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Sample records for observation wells time

  1. Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGE Energy Resources, IncInc JumpObamaObservation

  2. Category:Observation Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia:GeothermalNEPA Environmental AnalysisObservation

  3. Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Los Alamos National Laboratory in 1984. These wells were drilled to facilitate microseismic monitoring of ongoing MHF experiments attempting to produce a viable geothermal...

  4. Timed Automata with Observers under Energy Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doyen, Laurent

    of schedules given an initial energy level of one. For one-clock priced timed automata both the lowerTimed Automata with Observers under Energy Constraints Patricia Bouyer Lab. Spécification et@lsv.ens-cachan.fr ABSTRACT In this paper we study one-clock priced timed automata in which prices can grow linearly ( p = k

  5. The time to reach pseudosteady-state in horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al-Kahtani, Abdulghafour

    1998-01-01

    Engineers need to estimate the expected productivity of horizontal wells. We need to know how long it takes to reach pseudosteady-state to accept that estimation. When all boundaries influence the pressure distribution in the drainage area...

  6. Time changes in gradient and observed winds 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Ronald Dale

    1972-01-01

    OF FIGURES. 1. INXRODUCTION. 2. BACKGROUND AND STATEI'U':NT OF THE PROBLEM. . a. Previous studies. b. Statement of the problem. c. Objectives. 3. THEORETICAL CONSIDERATIONS. a. Gradient wind equation. b. Time rate-of-change of the gradient wind. . 4... for curvature of the height contours on the upper-level synoptic charts. Of the forces and accelerations contained in the complete horizontal equations of motion, those which do not appear in the gradient wind approximation are the frictional force...

  7. Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing time tracking and efficiency measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eric H. Neilsen, Jr.; Richard G. Kron; William N. Boroski

    2002-10-16

    Accurate and consistent time tracking is essential for evaluating the efficiency of survey observing operations and identifying areas that need improvement. Off the shelf time tracking software, which requires users to enter activities by hand, proved tedious to use and insufficiently exible. In this paper, we present an alternate time tracking system developed specifically for Sloan Digital Sky Survey observing. This system uses an existing logging system, murmur, to log the beginning and ending times of tracked circumstances, including activities, weather, and problems which effect observing. Operations software automatically generates most entries for routine observing activities; in a night of routine observing, time tracking requires little or no attention from the observing staff. A graphical user interface allows observers to make entries marking time lost to weather and equipment, and to correct inaccurate entries made by the observing software. The last is necessary when the change in activity is not marked by a change in the state of the software or instruments, or when the time is used for engineering or other observing not part of routine survey data collection. A second utility generates reports of time usage from these logs. These reports include totals for the time spent for each observing task, time lost to weather and problems, efficiency statistics for comparison with the survey baseline, and a detailed listing of what activities and problems were present in any covered time period.

  8. Functional design criteria for the self-installing liquid observation well. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-12-04

    This document presents the functional design criteria for installing liquid observation wells (LOWs) into single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide or organic wastes. The LOWs will be designed to accommodate the deployment of gamma, neutron, and electromagnetic induction probes and to interface with the existing tank structure and environment.

  9. Functional design criteria for the self-installing liquid observation well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, S.A.

    1995-06-16

    This document presents the functional design criteria for installing liquid observation wells (LOWs) into single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide wastes. The LOWs will be designed to accommodate the deployment of gamma, neutron, and electromagnetic induction probes and to interface with the existing tank structure and environment.

  10. Functional design criteria for the self-installing liquid observation well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parra, S.A.

    1996-01-01

    This document presents the functional Design Criteria for installing liquid observation wells (LOWs) into single-shell tanks containing ferrocyanide and organic wastes. The LOWs will be designed to accommodate the deployment of gamma, neutron, and electromagnetic induction probes and to interface with the existing tank structure and environment.

  11. Relative timing of solar flares observed at different wavelengths

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Veronig; B. Vrsnak; M. Temmer; A. Hanslmeier

    2002-08-05

    The timing of 503 solar flares observed simultaneously in hard X-rays, soft X-rays and H-alpha is analyzed. We investigated the start and the peak time differences in different wavelengths, as well as the differences between the end of the hard X-ray emission and the maximum of the soft X-ray and H-alpha emission. In more than 90% of the analyzed events, a thermal preheating seen in soft X-rays is present prior to the impulsive flare phase. On average, the soft X-ray emission starts 3 min before the hard X-ray and the H-alpha emission. No correlation between the duration of the preheating phase and the importance of the subsequent flare is found. Furthermore, the duration of the preheating phase does not differ for impulsive and gradual flares. For at least half of the events, the end of the nonthermal emission coincides well with the maximum of the thermal emission, consistent with the beam-driven evaporation model. On the other hand, for about 25% of the events there is strong evidence for prolonged evaporation beyond the end of the hard X-rays. For these events, the presence of an additional energy transport mechanism, most probably thermal conduction, seems to play an important role.

  12. Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salamon, Peter

    Observation time scale, free-energy landscapes, and molecular symmetry David J. Walesa,1 and Peter structures that interconvert on a given time scale are lumped together, the corresponding free-energy surface that are connected by free-energy barriers below a certain threshold. We illustrate this time dependence for some

  13. Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real time observations of the nucleation and growth of nanowires and nanotubes December 1, 2011 at 3pm36-428 Eric Stach Center for Functional Nanomaterials, Brookhaven National...

  14. Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David, Alexandre

    Controllers with Minimal Observation Power (Application to Timed Systems) Peter Bulychev1 , Franck, Danish-Chinese Center for Cyber Physical Systems (IDEA4CPS) and VKR Center of Excellence MT-LAB. #12;The iterations. We apply our approach to timed systems. We have developed a tool prototype and analyze

  15. A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    A Real-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil-Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen and development cost in addition to two case studies are documented. Introduction DrillEdge is a software system for how to handle the current situation. Verdande Technology has developed DrillEdge to reduce the cost

  16. Observer Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan, and Bjarne Foss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    of investigation. Gas lift is a technology to produce oil and gas from wells with low reservoir pressure in the Fig. 1. A gas lifted oil well tubing, which in turn reduces the downhole pressure (DHP), This workObserver Design for Gas Lifted Oil Wells Ole Morten Aamo, Gisle Otto Eikrem, Hardy Siahaan

  17. A Well Performance Study of Eagle Ford Shale Gas Wells Integrating Empirical Time-Rate and Analytical Time-Rate-Pressure Analysis 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Avery S

    2015-08-10

    estimated flowrate decline and historic gas flowrate data (qg) versus production time. ............................................................................................................................ 69 4.14 (Log-log Plot): PVT revised gas 30.... ................................................................................................................. 80 4.28 (Log-log Plot): PVT revised gas 30-year estimated cumulative production volume model comparison –– Arps modified hyperbolic decline model, power-law exponential decline model, and 50 percent and 100 percent completion efficiency RTA model...

  18. Empirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar Flare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piana, Michele

    & Michele Piana1,3 ABSTRACT We present electron images of an extended solar flare source, deduced from the impulsive phase of a solar flare typically appears in the form of accelerated electrons. In the generallyEmpirical Determination of the Energy Loss Rate of Accelerated Electrons in a Well-Observed Solar

  19. Spectral Models for Early Time SN 2011fe Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baron, E; Sullivan, M; Hsiao, E; Ellis, R S; Gal-Yam, A; Howell, D A; Nugent, P E; Dominguez, I; Krisciunas, K; Phillips, M M; Suntzeff, N; Wang, L; Thomas, R C

    2015-01-01

    We use observed UV through near IR spectra to examine whether SN 2011fe can be understood in the framework of Branch-normal SNe Ia and to examine its individual peculiarities. As a benchmark, we use a delayed-detonation model with a progenitor metallicity of Z_solar/20. We study the sensitivity of features to variations in progenitor metallicity, the outer density profile, and the distribution of radioactive nickel. The effect of metallicity variations in the progenitor have a relatively small effect on the synthetic spectra. We also find that the abundance stratification of SN 2011fe resembles closely that of a delayed detonation model with a transition density that has been fit to other Branch-normal Type Ia supernovae. At early times, the model photosphere is formed in material with velocities that are too high, indicating that the photosphere recedes too slowly or that SN 2011fe has a lower specific energy in the outer ~0.1 M_sun than does the model. We discuss several explanations for the discrepancies. ...

  20. Real time monitoring of multiple wells flowing under pseudosteady state condition by using Kalman filtering 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jacob, Suresh

    2002-01-01

    the relative localized skin effects in the individual wells and the reservoir wide relative permeability. The ability to continuously estimate the skin values in the wells offers tremendous value in production decisions. Simultaneous estimation of skin...

  1. Analytical study of capture time to a horizontal well Hongbin Zhan*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    ; Cleveland, 1994; Sawyer and Lieuallen-Dulam, 1998). This is partially because the cost of drilling Horizontal wells have been widely used in petro- leum industry for oil and gas production (Goode a horizontal well in a shallow aquifer is competitive with drilling a vertical well (Wilson and Kaback, 1993

  2. Spectral irradiance variations: Comparison between observations and the SATIRE model on solar rotation time scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yvonne C. Unruh; Natalie A. Krivova; Sami K. Solanki; Jerald W. Harder; Greg Kopp

    2008-02-28

    Aims: We test the reliability of the observed and calculated spectral irradiance variations between 200 and 1600 nm over a time span of three solar rotations in 2004. Methods: We compare our model calculations to spectral irradiance observations taken with SORCE/SIM, SoHO/VIRGO and UARS/SUSIM. The calculations assume LTE and are based on the SATIRE (Spectral And Total Irradiance REconstruction) model. We analyse the variability as a function of wavelength and present time series in a number of selected wavelength regions covering the UV to the NIR. We also show the facular and spot contributions to the total calculated variability. Results: In most wavelength regions, the variability agrees well between all sets of observations and the model calculations. The model does particularly well between 400 and 1300 nm, but fails below 220 nm as well as for some of the strong NUV lines. Our calculations clearly show the shift from faculae-dominated variability in the NUV to spot-dominated variability above approximately 400 nm. We also discuss some of the remaining problems, such as the low sensitivity of SUSIM and SORCE for wavelengths between approximately 310 and 350 nm, where currently the model calculations still provide the best estimates of solar variability.

  3. Well-observed dynamics of flaring and peripheral coronal magnetic loops during an M-class limb flare

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Jinhua; Zhou, Tuanhui; Ji, Haisheng; Feng, Li; Wiegelmann, Thomas; Inhester, Bernd

    2014-08-20

    In this paper, we present a variety of well-observed dynamic behaviors for the flaring and peripheral magnetic loops of the M6.6 class extreme limb flare that occurred on 2011 February 24 (SOL2011-02-24T07:20) from EUV observations by the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly on the Solar Dynamics Observatory and X-ray observations by RHESSI. The flaring loop motion confirms the earlier contraction-expansion picture. We find that the U-shaped trajectory delineated by the X-ray corona source of the flare roughly follows the direction of a filament eruption associated with the flare. Different temperature structures of the coronal source during the contraction and expansion phases strongly suggest different kinds of magnetic reconnection processes. For some peripheral loops, we discover that their dynamics are closely correlated with the filament eruption. During the slow rising to abrupt, fast rising of the filament, overlying peripheral magnetic loops display different responses. Two magnetic loops on the elbow of the active region had a slow descending motion followed by an abrupt successive fast contraction, while magnetic loops on the top of the filament were pushed outward, slowly being inflated for a while and then erupting as a moving front. We show that the filament activation and eruption play a dominant role in determining the dynamics of the overlying peripheral coronal magnetic loops.

  4. LATE-TIME OBSERVATIONS OF GRB 080319B: JET BREAK, HOST GALAXY, AND ACCOMPANYING SUPERNOVA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tanvir, N. R.; O'Brien, P. T.; Wiersema, K.; Starling, R. L. C.; Rol, E.; Levan, A. J.; Svensson, K.; Fruchter, A. S.; Granot, J.; Jakobsson, P.; Fynbo, J.; Hjorth, J.; Curran, P. A.; Burrows, D. N.; Genet, F.

    2010-12-10

    The Swift-discovered GRB 080319B was by far the most distant source ever observed at naked-eye brightness, reaching a peak apparent magnitude of 5.3 at a redshift of z = 0.937. We present our late-time optical (Hubble Space Telescope, Gemini, and Very Large Telescope) and X-ray (Chandra) observations, which confirm that an achromatic break occurred in the power-law afterglow light curve at {approx}11 days post-burst. This most likely indicates that the gamma-ray burst (GRB) outflow was collimated, which for a uniform jet would imply a total energy in the jet E{sub jet} {approx}> 10{sup 52} erg. Our observations also show a late-time excess of red light, which is well explained if the GRB was accompanied by a supernova (SN), similar to those seen in some other long-duration GRBs. The latest observations are dominated by light from the host and show that the GRB took place in a faint dwarf galaxy (r(AB) {approx} 27.0, rest frame M{sub B} {approx} -17.2). This galaxy is small even by the standards of other GRB hosts, which is suggestive of a low-metallicity environment. Intriguingly, the properties of this extreme event-a small host and bright SN-are entirely typical of the very low luminosity bursts such as GRB 980425 and GRB 060218.

  5. Real time synchrotron X-ray observations of solidification in hypoeutectic Al–Si alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nogita, Kazuhiro [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Yasuda, Hideyuki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Prasad, Arvind [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); McDonald, Stuart D., E-mail: s.mcdonald1@uq.edu.au [Nihon Superior Centre for the Manufacture of Electronic Materials, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia); Nagira, Tomoya; Nakatsuka, Noriaki [Department of Adaptive Machine Systems, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka, 565-0871 (Japan); Uesugi, Kentaro [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Sayo, Hyogo, 679-5198 (Japan); StJohn, David H. [School of Mechanical and Mining Engineering, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072 (Australia)

    2013-11-15

    This paper demonstrates how recent advances in synchrotron technology have allowed for the real-time X-ray imaging of solidification in Al–Si alloys, despite the small difference in atomic number of these elements. The experiments performed at the SPring-8 synchrotron, involved imaging the solidification of Al–1wt.%Si and Al–4wt.%Si alloys under a low-temperature gradient and a cooling rate of around 0.3 °C/s. The nucleation and growth of the primary aluminum grains as well as the onset of eutectic solidification were clearly observed. In the alloys containing Al–4wt.%Si, contrast was sufficient to characterize the nucleation rate and growth velocity of the aluminum grains. The importance of improving observation of solidification in the Al–Si system by increasing the time resolution during critical events is discussed. - Highlights: • A synchrotron technique was used to observe solidification of Al-Si alloys. • Nucleation, coarsening, and the onset of eutectic solidification were observed. • Images captured are suitable for quantitative analysis. • The resolution that was obtained should be possible for most aluminum alloys.

  6. Real-time characterization of partially observed epidemics using surrogate models.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Safta, Cosmin; Ray, Jaideep; Lefantzi, Sophia; Crary, David; Sargsyan, Khachik; Cheng, Karen

    2011-09-01

    We present a statistical method, predicated on the use of surrogate models, for the 'real-time' characterization of partially observed epidemics. Observations consist of counts of symptomatic patients, diagnosed with the disease, that may be available in the early epoch of an ongoing outbreak. Characterization, in this context, refers to estimation of epidemiological parameters that can be used to provide short-term forecasts of the ongoing epidemic, as well as to provide gross information on the dynamics of the etiologic agent in the affected population e.g., the time-dependent infection rate. The characterization problem is formulated as a Bayesian inverse problem, and epidemiological parameters are estimated as distributions using a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method, thus quantifying the uncertainty in the estimates. In some cases, the inverse problem can be computationally expensive, primarily due to the epidemic simulator used inside the inversion algorithm. We present a method, based on replacing the epidemiological model with computationally inexpensive surrogates, that can reduce the computational time to minutes, without a significant loss of accuracy. The surrogates are created by projecting the output of an epidemiological model on a set of polynomial chaos bases; thereafter, computations involving the surrogate model reduce to evaluations of a polynomial. We find that the epidemic characterizations obtained with the surrogate models is very close to that obtained with the original model. We also find that the number of projections required to construct a surrogate model is O(10)-O(10{sup 2}) less than the number of samples required by the MCMC to construct a stationary posterior distribution; thus, depending upon the epidemiological models in question, it may be possible to omit the offline creation and caching of surrogate models, prior to their use in an inverse problem. The technique is demonstrated on synthetic data as well as observations from the 1918 influenza pandemic collected at Camp Custer, Michigan.

  7. HINODE OBSERVATION OF PHOTOSPHERIC MAGNETIC ACTIVITIES TRIGGERING X-RAY MICROFLARES AROUND A WELL-DEVELOPED SUNSPOT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kano, R. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Shimizu, T. [Institute of Space and Astronautical Science, Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, 3-1-1 Yoshinodai, Chuo, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-5210 (Japan); Tarbell, T. D., E-mail: ryouhei.kano@nao.ac.j [Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center, 3251 Hanover Street, Department ADBS, Building 252, Palo Alto, CA 94304 (United States)

    2010-09-10

    Microflares, which are small energetic events in the solar corona, are an example of dynamical phenomena suitable for understanding energy release processes in the solar corona. We identified 55 microflares around a well-developed sunspot surrounded by a moat with high-cadence X-ray images from the Hinode X-ray Telescope, and searched for their photospheric counterparts in line-of-sight magnetograms taken with the Hinode Solar Optical Telescope. We found opposite magnetic polarities encountering each other around the footpoints of 28 microflares, while we could not find such encounters around the footpoints of the other 27 microflares. Emerging magnetic fluxes in the moat were the dominant origin causing the encounters of opposite polarities (21 of 28 events). Unipolar moving magnetic features (MMFs) with negative polarities the same as the sunspot definitely caused the encounters of opposite polarities for five microflares. The decrease of magnetic flux, i.e., magnetic flux cancellation, was confirmed at the encountering site in typical examples of microflares. Microflares were not isotropically distributed around the spot; the microflares with emerging magnetic fluxes (EMFs) were observed in the direction where magnetic islands with the same polarity as the spot were located at the outer boundary of the moat, while the microflares with negative MMFs were observed in the direction where magnetic islands with polarity opposite to the spot were located at the outer boundary of the moat. We also found that EMFs in the moat had a unique orientation in which those with the same polarity as the spot is closer to the spot than the other one that had the opposite polarity to the spot. These observational results lead to two magnetic configurations including magnetic reconnection for triggering energy release at least in half of the microflares around the spot, and suggest that the global magnetic structures around the spot strongly affect what kinds of polarity encounters are formed in the sunspot moat.

  8. Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Endres. William J.

    Real-time observation of lithium fibers growth inside a nanoscale lithium-ion battery Hessam to observe the real-time nucleation and growth of the lithium fibers inside a nanoscale Li-ion battery. Our.1063/1.3643035] Lithium-ion batteries are of great interest due to their high energy density, however, various safety

  9. A Wireless Internet-Based Observatory: The Real-time Coastal Observation Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Wireless Internet-Based Observatory: The Real-time Coastal Observation Network (ReCON) S. A community and educational institutions through the internet. A real-time database management system provides to the success of regional coastal ocean observing systems. The pervasiveness of wireless internet technology

  10. Distortions of Experimental Muon Arrival Time Distributions of Extensive Air Showers by the Observation Conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Haeusler; A. F. Badea; H. Rebel; I. M. Brancus; J. Oehlschlaeger

    2001-10-17

    Event-by-event measured arrival time distributions of Extensive Air Shower (EAS) muons are affected and distorted by various interrelated effects which originate from the time resolution of the timing detectors, from fluctuations of the reference time and the number (multiplicity) of detected muons spanning the arrival time distribution of the individual EAS events. The origin of these effects is discussed, and different correction procedures, which involve detailed simulations, are proposed and illustrated. The discussed distortions are relevant for relatively small observation distances (R < 200 m) from the EAS core. Their significance decreases with increasing observation distance and increasing primary energies. Local arrival time distributions which refer to the observed arrival time of the first local muon prove to be less sensitive to the mass of the primary. This feature points to the necessity of arrival time measurements with additional information on the curvature of the EAS disk.

  11. Energy relaxation during hot-exciton transport in quantum wells: Direct observation by spatially resolved phonon-sideband spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Kalt, Heinz

    2002-10-01

    We investigate the energy relaxation of excitons during the real-space transport in ZnSe quantum wells by using microphotoluminescence with spatial resolution enhanced by a solid immersion lens. The spatial evolution of the LO-phonon sideband...

  12. EarlyTime Observations of GRBs afterglow with 2m Robotic Telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gomboc, Andreja

    Early­Time Observations of GRBs afterglow with 2­m Robotic Telescopes A. Melandri # , A. Gomboc time multi­wavelength light curves, obtained by space and ground­based robotic telescopes, have shown followup programme being conducted on a network of the world's three largest robotic telescopes that aims

  13. PONDER - A Real time software backend for pulsar and IPS observations at the Ooty Radio Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Naidu, Arun; Manoharan, P K; Krishnakumar, M A

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a new real-time versatile backend, the Pulsar Ooty Radio Telescope New Digital Efficient Receiver (PONDER), which has been designed to operate along with the legacy analog system of the Ooty Radio Telescope (ORT). PONDER makes use of the current state of the art computing hardware, a Graphical Processing Unit (GPU) and sufficiently large disk storage to support high time resolution real-time data of pulsar observations, obtained by coherent dedispersion over a bandpass of 16 MHz. Four different modes for pulsar observations are implemented in PONDER to provide standard reduced data products, such as time-stamped integrated profiles and dedispersed time series, allowing faster avenues to scientific results for a variety of pulsar studies. Additionally, PONDER also supports general modes of interplanetary scintillation (IPS) measurements and very long baseline interferometry data recording. The IPS mode yields a single polarisation correlated time series of solar wind scintillation over a b...

  14. rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci-sion support when drilling oil wells. Decisions are sup-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    developed DrillEdge to reduce the cost and decrease the probability of fail- ures in oil well drilling-Time Decision Support System for High Cost Oil Well Drilling Operations Odd Erik Gundersen, Frode Sørmo, AgnarD rillEdge is a software system that provides real-time deci- sion support when drilling oil wells

  15. CONFRONTING THREE-DIMENSIONAL TIME-DEPENDENT JET SIMULATIONS WITH HUBBLE SPACE TELESCOPE OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Staff, Jan E.; Niebergal, Brian P.; Ouyed, Rachid; Pudritz, Ralph E.; Cai, Kai

    2010-10-20

    We perform state-of-the-art, three-dimensional, time-dependent simulations of magnetized disk winds, carried out to simulation scales of 60 AU, in order to confront optical Hubble Space Telescope observations of protostellar jets. We 'observe' the optical forbidden line emission produced by shocks within our simulated jets and compare these with actual observations. Our simulations reproduce the rich structure of time-varying jets, including jet rotation far from the source, an inner (up to 400 km s{sup -1}) and outer (less than 100 km s{sup -1}) component of the jet, and jet widths of up to 20 AU in agreement with observed jets. These simulations when compared with the data are able to constrain disk wind models. In particular, models featuring a disk magnetic field with a modest radial spatial variation across the disk are favored.

  16. time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanley, H. Eugene

    time scale observed in some close binary systems (19), and tidal dissipation (20) may also cause). At this stage, the core of star A undergoes collapse, and the residual nuclear fuel is ignited to power aware that both tidal and general relativistic ef- fects will be important in this system

  17. Monitoring water stress using time series of observed to unstressed surface temperature difference

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gentine, Pierre

    Monitoring water stress using time series of observed to unstressed surface temperature difference to monitor stress have shifted from establishing empirical relationships between combined vegetation cover/temperature surface temperature as a baseline to monitor water stress. The unstressed temperature is the equilibrium

  18. Observational constraints on light cosmic strings from photometry and pulsar timing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. S. Pshirkov; A. V. Tuntsov

    2009-11-25

    We constrain the cosmological density of cosmic string loops using two observational signatures -- gravitational microlensing and the Kaiser-Stebbins effect. Photometry from RXTE and CoRoT space missions and pulsar timing from Parkes Pulsar Timing Array, Arecibo and Green Bank radio telescopes allow us to probe cosmic strings in a wide range of tensions $G\\mu/c^2=10^{-16}\\div10^{-10}$. We find that pulsar timing data provide the most stringent constraints on the abundance of light strings at the level $\\Omega_s \\sim 10^{-3}$. Future observational facilities such as the Square Kilometer Array will allow one to improve these constraints by orders of magnitude.

  19. Range, Doppler and astrometric observables computed from Time Transfer Functions: a survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Hees; S. Bertone; C. Le Poncin-Lafitte; P. Teyssandier

    2014-12-10

    Determining range, Doppler and astrometric observables is of crucial interest for modelling and analyzing space observations. We recall how these observables can be computed when the travel time of a light ray is known as a function of the positions of the emitter and the receiver for a given instant of reception (or emission). For a long time, such a function--called a reception (or emission) time transfer function--has been almost exclusively calculated by integrating the null geodesic equations describing the light rays. However, other methods avoiding such an integration have been considerably developped in the last twelve years. We give a survey of the analytical results obtained with these new methods up to the third order in the gravitational constant $G$ for a mass monopole. We briefly discuss the case of quasi-conjunctions, where higher-order enhanced terms must be taken into account for correctly calculating the effects. We summarize the results obtained at the first order in $G$ when the multipole structure and the motion of an axisymmetric body is taken into account. We present some applications to on-going or future missions like Gaia and Juno. We give a short review of the recent works devoted to the numerical estimates of the time transfer functions and their derivatives.

  20. Hanford wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chamness, M.A.; Merz, J.K.

    1993-08-01

    Records describing wells located on or near the Hanford Site have been maintained by Pacific Northwest Laboratory and the operating contractor, Westinghouse Hanford Company. In support of the Ground-Water Surveillance Project, portions of the data contained in these records have been compiled into the following report, which is intended to be used by those needing a condensed, tabular summary of well location and basic construction information. The wells listed in this report were constructed over a period of time spanning almost 70 years. Data included in this report were retrieved from the Hanford Envirorunental Information System (HEIS) database and supplemented with information not yet entered into HEIS. While considerable effort has been made to obtain the most accurate and complete tabulations possible of the Hanford Site wells, omissions and errors may exist. This document does not include data on lithologic logs, ground-water analyses, or specific well completion details.

  1. Time Resolved Collapse of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pollack, L.; Tate, M. W.; Finnefrock, A. C.; Kalidas, C.; Trotter, S.; Darnton, N. C.; Lurio, L.; Austin, R. H.; Batt, C. A.; Gruner, S. M. (and others)

    2001-05-21

    High-intensity, ''pink'' beam from an undulator was used in conjunction with microfabricated rapid-fluid mixing devices to monitor the early events in protein folding with time resolved small angle x-ray scattering. This Letter describes recent work on the protein bovine {beta} -lactoglobulin where collapse from an expanded to a compact set of states was directly observed on the millisecond time scale. The role of chain collapse, one of the initial stages of protein folding, is not currently understood. The characterization of transient, compact states is vital in assessing the validity of theories and models of the folding process.

  2. Quantum generalized fluctuation-dissipation relations in terms of time-distributed observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yu. E. Kuzovlev

    2013-06-18

    New formulations of quantum generalized fluctuation-dissipation relations in terms of characteristic and probabilistic functionals of continuous observations are suggested and discussed. It is shown that control of entropy production in quantum system turns any measurement in it to a source of its extra perturbations, and because of this effect relations between probabilities of mutually time-reversed processes become definitely non-local in their functional space

  3. Analytical and semi-analytical solutions of horizontal well capture times under no-ow and constant-head boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    constrain the vertical ¯ow, but enhance the horizontal ¯ow, resulting in elongated iso- capture time curves to re- plenish the aquifers, resulting in less elongated iso-capture time curves. Ó 2000 Elsevier with surface restrictions (e.g., land®lls, lagoons, buildings, wetlands, lakes, utility lines, tanks), (2

  4. Observations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGasObservation of aof

  5. LATE-TIME SPECTRAL OBSERVATIONS OF THE STRONGLY INTERACTING TYPE Ia SUPERNOVA PTF11kx

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, Jeffrey M. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Nugent, Peter E.; Filippenko, Alexei V.; Cenko, S. Bradley [Department of Astronomy, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Gal-Yam, Avishay [Benoziyo Center for Astrophysics, The Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot 76100 (Israel); Sullivan, Mark [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton SO17 1BJ (United Kingdom); Howell, D. Andrew [Las Cumbres Observatory Global Telescope Network, Goleta, CA 93117 (United States); Pan, Yen-Chen; Hook, Isobel M., E-mail: jsilverman@astro.as.utexas.edu [Department of Physics (Astrophysics), University of Oxford, Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3RH (United Kingdom)

    2013-08-01

    PTF11kx was a Type Ia supernova (SN Ia) that showed time-variable absorption features, including saturated Ca II H and K lines that weakened and eventually went into emission. The strength of the emission component of H{alpha} gradually increased, implying that the SN was undergoing significant interaction with its circumstellar medium (CSM). These features, and many others, were blueshifted slightly and showed a P-Cygni profile, likely indicating that the CSM was directly related to, and probably previously ejected by, the progenitor system itself. These and other observations led Dilday et al. to conclude that PTF11kx came from a symbiotic nova progenitor like RS Oph. In this work we extend the spectral coverage of PTF11kx to 124-680 rest-frame days past maximum brightness. The late-time spectra of PTF11kx are dominated by H{alpha} emission (with widths of full width at half-maximum intensity Almost-Equal-To 2000 km s{sup -1}), strong Ca II emission features ({approx}10,000 km s{sup -1} wide), and a blue 'quasi-continuum' due to many overlapping narrow lines of Fe II. Emission from oxygen, He I, and Balmer lines higher than H{alpha} is weak or completely absent at all epochs, leading to large observed H{alpha}/H{beta} intensity ratios. The H{alpha} emission appears to increase in strength with time for {approx}1 yr, but it subsequently decreases significantly along with the Ca II emission. Our latest spectrum also indicates the possibility of newly formed dust in the system as evidenced by a slight decrease in the red wing of H{alpha}. During the same epochs, multiple narrow emission features from the CSM temporally vary in strength. The weakening of the H{alpha} and Ca II emission at late times is possible evidence that the SN ejecta have overtaken the majority of the CSM and agrees with models of other strongly interacting SNe Ia. The varying narrow emission features, on the other hand, may indicate that the CSM is clumpy or consists of multiple thin shells.

  6. Results of the Baikal experiment on observations of macroscopic nonlocal correlations in reverse time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Korotaev, S M; Kiktenko, E O; Budnev, N M; Gorohov, J V

    2015-01-01

    Although the general theory macroscopic quantum entanglement of is still in its infancy, consideration of the matter in the framework of action-at-a distance electrodynamics predicts for the random dissipative processes observability of the advanced nonlocal correlations. These correlations were really revealed in our previous experiments with some large-scale heliogeophysical processes as the source ones and the lab detectors as the probe ones. Recently a new experiment has been performing on the base of Baikal Deep Water Neutrino Observatory. The thick water layer is an excellent shield against any local impacts on the detectors. The first annual series 2012/2013 has demonstrated that detector signals respond to the heliogeophysical processes and causal connection of the signals directed downwards: from the Earth surface to the Baikal floor. But this nonlocal connection proved to be in reverse time. In addition advanced nonlocal correlation of the detector signal with the regional source-process: the random...

  7. Observation of time-invariant coherence in a room temperature quantum simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Silva, Isabela A; Bromley, Thomas R; Cianciaruso, Marco; Sarthour, Roberto S; Oliveira, Ivan S; Franco, Rosario Lo; deAzevedo, Eduardo R; Soares-Pinto, Diogo O; Adesso, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    The ability to live in coherent superposition states is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an unexpendable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. Here we show that, in a composite quantum system exposed to decohering noise, quantum coherence in a reference basis can stay protected for indefinite time. This occurs for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in a two-qubit room temperature nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator. Our study reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  8. Observation of time-invariant coherence in a room temperature quantum simulator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Isabela A. Silva; Alexandre M. Souza; Thomas R. Bromley; Marco Cianciaruso; Roberto S. Sarthour; Ivan S. Oliveira; Rosario Lo Franco; Eduardo R. deAzevedo; Diogo O. Soares-Pinto; Gerardo Adesso

    2015-11-06

    The ability to live in coherent superposition states is a signature trait of quantum systems and constitutes an unexpendable resource for quantum-enhanced technologies. However, decoherence effects usually destroy quantum superpositions. Here we show that, in a composite quantum system exposed to decohering noise, quantum coherence in a reference basis can stay protected for indefinite time. This occurs for a class of quantum states independently of the measure used to quantify coherence, and requires no control on the system during the dynamics. Such an invariant coherence phenomenon is observed experimentally in a two-qubit room temperature nuclear magnetic resonance quantum simulator. Our study reveals a novel interplay between coherence and various forms of correlations, and highlights the natural resilience of quantum effects in complex systems.

