{sup 3} of partially hydrolyzed polyacrylamide at a concentration of 1000 ppm was injected followed by an equal volume of solution but at a tapered concentration. A strong response in oil recovery for three of the four producers was observed. This paper reports on an original methodology that was designed for sampling and analyzing the polymer in the effluents of the producing wells. Concentrations and main characteristics of produced polyacrylamide were determined versus injected volume. No degradation of the polymer was detected. A molecular weight fractionation during polymer slug propagation into the reservoir due to adsorption/retention chromatography was observed. The low-polymer concentration of the effluents could be explained by a strong retention of the polymer in the low permeability zones of the reservoir.

  18. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells: Pauline Kraft Well No. 1, Nueces County, Texas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Pauline Kraft Well No. 1 was originally drilled to a depth of 13,001 feet and abandoned as a dry hole. The well was re-entered in an effort to obtain a source of GEO/sup 2/ energy for a proposed gasohol manufacturing plant. The well was tested through a 5-inch by 2-3/8 inch annulus. The geological section tested was the Frio-Anderson sand of Mid-Oligocene age. The interval tested was from 12,750 to 12,860 feet. A saltwater disposal well was drilled on the site and completed in a Micocene sand section. The disposal interval was perforated from 4710 to 4770 feet and from 4500 to 4542 feet. The test well failed to produce water at substantial rates. Initial production was 34 BWPD. A large acid stimulation treatment increased productivity to 132 BWPD, which was still far from an acceptable rate. During the acid treatment, a failure of the 5-inch production casing occurred. The poor production rates are attributed to a reservoir with very low permeability and possible formation damage. The casing failure is related to increased tensile strain resulting from cooling of the casing by acid and from the high surface injection pressure. The location of the casing failure is now known at this time, but it is not at the surface. Failure as a result of a defect in a crossover joint at 723 feet is suspected.

  19. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout PrintableBlenderWhatFellows -Vision WindWindow,

  20. When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    POSTER PRESENTATION Open Access When are microcircuits well-modeled by maximum entropy methods? Andrea K Barreiro1*, Eric T Shea-Brown1, Fred M Rieke2,3, Julijana Gjorgjieva4 From Nineteenth Annual Computational Neuroscience Meeting: CNS*2010 San... Antonio, TX, USA. 24-30 July 2010 Recent experiments in retina and cortex have demon- strated that pairwise maximum entropy (PME) methods can approximate observed spiking patterns to a high degree of accuracy [1,2]. In this paper we examine...

  1. Well injection valve with retractable choke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pringle, R.E.

    1986-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

  2. Productivity and Injectivity of Horizontal Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khalid Aziz; Sepehr Arababi; Thomas A. Hewett

    1997-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A general wellbore flow model is presented to incorporate not only frictional, accelerational and gravitational pressure drops, but also the pressure drop caused by inflow. Influence of inflow or outflow on the wellbore pressure drop is analyzed. New friction factor correlations accounting for both inflow and outflow are also developed. The greatest source of uncertainty is reservoir description and how it is used in simulators. Integration of data through geostatistical techniques leads to multiple descriptions that all honor available data. The reality is never known. The only way to reduce this uncertainty is to use more data from geological studies, formation evaluation, high resolution seismic, well tests and production history to constrain stochastic images. Even with a perfect knowledge about reservoir geology, current models cannot do routine simulations at a fine enough scale. Furthermore, we normally don't know what scale is fine enough. Upscaling introduces errors and masks some of the physical phenomenon that we are trying to model. The scale at which upscaling is robust is not known and it is probably smaller in most cases than the scale actually used for predicting performance. Uncertainties in the well index can cause errors in predictions that are of the same magnitude as those caused by reservoir heterogeneities. Simplified semi-analytical models for cresting behavior and productivity predictions can be very misleading.

  3. Methoden Wetenschappelijk and Observational

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steels, Luc

    Methoden Wetenschappelijk Onderzoek Fact-free and Observational Science #12;Data · Part of modern science is based on observation ­How do we do this? ­And what are the pitfalls? · Knowing how to observe is an important step in experimental design #12;Three kinds of science · There are (in my view) three ways

  4. Bayesian Learning via Stochastic Gradient Langevin Dynamics Max Welling welling@ics.uci.edu

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaski, Samuel

    Bayesian Learning via Stochastic Gradient Langevin Dynamics Max Welling welling@ics.uci.edu D. Bren on iterative learning from small mini-batches. By adding the right amount of noise to a standard stochastic" and collects sam- ples after it has been surpassed. We apply the method to three models: a mixture of Gaussians

  5. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  6. Drilling of wells with top drive unit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyadjieff, G.I.

    1984-05-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Well drilling apparatus including a top drive drilling assembly having a motor driven stem adapted to be attached to the upper end of a drill string and drive it during a drilling operation, a torque wrench carried by the top drive assembly and movable upwardly and downwardly therewith and operable to break a threated connection between the drill string and the stem, and an elevator carried by and suspended from the top drive assembly and adapted to engage a section of drill pipe beneath the torque wrench in suspending relation. The torque wrench and elevator are preferably retained against rotation with the rotary element which drives the drill string, but may be movable vertically relative to that rotary element and relative to one another in a manner actuating the apparatus between various different operating conditions.

  7. Kuwait poised for massive well kill effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports that full scale efforts to extinguish Kuwait's oil well fires are to begin. The campaign to combat history's worst oil fires, originally expected to begin in mid-March, has been hamstrung by logistical problems, including delays in equipment deliveries caused by damage to Kuwait's infrastructure. Meantime, production from a key field off Kuwait--largely unaffected by the war--is expected to resume in May, but Kuwaiti oil exports will still be hindered by damaged onshore facilities. In addition, Kuwait is lining up equipment and personnel to restore production from its heavily damaged oil fields. Elsewhere in the Persian Gulf, Saudi Arabia reports progress in combating history's worst oil spills but acknowledges a continuing threat.

  8. Completion report for Well ER-EC-6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Townsend

    2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-6 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the spring of 1999 as part of the DOE's hydrogeologic investigation well program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 66-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to the depth of 485.1 meters below the surface. The hole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 1,524.0 meters. A preliminary composite, static, water level was measured at the depth of approximately 434.6 meters prior to installation of the completion string. One completion string with four isolated, slotted intervals was installed in the well. Detailed lithologic descriptions with preliminary stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters and 33 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 504.4 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data. Detailed chemical and mineralogical studies of rock samples are in progress. The well penetrated Tertiary-age lava and tuff of the Timber Mountain Group, the Paintbrush Group, the Calico Hills Formation, and the Volcanics of Quartz Mountain. Intense hydrothermal alteration was observed below the depth of 640 m. The preliminary geologic interpretation indicates that this site may be located on a buried structural ridge that separates the Silent Canyon and Timber Mountain caldera complexes.

  9. Effects of flow paths on tight gas well performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ganpule, Sameer Vasant

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    , r? (3-10) Derivative is then defined as, ~PwD d(inr. ) (3-1 I) The late radial flow regime will develop when the pressure transient reaches the top and bottom boundaries. At that time the pressure transient will stop moving in vertical... 2001 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FLOW PATHS ON TIGHT GAS WELL PERFORMANCE A Thesis by SAMEER VASANT GANPULE Submitted to Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

  10. Application of horizontal wells in steeply dipping reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Navarro, Jose David

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ) + Rplj)/2 Np = Np(j-1) + DELTA Np R3 - Rs +[(kg/ko)(Uo/Ug)(Bo/Bg)] Gp = Gp 4-1) + DELTA NpsRp avg Rec. Fac. = Np/OOIP Rp=Gp/Np 43 IE+06 lE+05 a 1E+04 1E+03 ~m=000 ? a ? m=0, 08 ~m=0. 24 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 Time (years) Fig... Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering ABSTRACT Application of Horizontal Wells in Steeply Dipping Reservoirs. (December 1995) Jose David Lopez Navarro, B. S. , Universidad de America Santafe de Bogota, Colombia Co-chairs of Advisory Committee: Dr...

  11. Pair-Production Supernovae: Theory and Observation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Scannapieco

    2006-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

    I review the physical properties of pair-production supernovae (PPSNe) as well as the prospects for them to be constrained observationally. In very massive (140-260 solar mass) stars, much of the pressure support comes from the radiation field, meaning that they are loosely bound, with an adiabatic coefficient that is close to the minimum stable value. Near the end of C/O burning, the central temperature increases to the point that photons begin to be converted into electron-positron pairs, softening gamma below this critical value. The result is a runaway collapse, followed by explosive burning that completely obliterates the star. While these explosions can be up to 100 times more energetic that core collapse and Type Ia supernovae, their peak luminosities are only slightly greater. However, due both to copious Ni-56 production and hydrogen recombination, they are brighter much longer, and remain observable for ~ 1 year. Since metal enrichment is a local process, PPSNe should occur in pockets of metal-free gas over a broad range of redshifts, greatly enhancing their detectability, and distributing their nucleosyntehtic products about the Milky Way. This means that measurements of the abundances of metal-free stars should be thought of as directly constraining these objects. It also means that ongoing supernova searches, already provide weak constraints for PPSN models. A survey with the NIRCam instrument on JWST, on the other hand, would be able to extend these limits to z ~ 10. Observing a 0.3 deg^2 patch of sky for one week per year for three consecutive years, such a program would either detect or rule out the existence of these remarkable objects.

  12. THE 2012 HUBBLE ULTRA DEEP FIELD (UDF12): OBSERVATIONAL OVERVIEW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koekemoer, Anton M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Ellis, Richard S.; Schenker, Matthew A. [Department of Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, MS 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); McLure, Ross J.; Dunlop, James S.; Bowler, Rebecca A. A.; Rogers, Alexander B.; Curtis-Lake, Emma; Cirasuolo, Michele; Wild, V.; Targett, T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Edinburgh, Royal Observatory, Edinburgh EH9 3HJ (United Kingdom); Robertson, Brant E.; Schneider, Evan; Stark, Daniel P. [Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Ono, Yoshiaki; Ouchi, Masami [Institute for Cosmic Ray Research, University of Tokyo, Kashiwa City, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Charlot, Stephane [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014, Paris (France); Furlanetto, Steven R. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the 2012 Hubble Ultra Deep Field campaign (UDF12), a large 128 orbit Cycle 19 Hubble Space Telescope program aimed at extending previous Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)/IR observations of the UDF by quadrupling the exposure time in the F105W filter, imaging in an additional F140W filter, and extending the F160W exposure time by 50%, as well as adding an extremely deep parallel field with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) in the F814W filter with a total exposure time of 128 orbits. The principal scientific goal of this project is to determine whether galaxies reionized the universe; our observations are designed to provide a robust determination of the star formation density at z ?> 8, improve measurements of the ultraviolet continuum slope at z ? 7-8, facilitate the construction of new samples of z ? 9-10 candidates, and enable the detection of sources up to z ? 12. For this project we committed to combining these and other WFC3/IR imaging observations of the UDF area into a single homogeneous dataset to provide the deepest near-infrared observations of the sky. In this paper we present the observational overview of the project and describe the procedures used in reducing the data as well as the final products that were produced. We present the details of several special procedures that we implemented to correct calibration issues in the data for both the WFC3/IR observations of the main UDF field and our deep 128 orbit ACS/WFC F814W parallel field image, including treatment for persistence, correction for time-variable sky backgrounds, and astrometric alignment to an accuracy of a few milliarcseconds. We release the full, combined mosaics comprising a single, unified set of mosaics of the UDF, providing the deepest near-infrared blank-field view of the universe currently achievable, reaching magnitudes as deep as AB ? 30 mag in the near-infrared, and yielding a legacy dataset on this field.

  13. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capuano, Louis, Jr. (Thermasource Inc.); Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert (Thermasource Inc.); Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and cost. A task and cost based analysis of the exercise is subsequently conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the key technical and economic drivers of the well construction process. Finally, future research & development recommendations are provided and ranked based on their economic and technical significance.

  14. Fiscal year 1993 well plugging and abandonment program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from December 1992 through August 20, 1993. A total of 70 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the US Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  15. Observational learning in horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baer, Katherine Louise

    1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1979 Major Subject: Animal... Science OBSERVATIONAL LEARNING IN HORSES A Thesis by KATHERINE LOUISE BAER Approved as to style and content by: L7 . 5+~ (Chairma of . C mmittee) ) c r (Mem ) YiNicc CJ ~- (Membeh) (Head of Department May 1979 ABSTRACT Observational...

  16. Flow in geothermal wells: Part III. Calculation model for self-flowing well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bilicki, Z.; Kestin, J.; Michaelides, E.E.

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The theoretical model described predicts the temperature, pressure, dynamic dryness fraction, and void fraction along the vertical channel of two-phase flow. The existing data from operating wells indicate good agreement with the model. (MHR)

  17. Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhuoyi

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    be used to obtain downhole flow conditions, which is key information to control and optimize horizontal well production. However, the fluid flow in the reservoir is often multiphase and complex, which makes temperature and pressure interpretation very...

  18. Hot Pot Field Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  19. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  20. ROSAT Observations of the Flare Star CC Eri

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    H. C. Pan; C. Jordan

    1994-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The flare/spotted spectroscopic binary star CC Eri was observed with the Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) on the X-ray satellite ROSAT on 1990 July 9-11 and 1992 January 26-27. During the observations, the source was variable on time scales from a few minutes to several hours, with the X-ray (0.2-2 keV) luminosity in the range $\\sim 2.5-6.8\\times 10^{29} erg s^{-1}$. An X-ray flare-like event, which has a one hour characteristic rise time and a two hour decay time, was observed from CC Eri on 1990 July 10 16:14-21:34 (UT). The X-ray spectrum of the source can be described by current thermal plasma codes with two temperature components or with a continuous temperature distribution. The spectral results show that plasma at $Te\\sim 10^{7}$ K exists in the corona of CC Eri. The variations in the observed source flux and spectra can be reproduced by a flare, adopting a magnetic reconnection model. Comparisons with an unheated model, late in the flare, suggest that the area and volume of the flare are substantially larger than in a solar two ribbon flare, while the electron pressure is similar. The emission measure and temperature of the non-flaring emission, interpreted as the average corona, lead to an electron pressure similar to that in a well-developed solar active region. Rotational modulation of a spot related active region requires an unphysically large X-ray flux in a concentrated area.