  9. Results of the Baikal experiment on observations of macroscopic nonlocal correlations in reverse time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. M. Korotaev; V. O. Serdyuk; E. O. Kiktenko; N. M. Budnev; J. V. Gorohov

    2015-07-03

    Although the general theory macroscopic quantum entanglement of is still in its infancy, consideration of the matter in the framework of action-at-a distance electrodynamics predicts for the random dissipative processes observability of the advanced nonlocal correlations. These correlations were really revealed in our previous experiments with some large-scale heliogeophysical processes as the source ones and the lab detectors as the probe ones. Recently a new experiment has been performing on the base of Baikal Deep Water Neutrino Observatory. The thick water layer is an excellent shield against any local impacts on the detectors. The first annual series 2012/2013 has demonstrated that detector signals respond to the heliogeophysical processes and causal connection of the signals directed downwards: from the Earth surface to the Baikal floor. But this nonlocal connection proved to be in reverse time. In addition advanced nonlocal correlation of the detector signal with the regional source-process: the random component of hydrological activity in the upper layer was revealed and the possibility of its forecast on nonlocal correlations was demonstrated. But the strongest macroscopic nonlocal correlations are observed at extremely low frequencies, that is at periods of several months. Therefore the above results should be verified in a longer experiment. We verify them by data of the second annual series 2013/2014 of the Baikal experiment. All the results have been confirmed, although some quantitative parameters of correlations and time reversal causal links turned out different due to nonstationarity of the source-processes. A new result is displaying of the advanced response of nonlocal correlation detector to the earthquake. This opens up the prospect of the earthquake forecast on the new physical principle, although further confirmation in the next events is certainly needed.

  10. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Well Placement Well Placement LANL maintains an extensive groundwater monitoring and surveillance program through sampling. August 1, 2013 Finished groundwater well head with solar...

  11. TAKING ADVANTAGE OF THE COS TIME-TAG CAPABILITY: OBSERVATIONS OF PULSATING HOT DQ WHITE DWARFS AND DISCOVERY OF A NEW ONE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dufour, P.; Fontaine, G.; Bergeron, P. [Departement de Physique, Universite de Montreal, C.P. 6128, Succ. Centre-Ville, Montreal, QC H3C 3J7 (Canada); Beland, S. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Astronomy, 389 UCB, University of Colorado, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Chayer, P., E-mail: dufourpa@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: fontaine@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: bergeron@astro.umontreal.ca, E-mail: sbeland@colorado.edu, E-mail: chayer@stsci.edu [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    We present an analysis of the ultraviolet light curves of five Hot DQ white dwarfs recently observed with the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph (COS) on board the Hubble Space Telescope (HST). These light curves were constructed by extracting the time-tag information from the FUV and NUV spectroscopic data. Single-color light curves were thus produced in 60 s time bins. The Fourier analysis of these data successfully recovers the main pulsation modes of the three stars previously known to be variable from ground-based observations. We also report the discovery of pulsations in another object, SDSS J1153+0056, making it only the fifth member of the new class of variable Hot DQ stars and the first pulsating white dwarf to be discovered from space-based observations. The relatively high amplitudes of the modes observed in the FUV (2-4 times that observed in the optical) as well as the high fraction of stars variable in our sample suggest that most, if not all, Hot DQ white dwarfs might be pulsating at some level when observed at high enough sensitivity. Our results also underline the vast potential of the time-tag capability of the HST/COS combination.

  12. The system for observing fitness instruction time (SOFIT) as a measure of energy expenditure during classroom based physical activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Honas, Jeffery J.; Washburn, Richard A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Greene, Leon; Cook-Wiens, Galen; Donnelly, Joseph E.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to develop an equation to estimate physical activity energy expenditure (PAEE) during a 10-min physically active academic lesson using The System for Observing Fitness Instruction Time ...

  13. Implementing the Palomar Transient Factory Real-Time Detection Pipeline in GLADE: Results and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rusu, Florin

    Implementing the Palomar Transient Factory Real-Time Detection Pipeline in GLADE: Results, USA Abstract. Palomar Transient Factory is a comprehensive detection system for the identification-query processing, real-time classification 1 Introduction The Palomar Transient Factory (PTF) project [1, 2] aims

  14. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: VII. Potentially interesting candidate systems from Fourier-based statistical tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; Ford, Eric B.; Rowe, Jason F.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Holman, Matthew J.; Welsh, William F.; Borucki, William J.; Batalha, Natalie M.; Bryson, Steve; Caldwell, Douglas A.; Ciardi, David R.; /Caltech /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the deviations of transit times from a linear ephemeris for the Kepler Objects of Interest (KOI) through Quarter six (Q6) of science data. We conduct two statistical tests for all KOIs and a related statistical test for all pairs of KOIs in multi-transiting systems. These tests identify several systems which show potentially interesting transit timing variations (TTVs). Strong TTV systems have been valuable for the confirmation of planets and their mass measurements. Many of the systems identified in this study should prove fruitful for detailed TTV studies.

  15. Real-Time Observation of Atomic Layer Deposition Inhibition: Metal Oxide Growth on Self-Assembled Alkanethiols

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Real-Time Observation of Atomic Layer Deposition Inhibition: Metal Oxide Growth on Self each atomic layer deposition (ALD) cycle to an analytical island-growth model that enables moderately optimized conditions. KEYWORDS: atomic layer deposition, self-assembled monolayers, quartz crystal

  16. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: III. Confirmation of 4 Multiple Planet Systems by a Fourier-Domain Study of Anti-correlated Transit Timing Variations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steffen, Jason H.; /Fermilab; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; /Lick Observ.; Ford, Eric B.; /Florida U.; Carter, Joshua A.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Fressin, Francois; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Holman, Matthew J.; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Lissauer, Jack J.; /NASA, Ames; Rowe, Jason F.; /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /NASA, Ames; Ragozzine, Darin; /Harvard-Smithsonian Ctr. Astrophys.; Welsh, William F.; /Caltech; Borucki, William J.; /NASA, Ames /UC, Santa Barbara

    2012-01-01

    We present a method to confirm the planetary nature of objects in systems with multiple transiting exoplanet candidates. This method involves a Fourier-domain analysis of the deviations in the transit times from a constant period that result from dynamical interactions within the system. The combination of observed anticorrelations in the transit times and mass constraints from dynamical stability allow us to claim the discovery of four planetary systems, Kepler-25, Kepler-26, Kepler-27 and Kepler-28, containing eight planets and one additional planet candidate.

  17. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS, VOL. ???, XXXX, DOI:10.1029/, Application of satellite observations for timely1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martin, Randall

    for timely1 updates to global anthropogenic NOx emission2 inventories3 L. N. Lamsal, 1 R. V. Martin, 1, 2 A D R A F T February 1, 2011, 1:34pm D R A F T #12;X - 2 LAMSAL ET AL.: UPDATING NOX EMISSION INVENTORIES Anthropogenic emissions of nitrogen oxides (NOx) can change rapidly due4 to economic growth

  18. Direct Observation of the Phenomenology of a Solid Thermal Explosion Using Time-Resolved Proton Radiography

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smilowitz, L.; Henson, B. F.; Romero, J. J.; Asay, B. W.; Schwartz, C. L.; Saunders, A.; Merrill, F. E.; Morris, C. L.; Kwiatkowski, K.; Hogan, G.; Nedrow, P.; Murray, M. M.; Thompson, T. N.; McNeil, W.; Rightley, P.; Marr-Lyon, M.

    2008-06-06

    We present a new phenomenology for burn propagation inside a thermal explosion based on dynamic radiography. Radiographic images were obtained of an aluminum cased solid cylindrical sample of a plastic bonded formulation of octahydro-1,3,5,7-tetranitro-1,3,5,7-tetrazocine. The phenomenology observed is ignition followed by cracking in the solid accompanied by the propagation of a radially symmetric front of increasing proton transmission. This is followed by a further increase in transmission through the sample, ending after approximately 100 {mu}s. We show that these processes are consistent with the propagation of a convective burn front followed by consumption of the remaining solid by conductive particle burning.

  19. TIME SERIES MODELS OF THREE SETS OF RXTE OBSERVATIONS OF 4U 1543-47

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koen, C.

    2013-03-01

    The X-ray nova 4U 1543-47 was in a different physical state (low/hard, high/soft, and very high) during the acquisition of each of the three time series analyzed in this paper. Standard time series models of the autoregressive moving average (ARMA) family are fitted to these series. The low/hard data can be adequately modeled by a simple low-order model with fixed coefficients, once the slowly varying mean count rate has been accounted for. The high/soft series requires a higher order model, or an ARMA model with variable coefficients. The very high state is characterized by a succession of 'dips', with roughly equal depths. These seem to appear independently of one another. The underlying stochastic series can again be modeled by an ARMA form, or roughly as the sum of an ARMA series and white noise. The structuring of each model in terms of short-lived aperiodic and 'quasi-periodic' components is discussed.

  20. COMPARISON OF SOLAR SURFACE FLOWS INFERRED FROM TIME-DISTANCE HELIOSEISMOLOGY AND COHERENT STRUCTURE TRACKING USING HMI/SDO OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Svanda, Michal; Roudier, Thierry; Rieutord, Michel; Burston, Raymond; Gizon, Laurent

    2013-07-01

    We compare measurements of horizontal flows on the surface of the Sun using helioseismic time-distance inversions and coherent structure tracking of solar granules. Tracking provides two-dimensional horizontal flows on the solar surface, whereas the time-distance inversions estimate the full three-dimensional velocity flows in the shallow near-surface layers. Both techniques use Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager observations as input. We find good correlations between the various measurements resulting from the two techniques. Further, we find a good agreement between these measurements and the time-averaged Doppler line-of-sight velocity, and also perform sanity checks on the vertical flow that resulted from the three-dimensional time-distance inversion.

  1. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A monitoring well including a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto.

  2. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Sisson, J.B.

    1999-06-29

    A monitoring well is described which includes: a conduit defining a passageway, the conduit having a proximal and opposite, distal end; a coupler connected in fluid flowing relationship with the passageway; and a porous housing borne by the coupler and connected in fluid flowing relation thereto. 8 figs.

  3. Monitoring well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2002-01-01

    The present invention relates to a monitoring well which includes an enclosure defining a cavity and a water reservoir enclosed within the cavity and wherein the reservoir has an inlet and an outlet. The monitoring well further includes a porous housing borne by the enclosure and which defines a fluid chamber which is oriented in fluid communication with the outlet of the reservoir, and wherein the porous housing is positioned in an earthen soil location below-grade. A geophysical monitoring device is provided and mounted in sensing relation relative to the fluid chamber of the porous housing; and a coupler is selectively moveable relative to the outlet of reservoir to couple the porous housing and water reservoir in fluid communication. An actuator is coupled in force transmitting relation relative to the coupler to selectively position the coupler in a location to allow fluid communication between the reservoir and the fluid chamber defined by the porous housing.

  4. Dynamics of observables and exactly solvable quantum problems: Using time-dependent density functional theory to control quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mehdi Farzanehpour; I. V. Tokatly

    2015-06-29

    We use analytic (current) density-potential maps of time-dependent (current) density functional theory (TD(C)DFT) to inverse engineer analytically solvable time-dependent quantum problems. In this approach the driving potential (the control signal) and the corresponding solution of the Schr\\"odinger equation are parametrized analytically in terms of the basic TD(C)DFT observables. We describe the general reconstruction strategy and illustrate it with a number of explicit examples. First we consider the real space one-particle dynamics driven by a time-dependent electromagnetic field and recover, from the general TDDFT reconstruction formulas, the known exact solution for a driven oscillator with a time-dependent frequency. Then we use analytic maps of the lattice TD(C)DFT to control quantum dynamics in a discrete space. As a first example we construct a time-dependent potential which generates prescribed dynamics on a tight-binding chain. Then our method is applied to the dynamics of spin-1/2 driven by a time dependent magnetic field. We design an analytic control pulse that transfers the system from the ground to excited state and vice versa. This pulse generates the spin flip thus operating as a quantum NOT gate.

  5. Well pump

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ames, Kenneth R. (Pasco, WA); Doesburg, James M. (Chicago, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A well pump includes a piston and an inlet and/or outlet valve assembly of special structure. Each is formed of a body of organic polymer, preferably PTFE. Each includes a cavity in its upper portion and at least one passage leading from the cavity to the bottom of the block. A screen covers each cavity and a valve disk covers each screen. Flexible sealing flanges extend upwardly and downwardly from the periphery of the piston block. The outlet valve block has a sliding block and sealing fit with the piston rod.

  6. Well Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProjectAdministration NNSAWell Placement Well

  7. Time-resolved multiwavelength observations of the blazar VER J0521+211 from radio to gamma-ray energies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prokoph, Heike; Schultz, Cornelia

    2015-01-01

    VER J0521+211 (RGB J0521.8+2112) is one of the brightest and most powerful blazars detected in the TeV gamma-ray regime. It is located at a redshift of z=0.108 and since its discovery in 2009, VER J0521+211 has exhibited an average TeV flux exceeding 0.1 times that of the Crab Nebula, corresponding to an isotropic luminosity of $3\\times10^{44}$ erg s$^{-1}$. We present data from a comprehensive multiwavelength campaign on this object extending between November 2012 and February 2014, including single-dish radio observations, optical photometry and polarimetry, UV, X-ray, GeV and TeV gamma-ray data (VERITAS, MAGIC). Significant flux variability was observed at all wavelengths, including a long-lasting high state at gamma-ray energies in Fall 2013. Nightly-resolved spectra at X-ray and TeV energies are be presented, and emission mechanisms explaining the observed flux and spectral variability are discussed.

  8. Time-resolved observation of fast domain-walls driven by vertical spin currents in short tracks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sampaio, Joao; Lequeux, Steven; Chanthbouala, Andre; Cros, Vincent; Grollier, Julie; Matsumoto, Rie; Yakushiji, Kay; Kubota, Hitoshi; Fukushima, Akio; Yuasa, Shinji; Nishimura, Kazumasa; Nagamine, Yoshinori; Maehara, Hiroki; Tsunekawa, Koji

    2013-12-09

    We present time-resolved measurements of the displacement of magnetic domain-walls (DWs) driven by vertical spin-polarized currents in track-shaped magnetic tunnel junctions. In these structures, we observe very high DW velocities (600?m/s) at current densities below 10{sup 7}?A/cm{sup 2}. We show that the efficient spin-transfer torque combined with a short propagation distance allows avoiding the Walker breakdown process and achieving deterministic, reversible, and fast (?1?ns) DW-mediated switching of magnetic tunnel junction elements, which is of great interest for the implementation of fast DW-based spintronic devices.

  9. Observation Wells (Ozkocak, 1985) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName0 JumpOakland(Ozkocak, 1985)

  10. Constraints on Off-Axis GRB Jets in Type Ibc Supernovae From Late-Time Radio Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. M. Soderberg; D. A. Frail; M. H. Wieringa

    2005-12-06

    It has been suggested that the peculiar properties of the luminous Type Ic supernova SN 1998bw and its low-energy gamma-ray burst GRB 980425 may be understood if they originated in a standard gamma-ray burst explosion viewed far from the axis of the relativistic jet. In this scenario, strong radio emission is predicted from the jet on a timescale 1 to 10 years after the explosion as it decelerates and spreads into our line of sight. To test this hypothesis we have carried out late-time radio observations of SN 1998bw at $t=5.6$ years, yielding upper limits which are consistent with the continued fading of the supernova. We find these limits to be consistent with an off-axis jet only if the progenitor mass loss rate is $\\dot{M}\\lesssim 4 \\times 10^{-7}$ M$_\\odot$ yr$^{-1}$ (for a wind velocity $v_w=1000$ km s$^{-1}$) or the fraction of the shock energy in magnetic fields is $\\epsilon_B \\lesssim 10^{-3}$. These values are low relative to those inferred for cosmological GRBs. We combine the SN 1998bw measurements with existing observations for a sample of 15 local Type Ibc supernovae to estimate that at most 6% produce collimated, relativistic outflows.

  11. Transit Timing Observations from Kepler: II. Confirmation of Two Multiplanet Systems via a Non-parametric Correlation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ford, Eric B.; Fabrycky, Daniel C.; Steffen, Jason H.; Carter, Joshua A.; Fressin, Francois; Holman, Matthew J.; Lissauer, Jack J.; Moorhead, Althea V.; Morehead, Robert C.; Ragozzine, Darin; Rowe, Jason F.; /NASA, Ames /SETI Inst., Mtn. View /San Diego State U., Astron. Dept.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new method for confirming transiting planets based on the combination of transit timing variations (TTVs) and dynamical stability. Correlated TTVs provide evidence that the pair of bodies are in the same physical system. Orbital stability provides upper limits for the masses of the transiting companions that are in the planetary regime. This paper describes a non-parametric technique for quantifying the statistical significance of TTVs based on the correlation of two TTV data sets. We apply this method to an analysis of the transit timing variations of two stars with multiple transiting planet candidates identified by Kepler. We confirm four transiting planets in two multiple planet systems based on their TTVs and the constraints imposed by dynamical stability. An additional three candidates in these same systems are not confirmed as planets, but are likely to be validated as real planets once further observations and analyses are possible. If all were confirmed, these systems would be near 4:6:9 and 2:4:6:9 period commensurabilities. Our results demonstrate that TTVs provide a powerful tool for confirming transiting planets, including low-mass planets and planets around faint stars for which Doppler follow-up is not practical with existing facilities. Continued Kepler observations will dramatically improve the constraints on the planet masses and orbits and provide sensitivity for detecting additional non-transiting planets. If Kepler observations were extended to eight years, then a similar analysis could likely confirm systems with multiple closely spaced, small transiting planets in or near the habitable zone of solar-type stars.

  12. Early-type stars observed in the ESO UVES Paranal Observatory Project - V. Time-variable interstellar absorption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEvoy, Catherine M; Dufton, Philip L; Smith, Keith T; Kennedy, Michael B; Keenan, Francis P; Lambert, David L; Welty, Daniel E; Lauroesch, James T

    2015-01-01

    The structure and properties of the diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) on small scales, sub-au to 1 pc, are poorly understood. We compare interstellar absorption-lines, observed towards a selection of O- and B-type stars at two or more epochs, to search for variations over time caused by the transverse motion of each star combined with changes in the structure in the foreground ISM. Two sets of data were used: 83 VLT- UVES spectra with approximately 6 yr between epochs and 21 McDonald observatory 2.7m telescope echelle spectra with 6 - 20 yr between epochs, over a range of scales from 0 - 360 au. The interstellar absorption-lines observed at the two epochs were subtracted and searched for any residuals due to changes in the foreground ISM. Of the 104 sightlines investigated with typically five or more components in Na I D, possible temporal variation was identified in five UVES spectra (six components), in Ca II, Ca I and/or Na I absorption-lines. The variations detected range from 7\\% to a factor of 3.6 in co...

  13. Harmonic Analysis of Time Variations Observed in the Solar Radio Flux Measured at 810 MHz from 1957 to 2004

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Zieba; J. Maslowski; A. Michalec; G. Michalek; A. Kulak

    2007-01-15

    Long-running measurements of the solar radio flux density at 810 MHz were processed. Based on the least-squares method and using modified periodograms and an iterative technique of fitting and subtracting sinusoids in the time domain, frequency, amplitude, and phase characteristics of any analyzed time series were obtained. Solar cycles 20, 21, and 22 and shorter segments around solar minima and maxima were examined separately. Also, dynamic studies with 405, 810, and 1620 day windows were undertaken. The harmonic representations obtained for all these time series indicate large differences among solar cycles and their segments. We show that the solar radio flux at 810 MHz violates the Gnevyshev-Ohl rule for the pair of cycles 22-23. Analyzing the period 1957-2004, the following spectral periods longer than 1350 days were detected: 10.6, 8.0, 28.0, 5.3, 55.0, 3.9, 6.0, 4.4, and 14.6 yr. For spectral periods between 270 and 1350 days the 11 yr cycle is not recognized. We think that these harmonics form ``impulses of activity'' or a quasi-biennial cycle defined in the Benevolenskaya model of the ``double magnetic cycle.'' The value of about 0.09 is proposed for the interaction parameter (between the low- and high-frequency components) of this model. We confirm the intermittent behavior of the periodicity near 155 days. Correlation coefficients between the radio emission at 810 MHz and sunspot numbers, as well as the radio emission at 2800 MHz calculated for 540 day intervals, depend on the solar cycle phase.

  14. Zeroth-order inversion of transient head observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vasco, D.W.

    2008-01-01

    The hydraulic head was observed in seven surrounding wellsHydraulic conductivity variation used for numerical trajectory computations. The wellhydraulic conductivity, given the significant variations in travel time to the observation wells.

  15. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, Chin-Fu (Albany, CA); Doughty, Christine A. (Berkeley, CA)

    1985-01-01

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  16. Temporal changes in gas hydrate mound topography and ecology: deep-sea time-lapse camera observations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vardaro, Michael Fredric

    2004-09-30

    A deep-sea time-lapse camera and several temperature probes were deployed on the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf at a biological community associated with a gas hydrate outcropping to study topographic and hydrologic changes over time...

  17. Time-variable gravity observations of ice sheet mass balance: Precision and limitations of the GRACE satellite data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Velicogna, I.; Wahr, J.

    2013-01-01

    observations, Science, 314, Peltier, W. R. (2004), Globalice history models (ICE5G [Peltier, 2004] and Fleming andfor Greenland; ICE5G [Peltier, 2004] and IJ05 [Ivins and

  18. Real-time observation of morphological transformations in II-VI semiconducting nanobelts via environmental transmission electron microscopy

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Agarwal, Rahul; Zakharov, Dmitri N.; Krook, Nadia M.; Liu, Wenjing; Berger, Jacob; Stach, Eric A.; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-05-01

    It has been observed that wurtzite II–VI semiconducting nanobelts transform into single-crystal, periodically branched nanostructures upon heating. The mechanism of this novel transformation has been elucidated by heating II–VI nanobelts in an environmental transmission electron microscope (ETEM) in oxidizing, reducing and inert atmospheres while observing their structural changes with high spatial resolution. The interplay of surface reconstruction of high-energy surfaces of the wurtzite phase and environment-dependent anisotropic chemical etching of certain crystal surfaces in the branching mechanism of nanobelts has been observed. Understanding of structural and chemical transformations of materials via in situ microscopy techniques and their role in designingmore »new nanostructured materials is discussed.« less

  19. 100 Times Faster and 3 Times Sharper: Background-Dominated Observations of Stellar Populations with an 8-meter Optical-UV Space Telescope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas M. Brown

    2002-07-10

    An 8 m successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) would make incredible gains in the study of stellar populations, especially in the Local Group. If diffraction-limited at 0.5 microns, the "Next HST" could produce high-resolution imaging of faint sources over a wide field in 1 percent of the time needed with the HST. With these capabilities, photometry of the ancient main sequence could be obtained for many sight-lines through Local Group galaxies, thus determining directly the ages of their structures and providing a formation history for the Local Group populations.

  20. LibGaze: Real-time gaze-tracking of freely moving observers for wall-sized displays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of fixation and low-resolution in the periphery. Many eye-tracking systems require the ob- server's head freely and interact with a wall-sized display. The system combines a head-mounted eye tracker with a mo-study, designed to measure how users visually explore large displays. We find that observers use head move- ments

  1. The effect of task structure, practice schedule, and model type on the learning of relative and absolute timing by physical and observational practice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Black, Charles Beyer

    2004-11-15

    Three experiments compared learning of relative and absolute timing of a sequential key-pressing task by physical and observational practice. Experiment 1 compared a task with a complex internal structure (goal proportions of 22.2, 44.4, 33...

  2. Energy Conversion in Lifting Mass Vertically using a DC Electric Motor by Observing Required Time to Lift Object for a Certain Height

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viridi, Sparisoma; Permana, Sidik; Srigutomo, Wahyu; Susilawati, Anggie; Nuryadin, Bebeh Wahid; Nurhasan,

    2014-01-01

    In lifting mass vertically using a DC electric motor energy conversion from electric energy, through intermediate kinetic energy, to gravitation potential energy shows that time required {\\Delta}t to lift load mass m for height h is dependent quadratically to m. Several approaches to explain the experiment observation are discussed in this work, from ideal energy conversion to numerical solution from differential equation.

  3. The Young and Bright Type Ia Supernova ASASSN-14lp: Discovery, Early-Time Observations, First-Light Time, Distance to NGC 4666, and Progenitor Constraints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shappee, B J; Holoien, T W -S; Prieto, J L; Contreras, C; Itagaki, K; Burns, C R; Kochanek, C S; Stanek, K Z; Alper, E; Basu, U; Beacom, J F; Bersier, D; Brimacombe, J; Conseil, E; Danilet, A B; Dong, Subo; Falco, E; Grupe, D; Hsiao, E Y; Kiyota, S; Morrell, N; Nicolas, J; Phillips, M M; Pojmanski, G; Simonian, G; Stritzinger, M; Szczygie?, D M; Thompson, T A; Thorstensen, J; Wagner, M; Wo?niak, P R

    2015-01-01

    On 2014 Dec. 9.61, the All-Sky Automated Survey for SuperNovae (ASAS-SN or "Assassin") discovered ASASSN-14lp just $\\sim2$ days after first light using a global array of 14-cm diameter telescopes. ASASSN-14lp went on to become a bright supernova ($V = 11.94$ mag), second only to SN 2014J for the year. We present prediscovery photometry (with a detection less than a day after first light) and ultraviolet through near-infrared photometric and spectroscopic data covering the rise and fall of ASASSN-14lp for more than 100 days. We find that ASASSN-14lp had a broad light curve ($\\Delta m_{15}(B) = 0.796 \\pm 0.001_{\\textrm{stat}}$), a $B$-band maximum at $2457015.823 \\pm 0.030_{\\textrm{stat}}$, a rise time of $16.94^{+ 0.11 }_{- 0.11 }$ days, and moderate host--galaxy extinction ($E(B-V)_{\\textrm{host}} = 0.329 \\pm 0.001_{\\textrm{stat}}$). Using ASASSN-14lp we derive a distance modulus for NGC 4666 of $\\mu = 30.834 \\pm 0.003_{\\textrm{stat}} \\pm 0.16_{\\textrm{syst}}$ corresponding to a distance of $14.68 \\pm 0.02_{\\...

  4. Thermal well-test method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Tsang, C.F.; Doughty, C.A.

    1984-02-24

    A well-test method involving injection of hot (or cold) water into a groundwater aquifer, or injecting cold water into a geothermal reservoir is disclosed. By making temperature measurements at various depths in one or more observation wells, certain properties of the aquifer are determined. These properties, not obtainable from conventional well test procedures, include the permeability anisotropy, and layering in the aquifer, and in-situ thermal properties. The temperature measurements at various depths are obtained from thermistors mounted in the observation wells.

  5. Observations of traveling ionospheric disturbances with a satellite-beacon radio interferometer: Seasonal and local time behavior

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobson, A.R.; Carlos, R.C.; Massey, R.S.; Wui, Guanghui [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)

    1995-02-01

    The authors have operated a very long baseline interferometer array at a northern midlatitude site, illuminated by VHF radio beacons from two geosynchronous satellites, quasi-continuously for over a year. The array can detect and measure the trace velocity of traveling ionosphere disturbances (TIDs) via their signatures in the line-of-sight total electron content (TEC). The system noise level is of the order of 10{sup 13} m{sup {minus}2} in the TEC, so that even very weak perturbations can be studied. They have used the year-long TID detection/velocimetry data set to describe local time and seasonal dependences of the wave parameters. The most striking finding is that the preferred azimuths of TIDs in the data set tend to belong to either of two modes: The first mode, strongest at midday and in the early afternoon, particularly around winter equinox, propagates southward. The second mode, strongest in the evening, especially during summer solstice through autumn equinox, propagates west-northwestward. The two modes are disposed in local time such as to suggest the agency of clockwise rotation of the TID preferred azimuths versus time, as expected by wind filtering in the thermospheric diurnal tide. However, there is a gap between the two modes` azimuth bands. Moreover, the two modes exist in all trace-speed quartiles of the data set TIDs, a finding which is at variance with the hypothesis of wind filtering being the primary explanation of these modes. 28 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Time-Resolved Observation of Discrete and Continuous Magnetohydrodynamic Dynamo in the Reversed-Field Pinch Edge

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking With U.S.Week DayDr.Theories (Journal Article)Clean4,Time to Talk3,

  7. Late time multi wavelength observations of Swift J1644+5734: A luminous optical/IR bump and quiescent X-ray emission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Levan, A J; Brown, G C; Metzger, B D; Page, K L; Cenko, S B; O'Brien, P T; Lyman, J D; Wiersema, K; Stanway, E R; Fruchter, A S; Perley, D A; Bloom, J S

    2015-01-01

    We present late-time multi-wavelength observations of Swift J1644+57, suggested to be a relativistic tidal disruption flare (TDF). Our observations extend to >4 years from discovery, and show that 1.4 years after outburst the relativistic jet switched-off on a timescale less than tens of days, corresponding to a power-law decay faster than $t^{-70}$. Beyond this point weak X-rays continue to be detected at an approximately constant luminosity of $L_X \\sim 5 \\times 10^{42}$ erg s$^{-1}$, and are marginally inconsistent with a continuing decay of $t^{-5/3}$, similar to that seen prior to the switch-off. Host photometry enables us to infer a black hole mass of $M_{BH}=3 \\times 10^6$ M$_{\\odot}$, consistent with the late time X-ray luminosity arising from sub-Eddington accretion onto the black hole in the form of either an unusually optically faint AGN or a slowly varying phase of the transient. Optical/IR observations show a clear bump in the light curve at timescales of 30-50 days, with a peak magnitude (correc...

  8. Horizontal well replaces hydraulic fracturing in North Sea gas well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reynolds, D.A.; Seymour, K.P. )

    1991-11-25

    This paper reports on excessive water production from hydraulically fractured wells in a poor quality reservoir in the North SEa which prompted the drilling of a horizontal well. Gas production from the horizontal well reached six times that of the offset vertical wells, and no water production occurred. This horizontal well proved commercial the western section of the Anglia field. Horizontal drilling in the North SEa is as an effective technology to enhance hydrocarbon recovery from reservoirs that previously had proven uncommercial with other standard techniques. It is viable for the development of marginal reservoirs, particularly where conditions preclude stimulation from hydraulic fracturing.

  9. Decontaminating Flooded Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boellstorff, Diana; Dozier, Monty; Provin, Tony; Dictson, Nikkoal; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30

    This publication explains how to decontaminate and disinfect a well, test the well water and check for well damage after a flood....

  10. 4.5 years multi-wavelength observations of Mrk 421 during the ARGO-YBJ and Fermi common operation time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bartoli, B; Bi, X J; Cao, Z; Catalanotti, S; Chen, S Z; Chen, T L; Cui, S W; Dai, B Z; Damone, A; Danzengluobu,; De Mitri, I; Piazzoli, B D Ettorre; Di Girolamo, T; Di Sciascio, G; Feng, C F; Feng, Zhaoyang; Feng, Zhenyong; Gou, Q B; Guo, Y Q; He, H H; Hu, Haibing; Hu, Hongbo; Iacovacci, M; Iuppa, R; Jia, H Y; Labaciren,; Li, H J; Liu, C; Liu, J; Liu, M Y; Lu, H; Ma, L L; Ma, X H; Mancarella, G; Mari, S M; Marsella, G; Mastroianni, S; Montini, P; Ning, C C; Perrone, L; Pistilli, P; Salvini, P; Santonico, R; Shen, P R; Sheng, X D; Shi, F; Surdo, A; Tan, Y H; Vallania, P; Vernetto, S; Vigorito, C; Wang, H; Wu, C Y; Wu, H R; Xue, L; Yang, Q Y; Yang, X C; Yao, Z G; Yuan, A F; Zha, M; Zhang, H M; Zhang, L; Zhang, X Y; Zhang, Y; Zhao, J; Zhaxiciren,; Zhaxisangzhu,; Zhou, X X; Zhu, F R; Zhu, Q Q

    2015-01-01

    We report on the extensive multi-wavelength observations of the blazar Markarian 421 (Mrk 421) covering radio to gamma-rays, during the 4.5 year period of ARGO-YBJ and Fermi common operation time, from August 2008 to February 2013. In particular, thanks to the ARGO-YBJ and Fermi data, the whole energy range from 100 MeV to 10 TeV is covered without any gap. In the observation period, Mrk 421 showed both low and high activity states at all wavebands. The correlations among flux variations in different wavebands were analyzed. Seven large flares, including five X-ray flares and two GeV gamma-ray flares with variable durations (3-58 days), and one X-ray outburst phase were identified and used to investigate the variation of the spectral energy distribution with respect to a relative quiescent phase. During the outburst phase and the seven flaring episodes, the peak energy in X-rays is observed to increase from sub-keV to few keV. The TeV gamma-ray flux increases up to 0.9-7.2 times the flux of the Crab Nebula. T...

  11. BUFFERED WELL FIELD OUTLINES

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OIL & GAS FIELD OUTLINES FROM BUFFERED WELLS The VBA Code below builds oil & gas field boundary outlines (polygons) from buffered wells (points). Input well points layer must be a...

  12. Direct observation of the terahertz optical free induction decay of molecular rotation absorption lines in the sub-nanosecond time scale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chesnokov, E. N.; Koshlyakov, P. V. [Institute of Chemical Kinetics and Combustion, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kubarev, V. V. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation); Kulipanov, G. N. [Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics, Novosibirsk 630090 (Russian Federation)

    2012-09-24

    Optical free induction decay (FID) in the region of 60-75 cm{sup -1} was detected using 120 ps pulses of free electron laser. Signals were detected in real time using ultra-fast Schottky diode detectors. The oscillations corresponding to the splitting of absorption lines in deuterated water vapor ({Delta}f = 0.15 cm{sup -1}) and hydrogen bromide ({Delta}f = 0.02 cm{sup -1}) were detected. At high optical density, we observed the oscillations arising from 'top-hat' shape of absorption lines. Free induction decay signals could be detected in a single shot. This observation allowed obtaining a spectrum in one laser pulse, which facilitates studies of very fast processes.

  13. Hydrogeologic investigation and establishment of a permanent multi-observational well network in Aiken, Allendale, and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Eight-year interim report (1986-1994). Volume 1 cluster-site description

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gellici, J.A.; Reed, R.H.; Logan, W.R.; Aadland, R.K.; Simones, G.C.

    1995-05-01

    The South Carolina Department of Natural Resources, Water Resources Division (SCWRD), in collaboration with the United States Department of Energy (USDOE) is conducting a hydrogeologic investigation of the ground-water system(s) peripheral to the Savannah River Site. The study area is located in the Southeastern Coastal Plain hydrogeologic province in Aiken, Allendale and Barnwell Counties, South Carolina. Ground-water movement, quality, and availability are being evaluated in order to better protect and manage this valuable regional resource. The investigation involves a well-cluster system comparable to the one constructed on the SRS. Cluster sites are situated outside the SRS on the basis of study objectives, proximity to the plant`s borders, land availability, and for the optimization of hydrogeologic control. One to three wells are completed into each major aquifer, and at each cluster site, at least one borehole is continuously cored and geophysically logged from land surface to at least 10 feet into unweathered bedrock. Data collected from the ongoing study include 146 paleontologic and palynologic age dates, 100 x-ray diffraction analyses of clay and bulk mineralogy, 442 sieve analyses, 6,040 feet of detailed core description, mineral composition and porosity determined from thin-section analyses, and continuous water-level data. This report is a compilation and interpretation of the {open_quotes}C-well{close_quotes} data that have been generated from the project and that will be used to model and characterize the aquifers and confining units in the region.

  14. Ness horizontal-well case study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koonsman, T.L. (Mobil Exploration Norway Inc. (Norway)); Purpich, A.J. (Mobil North Sea Ltd. (United Kingdom))

    1992-10-01

    This paper reviews the reservoir management work that led to the recommendation to drill the Ness field horizontal well. It also discusses the poor well performance seen almost immediately after production began and the reasons for that well performance revealed by a postdrill reservoir simulation. Finally, the atypical logging responses observed in the well are discussed.

  15. Plugging Abandoned Water Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.

    2002-02-28

    is abandoned without proper plugging, upward flow of salty water from the deeper aquifer may cause contamination of the shallow, fresh water aquifer. Also, any pollu- tants that occur in one zone can migrate to another zone through a well. Unplugged abandoned... wells may deplete pres- sure within an aquifer. Pressure in artesian aquifers decreases as water discharges at land surface or to less pressurized aquifers. Eventually a drop in pres- sure causes flowing wells to stop flowing and the water level...

  16. Absolute Time Derivatives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. Matolcsi; P. Van

    2006-10-23

    A four dimensional treatment of nonrelativistic space-time gives a natural frame to deal with objective time derivatives. In this framework some well known objective time derivatives of continuum mechanics appear as Lie-derivatives. Their coordinatized forms depends on the tensorial properties of the relevant physical quantities. We calculate the particular forms of objective time derivatives for scalars, vectors, covectors and different second order tensors from the point of view of a rotating observer. The relation of substantial, material and objective time derivatives is treated.

  17. Penrose Well Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Christopherson, Karen

    2013-03-15

    Penrose Well Temperatures Geothermal waters have been encountered in several wells near Penrose in Fremont County, Colorado. Most of the wells were drilled for oil and gas exploration and, in a few cases, production. This ESRI point shapefile utilizes data from 95 wells in and around the Penrose area provided by the Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) database at http://cogcc.state.co.us/ . Temperature data from the database were used to calculate a temperature gradient for each well. This information was then used to estimate temperatures at various depths. Projection: UTM Zone 13 NAD27 Extent: West -105.224871 East -105.027633 North 38.486269 South 38.259507 Originators: Colorado Oil and Gas Conservation Commission (COGCC) Karen Christopherson

  18. Production Trends of Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khan, Waqar A.

    2010-01-14

    To obtain better well performance and improved production from shale gas reservoirs, it is important to understand the behavior of shale gas wells and to identify different flow regions in them over a period of time. It is also important...

  19. Isobaric groundwater well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Sisson, James B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1999-01-01

    A method of measuring a parameter in a well, under isobaric conditions, including such parameters as hydraulic gradient, pressure, water level, soil moisture content and/or aquifer properties the method as presented comprising providing a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends, the casing supporting a transducer having a reference port; placing the casing lengthwise into the well, second end first, with the reference port vented above the water table in the well; and sealing the first end. A system is presented for measuring a parameter in a well, the system comprising a casing having first and second opposite ends, and a length between the ends and being configured to be placed lengthwise into a well second end first; a transducer, the transducer having a reference port, the reference port being vented in the well above the water table, the casing being screened across and above the water table; and a sealing member sealing the first end. In one embodiment, the transducer is a tensiometer transducer and in other described embodiments, another type transducer is used in addition to a tensiometer.

  20. X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    T. and Narita, H. , 2006. Methane hydrate crystal growth ina porous medium filled with methane-saturated liquid water.Kneafsey, T.J. et al. , 2007. Methane hydrate formation and

  1. X-ray CT Observations of Methane Hydrate Distribution Changes over Time in a Natural Sediment Core from the BPX-DOE-USGS Mount Elbert Gas Hydrate Stratigraphic Test Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kneafsey, T.J.

    2012-01-01

    temperature to 4°C with the pore pressure of the system atby increasing the pore pressure to 4.8MPa and the confiningto a drop in pore pressure of 0.07MPa. Additional hydrate

  2. Direct observation of intrinsic piezoelectricity of Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} by time-resolved x-ray diffraction measurement using single-crystalline films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujisawa, Takashi; Ehara, Yoshitaka; Yasui, Shintaro; Kamo, Takafumi; Funakubo, Hiroshi; Yamada, Tomoaki; Sakata, Osami

    2014-07-07

    Lead zirconate titanate, Pb(Zr,Ti)O{sub 3} or PZT, is one of the most widely investigated ferroelectric and piezoelectric materials due to its superior properties. However, the intrinsic properties of PZT have not been directly measured due to the lack of fabrication of single crystals even though a basic understanding of intrinsic properties has been of interest developing lead-free piezoelectric materials. We demonstrated the direct observation of the intrinsic piezoelectric property by means of the detection of electric-field induced crystal lattice distortion of thick Pb(Zr{sub 0.35}Ti{sub 0.65})O{sub 3} single-crystalline films with single polar-axis orientation and negligible residual strain using the time-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) together with the polarization response. Consequently, the effective converse piezoelectric response was experimentally revealed; hence, the electrostrictive coefficient, which is the conversion coefficient between the electrical and mechanical response, was determined. The obtained effective electrostrictive coefficient was 5.2–6.3?×?10{sup ?2} m{sup 4}/C{sup 2}, which agrees with theoretical prediction.

  3. Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion upon C2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IR spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    Figure 7: Prompt growth of ethane upon C 2 H 4 hydrogenationratio corresponds to the ethane absorbance of the first timeObservation of Surface Ethyl to Ethane Interconversion upon

  4. Thermal indicator for wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gaven, Jr., Joseph V. (Oakton, VA); Bak, Chan S. (Newbury Park, CA)

    1983-01-01

    Minute durable plate-like thermal indicators are employed for precision measuring static and dynamic temperatures of well drilling fluids. The indicators are small enough and sufficiently durable to be circulated in the well with drilling fluids during the drilling operation. The indicators include a heat resistant indicating layer, a coacting meltable solid component and a retainer body which serves to unitize each indicator and which may carry permanent indicator identifying indicia. The indicators are recovered from the drilling fluid at ground level by known techniques.

  5. Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Reeder, 1957) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName01988) | Open EnergyEnergy

  6. Observation Wells At Mccoy Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName01988) | Open

  7. Spatially indirect excitons in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lai, Chih-Wei Eddy

    2004-03-01

    Microscopic quantum phenomena such as interference or phase coherence between different quantum states are rarely manifest in macroscopic systems due to a lack of significant correlation between different states. An exciton system is one candidate for observation of possible quantum collective effects. In the dilute limit, excitons in semiconductors behave as bosons and are expected to undergo Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) at a temperature several orders of magnitude higher than for atomic BEC because of their light mass. Furthermore, well-developed modern semiconductor technologies offer flexible manipulations of an exciton system. Realization of BEC in solid-state systems can thus provide new opportunities for macroscopic quantum coherence research. In semiconductor coupled quantum wells (CQW) under across-well static electric field, excitons exist as separately confined electron-hole pairs. These spatially indirect excitons exhibit a radiative recombination time much longer than their thermal relaxation time a unique feature in direct band gap semiconductor based structures. Their mutual repulsive dipole interaction further stabilizes the exciton system at low temperature and screens in-plane disorder more effectively. All these features make indirect excitons in CQW a promising system to search for quantum collective effects. Properties of indirect excitons in CQW have been analyzed and investigated extensively. The experimental results based on time-integrated or time-resolved spatially-resolved photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and imaging are reported in two categories. (i) Generic indirect exciton systems: general properties of indirect excitons such as the dependence of exciton energy and lifetime on electric fields and densities were examined. (ii) Quasi-two-dimensional confined exciton systems: highly statistically degenerate exciton systems containing more than tens of thousands of excitons within areas as small as (10 micrometer){sup 2} were observed. The spatial and energy distributions of optically active excitons were used as thermodynamic quantities to construct a phase diagram of the exciton system, demonstrating the existence of distinct phases. Optical and electrical properties of the CQW sample were examined thoroughly to provide deeper understanding of the formation mechanisms of these cold exciton systems. These insights offer new strategies for producing cold exciton systems, which may lead to opportunities for the realization of BEC in solid-state systems.

  8. Geothermal Well Site Restoration and Plug and Abandonment of Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinehart, Ben N.

    1994-08-01

    A report is presented on the final phase of an energy research program conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) involving two geothermal well sites in the State of Louisiana-the Gladys McCall site and the Willis Hulin site. The research program was intended to improve geothermal technology and to determine the efficacy of producing electricity commercially from geopressured resource sites. The final phase of the program consisted of plug and abandonment (P&A) of the wells and restoration of the well sites. Restoration involved (a) initial soil and water sampling and analysis; (b) removal and disposal of well pads, concrete, utility poles, and trash; (c) plugging of monitor and freshwater wells; and (d) site leveling and general cleanup. Restoration of the McCall site required removal of naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM), which was costly and time-consuming. Exhibits are included that provide copies of work permits and authorizations, P&A reports and procedures, daily workover and current conditions report, and cost and salvage reports. Site locations, grid maps, and photographs are provided.

  9. Phenomenal well-being 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Campbell, Stephen Michael

    2006-08-16

    the hedonistic concept of satisfaction. An epistemic model of life-comparison (inspired by Peter RailtonÂ?s full information account of well-being) on which phenomenal lives are judged on the criterion of satisfaction is presented, followed by some objections...

  10. Interface effect in coupled quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2014-06-28

    This paper intends to theoretically investigate the effect of the interfaces on the Rashba spin splitting of two coupled quantum wells. The results show that the interface related Rashba spin splitting of the two coupled quantum wells is both smaller than that of a step quantum well which has the same structure with the step quantum well in the coupled quantum wells. And the influence of the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction of the coupled quantum wells is larger than that of a step quantum well. It demonstrates that the spin relaxation time of the two coupled quantum wells will be shorter than that of a step quantum well. As for the application in the spintronic devices, a step quantum well may be better than the coupled quantum wells, which is mentioned in this paper.

  11. Application of the Ensemble Kalman Filter to Estimate Fracture Parameters in Unconventional Horizontal Wells by Downhole Temperature Measurements 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gonzales, Sergio Eduardo

    2013-07-23

    performance in hydraulic fractured wells in real time by the aid of fiber optic. However, no applications have yet been attempted to describe or estimate the fracture parameters using distributed temperature sensing as the observation parameter. The Ensemble...

  12. Initial Helioseismic Observations by Hinode/SOT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takashi Sekii; Alexander G. Kosovichev; Junwei Zhao; Saku Tsuneta; Hiromoto Shibahashi; Thomas E. Berger; Kiyoshi Ichimoto; Yukio Katsukawa; Bruce W. Lites; Shin'ichi Nagata; Toshifumi Shimizu; Richard A. Shine; Yoshinori Suematsu; Theodore D. Tarbell; Alan M. Title

    2007-09-12

    Results from initial helioseismic observations by Solar Optical Telescope onboard Hinode are reported. It has been demonstrated that intensity oscillation data from Broadband Filter Imager can be used for various helioseismic analyses. The k-omega power spectra, as well as corresponding time-distance cross-correlation function that promises high-resolution time-distance analysis below 6-Mm travelling distance, were obtained for G-band and CaII-H data. Subsurface supergranular patterns have been observed from our first time-distance analysis. The results show that the solar oscillation spectrum is extended to much higher frequencies and wavenumbers, and the time-distance diagram is extended to much shorter travel distances and times than they were observed before, thus revealing great potential for high-resolution helioseismic observations from Hinode.

  13. Eat Well for Less. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cox, Maeona; Mason, Louise; Reasonover, Frances L.; Tribble, Marie; Gibson, G. G.

    1955-01-01

    . Brown on all sides in shortening. Season. doc water. Cover and simmer 21/2 hours or until tender. About 45 minutes bef~o' the end of cooking time, add onions and sweet potatoes. Cook beans separaltisic and serve with stew. Thicken liquid for gravy... shortening. Add seasoning and Cover and simmer over low heat for 15 minutes, then add kidney ur meat mixture into a greased 1 or 1112-quart casserole (or other bak- same capacity). Top with cornbread batter. spreading carefully with Bake in hot oven 42S...

  14. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, J.M.; Wylie, A.H.

    1996-01-09

    A method and apparatus have been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing. 10 figs.

  15. Vapor port and groundwater sampling well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wylie, Allan H. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1996-01-01

    A method and apparatus has been developed for combining groundwater monitoring wells with unsaturated-zone vapor sampling ports. The apparatus allows concurrent monitoring of both the unsaturated and the saturated zone from the same well at contaminated areas. The innovative well design allows for concurrent sampling of groundwater and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the vadose (unsaturated) zone from a single well, saving considerable time and money. The sample tubes are banded to the outer well casing during installation of the well casing.

  16. Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development Wells At Salt Wells Area (Nevada Bureau of Mines and Geology, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Development Wells...

  17. Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Blass, Andreas R.

    Program Termination and Well Partial Orderings Andreas Blass Yuri Gurevich Abstract The following observation may be useful in establishing program termination: if a transitive relation R is covered of the stature P of a well partial ordering P and show that |R| 1 × · · · × n and that this bound is tight

  18. Inclusion of In-Situ Velocity Measurements into the UCSD Time-Dependent Tomography to Constrain and Better-Forecast Remote-Sensing Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, B. V.; Hick, P. P.; Bisi, M. M.; Clover, J. M.; Buffington, A.

    2010-01-01

    time”. The solar-wind velocity forecast 24 hours ahead of72-hour forecast volume using the extant solar-wind model.forecast. In-situ data have been the primary measurements available for study of solar-wind

  19. Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Single-Well and Cross-Well Seismic At Salt Wells Area (Bureau of Land Management, 2009) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  20. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, Douglas S. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    1998-01-01

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping.

  1. First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol Reinhard Beer,1 Mark W) and methanol (CH3OH), well above the normal background levels. This is the first time that these molecules have. Citation: Beer, R., et al. (2008), First satellite observations of lower tropospheric ammonia and methanol

  2. Late-time Evolution of Composite Supernova Remnants: Deep Chandra Observations and Hydrodynamical Modeling of a Crushed Pulsar Wind Nebula in SNR G327.1-1.1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temim, Tea; Kolb, Christopher; Blondin, John; Hughes, John P; Bucciantini, Niccolo

    2015-01-01

    In an effort to better understand the evolution of composite supernova remnants (SNRs) and the eventual fate of relativistic particles injected by their pulsars, we present a multifaceted investigation of the interaction between a pulsar wind nebula (PWN) and its host SNR G327.1-1.1. Our 350 ks Chandra X-ray observations of SNR G327.1-1.1 reveal a highly complex morphology; a cometary structure resembling a bow shock, prong-like features extending into large arcs in the SNR interior, and thermal emission from the SNR shell. Spectral analysis of the non-thermal emission offers clues about the origin of the PWN structures, while enhanced abundances in the PWN region provide evidence for mixing of supernova ejecta with PWN material. The overall morphology and spectral properties of the SNR suggest that the PWN has undergone an asymmetric interaction with the SNR reverse shock (RS) that can occur as a result of a density gradient in the ambient medium and/or a moving pulsar that displaces the PWN from the center ...

  3. Well-pump alignment system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Drumheller, D.S.

    1998-10-20

    An improved well-pump for geothermal wells, an alignment system for a well-pump, and to a method for aligning a rotor and stator within a well-pump are disclosed, wherein the well-pump has a whistle assembly formed at a bottom portion thereof, such that variations in the frequency of the whistle, indicating misalignment, may be monitored during pumping. 6 figs.

  4. One of the closest planet pairs to the 3:2 Mean Motion Resonance, confirmed with K2 observations and Transit Timing Variations: EPIC201505350

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armstrong, David J; Barros, Susana C C; Demangeon, Olivier; McCormac, James; Osborn, Hugh P; Lillo-Box, Jorge; Santerne, Alexandre; Tsantaki, Maria; Almenara, José-Manuel; Barrado, David; Boisse, Isabelle; Bonomo, Aldo S; Bouchy, François; Brown, David J A; Bruno, Giovanni; Cerda, Javiera Rey; Courcol, Bastien; Deleuil, Magali; Díaz, Rodrigo F; Doyle, Amanda P; Hébrard, Guillaume; Kirk, James; Lam, Kristine W F; Pollacco, Don L; Rajpurohit, Arvind; Spake, Jessica; Walker, Simon R

    2015-01-01

    The K2 mission has recently begun to discover new and diverse planetary systems. In December 2014 Campaign 1 data from the mission was released, providing high-precision photometry for ~22000 objects over an 80 day timespan. We searched these data with the aim of detecting further important new objects. Our search through two separate pipelines led to the independent discovery of EPIC201505350, a two-planet system of Neptune sized objects (4.2 and 7.2 $R_\\oplus$), orbiting a K dwarf extremely close to the 3:2 mean motion resonance. The two planets each show transits, sometimes simultaneously due to their proximity to resonance and alignment of conjunctions. We obtain further ground based photometry of the larger planet with the NITES telescope, demonstrating the presence of large transit timing variations (TTVs) of over an hour. These TTVs allows us to confirm the planetary nature of the system, and place a limit on the mass of the outer planet of $386M_\\oplus$.

  5. Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnston, Alan

    Dispatch R427 Time perception: Brain time or event time? Alan Johnston* and Shin'ya Nishida Recent experiments show that synchronous events can appear to an observer to occur at different times. Neural processing time delays are offered as an explanation of these temporal illusions, but equating perceived time

  6. Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McConnell, Terry

    Health And Wellness Department Of Health And Wellness Lutchmie Narine, Chair, 315-443-9630 426 The Department of Health and Wellness offers a 123-credit Bachelor of Science degree (B.S.) in public health. Our graduates are prepared to work in community health education and health promotion in public health agencies

  7. MARGINAL EXPENSE OIL WELL WIRELESS SURVEILLANCE MEOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason M. Medizade; John R. Ridgely; Donald G. Nelson

    2004-11-01

    A marginal expense oil well wireless surveillance system to monitor system performance and production from rod-pumped wells in real time from wells operated by Vaquero Energy in the Edison Field, Main Area of Kern County in California has been successfully designed and field tested. The surveillance system includes a proprietary flow sensor, a programmable transmitting unit, a base receiver and receiving antenna, and a base station computer equipped with software to interpret the data. First, the system design is presented. Second, field data obtained from three wells is shown. Results of the study show that an effective, cost competitive, real-time wireless surveillance system can be introduced to oil fields across the United States and the world.

  8. Well having inhibited microbial growth

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2006-08-15

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  9. Direct observation of surface ethyl to ethane interconversion uponC2H4 hydrogenation over Pt/Al2O3 catalyst by time-resolved FT-IRspectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wasylenko, Walter; Frei, Heinz

    2004-12-10

    Time-resolved FT-IR spectra of ethylene hydrogenation over alumina-supported Pt catalyst were recorded at 25 ms resolution in the temperature range 323 to 473 K using various H2 flow rates (1 atm total gas pressure). Surface ethyl species (2870 and 1200 cm-1) were detected at all temperatures along with the gas phase ethane product (2954 and 2893 cm-1). The CH3CH2Pt growth was instantaneous on the time scale of 25ms under all experimental conditions. At 323 K, the decay time of surface ethyl (122 + 10 ms) coincides with the rise time of C2H6 (144 + 14 ms).This establishes direct kinetic evidence for surface ethyl as the kinetically relevant intermediate. Such a direct link between the temporal behavior of an observed intermediate and the final product growth in a heterogeneous catalytic system has not been demonstrated before to our knowledge. A fraction (10 percent) of the asymptotic ethane growth at 323 K is prompt, indicating that there are surface ethyl species that react much faster than the majority of the CH3CH2Pt intermediates. The dispersive kinetics is attributed to the varying strength of interaction of the ethyl species with the Pt surface caused by heterogeneity of the surface environment. At 473 K, the majority of ethyl intermediates are hydrogenated prior to the recording of the first time slice (24 ms), and a correspondingly large prompt growth of ethane is observed. The yield and kinetics of the surface ethylidyne are in agreement with the known spectator nature of this species.

  10. Kodama time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abreu, Gabriel

    2010-01-01

    In a general time-dependent (3+1)-dimensional spherically symmetric spacetime, the so-called Kodama vector is a naturally defined geometric quantity that is timelike outside the evolving horizon and so defines a preferred class of fiducial observers. However the Kodama vector does not by itself define any preferred notion of time. We demonstrate that a preferred time coordinate - which we shall call Kodama time - can be introduced by taking the additional step of applying the Clebsch decomposition theorem to the Kodama vector. We thus construct a geometrically preferred coordinate system for any time-dependent spherically symmetric spacetime, and explore its properties. In particular we use this formalism to construct a general class of conservation laws, generalizing Kodama's energy flux. We study the geometrically preferred fiducial observers, and demonstrate that it is possible to define and calculate a generalized notion of surface gravity that is valid throughout the entire evolving spacetime. Furthermor...

  11. Assessment of Injection Well Construction and Operation for Water Injection Wells and Salt Water Disposal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    such as drilling mud and work- over fluids. These are all shallow wells using injected fresh water to dissolve salt Disposal Wells in the Nine Township Area ­ 2009 September 2009 Prepared by Delaware Basin Drilling into a brine solution. In order to develop a solution mine, either a new well is drilled for brine extraction

  12. Session: Long Valley Exploratory Well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Finger, John T.; Eichelberger, John C.; Hickox, Charles E.

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of four presentations: ''Long Valley Exploratory Well - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''The Long Valley Well - Phase II Operations'' by John T. Finger; ''Geologic results from the Long Valley Exploratory Well'' by John C. Eichelberger; and ''A Model for Large-Scale Thermal Convection in the Long Valley Geothermal Region'' by Charles E. Hickox.

  13. Well Monitoring System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EGS well monitoring tools offer a unique set of solutions which will lower costs and increase confidence in future geothermal projects.

  14. Emergence of time and Observable physics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Da Xu

    2009-08-17

    This is a philosophy paper rather than mathematical physics work. I will publish it in some other place.

  15. Optimization of fractured well performance of horizontal gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Magalhaes, Fellipe Vieira

    2009-06-02

    In low-permeability gas reservoirs, horizontal wells have been used to increase the reservoir contact area, and hydraulic fracturing has been further extending the contact between wellbores and reservoirs. This thesis presents an approach...

  16. Quantum Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    John Ashmead

    2010-05-05

    Normally we quantize along the space dimensions but treat time classically. But from relativity we expect a high level of symmetry between time and space. What happens if we quantize time using the same rules we use to quantize space? To do this, we generalize the paths in the Feynman path integral to include paths that vary in time as well as in space. We use Morlet wavelet decomposition to ensure convergence and normalization of the path integrals. We derive the Schr\\"odinger equation in four dimensions from the short time limit of the path integral expression. We verify that we recover standard quantum theory in the non-relativistic, semi-classical, and long time limits. Quantum time is an experiment factory: most foundational experiments in quantum mechanics can be modified in a way that makes them tests of quantum time. We look at single and double slits in time, scattering by time-varying electric and magnetic fields, and the Aharonov-Bohm effect in time.

  17. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, Roger J. (Albuquerque, NM); Osbourn, Gordon C. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1987-01-01

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  18. Quantum well multijunction photovoltaic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaffin, R.J.; Osbourn, G.C.

    1983-07-08

    A monolithic, quantum well, multilayer photovoltaic cell comprises a p-n junction comprising a p-region on one side and an n-region on the other side, each of which regions comprises a series of at least three semiconductor layers, all p-type in the p-region and all n-type in the n-region; each of said series of layers comprising alternating barrier and quantum well layers, each barrier layer comprising a semiconductor material having a first bandgap and each quantum well layer comprising a semiconductor material having a second bandgap when in bulk thickness which is narrower than said first bandgap, the barrier layers sandwiching each quantum well layer and each quantum well layer being sufficiently thin that the width of its bandgap is between said first and second bandgaps, such that radiation incident on said cell and above an energy determined by the bandgap of the quantum well layers will be absorbed and will produce an electrical potential across said junction.

  19. Subsurface steam sampling in Geysers wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lysne, P. [Lysne (Peter), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Koenig, B. [Unocal Geothermal and Power Operations Group, Santa Rose, CA (United States); Hirtz, P. [Thermochem, Inc., Santa Rosa, CA (United States); Normann, R.; Henfling, J. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1997-01-01

    A new downhole sampling tool has been built for use in steam wells at The Geysers geothermal reservoir. The tool condenses specimens into an initially evacuated vessel that is opened down hole at the direction of an on-board computer. The tool makes a temperature log of the well as it is deployed, and the pressure and temperature of collected specimens are monitored for diagnostic purposes. Initial tests were encouraging, and the Department of Energy has funded an expanded effort that includes data gathering needed to develop a three-dimensional model of The Geysers geochemical environment. Collected data will be useful for understanding the origins of hydrogen chloride and non-condensable gases in the steam, as well as tracking the effect of injection on the composition of produced steam. Interested parties are invited to observe the work and to join the program.

  20. Well-Tech Award 2008 Well-Tech Award 2007

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chiao, Jung-Chih

    ://www.well-tech.it/_nuovo%20sito_/anteprima%202009/anteprima_2009_acce.html #12;ACCESSIBILITY Protesi di nuova generazione che farlo diventare il più naturale possibile, cercando un perfetto equilibrio tra protesi e corpo. Able - B Protesi di nuova generazione che punta ad ottimizzare comfort, propriocezione, andatura, postura, estetica

  1. Partial Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Marlow

    2006-10-20

    We attempt to dissolve the measurement problem using an anthropic principle which allows us to invoke rational observers. We argue that the key feature of such observers is that they are rational (we need not care whether they are `classical' or `macroscopic' for example) and thus, since quantum theory can be expressed as a rational theory of probabilistic inference, the measurement problem is not a problem.

  2. Well completion and servicing fluid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grimsley, R.L.

    1990-09-25

    This patent describes a well completion servicing fluid for controlling formation pressure during completion or servicing of a well. It comprises: an aqueous solution of calcium chloride, a solid weighing agent suspended in the solution and being selected from the group consisting of zinc, zinc oxide, and mixtures thereof; and a viscosifier dissolved in the solution in an amount effective to suspend the weighing agent. The fluid has a density of greater than 15 pounds per gallon and being substantially free of bromide ions and being substantially free of solid material which is not soluble in hydrochloric acid.

  3. Process for cementing geothermal wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eilers, Louis H. (Inola, OK)

    1985-01-01

    A pumpable slurry of coal-filled furfuryl alcohol, furfural, and/or a low molecular weight mono- or copolymer thereof containing, preferably, a catalytic amount of a soluble acid catalyst is used to cement a casing in a geothermal well.

  4. Time-aging time-stress superposition in soft glass under tensile deformation field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Asima Shaukat; Ashutosh Sharma; Yogesh M. Joshi

    2010-06-10

    We have studied the tensile deformation behaviour of thin films of aging aqueous suspension of Laponite, a model soft glassy material, when subjected to a creep flow field generated by a constant engineering normal stress. Aqueous suspension of Laponite demonstrates aging behaviour wherein it undergoes time dependent enhancement of its elastic modulus as well as its characteristic relaxation time. However, under application of the normal stress, the rate of aging decreases and in the limit of high stress, the aging stops with the suspension now undergoing a plastic deformation. Overall, it is observed that the aging that occurs over short creep times at small normal stresses is same as the aging that occurs over long creep times at large normal stresses. This observation allows us to suggest an aging time - process time - normal stress superposition principle, which can predict rheological behaviour at longer times by carrying out short time tests.

  5. Health Education & Wellness - HPMC Occupational Health Services

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wellness Health Education & Wellness Health Education & Wellness Downloads & Patient Materials Health & Productivity Health Calculators & Logs Health Coaching Health Fairs and...

  6. A new well surveying tool 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haghighi, Manuchehr Mehdizabeh

    1966-01-01

    13 13 11 12 15 l2 48 51 51 51 49 49 49 51 50 49 Undetermined values. 'ARABLE II COMPARISON OF MEASURED ANGLES @ID ANGLES INDICATE' EY SURVEYING DEVICE ACTUAL VALUES EERIE(;QVENTAL VALUES Rnn No. 1 Run No. 2 Depth: Direction of...A NEW WELL SURVEYING TOOL A Thesis By MANUCHEHR MEHDIZABEH HAGHIGHI Submitted to the Graduate College of the Texas ANM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE Major Subject: PETROLEUM...

  7. Well Deepening | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThinWarsaw, Poland:EnergyWe Energy Wind FarmWege WindWeldWell

  8. Wellness Services | The Ames Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust,Field-effectWorking WithTelecentricN AProjectAdministration NNSAWellWellness Services

  9. The use of real-time off-site observations as a methodology for increasing forecast skill in prediction of large wind power ramps one or more hours ahead of their impact on a wind plant.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin Wilde, Principal Investigator

    2012-12-31

    ABSTRACT Application of Real-Time Offsite Measurements in Improved Short-Term Wind Ramp Prediction Skill Improved forecasting performance immediately preceding wind ramp events is of preeminent concern to most wind energy companies, system operators, and balancing authorities. The value of near real-time hub height-level wind data and more general meteorological measurements to short-term wind power forecasting is well understood. For some sites, access to onsite measured wind data - even historical - can reduce forecast error in the short-range to medium-range horizons by as much as 50%. Unfortunately, valuable free-stream wind measurements at tall tower are not typically available at most wind plants, thereby forcing wind forecasters to rely upon wind measurements below hub height and/or turbine nacelle anemometry. Free-stream measurements can be appropriately scaled to hub-height levels, using existing empirically-derived relationships that account for surface roughness and turbulence. But there is large uncertainty in these relationships for a given time of day and state of the boundary layer. Alternatively, forecasts can rely entirely on turbine anemometry measurements, though such measurements are themselves subject to wake effects that are not stationary. The void in free-stream hub-height level measurements of wind can be filled by remote sensing (e.g., sodar, lidar, and radar). However, the expense of such equipment may not be sustainable. There is a growing market for traditional anemometry on tall tower networks, maintained by third parties to the forecasting process (i.e., independent of forecasters and the forecast users). This study examines the value of offsite tall-tower data from the WINDataNOW Technology network for short-horizon wind power predictions at a wind farm in northern Montana. The presentation shall describe successful physical and statistical techniques for its application and the practicality of its application in an operational setting. It shall be demonstrated that when used properly, the real-time offsite measurements materially improve wind ramp capture and prediction statistics, when compared to traditional wind forecasting techniques and to a simple persistence model.