  1. Method for cutting steam heat losses during cyclic steam injection of wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gondouin, M.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heavy Oil is abundant in California. It is a very viscous fluid, which must be thinned in order to flow from wells at economical rates. The best method of oil viscosity reduction is by cyclic steam injection into the oil-containing rock formations. Making steam in conventional generators fueled with Natural Gas is, however, a costly process. The main objective of this Project is to reduce the cost of the required steam, per Barrel of Oil produced. This is made possible by a combination of Patented new technologies with several known methods. The best known method for increasing the production rate from oil wells is to use horizontal drainholes, which provide a much greater flow area from the oil zone into the well. A recent statistic based on 344 horizontal wells in 21 Canadian Oil fields containing Heavy Oil shows that these are, on the average six times more prolific than vertical wells. The cost of horizontal wells, however, is generally two to three times that of a vertical well, in the same field, so our second goal is to reduce the net cost of horizontal wells by connecting two of them to the same vertical casing, well head and pumping system. With such a well configuration, it is possible to get two horizontal wells for the price of about one and a half times the price of a single vertical well.

  2. Observation of the Goos-Haenchen Shift with Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haan, Victor-O. de; Plomp, Jeroen; Rekveldt, Theo M.; Kraan, Wicher H.; Well, Ad A. van; Dalgliesh, Robert M.; Langridge, Sean [Department Radiation, Radionuclides and Reactors, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands); STFC, ISIS, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Chilton, Oxfordshire, OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The Goos-Haenchen effect is a spatial shift along an interface resulting from an interference effect that occurs for total internal reflection. This phenomenon was suggested by Sir Isaac Newton, but it was not until 1947 that the effect was experimentally observed by Goos and Haenchen. We provide the first direct, absolute, experimental determination of the Goos-Haenchen shift for a particle experiencing a potential well as required by quantum mechanics: namely, wave-particle duality. Here, the particle is a spin-polarized neutron reflecting from a film of magnetized material. We detect the effect through a subtle change in polarization of the neutron. Here, we demonstrate, through experiment and theory, that neutrons do exhibit the Goos-Haenchen effect and postulate that the associated time shift should also be observable.

  3. Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slevinsky, B.A.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

  4. Air drilling has some pluses for horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carden, R.S. (Grace, Shursen, Moore and Associates, Inc., Amarillo, TX (US))

    1991-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Drilling horizontal wells with air as the circulating medium is not a common practice; however, air has come distinct advantages over drilling mud. They are: Significant increase in rate of penetration which leads to shorter drilling time. Elimination of lost circulation problems, especially in areas of very low bottom hole pressures. Continual drill stem test of potential producing formations. Minimal damage to the formation. Unfortunately, there are some disadvantages to drilling with air. Downhole motor life is shorter and less predictable. No measurement-while-drilling (MWD) system is currently available that will work consistently in air drilling environments. Hole cleaning is a problem at inclinations above 50{degree}. The horizontal section length is reduced because of the increased friction (drag) between the drillstring and borehole. The types of lithologies and targets are limited. Several horizontal wells have been successfully drilled with air or foam since 1986. At a minimum, operators drill the horizontal section with air or foam to eliminate lost circulation problems in low pressure or partially depleted reservoirs and to reduce formation damage due to drilling fluid invasion. However, problems have been encountered in drilling horizontal wells with air. Not all of the problems are unique to air drilling, but some may be exaggerated by the conditions in an air-drilled hole.

  5. ARSENIC IN PRIVATE WELLS IN NH YEAR 1 FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    performed geospatial analysis of the well water arsenic estimates and survey results and produced the maps .................................................................................................. 7 Well water quality...................................................................................................... 7 Well water testing

  6. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well...

  7. Observation of chaotic beats in a driven memristive Chua's circuit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Ishaq Ahamed; K. Srinivasan; K. Murali; M. Lakshmanan

    2010-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, a time varying resistive circuit realising the action of an active three segment piecewise linear flux controlled memristor is proposed. Using this as the nonlinearity, a driven Chua's circuit is implemented. The phenomenon of chaotic beats in this circuit is observed for a suitable choice of parameters. The memristor acts as a chaotically time varying resistor (CTVR), switching between a less conductive OFF state and a more conductive ON state. This chaotic switching is governed by the dynamics of the driven Chua's circuit of which the memristor is an integral part. The occurrence of beats is essentially due to the interaction of the memristor aided self oscillations of the circuit and the external driving sinusoidal forcing. Upon slight tuning/detuning of the frequencies of the memristor switching and that of the external force, constructive and destructive interferences occur leading to revivals and collapses in amplitudes of the circuit variables, which we refer as chaotic beats. Numerical simulations and Multisim modelling as well as statistical analyses have been carried out to observe as well as to understand and verify the mechanism leading to chaotic beats.

  8. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWellsWells Drilled (Feet per

  9. Geologic Results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McConnell, Vicki S.; Eichelberger, John C.; Keskinen, Mary J.; Layer, Paul W.

    1992-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    As a deep well in the center of a major Quaternary caldera, the Long Valley Exploratory Well (LVEW) provides a new perspective on the relationship between hydrothermal circulation and a large crustal magma chamber. It also provides an important test of models for the subsurface structure of active continental calderas. Results will impact geothermal exploration, assessment, and management of the Long Valley resource and should be applicable to other igneous-related geothermal systems. Our task is to use the cuttings and core from LVEW to interpret the evolution of the central caldera region, with emphasis on evidence of current hydrothermal conditions and circulation. LVEW has reached a depth of 2313 m, passing through post-caldera extrusives and the intracaldera Bishop Tuff to bottom in the Mt. Morrison roof pendant of the Sierran basement. The base of the section of Quaternary volcanic rocks related to Long Valley Caldera was encountered at 1800 m of which 1178 m is Bishop Tuff. The lithologies sampled generally support the classic view of large intercontinental calderas as piston-cylinder-like structures. In this model, the roof of the huge magma chamber, like an ill-fitting piston, broke and sank 2 km along a ring fracture system that simultaneously and explosively leaked magma as Bishop Tuff. Results from LVEW which support this model are the presence of intact basement at depth at the center of the caldera, the presence of a thick Bishop Tuff section, and textural evidence that the tuff encountered is not near-vent despite its central caldera location. An unexpected observation was the presence of rhyolite intrusions within the tuff with a cumulative apparent thickness in excess of 300 m. Chemical analyses indicate that these are high-silica, high-barium rhyolites. Preliminary {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar analyses determined an age of 626 {+-} 38 ka (this paper). These observations would indicate that the intrusions belong to the early post-collapse episode of volcanism and are contemporaneous with resurgence of the caldera floor. If they are extensive sills rather than dikes, a possibility being investigated through relogging of core from neighboring wells, they were responsible for resurgence. A {sup 40}Ar/{sup 39}Ar age of 769 {+-} 14 ka from Bishop Tuff at 820 m depth conforms with tuff ages from outside the caldera and indicates an absence of shallow hydrothermal activity (>300 C) persisting after emplacement. Work is proceeding on investigating hydrothermal alteration deeper in the well. This alteration includes sulfide+quartz fracture fillings, calcite+quartz replacement of feldspars, and disseminated pyrite in both the tuff and basement. Electron microprobe analysis of phases are being conducted to determine initial magmatic and subsequent hydrothermal conditions.

  10. Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzuki, Masatsugu

    Female Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Amy:56:27.6 Deborah Mc Eligot Deborah Storrings Male Team Overall Name Age Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Pace Rank Time Rank Time Pace Time 1 Macon Fessenden 20 1 5:42.2 2 0:26.9 1 34:29.7 3:23 1 0:12.8 1 17:41.1 3

  11. Observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanford, Glenn DelFosse

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An observation of relativistic antihydrogen atoms is reported in this dissertation. Experiment 862 at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory observed antihydrogen atoms produced by the interaction of a circulating beam of high momentum (3 < p < 9 GeV/c) antiprotons and a jet of molecular hydrogen gas. Since the neutral antihydrogen does not bend in the antiproton source magnets, the detectors could be located far from the interaction point on a beamline tangent to the storage ring. The detection of the antihydrogen is accomplished by ionizing the atoms far from the interaction point. The positron is deflected by a magnetic spectrometer and detected, as are the back to back photons resulting from its annihilation. The antiproton travels a distance long enough for its momentum and time of flight to be measured accurately. A statistically significant sample of 101 antihydrogen atoms has been observed. A measurement of the cross section for {bar H}{sup 0} production is outlined within. The cross section corresponds to the process where a high momentum antiproton causes e{sup +} e{sup -} pair creation near a nucleus with the e{sup +} being captured by the antiproton. Antihydrogen is the first atom made exclusively of antimatter to be detected. The observation experiment's results are the first step towards an antihydrogen spectroscopy experiment which would measure the n = 2 Lamb shift and fine structure.

  12. The Effect of Well Trajectory on Production Performance of Tight Gas Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aldousari, Mohammad

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    been studied. The aim of this research is to investigate the effect of the trajectory angle on pressure drop in horizontal wells. In addition, the contribution of water flow to pressure drop is a part of this research. Generally, water comes from...

  13. New wells architectures to access deep geothermal reservoirsand increase well productivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with the higher costs of well drilling and completion. Our first step in tackling theproblem,was to consider with the wellbore flow which is modelled by a 1D momentum equation describing the conservation of the fluid in the wellbore fluid coupled to the heat transfer in the reservoir.We apply this coupled wellbore and reservoir

  14. Segmentation of complex geophysical structures with well Running title: Image segmentation with well data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    with well data. Authors: Christian Gout§, and Carole Le Guyader. Complete affiliation: § Universit´e de 96822-2273 , USA. chris gout@cal.berkeley.edu : INSA de Rennes 20 Avenue des Buttes de Co¨esmes CS 14315 35043 Rennes, France. carole.le-guyader@insa-rennes.fr Corresponding author : Christian Gout

  15. Phonon-drag thermopower in anisotropic AlAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehmann, Dietmar [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Technische Universitt Dresden, D-01062 Dresden (Germany); Tsaousidou, Margarita [Materials Science Department, University of Patras, Patras 26 504 (Greece); Kubakaddi, Shrishail [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad-580 003 (India)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    In the present work we have developed a generalized theory of phonon-drag thermopower ?{sup g} for a highly anisotropic two-dimensional electron gas. For electrons confined in AlAs quantum wells we calculate ?{sup g} as function of temperature. We show that ?{sup g} exhibits a strong anisotropic behavior depending on valley occupancy which can be tuned by well width and strain. Also a great enhancement of ?{sup g} is observed compared to GaAs quantum wells.

  16. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems Under Well-Controlled Temperature Condition. Observation of Entropic Effect on Conformation Changes of Complex Systems...

  17. Prospects for joint gravitational wave and short gamma-ray burst observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Clark; H. Evans; S. Fairhurst; I. W. Harry; E. Macdonald; D. Macleod; P. J. Sutton; A. R. Williamson

    2014-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a detailed evaluation of the expected rate of joint gravitational-wave and short gamma-ray burst (GRB) observations over the coming years. We begin by evaluating the improvement in distance sensitivity of the gravitational wave search that arises from using the GRB observation to restrict the time and sky location of the source. We argue that this gives a 25% increase in sensitivity when compared to an all-sky, all-time search, corresponding to more than doubling the number of detectable gravitational wave signals associated with GRBs. Using this, we present the expected rate of joint observations with the advanced LIGO and Virgo instruments, taking into account the expected evolution of the gravitational wave detector network. We show that in the early advanced gravitational wave detector observing runs, from 2015-2017, there is only a small chance of a joint observation. However, as the detectors approach their design sensitivities, there is a good chance of joint observations provided wide field GRB satellites, such as Fermi and the Interplanetary Network, continue operation. The rate will also depend critically upon the nature of the progenitor, with neutron star--black hole systems observable to greater distances than double neutron star systems. The relative rate of binary mergers and GRBs will depend upon the jet opening angle of GRBs. Consequently, joint observations, as well as accurate measurement of both the GRB rate and binary merger rates will allow for an improved estimation of the opening angle of GRBs.

  18. Time Off

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas ConchasPassiveSubmittedStatus TomAboutManusScienceThe43068G. ThundatSmallDepartment ofTimTime

  19. Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. W. Weiss

    2006-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

  20. An Integrated Well Performance Study for Shale Reservoir Systems - Application to the Marcellus Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Riser, Landon Jess

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we focus on the integration of two independent analyses, time-rate analysis and model-based production analysis, as an approach to resolve the uncertainty in estimating ultimate recovery (EUR) for wells in unconventional reservoirs...

  1. A Novel Approach for the Rapid Estimation of Drainage Volume, Pressure and Well Rates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Neha 1986-

    2012-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

    For effective reservoir management and production optimization, it is important to understand drained volumes, pressure depletion and reservoir well rates at all flow times. For conventional reservoirs, this behavior is based on the concepts...

  2. Electron transfer and capture dynamics in ZnSe quantum wells grown on GaAs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dongol, A.; Wagner, H. P. [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, Ohio 45221 (United States)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the transfer and capture dynamics of electrons in phase coherent photorefractive ZnSe quantum wells grown on GaAs using degenerate three-beam four-wave-mixing. The measurements reveal electron capture times by the quantum well in the order of several tens of picoseconds and a transit time of approximately 5 picoseconds from the GaAs substrate through the ZnMgSe barrier.

  3. Integrating knowledge-based techniques into well-test interpretation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harrison, I.W.; Fraser, J.L. [Artificial Intelligence Applications Inst., Edinburgh (United Kingdom)

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of the Spirit Project was to develop a prototype of next-generation well-test-interpretation (WTI) software that would include knowledge-based decision support for the WTI model selection task. This paper describes how Spirit makes use of several different types of information (pressure, seismic, petrophysical, geological, and engineering) to support the user in identifying the most appropriate WTI model. Spirit`s knowledge-based approach to type-curve matching is to generate several different feasible interpretations by making assumptions about the possible presence of both wellbore storage and late-time boundary effects. Spirit fuses information from type-curve matching and other data sources by use of a knowledge-based decision model developed in collaboration with a WTI expert. The sponsors of the work have judged the resulting prototype system a success.

  4. New techniques for monitoring cement hydration under simulated well conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luke, K.; Hall, C.; Jones, T. [Schlumberger Cambridge Research (United Kingdom); Barnes, P.; Turillas, X.; Lewis, A. [Univ. of London (United Kingdom). Birkbeck College

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and synchrotron X-ray powder diffraction methods are described for studying cement hydration chemistry at temperatures up to 200 C, covering the normal temperature range of wellbore cementing. The methods provide complementary information on the transformation of silicate, ferrite and sulfate minerals. The thermal decomposition of the cement mineral ettringite is shown to occur at 114 C in a sealed system in contact with water. The FTIR spectrum of a well cement slurry hydrating at 150 C and 2,000 psi is analyzed. The anomalous thickening time behavior of certain cements around 75--100 C is discussed in the light of new data on the hydration of a Class G cement at 65 and 95 C, with and without retarder.