  10. The relationship of time perspective to time allocation, recreation experience preferences, and wellness 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shores, Kindal Alayne

    2006-10-30

    -1 T HE ? R E L A T I ONSHIP ? OF ? T I M E ? PE R SP E C T I VE ? T O? T I M E ? A L L OC A T I ON, ? R E C R E A T I ON?E XPE R I E NC E ? PRE F E R E NC E S , ? A ND? W E L L NE SS ? A ? D i s s ert a t i o n? by? K I ND AL ? AL A YNE? SHOR E S? Submi... t t ed? to? t h e?O f f i c e?o f ? Graduat e?S t udi es ? o f ? T ex as ? A& M ? U ni vers i t y? i n ? p art i a l ? f u lf il lm e n t ? o f ? t h e?r equi r e m e n t s ? f o r ? t h e?degr ee ? o f ? DOC T OR ? OF ? PHI L OSOPHY? A ugu s t ? 2005? M...

  11. Geologic and hydrologic records of observation wells, test holes, test wells, supply wells, springs, and surface water stations in the Los Alamos area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Purtymun, W.D.

    1995-01-01

    Hundreds of holes have been drilled into the Pajarito Plateau and surrounding test areas of the Los Alamos National Laboratory since the end of World War II. They range in depth from a few feet to more than 14,000 ft. The holes were drilled to provide geologic, hydrologic, and engineering information related to development of a water supply, to provide data on the likelihood or presence of subsurface contamination from hazardous and nuclear materials, and for engineering design for construction. The data contained in this report provide a basis for further investigations into the consequences of our past, present, and future interactions with the environment.

  12. Ultra Thin Quantum Well Materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dr Saeid Ghamaty

    2012-08-16

    This project has enabled Hi-Z technology Inc. (Hi-Z) to understand how to improve the thermoelectric properties of Si/SiGe Quantum Well Thermoelectric Materials. The research that was completed under this project has enabled Hi-Z Technology, Inc. (Hi-Z) to satisfy the project goal to understand how to improve thermoelectric conversion efficiency and reduce costs by fabricating ultra thin Si/SiGe quantum well (QW) materials and measuring their properties. In addition, Hi-Z gained critical new understanding on how thin film fabrication increases the silicon substrate's electrical conductivity, which is important new knowledge to develop critical material fabrication parameters. QW materials are constructed with alternate layers of an electrical conductor, SiGe and an electrical insulator, Si. Film thicknesses were varied, ranging from 2nm to 10nm where 10 nm was the original film thickness prior to this work. The optimum performance was determined at a Si and SiGe thickness of 4nm for an electrical current and heat flow parallel to the films, which was an important conclusion of this work. Essential new information was obtained on how the Si substrate electrical conductivity increases by up to an order of magnitude upon deposition of QW films. Test measurements and calculations are accurate and include both the quantum well and the substrate. The large increase in substrate electrical conductivity means that a larger portion of the electrical current passes through the substrate. The silicon substrate's increased electrical conductivity is due to inherent impurities and thermal donors which are activated during both molecular beam epitaxy and sputtering deposition of QW materials. Hi-Z's forward looking cost estimations based on future high performance QW modules, in which the best Seebeck coefficient and electrical resistivity are taken from separate samples predict that the electricity cost produced with a QW module could be achieved at <$0.35/W. This price would open many markets for waste heat recovery applications. By installing Hi-Z's materials in applications in which electricity could be produced from waste heat sources could result in significant energy savings as well as emissions reductions. For example, if QW thermoelectric generators could be introduced commercially in 2015, and assuming they could also capture an additional 0.1%/year of the available waste heat from the aluminum, steel, and iron industries, then by 2020, their use would lead to a 2.53 trillion Btu/year reduction in energy consumption. This translates to a $12.9 million/year energy savings, and 383.6 million lb's of CO2 emissions reduction per year. Additionally, Hi-Z would expect that the use of QW TE devices in the automotive, manufacturing, and energy generation industries would reduce the USA's petroleum and fossil fuel dependence, and thus significantly reduce emissions from CO2 and other polluting gasses such as NOx, SOx, and particulate matter (PM), etc.

  13. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    to obser- vation well, L; vertical hydraulic conductivity ofGas Wells Stimulated by Massive Hydraulic Fracturing," SPEproduc- tion well, L; hori zontal hydraulic conductivi ty,

  14. Well funneled nuclear structure landscape: renormalization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Idini; G. Potel; F. Barranco; E. Vigezzi; R. A. Broglia

    2015-04-29

    A complete characterization of the structure of nuclei can be obtained by combining information arising from inelastic scattering, Coulomb excitation and $\\gamma-$decay, together with one- and two-particle transfer reactions. In this way it is possible to probe the single-particle and collective components of the nuclear many-body wavefunction resulting from their mutual coupling and diagonalising the low-energy Hamiltonian. We address the question of how accurately such a description can account for experimental observations. It is concluded that renormalizing empirically and on equal footing bare single-particle and collective motion in terms of self-energy (mass) and vertex corrections (screening), as well as particle-hole and pairing interactions through particle-vibration coupling allows theory to provide an overall, quantitative account of the data.

  15. Room temperature spin transport in undoped (110) GaAs/AlGaAs quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yokota, Nobuhide Aoshima, Yohei; Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Kawaguchi, Hitoshi

    2014-02-17

    We are reporting on our first observation of a micrometer-order electron spin transport in a (110) GaAs/AlGaAs multiple quantum well (QW) at room temperature using a space- and time-resolved Kerr rotation technique. A 37-?m transport was observed within an electron spin lifetime of 1.2?ns at room temperature when using an in-plane electric field of 1.75?kV/cm. The spatio-temporal profiles of electron spins were well reproduced by the spin drift-diffusion equations coupled with the Poisson equation, supporting the validity of the measurement. The results suggest that (110) QWs are useful as a spin transport layer for semiconductor spintronic devices operating at room temperature.

  16. The dependence of potential well formation on the magnetic field strength and electron injection current in a polywell device

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornish, S., E-mail: cornish@physics.usyd.edu.au; Gummersall, D.; Carr, M.; Khachan, J. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia)

    2014-09-15

    A capacitive probe has been used to measure the plasma potential in a polywell device in order to observe the dependence of potential well formation on magnetic field strength, electron injection current, and polywell voltage bias. The effectiveness of the capacitive probe in a high energy electron plasma was determined by measuring the plasma potential of a planar diode with an axial magnetic field. The capacitive probe was translated along the axis of one of the field coils of the polywell, and the spatial profile of the potential well was measured. The confinement time of electrons in the polywell was estimated with a simple analytical model which used the experimentally observed potential well depths, as well as a simulation of the electron trajectories using particle orbit theory.

  17. Performance Analysis & Optimization of Well Production in Unconventional Resource Plays 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sehbi, Baljit Singh

    2013-05-01

    The Unconventional Resource Plays consisting of the lowest tier of resources (large volumes and most difficult to develop) have been the main focus of US domestic activity during recent times. Horizontal well drilling and hydraulic fracturing...

  18. Health and Wellness Guide for Students Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Health and Wellness Guide for Students #12;Introduction What is Wellness? Wellness is an active life. Many factors can influence your health and well-being, in fact there are 7 different, interacting dimensions of health and wellness. The 7 dimensions are: Physical Wellness ­ Taking care of your body

  19. Spin-orbit interaction in multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hao, Ya-Fei

    2015-01-07

    In this paper, we investigate how the structure of multiple quantum wells affects spin-orbit interactions. To increase the interface-related Rashba spin splitting and the strength of the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, we designed three kinds of multiple quantum wells. We demonstrate that the structure of the multiple quantum wells strongly affected the interface-related Rashba spin-orbit interaction, increasing the interface-related Rashba spin splitting to up to 26% larger in multiple quantum wells than in a stepped quantum well. We also show that the cubic Dresselhaus spin-orbit interaction similarly influenced the spin relaxation time of multiple quantum wells and that of a stepped quantum well. The increase in the interface-related Rashba spin splitting originates from the relationship between interface-related Rashba spin splitting and electron probability density. Our results suggest that multiple quantum wells can be good candidates for spintronic devices.

  20. Representative well models for eight geothermal-resource areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carson, C.C.; Lin, Y.T.; Livesay, B.J.

    1983-02-01

    Representative well models have been constructed for eight major geothermal-resource areas. The models define representative times and costs associated with the individual operations that can be expected during drilling and completion of geothermal wells. The models were made for and have been used to evaluate the impacts of potential new technologies. The nature, construction, and validation of the models are presented.

  1. Water coning calculations for vertical and horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Weiping

    1990-01-01

    recovery of several wells coning water. Since their type curves are specific for the data they investigated, it can not serve as a general method of coning evaluation. Addington'2 developed a set of gas coning correlations for 3-D coarse grid... for predicting (1) critical coning rate, (2) breakthrough time, and (3) WOR after breakthrough in both vertical and horizontal wells. Two hand calculation methods had been developed in this study. Either of them applies to both vertical and horizontal wells...

  2. Two-dimensional nonlinear finite element analysis of well damage due to reservoir compaction, well-to-well interactions, and localization on weak layers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hilbert, L.B. Jr. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Fredrich, J.T. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bruno, M.S. [Terralog Technologies USA, Inc., Arcadia, CA (United States); Deitrick, G.L.; Rouffignac, E.P. de [Shell Exploration and Production Co., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-05-01

    In this paper the authors present the results of a coupled nonlinear finite element geomechanics model for reservoir compaction and well-to-well interactions for the high-porosity, low strength diatomite reservoirs of the Belridge field near Bakersfield, California. They show that well damage and failures can occur under the action of two distinct mechanisms: shear deformations induced by pore compaction, and subsidence, and shear deformations due to well-to-well interactions during production or water injection. They show such casting damage or failure can be localized to weak layers that slide or slip under shear due to subsidence. The magnitude of shear displacements and surface subsidence agree with field observations.

  3. Data Bias in Rate Transient Analysis of Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agnia, Ammar Khalifa Mohammed

    2012-07-16

    or contains outliers, it will be hard to distinguish their effects from common regime if the superposition time functions are used as plotting time function on log-log plots. Such deceiving presence of these flow regimes will define erroneous well...

  4. New multilateral well architecture in heterogeneous reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jia, Hongqiao

    2004-09-30

    Multilateral well technology has been widely used in the world oil fields. There still has technical limitation of these kinds of well structure. This thesis presents a new multilateral well architecture which is more ...

  5. INVITATIONAL WELL-TESTING SYMPOSIUM PROCEEDINGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Authors, Various

    2011-01-01

    Prior to spudding the well Drilling rate'is a direct meansGraves, E. D. , Jr. : Well Design: Drilling and Production,Density to Aid in Drilling Wells in High Pressure Areas.

  6. SW New Mexico Oil Well Formation Tops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shari Kelley

    2015-10-21

    Rock formation top picks from oil wells from southwestern New Mexico from scout cards and other sources. There are differing formation tops interpretations for some wells, so for those wells duplicate formation top data are presented in this file.

  7. Industry survey for horizontal wells. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilson, D.D.; Kaback, D.S. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Denver, CO (United States); Denhan, M.E. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Watkins, D. [CDM Federal Programs Corp., Aiken, SC (United States)

    1993-07-01

    An international survey of horizontal environmental wells was performed during May and June of 1993. The purpose of the survey was to provide the environmental industry with an inventory of horizontal environmental wells and information pertaining to the extent of the use of horizontal environmental wells, the variety of horizontal environmental well applications, the types of geologic and hydrogeologic conditions within which horizontal environmental wells have been installed, and the companies that perform horizontal environmental well installations. Other information, such as the cost of horizontal environmental well installations and the results of tests performed on the wells, is not complete but is provided as general information with the caveat that the information should not be used to compare drilling companies. The result of the survey is a catalogue of horizontal environmental wells that are categorized by the objective or use of the wells, the vertical depth of the wells, and the drilling company contracted to install the wells.

  8. Wells Public Utilities - Commercial & Industrial Energy Efficiency...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Refrigeration Equipment Program Info Sector Name Utility Administrator Wells Public Utilities Website http:www.SaveEnergyInWells.com State Minnesota Program Type Rebate Program...

  9. Helicopter magnetic survey conducted to locate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veloski, G.A.; Hammack, R.W.; Stamp, V.; Hall, R.; Colina, K.

    2008-07-01

    A helicopter magnetic survey was conducted in August 2007 over 15.6 sq mi at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3’s (NPR-3) Teapot Dome Field near Casper, Wyoming. The survey’s purpose was to accurately locate wells drilled there during more than 90 years of continuous oilfield operation. The survey was conducted at low altitude and with closely spaced flight lines to improve the detection of wells with weak magnetic response and to increase the resolution of closely spaced wells. The survey was in preparation for a planned CO2 flood for EOR, which requires a complete well inventory with accurate locations for all existing wells. The magnetic survey was intended to locate wells missing from the well database and to provide accurate locations for all wells. The ability of the helicopter magnetic survey to accurately locate wells was accomplished by comparing airborne well picks with well locations from an intense ground search of a small test area.

  10. Accelerated Expansion: Theory and Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Polarski

    2001-09-20

    The present paradigm in cosmology is the usual Big-Bang Cosmology in which two stages of accelerated expansion are incorporated: the inflationary phase in the very early universe which produces the classical inhomogeneities observed in the universe, and a second stage of acceleration at the present time as the latest Supernovae observations seem to imply. Both stages could be produced by a scalar field and observations will strongly constrain the microscopic lagrangian of any proposed model.

  11. Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    ISM Workshop Presentations Knoxville Convention Center, Knoxville, TN August 2009 Track 4: Employee Health and Wellness

  12. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity.

  13. Horizontal well applications in complex carbonate reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rahman, M.; Al-Awami, H.

    1995-10-01

    Over the past four years, Saudi Aramco has drilled over eighty horizontal wells, onshore and offshore. It has successfully applied this technology to develop new reservoirs as well as enhance recovery from its mature fields. This paper presents the reservoir engineering aspects of `horizontal` and `high angle` wells drilled in a major offshore field in Saudi Arabia. It shows how horizontal wells have (a) increased the recovery of bypassed oil, (b) improved well productivity in tight reservoirs, (c) increased production from thin oil zones underlain by water, and (d) improved peripheral injection. The paper discusses the actual performance of the horizontal wells and compares them with offset conventional wells. It presents the results of logging and testing of these wells, and highlights actual field data on (a) relationship between productivity gain and horizontal length, (b) pressure loss along the horizontal wellbore, and (c) effect of heterogeneity on coning an inflow performance.

  14. Disinfecting Water Wells by Shock Chlorination 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dozier, Monty; McFarland, Mark L.

    2005-09-30

    If your well has been flooded, it must be shock chlorinated before it can be used as a source of drinking water. This publication explains how to disinfect a well using either dry chlorine or liquid household bleach....

  15. RFI Well Integrity 06 JUL 1400

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This PowerPoint report entitled "Well Integrity During Shut - In Operations: DOE/DOI Analyses" describes risks and suggests risk management recommendations associated with shutting in the well.

  16. Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan CSMRI Site Prepared for: Colorado School;CSMRI Site Groundwater Monitoring Well Installation Work Plan December 6, 2006 Page ii Table of Contents

  17. Capping of Water Wells for Future Use 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lesikar, Bruce J.; Mechell, Justin

    2007-09-04

    Water wells that are not being used, but that might be needed in the future, can be sealed with a cap that covers the top of the well casing pipe to prevent unauthorized access and contamination of the well. This publication explains how to cap a...

  18. Observation Wells At Lightning Dock Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPI VenturesNewSt. Louis,Energy Information Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004)

  19. Observation Wells At Blue Mountain Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName0 JumpOakland(Ozkocak,

  20. Observation Wells At East Brawley Area (Matlick & Jayne, 2008) | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName0 JumpOakland(Ozkocak,Energy

  1. Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dash, Et Al., 1983) |

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName0

  2. Observation Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al.,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName01988) | Open Energy

  3. Observation Wells At The Needles Area (DOE GTP) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:Information 3rd|Northfork ElectricName01988) | OpenThe Needles Area

  4. First Observation of CP Violation in [bar over B][superscript 0] ? D[(*) over CP]h[superscript 0] Decays by a Combined Time-Dependent Analysis of BABAR and Belle Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdesselam, A.

    We report a measurement of the time-dependent CP asymmetry of [bar over B][superscript 0] ? D[(*) over CP]h[superscript 0] decays, where the light neutral hadron h[superscript 0] is a ?[superscript 0], ?, or ? meson, and ...

  5. Evidence of Reopened Microfractures in Production Data of Hydraulically Fractured Shale Gas Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Apiwathanasorn, Sippakorn

    2012-10-19

    the presence of reopened natural fracture network can be observed in pressure and production data of shale gas wells producing from two shale formations with different well and reservoir properties. Homogeneous, dual porosity and triple porosity models...

  6. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA); Gustafson, Gregg S. (Redmond, WA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  7. Well purge and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, R.; Smith, R.M.; Hall, S.H.; Smart, J.E.; Gustafson, G.S.

    1995-10-24

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly with a packer, pump and exhaust, that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. The packer is positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion. 8 figs.

  8. Cathodic protection of storage field well casings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1986-01-01

    Downhole logging of gas storage field wells to determine cathodic protection (CP) levels is expensive and requires removing the well from service. A technique allowing the prediction of downhole CP levels by modeling combined with limiting field measurements would provide the industry with a cost-effective means of implementing and monitoring casing protection. A computer model has been developed for a cathodically protected well casing.

  9. New York/Region Opinions Editorial Observer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pianka, Eric R.

    New York/Region Opinions Editorial Observer Grasping the Depth of Time as a First Step of us. The idea of such quantities of time is extremely new. Humans began to understand the true scale

  10. Analysis of well test data influenced by multiple reservoir boundaries using pressure derivative type curves 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buzarde, Charles Brett

    1991-01-01

    Well No-Flow Boundary Image Well Figure 2. 2 Real Well and Image Well Pressure Drwadown Patterns After an Extended Flow Period. Real well ~ L rw I m age w e I 1 L ~ rw Figure 2. 3 Single Linear No-flow Barrier Image Well Configuration 22 Apr.... 1 At early times the value of tD will be large while our value of tDL will be small (because rw2 ?L2) Therefore at early times the exponent terms in Eq. 3. 1 have the following values -I p(4t ) -I and exp( ? ) ~ 0 tDL This is the middle time...

  11. What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Danforth, Bryan Nicholas

    1 What Is Well Yield? Private wells are frequently drilled in rural areas to supply water lowering the water level in the borehole below the pump intake is called the well yield. Low-yielding wells are generally considered wells that cannot meet the peak water demand for the home or farm. This fact sheet

  12. Theory of Earthquake Recurrence Times

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Saichev; D. Sornette

    2006-05-31

    The statistics of recurrence times in broad areas have been reported to obey universal scaling laws, both for single homogeneous regions (Corral, 2003) and when averaged over multiple regions (Bak et al.,2002). These unified scaling laws are characterized by intermediate power law asymptotics. On the other hand, Molchan (2005) has presented a mathematical proof that, if such a universal law exists, it is necessarily an exponential, in obvious contradiction with the data. First, we generalize Molchan's argument to show that an approximate unified law can be found which is compatible with the empirical observations when incorporating the impact of the Omori law of earthquake triggering. We then develop the full theory of the statistics of inter-event times in the framework of the ETAS model of triggered seismicity and show that the empirical observations can be fully explained. Our theoretical expression fits well the empirical statistics over the whole range of recurrence times, accounting for different regimes by using only the physics of triggering quantified by Omori's law. The description of the statistics of recurrence times over multiple regions requires an additional subtle statistical derivation that maps the fractal geometry of earthquake epicenters onto the distribution of the average seismic rates in multiple regions. This yields a prediction in excellent agreement with the empirical data for reasonable values of the fractal dimension $d \\approx 1.8$, the average clustering ratio $n \\approx 0.9$, and the productivity exponent $\\alpha \\approx 0.9$ times the $b$-value of the Gutenberg-Richter law.

  13. Fluctuations of fragment observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Gulminelli; M. D'Agostino

    2006-11-09

    This contribution presents a review of our present theoretical as well as experimental knowledge of different fluctuation observables relevant to nuclear multifragmentation. The possible connection between the presence of a fluctuation peak and the occurrence of a phase transition or a critical phenomenon is critically analyzed. Many different phenomena can lead both to the creation and to the suppression of a fluctuation peak. In particular, the role of constraints due to conservation laws and to data sorting is shown to be essential. From the experimental point of view, a comparison of the available fragmentation data reveals that there is a good agreement between different data sets of basic fluctuation observables, if the fragmenting source is of comparable size. This compatibility suggests that the fragmentation process is largely independent of the reaction mechanism (central versus peripheral collisions, symmetric versus asymmetric systems, light ions versus heavy ion induced reactions). Configurational energy fluctuations, that may give important information on the heat capacity of the fragmenting system at the freeze out stage, are not fully compatible among different data sets and require further analysis to properly account for Coulomb effects and secondary decays. Some basic theoretical questions, concerning the interplay between the dynamics of the collision and the fragmentation process, and the cluster definition in dense and hot media, are still open and are addressed at the end of the paper. A comparison with realistic models and/or a quantitative analysis of the fluctuation properties will be needed to clarify in the next future the nature of the transition observed from compound nucleus evaporation to multi-fragment production.

  14. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

    2004-09-30

    This project is a research into the effect of gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells. It is the result of a problem encountered in producing a low permeability formation from a well in South Texas owned by the El Paso Production...

  15. Chaos in a well : Effects of competing length scales

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Sankaranarayanan; A. Lakshminarayan; V. B. Sheorey

    2001-06-12

    A discontinuous generalization of the standard map, which arises naturally as the dynamics of a periodically kicked particle in a one dimensional infinite square well potential, is examined. Existence of competing length scales, namely the width of the well and the wavelength of the external field, introduce novel dynamical behaviour. Deterministic chaos induced diffusion is observed for weak field strengths as the length scales do not match. This is related to an abrupt breakdown of rotationally invariant curves and in particular KAM tori. An approximate stability theory is derived wherein the usual standard map is a point of ``bifurcation''.

  16. Coiled tubing velocity strings keep wells unloaded

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesson, H.R.; Shursen, J.L.

    1989-07-01

    Liquid loading is a problem in many older and even some newer gas wells, particularly in pressure depletion type reservoirs. This liquid loading results in decreased production and may even kill the well. The use of coiled tubing as a velocity string (or siphon string) has proved to be an economically viable alternative to allow continued and thus, increased cumulative production for wells experiencing liquid loading problems. Coiled tubing run inside the existing production string reduces the flow area, whether the well is produced up the tubing or up the annulus. This reduction in flow area results in an increase in flow velocity and thus, an increase in the well's ability to unload fluids.

  17. Monitoring cathodic protection of well casings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J.

    1980-01-01

    Because conventional downhole logging of gas storage wells to determine cathodic-protection levels is expensive and inconvenient, a program was developed (1) to predict downhole casing-to-soil potentials from wellhead measurements in the presence of interference and (2 )to model the mutual interference effects occurring between the wells and the cathodic-protection systems. In the first phase of this project, a transmission-line model that was developed to represent the well casing electrically adequately predicted the downhole potentials for both ideal and nonideal polarization conditions. By allowing the number of sections used and their parameter values as variables, the model can accommodate different environments and casing configurations. The model's representation of a well casing by a lumped-parameter electrical network will also permit interference studies between mutually coupled wells.

  18. Matter: Space without Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yousef Ghazi-Tabatabai

    2012-11-19

    While Quantum Gravity remains elusive and Quantum Field Theory retains the interpretational difficulties of Quantum Mechanics, we have introduced an alternate approach to the unification of particles, fields, space and time, suggesting that the concept of matter as space without time provides a framework which unifies matter with spacetime and in which we anticipate the development of complete theories (ideally a single unified theory) describing observed 'particles, charges, fields and forces' solely with the geometry of our matter-space-time universe.

  19. Well casing-based geophysical sensor apparatus, system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA)

    2010-03-09

    A geophysical sensor apparatus, system, and method for use in, for example, oil well operations, and in particular using a network of sensors emplaced along and outside oil well casings to monitor critical parameters in an oil reservoir and provide geophysical data remote from the wells. Centralizers are affixed to the well casings and the sensors are located in the protective spheres afforded by the centralizers to keep from being damaged during casing emplacement. In this manner, geophysical data may be detected of a sub-surface volume, e.g. an oil reservoir, and transmitted for analysis. Preferably, data from multiple sensor types, such as ERT and seismic data are combined to provide real time knowledge of the reservoir and processes such as primary and secondary oil recovery.

  20. Dark Energy: Observational Evidence and Theoretical Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Novosyadlyj; V. Pelykh; Yu. Shtanov; A. Zhuk

    2015-02-14

    The book elucidates the current state of the dark energy problem and presents the results of the authors, who work in this area. It describes the observational evidence for the existence of dark energy, the methods and results of constraining of its parameters, modeling of dark energy by scalar fields, the space-times with extra spatial dimensions, especially Kaluza---Klein models, the braneworld models with a single extra dimension as well as the problems of positive definition of gravitational energy in General Relativity, energy conditions and consequences of their violation in the presence of dark energy. This monograph is intended for science professionals, educators and graduate students, specializing in general relativity, cosmology, field theory and particle physics.

  1. Transient productivity index for numerical well test simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blanc, G.; Ding, D.Y.; Ene, A.

    1997-08-01

    The most difficult aspect of numerical simulation of well tests is the treatment of the Bottom Hole Flowing (BHF) Pressure. In full field simulations, this pressure is derived from the Well-block Pressure (WBP) using a numerical productivity index which accounts for the grid size and permeability, and for the well completion. This productivity index is calculated assuming a pseudo-steady state flow regime in the vicinity of the well and is therefore constant during the well production period. Such a pseudo-steady state assumption is no longer valid for the early time of a well test simulation as long as the pressure perturbation has not reached several grid-blocks around the well. This paper offers two different solutions to this problem: (1) The first one is based on the derivation of a Numerical Transient Productivity Index (NTPI) to be applied to Cartesian grids; (2) The second one is based on the use of a Corrected Transmissibility and Accumulation Term (CTAT) in the flow equation. The representation of the pressure behavior given by both solutions is far more accurate than the conventional one as shown by several validation examples which are presented in the following pages.

  2. Pressure buildup characteristics in Austin Chalk wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claycomb, Eddy

    1982-01-01

    hole pressure instruments used to collect data were of the Amerada-gauge type. The instruments were either a RPG-3 (1-1/4" dia. ) or a RPG-4 (1" dia. ). The gauges consist of three basic parts: the recording section, a clock and either a pressure... stimulation was designed and performed on the well. Five months after the fracture stimulation and continuous production, the well had flow rates in excess of 1. 7 mmscf per day and 170 bbls, of oil per day. Case II: Conductive H draulic Fracture Well...

  3. Nevada Test Site Groundwater Well Rehabilitation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David B. Hudson

    2006-12-01

    This plan describes actions to improve the utility and credibility of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) interim groundwater monitoring program. The two principal actions are: (1) well maintenance/rehabilitation activities and (2) the deployment of dedicated low-cost and reliable jack-pumps for groundwater sampling from deep monitoring wells. The scope of this proposal is to perform these actions on some number of nine selected wells (Figure 1) to evaluate whether these actions are achievable, practical, cost effective, and result in improved groundwater data quality.

  4. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, T.J.; Holdren, G.R. Jr.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1998-09-08

    A method and apparatus are disclosed for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques. 3 figs.

  5. Groundwater well with reactive filter pack

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gilmore, Tyler J. (Pasco, WA); Holdren, Jr., George R. (Kennewick, WA); Kaplan, Daniel I. (Richland, WA)

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for the remediation of contaminated soil and ground water wherein a reactive pack material is added to the annular fill material utilized in standard well construction techniques.

  6. Completion of Oil Wells May 4, 2003

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rudge, John

    Completion of Oil Wells John Rudge May 4, 2003 1 Introduction After the initial drilling of an oil for given , z; i.e. ignore radial variation. Under this assumption these equations can be easily integrated

  7. Modeling techniques for simulating well behavior 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rattu, Bungen Christina

    2002-01-01

    This thesis is a catalog of modeling techniques useful in simulating well behavior in certain types of reservoirs that are often encountered in petroleum reservoirs. Emphasis has been placed on techniques that can be used with any conventional...

  8. Subsea tree cap well choke system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bednar, J.M.

    1991-04-30

    This patent describes an apparatus useful in subsea well completions requiring a subsea choke. It comprises: a wellhead connector; a tree flow passage; a tree annulus passage; a tree cap; a choke; and a production line.

  9. Well-being and Philosophy of Science

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexandrova, Anna

    2015-03-06

    determinants and risk factors at biological, psychological and social levels (Diener 2012). Well-being is no longer thought to be an idiosyncratic personal phenomenon that does not admit of population-level analysis. Connected to this, there is a growing... simple division of labor: philosophers (or scientists in their philosophical moments) do the foundational normative work by telling us what well-being is, while scientists (or philosophers in their empirical moments) investigate the network of causes...

  10. PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

  11. SYMBOLS FOR TIME = time variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchowski, Andrew T.

    =forever) Cost spent to build variation point i at time i = index over variation points #12;SYMBOLS FOR TIME to account for net present value of money r = assumed interest rate i = index over variation points Cost Expected cost summed over all relevant time intervals Cost spent to build variation point i at time r

  12. Thermal extraction analysis of five Los Azufres production wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kruger, Paul; Quijano, Luis

    1995-01-26

    Thermal energy extraction from five wells supplying 5-MWe wellhead generators in three zones of the Los Azufres geothermal field has been examined from production and chemical data compiled over 14-years of operation. The data, as annual means, are useful in observing small-scale changes in reservoir performance with continuous production. The chemical components are chloride for quality control and the geothermometer elements for reservoir temperatures. The flowrate and fluid enthalpy data are used to calculate the thermal extraction rates. Integration of these data provides an estimate of the total energy extracted from the zone surrounding the well. The combined production and chemical geothermometer data are used to model the produced fluid as coming from just-penetrating wells for which the annual produced mass originates from a series of concentric hemispheric shells moving out into the reservoir. Estimates are made of the drawdown distance into the reservoir and the far-field conditions.

  13. Time in Quantum Mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Curt A. Moyer

    2013-05-23

    The failure of conventional quantum theory to recognize time as an observable and to admit time operators is addressed. Instead of focusing on the existence of a time operator for a given Hamiltonian, we emphasize the role of the Hamiltonian as the generator of translations in time to construct time states. Taken together, these states constitute what we call a timeline, or quantum history, that is adequate for the representation of any physical state of the system. Such timelines appear to exist even for the semi-bounded and discrete Hamiltonian systems ruled out by Pauli's theorem. However, the step from a timeline to a valid time operator requires additional assumptions that are not always met. Still, this approach illuminates the crucial issue surrounding the construction of time operators, and establishes quantum histories as legitimate alternatives to the familiar coordinate and momentum bases of standard quantum theory.

  14. Observability and Computability in Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Subhash Kak

    2012-06-26

    This paper considers the relevance of the concepts of observability and computability in physical theory. Observability is related to verifiability which is essential for effective computing and as physical systems are computational systems it is important even where explicit computation is not the goal. Specifically, we examine two problems: observability and computability for quantum computing, and remote measurement of time and frequency.

  15. CX Lyrae 2008 Observing Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Ponthiere, Pierre; Hambsch, Franz-Josef

    2012-01-01

    The Blazhko effect in CX Lyr has been reported for the first time by Le Borgne et al. (2007). The authors have pointed out that the Blazhko period was not evaluated accurately due to dataset scarcity. The possible period values announced were 128 or 227 days. A newly conducted four-month observing campaign in 2008 (fifty-nine observation nights) has provided fourteen times of maximum. From a period analysis of measured times of maximum, a Blazhko period of 62 +/- 2 days can be suggested. However, the present dataset is still not densely sampled enough to exclude that the measured period is still a modulation of the real Blazhko period. Indeed the shape of the (O-C) curve does not repeat itself exactly during the campaign duration.

  16. Entiat 4Mile WELLs Completion Report, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malinowksi, Richard

    2007-01-01

    The Entiat 4-mile Wells (Entiat 4-mile) project is located in the Entiat subbasin and will benefit Upper Columbia steelhead, spring Chinook and bull trout. The goal of this project is to prevent juvenile fish from being diverted into an out-of-stream irrigation system and to eliminate impacts due to the annual maintenance of an instream pushup dam. The objectives include eliminating a surface irrigation diversion and replacing it with two wells, which will provide Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) and the Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) with a Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) BiOp metric credit of one. Wells were chosen over a new fish screen based on biological benefits and costs. Long-term biological benefits are provided by completely eliminating the surface diversion and the potential for fish entrainment in a fish screen. Construction costs for a new fish screen were estimated at $150,000, which does not include other costs associated with implementing and maintaining a fish screening project. Construction costs for a well were estimated at $20,000 each. The diversion consisted of a pushup dam that diverted water into an off-channel pond. Water was then pumped into a pressurized system for irrigation. There are 3 different irrigators who used water from this surface diversion, and each has multiple water right claims totaling approximately 5 cfs. Current use was estimated at 300 gallons per minute (approximately 0.641 cfs). Some irrigated acreage was taken out of orchard production less than 5 years ago. Therefore, approximately 6.8 acre-feet will be put into the State of Washington Trust Water Right program. No water will be set aside for conservation savings. The construction of the two irrigation wells for three landowners was completed in September 2006. The Lower Well (Tippen/Wick) will produce up to 175 gpm while the Upper Well (Griffith) will produce up to 275 gpm during the irrigation season. The eight inch diameter wells were developed to a depth of 75 feet and 85 feet, respectively, and will be pumped with Submersible Turbine pumps. The irrigation wells have been fitted with new electric boxes and Siemens flowmeters (MAG8000).

  17. Solitons and vortices in nonlinear potential wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dror, Nir

    2015-01-01

    We consider self-trapping of topological modes governed by the one- and two-dimensional (1D and 2D) nonlinear-Schrodinger/Gross-Pitaevskii equation with effective single- and double-well (DW) nonlinear potentials induced by spatial modulation of the local strength of the self-defocusing nonlinearity. This setting, which may be implemented in optics and Bose-Einstein condensates, aims to extend previous studies, which dealt with single-well nonlinear potentials. In the 1D setting, we find several types of symmetric, asymmetric and antisymmetric states, focusing on scenarios of the spontaneous symmetry breaking. The single-well model is extended by including rocking motion of the well, which gives rise to Rabi oscillations between the fundamental and dipole modes. Analysis of the 2D single-well setting gives rise to stable modes in the form of ordinary dipoles, vortex-antivortex dipoles (VADs), and vortex triangles (VTs), which may be considered as produced by spontaneous breaking of the axial symmetry. The con...

  18. Modelling Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burra G. Sidharth

    2008-09-03

    We briefly review two concepts of time - the usual time associated with "being" and more recent ideas, answering to the description of "becoming". The approximation involved in the former is examined. Finally we argue that it is (unpredictable) fluctuations that underlie time.

  19. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells The patented system delivers...

  20. Nonclassical Light from Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Grünwald; W. Vogel

    2014-05-06

    The fluorescence light from semiconductor quantum wells is analyzed with respect to its quantum optical properties. The light emitted by the excitons is described by bosonic excitations with a Kerr-type nonlinear interaction. To create the excitons, the incoming pump laser light is absorbed and the absorption acts as a spectral filter for the emitted light. The quantum properties of the emitted light are analyzed for the bare excitonic and the quantum-well systems. Squeezing of the quantum-well fluorescence persists for higher pump laser powers than the squeezing of the excitonic fluorescence. For strong pumping, the nonlinearity suppresses the creation of photon pairs and the photon statistics becomes sub-Poisson.

  1. SPORT CLUBSFITNESS &WELLNESSAQUATICS INTRAMURALS RECREATION & WELLNESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is prohibited. · Weapons (knife, gun, etc) are not permitted on the property at any time. FACILITY RULES of equipment beyond its designed purpose are prohibited. · Chalk is prohibited in the facility. · Spitting

  2. VLBA Archive & Distribution Architecture Donald C. Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wells, Donald C.

    statements, in order to bind the DBMS­ based archive catalog to the archive media. 1 Scope, Goal, Strategy, and the DBMS is Ingres. Programmers all have Sun workstations, and the real­time code executes in Motorola MVME

  3. Water Well with Brick Pump House 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raiford Stripling Associates, Inc.; Stripling, Raiford L.

    2011-08-29

    Expensive fan wrecks and down time occurs when couplings break or gearboxes self-destruct. A viable alternative eliminates shaft, coupling, and gearbox moving motor to ground level, driving a hydraulic pump transmitting fluid under pressure. A...

  4. Passive States for Essential Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert Strich

    2008-01-23

    The aim of this note is to present a unified approach to the results given in \\cite{bb99} and \\cite{bs04} which also covers examples of models not presented in these two papers (e.g. $d$-dimensional Minkowski space-time for $d\\geq 3$). Assuming that a state is passive for an observer travelling along certain (essential) worldlines, we show that this state is invariant under the isometry group, is a KMS-state for the observer at a temperature uniquely determined by the structure constants of the Lie algebra involved and fulfills (a variant of) the Reeh-Schlieder property. Also the modular objects associated to such a state and the observable algebra of an observer are computed and a version of weak locality is examined.

  5. Pseudo energy wells in active systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raman Sheshka; Pierre Recho; Lev Truskinovsky

    2015-09-09

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon at a micro-scale and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudo-well in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped ratchet-type stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with correlations in the noise and show that subtle differences in out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudo-well.

  6. Resonator-quantum well infrared photodetectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, K. K. Sun, J.; Olver, K.; Jhabvala, M. D.; Jhabvala, C. A.; Waczynski, A.

    2013-11-11

    We applied a recent electromagnetic model to design the resonator-quantum well infrared photodetector (R-QWIP). In this design, we used an array of rings as diffractive elements to diffract normal incident light into parallel propagation and used the pixel volume as a resonator to intensify the diffracted light. With a proper pixel size, the detector resonates at certain optical wavelengths and thus yields a high quantum efficiency (QE). To test this detector concept, we fabricated a number of R-QWIPs with different quantum well materials and detector geometries. The experimental result agrees satisfactorily with the prediction, and the highest QE achieved is 71%.

  7. Pseudo energy wells in active systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheshka, Raman; Truskinovsky, Lev

    2015-01-01

    Active stabilization in systems with zero or negative stiffness is an essential element of a wide variety of biological processes. We study a prototypical example of this phenomenon at a micro-scale and show how active rigidity, interpreted as a formation of a pseudo-well in the effective energy landscape, can be generated in an overdamped ratchet-type stochastic system. We link the transition from negative to positive rigidity with correlations in the noise and show that subtle differences in out-of-equilibrium driving may compromise the emergence of a pseudo-well.

  8. Modeling non-annular flow in gas condensate wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Garber, J.D.; Varanasi, N.R.S. [Univ. of Southwestern Louisiana, Lafayette, LA (United States). Corrosion Research Center

    1997-09-01

    As gas condensate wells mature they begin producing less gas and more formation water. At this point the wells will likely begin to experience non-annular flow. A model has been developed which fully describes slug flow, and a criterion has been established to locate the slug-churn hydrodynamic transition in the non-annular region. The model has been verified using laboratory generated data. It has been applied to several wells being produced in the Gulf of Mexico to indicate whether they are in slug or churn flow. The information generated has been useful in providing a method for calculating the residence time of the liquids inside the tubing and the pressure drop per 100 feet of tubing.

  9. Observations of Accreting Pulsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lars Bildsten; Deepto Chakrabarty; John Chiu; Mark H. Finger; Danny T. Koh; Robert W. Nelson; Thomas A. Prince; Bradley C. Rubin; D. Matthew Scott; Mark Stollberg; Brian A. Vaughan; Colleen A. Wilson; Robert B. Wilson

    1997-07-22

    We summarize five years of continuous monitoring of accretion-powered pulsars with the Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) on the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory. Our 20-70 keV observations have determined or refined the orbital parameters of 13 binaries, discovered 5 new transient accreting pulsars, measured the pulsed flux history during outbursts of 12 transients (GRO J1744-28, 4U 0115+634, GRO J1750-27, GS 0834-430, 2S 1417-624, GRO J1948+32, EXO 2030+375, GRO J1008-57, A 0535+26, GRO J2058+42, 4U 1145-619 and A 1118-616), and also measured the accretion torque history of during outbursts of 6 of those transients whose orbital parameters were also known. We have also continuously measured the pulsed flux and spin frequency for eight persistently accreting pulsars (Her X-1, Cen X-3, Vela X-1, OAO 1657-415, GX 301-2, 4U 1626-67, 4U 1538-52, and GX 1+4). Because of their continuity and uniformity over a long baseline, BATSE observations have provided new insights into the long-term behavior of accreting magnetic stars. We have found that all accreting pulsars show stochastic variations in their spin frequencies and luminosities, including those displaying secular spin-up or spin-down on long time scales, blurring the conventional distinction between disk-fed and wind-fed binaries. Pulsed flux and accretion torque are strongly correlated in outbursts of transient accreting pulsars, but uncorrelated, or even anticorrelated, in persistent sources.

  10. Observational Approach to Chromium Site Remediation - 13266

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott Myers, R.

    2013-07-01

    Production reactors at the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in Richland, Washington, required massive quantities of water for reactor cooling and material processing. To reduce corrosion and the build-up of scale in pipelines and cooling systems, sodium dichromate was added to the water feedstock. Spills and other releases at the makeup facilities, as well as leaks from miles of pipelines, have led to numerous areas with chromium-contaminated soil and groundwater, threatening fish populations in the nearby Columbia River. Pump-and-treat systems have been installed to remove chromium from the groundwater, but significant contamination remain in the soil column and poses a continuing threat to groundwater and the Columbia River. Washington Closure Hanford, DOE, and regulators are working on a team approach that implements the observational approach, a strategy for effectively dealing with the uncertainties inherent in subsurface conditions. Remediation of large, complex waste sites at a federal facility is a daunting effort. It is particularly difficult to perform the work in an environment of rapid response to changing field and contamination conditions. The observational approach, developed by geotechnical engineers to accommodate the inherent uncertainties in subsurface conditions, is a powerful and appropriate method for site remediation. It offers a structured means of quickly moving into full remediation and responding to the variations and changing conditions inherent in waste site cleanups. A number of significant factors, however, complicate the application of the observational approach for chromium site remediation. Conceptual models of contamination and site conditions are difficult to establish and get consensus on. Mid-stream revisions to the design of large excavations are time-consuming and costly. And regulatory constraints and contract performance incentives can be impediments to the flexible responses required under the observational approach. The WCH project team is working closely with stakeholders and taking a number of steps to meet these challenges in a continuing effort to remediate chromium contaminated soil in an efficient and cost-effective manner. (authors)

  11. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    George J. Hirasaki; Kishore K. Mohanty

    2005-09-05

    The objective of this report is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. The advances made in the understanding of NMR fluid properties are summarized in a chapter written for an AAPG book on NMR well logging. This includes live oils, viscous oils, natural gas mixtures, and the relation between relaxation time and diffusivity. Oil based drilling fluids can have an adverse effect on NMR well logging if it alters the wettability of the formation. The effect of various surfactants on wettability and surface relaxivity are evaluated for silica sand. The relation between the relaxation time and diffusivity distinguishes the response of brine, oil, and gas in a NMR well log. A new NMR pulse sequence in the presence of a field gradient and a new inversion technique enables the T{sub 2} and diffusivity distributions to be displayed as a two-dimensional map. The objectives of pore morphology and rock characterization are to identify vug connectivity by using X-ray CT scan, and to improve NMR permeability correlation. Improved estimation of permeability from NMR response is possible by using estimated tortuosity as a parameter to interpolate between two existing permeability models.

  12. Coiled tubing isolates zones, fractures wells with single trip service

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Silverman, S.A.

    1999-04-01

    A system has been devised that combines high pressure coiled tubing (CT) and a selective isolation technique to frac multiple zones in a single operation. Multiple zones in one well can be individually isolated, fractured and flowed back simultaneously which results in reduced exposure to kill fluids and therefore higher retained conductivity for newly created fractures. The technique has been named CoilFRAC{trademark} by Dowell. The key benefits to the entire operation are reduced rig and operations time compared to conventional fracturing processes. Time savings, increased production, and environmental benefits are the economic drivers that result in rapid return on investment for production operators. The single trip concept for perforating and stimulation crews also brings additional benefits over multiple mobilizations. Wells which previously had only major zones perforated and stimulated and which are currently depleted can be revived economically using this system, giving the well a second life. The paper describes the equipment and its safety and contingency features, optimized shallow gas production in Alberta, and results from a South Texas oil well fracturing.

  13. Reservoir studies of new multilateral well architecture 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarfare, Manoj Dnyandeo

    2004-09-30

    solutions to these problems and prove to be the most likely tool to propel the industry in the next century. In this research we propose a new multilateral well architecture for more efficient and effective field drainage. We study the architecture from a...

  14. Geometrical Music Theory Rachel Wells Hall1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hall, Rachel W.

    Geometrical Music Theory Rachel Wells Hall1 Music theorists have frequently invoked geometry in modeling musical objects such as chords, rhythms, and scales; however, no unified geometric perspective has musical terms can be understood as expressing symmetries of n-dimensional space. Identifying-- "gluing

  15. Marginal Expense Oil Well Wireless Surveillance (MEOWWS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, Donald G.

    2002-03-11

    The objective of this study was to identify and field test a new, low cost, wireless oil well surveillance system. A variety of suppliers and technologies were considered. One supplier and system was chosen that was low cost, new to the oil field, and successfully field tested.

  16. Foolproof completions for high rate production wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tosic, Slavko

    2009-05-15

    wells, particularly those with subsea wellheads, and the alternative has been to subject the completion to increasingly high drawdown, accepting a high skin effect. A far better solution is to use a HPF completion. Of course the execution of a successful...

  17. T2WELL/ECO2N

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    002966IBMPC00 T2Well/ECO2N Version 1.0: Multiphase and Non-Isothermal Model for Coupled Wellbore-Reservoir Flow of Carbon Dioxide and Variable Salinity Water  http:..esd.lbl.gov/tough/licensing.html 

  18. Effects of fracturing fluid recovery upon well performance and ultimate recovery of hydraulically fractured gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berthelot, Jan Marie

    1990-01-01

    EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS A Thesis IAN MARIE BERTHELOT Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas AdtM University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1990 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering EFFECTS OF FRACTURING FLUID RECOVERY UPON WELL PERFORMANCE AND ULTIMATE RECOVERY OF HYDRAULICALLY FRACTURED GAS WELLS by JAN MARIE BERTIIELOT Appmved...

  19. Completion practices in deep sour Tuscaloosa wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huntoon, G.G.

    1984-01-01

    Successful development of the Tuscaloosa trend in Louisiana has required unique completion practices to produce the trend's deep sour formations. Amoco's operations in the Tuscaloosa formation are between 16,000 and 21,000 ft (4877 and 6400 m), and a range of pressure environments, high temperatures, and corrosive elements is encountered. Application of proved completion practices and equipment has resulted in several techniques that enhance the safety, longevity, and production capacity of these wells. The design of deep Tuscaloosa completions is assisted by a series of correlations developed to project bottomhole and surface shut-in tubing pressures, temperature gradients, and flow capacities for deep sour wells. This paper discusses material selection, completion practices, completion fluids, wellhead equipment, packer designs, corrosion-inhibition systems, and safety and monitoring equipment used in the Tuscaloosa trend. The design of a wellhead surface installation used to detect equipment failure, to pump kill fluids, and to circulate corrosion inhibitors is reviewed. A case study illustrates the methods used in completing a Tuscaloosa well with surface pressures exceeding 16,000 psi (110.3 MPa). Deep high-pressure sour-gas wells can be completed safely if all the elements of the environment that will affect the mechanical integrity of the wellbore are considered in the completion designs. The development of higher-strength material capable of withstanding SSC is needed if wells are completed in formations deeper than 22,000 ft (6700 m). Further research is necessary on the use of alloy steels and nonferrous metals for sour service. Effective high-temperature corrosion inhibitors for heavy zinc bromide completion fluids must be developed before these brines can be used in the Tuscaloosa. The testing of new inhibitors for use in highpressure sour-gas completions should be continued.

  20. Well constructions with inhibited microbial growth and methods of antimicrobial treatment in wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lee, Brady D.; Dooley, Kirk J.

    2004-11-02

    The invention includes methods of inhibiting microbial growth in a well. A packing material containing a mixture of a first material and an antimicrobial agent is provided to at least partially fill a well bore. One or more access tubes are provided in an annular space around a casing within the well bore. The access tubes have a first terminal opening located at or above a ground surface and have a length that extends from the first terminal opening at least part of the depth of the well bore. The access tubes have a second terminal opening located within the well bore. An antimicrobial material is supplied into the well bore through the first terminal opening of the access tubes. The invention also includes well constructs.

  1. Pumpernickel Valley Geothermal Project Thermal Gradient Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Z. Adam Szybinski

    2006-01-01

    The Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area is located near the eastern edge of the Sonoma Range and is positioned within the structurally complex Winnemucca fold and thrust belt of north-central Nevada. A series of approximately north-northeast-striking faults related to the Basin and Range tectonics are superimposed on the earlier structures within the project area, and are responsible for the final overall geometry and distribution of the pre-existing structural features on the property. Two of these faults, the Pumpernickel Valley fault and Edna Mountain fault, are range-bounding and display numerous characteristics typical of strike-slip fault systems. These characteristics, when combined with geophysical data from Shore (2005), indicate the presence of a pull-apart basin, formed within the releasing bend of the Pumpernickel Valley – Edna Mountain fault system. A substantial body of evidence exists, in the form of available geothermal, geological and geophysical information, to suggest that the property and the pull-apart basin host a structurally controlled, extensive geothermal field. The most evident manifestations of the geothermal activity in the valley are two areas with hot springs, seepages, and wet ground/vegetation anomalies near the Pumpernickel Valley fault, which indicate that the fault focuses the fluid up-flow. There has not been any geothermal production from the Pumpernickel Valley area, but it was the focus of a limited exploration effort by Magma Power Company. In 1974, the company drilled one exploration/temperature gradient borehole east of the Pumpernickel Valley fault and recorded a thermal gradient of 160oC/km. The 1982 temperature data from five unrelated mineral exploration holes to the north of the Magma well indicated geothermal gradients in a range from 66 to 249oC/km for wells west of the fault, and ~283oC/km in a well next to the fault. In 2005, Nevada Geothermal Power Company drilled four geothermal gradient wells, PVTG-1, -2, -3, and -4, and all four encountered geothermal fluids. The holes provided valuable water geochemistry, supporting the geothermometry results obtained from the hot springs and Magma well. The temperature data gathered from all the wells clearly indicates the presence of a major plume of thermal water centered on the Pumpernickel Valley fault, and suggests that the main plume is controlled, at least in part, by flow from this fault system. The temperature data also defines the geothermal resource with gradients >100oC/km, which covers an area a minimum of 8 km2. Structural blocks, down dropped with respect to the Pumpernickel Valley fault, may define an immediate reservoir. The geothermal system almost certainly continues beyond the recently drilled holes and might be open to the east and south, whereas the heat source responsible for the temperatures associated with this plume has not been intersected and must be at a depth greater than 920 meters (depth of the deepest well – Magma well). The geological and structural setting and other characteristics of the Pumpernickel Valley geothermal project area are markedly similar to the portions of the nearby Dixie Valley geothermal field. These similarities include, among others, the numerous, unexposed en echelon faults and large-scale pull-apart structure, which in Dixie Valley may host part of the geothermal field. The Pumpernickel Valley project area, for the majority of which Nevada Geothermal Power Company has geothermal rights, represents a geothermal site with a potential for the discovery of a relatively high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power production. Among locations not previously identified as having high geothermal potential, Pumpernickel Valley has been ranked as one of four sites with the highest potential for electrical power production in Nevada (Shevenell and Garside, 2003). Richards and Blackwell (2002) estimated the total heat loss and the preliminary production capacity for the entire Pumpernickel Valley geothermal system to be at 35MW. A more conservative estimate, for

  2. GAS INJECTION/WELL STIMULATION PROJECT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John K. Godwin

    2005-12-01

    Driver Production proposes to conduct a gas repressurization/well stimulation project on a six well, 80-acre portion of the Dutcher Sand of the East Edna Field, Okmulgee County, Oklahoma. The site has been location of previous successful flue gas injection demonstration but due to changing economic and sales conditions, finds new opportunities to use associated natural gas that is currently being vented to the atmosphere to repressurize the reservoir to produce additional oil. The established infrastructure and known geological conditions should allow quick startup and much lower operating costs than flue gas. Lessons learned from the previous project, the lessons learned form cyclical oil prices and from other operators in the area will be applied. Technology transfer of the lessons learned from both projects could be applied by other small independent operators.

  3. Vibration of Generalized Double Well Oscillators

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grzegorz Litak; Marek Borowiec; Arkadiusz Syta

    2006-10-20

    We have applied the Melnikov criterion to examine a global homoclinic bifurcation and transition to chaos in a case of a double well dynamical system with a nonlinear fractional damping term and external excitation. The usual double well Duffing potential having a negative square term and positive quartic term has been generalized to a double well potential with a negative square term and a positive one with an arbitrary real exponent $q > 2$. We have also used a fractional damping term with an arbitrary power $p$ applied to velocity which enables one to cover a wide range of realistic damping factors: from dry friction $p \\to 0$ to turbulent resistance phenomena $p=2$. Using perturbation methods we have found a critical forcing amplitude $\\mu_c$ above which the system may behave chaotically. Our results show that the vibrating system is less stable in transition to chaos for smaller $p$ satisfying an exponential scaling low. The critical amplitude $\\mu_c$ as an exponential function of $p$. The analytical results have been illustrated by numerical simulations using standard nonlinear tools such as Poincare maps and the maximal Lyapunov exponent. As usual for chosen system parameters we have identified a chaotic motion above the critical Melnikov amplitude $\\mu_c$.

  4. Remote down-hole well telemetry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Briles, Scott D. (Los Alamos, NM); Neagley, Daniel L. (Albuquerque, NM); Coates, Don M. (Santa Fe, NM); Freund, Samuel M. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2004-07-20

    The present invention includes an apparatus and method for telemetry communication with oil-well monitoring and recording instruments located in the vicinity of the bottom of gas or oil recovery pipes. Such instruments are currently monitored using electrical cabling that is inserted into the pipes; cabling has a short life in this environment, and requires periodic replacement with the concomitant, costly shutdown of the well. Modulated reflectance, a wireless communication method that does not require signal transmission power from the telemetry package will provide a long-lived and reliable way to monitor down-hole conditions. Normal wireless technology is not practical since batteries and capacitors have to frequently be replaced or recharged, again with the well being removed from service. RF energy generated above ground can also be received, converted and stored down-hole without the use of wires, for actuating down-hole valves, as one example. Although modulated reflectance reduces or eliminates the loss of energy at the sensor package because energy is not consumed, during the transmission process, additional stored extra energy down-hole is needed.

  5. Neural networks predict well inflow performance 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alrumah, Muhammad K.

    2004-09-30

    ........................................................................................................................66 vii LIST OF TABLES TABLE Page 1 Reservoir properties and descriptions. ............................................................ 11 2 Relative permeability and PVT curves selected for cases examined..............19 3 Sample... 2). ......................................................... 20 10 Relative change in productivity index with time. ...........................................21 11 PVT curves from Vogel?s paper...

  6. Productivity and injectivity of horizontal wells. Quarterly report...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    99 MATHEMATICS, COMPUTERS, INFORMATION SCIENCE, MANAGEMENT, LAW, MISCELLANEOUS; OIL WELLS; DAMAGE; WELL DRILLING; WELL COMPLETION; EQUATIONS; PROGRESS REPORT This report...

  7. Observational testing of magnetospheric magnetic field models at geosynchronous orbit

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiss, L.A.; Thomsen, M.F.; Reeves, G.D.; McComas, D.J.

    1996-09-01

    Empirical mode which estimate the magnetic field direction and magnitude at any point within the magnetosphere under a variety of conditions play an important role in space weather forecasting. We report here on a number of different studies aimed at quantitatively evaluating these models, and in particular the Tsyganenko T89a model. The models are evaluated in two basic ways: (1) by comparing the range of magnetic field tilt angles observed at geosynchronous orbit with the ranges predicted for the same locations by the models; and (2) by comparing the observed magnetic field mapping between the ionosphere and geosynchronous orbit (using two-satellite magnetic field conjunctions) with the model predictions at the same locations. We find that while the T89a model predicts reasonably well the basic variation in tilt angle with local time and permits a range of field inclinations adequate to encompass the majority of observed angles on the dawn, dusk, and night sides, it is unable to reproduce the range of inclinations on the dayside. The model also predicts a smaller magnetic latitude range of geosynchronous field line footpoints than the observed two-satellite mapping indicate. Together, these results suggest that the next generation of field models should allow a greater range of stretching, especially in local time sectors away from midnight. It is important to note, however, that any increased range should encompass less-stretched configurations: although there are certainly cases where the models are not sufficiently stretched, we find that on average all magnetic field models tested, including T89a, are too stretched. Finally, in investigating how well the observed degree of field stretch was ordered by various magnetospheric indices, we find that the tilt of the field at geosynchronous orbit is a promising candidate for the incorporation into future models.

  8. A Parametric Study on the Benefits of Drilling Multilateral and Horizontal Wells in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    A Parametric Study on the Benefits of Drilling Multilateral and Horizontal Wells in Coalbed Methane;motivation > CBM Background Time Productionrate,MSCF/dorbbl/d Phase 1 Well dewatered Phase 2: - Significant Productionrate,MSCF/dorbbl/d Phase 1 Well dewatered Peak gas rate Phase 3: - Gas rate starts to decline - Water

  9. Lagrangian Relaxation Based Decompositon for Well Scheduling in Shale-gas Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grossmann, Ignacio E.

    Lagrangian Relaxation Based Decompositon for Well Scheduling in Shale-gas Systems Brage Rugstad of mid and late-life wells in shale-gas systems. This state of the wells can be prevented by performing solutions in reasonable computation times. Keywords: Shale-gas production, Lagrangian relaxation, mixed

  10. Time-Encoded Imagers.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik

    2014-11-01

    This report provides a short overview of the DNN R&D funded project, Time-Encoded Imagers. The project began in FY11 and concluded in FY14. The Project Description below provides the overall motivation and objectives for the project as well as a summary of programmatic direction. It is followed by a short description of each task and the resulting deliverables.

  11. Increasing Well Productivity in Gas Condensate Wells in Qatar's North Field 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Nathan

    2010-07-14

    2.1.4. Method for Reduction of Non Darcy Flow Study ......... 17 2.2. PVT Analysis .......................................................................... 17 2.3. Reservoir Description... to study Non Darcy flow in both a multilateral well and a vertical well. A Non Darcy flow sensitivity test is run to see the impact Non Darcy flow has on near wellbore condensate blockage, and therefore, gas well productivity. 2.2. PVT...

  12. Hydraulic fracture stimulation treatment of Well Baca 23. Geothermal Reservoir Well-Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-06-01

    Well Stimulation Experiment No. 5 of the Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program (GRWSP) was performed on March 22, 1981 in Baca 23, located in Union's Redondo Creek Project Area in Sandoval County, New Mexico. The treatment selected was a large hydraulic fracture job designed specifically for, and utilizing frac materials chosen for, the high temperature geothermal environment. The well selection, fracture treatment, experiment evaluation, and summary of the job costs are presented herein.

  13. Wells, Vermont: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEtGeorgia: Energy Resources Jump to:Search YourIndiana: EnergyWells, Vermont:

  14. Infinite potential well with a sinusoidal bottom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. D. Alhaidari; H. Bahlouli

    2008-08-07

    We construct a tridiagonal matrix representation of the wave operator that maps the wave equation into a three-term recursion relation for the expansion coefficients of the wavefunction. Finding a solution of the recursion relation is equivalent to solving the original problem. Consequently, a larger class of solvable potentials is obtained. The usual diagonal representation constraint results in a reduction to the conventional class of solvable potentials. To exhibit the power of this approach, we give an exact solution for the infinite potential well with sinusoidal bottom.

  15. In situ bioremediation using horizontal wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In Situ Bioremediation (ISB), which is the term used in this report for Gaseous Nutrient Injection for In Situ Bioremediation, remediates soils and ground water contaminated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) both above and below the water table. ISB involves injection of air and nutrients (sparging and biostimulation) into the ground water and vacuum extraction to remove .VOCs from the vadose zone concomitant with biodegradation of VOCs. The innovation is in the combination of 3 emerging technologies, air stripping, horizontal wells, and bioremediation via gaseous nutrient injection with a baseline technology, soil vapor extraction, to produce a more efficient in situ remediation system.

  16. Logging of subterranean wells using coiled tubing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pilla, J.

    1991-01-15

    This patent describes an apparatus for production logging of a well utilizing artificial lift in a wellbore. It comprises: coiled tubing extending into the wellbore having wireline electrical cable passing through a central bore thereof and having a remote end within the wellbore which end is connected to gas injector means. The wireline cable passing through the gas injector means to a flexible electrically conductive support spacer having an end portion remote from the gas injector means and logging means connected to the end portion of the support spacer.

  17. Production Well Performance Enhancement using Sonication Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adewumi, Michael A; Ityokumbul, M Thaddeus; Watson, Robert W; Eltohami, Eltohami; Farias, Mario; Heckman, Glenn; Houlihan, Brendan; Karoor, Samata Prakash; Miller, Bruce G; Mohammed, Nazia; Olanrewaju, Johnson; Ozdemir, Mine; Rejepov, Dautmamed; Sadegh, Abdallah A; Quammie, Kevin E; Zaghloul, Jose; Hughes, W Jack; Montgomery, Thomas C

    2005-12-31

    The objective of this project was to develop a sonic well performance enhancement technology that focused on near wellbore formation damage. In order to successfully achieve this objective, a three-year project was defined. The entire project was broken into four tasks. The overall objective of all this was to foster a better understanding of the mechanisms involved in sonic energy interactions with fluid flow in porous media and adapt such knowledge for field applications. The fours tasks are: • Laboratory studies • Mathematical modeling • Sonic tool design and development • Field demonstration The project was designed to be completed in three years; however, due to budget cuts, support was only provided for the first year, and hence the full objective of the project could not be accomplished. This report summarizes what was accomplished with the support provided by the US Department of Energy. Experiments performed focused on determining the inception of cavitation, studying thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions, investigating sonic energy interactions with glass beads and oil, and studying the effects of sonication on crude oil properties. Our findings show that the voltage threshold for onset of cavitation is independent of transducer-hydrophone separation distance. In addition, thermal dissipation under cavitation conditions contributed to the mobilization of deposited paraffins and waxes. Our preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that waxes are mobilized when the fluid temperature approaches 40°C. Experiments were conducted that provided insights into the interactions between sonic wave and the fluid contained in the porous media. Most of these studies were carried out in a slim-tube apparatus. A numerical model was developed for simulating the effect of sonication in the nearwellbore region. The numerical model developed was validated using a number of standard testbed problems. However, actual application of the model for scale-up purposes was limited due to funding constraints. The overall plan for this task was to perlorm field trials with the sonication tooL These trials were to be performed in production and/or injection wells located in Pennsylvania, New York, and West Virginia. Four new wells were drilled in preparation for the field demonstration. Baseline production data were collected and reservoir simulator tuned to simulate these oil reservoirs. The sonication tools were designed for these wells. However, actual field testing could not be carried out because of premature termination of the project.

  18. Decline curve analysis for horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shih, Min-Yu

    1994-01-01

    Subject; Petroleum Engineering DECLINE CURVE ANALYSIS FOR HORIZONTAL WELLS A Thesis by MIN- YU SHIH Submitted to Texas A8tM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degtee of MASTER OF SCIENCE Approved as to style and content... curves are given as log-log plots of MttdaLLattaad: Fetkovich Type Curve Radial Flow, Circular Reservoir Solutions 12 Transient "Stems" tTransient Flow) 8 001 160 000 x10 Depletion "Stems" (Boundary-Dominated Flow) r)04Arps Equations b 0 0...

  19. Spontaneous Potential Well Log | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:Spill Prevention andWell Log Jump to: navigation,

  20. California Water Well Standards | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank, Maine:Kansas: EnergyCalendarCalhounWebpageProjectPrograms Jump to:Well

  1. Category:Production Wells | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to: navigation,GroundNearGeothermalpower.jpgWells Jump to:

  2. Category:Well Deepening | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPID RoadmapInformation Utility RateWaterWell

  3. Solar flare electron acceleration: comparing theories and observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold O. Benz; Pascal Saint-Hilaire

    2003-08-19

    A popular scenario for electron acceleration in solar flares is transit-time damping of low-frequency MHD waves excited by reconnection and its outflows. The scenario requires several processes in sequence to yield energetic electrons of the observed large number. Until now there was very little evidence for this scenario, as it is even not clear where the flare energy is released. RHESSI measurements of bremsstrahlung by non-thermal flare electrons yield energy estimates as well as the position where the energy is deposited. Thus quantitative measurements can be put into the frame of the global magnetic field configuration as seen in coronal EUV line observations. We present RHESSI observations combined with TRACE data that suggest primary energy inputs mostly into electron acceleration and to a minor fraction into coronal heating and primary motion. The more sensitive and lower energy X-ray observations by RHESSI have found also small events (C class) at the time of the acceleration of electron beams exciting meter wave Type III bursts. However, not all RHESSI flares involve Type III radio emissions. The association of other decimeter radio emissions, such as narrowband spikes and pulsations, with X-rays is summarized in view of electron acceleration

  4. Real-Time Evaluation of Stimulation and Diversion in Horizontal Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tabatabaei Bafruei, Seyed Mohammad

    2012-02-14

    of the reactants and products .................................................... 59 Table 4.1 Inversion results for the first and second sets of perforation using MCMC method... ........................................................................................ 75 Table 4.2 Inversion results for the first set of perforation ....................................... 77 Table 4.3 Inversion results for the second set of perforation ................................... 77 Table 4.4 Inversion results...