  5. Observing Massive Galaxy Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher J. Conselice

    2002-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A major goal of contemporary astrophysics is understanding the origin of the most massive galaxies in the universe, particularly nearby ellipticals and spirals. Theoretical models of galaxy formation have existed for many decades, although low and high redshift observations are only beginning to put constraints on different ideas. We briefly describe these observations and how they are revealing the methods by which galaxies form by contrasting and comparing fiducial rapid collapse and hierarchical formation model predictions. The available data show that cluster ellipticals must have rapidly formed at z > 2, and that up to 50% of all massive galaxies at z ~ 2.5 are involved in major mergers. While the former is consistent with the monolithic collapse picture, we argue that hierarchal formation is the only model that can reproduce all the available observations.

  6. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  7. Tidal response variation and recovery following the Wenchuan earthquake from water level data of multiple wells in the nearfield

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lai, Guijuan; Ge, Hongkui; Xue, Lian; Brodsky, Emily E; Huang, Fuqiong; Wand, Weilai

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    m) Water level (m) Time (year) LGH f Water level (m) WaterBB and JY. For the well LGH, phases are negative before theEarth tides for well LGH after the Wenchuan earthquake. The

  8. A Parametric Study on the Benefits of Drilling Multilateral and Horizontal Wells in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    A Parametric Study on the Benefits of Drilling Multilateral and Horizontal Wells in Coalbed Methane reservoirs can be drained with horizontal well configurations. - In a very short time, coal system can, Texas SPE Paper # 96018 #12;- Coal is an unusual reservoir rock, with highly complex reservoir

  9. Spin-polarized current oscillations in diluted magnetic semiconductor multiple quantum wells Manuel Bejar,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sánchez, David

    . The transport properties of Mn-based heterostructures have been studied10 including miniband transportSpin-polarized current oscillations in diluted magnetic semiconductor multiple quantum wells Manuel. The spin polarization oscillates in both magnetic and nonmagnetic quantum wells and the time average

  10. Utilizing Distributed Temperature Sensors in Predicting Flow Rates in Multilateral Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Mulla, Jassim Mohammed A.

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    and pressure data to determine the flow rate in real time out of a multilateral well. Temperature and pressure changes are harder to predict in horizontal laterals compared with vertical wells because of the lack of variation in elevation and geothermal...

  11. Universal short-time response and formation of correlations after quantum quenches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Morawetz

    2014-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The short-time evolution of two distinct systems, the pump and probe experiments with semiconductor and the sudden quench of cold atoms in an optical lattice, is found to be described by the same universal response function. This analytic formula at short time scales is derived from the quantum kinetic theory approach observing that correlations need time to be formed. The demand of density conservation leads to a reduction of the relaxation time by a factor of four in quench setups. The influence of finite trapping potential is derived and discussed as well as Singwi-Sj{\\o}lander local field corrections.

  12. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  13. Geologic controls influencing CO2 loss from a leaking well.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopkins, Polly L.; Martinez, Mario J.; McKenna, Sean Andrew; Klise, Katherine A.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Injection of CO2 into formations containing brine is proposed as a long-term sequestration solution. A significant obstacle to sequestration performance is the presence of existing wells providing a transport pathway out of the sequestration formation. To understand how heterogeneity impacts the leakage rate, we employ two dimensional models of the CO2 injection process into a sandstone aquifer with shale inclusions to examine the parameters controlling release through an existing well. This scenario is modeled as a constant-rate injection of super-critical CO2 into the existing formation where buoyancy effects, relative permeabilities, and capillary pressures are employed. Three geologic controls are considered: stratigraphic dip angle, shale inclusion size and shale fraction. In this study, we examine the impact of heterogeneity on the amount and timing of CO2 released through a leaky well. Sensitivity analysis is performed to classify how various geologic controls influence CO2 loss. A 'Design of Experiments' approach is used to identify the most important parameters and combinations of parameters to control CO2 migration while making efficient use of a limited number of computations. Results are used to construct a low-dimensional description of the transport scenario. The goal of this exploration is to develop a small set of parametric descriptors that can be generalized to similar scenarios. Results of this work will allow for estimation of the amount of CO2 that will be lost for a given scenario prior to commencing injection. Additionally, two-dimensional and three-dimensional simulations are compared to quantify the influence that surrounding geologic media has on the CO2 leakage rate.

  14. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

  15. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWells Drilled (Feet per

  16. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Developmental Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWells Drilledper

  17. U.S. Average Depth of Dry Holes Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecemberSteamYearTexas--State Offshore ShaleAcquisitionsWells DrilledperExploratory

  18. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random paper around a research question: For example, you may be interested in power relations, interactions

  19. Academic Writing Observation Papers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    a particular action and did not notice something about the people involved. Note what you did not notice observations. People: If the setting is crowded, choose a particular group (or groups) or focus on random in power relations, interactions between interpersonal communication processes and other media, or other

  20. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  1. EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EBONEEUROPEAN BIODIVERSITY OBSERVATION NETWORK Geert De Blust, Guy Laurijssens, Hans Van Calster of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers #12;#12;Design of a monitoring-effectiveness Optimization of biodiversity monitoring through close collaboration of users and data providers Geert De Blust1

  2. Fractal quantum well heterostructures for broadband light emitters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crawford, M.H.; Gourley, P.L.; Meissner, K.E.; Sinclair, M.B.; Jones, E.D.; Chow, W.W.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine carrier relaxation and radiative recombination in AlGaAs based near IR and AlGaInP based visible fractal quantum well heterostructures. Through temperature dependent photoluminescence, we demonstrate that enhanced population of higher lying energy levels can be achieved by varying the thickness of the layers in the fractal heterostructurd. This distribution of carriers results in room temperature emission over a relatively broad range of wavelengths: approximately 700--855 nm for AlGaAs structures and 575--650 nm for AlGaInP structures. Spectra are compared to theoretical calculations to evaluate the non-equilibrium nature of the carrier distributions. Time resolved photoluminescence measurements demonstrate an approximately linear relationship between the radiative decay time and the layer thickness of the structure. Correspondingly, integrated luminescence measurements at room temperature reveal a factor of four increase in the light output efficiency of the structure as the fractal layer thickness is increased from 50 {angstrom} to 400 {angstrom}. The applicability of these heterostructures to broadband LEDs is discussed.

  3. Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

  4. Natural geometric representation for electron local observables

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minogin, V.G., E-mail: minogin@isan.troitsk.ru

    2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    An existence of the quartic identities for the electron local observables that define orthogonality relations for the 3D quantities quadratic in the electron observables is found. It is shown that the joint solution of the quartic and bilinear identities for the electron observables defines a unique natural representation of the observables. In the natural representation the vector type electron local observables have well-defined fixed positions with respect to a local 3D orthogonal reference frame. It is shown that the natural representation of the electron local observables can be defined in six different forms depending on a choice of the orthogonal unit vectors. The natural representation is used to determine the functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the local observables valid for any shape of the electron wave packet. -- Highlights: Quartic identities that define the orthogonality relations for the electron local observables are found. Joint solution of quartic and bilinear identities defines a unique natural representation of the electron local observables. Functional dependence of the electron wave functions on the electron local observables is determined.

  5. Eruptive and Geomorphic Processes at the Lathrop Wells Scoria Cone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Valentine; D.J. Krier; F.V. Perry; G. Heiken

    2006-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The {approx}80 ka Lathrop Wells volcano (southern Nevada, U.S.A.) preserves evidence for a range of explosive processes and emplacement mechanisms of pyroclastic deposits and lava fields in a small-volume basaltic center. Early cone building by Strombolian bursts was accompanied by development of a fan-like lava field reaching {approx}800 m distance from the cone, built upon a gently sloping surface. Lava flows carried rafts of cone deposits, which provide indirect evidence for cone facies in lieu of direct exposures in the active quarry. Subsequent activity was of a violent Strombolian nature, with many episodes of sustained eruption columns up to a few km in height. These deposited layers of scoria lapilli and ash in different directions depending upon wind direction at the time of a given episode, reaching up to {approx}20 km from the vent, and also produced the bulk of the scoria cone. Lava effusion migrated from south to north around the eastern base of the cone as accumulation of lavas successively reversed the topography at the base of the cone. Late lavas were emplaced during violent Strombolian activity and continued for some time after explosive eruptions had waned. Volumes of the eruptive products are: fallout--0.07 km{sup 3}, scoria cone--0.02 km{sup 3}, and lavas--0.03 km{sup 3}. Shallow-derived xenolith concentrations suggest an upper bound on average conduit diameter of {approx}21 m in the uppermost 335 m beneath the volcano. The volcano was constructed over a period of at least seven months with cone building occurring only during part of that time, based upon analogy with historical eruptions. Post-eruptive geomorphic evolution varied for the three main surface types that were produced by volcanic activity: (1) scoria cone, (2) low relief surfaces (including lavas) with abundant pyroclastic material, and (3) lavas with little pyroclastic material. The role of these different initial textures must be accounted for in estimating relative ages of volcanic surfaces, and failure to account for this resulted in previous erroneous interpretation that the volcano is polycyclic (eruptions separated by 1,000s-10,000s of years). Lathrop Wells volcano provides an example of the wide range of eruptive processes that can occur with little change in major element composition; the variation in explosive and effusive processes, including their simultaneous occurrence, must result entirely from fluid dynamic, crystallization, and degassing processes in the ascending multiphase magma. The volcano also provides key analog information regarding processes that are important for volcanic risk assessment at the proposed Yucca Mountain radioactive waste repository, {approx}18 km north of the volcano.

  6. Global optimization of data quality checks on 2-D and 3-D networks of GPR cross-well tomographic data for automatic correction of unknown well deviations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sassen, D. S.; Peterson, J. E.

    2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Significant errors related to poor time zero estimation, well deviation or mislocation of the transmitter (TX) and receiver (RX) stations can render even the most sophisticated modeling and inversion routine useless. Previous examples of methods for the analysis and correction of data errors in geophysical tomography include the works of Maurer and Green (1997), Squires et al. (1992) and Peterson (2001). Here we follow the analysis and techniques of Peterson (2001) for data quality control and error correction. Through our data acquisition and quality control procedures we have very accurate control on the surface locations of wells, the travel distance of both the transmitter and receiver within the boreholes, and the change in apparent zero time. However, we often have poor control on well deviations, either because of economic constraints or the nature of the borehole itself prevented the acquisition of well deviation logs. Also, well deviation logs can sometimes have significant errors. Problems with borehole deviations can be diagnosed prior to inversion of travel-time tomography data sets by plotting the apparent velocity of a straight ray connecting a transmitter (TX) to a receiver (RX) against the take-off angle of the ray. Issues with the time-zero pick or distances between wells appear as symmetric smiles or frown in these QC plots. Well deviation or dipping-strong anisotropy will result in an asymmetric correlation between apparent velocity and take-off angle (Figure 1-B). In addition, when a network of interconnected GPR tomography data is available, one has the additional quality constraint of insuring that there is continuity in velocity between immediately adjacent tomograms. A sudden shift in the mean velocity indicates that either position deviations are present or there is a shift in the pick times. Small errors in well geometry may be effectively treated during inversion by including weighting, or relaxation, parameters into the inversion (e.g. Bautu et al., 2006). In the technique of algebraic reconstruction tomography (ART), which is used herein for the travel time inversion (Peterson et al., 1985), a small relaxation parameter will smooth imaging artifacts caused by data errors at the expense of resolution and contrast (Figure 2). However, large data errors such as unaccounted well deviations cannot be adequately suppressed through inversion weighting schemes. Previously, problems with tomograms were treated manually. However, in large data sets and/or networks of data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Mislocation of the transmitter and receiver stations of GPR cross-well tomography data sets can lead to serious imaging artifacts if not accounted for prior to inversion. Previously, problems with tomograms have been treated manually prior to inversion. In large data sets and/or networks of tomographic data sets, trial and error changes to well geometries become increasingly difficult and ineffective. Our approach is to use cross-well data quality checks and a simplified model of borehole deviation with particle swarm optimization (PSO) to automatically correct for source and receiver locations prior to tomographic inversion. We present a simple model of well deviation, which is designed to minimize potential corruption of actual data trends. We also provide quantitative quality control measures based on minimizing correlations between take-off angle and apparent velocity, and a quality check on the continuity of velocity between adjacent wells. This methodology is shown to be accurate and robust for simple 2-D synthetic test cases. Plus, we demonstrate the method on actual field data where it is compared to deviation logs. This study shows the promise for automatic correction of well deviations in GPR tomographic data. Analysis of synthetic data shows that very precise estimates of well deviation can be made for small deviations, even in the presence of static data errors. However, the analysis of the synthetic data and the application of

  7. T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. Geopressured-geothermal well report, Volume II. Well workover and production testing, February 1982-October 1985. Final report. Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The T-F and S/DOE Gladys McCall No. 1 well was the fourth in a series of wells in the DOE Design Wells Program that were drilled into deep, large geopressured-geothermal brine aquifers in order to provide basic data with which to determine the technological and economic viability of producing energy from these unconventional resources. This brine production well was spudded on May 27, 1981 and drilling operations were completed on November 2, 1981 after using 160 days of rig time. The well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet. The target sands lie at a depth of 14,412 to 15,860 feet in the Fleming Formation of the lower Miocene. This report covers well production testing operations and necessary well workover operations during the February 1982 to October 1985 period. The primary goals of the well testing program were: (1) to determine reservoir size, shape, volume, drive mechanisms, and other reservoir parameters, (2) to determine and demonstrate the technological and economic viability of producing energy from a geopressured-geothermal brine aquifer through long-term production testing, and (3) to determine problem areas associated with such long-term production, and to develop solutions therefor.

  8. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Lim

    2014-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  9. Economic viability of multiple-lateral horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christopher Jason

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal wells are gaining popularity throughout the petroleum industry as a means to increase well productivity and enhance incremental economics. Horizontal wells provide greater reservoir exposure and are useful in intersecting additional pay...