  5. Wireless technology collects real-time information from oil and gas wells

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0Photos andSeminarsDesign »Wind and solar3 CSTEC

  6. Well injection valve with retractable choke

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pringle, R.E.

    1986-07-22

    An injection valve is described for use in a well conduit consisting of: a housing having a bore, a valve closure member in the bore moving between open and closed positions, a flow tube telescopically movable in the housing for controlling the movement of the valve closure member, means for biasing the flow tube in a direction for allowing the valve closure member to move to the closed position, an expandable and contractible fluid restriction connected to the flow tube and extending into the bore for moving the flow tube to the open position in response to injection fluid, but allowing the passage of well tools through the valve, the restriction contractible in response to fluid flow, the restriction includes, segments movable into and out of the bore, and biasing means yieldably urging the segments into the bore, a no-go shoulder on the flow tube, and releasable lockout means between the flow tube and the housing for locking the flow tube and valve in the open position.

  7. Quantum time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giovannetti, Vittorio

    We give a consistent quantum description of time, based on Page and Wootters’s conditional probabilities mechanism, which overcomes the criticisms that were raised against similar previous proposals. In particular we show ...

  8. Chow Time 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Unknown

    2011-09-05

    -1 THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY December 2004 Major Subject: Civil Engineering THE PREDICTION OF BUS ARRIVAL TIME USING AUTOMATIC VEHICLE LOCATION SYSTEMS DATA A Dissertation by RAN HEE JEONG Submitted to Texas A...

  9. Viscous heavy brine completion fluids. [Oil wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Darlington, R.K.; Hunter, D.V.

    1982-01-01

    An activated hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC) has been developed which will viscosify brines of any density up to 19.2 lb/gal containing calcium chloride, calcium bromide and/or zinc bromide. The use of activated hydroxyethyl cellulose allows preparation of viscosified brines at ambient emperature and without undissolved polymer solids. The time required to prepare a viscosified brine is greatly reduced. In addition, the rheology of brines viscosified with activated HEC can be accurately predicted allowing brines with equivalent solution rheology properties to be prepared batch after batch. 29 refs.

  10. Fiscal year 1993 well plugging and abandonment program, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from December 1992 through August 20, 1993. A total of 70 wells and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the US Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  11. Stratigraphy of the PB-1 well, Nopal I uranium deposit, Sierra Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, P.

    2009-01-01

    D. , 1985, Volcanic stratigraphy and U-Mo mineralization ofSTRATIGRAPHY OF THE PB-1 WELL, NOPAL I URANIUM DEPOSIT,to document the local stratigraphy. Detailed observations of

  12. Observation of the Goos-Haenchen Shift with Neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haan, Victor-O. de; Plomp, Jeroen; Rekveldt, Theo M.; Kraan, Wicher H.; Well, Ad A. van; Dalgliesh, Robert M.; Langridge, Sean

    2010-01-08

    The Goos-Haenchen effect is a spatial shift along an interface resulting from an interference effect that occurs for total internal reflection. This phenomenon was suggested by Sir Isaac Newton, but it was not until 1947 that the effect was experimentally observed by Goos and Haenchen. We provide the first direct, absolute, experimental determination of the Goos-Haenchen shift for a particle experiencing a potential well as required by quantum mechanics: namely, wave-particle duality. Here, the particle is a spin-polarized neutron reflecting from a film of magnetized material. We detect the effect through a subtle change in polarization of the neutron. Here, we demonstrate, through experiment and theory, that neutrons do exhibit the Goos-Haenchen effect and postulate that the associated time shift should also be observable.

  13. Satellite observations of thought experiments close to a black hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. K. Chakrabarti

    2000-07-18

    Since black holes are `black', methods of their identification must necessarily be indirect. Due to very special boundary condition on the horizon, the advective flow behaves in a particular way, which includes formation of centrifugal pressure dominated boundary layer or CENBOL where much of the infall energy is released and outflows are generated. The observational aspects of black holes must depend on the steady and time-dependent properties of this boundary layer. Several observational results are written down in this review which seem to support the predictions of thought experiments based on this advective accretion/outflow model. In future, when gravitational waves are detected, some other predictions of this model could be tested as well.

  14. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capuano, Louis, Jr.; Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert; Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

    2008-12-01

    Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and cost. A task and cost based analysis of the exercise is subsequently conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the key technical and economic drivers of the well construction process. Finally, future research & development recommendations are provided and ranked based on their economic and technical significance.

  15. Geo-neutrino Observation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dye, S. T.; Alderman, M.; Batygov, M.; Learned, J. G.; Matsuno, S.; Mahoney, J. M.; Pakvasa, S.; Rosen, M.; Smith, S.; Varner, G.; McDonough, W. F.

    2009-12-17

    Observations of geo-neutrinos measure radiogenic heat production within the earth, providing information on the thermal history and dynamic processes of the mantle. Two detectors currently observe geo-neutrinos from underground locations. Other detection projects in various stages of development include a deep ocean observatory. This paper presents the current status of geo-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology and neutrino physics.

  16. Ulysses observations of magnetic waves due to newborn interstellar pickup ions. II. Application of turbulence concepts to limiting wave energy and observability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cannon, Bradford E.; Smith, Charles W.; Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.; Joyce, Colin J.; Murphy, Neil; Nuno, Raquel G. E-mail: Charles.Smith@unh.edu E-mail: Bernie.Vasquez@unh.edu E-mail: Neil.Murphy@jpl.nasa.gov

    2014-06-01

    The low-frequency magnetic waves that arise from the isotropization of newborn interstellar pickup ions (PUIs) are reasonably well described by linear and quasi-linear kinetic theory in so far as those theories predict the wave frequency and polarization in the spacecraft frame. Those theories fail to describe the scarce observability of the waves. Quasilinear theory predicts that the wave power should accumulate over long periods of time as the relatively weak kinetic instability slowly adds power to the observed spectrum. At the same time it has been argued that the same wave energy must serve as a secondary source of thermal ion heating in the outer heliosphere once the initial turbulence is depleted. To the extent that turbulent transport of the wave energy acts against the spectrally confined accumulation of wave energy, turbulence should be a limiting factor in observability. We argue that turbulence does limit the observability of the waves and we use turbulence theory to predict the observed wave energy. We compare this prediction against a database of 502 wave observations attributed to newborn interstellar PUIs observed by the Ulysses spacecraft.

  17. Hydraulic Fracture Stimulation and Acid Treatment of Well Baca 20; Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1983-07-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy-sponsored Geothermal Reservoir Well Stimulation Program was initiated in February 1979 to pursue industry interest in geothermal well stimulation work and to develop technical expertise in areas directly related to geothermal well stimulation activities. This report provides an overview of the two experiments conducted in the high-temperature reservoir in Baca, New Mexico. The report discusses resource and reservoir properties, and provides a description of the stimulation experiment, a description of the treatment evaluation, and a summary of the experiment costs. (DJE-2005)

  18. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    2013-06-28

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  19. Hot Pot Field Observations

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Lane, Michael

    Map of field observations including depressions, springs, evidence of former springs, travertine terraces and vegetation patterns. Map also contains interpretation of possible spring alignments.

  20. Atomic Collapse Observed

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientists Observe Atomic Collapse State Quantum Mechanics Prediction Confirmed in Graphene Using NERSC's Hopper April 26, 2013 | Tags: Hopper, Materials Science Contact: Linda...

  1. Time Reversal Violation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quinn, H; /SLAC

    2009-01-27

    This talk briefly reviews three types of time-asymmetry in physics, which I classify as universal, macroscopic and microscopic. Most of the talk is focused on the latter, namely the violation of T-reversal invariance in particle physics theories. In sum tests of microscopic T-invariance, or observations of its violation, are limited by the fact that, while we can measure many processes, only in very few cases can we construct a matched pair of process and inverse process and observe it with sufficient sensitivity to make a test. In both the cases discussed here we can achieve an observable T violation making use of flavor tagging, and in the second case also using the quantum properties of an antisymmetric coherent state of two B mesons to construct a CP-tag. Both these tagging properties depend only on very general properties of the flavor and/or CP quantum numbers and so provide model independent tests for T-invariance violations. The microscopic laws of physics are very close to T-symmetric. There are small effects that give CP- and T-violating processes in three-generation-probing weak decays. Where a T-violating observable can be constructed we see the relationships between T-violation and CP-violation expected in a CPT conserving theory. These microscopic effects are unrelated to the 'arrow of time' that is defined by increasing entropy, or in the time direction defined by the expansion of our Universe.

  2. Electron transport in coupled double quantum wells and wires

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harff, N.E.; Simmons, J.A.; Lyo, S.K. [and others

    1997-04-01

    Due to inter-quantum well tunneling, coupled double quantum wells (DQWs) contain an extra degree of electronic freedom in the growth direction, giving rise to new transport phenomena not found in single electron layers. This report describes work done on coupled DQWs subject to inplane magnetic fields B{sub {parallel}}, and is based on the lead author`s doctoral thesis, successfully defended at Oregon State University on March 4, 1997. First, the conductance of closely coupled DQWs in B{sub {parallel}} is studied. B{sub {parallel}}-induced distortions in the dispersion, the density of states, and the Fermi surface are described both theoretically and experimentally, with particular attention paid to the dispersion anticrossing and resulting partial energy gap. Measurements of giant distortions in the effective mass are found to agree with theoretical calculations. Second, the Landau level spectra of coupled DQWs in tilted magnetic fields is studied. The magnetoresistance oscillations show complex beating as Landau levels from the two Fermi surface components cross the Fermi level. A third set of oscillations resulting from magnetic breakdown is observed. A semiclassical calculation of the Landau level spectra is then performed, and shown to agree exceptionally well with the data. Finally, quantum wires and quantum point contacts formed in DQW structures are investigated. Anticrossings of the one-dimensional DQW dispersion curves are predicted to have interesting transport effects in these devices. Difficulties in sample fabrication have to date prevented experimental verification. However, recently developed techniques to overcome these difficulties are described.

  3. Characterization and modeling of multiphase mixtures from deep, subsea wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, S.; Hill, A.D.

    1996-09-01

    The effects of flow in a vertical pipe on the flow in subsequent horizontal pipes were investigated by performing both experimental and theoretical studies. This geometry mimics production from subsea wells connected to subsea horizontal flow lines. The fluids were conducted into a 153-meter deep well through two different casings, allowing the mixtures to flow up through a 5.08 cm ID vertical pipe and then into a horizontal flow loop which consists of two pipes with 6.35 cm ID and 18.4 cm ID, respectively. The flow regime behaviors in the horizontal pipes were studied for a wide range of flow rates. From the tests, it was found that the flow regimes in the small horizontal pipe were greatly affected by the flows in the vertical pipe while the flow regimes in the large horizontal pipe were hardly affected. A theoretical model based on wave mechanics was developed to simulate the process of the liquid slugs formed in the vertical pipe being carried over into the horizontal pipe. The theoretical predictions matched the experimental observations very well. The results of this study will greatly benefit the understanding of the flow regime behavior that will occur in deep, subsea flow lines transporting multiple phases from subsea completions.

  4. Inspecting coiled tubing for well operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gard, M.F.; Pasternack, E.S.; Smith, L.J.

    1992-02-18

    This patent describes improvement in a coiled tubing system for insertion of a substantially continuous bendable length of metal tubing into and withdrawal from a wellbore, the system including a tubing injection unit disposed for injecting the length of tubing into the well bore and storage means for dispensing the length of tubing and receiving the length of tubing from the injection unit. The improvement includes: tubing inspection apparatus for substantially continuously inspecting the wall section of the tubing to detect cracks and structural defects which may lead to tubing failure, the apparatus comprising: a source of electromagnetic radiation mounted in proximity to the tubing between the injection unit and a wellhead into which the tubing is injected; a radiation detector unit for receiving signals from the source which have been projected through the wall of the tubing; means for receiving signals form the detector unit for monitoring the structural integrity o the wall of the tubing during one of injecting and withdrawing the tubing with respect to the wellhead; and housing means supported for rotation about a longitudinal axis of the tubing.

  5. Cement fatigue and HPHT well integrity with application to life of well prediction 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ugwu, Ignatius Obinna

    2009-05-15

    In order to keep up with the world’s energy demands, oil and gas producing companies have taken the initiative to explore offshore reserves or drill deeper into previously existing wells. The consequence of this, however, ...

  6. Personal observations on interdisciplinarity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaufmann, E. N.

    1999-10-11

    The author's assignment was to report on how I{sup 3} relates to professional societies and journals he has known, a not unreasonable request given past associations with the Materials Research Society (MRS) and its journal, JMR, particularly in their more formative years. Some recollections and some comments on current postures of MRS and JMR will be found in the section following. There are manifold anecdotes one might relate about overcoming (or not) barriers raised by disciplinary preconception and much revered institutional norms. But to what end? On recalling his own involvements and on trying to discern the common elements, the author concludes that lessons learned from such accounts are, at the detail level, too situation-specific to be generally useful while at the same time being easily generalized to a few tenets that most of us by now find obvious in principle but that provide no actionable roadmap for implementing I{sup 3} in a specific new arena. How can that be? Other contributors are submitting the I{sup 3}R challenge to scholarly analysis and reporting on significant impediments and enviable achievements. He notes that the common themes permeating the entire discussion reduce to a few fundamental aspects of human nature well known and ubiquitous not merely in the universe of science, technology and research, but in broader society. He feels it is important not to lose sight of this as one examines I{sup 3} problems and solutions, for it is often the larger context that rises to thwart the best of local intentions. He feels that humans are a risk averse species. This translates into resistance to change and thus to institutional inertia. When taken in concert with the subjective propensity to categorize and the objective need at any given stage of development to parse complex systems into manageable subunits, it becomes clear why rigid taxonomies are the rule. Be they definitions of departments on campus, political labels, or finding program classifications. It is fair to say that in the examples presented at this gathering, the origin of hurdles confronting introduction of an I{sup 3} approach in extant systems is the inevitable rigidity of existing structures. Similarly, successes seem to arise when one or more of a few criteria are met. Based on enlightened self-interest, the principal movers find the risk-reward calculus of success compelling enough to pay the price of breaking with tradition. This is often facilitated when the entrepreneurial venture does not risk the mainstay of the principals' vocations. Also, barriers are lowered considerably when the new I{sup 3} enterprise is green field i.e., not making a frontal assault on a preexisting structure. Otherwise, the organizations involved must offer some open avenues to change or at least to circumvent boundaries. Having the right-sized, well-positioned resources is certainly also necessary. Of course, it would be naive to underestimate the importance of the details underlying any and all I{sup 3} successes, but these must be devised in the milieu of the particular people and institutions involved. The author believes that no generic protocols for barrier reduction or for incentives that balance risk will fit differing circumstances. Attempts to map one successful formula onto a new situation are likely to disappoint. Likewise, general programs to promote I{sup 3} in a top down fashion may raise awareness and enthusiasm, but are always tested at the bench--just as in technology transfer, I{sup 3}R is a contact sport. Although not sufficient, it is nevertheless still clearly a necessary prerequisite to create and sustain genuine and practical inducements that mitigate the risk attendant to disturbing the status quo and blunt institutional disincentives.

  7. Analysis of temperatures and water levels in wells to estimatealluvial aquifer hydraulic conductivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Grace W.; Jasperse, James; Seymour, Donald; Constantz, Jim

    2003-06-19

    Well water temperatures are often collected simultaneously with water levels; however, temperature data are generally considered only as a water quality parameter and are not utilized as an environmental tracer. In this paper, water levels and seasonal temperatures are used to estimate hydraulic conductivities in a stream-aquifer system. To demonstrate this method, temperatures and water levels are analyzed from six observation wells along an example study site, the Russian River in Sonoma County, California. The range in seasonal ground water temperatures in these wells varied from <0.28C in two wells to {approx}88C in the other four wells from June to October 2000. The temperature probes in the six wells are located at depths between 3.5 and 7.1 m relative to the river channel. Hydraulic conductivities are estimated by matching simulated ground water temperatures to the observed ground water temperatures. An anisotropy of 5 (horizontal to vertical hydraulic conductivity) generally gives the best fit to the observed temperatures. Estimated conductivities vary over an order of magnitude in the six locations analyzed. In some locations, a change in the observed temperature profile occurred during the study, most likely due to deposition of fine-grained sediment and organic matter plugging the streambed. A reasonable fit to this change in the temperature profile is obtained by decreasing the hydraulic conductivity in the simulations. This study demonstrates that seasonal ground water temperatures monitored in observation wells provide an effective means of estimating hydraulic conductivities in alluvial aquifers.

  8. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matt Visser

    2014-11-25

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  9. Physical observability of horizons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Visser, Matt

    2014-01-01

    Event horizons are (generically) not physically observable. In contrast, apparent horizons (and the closely related trapping horizons) are generically physically observable --- in the sense that they can be detected by observers working in finite-size regions of spacetime. Consequently event horizons are inappropriate tools for defining astrophysical black holes, or indeed for defining any notion of evolving}black hole, (evolving either due to accretion or Hawking radiation). The only situation in which an event horizon becomes physically observable is for the very highly idealized stationary or static black holes, when the event horizon is a Killing horizon which is degenerate with the apparent and trapping horizons; and then it is the physical observability of the apparent/trapping horizons that is fundamental --- the event horizon merely comes along for the ride.

  10. ANTI-SLUG CONTROL OF GAS-LIFT WELLS -EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    will be the area of investigation. Gas lift is a technology to produce oil and gas from wells with low reservoir. The observer relies on topside measurements only, and downhole pressure for feedback control is estimated. Combining the nonlinear observer with conventional PI control of the downhole pressure, we demonstrate

  11. Exploratory Well At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Matlick &...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Activity Date 1975 - 1980 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Deep exploratory wells were drilled after a phase of thermal gradient wells helped narrow...

  12. ARSENIC IN PRIVATE WELLS IN NH YEAR 1 FINAL REPORT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bucci, David J.

    performed geospatial analysis of the well water arsenic estimates and survey results and produced the maps............................................................................................... 8 Well water treatment .................................................................................................. 7 Well water quality

  13. Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well Cement Composites Multifunctional Corrosion-resistant Foamed Well...

  14. Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases) Energetic Materials for EGS Well Stimulation (solids, liquids, gases) Energetic Materials for EGS Well...

  15. Controlling formation fines at their sources to maintain well productivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nguyen, P.D.; Weaver, J.D.; Rickman, R.D.; Dusterhoft, R.G.; Parker, M.A.

    2007-05-15

    Migration of formation fines has been shown to cause production decline in many wells. Despite the availability of new downhole tools for use in well stimulation and completion, the ability to sustain desired production levels is often plagued with fines migration problems. The solution to this problem is appropriate treatment to mitigate fines migration at its source. This paper describes the use of an ultra-thin tackifying agent (UTTA) for stabilizing fines in high-rate producing or injection wells. This UTTA is applied as part of an initial prepad in fracturing or gravel-packing operations, as a remedial treatment, or as a post-treatment following acid fracturing or matrix acidizing treatments. The primary purpose of UTTA application is to immobilize formation fines so that they will not detach, migrate with flowing fluids, plug the pore channels, and reduce the flow path permeability. Results of laboratory testing indicate that the UTTA system is applicable to most types of formation fines, including coals, sandstones, and carbonates. Once injected into the formation matrix or proppant pack, the UTTA forms a thin film on formation surfaces, encapsulating the fines. Capillary action helps pull the tackifier into the contact points, fixing the particulate in place without plugging the pore throat. The UTTA does not require a shut-in time after its application. The thin film tackifier does not harden, but remains flexible, enhancing the ability of a formation to withstand stress cycling and allowing the formation to handle high shear stress during high flow rates.

  16. Well test imaging - a new method for determination of boundaries from well test data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slevinsky, B.A.

    1997-08-01

    A new method has been developed for analysis of well test data, which allows the direct calculation of the location of arbitrary reservoir boundaries which are detected during a well test. The method is based on elements of ray tracing and information theory, and is centered on the calculation of an instantaneous {open_quote}angle of view{close_quote} of the reservoir boundaries. In the absence of other information, the relative reservoir shape and boundary distances are retrievable in the form of a Diagnostic Image. If other reservoir information, such as 3-D seismic, is available; the full shape and orientation of arbitrary (non-straight line or circular arc) boundaries can be determined in the form of a Reservoir Image. The well test imaging method can be used to greatly enhance the information available from well tests and other geological data, and provides a method to integrate data from multiple disciplines to improve reservoir characterization. This paper covers the derivation of the analytical technique of well test imaging and shows examples of application of the technique to a number of reservoirs.

  17. Behavior of nitrate-nitrogen movement around a pumping high-capacity well: A field example

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ayers, J.F.; Chen, X.; Gosselin, D.C. [Univ. of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE (United States). Conservation and Survey Div.

    1998-03-01

    This study examines the near-field flow regime influencing the chemical composition of water samples collected form an irrigation well during short pumping periods. Data on the radial and vertical distribution of nitrate-nitrogen (NO{sub 3}-N) and on draw-down were collected from a closely spaced multi-level monitoring well network installed around an irrigation well. Aquifer properties were determined from grain-size analyses performed on samples collected from test holes drilled around the irrigation well and from drawdown data using the method of Neuman (1974). Grain-size characteristics were determined from cumulative distribution curves and used to construct vertical hydraulic conductivity (K) profiles based on frequently used empirical formulas applied to grain-size data for the determination of aquifer properties. Resultant vertical profiles show a general increase in K with depth. Results from the analysis of drawdown curves support the general trend of K determined form the grain-size data, drawdown-based K values, however, were 1.5 to 2 times greater than those determined form the empirical methods. Results from four pump-and-sample experiments at different times during the irrigation season indicate: (1) the distribution of NO{sub 3}-N around the irrigation well is complex and variable over time and space; (2) shapes of concentration-time curves for individual sample points are governed by the initial contaminant distribution, and shapes of concentration-time curves for the pumping well are governed by variables such as well screen position and hydrogeologic properties; (3) irrigation well samples underestimate the highest, as well as the average NO{sub 3}-N concentrations within the aquifer; and (4) a sampling strategy based on the behavioral characteristics of the well as reflected in concentration-time curves can improve the interpretation of water quality data collected from high-capacity wells.

  18. Observables on Quantum Structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anatolij Dvure?enskij; Mária Kuková

    2012-04-29

    An observable on a quantum structure is any $\\sigma$-homomorphism of quantum structures from the Borel $\\sigma$-algebra into the quantum structure. We show that our partial information on an observable known only for all intervals of the form $(-\\infty,t)$ is sufficient to determine uniquely the whole observable defined on quantum structures like $\\sigma$-MV-algebras, $\\sigma$-effect algebras, Boolean $\\sigma$-algebras, monotone $\\sigma$-complete effect algebras with the Riesz Decomposition Property, the effect algebra of effect operators of a Hilbert space, and a system of functions, and an effect-tribe.

  19. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R N Manchester

    2006-04-13

    Given sufficient sensitivity, pulsar timing observations can make a direct detection of gravitational waves passing over the Earth. Pulsar timing is most sensitive to gravitational waves with frequencies in the nanoHertz region, with the most likely astronomical sources being binary super-massive black holes in galaxy cores. The Parkes Pulsar Timing Array project uses the Parkes 64-m radio telescope to make precision timing observations of a sample of about 20 millisecond pulsars with a principal goal of making a direct detection of gravitational waves. Observations commenced about one year ago and so far sub-microsecond timing residuals have been achieved for more than half of these pulsars. New receiver and software systems are being developed with the aim of reducing these residuals to the level believed necessary for a positive detection of gravitational waves.

  20. Performance of a well with lateral and vertical wellbores 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abdat, Toriq

    2002-01-01

    analysis of actual well test data is also provided. For horizontal wells, we focus on analysis pressure solution for pseudoradial flow. Limited entry slanted wells are considered in this work by comparing wells with different angles and evaluating...

  1. MARS OBSERVER Mission Failure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    of Mars Observer Mission Failure.. ................... D-12 a. Most Probable Cause: Leakage of NT0 Through Check Valves .................................................................. D-14 b. Potential Cause: Pressure Regulator Failure....................... D-28 c. Potential Cause: Failure of a Pyro Valve Charge

  2. Insights from modeling and observational evaluation of a precipitating continental cumulus event observed during the MC3E field campaign

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mechem, David B.; Giangrande, Scott E.; Wittman, Carly S.; Borque, Paloma; Toto, Tami; Kollias, Pavlos

    2015-03-13

    A case of shallow cumulus and precipitating cumulus congestus sampled at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program Southern Great Plains (SGP) supersite is analyzed using a multi-sensor observational approach and numerical simulation. Observations from a new radar suite surrounding the facility are used to characterize the evolving statistical behavior of the precipitating cloud system. This is accomplished using distributions of different measures of cloud geometry and precipitation properties. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with size-resolved (bin) microphysics is employed to determine the forcings most important in producing the salient aspects of the cloud system captured in the radar observations. Our emphasis ismore »on assessing the importance of time-varying vs. steady-state large-scale forcing on the model's ability to reproduce the evolutionary behavior of the cloud system. Additional consideration is given to how the characteristic spatial scale and homogeneity of the forcing imposed on the simulation influences the evolution of cloud system properties. Results indicate that several new scanning radar estimates such as distributions of cloud top are useful to differentiate the value of time-varying (or at least temporally well-matched) forcing on LES solution fidelity.« less

  3. Segmentation of complex geophysical structures with well Running title: Image segmentation with well data.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    gap for reservoir characterization. Morevoer, it is well known that interpre- tation of faults for instance Monsen et al. [24], Randen et al. [28]). More precisely, the fault extraction from 3D data is of key importance in reservoir characterization: detailed knowledge of the fault system may provide

  4. Altering Reservoir Wettability to Improve Production from Single Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. W. Weiss

    2006-09-30

    Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured and typically produce less than 10% original oil in place during primary recovery. Spontaneous imbibition has proven an important mechanism for oil recovery from fractured reservoirs, which are usually weak waterflood candidates. In some situations, chemical stimulation can promote imbibition of water to alter the reservoir wettability toward water-wetness such that oil is produced at an economic rate from the rock matrix into fractures. In this project, cores and fluids from five reservoirs were used in laboratory tests: the San Andres formation (Fuhrman Masho and Eagle Creek fields) in the Permian Basin of Texas and New Mexico; and the Interlake, Stony Mountain, and Red River formations from the Cedar Creek Anticline in Montana and South Dakota. Solutions of nonionic, anionic, and amphoteric surfactants with formation water were used to promote waterwetness. Some Fuhrman Masho cores soaked in surfactant solution had improved oil recovery up to 38%. Most Eagle Creek cores did not respond to any of the tested surfactants. Some Cedar Creek anticline cores had good response to two anionic surfactants (CD 128 and A246L). The results indicate that cores with higher permeability responded better to the surfactants. The increased recovery is mainly ascribed to increased water-wetness. It is suspected that rock mineralogy is also an important factor. The laboratory work generated three field tests of the surfactant soak process in the West Fuhrman Masho San Andres Unit. The flawlessly designed tests included mechanical well clean out, installation of new pumps, and daily well tests before and after the treatments. Treatments were designed using artificial intelligence (AI) correlations developed from 23 previous surfactant soak treatments. The treatments were conducted during the last quarter of 2006. One of the wells produced a marginal volume of incremental oil through October. It is interesting to note that the field tests were conducted in an area of the field that has not met production expectations. The dataset on the 23 Phosphoria well surfactant soaks was updated. An analysis of the oil decline curves indicted that 4.5 lb of chemical produced a barrel of incremental oil. The AI analysis supports the adage 'good wells are the best candidates.' The generally better performance of surfactant in the high permeability core laboratory tests supports this observation. AI correlations were developed to predict the response to water-frac stimulations in a tight San Andres reservoir. The correlations maybe useful in the design of Cedar Creek Anticline surfactant soak treatments planned for next year. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance scans of dolomite cores to measure porosity and saturation during the high temperature laboratory work were acquired. The scans could not be correlated with physical measurement using either conventional or AI methods.

  5. Emergence of the Persistent Spin Helix in Semiconductor Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koralek, Jake; Weber, Chris; Orenstein, Joe; Bernevig, Andrei; Zhang, Shoucheng; Mack, Shawn; Awschalom, David

    2011-08-24

    According to Noether's theorem, for every symmetry in nature there is a corresponding conservation law. For example, invariance with respect to spatial translation corresponds to conservation of momentum. In another well-known example, invariance with respect to rotation of the electron's spin, or SU(2) symmetry, leads to conservation of spin polarization. For electrons in a solid, this symmetry is ordinarily broken by spin-orbit (SO) coupling, allowing spin angular momentum to flow to orbital angular momentum. However, it has recently been predicted that SU(2) can be recovered in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), despite the presence of SO coupling. The corresponding conserved quantities include the amplitude and phase of a helical spin density wave termed the 'persistent spin helix' (PSH). SU(2) is restored, in principle, when the strength of two dominant SO interactions, the Rashba ({alpha}) and linear Dresselhaus ({beta}{sub 1}), are equal. This symmetry is predicted to be robust against all forms of spin-independent scattering, including electron-electron interactions, but is broken by the cubic Dresselhaus term ({beta}{sub 3}) and spin-dependent scattering. When these terms are negligible, the distance over which spin information can propagate is predicted to diverge as {alpha} {yields} {beta}{sub 1}. Here we observe experimentally the emergence of the PSH in GaAs quantum wells (QW's) by independently tuning {alpha} and {beta}{sub 1}. Using transient spin-grating spectroscopy (TSG), we find a spin-lifetime enhancement of two orders of magnitude near the symmetry point. Excellent quantitative agreement with theory across a wide range of sample parameters allows us to obtain an absolute measure of all relevant SO terms, identifying {beta}{sub 3} as the main SU(2) violating term in our samples. The tunable suppression of spin-relaxation demonstrated in this work is well-suited for application to spintronics.

  6. The thermodynamics of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dries Sels; Michiel Wouters

    2015-01-22

    The problem of time is a deep paradox in our physical description of the world. According to Aristotle's relational theory, time is a measure of change and does not exist on its own. In contrast, quantum mechanics, just like Newtonian mechanics, is equipped with a master clock that dictates the evolution of a system. This clock is infinitely precise and tacitly supplied free of charge from outside physics. Not only does this absolute time make it notoriously difficult to make a consistent theory of quantum gravity, it is also the underlying problem in establishing the second law. Indeed, contrary to our experience, the Wheeler-deWitt equation --a canonical quantization of general relativity-- predicts a static universe. Similarly, when simply concerned with the dynamics of a closed quantum system, there is no second law because the Von Neumann entropy is invariant under unitary transformations. Here we are mainly concerned with the latter problem and we show that it can be resolved by attributing a minimal amount of resources to the measurement of time. Although there is an absolute time in quantum mechanics, an observer can only establish a time by measuring a clock. For a local measurement, the minimal entropy production is equal to the number of ticks. This lower bound is attained by a black hole.

  7. Drilling and abandonment preparation of CO? storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Martens, Sonja; Norden, Ben; Henninges, Jan; Freifeld, Barry M.

    2014-12-31

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO? research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO? were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation ofmore »the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO? injection. The experience with the first CO? well killing operation will be reviewed.« less

  8. Drilling and abandonment preparation of CO? storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevedel, Bernhard [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Martens, Sonja [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Norden, Ben [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Henninges, Jan [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Freifeld, Barry M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-12-31

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO? research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO? were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation of the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO? injection. The experience with the first CO? well killing operation will be reviewed.

  9. Drilling and abandonment preparation of CO? storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prevedel, Bernhard [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Martens, Sonja [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Norden, Ben [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Henninges, Jan [GFZ German Centre for Geoscience, Telegrafenberg, Potsdam (Germany); Freifeld, Barry M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2014-01-01

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO? research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO? were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation of the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO? injection. The experience with the first CO? well killing operation will be reviewed.

  10. Drilling and Abandonment Preparation of CO2 storage wells – Experience from the Ketzin pilot site

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Prevedel, Bernhard; Martens, Sonja; Norden, Ben; Henninges, Jan; Freifeld, Barry M.

    2014-01-01

    At Ketzin, located west of Berlin, the GFZ German Centre for Geosciences is operating Europe's largest CO2 research storage site. This pilot site has been developed since 2004 and is comprised of one combined injection/observation well and four monitoring wells. From June 2008 to August 2013, a total of 67 kilotons of CO2 were safely injected into the sandstone units of the Upper Triassic Stuttgart Formation in a depth between 630 to 650 m. The paper discusses the well designs and lessons learned in drilling engineering and operations. The abandonment phase started in Ketzin with the first plug cementation ofmore »the observation well Ktzi 202 shortly after shut-in of CO2 injection. The experience with the first CO2 well killing operation will be reviewed.« less

  11. Air Observe System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-10

    This manuscript contains a description and basic principles for observing inaccessible areas using low cost, easily deployed equipment. The basic premise is to suspend a tiny video camera at an altitude of 10 - 200 meters over the area to be surveyed. The TV camera supports at altitude by wind or balloon. The technical challenges regard the means by which the camera is suspended. Such a system may be used by military or police forces or by civil authorities for rescue missions or assessment of natural disasters. The method may be further developed for military applications by integrating the surveillance task with deployment of munitions. Key words: air observer, air suspended system, low altitude video observer.