  10. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  11. Directional Drilling and Equipment for Hot Granite Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, R. E.; Neudecker, J. W.; Rowley, J.C.; Brittenham, T. L.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Directional drilling technology was extended and modified to drill the first well of a subsurface geothermal energy extraction system at the Fenton Hill, New Mexico, hot dry rock (HDR) experimental site. Borehole geometries, extremely hard and abrasive granite rock, and high formation temperatures combined to provide a challenging environment for directional drilling tools and instrumentation. Completing the first of the two-wellbore HDR system resulted in the definition of operation limitations of -many conventional directional drilling tools, instrumentation, and techniques. The successful completion of the first wellbore, Energy Extraction Well No. 2 (EE-21), to a measured depth of 4.7 km (15,300 ft) in granite reservoir rock with a bottomhole temperature of 320 C (610 F) required the development of a new high-temperature downhole motor and modification of existing wireline-conveyed steering tool systems. Conventional rotary-driven directional assemblies were successfully modified to accommodate the very hard and abrasive rock encountered while drilling nearly 2.6 km (8,500 ft) of directional hole to a final inclination of 35{sup o} from the vertical at the controlled azimuthal orientation. Data were collected to optimize the drilling procedures far the programmed directional drilling of well EE-3 parallel to, and 370 metres (1,200 ft) above, Drilling equipment and techniques used in drilling wellbores for extraction of geothermal energy from hot granite were generally similar to those that are standard and common to hydrocarbon drilling practices. However, it was necessary to design some new equipment for this program: some equipment was modified especially for this program and some was operated beyond normal ratings. These tools and procedures met with various degrees of success. Two types of shock subs were developed and tested during this project. However, downhole time was limited, and formations were so varied that analysis of the capabilities of these items is not conclusive. Temperature limits of the tools were exceeded. EE-2. Commercial drilling and fishing jars were improved during the drilling program. Three-cone, tungsten-carbide insert bit performance with downhole motors was limited by rapid gauge wear. Rotary drilling was optimized for wells EE-2 and EE-3 using softer (IADS 635 code) bits and provided a balance between gauge,. cutting structure, and bearing life. Problems of extreme drill string drag, drill string twist-off, and corrosion control are discussed.

  12. Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility Jump to: navigation, search Name Pagosa Springs Private Wells Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility...

  13. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well...

  14. Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act (West Virginia)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Natural Gas Horizontal Well Control Act regulates the construction, alteration, enlargement, abandonment and removal of horizontal wells and associated water and wastewater use and storage. The...

  15. ELIMINATING THE WELLBORE RESPONSE IN TRANSIENT WELL TEST ANALYSIS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, C.W.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Steam-Water Flow in Geothermal Wells", J. Pet. Tech. , ~, p.Storage Effects in Geothermal Wells," Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,

  16. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    395. Notes Among these wells were exploration and monitoring wells drilled near the Fish Hatchery Springs in preparation for the siting of a second binary geothermal power...

  17. Hydraulic fracturing and wellbore completion of coalbed methane wells in the Powder River Basin, Wyoming: Implications for water and gas production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colmenares, L.B.; Zoback, M.D. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. of Geophysics

    2007-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Excessive water production (more than 7000 bbl/month per well) from many coalbed methane (CBM) wells in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming is also associated with significant delays in the time it takes for gas production to begin. Analysis of about 550 water-enhancement activities carried out during well completion demonstrates that such activities result in hydraulic fracturing of the coal. Water-enhancement activities, consists of pumping 60 bbl of water/min into the coal seam during approximately 15 min. This is done to clean the well-bore and to enhance CBM production. Hydraulic fracturing is of concern because vertical hydraulic fracture growth could extend into adjacent formations and potentially result in excess CBM water production and inefficient depressurization of coals. Analysis of the pressure-time records of the water-enhancement tests enabled us to determine the magnitude of the least principal stress (S{sub 3}) in the coal seams of 372 wells. These data reveal that because S{sub 3} switches between the minimum horizontal stress and the overburden at different locations, both vertical and horizontal hydraulic fracture growth is inferred to occur in the basin, depending on the exact location and coal layer. Relatively low water production is observed for wells with inferred horizontal fractures, whereas all of the wells associated with excessive water production are characterized by inferred vertical hydraulic fractures. The reason wells with exceptionally high water production show delays in gas production appears to be inefficient depressurization of the coal caused by water production from the formations outside the coal. To minimize CBM water production, we recommend that in areas of known vertical fracture propagation, the injection rate during the water-enhancement tests should be reduced to prevent the propagation of induced fractures into adjacent water-bearing formations.

  18. Linear and nonlinear time series analysis of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Timmer; U. Schwarz; H. U. Voss; I. Wardinski; T. Belloni; G. Hasinger; M. van der Klis; Juergen Kurths

    1999-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We analyze the variability in the X-ray lightcurves of the black hole candidate Cygnus X-1 by linear and nonlinear time series analysis methods. While a linear model describes the over-all second order properties of the observed data well, surrogate data analysis reveals a significant deviation from linearity. We discuss the relation between shot noise models usually applied to analyze these data and linear stochastic autoregressive models. We debate statistical and interpretational issues of surrogate data testing for the present context. Finally, we suggest a combination of tools from linear andnonlinear time series analysis methods as a procedure to test the predictions of astrophysical models on observed data.

  19. Time-evolution of the external field problem in Quantum Electrodynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deckert, D.-A.; Duerr, D.; Merkl, F.; Schottenloher, M. [Mathematisches Institut, Ludwigs-Maximilians-Universitaet Muenchen, Theresienstrasse 39, D-80333 Muenchen (Germany)

    2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We construct the time-evolution for the second-quantized Dirac equation subject to a smooth, compactly supported, time dependent electromagnetic potential and identify the degrees of freedom involved. Earlier works on this (e.g., Ruijsenaars) observed the Shale-Stinespring condition and showed that the one-particle time-evolution can be lifted to Fock space if and only if the external field had zero magnetic components. We scrutinize the idea, observed earlier by Fierz and Scharf, that the time-evolution can be implemented between time varying Fock spaces. In order to define these Fock spaces we are led to consider classes of reference vacua and polarizations. We show that this implementation is up to a phase independent of the chosen reference vacuum or polarization and that all induced transition probabilities are well-defined and unique.

  20. Fiscal year 1995 well installation program summary Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the well installation activities conducted during the federal fiscal year (FY) 1995 drilling program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (including activities that were performed in late FY 1994, but not included in the FY 1994 Well Installation Program Summary Report). Synopses of monitoring well construction/well development data, well location rationale, geological/hydrological observations, quality assurance/quality control methods, and health and safety monitoring are included. Three groundwater monitoring wells and two gas monitoring probes were installed during the FY 1995 drilling program. One of the groundwater monitoring wells was installed at Landfill VI, the other two in the Boneyard/Burnyard area. All of the groundwater monitoring wells were constructed with stainless steel screens and casings. The two gas monitoring probes were installed at the Centralized Sanitary Landfill II and were of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) screened construction. Eleven well rehabilitation/redevelopment efforts were undertaken during FY 1995 at the Y-12 Plant. All new monitoring wells and wells targeted for redevelopment were developed by either a 2.0-in. diameter swab rig or by hand bailing until nonspecific parameters (pH and specific conductance) attained steady-state levels. Turbidity levels were lowered, if required, to the extent practicable by continued development beyond a steady-state level of pH and conductance.

  1. TWRS privatization phase 1 monitoring wells engineering study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, B.A.; Newcomer, D.R.

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This engineering study provides an evaluation of existing wells and boreholes (wells) within the proposed location for the Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) Privatization Phase 1 demonstration site. Phase 1 is part of the TWRS program that was established to manage, retrieve, treat, immobilize, and dispose of high-level waste stored in underground tanks at the Hanford Site. This evaluation is to determine which wells will remain active within the demonstration site based on regulatory, programmatic, or other beneficial use requirements. An initial evaluation of wells within the demonstration site was conducted in 1996. However, changes in construction plans and expansion of the demonstration site necessitated a reevaluation and reclassification of the wells that are within the expanded site. Impacted wells include many of those previously evaluated as well as additional wells identified in or near the expansion areas. Thirty-three wells exist within and immediately adjacent to the identified boundary of the proposed demonstration site. The wells identified for decommissioning will be abandoned according to the well decommissioning plan. Future well requirements within the site include replacement wells for those wells impacted by construction activities, replacements for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976 (RCRA) wells going dry, and a new characterization well installed to support a TWRS Phase 2 site assessment.

  2. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

    2003-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  3. REAL-TIME TRACER MONITORING OF RESERVOIR STIMULATION PROCEDURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George Scott III

    2002-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ongoing Phase 2 work comprises the development and field-testing of a real-time reservoir stimulation diagnostic system. Phase 3 work commenced in June 2001, and involved conducting research, development and field-testing of real-time enhanced dual-fluid stimulation processes. Experimental field-testing to date includes three well tests. Application of these real-time stimulation processes and diagnostic technologies has been technically successful with commercial production from the ''marginal'' reservoirs in the first two well tests. The third well test proved downhole-mixing is an efficient process for acid stimulation of a carbonate reservoir that produced oil and gas with 2200 psi bottomhole reservoir pressure, however, subsequent shut-in pressure testing indicated the reservoir was characterized by low-permeability. Realtimezone continues to seek patent protection in foreign markets to the benefit of both RTZ and NETL. Realtimezone and the NETL have licensed the United States patented to Halliburton Energy Services (HES). Ongoing Phase 2 and Phase 3 field-testing continues to confirm applications of both real-time technologies, from well testing conducted over the last 12-month work period and including well test scheduled for year-end of 2002. Technical data transfer to industry is ongoing via Internet tech-transfer, public presentations and industry publications. Final Phase 3 test work will be focused on further field-testing the innovational process of blending stimulation fluids downhole. This system provides a number of advantages in comparison to older industry fracturing techniques and allows the operator to control reservoir fracture propagation and concentrations of proppant placed in the reservoir, in real-time. Another observed advantage is that lower friction pressures result, which results in lower pump treating pressures and safer reservoir hydraulic fracturing jobs.

  4. Forward observer: stories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Christopher Lee

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Stephen King and, quite sincerely, Peter Straub, who even now I regard to be one of the finest of American novelists, his repute shackled by his dedication to what is often perceived to be a distasteful genre) as well as those others trafficking... thing to have, nice for day-trips and the like, but. . . Their verbal ellipses brought back the old sales-department pressure to lvtfke's knuckles and recalled from retirement the fuck-'em-all pugnacity that had sent him hurtling up the ladder back...

  5. Horizontal well drill-in fluid utilizing alcohol ethoxylate

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jachnik, R.P.; Green, P.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The drilling of horizontal wells in the last 6 years has significantly improved the economics of oil and gas production from depleted reservoirs or tight sands. This paper illustrates the application of an alcohol ethoxylate into a drill-in fluid designed to minimize formation damage in low permeability sandstones while drilling horizontal sections as long as 1,617 meters (5,306 ft) at depths approaching 6,580 meters (21,600 ft) and to facilitate formation cleanup. The chemistry of alcohol ethoxylates/alkoxylates are described and the more popular names used within the industry will be discussed. Laboratory results are presented which illustrate colloidal phenomena not previously reported with these systems, the routes taken for successful application into a drill-in fluid and how complex these particular colloidal systems are from a physical chemical viewpoint, along with the inevitable learning curve required to fully optimize these systems. Generalized case histories from the UK Southern North Sea will be described, along with field observations which back up the colloidal phenomena seen in the laboratory.

  6. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  7. Reducing the efficiency droop by lateral carrier confinement in InGaN/GaN quantum-well nanorods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shi, Chentian; Yang, Fan; Park, Min Joo; Kwak, Joon Seop; Jung, Sukkoo; Choi, Yoon-Ho; Wang, Xiaoyong; Xiao, Min

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Efficiency droop is a major obstacle facing high-power application of InGaN/GaN quantum-well (QW) light-emitting diodes. In this letter, we report the suppression of efficiency droop induced by density-activated defect recombination in nanorod structure of a-plane InGaN/GaN QWs. In the high carrier density regime, the retained emission efficiency in a dry-etched nanorod sample is observed to be over two times higher than that in its parent QW sample. We further argue that the improvement is a combined effect of the amendment contributed by lateral carrier confinement and the deterioration made by surface trapping.

  8. Evidence of former higher temperatures from alteration minerals, Bostic 1-A well, Mountain Home, Idaho

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arney, B.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Cuttings from the silicic volcanics in the Bostic 1-A well near Mountain Home, Idaho have been examined petrographically with the assistance of x-ray diffraction and electron microprobe analyses. Results indicate that these rocks have been subjected to much higher temperatures than were observed in the well in 1974, when a static temperature log was run. It is not known to what extent the alternation may be due to greater depth of burial in the past, or whether it resulted from an early hydrothermal system of higher temperature than the one now observed.

  9. Observing the Inflationary Reheating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerome Martin; Christophe Ringeval; Vincent Vennin

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Reheating is the the epoch which connects inflation to the subsequent hot Big-Bang phase. Conceptually very important, this era is however observationally poorly known. We show that the current Planck satellite measurements of the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) anisotropies constrain the kinematic properties of the reheating era for most of the inflationary models. This result is obtained by deriving the marginalized posterior distributions of the reheating parameter for about 200 models taken in Encyclopaedia Inflationaris. Weighted by the statistical evidence of each model to explain the data, we show that the Planck 2013 measurements induce an average reduction of the posterior-to-prior volume by 40%. Making some additional assumptions on reheating, such as specifying a mean equation of state parameter, or focusing the analysis on peculiar scenarios, can enhance or reduce this constraint. Our study also indicates that the Bayesian evidence of a model can substantially be affected by the reheating properties. The precision of the current CMB data is therefore such that estimating the observational performance of a model now requires to incorporate information about its reheating history.

  10. Observed Cosmological Redshifts Support Contracting Accelerating Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The main argument that Universe is currently expanding is observed redshift increase by distance. However, this conclusion may not be correct, because cosmological redshift depends only on the scaling factors, the change in the size of the universe during the time of light propagation and is not related to the speed of observer or speed of the object emitting the light. An observer in expanding universe will measure the same redshift as observer in contracting universe with the same scaling. This was not taken into account in analysing the SN Ia data related to the universe acceleration. Possibility that universe may contract, but that the observed light is cosmologically redshifted allows for completely different set of cosmological parameters $\\Omega_M, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}$, including the solution $\\Omega_M=1, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0$. The contracting and in the same time accelerating universe explains observed deceleration and acceleration in SN Ia data, but also gives significantly larger value for the age of the universe, $t_0 = 24$ Gyr. This allows to reconsider classical cosmological models with $\\Lambda =0$. The contracting stage also may explain the observed association of high redshifted quasars to low redshifted galaxies.