  12. Interpreting Horizontal Well Flow Profiles and Optimizing Well Performance by Downhole Temperature and Pressure Data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Zhuoyi

    2011-02-22

    . Because of geothermal gradient, formation temperature along the depth of the wellbore changes significantly. At such a situation, some small thermal effects, such as fluid thermal expansion and viscous dissipation heating, can be ignored compared... data. For horizontal wells, because geothermal temperature changes are relatively small, the dominating effects on the wellbore temperature changes may be thermal expansion, viscous dissipative heating, and thermal conduction. Model for temperature...

  13. Pahute Mesa Well Development and Testing Analyses for Wells ER-20-7, ER-20-8 #2, and ER-EC-11, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Ruskauff

    2011-12-01

    This report analyzes the following data collected from ER-20-7, ER-20-8 No.2, and ER-EC-11 during WDT operations: (1) Chemical indicators of well development (Section 2.0); (2) Static hydraulic head (Section 3.0); (3) Radiochemistry and geochemistry (Section 4.0); (4) Drawdown observed at locations distal to the pumping well (Section 5.0); and (5) Drilling water production, flow logs, and temperature logs (Section 6.0). The new data are further considered with respect to existing data as to how they enhance or change interpretations of groundwater flow and transport, and an interim small-scale conceptual model is also developed and compared to Phase I concepts. The purpose of well development is to remove drilling fluids and drilling-associated fines from the formation adjacent to a well so samples reflecting ambient groundwater water quality can be collected, and to restore hydraulic properties near the well bore. Drilling fluids can contaminate environmental samples from the well, resulting in nonrepresentative measurements. Both drilling fluids and preexisting fines in the formation adjacent to the well can impede the flow of water from the formation to the well, creating artifacts in hydraulic response data measured in the well.

  14. Quantum Mechanics Without Observers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    W. H. Sulis

    2013-03-03

    The measurement problem and the role of observers have plagued quantum mechanics since its conception. Attempts to resolve these have introduced anthropomorphic or non-realist notions into physics. A shift of perspective based upon process theory and utilizing methods from combinatorial games, interpolation theory and complex systems theory results in a novel realist version of quantum mechanics incorporating quasi-local, nondeterministic hidden variables that are compatible with the no-hidden variable theorems and relativistic invariance, and reproduce the standard results of quantum mechanics to a high degree of accuracy without invoking observers.

  15. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore, K.

    2001-07-13

    The objective of this project is to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions that are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. This is the first annual progress report submitted to the DOE. It reports on the work completed during the reporting period even if it may have started before this period. This project is a partnership between Professor George J. Hirasaki at Rice University and Professor Kishore Mohanty at University of Houston. In addition to the DOE, this project is supported by a consortium of oil companies and service companies. The fluid properties characterization has emphasized the departure of live oils from correlations based on dead oils. Also, asphaltic components can result in a difference between the T1 and T2 relaxation time distributions as well as reduce the hydrogen index. The fluid rock characterizations that are reported here are the effects of wettability and internal magnetic field gradients. A pore reconstruction method ha s been developed to recreate three-dimensional porous media from two-dimensional images that reproduce some of their key statistical properties. A Monte Carlo simulation technique has been developed to calculate the magnetization decay in fluid saturated porous media given their pore structure.

  16. Global Warming Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schofield, Jeremy

    Global Warming Observations: 1. Global temperature has been gradually rising in recent years #15 in range 8000 12000 nm { CFC's, methane and N 2 O important for global warming even though concentra- tions in concentration of \\greenhouse gases" like CO 2 What determines global temperature? Energy budget of earth: 1

  17. GROUND WATER MEASUREMENTS FROM OB WELLS FOR THE MONTH OF MAY (2004 to 2008)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    well + pump Population 1000 1000 600 800 2000 Construction cost (Rs.) 600000 650000 55000 70000 2500000 Maintenance cost 0 2500 500 1000 4000 Time of const.( days ) 90 120 5 7 180 Total No. of most important Quantitative attributes are as follows:- Population served Construction cost Maintenance cost Time required

  18. Empirical model determines energy required to clean sand from well bore

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Appah, D.; Ichara, M. (Univ. of Port Harcourt (Nigeria))

    1994-02-28

    An empirical hydraulic model has been developed for determining the energy required for cleaning a vertical and nearly vertical well bore plugged with sand particles. The model considers pressure losses and cleanout time and compares sand cleanout time during direct and reverse circulation of water. Good agreement was obtained between the model and experimental results.

  19. Primary Cementing of a Highly Deviated Oil Well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fournier, John J.F.

    in the construction of a well. The objective is to provide zonal isolation, i.e., a hydraulic seal between the wellPrimary Cementing of a Highly Deviated Oil Well by Mariana Carrasco-Teja B.Sc., Instituto Tecnol. The study comes from the primary cementing of highly deviated oil and gas wells. Highly deviated wells

  20. VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Janson, Svante

    VOLATILITY TIME AND PROPERTIES OF OPTION PRICES volatility time, to show convexity of option prices in the underlying asset if the contract function is convex as well as continuity and monotonicity of the option price in the volatility

  1. Installation of 2 7/8-in. coiled-tubing tailpipes in live gas wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.A.; Bayes, K.P.

    1994-05-01

    This paper describes a technique for installing 2 7/8-in. coiled tubing as tailpipe extensions below existing production packers in live gas wells. It also covers the use of coiled tubing as a way to complete wells. Large savings in rig time and deferred production have been realized with this technique. Fluid losses to the formation do not occur, and no expensive rig time is needed to kill or clean up the wells, as required for conventional workovers below existing production packers. This technique is particularly applicable in depleted reservoirs that could be impaired by traditional workover methods.

  2. Laser Oil and Gas Well Drilling Demonstration Videos

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    ANL's Laser Applications Laboratory and collaborators are examining the feasibility of adapting high-power laser technology to drilling for gas and oil. The initial phase is designed to establish a scientific basis for developing a commercial laser drilling system and determine the level of gas industry interest in pursuing future research. Using lasers to bore a hole offers an entirely new approach to mechanical drilling. The novel drilling system would transfer light energy from lasers on the surface, down a borehole by a fiber optic bundle, to a series of lenses that would direct the laser light to the rock face. Researchers believe that state-of-the-art lasers have the potential to penetrate rock many times faster than conventional boring technologies - a huge benefit in reducing the high costs of operating a drill rig. Because the laser head does not contact the rock, there is no need to stop drilling to replace a mechanical bit. Moreover, researchers believe that lasers have the ability to melt the rock in a way that creates a ceramic sheath in the wellbore, eliminating the expense of buying and setting steel well casing. A laser system could also contain a variety of downhole sensors, including visual imaging systems that could communicate with the surface through the fiber optic cabling. Earlier studies have been promising, but there is still much to learn. One of the primary objectives of the new study will be to obtain much more precise measurements of the energy requirements needed to transmit light from surface lasers down a borehole with enough power to bore through rocks as much as 20,000 feet or more below the surface. Another objective will be to determine if sending the laser light in sharp pulses, rather than as a continuous stream, could further increase the rate of rock penetration. A third aspect will be to determine if lasers can be used in the presence of drilling fluids. In most wells, thick fluids called "drilling muds" are injected into the borehole to wash out rock cuttings and keep water and other fluids from the underground formations from seeping into the well. The technical challenge will be to determine whether too much laser energy is expended to clear away the fluid where the drilling is occurring. (Copied with editing from http://www.ne.anl.gov/facilities/lal/laser_drilling.html). The demonstration videos, provided here in QuickTime format, are accompanied by patent documents and PDF reports that, together, provide an overall picture of this fascinating project.

  3. Magnetism and superconductivity observed to exist in harmony

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Los Alamos National Laboratory, along with colleagues at institutions in Switzerland and Canada, have observed, for the first time in a single exotic phase, a situation...

  4. Comet tail formation: Giotto observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilken, B.; Jockers, K.; Johnstone, A.; Coates, A.; Heath, J.; Formisano, V.; Amata, E.; Winningham, J.D.; Thomsen, M.; Bryant, D.A.

    1986-01-01

    The process of mass loading of the solar wind by cometary ions, which forms comet tails, has been observed throughout the coma of comet Halley. Three distinct regimes were found where the nature of the energy and momentum coupling between solar wind and cometary ions is different. Outside the bow shock, where there is little angular scattering of the freshly ionized particles, the coupling is described by the simple pickup trajectory and the energy is controlled by the angle between the flow and the magnetic field. Just inside the bow shock, there is considerable scattering accompanied by another acceleration process which raises some particle energies well above the straightforward pickup value. Finally, closer to the nucleus, the amount of scattering decreases and the coupling is once more controlled by the magnetic field direction. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  5. U.S. Average Depth of Crude Oil Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Estimated Production fromSales (Billion CubicWells

  6. U.S. Average Depth of Natural Gas Exploratory Wells Drilled (Feet per Well)

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustments (BillionProved Reserves (Billion Cubic Feet)Estimated Production fromSalesWells Drilled (Feet per

  7. Economic viability of multiple-lateral horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Christopher Jason

    1995-01-01

    Horizontal wells are gaining popularity throughout the petroleum industry as a means to increase well productivity and enhance incremental economics. Horizontal wells provide greater reservoir exposure and are useful in ...

  8. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    2014-12-19

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  9. UTM Well Coordinates for the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site (BHRS)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    David Lim

    A series of oscillatory pumping tests were performed at the BHRS. The data collected from these wells will be used to tomographically image the shallow subsurface. This excel file only contains well coordinates for all wells at the Boise site.

  10. Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    field. Identify opportunities in mature fields: Sweet spots for infill drilling. Underperformer wellsIdentifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using Monthly Production wells rather than the entire field. #12;Introduction Objective Methodology Results Conclusion Objective

  11. Modeling performance of horizontal, undulating, and multilateral wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kamkom, Rungtip

    2009-05-15

    Horizontal, undulating, and multilateral wells are relatively new alternatives in field development because they can increase the productivity per well and reduce the cost of field development. Because the feasibility of these wells may not be valid...

  12. Time Management Managing Time and Tasks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Management Managing Time and Tasks What is time management? Time can't be managed ­ but you can manage the amount of time you use each day for fun, work, rest, and time spent with others. Why is time management important? You have responsibilities to yourself, to your family and friends, to your

  13. Observations of Exoplanet Atmospheres

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Crossfield, Ian J M

    2015-01-01

    Detailed characterization of an extrasolar planet's atmosphere provides the best hope for distinguishing the makeup of its outer layers, and the only hope for understanding the interplay between initial composition, chemistry, dynamics & circulation, and disequilibrium processes. In recent years, some areas have seen rapid progress while developments in others have come more slowly and/or have been hotly contested. This article gives an observer's perspective on the current understanding of extrasolar planet atmospheres prior to the considerable advances expected from the next generation of observing facilities. Atmospheric processes of both transiting and directly-imaged planets are discussed, including molecular and atomic abundances, cloud properties, thermal structure, and planetary energy budgets. In the future we can expect a continuing and accelerating stream of new discoveries, which will fuel the ongoing exoplanet revolution for many years to come.

  14. Observable primordial vector modes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antony Lewis

    2004-06-04

    Primordial vector modes describe vortical fluid perturbations in the early universe. A regular solution exists with constant non-zero radiation vorticities on super-horizon scales. Baryons are tightly coupled to the photons, and the baryon velocity only decays by an order unity factor by recombination, leading to an observable CMB anisotropy signature via the Doppler effect. There is also a large B-mode CMB polarization signal, with significant power on scales larger than l~2000. This B-mode signature is distinct from that expected from tensor modes or gravitational lensing, and makes a primordial vector to scalar mode power ratio ~10^(-6) detectable. Future observations aimed at detecting large scale B-modes from gravitational waves will also be sensitive to regular vector modes at around this level.

  15. Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Log Data At Valles Caldera - Redondo Geothermal Area (Shevenell, Et Al., 1988) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data...

  16. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Smith & Rex, 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Exploratory Well At...

  17. Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Well Log Data At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Fairbank & Niggemann, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Well Log Data At Blue...

  18. Observations on European Agriculture. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fraps, G. S. (George Stronach)

    1911-01-01

    AS ACKICUL-I-uRAL EXPE RIMENT STATIONS bLLETIN No. 14-1 DECEMBER, 1911 Division of Chemistry Observations on European Agriculture BY G. S. FRAPS, Chemist 0 Postoffice : CULLEGE STATION; TEXAS AUSTIN. TEXAS I AUSTIN PRINTING CO:. PRINTERS... ............................................... and Conclusions 35 [Blank Page in Original Bulletin] rrvations on European Agriculture By C. S. FRAPS ie object of this Bulletin is to present such abservadons on :ulture in Europe as may offer suggestions of value to Texas - :ulturists. The writer...

  19. Fiscal year 1996 well plugging and abandonment program Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    This report is a synopsis of the progress of the well plugging and abandonment program at the Oak Ridge Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, from August 1995 through August 1996. A total of 27 wells, piezometers, and borings were plugged and abandoned during the period of time covered in this report. All wells and borings were plugged and abandoned in accordance with the Monitoring Well Plugging and Abandonment Plan for the U.S. Department of Energy, Y-12 Plant, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (HSW, Inc. 1991).

  20. Heating and cooling of coronal loops observed by SDO

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Leping; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Context: One of the most prominent processes suggested to heat the corona to well above 10^6 K builds on nanoflares, short bursts of energy dissipation. Aims: We compare observations to model predictions to test the validity of the nanoflare process. Methods: Using extreme UV data from AIA/SDO and HMI/SDO line-of-sight magnetograms we study the spatial and temporal evolution of a set of loops in active region AR 11850. Results: We find a transient brightening of loops in emission from Fe xviii forming at about 7.2 MK while at the same time these loops dim in emission from lower temperatures. This points to a fast heating of the loop that goes along with evaporation of material that we observe as apparent upward motions in the image sequence. After this initial phases lasting for some 10 min, the loops brighten in a sequence of AIA channels showing cooler and cooler plasma, indicating the cooling of the loops over a time scale of about one hour. A comparison to the predictions from a 1D loop model shows that t...

  1. Room temperature continuous wave InGaAsN quantum well vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1.3 um

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    CHOQUETTE,KENT D.; KLEM,JOHN F.; FISCHER,ARTHUR J.; SPAHN,OLGA B.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.; FRITZ,IAN J.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; BREILAND,WILLIAM G.; SIEG,ROBERT M.; GEIB,KENT M.; SCOTT,J.W.; NAONE,R.L.

    2000-06-05

    Selectively oxidized vertical cavity lasers emitting at 1294 nm using InGaAsN quantum wells are reported for the first time which operate continuous wave at and above room temperature. The lasers employ two n-type Al{sub 0.94}Ga{sub 0.06}As/GaAs distributed Bragg reflectors each with a selectively oxidized current aperture adjacent to the optical cavity, and the top output mirror contains a tunnel junction to inject holes into the active region. Continuous wave single mode lasing is observed up to 55 C. These lasers exhibit the longest wavelength reported to date for vertical cavity surface emitting lasers grown on GaAs substrates.

  2. Space-time diamonds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daiqin Su; T. C. Ralph

    2015-07-02

    We show that the particle number distribution of diamond modes, modes that are localised in a finite space-time region, are thermal for the Minkowski vacuum state of a massless scalar field, an analogue to the Unruh effect. The temperature of the diamond is inversely proportional to its size. An inertial observer can detect this thermal radiation by coupling to the diamond modes using an appropriate energy scaled detector. We further investigate the correlations between various diamonds and find that entanglement between adjacent diamonds dominates.

  3. Observed Cosmological Redshifts Support Contracting Accelerating Universe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branislav Vlahovic

    2012-07-02

    The main argument that Universe is currently expanding is observed redshift increase by distance. However, this conclusion may not be correct, because cosmological redshift depends only on the scaling factors, the change in the size of the universe during the time of light propagation and is not related to the speed of observer or speed of the object emitting the light. An observer in expanding universe will measure the same redshift as observer in contracting universe with the same scaling. This was not taken into account in analysing the SN Ia data related to the universe acceleration. Possibility that universe may contract, but that the observed light is cosmologically redshifted allows for completely different set of cosmological parameters $\\Omega_M, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}$, including the solution $\\Omega_M=1, \\Omega_{\\Lambda}=0$. The contracting and in the same time accelerating universe explains observed deceleration and acceleration in SN Ia data, but also gives significantly larger value for the age of the universe, $t_0 = 24$ Gyr. This allows to reconsider classical cosmological models with $\\Lambda =0$. The contracting stage also may explain the observed association of high redshifted quasars to low redshifted galaxies.

  4. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud fieldmore »and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.« less

  5. First observations of tracking clouds using scanning ARM cloud radars

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borque, Paloma; Giangrande, Scott; Kollias, Pavlos

    2014-12-01

    Tracking clouds using scanning cloud radars can help to document the temporal evolution of cloud properties well before large drop formation (‘‘first echo’’). These measurements complement cloud and precipitation tracking using geostationary satellites and weather radars. Here, two-dimensional (2-D) Along-Wind Range Height Indicator (AW-RHI) observations of a population of shallow cumuli (with and without precipitation) from the 35-GHz scanning ARM cloud radar (SACR) at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) program Southern Great Plains (SGP) site are presented. Observations from the ARM SGP network of scanning precipitation radars are used to provide the larger scale context of the cloud field and to highlight the advantages of the SACR to detect the numerous, small, non-precipitating cloud elements. A new Cloud Identification and Tracking Algorithm (CITA) is developed to track cloud elements. In CITA, a cloud element is identified as a region having a contiguous set of pixels exceeding a preset reflectivity and size threshold. The high temporal resolution of the SACR 2-D observations (30 sec) allows for an area superposition criteria algorithm to match cloud elements at consecutive times. Following CITA, the temporal evolution of cloud element properties (number, size, and maximum reflectivity) is presented. The vast majority of the designated elements during this cumulus event were short-lived non-precipitating clouds having an apparent life cycle shorter than 15 minutes. The advantages and disadvantages of cloud tracking using an SACR are discussed.

  6. Thermonuclear X-ray Bursts: Theory vs. Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrew Cumming

    2003-11-18

    I review our theoretical understanding of thermonuclear flashes on accreting neutron stars, concentrating on comparisons to observations. Sequences of regular Type I X-ray bursts from GS 1826-24 and 4U 1820-30 are very well described by the theory. I discuss recent work which attempts to use the observed burst properties in these sources to constrain the composition of the accreted material. For GS 1826-24, variations in the burst energetics with accretion rate indicate that the accreted material has solar metallicity; for 4U 1820-30, future observations should constrain the hydrogen fraction, testing evolutionary models. I briefly discuss the global bursting behavior of burst sources, which continues to be a major puzzle. Finally, I turn to superbursts, which naturally fit into the picture as unstable carbon ignition in a thick layer of heavy elements. I present new time-dependent models of the cooling tails of superbursts, and discuss the various interactions between superbursts and normal Type I bursts, and what can be learned from them.

  7. Forward observer: stories 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carpenter, Christopher Lee

    1997-01-01

    , was fairly skillful in a worthless way, although it had not yet dawned on me that there could be a deeper purpose to menace that merely the signaling of yet another bloody death; after all, fiction was, to me, mere entertainment, and those novels treated.... Themes, especially the broad ones, are pretty easy to bandy about ? acceptance, alienation, death, discovery, growth, etc. But a fiction's essence has to contain not only the desired theme, but the specifics of the pursuit as well. John Gardner...

  8. MONITORING WELL-BEING OF CIVIL ENGINEERING PROFESSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bruneau, Michel

    MONITORING WELL-BEING OF CIVIL ENGINEERING PROFESSION By Michel Bruneau, 1Member, ASCE ABSTRACT reported decline in the well-beingof the civilengineering profession. These deficienciesare: (1) Public-beingof the civilengineering profession, as well as the evolution of this well-being.Quan- titativeperformanceindicesare

  9. Well completion process for formations with unconsolidated sands

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davies, David K. (Kingwood, TX); Mondragon, III, Julius J. (Redondo Beach, CA); Hara, Philip Scott (Monterey Park, CA)

    2003-04-29

    A method for consolidating sand around a well, involving injecting hot water or steam through well casing perforations in to create a cement-like area around the perforation of sufficient rigidity to prevent sand from flowing into and obstructing the well. The cement area has several wormholes that provide fluid passageways between the well and the formation, while still inhibiting sand inflow.

  10. ARM Observations Projected

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 OutreachProductswsicloudwsicloudden Documentation Data Management Facility PlotsProductsObservations Projected

  11. Global Observables at RHIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Milov

    2006-10-17

    Main characteristics of the charged particle dN_ch/deta and transverse energy dE_T/deta production measured in Heavy Ion collisions at RHIC energies are presented in this article. Transformation of the pseudo-rapidity shape, relation to the incident energy and centrality profile are described in a systematic way. Centrality profile is shown to be closely bound to the number of nucleons participating in the collisions, at the same time an alternative approach to study the centrality behavior is also discussed.

  12. Correlation between human observer performance and model observer performance in differential phase contrast CT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Ke; Garrett, John; Chen, Guang-Hong

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: With the recently expanding interest and developments in x-ray differential phase contrast CT (DPC-CT), the evaluation of its task-specific detection performance and comparison with the corresponding absorption CT under a given radiation dose constraint become increasingly important. Mathematical model observers are often used to quantify the performance of imaging systems, but their correlations with actual human observers need to be confirmed for each new imaging method. This work is an investigation of the effects of stochastic DPC-CT noise on the correlation of detection performance between model and human observers with signal-known-exactly (SKE) detection tasks.Methods: The detectabilities of different objects (five disks with different diameters and two breast lesion masses) embedded in an experimental DPC-CT noise background were assessed using both model and human observers. The detectability of the disk and lesion signals was then measured using five types of model observers including the prewhitening ideal observer, the nonprewhitening (NPW) observer, the nonprewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (NPWEi), the prewhitening observer with eye filter and internal noise (PWEi), and the channelized Hotelling observer (CHO). The same objects were also evaluated by four human observers using the two-alternative forced choice method. The results from the model observer experiment were quantitatively compared to the human observer results to assess the correlation between the two techniques.Results: The contrast-to-detail (CD) curve generated by the human observers for the disk-detection experiments shows that the required contrast to detect a disk is inversely proportional to the square root of the disk size. Based on the CD curves, the ideal and NPW observers tend to systematically overestimate the performance of the human observers. The NPWEi and PWEi observers did not predict human performance well either, as the slopes of their CD curves tended to be steeper. The CHO generated the best quantitative agreement with human observers with its CD curve overlapping with that of human observer. Statistical equivalence between CHO and humans can be claimed within 11% of the human observer results, including both the disk and lesion detection experiments.Conclusions: The model observer method can be used to accurately represent human observer performance with the stochastic DPC-CT noise for SKE tasks with sizes ranging from 8 to 128 pixels. The incorporation of the anatomical noise remains to be studied.

  13. Experimental Observation of Bonding Electrons in Proteins*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Experimental Observation of Bonding Electrons in Proteins* (Received for publication, April 15 enables bonding details of electron distributions in proteins to be revealed experimentally for the first time. We move one step closer to imaging directly the fine details of the electronic structure on which

  14. Free Carrier Absorption due to Dislocation Scattering in GaN Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vaidya, R. G. [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka (India); Department of Physics, Tumkur University, Tumkur, Karnataka, 572102 (India); Sankeshwar, N. S.; Mulimani, B. G. [Department of Physics, Karnatak University, Dharwad, Karnataka (India)

    2011-10-20

    Free carrier absorption (FCA) is studied in quantum well structures assuming electrons to be scattered by dislocations via strain field. Expression for FCA coefficient, {alpha} is obtained assuming radiation field to be polarized along the plane of quantum well. Numerical results of {alpha}, as function of photon frequency, {Omega} and well width, d are presented. Calculations show, FCA to decrease with increase in {Omega} with a kink observed at {Omega} = 7.79x10{sup 13} s{sup -1} indicating onset of inter subband transitions. {alpha} is found to be proportional to d{sup -3} and to increase with increase in dislocation density.

  15. Testing geopressured geothermal reservoirs in existing wells. Wells of Opportunity Program final contract report, 1980-1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    The geopressured-geothermal candidates for the Wells of Opportunity program were located by the screening of published information on oil industry activity and through direct contact with the oil and gas operators. This process resulted in the recommendation to the DOE of 33 candidate wells for the program. Seven of the 33 recommended wells were accepted for testing. Of these seven wells, six were actually tested. The first well, the No. 1 Kennedy, was acquired but not tested. The seventh well, the No. 1 Godchaux, was abandoned due to mechanical problems during re-entry. The well search activities, which culminated in the acceptance by the DOE of 7 recommended wells, were substantial. A total of 90,270 well reports were reviewed, leading to 1990 wells selected for thorough geological analysis. All of the reservoirs tested in this program have been restricted by one or more faults or permeability barriers. A comprehensive discussion of test results is presented.

  16. UGE Scheduler Cycle Time

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    UGE Scheduler Cycle Time UGE Scheduler Cycle Time Genepool Cycle Time Genepool Daily Genepool Weekly Phoebe Cycle Time Phoebe Daily Phoebe Weekly What is the Scheduler Cycle? The...

  17. Multi-well sample plate cover penetration system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Beer, Neil Reginald (Pleasanton, CA)

    2011-12-27

    An apparatus for penetrating a cover over a multi-well sample plate containing at least one individual sample well includes a cutting head, a cutter extending from the cutting head, and a robot. The cutting head is connected to the robot wherein the robot moves the cutting head and cutter so that the cutter penetrates the cover over the multi-well sample plate providing access to the individual sample well. When the cutting head is moved downward the foil is pierced by the cutter that splits, opens, and folds the foil inward toward the well. The well is then open for sample aspiration but has been protected from cross contamination.

  18. Observer-dependent optical properties of stationary axisymmetric spacetimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Donato Bini; Fernando de Felice; Andrea Geralico

    2014-08-23

    The world lines of null particles admit arbitrary parametrizations. In the presence of a family of observers one may introduce along a null world line an extension of the so-called Cattaneo's relative standard time parameter (valid for massive particles) which plays a special role. Another possibility is to use the coordinate time itself as a parameter. The relation between relative standard time and coordinate time allows for the introduction of an observer-dependent optical path and associated refraction index. Both these quantities are studied here working out explicit examples concerning familiar null orbits and observers in black hole spacetimes.

  19. Partial and Complete Observables for Canonical General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    B. Dittrich

    2005-07-25

    In this work we will consider the concepts of partial and complete observables for canonical general relativity. These concepts provide a method to calculate Dirac observables. The central result of this work is that one can compute Dirac observables for general relativity by dealing with just one constraint. For this we have to introduce spatial diffeomorphism invariant Hamiltonian constraints. It will turn out that these can be made to be Abelian. Furthermore the methods outlined here provide a connection between observables in the space--time picture, i.e. quantities invariant under space--time diffeomorphisms, and Dirac observables in the canonical picture.

  20. Time and Labor Manual -Time Keepers -LSUSH

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Version Date: July 2012 #12;COPYRIGHT & TRADEMARKS create a risk of personal injury. If you use this software in dangerous applications, then you shall Guide Time and Labor Manual - Time Keepers - LSUSH Page iii Table of Contents Time and Labor Manual

  1. Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kunkle, Tom

    Time Commitments Where Does Your Time Go Everyone starts the week with the same number of hours. So, why does your time go so fast? Let's find out! Number of hours of sleep each night ____ x 7 preparation/clean-up time) ____ x 7 = ____ Travel time to and from campus ___ x __ = ____ Number of hours per

  2. How ARCO drills high-angle wells offshore Indonesia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tjondrodiputro, B.; Eddyarso, H.; Jones, K. (Atlantic Richfield Indonesia, Inc., Jakarta (Indonesia))

    1993-03-01

    Atlantic Richfield Indonesia, Inc. (ARII) drilled and completed 28 high-angle wells since early 1986 in Bima, Papa and FF fields in the Offshore North West Java Sea (ONWJ) contract area. Early wells were drilled with conventional rotary bottomhole assemblies (BHAs); introduction of a steerable tool and MWD subsequently increased efficiency and reduced drilling costs. Both lignosulfonate and dispersed pac polymer muds have been used with good success. Cost to drill a high-angle well has been only marginally more than that of a 45[degree] directional well. Elimination of open hole logging and use of preperforated liners have reduced drilling costs by 10%. Production performance for wells has been higher than for vertical or low-angle wells. High-angle wells in Bima have outperformed offset vertical wells and are classified as a success. However, horizontal wells in Papa, which has a strong bottom-water drive, have not shown any improved recovery over conventional wells. The new well in FF field is still being evaluated. In this first of a two-part report, high-angle drilling operations including well planning, BHA selection, casing and mud programs, hole cleaning and logging are described. Specific wells in the Bima area are discussed as examples.

  3. CTu2J.1.pdf CLEO Technical Digest OSA 2012 Light Emission in Ge Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, David A. B.

    CTu2J.1.pdf CLEO Technical Digest © OSA 2012 Light Emission in Ge Quantum Wells Edward T. Fei1 Engineering, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA edfei@stanford.edu Abstract: We present the Ge/SiGe and electroluminescence show enhanced optical properties over bulk Ge. Further optical enhancement is observed in disk

  4. Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA(DOI-BLM...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Salt Wells Geothermal Exploratory Drilling Program EA (DOI-BLM-NV-C010-2009-0006-EA) Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Salt Wells...

  5. Hot exciton transport in ZnSe quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Hui; Moehl, Sebastian; Wachter, Sven; Kalt, Heinz

    2002-02-01

    The in-plane transport of excitons in ZnSe quantum wells is investigated directly by microphotoluminescence in combination with a solid immersion lens. Due to the strong Froehlich coupling, the initial kinetic energy of the excitons is well...

  6. Pressure transient testing and productivity analysis for horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yueming

    2004-11-15

    This work studied the productivity evaluation and well test analysis of horizontal wells. The major components of this work consist of a 3D coupled reservoir/wellbore model, a productivity evaluation, a deconvolution ...

  7. Exploratory Well At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Sorey...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    1983 to the east and north of Highway 395. Notes Among these wells were exploration and monitoring wells drilled near the Fish Hatchery Springs in preparation for the siting of a...

  8. Surge Block Method for Controlling Well Clogging and Sampling Sediment during Bioremediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Wei-min [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Watson, David B [ORNL] [ORNL; Luo, Jian [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Carley, Jack M [ORNL] [ORNL; Mehlhorn, Tonia L [ORNL] [ORNL; Kitanidis, Peter K. [Stanford University] [Stanford University; Jardine, Philip [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)] [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Criddle, Craig [Stanford University] [Stanford University

    2013-01-01

    A surge block treatment method (i.e. inserting a solid rod plunger with a flat seal that closely fits the casing interior into a well and stocking it up and down) was performed for the rehabilitation of wells clogged with biomass and for the collection of time series sediment samples during in situ bioremediation tests for U(VI) immobilization at a the U.S. Department of Energy site in Oak Ridge, TN. The clogging caused by biomass growth had been controlled by using routine surge block treatment for18 times over a nearly four year test period. The treatment frequency was dependent of the dosage of electron donor injection and microbial community developed in the subsurface. Hydraulic tests showed that the apparent aquifer transmissivity at a clogged well with an inner diameter (ID) of 10.16 cm was increased by 8 13 times after the rehabilitation, indicating the effectiveness of the rehabilitation. Simultaneously with the rehabilitation, the surge block method was successfully used for collecting time series sediment samples composed of fine particles (clay and silt) from wells with ID 1.9 10.16 cm for the analysis of mineralogical and geochemical composition and microbial community during the same period. Our results demonstrated that the surge block method provided a cost-effective approach for both well rehabilitation and frequent solid sampling at the same location.

  9. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) Well Construction Technology Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polsky, Yarom; Capuano, Louis; Finger, John; Huh, Michael; Knudsen, Steve; Chip, A.J. Mansure; Raymond, David; Swanson, Robert

    2008-12-01

    This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: 1. Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. 2. Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics.