  11. Global Observables at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Milov

    2006-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Main characteristics of the charged particle dN_ch/deta and transverse energy dE_T/deta production measured in Heavy Ion collisions at RHIC energies are presented in this article. Transformation of the pseudo-rapidity shape, relation to the incident energy and centrality profile are described in a systematic way. Centrality profile is shown to be closely bound to the number of nucleons participating in the collisions, at the same time an alternative approach to study the centrality behavior is also discussed.

  12. Evaluation of existing wells at the Nevada Test Site for plugging and abandonment or for recompletion as monitoring wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gillespie, D.; Donithan, D.; Seaber, P.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this investigation, various information sources from the Nevada Test Site (NTS), national laboratories and the Desert Research Institute were utilized to verify the existence of approximately 250 existing wells or boreholes at the NTS. Of these wells, 40 were determined to be located within one kilometer of underground nuclear tests conducted near (within 25 m) or below the water table. These 40 existing wells were then investigated in detail to determine their drilling and construction history, lithology and hydrologic units penetrated, and current conditions. These findings are presented for each well, as well as recommendations as to whether individual wells should be plugged and abandoned or could possibly be recompleted as groundwater quality monitoring locations. Two of the 40 wells, UE-20e and UE-2a, contain lost drilling strings and do not penetrate aquifers. These two wells should be plugged and abandoned and removed from the NTS well inventory. Three other wells, TestWell No. 1, TestWell No. 5, and TestWell No. 6, are reported stemmed with sand to the surface. These three wells did not penetrate the water table and would require substantial deepening to be recompleted as groundwater monitoring locations. If not recompleted, these wells should also be plugged and abandoned and removed from the NTS well inventory. Eleven of the 34 wells, Test Well No. 7, RNM No. 1, RNM No. 2, RNM No. 2S, U-3cn No. 5, UE-20n No. 1, UE-7ns, UE-5n, UE-4t, UE-3e No. 3 and U-15k Test Hole, penetrate aquifers and do not require recompletion to produce groundwater monitoring locations. These wells are either constructed such that recompletion is not needed or not possible. Several of the 11 wells may require the removal of tubing and the placement or replacement of pump equipment. All five of the wells require wellhead rehabilitation to ensure they are not contaminated by surface water or other materials.

  13. Suzaku observations of AGN and synergy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kataoka, Jun [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Takahashi, Tad [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, JAXA, Kanagawa, 229-8510 (Japan); Madejski, Greg [Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology, Stanford University (United States)

    2007-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

  14. Suzaku Observations of AGN and Synergy with GLAST

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kataoka, Jun; /Tokyo Inst. Tech.; Takahashi, Tad; /JAXA, Sagamihara; Madejski, Greg; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2007-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    In next five years, dramatic progress is anticipated for the AGN studies, as we have two important missions to observe celestial sources in the high energy regime: GLAST and Suzaku. Suzaku is the 5th Japanese X-ray astronomy satellite which was successfully launched in July 2005. It carries four X-ray sensitive imaging CCD cameras (0.2-12 keV) located in the focal planes of X-ray telescope, and a non-imaging, collimated hard X-ray detector, which extends the bandpass of the observatory to include the 10-600 keV range. Simultaneous monitoring observations by the two instruments (GLAST and Suzaku) will be particularly valuable for variable radio-loud AGN, allowing the cross-correlations of time series as well as detailed modeling of the spectral evolution between the X-ray and gamma-ray energy bands. In this paper, we show early highlights from Suzaku observations of radio-loud AGNs, and discuss what we can do with GLAST in forthcoming years.

  15. Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Theory vs. Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Cumming

    2003-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

    I review our theoretical understanding of thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars, concentrating on comparisons to observations. Sequences of regular Type I X-ray bursts from GS 1826-24 and 4U 1820-30 are very well described by the theory. I discuss recent work which attempts to use the observed burst properties in these sources to constrain the composition of the accreted material. For GS 1826-24, variations in the burst energetics with accretion rate indicate that the accreted material has solar metallicity; for 4U 1820-30, future observations should constrain the hydrogen fraction, testing evolutionary models. I briefly discuss the global bursting behavior of burst sources, which continues to be a major puzzle. Finally, I turn to superbursts, which naturally fit into the picture as unstable carbon ignition in a thick layer of heavy elements. I present new time-dependent models of the cooling tails of superbursts, and discuss the various interactions between superbursts and normal Type I bursts, and what can be learned from them.

  16. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  17. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  18. Time-dependent extinction rate and species abundance in a tangled-nature model of biological evolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christensen, Kim

    Time-dependent extinction rate and species abundance in a tangled-nature model of biological properties. The macrodynamics exhibit intermittent two-mode switching with a gradually decreasing extinction sense. The form of the species abundance curve compares well with observed func- tional forms. The model

  19. MODELING OBSERVATIONAL CONSTRAINTS FOR DARK MATTER HALOS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartwick, F. D. A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, Victoria, BC V8W 3P6 (Canada)

    2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations show that the underlying rotation curves at intermediate radii in spiral and low-surface-brightness galaxies are nearly universal. Further, in these same galaxies, the product of the central density and the core radius ({rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0}) is constant. An empirically motivated model for dark matter halos that incorporates these observational constraints is presented and shown to be in accord with the observations. A model fit to the observations of the galaxy cluster A611 shows that {rho}{sub 0} r{sub 0} for the dark matter halo in this more massive structure is larger by a factor of {approx}20 over that assumed for the galaxies. The model maintains the successful Navarro-Frenk-White form in the outer regions, although the well-defined differences in the inner regions suggest that modifications to the standard cold dark matter picture are required.

  20. Accelerated Bose-Einstein condensates in a double-well potential

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sacchetti, Andrea

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Devices based on ultracold atoms moving in an accelerating optical lattice or double-well potential are a promising tool for precise measurements of fundamental physical constants as well as for the construction of sensors. Here, we carefully analyze the model of a couple of BECs separated by a barrier in an accelerated field and we show how the observable quantities, mainly the period of the beating motion or of the phase-shift, are related to the physical parameters of the model as well as to the energy of the initial state.

  1. INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ludkovski, Mike

    INVENTORY MANAGEMENT WITH PARTIALLY OBSERVED NONSTATIONARY DEMAND ERHAN BAYRAKTAR AND MICHAEL LUDKOVSKI Abstract. We consider a continuous-time model for inventory management with Markov mod- ulated non inventory level. We then solve this equivalent formulation and directly characterize an optimal inventory

  2. INTEGRAL observations of Her X-1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Klochkov; R. Staubert; K. Postnov; N. Shakura; A. Santangelo; S. Tsygankov; A. Lutovinov; I. Kreykenbohm; J. Wilms

    2008-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Aims: We investigate the X-ray spectral and timing properties of the accreting X-ray pulsar Her X-1 observed with the INTEGRAL satellite in July-August 2005. Methods: The data analyzed in this work cover a substantial part of one main-on state of the source. The short-time scale pulse period development is measured. X-ray pulse profiles for different energy ranges and time intervals are constructed. Pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved broad band X-ray spectra are studied. Spectral changes during X-ray dips are explored. Results: The X-ray pulse profiles are found to change significantly during the period of observations. For the first time a strong spinup is measured within one 35 d cycle. Spectral characteristics observed during the X-ray dips are consistent with their interpretaion as due to partial covering as has been reported by several authors. The fundamental cyclotron absorption line is firmly observed in both pulse-averaged and pulse-phase resolved X-ray spectra. The energy, width, and the depth of the line are found to vary significantly with pulse phase.

  3. Identification of a gravitational arrow of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julian Barbour; Tim Koslowski; Flavio Mercati

    2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    It is widely believed that special initial conditions must be imposed on any time-symmetric law if its solutions are to exhibit behavior of any kind that defines an `arrow of time'. We show that this is not so. The simplest non-trivial time-symmetric law that can be used to model a dynamically closed universe is the Newtonian $N$-body problem with vanishing total energy and angular momentum. Because of special properties of this system (likely to be shared by any law of the Universe), its typical solutions all divide at a uniquely defined point into two halves. In each a well-defined measure of shape complexity fluctuates but grows irreversibly between rising bounds from that point. Structures that store dynamical information are created as the complexity grows and act as `records'. Each solution can be viewed as having a single past and two distinct futures emerging from it. Any internal observer must be in one half of the solution and will only be aware of the records of one branch and deduce a unique past and future direction from inspection of the available records.

  4. Measuring and modeling activity and travel well-being

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abou Zeid, Maya, 1979-

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis develops methods for the measurement of activity and travel well-being and models for linking well-being and behavior. The hypotheses underlying this research are that (1) activities are planned to maintain or ...

  5. Hot exciton transport in ZnSe quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Wachter, Sven; Kalt, Heinz

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The in-plane transport of excitons in ZnSe quantum wells is investigated directly by microphotoluminescence in combination with a solid immersion lens. Due to the strong Froehlich coupling, the initial kinetic energy of the excitons is well...

  6. Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Exploration Activity Details...

  7. Basic Data Report for Monitor Well AEC-7 Reconfiguration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington Regulatory and Environmental Services

    2005-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The New Mexico Office of the State Engineer (OSE) permitted well AEC-7 as C-2742. This well has been part of the far-field monitoring network since 1974. The well was used to obtain water level elevations and hydraulic parameters from both the Bell Canyon Formation and the Culebra Member of the Rustler Formation. This basic data report provides a historical account of the well from the original installation to the current configuration.

  8. Observing alternatives to inflation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Peter

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the possibility that the inflationary paradigm, undoubtfully today's best framework to understand all the present cosmological data, may still have some viable challengers. The underlying idea for such discussions is that although inflation already passed quite a large number of tests, indeed enough to make it part of the so-called ``standard model'' of cosmology, it has always been through indirect measurements: there is not a chance that we may ever directly check its validity, and therefore, in order to assert its factuality with increasing level of confidence, it is required that we compare its predictions not only to observations, but also to as many contenders as possible. Among other categories of possible models, we wish to put the emphasis in particular on bouncing cosmologies that, however not as complete as the inflation paradigm might be, could still represent a reasonnable way of explaining the current data. Hopefully, future data will be able to discriminate between these various sets of theories.

  9. SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surveys; routine activities that do not affect the integrity of the well or the formation; the removal SB 4 Well Stimulation Treatment Regulations Text of Proposed Regulations Page 1 of 13 SB 4 WELL STIMULATION TREATMENT REGULATIONS TEXT OF PROPOSED REGULATIONS Added text is shown in underline

  10. WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzer, William

    WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN is a localization of A if and only if B is flat and well-centered over A. If the integral clo* *sure.3 that a simple flat well-centered overring of an integral domain A is a localization of A. If the integral

  11. WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heinzer, William

    WELL-CENTERED OVERRINGS OF AN INTEGRAL DOMAIN William Heinzer Department of Mathematics, Purdue of A if and only if B is flat and well-centered over A. If the integral closure of A is a Krull domain in Theorem 3.6 that every finitely generated well-centered over- ring of an integrally closed domain is flat

  12. Soda Lake Well Lithology Data and Geologic Cross-Sections

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faulds, James E.

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Comprehensive catalogue of drill?hole data in spreadsheet, shapefile, and Geosoft database formats. Includes XYZ locations of well heads, year drilled, type of well, operator, total depths, well path data (deviations), lithology logs, and temperature data. Plus, 13 cross?sections in Adobe Illustrator format.

  13. University of NebraskaLincoln The UNL Wellness Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Powers, Robert

    programming: wellness.unl.edu Don't see what you are looking for to fulfill your wellness needs? Give us and their families may utilize short-term counseling services. Student On-campus Resource: Counseling Wellness Karen Miller, Registered Dietitian 402­472­0880 Nutrition Consultation and Assessments Receive

  14. Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    #12;i Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza 60 ECTS thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of a Magister Scientiarum #12;iv Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells 60 ECTS thesis

  15. The Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and local information needs and decisions related to water-quality management and policy (httpThe Quality of Our Nation's Waters Factors Affecting Public-Supply-Well Vulnerability to Contamination: Understanding Observed Water Quality and Anticipating Future Water Quality National Water-Quality

  16. Surge Block Method for Controlling Well Clogging and Sampling Sediment during Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Carley, Jack M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Criddle, Craig [Stanford University] [Stanford University

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A surge block treatment method (i.e. inserting a solid rod plunger with a flat seal that closely fits the casing interior into a well and stocking it up and down) was performed for the rehabilitation of wells clogged with biomass and for the collection of time series sediment samples during in situ bioremediation tests for U(VI) immobilization at a the U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. The clogging caused by biomass growth had been controlled by using routine surge block treatment for18 times over a nearly four year test period. The treatment frequency was dependent of the dosage of electron donor injection and microbial community developed in the subsurface. Hydraulic tests showed that the apparent aquifer transmissivity at a clogged well with an inner diameter (ID) of 10.16 cm was increased by 8 13 times after the rehabilitation, indicating the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. Simultaneously with the rehabilitation, the surge block method was successfully used for collecting time series sediment samples composed of fine particles (clay and silt) from wells with ID 1.9 10.16 cm for the analysis of mineralogical and geochemical composition and microbial community during the same period. Our results demonstrated that the surge block method provided a cost-effective approach for both well rehabilitation and frequent solid sampling at the same location.

  17. Observer-dependent optical properties of stationary axisymmetric spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

    2014-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The world lines of null particles admit arbitrary parametrizations. In the presence of a family of observers one may introduce along a null world line an extension of the so-called Cattaneo's relative standard time parameter (valid for massive particles) which plays a special role. Another possibility is to use the coordinate time itself as a parameter. The relation between relative standard time and coordinate time allows for the introduction of an observer-dependent optical path and associated refraction index. Both these quantities are studied here working out explicit examples concerning familiar null orbits and observers in black hole spacetimes.

  18. Observation of d-Orbital Aromaticity. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeedingUnder Well-ControlledObservation of aObservation

  19. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R. [and others

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait`s oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  20. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  1. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, Carol T. (Orinda, CA); Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Bowman, Barry R. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Comfort, III, William J. (Livermore, CA); Guymon, Lloyd G. (Livermore, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Pedersen, Knud B. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA); Strauch, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  2. Partial and Complete Observables for Canonical General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dittrich

    2005-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    In this work we will consider the concepts of partial and complete observables for canonical general relativity. These concepts provide a method to calculate Dirac observables. The central result of this work is that one can compute Dirac observables for general relativity by dealing with just one constraint. For this we have to introduce spatial diffeomorphism invariant Hamiltonian constraints. It will turn out that these can be made to be Abelian. Furthermore the methods outlined here provide a connection between observables in the space--time picture, i.e. quantities invariant under space--time diffeomorphisms, and Dirac observables in the canonical picture.

  3. THERMAL PROPERTIES OF A SOLAR CORONAL CAVITY OBSERVED WITH THE X-RAY TELESCOPE ON HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, Katharine K. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden St. MS 58, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Gibson, Sarah E. [HAO/NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307-3000 (United States); Kucera, Therese A. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Code 671, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Hudson, Hugh S. [Space Sciences Laboratories, University of California, Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Kano, Ryouhei, E-mail: kreeves@cfa.harvard.edu [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

    2012-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Coronal cavities are voids in coronal emission often observed above high latitude filament channels. Sometimes, these cavities have areas of bright X-ray emission in their centers. In this study, we use data from the X-ray Telescope (XRT) on the Hinode satellite to examine the thermal emission properties of a cavity observed during 2008 July that contains bright X-ray emission in its center. Using ratios of XRT filters, we find evidence for elevated temperatures in the cavity center. The area of elevated temperature evolves from a ring-shaped structure at the beginning of the observation, to an elongated structure two days later, finally appearing as a compact round source four days after the initial observation. We use a morphological model to fit the cavity emission, and find that a uniform structure running through the cavity does not fit the observations well. Instead, the observations are reproduced by modeling several short cylindrical cavity 'cores' with different parameters on different days. These changing core parameters may be due to some observed activity heating different parts of the cavity core at different times. We find that core temperatures of 1.75 MK, 1.7 MK, and 2.0 MK (for July 19, July 21, and July 23, respectively) in the model lead to structures that are consistent with the data, and that line-of-sight effects serve to lower the effective temperature derived from the filter ratio.

  4. OBSERVATIONS OF RECENT NEW PARTICLE FORMATION IN HOUSTON DURING TEXAQS-2000.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BUZORIUS,G.; BRECHTEL,F.; ZELENYUK,A.; IMRE,D.; ANGEVINE,W.M.

    2001-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Particle number size distribution measurements were conducted at a tall building site and on a research aircraft during the TexAQS-2000 study. High concentrations of nucleation mode particles were observed during the early morning hours at the same time as the top of the developing boundary layer reached the sampling altitude. Transport of primary emissions from traffic and other local sources, as well as secondary formation processes, was observed. Growth of particles from the nucleation to Aitken modes appears to significantly impact the observed diurnal variation in the number size distribution. As these particles grow to larger sizes they may become more effective at scattering radiation and could act as cloud condensation nuclei, resulting in visibility and climate effects.

  5. Vision Statement Marketing at Kent State University should consist of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palffy-Muhoray, Peter

    of centrally developed, well-managed, well-funded and strategically placed image, message support and involvement. The Kent State University "Brand" Marketing research requirements to building brand equity. While terms such as "brand," "branding

  6. Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpine, J.L. (White Buffalo Petroleum Co., Tulsa, OK (US)); Joshi, S.D. (Joshi Technologies International Inc., Tulsa, OK (US))

    1991-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

  7. Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  8. ECONOMIC RECOVERY OF OIL TRAPPED AT FAN MARGINS USING HIGH ANGLE WELLS AND MULTIPLE HYDRAULIC FRACTURES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mike L. Laue

    2001-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    This project attempts to demonstrate the effectiveness of exploiting thin-layered, low-energy deposits at the distal margin of a prograding turbidite complex through the use of hydraulically fractured horizontal or high-angle wells. The combination of a horizontal or high-angle well and hydraulic fracturing will allow greater pay exposure than can be achieved with conventional vertical wells while maintaining vertical communication between thin interbedded layers and the wellbore. A high-angle well will be drilled in the fan-margin portion of a slope-basin clastic reservoir and will be completed with multiple hydraulic-fracture treatments. Geologic modeling, reservoir characterization, and fine-grid reservoir simulation will be used to select the well location and orientation. Design parameters for the hydraulic-fracture treatments will be determined, in part, by fracturing an existing test well. Fracture azimuth will be predicted by passive seismic monitoring of a fracture-stimulation treatment in the test well using logging tools in an offset well. The long radius, near horizontal well was drilled during the first quarter of 1996. Well conditions resulted in the 7 in. production liner sticking approximately 900 ft off bottom. Therefore, a 5 in. production liner was necessary to case this portion of the target formation. Swept-out sand intervals and a poor cement bond behind the 5 in. liner precluded two of the three originally planned hydraulic fracture treatments. As a result, all pay intervals behind the 5 in. liner were perforated and stimulated with a non-acid reactive fluid. Following a short production period, the remaining pay intervals in the well (behind the 7 in. liner) were perforated. The well was returned to production to observe production trends and pressure behavior and assess the need to stimulate the new perforations.

  9. 2009-2010 Special Projects Boellstorff: A Southern Region Well Owner Network to Safeguard Private Well and Aquifer Integrity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , improper well construction techniques, abandoned wells, improperly sited and functioning on-site wastewater treatment systems, and changes in land use. The aim of the proposed Southern Region Well Owner Network integrity. The SRWON will improve rural and rural-urban interface environmental management by providing

  10. Geopressured-geothermal well activities in Louisiana. Annual report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John, C.J.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since September 1978, microseismic networks have operated continuously around US Department of Energy (DOE) geopressured-geothermal well sites to monitor any microearthquake activity in the well vicinity. Microseismic monitoring is necessary before flow testing at a well site to establish the level of local background seismicity. Once flow testing has begun, well development may affect ground elevations and/or may activate growth faults, which are characteristic of the coastal region of southern Louisiana and southeastern Texas where these geopressured-geothermal wells are located. The microseismic networks are designed to detest small-scale local earthquakes indicative of such fault activation. Even after flow testing has ceased, monitoring continues to assess any microearthquake activity delayed by the time dependence of stress migration within the earth. Current monitoring shows no microseismicity in the geopressured-geothermal prospect areas before, during, or after flow testing.

  11. Registration of Hanford Site Class V underground injection wells. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Plan and Schedule for Disposition and Regulatory Compliance for Miscellaneous Streams (DOE 1994) requires that all existing Class V injection wells be registered under WAC 173--218. (Washington Underground Injection Control Program). The purpose of this document is to fulfill this requirement by registering all active Class V underground injection control wells, on the Hanford Site, under WAC 173--218. This registration will revise the registration previously submitted in 1988 (DOE 1988). In support of this registration, an extensive effort has been made to identify all injection wells on the Hanford Site. New injection wells will not be constructed on the Hanford Site except to receive uncontaminated stormwater or groundwater heatpump return flow. All changes to Miscellaneous Streams will be tracked through the Hanford Site Miscellaneous Streams Inventory Database. Table 5--2 of this injection well registration may be updated annually at the same time as the Miscellaneous Streams Inventory, if necessary.

  12. Extreme commutative quantum observables are sharp

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teiko Heinosaari; Juha-Pekka Pellonp

    2011-06-21T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well known that, in the description of quantum observables, positive operator valued measures (POVMs) generalize projection valued measures (PVMs) and they also turn out be more optimal in many tasks. We show that a commutative POVM is an extreme point in the convex set of all POVMs if and only if it is a PVM. This results implies that non-commutativity is a necessary ingredient to overcome the limitations of PVMs.

  13. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  14. The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

    2008-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

  15. How postcapping put Kuwait`s wells back onstream

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D. [ABB Vetco Gray Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In late february 1991, the retreating Iraqi army blew up, or otherwise caused to blowout, some 700 wells in Kuwait. Between March and November, all of the fires were extinguished and the wells were capped. Work began in July 1991 to recomplete the damaged wells with replaced or reworked tubulars and well heads so that production could be resumed. Except for some of the earlier-capped wells into which cement was pumped, thus requiring more extensive downhole work, many of the damaged wells, particularly in Burgan field, were put back into production mode by the procedure described here, which became known as postcapping. This paper describes the equipment and techniques used in postcapping damaged wellheads.

  16. GEOFRAC: an explosives stimulation technique for a geothermal well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mumma, D.M.; McCullough, F. Jr.; Schmidt, E.W.; Pye, D.S.; Allen, W.C.; Pyle, D.; Hanold, R.J.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The first known use of explosives for stimulating a geothermal well was successfully conducted in December 1981 with a process called GEOFRAC. The 260/sup 0/C well was located at the Union Oil Company's Geysers Field in northern California. For the initial test, 364 kg of a new explosive called HITEX II was placed at a depth of 2256 meters and detonated to verify techniques. The explosive was contained in an aluminum canister to separate it from the well fluids. In the second test, 5000 kg of explosive was used representing a column length of approximately 191 meters. The explosive was detonated at a depth of 1697 meters in the same well. The results of these tests show that HITEX II can be safely emplaced and successfully detonated in a hot geothermal well without causing damage to the well bore or casing.

  17. Eigenstate Localization in an Asymmetric Coupled Quantum Well Pair

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mialitsin, A.; Schmult, S.; Solov'yov, I. A.; Fluegel, B.; Mascarenhas, A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Optical pumping of a type-I/type-II coupled asymmetric quantum well pair induces a spatially separated two dimensional charge carriers plasma in the well's wide and narrow parts. Treating the two coupled wells as a single system we find that the eigenstate probability distribution localizes exclusively either in the wide or the narrow parts of the well pair. The energy of the narrow-well localized state determines the minimal excitation energy for optically pumped charge carriers separation. In a previously used design [Guliamov et al., PRB 64 035314 (2001)] this narrow well transition energy was measured to correspond to a wavelength of 646 nm. We propose modifications to the design suggested earlier with the purpose of pushing up the energy required for the optical pumping of the two-dimensional plasma into the green and blue regions of the visible spectrum.

  18. Automated robotic equipment for ultrasonic inspection of pressurizer heater wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY); DeRossi, Raymond S. (Amsterdam, NY); Mullins, Lawrence E. (Middle Grove, NY)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A robotic device for remotely inspecting pressurizer heater wells is provided which has the advantages of quickly, precisely, and reliably acquiring data at reasonable cost while also reducing radiation exposure of an operator. The device comprises a prober assembly including a probe which enters a heater well, gathers data regarding the condition of the heater well and transmits a signal carrying that data; a mounting device for mounting the probe assembly at the opening of the heater well so that the probe can enter the heater well; a first motor mounted on the mounting device for providing movement of the probe assembly in an axial direction; and a second motor mounted on the mounting device for providing rotation of the probe assembly. This arrangement enables full inspection of the heater well to be carried out.

  19. Generalized IPR curves for predicting well behavior. [Inflow Performance Relation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Patton, L.D.; Goland, M.

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Oil well productivity calculations are required to relate surface measured oil rate to the pressure drawdown of the well in order to predict well behavior. The productivity index concept and the inflow performance relation concept can be combined to derive a workable form of a well's deliverability which covers the entire pressure range above and below the bubble point. A procedure for predicting well behavior is presented using equations to determine the relationship between shut-in bottom-hole pressure, bubble point pressure, and bottom-hole producing pressure. An example calculation is provided comparing 2 wells. The conclusion is that one set of production test data (rate and bottom-hole producing pressure) together with the shut-in bottom-hole pressure (or average reservoir pressure) and bubble point pressure are enough to construct a reliable inflow performance relation.

  20. Investigation and evaluation of geopressured-geothermal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hartsock, J.H.; Rodgers, J.A.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Over the life of the project, 1143 wildcat wells were screened for possible use. Although many did not meet the program's requirement for sand development, a surprisingly large number were abandoned because of downhole mechanical problems. Only 94 of these wells were completed as commercial hydrocarbon producers. Five wells of opportunity were funded for testing. Of these, two were evaluated for their hydraulic energy, thermal energy, and recoverable methane, and three were abandoned because of mechanical problems. (MHR)

  1. Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fjerstad, Paul Albert

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Advisory Committee: Dr. W. D. Von Gonten A three-dimensional reservoir simulation model does not calculate the correct bottomhole flowing pressure, p f, for a partially penetrating well. The simulator well cell pressure must be corrected ro obtain... an accurate value for p f. Simulation model results have wf' been used in this part to develop a new inflow equation relating cell pressure to actual bottomhole flowing pressure for a partially penetrating well. Based on the new inflow equation, an equation...

  2. Horizontal Well Placement Optimization in Gas Reservoirs Using Genetic Algorithms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Trevor Howard

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    University Co-Chairs of Advisory Committee, Dr. Ding Zhu Dr. Hadi Nasrabadi Horizontal well placement determination within a reservoir is a significant and difficult step... optimization is an important criterion during the reservoir development phase of a horizontal-well project in gas reservoirs, but it is less significant to vertical wells in a homogeneous reservoir. It is also shown that genetic algorithms are an extremely...

  3. Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 1988) Exploration...

  4. wellness.umd.edu 1. Choose a balanced, energy-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    sporting event 30. Play an instrument 31. Write a poem or story 32. Go ice skating at Wells Ice Rink 33

  5. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Final report Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California....

  6. Private Water Well Education for Adult Residents of Oklahoma.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robbins, Sharon Marie

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??The scope of this study involved an investigation into the education of the adult residents of Oklahoma regarding private water wells. The groundwater supply for (more)

  7. Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    structural controls, and potential subsurface reservoir temperatures of geothermal fluids. An example is provided by the Salt Wells geothermal system in Churchill County,...

  8. Fraced horizontal well shows potential of deep tight gas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schueler, S. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Celle (Germany); Santos, R. [Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH, Hamburg (Germany)

    1996-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful completion of a multiple fraced, deep horizontal well demonstrated new techniques for producing tight gas sands. In Northwest Germany, Mobil Erdgas-Erdoel GmbH drilled, cased, and fraced the world`s deepest horizontal well in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand at 15,687 ft (4,783 m) true vertical depth. The multiple frac concept provides a cost-efficient method to economically produce significant gas resources in the ultra-tight Rotliegendes ``Main`` sand. Besides the satisfactory initial gas production rate, the well established several world records, including deepest horizontal well with multiple fracs, and proved this new technique to develop ultra-tight sands.

  9. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Project Officer: Dan KingGreg Stillman Total budget: 300 K April 24 , 2013 Principal Investigator: Dr. Toshifumi...

  10. Knowledge-based stratigraphic well-log correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denton, Michael A.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    represents the formations, and new rules for the knowledge-base that can correlate formations in reservoirs with secondary stratification. This expert system has correlated ovei' 3, 500 ft. of well-log data from three different types of rock sequences... inspirational support. TABLE OF CONTENTS Page ABSTRACT nl DEDICATION ACKNOWLEDGEMENT TABLE OF CONTENTS LIST OF TABLES x1 LIST OF FIGURES xl1 CHAPTER I ? INTRODUCTION 1. 1 Well-Logs 1. 2 Stratigraphic Well-Log Correlation . 1. 3 Well-Log Correlation...

  11. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  12. BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    osmosis, heat conduction, pressure thermal effect, and the interconvertibility of mechanical and thermal energy. The model has been applied to Raft River geothermal well RRG-9,...

  13. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the...

  14. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Exploration Activity Details Location Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...

  15. Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Abstract...

  16. CY2003 RCRA GROUNDWATER MONITORING WELL SUMMARY REPORT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MARTINEZ, C.R.

    2003-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the calendar year (CY) 2003 field activities associated with the installation of two new groundwater monitoring wells in the A-AX Waste Management Area (WMA) and four groundwater monitoring wells in WMA C in the 200 East Area of the Hanford Nuclear Reservation. All six wells were installed by Fluor Hanford Inc. (FH) for CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) in support of Draft Hanford Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement) M-24-00 milestones and ''Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of 1976'' (RCRA) groundwater monitoring requirements. Drilling data for the six wells are summarized in Table 1.

  17. Application of horizontal wells in steeply dipping reservoirs.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez Navarro, Jose David

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ??A three-dimensional reservoir simulation study is performed to evaluate the impact of horizontal well applications on oil recovery from steeply dipping reservoirs. The Provincia field, (more)

  18. Chaotic Hamiltonian ratchets for pulsed periodic double-well potentials: Classical correlations and the ratchet current

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonckheere, Thibaut

    Chaotic Hamiltonian ratchets for pulsed periodic double-well potentials: Classical correlations and the ratchet current N. A. C. Hutchings,1 M. R. Isherwood,1 T. Jonckheere,2 and T. S. Monteiro1 1 Department, ratchet currents, and time scales of a new ratchet in a fully chaotic Hamiltonian system, introduced

  19. Shock chlorination is a method of disinfect-ing a water well. It is recommended when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    period. Most water treatment equipment (such as water heaters, softeners and pressure tanks) should alsoShock chlorination is a method of disinfect- ing a water well. It is recommended when a water is the source of bacteria, the system will be contaminated again every time water is pumped into the plumbing

  20. Effect of phonon confinement on lattice thermal conductivity of lead Telluride quantum well structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tripathi, Madhvendra Nath, E-mail: ommadhav27@gmail.com [Department of Pure and Applied Physics, Guru Ghasidas Vishwavidyalaya, Bilaspur-495009, Chhattisgarh (India)

    2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper examines the effect of spatial confinement of acoustic phonons on average group velocity and consequently the lattice thermal conductivity of a free-standing PbTe quantum well structure and their temperature dependence. The average group velocity at 100 decreases 30% to the bulk value and falls more rapidly on reducing the width of quantum well. Moreover, the lattice thermal conductivity of 100 wide PbTe quantum well with value of 0.60 W/mK shows considerable decrease of 70% compared to its bulk value. It is observed that the effect of reduction in well width is less pronounce as temperature increases. This appears mainly due to dominance of umklapp processes over the confinement effects.

  1. Radar Observations of the 2011 October Draconid Outburst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ye, Quanzhi; Campbell-Brown, Margaret D; Weryk, Robert J

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A strong outburst of the October Draconid meteor shower was predicted for October 8, 2011. Here we present the observations obtained by the Canadian Meteor Orbit Radar (CMOR) during the 2011 outburst. CMOR recorded 61 multi-station Draconid echoes and 179 single-station overdense Draconid echoes (covering the magnitude range of +3 <= MV <= +7) between 16-20h UT on October 8, 2011. The mean radiant for the outburst was determined to be a_g = 261.9o +/- 0.3o, d_g = +55.3o +/- 0.3o (J2000) from observations of the underdense multi-station echoes. This radiant location agrees with model predictions to ~1o . The determined geocentric velocity was found to be ~10-15% lower than the model value (17.0 - 19.1 km s^-1 versus 20.4 km s^-1), a discrepancy we attribute to undercorrection for atmospheric deceleration of low density Draconid meteoroids as well as to poor radar radiant geometry during the outburst peak. The mass index at the time of the outburst was determined to be ~ 1.75 using the amplitude distribut...

  2. Precision Timed Machines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Isaac Suyu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1.4 Precision Timed Machines . . . . .Precision Timed Machine 2.1precision timed (PRET) machine. pages 264265, June 2007. [

  3. MEDICATION TREATMENT FOR ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDERS UNLV STUDENT WELLNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemmers, Oliver

    Jan 2010 MEDICATION TREATMENT FOR ATTENTION DEFICIT DISORDERS UNLV STUDENT WELLNESS SRWC (702) 895-3627 Due to the high potential for both abuse and possibly sudden unexpected death, UNLV Student Wellness for ADD/ADHD. You may contact the CAPS triage counselor or our care manager, Perris Kent, for an ADD

  4. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nardi, Anthony P. (Burlington, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  5. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, William H. (Westford, MA); Mitchell, Peter G. (Concord, MA)

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  6. General inflow performance relationship for solution-gas reservoir wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias-Couto, L.E.; Golan, M.

    1982-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two equations are developed to describe the inflow performance relationship (IPR) of wells producing from solution-gas drive reservoirs. These are general equations (extensions of the currently available IPR's) that apply to wells with any drainage-area shape at any state of completion flow efficiency and any stage of reservoir depletion. 7 refs.

  7. Integration of well test analysis into naturally fractured reservoir simulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez Garcia, Laura Elena

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2005 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering INTEGRATION OF WELL TEST ANALYSIS INTO A NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIR SIMULATION A Thesis by LAURA..., W. John Lee Wayne M. Ahr Head of Department, Stephen A. Holditch December 2005 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering iii ABSTRACT Integration of Well Test Analysis into a Naturally Fractured Reservoir...

  8. Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckhaus, Steffi

    Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus IAD - Technical University of Darmstadt interactiondesign@steffi.beckhaus.de ABSTRACT Slow technology is technology that actively influences our well): Miscellaneous General Terms Slow Technology SLOW TECHNOLOGY IS... Slow technology is technology that actively

  9. FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FULL FUEL CYCLE ASSESSMENT WELL TO TANK ENERGY INPUTS, EMISSIONS, AND WATER IMPACTS Prepared For be divided into two parts: · Well-to-Tank (WTT) Feedstock extraction, transport, storage, processing, distribution, transport, and storage · Tank-to-Wheels (TTW) Refueling, consumption and evaporation The full

  10. KNOWLEDGE-BASED DECISION SUPPORT IN OIL WELL DRILLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    for capturing and reusing experience and best practice in industrial operations5-7 . CBR as a technology has nowKNOWLEDGE-BASED DECISION SUPPORT IN OIL WELL DRILLING Combining general and case-specific knowledge of Computer and Information Science. agnar.aamodt@idi.ntnu.no Abstract: Oil well drilling is a complex process

  11. texas well owner network More than a million private water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the successful Texas Watershed Stewards program by emphasizing best management practices (BMPs). Agri have a better understanding of the relation- ships between practices in or near wells and the quality ·U.S. Environmental Protection Agency twon.tamu.edu Private water wells have a greater risk

  12. Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C. [Texas A& M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

  13. Helicopter Surveys for Locating Wells and Leaking Oilfield Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Hodges, G. (Fugro Airborne Surveys)

    2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energys National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys

  14. Analysis of Transient Pressure Tests for Olkaria Exploration Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haukwa, Charles B.

    1987-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Analysis of transient pressure tests for Olkaria West wells shows that both infinite acting and double porosity models can be used to analyze the well behaviour and infer reservoir properties from fall-off steps of long enough duration, in wells where no significant thermal recovery occurs. The double porosity model gives better estimates of reservoir properties than the infinite acting model, for long fall-off steps in wells intercepting fractures. Semilog methods give fairly good estimates of reservoir transmissivity for the long fall-off steps but are highly inaccurate when used independently, especially for the short fall-off steps conducted in most of the wells. Double porosity models can also be used for recovery test analyses where two phase transients are not significant. 6 refs., 11 figs., 8 tabs.

  15. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  16. Field observations and lessons learned

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nielsen, Joh B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This presentation outlines observations and lessons learned from the Megaports program. It provides: (1) details of field and technical observations collected during LANL field activities at ports around the world and details of observations collected during radiation detections system testing at Los Alamos National Laboratory; (2) provides suggestions for improvement and efficiency; and (3) discusses possible program execution changes for more effective operations.

  17. MAGNETOACOUSTIC WAVE ENERGY FROM NUMERICAL SIMULATIONS OF AN OBSERVED SUNSPOT UMBRA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felipe, T.; Khomenko, E.; Collados, M., E-mail: tobias@iac.es [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, 38205, C/Via Lactea, s/n, La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain)

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We aim at reproducing the height dependence of sunspot wave signatures obtained from spectropolarimetric observations through three-dimensional MHD numerical simulations. A magnetostatic sunspot model based on the properties of the observed sunspot is constructed and perturbed at the photosphere, introducing the fluctuations measured with the Si I {lambda}10827 line. The results of the simulations are compared with the oscillations observed simultaneously at different heights from the He I {lambda}10830 line, the Ca II H core, and the Fe I blends in the wings of the Ca II H line. The simulations show a remarkable agreement with the observations. They reproduce the velocity maps and power spectra at the formation heights of the observed lines, as well as the phase and amplification spectra between several pairs of lines. We find that the stronger shocks at the chromosphere are accompanied with a delay between the observed signal and the simulated one at the corresponding height, indicating that shocks shift the formation height of the chromospheric lines to higher layers. Since the simulated wave propagation matches very well the properties of the observed one, we are able to use the numerical calculations to quantify the energy contribution of the magnetoacoustic waves to the chromospheric heating in sunspots. Our findings indicate that the energy supplied by these waves is too low to balance the chromospheric radiative losses. The energy contained at the formation height of the lowermost Si I {lambda}10827 line in the form of slow magnetoacoustic waves is already insufficient to heat the higher layers, and the acoustic energy which reaches the chromosphere is around 3-9 times lower than the required amount of energy. The contribution of the magnetic energy is even lower.

  18. Suzaku Observations of Extreme MeV Blazar Swift J0746.3+2548

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watanabe, Shin; Sato, Rie; Takahashi, Tadayuki; Kataoka, Jun; Madejski, Greg; Sikora, Marek; Tavecchio, Fabrizio; Sambruna, Rita; Romani, Roger; Edwards, Philip G.; Pursimo, Tapio

    2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the Suzaku observations of the high luminosity blazar SWIFT J0746.3+2548 (J0746) conducted in November 2005. This object, with z = 2.979, is the highest redshift source observed in the Suzaku Guaranteed Time Observer (GTO) period, is likely to show high gamma-ray flux peaking in the MeV range. As a result of the good photon statistics and high signal-to-noise ratio spectrum, the Suzaku observation clearly confirms that J0746 has an extremely hard spectrum in the energy range of 0.3-24 keV, which is well represented by a single power-law with a photon index of {Lambda}{sub ph} {approx_equal} 1.17 and Galactic absorption. The multiwavelength spectral energy distribution of J0746 shows two continuum components, and is well modeled assuming that the high-energy spectral component results from Comptonization of the broad-line region photons. In this paper we search for the bulk Compton spectral features predicted to be produced in the soft X-ray band by scattering external optical/UV photons by cold electrons in a relativistic jet. We discuss and provide constraints on the pair content resulting from the apparent absence of such features.

  19. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard [Department of Physics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221 (United States); Yarrison-Rice, Jan [Department of Physics, Miami University, Oxford, OH 45056 (United States); Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati [Department of Electronic Materials and Engineering, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 0200 (Australia); Etheridge, Joanne [Monash Centre for Electron Microscopy, Monash University, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Wong, Bryan M. [Materials Chemistry Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, CA 94551 (United States)

    2013-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  20. Empirical Study Of Tube Wave Suppression For Single Well Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, Phillip Bradley; Weinberg, David Michael; Fincke, James Russell

    2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's portion of a collaborative effort with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories on a borehole seismic project called Single Well Seismic Imaging. The INEEL's role was to design, fabricate, deploy, and test a number of passive devices to suppress the energy within the borehole. This energy is generally known as tube waves. Heretofore, tube waves precluded acquisition of meaningful single-well seismic data. This report addresses the INEEL tests, theories, observations, and test results.

  1. Empirical Study Of Tube Wave Suppression For Single Well Seismic Imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    West, P.B.; Weinberg, D.M.; Fincke, J.R.

    2002-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory's portion of a collaborative effort with Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and Sandia National Laboratories on a borehole seismic project called Single Well Seismic Imaging. The INEEL's role was to design, fabricate, deploy, and test a number of passive devices to suppress the energy within the borehole. This energy is generally known as tube waves. Heretofore, tube waves precluded acquisition of meaningful single-well seismic data. This report addresses the INEEL tests, theories, observations, and test results.

  2. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  3. ADVANCED TECHNIQUES FOR RESERVOIR SIMULATION AND MODELING OF NONCONVENTIONAL WELLS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Louis J. Durlofsky; Khalid Aziz

    2004-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Nonconventional wells, which include horizontal, deviated, multilateral and ''smart'' wells, offer great potential for the efficient management of oil and gas reservoirs. These wells are able to contact larger regions of the reservoir than conventional wells and can also be used to target isolated hydrocarbon accumulations. The use of nonconventional wells instrumented with downhole inflow control devices allows for even greater flexibility in production. Because nonconventional wells can be very expensive to drill, complete and instrument, it is important to be able to optimize their deployment, which requires the accurate prediction of their performance. However, predictions of nonconventional well performance are often inaccurate. This is likely due to inadequacies in some of the reservoir engineering and reservoir simulation tools used to model and optimize nonconventional well performance. A number of new issues arise in the modeling and optimization of nonconventional wells. For example, the optimal use of downhole inflow control devices has not been addressed for practical problems. In addition, the impact of geological and engineering uncertainty (e.g., valve reliability) has not been previously considered. In order to model and optimize nonconventional wells in different settings, it is essential that the tools be implemented into a general reservoir simulator. This simulator must be sufficiently general and robust and must in addition be linked to a sophisticated well model. Our research under this five year project addressed all of the key areas indicated above. The overall project was divided into three main categories: (1) advanced reservoir simulation techniques for modeling nonconventional wells; (2) improved techniques for computing well productivity (for use in reservoir engineering calculations) and for coupling the well to the simulator (which includes the accurate calculation of well index and the modeling of multiphase flow in the wellbore); and (3) accurate approaches to account for the effects of reservoir heterogeneity and for the optimization of nonconventional well deployment. An overview of our progress in each of these main areas is as follows. A general purpose object-oriented research simulator (GPRS) was developed under this project. The GPRS code is managed using modern software management techniques and has been deployed to many companies and research institutions. The simulator includes general black-oil and compositional modeling modules. The formulation is general in that it allows for the selection of a wide variety of primary and secondary variables and accommodates varying degrees of solution implicitness. Specifically, we developed and implemented an IMPSAT procedure (implicit in pressure and saturation, explicit in all other variables) for compositional modeling as well as an adaptive implicit procedure. Both of these capabilities allow for efficiency gains through selective implicitness. The code treats cell connections through a general connection list, which allows it to accommodate both structured and unstructured grids. The GPRS code was written to be easily extendable so new modeling techniques can be readily incorporated. Along these lines, we developed a new dual porosity module compatible with the GPRS framework, as well as a new discrete fracture model applicable for fractured or faulted reservoirs. Both of these methods display substantial advantages over previous implementations. Further, we assessed the performance of different preconditioners in an attempt to improve the efficiency of the linear solver. As a result of this investigation, substantial improvements in solver performance were achieved.

  4. Geology and Geothermal Potential North of Wells, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jewell, Paul W.

    1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The geology north of Wells, Nevada is dominated by approximately 2150 m of Tertiary lacustrine siltstones and conglomerates. The sediments are cut by a high-angle, range-bounding fault and several associated step faults. Hydrothermal alteration and silicification are associated with the high-angle faults. Two ages of Quaternary sediments locally overlie the Tertiary sediments. Lithologic and well log analyses define numerous potential aquifers in the Tertiary sediments. The shallowest of these aquifers is overlain by a tuffaceous siltstone which appears to act as an aquitard for hot water moving through the aquifers. Three possible subsurface hydrologic models can be constructed to explain the spatial relationships of the thermal water near Wells. Cost-effective steps taken to expedite geothermal development in the area might include deepening of an existing domestic well in the city of Wells to at least 180 m in order to penetrate the tuffaceous siltstone aquitard, running borehole logs for all existing wells, and conducting a shallow temperature-probe survey in the Tertiary sediments north of Wells.

  5. Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, Thomas M. (San Francisco, CA)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of synthesis for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well (26) in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well (26) includes at least one orifice (74) extending into the well (26), and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well (26) to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of B) expelling the reagent solution from the well (26), while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit (80) of the orifice (74) exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well (26) through the orifice exit (80).

  6. Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, T.M.

    1998-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of synthesis is described for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: (A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well includes at least one orifice extending into the well, and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of (B) expelling the reagent solution from the well, while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit of the orifice exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well through the orifice exit. 9 figs.

  7. A gold hybrid structure as optical coupler for quantum well infrared photodetector

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Jiayi; Li, Qian; Jing, Youliang [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 500 Yu Tian Road, Shanghai 200083 (China); Chen, Xiaoshuang, E-mail: xschen@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Li, Zhifeng; Li, Ning; Lu, Wei [National Laboratory for Infrared Physics, Shanghai Institute of Technical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 500 Yu Tian Road, Shanghai 200083 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A hybrid structure consisting of a square lattice of gold disk arrays and an overlaying gold film is proposed as an optical coupler for a backside-illuminated quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP). Finite difference time-domain method is used to numerically simulate the reflection spectra and the field distributions of the hybrid structure combined with the QWIP device. The results show that the electric field component perpendicular to the quantum well is strongly enhanced when the plasmonic resonant wavelength of the hybrid structure coincides with the response one of the quantum well infrared photodetector regardless of the polarization of the incident light. The effect of the diameter and thickness of an individual gold disk on the resonant wavelength is also investigated, which indicates that the localized surface plasmon also plays a role in the light coupling with the hybrid structure. The coupling efficiency can exceed 50 if the structural parameters of the gold disk arrays are well optimized.

  8. Nembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nembhard, Harriet Black

    observations. The Shewhart chart has been well-discussed in the literature and introductory texts on SPC (seeNembhard (2002) 1 Individual Observation Process Monitoring Charts for Systems with Response Lags Engineering April 2002 Abstract Previously, it has been held that statistical process control (SPC

  9. G. M. Koelemay well No. 1, Jefferson County, Texas. Volume II. Well test data: testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The following are included in the appendices: field test data, combined and edited raw data, time/pressure data, sample log, reservoir fluid study, gas data, sample collection and analysis procedure, scale monitoring and water analysis, sand detector and strip charts, and Horner-type plot data. (MHR)

  10. Completion report for well ER-3-2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-3-2 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office (DOE/NV), in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project (NV ERP) at the Nevada Test Site. IT Corporation (IT) was the principal environmental contractor for the project. The roles and responsibilities of IT and other contractors involved in the project are described in the Raytheon Services Nevada (RSN) Drilling Program and the Underground Test Area Operable Unit Project Management Plan. The well will become part of the Underground Test Area (UGTA) monitoring well network.

  11. How perforation shot density affects gas well performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cheng, A.M.C.

    1988-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The single gas well model is formulated using the systems analysis approach and is composed of three main modules. The first module is the modified inflow performance relationship (IPR). This IPR accounts for pressure drops through the reservoir, laminar skin and damaged, compacted zone around casing perforations. The second module is the tubing outflow performance computed via the Cullender and Smith method. The third module is the gas material balance equation for computing average well pressure with a given gas production level. By coupling this equation with the computed inflow and outflow results, future gas deliverability and economic return of a gas well can then be projected.

  12. Deep Well #4 Backup Power Systems Project Closeout Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeremy Westwood

    2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The project scope was to install a diesel generated power source to deep well 4 in addition to the existing commercial power source. The diesel power source and its fuel supply system shall be seismically qualified to withstand a Performance Category 4 (PC-4) seismic event. This diesel power source will permit the deep well to operate during a loss of commercial power. System design will incorporate the ability to select and transfer power between the new diesel power source and commercial power sources for the the deep well motor and TRA-672 building loads.

  13. Effect of exciton oscillator strength on upconversion photoluminescence in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Osamu, E-mail: kojima@phoenix.kobe-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Shouhei; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Akahane, Kouichi [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2014-11-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We report upconversion photoluminescence (UCPL) in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells. UCPL from the AlAs barrier is caused by the resonant excitation of the excitons in the GaAs well. When the quantum well has sufficient miniband width, UCPL is hardly observed because of the small exciton oscillator strength. The excitation-energy and excitation-density dependences of UCPL intensity show the exciton resonant profile and a linear increase, respectively. These results demonstrate that the observed UCPL caused by the saturated two-step excitation process requires a large number of excitons.

  14. Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Craig M.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small...

  15. Development and verification of new semi-analytical methods for the analysis and prediction of gas well performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knowles, Robert Stephen

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . We have developed two new relations (p and (p/z) results) that predict gas well rate-time performance within engineering accuracy of the rigorous solution. Unlike the pseudopressure-pseudotime relation, our new solutions require only knowledge...

  16. Simulation studies of waterflood performance with horizontal wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Horacio

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two-and three-dimensional simulation studies have been carried out to evaluate waterflood oil recovery in a 40-acre 5-spot pattern using horizontal and vertical well systems. The three-dimensional simulation results indicate that the parameters...

  17. Water Wells and Drilled or Mined Shafts (Texas)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The drilling, excavation, and construction of a water well or mine shaft requires a permit from the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (previously known as the Texas Natural Resource...

  18. Explicit deconvolution of wellbore storage distorted well test data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bahabanian, Olivier

    2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis/interpretation of wellbore storage distorted pressure transient test data remains one of the most significant challenges in well test analysis. Deconvolution (i.e., the "conversion" of a variable-rate distorted pressure profile...

  19. U.S. Geothermal Completes Second Successful Production Well at...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Completes Second Successful Production Well at Neal Hot Springs Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal Completes Second...

  20. Comparison of Emperical Decline Curve Analysis for Shale Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanfar, Mohammed Sami

    2013-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This study compares four recently developed decline curve methods and the traditional Arps or Fetkovich approach. The four methods which are empirically formulated for shale and tight gas wells are: 1. Power Law Exponential Decline (PLE). 2...

  1. Temperature behavior in the build section of multilateral wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Romero Lugo, Analis Alejandra

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . The model predicts the temperature profiles in the build sections connecting the laterals to one another or to a main wellbore, thus accounting for the changing well angle relative to the temperature profile in the earth. In addition, energy balance...

  2. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA(DOI-BLM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program...

  3. Transient and Pseudosteady-State Productivity of Hydraulically Fractured Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumban Gaol, Ardhi

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    , are represented in the form of transient peudosteady-state productivity indices. The numerical simulator is validated by comparing results to known analytical solution for radial flow, existing models of productivity for vertical well intersected by vertical...

  4. Development Wells At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Suemnicht...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of the Basalt Canyon Pipeline later in 2005 to support the MP-I plant with additional fluids from wells 57-22 and 66-25 near Shady Rest to the east (completed in 2006 to approx....

  5. Development Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dreesen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    into EE-2 at an average flow rate of 100 Ls and downhole pressure of 83 MPa, the fracture pattern produced again failed to connect the two wells. A third attempt to fracture...

  6. Well Productivity Enhancement of High Temperature Heterogeneous Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guanqun

    2014-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Acidizing is one of the most popular techniques for well productivity enhancement during oil and gas production. However, the treatment method is not very effective when the wellbore penetrates through multiple layers of heterogeneous reservoirs...

  7. Midcontinent well operators learn advantages of coiled-tubing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle, D.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    From well cleanup to velocity strings to squeeze jobs, more Midcontinent operators are adding coiled-tubing methods to their oilfield techniques. The advantages of these techniques are discussed.

  8. Seismic Signal Processing for Single Well Imaging Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Brendan

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis focuses on the concept of Single Well Imaging (SWI) in which a seismic source and receivers are deployed in a borehole to investigate the surrounding geology. The Uniwell project (1997-1999) was the first ...

  9. Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring a Water Right Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther: Washington State Department of...

  10. Electrode wells for powerline-frequency electrical heating of soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buettner, Harley M. (Livermore, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Siegel, William H. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode well for use in powerline-frequency heating of soils for decontamination of the soil. Heating of soils enables the removal of volatile organic compounds from soil when utilized in combination with vacuum extraction. A preferred embodiment of the electrode well utilizes a mild steel pipe as the current-carrying conductor to at least one stainless steel electrode surrounded by a conductive backfill material, preferably graphite or steel shot. A covering is also provided for electrically insulating the current-carrying pipe. One of the electrode wells is utilized with an extraction well which is under subatmospheric pressure to withdraw the volatile material, such as gasoline and trichioroethylene (TCE) as it is heated.

  11. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  12. Electrode wells for powerline-frequency electrical heating of soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buettner, H.M.; Daily, W.D.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.; Ramirez, A.L.; Siegel, W.H.

    1999-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrode well is described for use in powerline-frequency heating of soils for decontamination of the soil. Heating of soils enables the removal of volatile organic compounds from soil when utilized in combination with vacuum extraction. A preferred embodiment of the electrode well utilizes a mild steel pipe as the current-carrying conductor to at least one stainless steel electrode surrounded by a conductive backfill material, preferably graphite or steel shot. A covering is also provided for electrically insulating the current-carrying pipe. One of the electrode wells is utilized with an extraction well which is under subatmospheric pressure to withdraw the volatile material, such as gasoline and trichloroethylene (TCE) as it is heated. 4 figs.

  13. Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

  14. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa Higgs-like

  15. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary)morphinan antagonist Journal Article: CrystalFG36-08GO18149Speeding access toSpeedingSpeeding accessa

  16. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding accessandBusinessDevelopmentObligations

  17. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the ContributionsArmsSpeedingSpeeding

  18. Use of sonication for in-well softening of semivolatile organic compounds. 1997 annual progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R.W.; Manning, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (US); Hoffman, M.R. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (US); Gorelick, S. [Stanford Univ., CA (US)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    'This project investigates the in-situ degradation of semivolatile organic compounds (SVOCs) and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using in-well sonication, in-well vapor stripping, and bioremediation. Pretreating groundwaters with sonication techniques in-situ would form VOCs that can be effectively removed by in-well vapor stripping and bioremediation. The mechanistic studies focus on the coupling of megasonics and ultrasonics to soften (i.e., partially degrade) the SVOCs; oxidative reaction mechanism studies; surface corrosion studies (on the reactor walls/well); enhancement due to addition of oxidants, quantification of the hydroxyl radical formation; identification/quantification of degradation products; volatility/degradability of the treated waters; development of a computer simulation model to describe combined in-well sonication/in-well vapor stripping/bioremediation; systems analysis/economic analysis; large laboratory-scale experiment verification; and field demonstration of the integrated technology. Benefits of this approach include: (1) Remediation is performed in-situ; (2) The treatment systems complement each other; their combination can drastically reduce or remove SVOCs and VOCs; (3) Ability to convert hard-to-degrade organics into more volatile organic compounds; (4) Ability to remove residual VOCs and softened SVOCs through the combined action of in-well vapor stripping and biodegradation; (5) Does not require handling or disposing of water at the ground surface; and (6) Cost-effective and improved efficiency, resulting in shortened clean-up times to remediate a site.'

  19. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  20. Completion Report for Well ER-EC-5

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bechtel Nevada

    2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Well ER-EC-5 was drilled for the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office in support of the Nevada Environmental Restoration Project at the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada. This well was drilled in the summer of 1999 as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's hydrogeologic investigation program in the Western Pahute Mesa - Oasis Valley region just west of the Nevada Test Site. A 44.5-centimeter surface hole was drilled and cased off to a depth of 342.6 meters below ground surface. The borehole diameter was then decreased to 31.1 centimeters for drilling to a total depth of 762.0 meters. One completion string with three isolated slotted intervals was installed in the well. A preliminary composite, static water level was measured at the depth of 309.9 meters, 40 days after installation of the completion string. Detailed lithologic descriptions with stratigraphic assignments are included in the report. These are based on composite drill cuttings collected every 3 meters, and 18 sidewall samples taken at various depths below 349.6 meters, supplemented by geophysical log data and results from detailed chemical and mineralogical analyses of rock samples. The well penetrated Tertiary-age tuffs of the Thirsty Canyon Group, caldera moat-filling sedimentary deposits, lava of the Beatty Wash Formation, and landslide breccia and tuffs of the Timber Mountain Group. The well reached total depth in welded ashflow tuff of the Ammonia Tanks Tuff after penetrating 440.1 meters of this unit, which is also the main water-producing unit in the well. The geologic interpretation of data from this well constrains the western margin of the Ammonia Tanks caldera to the west of the well location.