  10. Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karlsson, Brynjar

    #12;i Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza-Temperature Geothermal Wells Alvin I. Remoroza 60 ECTS thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of a Magister Scientiarum #12;iv Calcite Mineral Scaling Potentials of High-Temperature Geothermal Wells 60 ECTS thesis

  11. Horizontal well hydraulics in leaky aquifers Hongbin Zhan*, Eungyu Park

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    Horizontal well hydraulics in leaky aquifers Hongbin Zhan*, Eungyu Park Department of Geology presents a general study of horizontal well hydraulics for three aquifer types: a leaky confined aquifer- standing of horizontal well hydraulics under various aquifer conditions. 2. Mathematical model I

  12. Evaluating climate models: Should we use weather or climate observations?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oglesby, Robert J [ORNL; Erickson III, David J [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    Calling the numerical models that we use for simulations of climate change 'climate models' is a bit of a misnomer. These 'general circulation models' (GCMs, AKA global climate models) and their cousins the 'regional climate models' (RCMs) are actually physically-based weather simulators. That is, these models simulate, either globally or locally, daily weather patterns in response to some change in forcing or boundary condition. These simulated weather patterns are then aggregated into climate statistics, very much as we aggregate observations into 'real climate statistics'. Traditionally, the output of GCMs has been evaluated using climate statistics, as opposed to their ability to simulate realistic daily weather observations. At the coarse global scale this may be a reasonable approach, however, as RCM's downscale to increasingly higher resolutions, the conjunction between weather and climate becomes more problematic. We present results from a series of present-day climate simulations using the WRF ARW for domains that cover North America, much of Latin America, and South Asia. The basic domains are at a 12 km resolution, but several inner domains at 4 km have also been simulated. These include regions of complex topography in Mexico, Colombia, Peru, and Sri Lanka, as well as a region of low topography and fairly homogeneous land surface type (the U.S. Great Plains). Model evaluations are performed using standard climate analyses (e.g., reanalyses; NCDC data) but also using time series of daily station observations. Preliminary results suggest little difference in the assessment of long-term mean quantities, but the variability on seasonal and interannual timescales is better described. Furthermore, the value-added by using daily weather observations as an evaluation tool increases with the model resolution.

  13. On the Flow of Time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F R Ellis

    2008-12-01

    Current theoretical physics suggests the flow of time is an illusion: the entire universe just is, with no special meaning attached to the present time. This paper points out that this view, in essence represented by usual space-time diagrams, is based on time-reversible microphysical laws, which fail to capture essential features of the time-irreversible nature of decoherence and the quantum measurement process, as well as macro-physical behaviour and the development of emergent complex systems, including life, which exist in the real universe. When these are taken into account, the unchanging block universe view of spacetime is best replaced by an evolving block universe which extends as time evolves, with the potential of the future continually becoming the certainty of the past; spacetime itself evolves, as do the entities within it. However this time evolution is not related to any preferred surfaces in spacetime; rather it is associated with the evolution of proper time along families of world lines. The default state of fundamental physics should not be taken to be a time irreversible evolution of physical states: it is an ongoing irreversible development of time itself.

  14. ANDERSON LOCALIZATION FOR TIME PERIODIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    disorder, Anderson localization in Z d is stable un- der localized time-periodic perturbations by proving random Schrodinger operators at large disorder has been well known since the seminal work of Fr is approximated by the potential V . The equation governing the system is (1.5) i @ @t = (#1; + V ) on Z d #2

  15. Fast bias inversion of a double well without residual particle excitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Martínez-Garaot; M. Palmero; D. Guéry-Odelin; J. G. Muga

    2015-07-14

    We design fast bias inversions of an asymmetric double well so that the lowest states in each well remain so and free from residual motional excitation. This cannot be done adiabatically, and a sudden bias switch produces in general motional excitation. The residual excitation is suppressed by complementing a predetermined fast bias change with a linear ramp whose time-dependent slope compensates for the displacement of the wells. The process, combined with vibrational multiplexing and demultiplexing, can produce vibrational state inversion without exciting internal states, just by deforming the trap.

  16. Well correction factors for three-dimensional reservoir simulation with nonsquare grid blocks and anisotropic permeability 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Dukmin

    1988-01-01

    of the well inflow equation for a partially perforated well is written as J model 0. 00708 kh ln(ro/rw) + s3D (4) where h is thickness of layer perforated. Fjerstad also pre- sented a new equation for the proper shut-in time including s3D as ro e D 2(ht.../h - 1) 67. 5 dsctdx e At' - [ ] ( ] . (5) rw k This equation reduces to Eq. 3 for a fully penetrating well. The current work investigates how the actual pwf is related to the po obtained in the three-dimensional reservoir simulation model...

  17. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, Carol T. (Orinda, CA); Bender, Donald A. (Dublin, CA); Bowman, Barry R. (Livermore, CA); Burnham, Alan K. (Livermore, CA); Chesnut, Dwayne A. (Pleasanton, CA); Comfort, III, William J. (Livermore, CA); Guymon, Lloyd G. (Livermore, CA); Henning, Carl D. (Livermore, CA); Pedersen, Knud B. (Livermore, CA); Sefcik, Joseph A. (Tracy, CA); Smith, Joseph A. (Livermore, CA); Strauch, Mark S. (Livermore, CA)

    1993-01-01

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  18. Oil/gas separator for installation at burning wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alonso, C.T.; Bender, D.A.; Bowman, B.R.; Burnham, A.K.; Chesnut, D.A.; Comfort, W.J. III; Guymon, L.G.; Henning, C.D.; Pedersen, K.B.; Sefcik, J.A.; Smith, J.A.; Strauch, M.S.

    1993-03-09

    An oil/gas separator is disclosed that can be utilized to return the burning wells in Kuwait to production. Advantageously, a crane is used to install the separator at a safe distance from the well. The gas from the well is burned off at the site, and the oil is immediately pumped into Kuwait's oil gathering system. Diverters inside the separator prevent the oil jet coming out of the well from reaching the top vents where the gas is burned. The oil falls back down, and is pumped from an annular oil catcher at the bottom of the separator, or from the concrete cellar surrounding the well.

  19. Registration of Hanford Site Class V underground injection wells. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    The Plan and Schedule for Disposition and Regulatory Compliance for Miscellaneous Streams (DOE 1994) requires that all existing Class V injection wells be registered under WAC 173--218. (Washington Underground Injection Control Program). The purpose of this document is to fulfill this requirement by registering all active Class V underground injection control wells, on the Hanford Site, under WAC 173--218. This registration will revise the registration previously submitted in 1988 (DOE 1988). In support of this registration, an extensive effort has been made to identify all injection wells on the Hanford Site. New injection wells will not be constructed on the Hanford Site except to receive uncontaminated stormwater or groundwater heatpump return flow. All changes to Miscellaneous Streams will be tracked through the Hanford Site Miscellaneous Streams Inventory Database. Table 5--2 of this injection well registration may be updated annually at the same time as the Miscellaneous Streams Inventory, if necessary.

  20. Well fluid isolation and sample apparatus and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schalla, Ronald (Kennewick, WA); Smith, Ronald M. (Richland, WA); Hall, Stephen H. (Kennewick, WA); Smart, John E. (Richland, WA)

    1995-01-01

    The present invention specifically permits purging and/or sampling of a well but only removing, at most, about 25% of the fluid volume compared to conventional methods and, at a minimum, removing none of the fluid volume from the well. The invention is an isolation assembly that is inserted into the well. The isolation assembly is designed so that only a volume of fluid between the outside diameter of the isolation assembly and the inside diameter of the well over a fluid column height from the bottom of the well to the top of the active portion (lower annulus) is removed. A seal may be positioned above the active portion thereby sealing the well and preventing any mixing or contamination of inlet fluid with fluid above the packer. Purged well fluid is stored in a riser above the packer. Ports in the wall of the isolation assembly permit purging and sampling of the lower annulus along the height of the active portion.

  1. Horizontal-well pilot waterflood tests shallow, abandoned field

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McAlpine, J.L. ); Joshi, S.D. )

    1991-08-05

    This paper reports on the suitability of using horizontal wells in a waterflood of shallow, partially depleted sands which will be tested in the Jennings field in Oklahoma. The vertical wells drilled in the Jennings field intersect several well-known formations such as Red Fork, Misner, and Bartlesville sand. Most of these formations have been produced over a number of years, and presently no wells are producing in the field. In the 1940s, 1950s, and 1960s, wells were drilled on 10-acre spacing, and the last well was plugged in 1961. The field was produced only on primary production and produced approximately 1 million bbl of oil. Because the field was not waterflooded, a large potential exists to produce from the field using secondary methods. To improve the economics for the secondary process, a combination of horizontal and vertical wells was considered.

  2. INTEGRAL and RXTE observations of the fast X-ray transient XTEJ1901+014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. I. Karasev; A. A. Lutovinov; S. A. Grebenev

    2006-11-13

    We present results of spectral and timing analysis of the fast X-ray transient XTE J1901+014 based on data of the RXTE and INTEGRAL observatories. With the INTEGRAL/ISGRI the source was detected at a significance level of 20$\\sigma$ with the persistent flux of $\\sim$2.7 mCrab in a 17-100 keV energy band in 2003-2004 (during long observations of the Sagittarius arm region). We added the RXTE/PCA (3-20 keV) data obtained in 1998 to the INTEGRAL/ISGRI data to build the broadband spectrum of the source in a quiescent state. It was found that the spectrum can be well approximated by a simple powerlaw with a photon index of $\\sim$2.15. From timing analysis we found short time scale aperiodic variations which can be connected with instabilities in the accretion flow.

  3. Time-Dependent Lagrangian Biomechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ivancevic, Tijana T

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we present the time-dependent generalization of an 'ordinary' autonomous human musculo-skeletal biomechanics. We start with the configuration manifold of human body, given as a set of its all active degrees of freedom (DOF). This is a Riemannian manifold with a material metric tensor given by the total mass-inertia matrix of the human body segments. This is the base manifold for standard autonomous biomechanics. To make its time-dependent generalization, we need to extend it with a real time axis. On this extended configuration space we develop time-dependent biomechanical Lagrangian dynamics, using derived jet spaces of velocities and accelerations, as well as the underlying geometric evolution of the mass-inertia matrix. Keywords: Human time-dependent biomechanics, configuration manifold, jet spaces, geometric evolution

  4. Spectral and Temporal Behavior of the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1118+480 as Observed with BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frontera, F; Zdziarski, A A; Belloni, T; Del Sordo, S; Masetti, N; Orlandini, M; Palazzi, E

    2003-01-01

    XTE J1118+480 is a well established black hole candidate with a mass estimate in the range from 7 to 10 solar masses. With BeppoSAX we observed the source 4 times, from April to December 2000. Results of the firs t observation were already reported (Frontera et al. 2001). Here we report spectral results of the later observations, performed in May, June and December 2000 and compare them with the results obtained from the 2000 April observation. We observe a decrease of the column density from a value consistent with the Galactic N_H obtained from radio measurement s to a value a factor 2 lower. The spectra are well fit with a thermal Comptonization plus a blackbody model. The blackbody luminosity decreases with time, while the electron temperature of the Comptonizing electron s does not show significant changes. A Compton reflection component is apparent and stable, although weak (mean value of Omega/2pi = 0.21[-0.04,+0.05]). The reflector shows a low metallicity (mean value of Z/Zsun = 0.13[-0.04,+0.06]). On...

  5. Spectral and Temporal Behavior of the Black Hole Candidate XTE J1118+480 as Observed with BeppoSAX

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Frontera; L. Amati; A. A. Zdziarski; T. Belloni; S. Del Sordo; N. Masetti; M. Orlandini; E. Palazzi

    2003-04-14

    XTE J1118+480 is a well established black hole candidate with a mass estimate in the range from 7 to 10 solar masses. With BeppoSAX we observed the source 4 times, from April to December 2000. Results of the firs t observation were already reported (Frontera et al. 2001). Here we report spectral results of the later observations, performed in May, June and December 2000 and compare them with the results obtained from the 2000 April observation. We observe a decrease of the column density from a value consistent with the Galactic N_H obtained from radio measurement s to a value a factor 2 lower. The spectra are well fit with a thermal Comptonization plus a blackbody model. The blackbody luminosity decreases with time, while the electron temperature of the Comptonizing electron s does not show significant changes. A Compton reflection component is apparent and stable, although weak (mean value of Omega/2pi = 0.21[-0.04,+0.05]). The reflector shows a low metallicity (mean value of Z/Zsun = 0.13[-0.04,+0.06]). On the basis of the spectral results, a hot central disk appears the best scenar io for the high energy photons, while the temporal properties point to a non therma l origin of a fraction of the soft X-ray photons, likely synchrotron emission internal to the hot disk.

  6. The web-PLOP observation prioritisation system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Colin Snodgrass; Yiannis Tsapras; Rachel Street; Daniel Bramich; Keith Horne; Martin Dominik; Alasdair Allan

    2008-05-14

    We present a description of the automated system used by RoboNet to prioritise follow up observations of microlensing events to search for planets. The system keeps an up-to-date record of all public data from OGLE and MOA together with any existing RoboNet data and produces new PSPL fits whenever new data arrives. It then uses these fits to predict the current or future magnitudes of events, and selects those to observe which will maximise the probability of detecting planets for a given telescope and observing time. The system drives the RoboNet telescopes automatically based on these priorities, but it is also designed to be used interactively by human observers. The prioritisation options, such as telescope/instrument parameters, observing conditions and available time can all be controlled via a web-form, and the output target list can also be customised and sorted to show the parameters that the user desires. The interactive interface is available at http://www.artemis-uk.org/web-PLOP/

  7. Numerical Model Construction with Closed Observables

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Felix Dietrich; Gerta Köster; Hans-Joachim Bungartz

    2015-10-18

    Performing analysis, optimization and control using simulations of many-particle systems is computationally demanding when no macroscopic model for the dynamics of the variables of interest is available. In case observations on the macroscopic scale can only be produced via legacy simulator code or live experiments, finding a model for these macroscopic variables is challenging. In this paper, we employ time-lagged embedding theory to construct macroscopic numerical models from output data of a black box, such as a simulator or live experiments. Since the state space variables of the constructed, coarse model are dynamically closed and observable by an observation function, we call these variables closed observables. The approach is an online-offline procedure, as model construction from observation data is performed offline and the new model can then be used in an online phase, independent of the original. We illustrate the theoretical findings with numerical models constructed from time series of a two-dimensional ordinary differential equation system, and from the density evolution of a transport-diffusion system. Applicability is demonstrated in a real-world example, where passengers leave a train and the macroscopic model for the density flow onto the platform is constructed with our approach. If only the macroscopic variables are of interest, simulation runtimes with the numerical model are three orders of magnitude lower compared to simulations with the original fine scale model. We conclude with a brief discussion of possibilities of numerical model construction in systematic upscaling, network optimization and uncertainty quantification.

  8. Nitrogen Monitoring of West Hackberry 117 Cavern Wells.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bettin, Giorgia; Lord, David

    2015-02-01

    U.S. Strategic Petroleum Reserve (SPR) oil storage cavern West Hackberry 117 was tested under extended nitrogen monitoring following a successful mechanical integrity test in order to validate a newly developed hydrostatic column model to be used to differentiate between normal "tight" well behavior and small-leak behavior under nitrogen. High resolution wireline pressure and temperature data were collected during the test period and used in conjunction with the hydrostatic column model to predict the nitrogen/oil interface and the pressure along the entire fluid column from the bradenhead flange nominally at ground surface to bottom of brine pool. Results here and for other SPR caverns have shown that wells under long term nitrogen monitoring do not necessarily pressurize with a relative rate (P N2 /P brine) of 1. The theoretical relative pressure rate depends on the well configuration, pressure and the location of the nitrogen-oil interface and varies from well to well. For the case of WH117 the predicted rates were 0.73 for well A and 0.92 for well B. The measured relative pressurization rate for well B was consistent with the model prediction, while well A rate was found to be between 0.58-0.68. A number of possible reasons for the discrepancy between the model and measured rates of well A are possible. These include modeling inaccuracy, measurement inaccuracy or the possibility of the presence of a very small leak (below the latest calculated minimum detectable leak rate).

  9. Denoising Deterministic Time Series

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Steven P. Lalley; Andrew B. Nobel

    2006-04-21

    This paper is concerned with the problem of recovering a finite, deterministic time series from observations that are corrupted by additive, independent noise. A distinctive feature of this problem is that the available data exhibit long-range dependence and, as a consequence, existing statistical theory and methods are not readily applicable. This paper gives an analysis of the denoising problem that extends recent work of Lalley, but begins from first principles. Both positive and negative results are established. The positive results show that denoising is possible under somewhat restrictive conditions on the additive noise. The negative results show that, under more general conditions on the noise, no procedure can recover the underlying deterministic series.

  10. Fully Coupled Well Models for Fluid Injection and Production

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, Mark D.; Bacon, Diana H.; White, Signe K.; Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-08-05

    Wells are the primary engineered component of geologic sequestration systems with deep subsurface reservoirs. Wells provide a conduit for injecting greenhouse gases and producing reservoirs fluids, such as brines, natural gas, and crude oil, depending on the target reservoir. Well trajectories, well pressures, and fluid flow rates are parameters over which well engineers and operators have control during the geologic sequestration process. Current drilling practices provided well engineers flexibility in designing well trajectories and controlling screened intervals. Injection pressures and fluids can be used to purposely fracture the reservoir formation or to purposely prevent fracturing. Numerical simulation of geologic sequestration processes involves the solution of multifluid transport equations within heterogeneous geologic media. These equations that mathematically describe the flow of fluid through the reservoir formation are nonlinear in form, requiring linearization techniques to resolve. In actual geologic settings fluid exchange between a well and reservoir is a function of local pressure gradients, fluid saturations, and formation characteristics. In numerical simulators fluid exchange between a well and reservoir can be specified using a spectrum of approaches that vary from totally ignoring the reservoir conditions to fully considering reservoir conditions and well processes. Well models are a numerical simulation approach that account for local conditions and gradients in the exchange of fluids between the well and reservoir. As with the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow in the reservoir, variation in fluid properties with temperature and pressure yield nonlinearities in the mathematical equations that describe fluid flow within the well. To numerically simulate the fluid exchange between a well and reservoir the two systems of nonlinear multifluid flow equations must be resolved. The spectrum of numerical approaches for resolving these equations varies from zero coupling to full coupling. In this paper we describe a fully coupled solution approach for well model that allows for a flexible well trajectory and screened interval within a structured hexahedral computational grid. In this scheme the nonlinear well equations have been fully integrated into the Jacobian matrix for the reservoir conservation equations, minimizing the matrix bandwidth.

  11. An inventory of wells of Oak Ridge National Laboratory 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, R.M.; Gryder, R.K.; Baxter, F.P.

    1993-02-01

    The well inventory described in this report is a database of well information being developed for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Groundwater Coordinator and the ORNL Groundwater Protection Program. Data are presented on 2071 ORNL wells as maps and as tabular data. A table of well identification aliases is given to permit correlation with earlier reports. Information is incomplete for many of the wells, and a form is provided for readers to provide missing or updated data. The goal of the developers of this data base is to produce a comprehensive inventory of wells at ORNL. This data base is being maintained to provide current information for the operational management of the ORNL groundwater monitoring system and for various users of groundwater data at ORNL.

  12. Novel coiled tubing application controls large LPG storage well fire

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gebhardt, F.; Eby, D.; Barnett, D.

    1996-06-01

    Conventional well control techniques for normal oil and gas wells are widely known and have been presented on numerous occasions. However, LPG storage (or cavern) wells rarely blow out and/or catch on fire. As a result, little information has been presented on the topic of well control for these types of wells. This article chronicles a case history of a high-volume liquid propane storage well fire. Because conventional wellhead removal methods could not be applied in this case, the capping/kill plan called for use of coiled tubing in a novel manner to cut the tubing downhole and install an inflatable packer to shut off propane flow. The plan was successfully executed, saving the operator millions of dollars in LPC product loss and cost of control.

  13. Automated robotic equipment for ultrasonic inspection of pressurizer heater wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nachbar, Henry D. (Ballston Lake, NY); DeRossi, Raymond S. (Amsterdam, NY); Mullins, Lawrence E. (Middle Grove, NY)

    1993-01-01

    A robotic device for remotely inspecting pressurizer heater wells is provided which has the advantages of quickly, precisely, and reliably acquiring data at reasonable cost while also reducing radiation exposure of an operator. The device comprises a prober assembly including a probe which enters a heater well, gathers data regarding the condition of the heater well and transmits a signal carrying that data; a mounting device for mounting the probe assembly at the opening of the heater well so that the probe can enter the heater well; a first motor mounted on the mounting device for providing movement of the probe assembly in an axial direction; and a second motor mounted on the mounting device for providing rotation of the probe assembly. This arrangement enables full inspection of the heater well to be carried out.

  14. Shock chlorination is a method of disinfect-ing a water well. It is recommended when

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    system is contaminated with bacte- ria. Contamination can occur when the well is installed, when repairs is the source of bacteria, the system will be contaminated again every time water is pumped into the plumbing be disinfected. Drinking water filters, such as car- bon filters, should be temporarily disconnected or by

  15. Quantum wells on indium gallium arsenic compositionally graded buffers realized by molecular beam epitaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choy, Henry Kwong Hin, 1974-

    2005-01-01

    For a long time, there has been a desire to extend the emission wavelength of GaAs-based quantum well lasers, with the aim of eventually replacing InP with GaAs as the substrate of choice for communication applications. ...

  16. Laboratory test plan in-well vapor stripping system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J

    1994-07-01

    This test plan describes the activities that will be conducted as a part of the laboratory testing of a full-scale mockup of the Stanford in-well vapor stripping system. These tests will be conducted to delineate design parameters for the in-well vapor stripping unit and to identify and quantify variables that are sensitive to the dynamic hydraulic effects induced by operation of the system. No radioactive materials are involved in this test. In-well vapor stripping has been used successfully as an alternative to conventional pump-and-treat technology for remediation of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminated groundwater in Europe and more recently in the United States. In-well vapor stripping permits in situ remediation of VOC-contaminated groundwater by combining an in-well vapor stripping system with a treatment well is used to extract and discharge groundwater simultaneously, resulting in the establishment of a vertical circulation groundwater flow cell in the aquifer. Groundwater extracted from the aquifer via the lower screened interval is treated for VOCs by in-well vapor stripping within the treatment well. This stripping causes aqueous phase VOCs to partition preferentially into a vapor phase. Treated groundwater is discharged back to the aquifer via the upper screened interval of the treatment well, while the vapor phase VOCs are simultaneously removed from the well bore and contained at the surface with a vacuum extraction system. Groundwater entrained into the vertical circulation flow cell becomes sequentially cleaned of VOC contamination in an efficient manner without the need for surface treatment and handling of contaminated groundwater. An added benefit of in-well vapor stripping is the ability to perform vadose zone vapor extraction concurrently with groundwater remediation. This uses the vacuum extraction capabilities of the in-well vapor stripping configured with the upper screened interval placed into the vadose zone above the water table.

  17. Optical observations of GRB 060124 afterglow: A case for an injection break

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuntal Misra; D. Bhattacharya; D. K. Sahu; Ram Sagar; G. C. Anupama; A. J. Castro-Tirado; S. S. Guziy; B. C. Bhatt

    2007-01-15

    We present broad band optical afterglow observations of a long duration GRB 060124 using the 1.04-m Sampurnanand Telescope at ARIES, Nainital and the 2.01-m HCT at IAO, Hanle, including the earliest ground based observations in R band for this GRB. We determine the decay slope of the light curve at different bands and examine the reality of a proposed jet break. We use data from our observations as well as others reported in the literature to construct light curves in different bands and make power law fits to them. The spectral slope of the afterglow emission in the optical band is estimated. Our first R-band observations were taken $\\sim 0.038$~d after burst. We find that all available optical data after this epoch are well fit by a single power law, with a temporal flux decay index $\\alpha\\sim 0.94$. We do not find any evidence of a jet break within our data, which extend till $\\sim 2$~d after the burst. The X-ray light curve, however, shows a distinct break around 0.6 day. We attribute this break to a steepening of the electron energy spectrum at high energies. We conclude that the above measurements are consistent with the picture of a standard fireball evolution with no jet break within $t\\sim 2$~days after the burst. This sets a lower limit of $3\\times 10^{50}$~erg to the total energy released in the explosion.

  18. Geothermal well log interpretation state of the art. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanyal, S.K.; Wells, L.E.; Bickham, R.E.

    1980-01-01

    An in-depth study of the state of the art in Geothermal Well Log Interpretation has been made encompassing case histories, technical papers, computerized literature searches, and actual processing of geothermal wells from New Mexico, Idaho, and California. A classification scheme of geothermal reservoir types was defined which distinguishes fluid phase and temperature, lithology, geologic province, pore geometry, salinity, and fluid chemistry. Major deficiencies of Geothermal Well Log Interpretation are defined and discussed with recommendations of possible solutions or research for solutions. The Geothermal Well Log Interpretation study and report has concentrated primarily on Western US reservoirs. Geopressured geothermal reservoirs are not considered.

  19. Estimating Well Costs for Enhanced Geothermal System Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. K. Bloomfield; P. T. Laney

    2005-08-01

    The objective of the work reported was to investigate the costs of drilling and completing wells and to relate those costs to the economic viability of enhanced geothermal systems (EGS). This is part of a larger parametric study of major cost components in an EGS. The possibility of improving the economics of EGS can be determined by analyzing the major cost components of the system, which include well drilling and completion. Determining what costs in developing an EGS are most sensitive will determine the areas of research to reduce those costs. The results of the well cost analysis will help determine the cost of a well for EGS development.

  20. Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Water geochemistry study of Indian Wells Valley, Inyo and Kern Counties, California. Supplement. Isotope geochemistry and Appendix H. Final report Jump to: navigation, search...

  1. Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Controlled Source Frequency-Domain Magnetics At Salt Wells Area (Montgomery, Et Al., 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  2. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  3. Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

  4. Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Surface Indicators of Geothermal Activity at Salt Wells, Nevada, USA, Including Warm Ground, Borate Deposits, and Siliceous Alteration Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  5. 2013 strategic petroleum reserve big hill well integrity grading report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lord, David L.; Roberts, Barry L.; Lord, Anna C. Snider; Bettin, Giorgia; Sobolik, Steven Ronald; Park, Byoung Yoon; Rudeen, David Keith; Eldredge, Lisa; Wynn, Karen; Checkai, Dean; Perry, James Thomas

    2014-02-01

    This report summarizes the work performed in developing a framework for the prioritization of cavern access wells for remediation and monitoring at the Big Hill Strategic Petroleum Reserve site. This framework was then applied to all 28 wells at the Big Hill site with each well receiving a grade for remediation and monitoring. Numerous factors affecting well integrity were incorporated into the grading framework including casing survey results, cavern pressure history, results from geomechanical simulations, and site geologic factors. The framework was developed in a way as to be applicable to all four of the Strategic Petroleum Reserve sites.

  6. BOREHOLE PRECONDITIONING OF GEOTHERMAL WELLS FOR ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to precondition a well to optimize fracturing and production during Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) reservoir development. A finite element model was developed for the fully...

  7. Mergers and Mass Accretion for Infalling Halos Both End Well...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Halos Both End Well Outside Cluster Virial Radii Authors: Behroozi, Peter S. ; Baltimore, Space Telescope Sci. Stanford U., Phys. Dept. SLAC KIPAC, Menlo Park ; Wechsler,...

  8. Wells Public Utilities- Residential Energy Efficiency Rebate Program

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    SMMPA develops innovative products and services to help them deliver value to customers. With help from SMMPA, Wells Public Utilities provides incentives for residential and commercial customers ...

  9. Symmetry Lowering in Extreme-Electron-Density Perovskite Quantum Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jack Y.; Hwang, Jinwoo; Raghavan, Santosh; Stemmer, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    in Extreme-Electron-Density Perovskite Quantum Wells Jack Y.in the ideal cubic perovskite structure. The insulatingan orthorhombic distorted perovskite (space group Pnma [17])

  10. Interface-induced magnetism in perovskite quantum wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jackson, Clayton A; Stemmer, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    INDUCED MAGNETISM IN PEROVSKITE . . . PHYSICAL REVIEW B 88,induced magnetism in perovskite quantum wells Clayton A.structures. A prototypical perovskite heterostructure is

  11. Method for determining formation quality factor from well log...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    determining formation quality factor from well log data and its application to seismic reservoir characterization Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Method for...

  12. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  13. ,"New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)",1,"Annual",2014 ,"Release...

  14. In-well vapor stripping drilling and characterization work plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koegler, K.J.

    1994-03-13

    This work plan provides the information necessary for drilling, sampling, and hydrologic testing of wells to be completed in support of a demonstration of the in-well vapor stripping system. The in-well vapor stripping system is a remediation technology designed to preferentially extract volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from contaminated groundwater by converting them to a vapor phase. Air-lift pumping is used to lift and aerate groundwater within the well. The volatiles escaping the aerated water are drawn off by a slight vacuum and treated at the surface while the water is allowed to infiltrate the vadose zone back to the watertable.

  15. Development Wells At Fenton Hill HDR Geothermal Area (Dreesen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    required to support a commercial power plant. Initial attempts to connect the two wells by hydraulic pressure-stimulation in 1982 were unsuccessful. Efforts to produce a...

  16. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Fluid...

  17. Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy: Interpretation of New Wells in the Coso Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  18. Lithologic Descriptions and Temperature Profiles of Five Wells...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wells in the Southwestern Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico Abstract The subsurface stratigraphy and temperature profiles of the southern and western Valles caldera region have...

  19. Vital Elements Score Comments Introduction/Motivation: Well defined &

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ito, Garrett

    Evaluator: Vital Elements Score Comments · Introduction/Motivation: Well defined & motivated: Resounding, memorable, & address objectives Vital Elements Total Presentation Mechanics · Clarity

  20. Statistical criteria for characterizing irradiance time series.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stein, Joshua S.; Ellis, Abraham; Hansen, Clifford W.

    2010-10-01

    We propose and examine several statistical criteria for characterizing time series of solar irradiance. Time series of irradiance are used in analyses that seek to quantify the performance of photovoltaic (PV) power systems over time. Time series of irradiance are either measured or are simulated using models. Simulations of irradiance are often calibrated to or generated from statistics for observed irradiance and simulations are validated by comparing the simulation output to the observed irradiance. Criteria used in this comparison should derive from the context of the analyses in which the simulated irradiance is to be used. We examine three statistics that characterize time series and their use as criteria for comparing time series. We demonstrate these statistics using observed irradiance data recorded in August 2007 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and in June 2009 in Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  1. Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyzin, Leonid

    Physically Observable Cryptography Silvio Micali Leonid Reyzin November 29, 2003 Abstract.) inherent in the physical execution of any cryptographic algorithm. Such "physical observation attacks mathematically impregnable systems. The great practicality and the inherent availability of physical attacks

  2. World-line observables and clocks in General Relativity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hossein Farajollahi

    2005-11-20

    A proposal for the issue of time and observables in any parameterized theory such as general relativity is addressed. Introduction of a gauge potential 3-form A in the theory of relativity enables us to define a gauge-invariant quantity which can be used by observers as a clock to measure the passage of time. This dynamical variable increases monotonically and continuously along a world line. Then we define world line observables to be any covariantly defined quantity obtained from the field configurations on any such causal past with dynamical time T.

  3. Initiation time of near-infrared laser-induced slip on the surface of silicon wafers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Choi, Sungho [Graduate School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133–791 (Korea, Republic of); Jhang, Kyung-Young, E-mail: kyjhang@hanyang.ac.kr [School of Mechanical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul 133–791 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-23

    We have determined the initiation time of laser-induced slip on a silicon wafer surface subjected to a near-infrared continuous-wave laser by numerical simulations and experiments. First, numerical analysis was performed based on the heat transfer and thermoelasticity model to calculate the resolved shear stress and the temperature-dependent yield stress. Slip initiation time was predicted by finding the time at which the resolved shear stress reached the yield stress. Experimentally, the slip initiation time was measured by using a laser scattering technique that collects scattered light from the silicon wafer surface and detects strong scattering when the surface slip is initiated. The surface morphology of the silicon wafer surface after laser irradiation was also observed using an optical microscope to confirm the occurrence of slip. The measured slip initiation times agreed well with the numerical predictions.

  4. Pulsar-Wind Nebulae: Recent Progress in Observations and Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kargaltsev, Oleg; Lyubarsky, Yuri; Striani, Edoardo

    2015-01-01

    In this review we describe recent observational and theoretical developments in our understanding of pulsar winds and pulsar-wind nebulae (PWNe). We put special emphasis on the results from observations of well-characterized PWNe of various types (e.g., torus-jet and bowshock-tail), the most recent MHD modeling efforts, and the status of the flaring Crab PWN puzzle.

  5. MEASUREMENT OF COMPRESSIONAL-WAVE SEISMIC VELOCITIES IN 29 WELLS AT THE HANFORD SITE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PETERSON SW

    2010-10-08

    Check shot seismic velocity surveys were collected in 100 B/C, 200 East, 200-PO-1 Operational Unit (OU), and the Gable Gap areas in order to provide time-depth correlation information to aid the interpretation of existing seismic reflection data acquired at the Hanford Site (Figure 1). This report details results from 5 wells surveyed in fiscal year (FY) 2008, 7 wells in FY 2009, and 17 wells in FY 2010 and provides summary compressional-wave seismic velocity information to help guide future seismic survey design as well as improve current interpretations of the seismic data (SSC 1979/1980; SGW-39675; SGW-43746). Augmenting the check shot database are four surveys acquired in 2007 in support of the Bechtel National, Inc. Waste Treatment Plant construction design (PNNL-16559, PNNL-16652), and check shot surveys in three wells to support seismic testing in the 200 West Area (Waddell et al., 1999). Additional sonic logging was conducted during the late 1970s and early 1980s as part of the Basalt Waste Isolation Program (BWIP) (SSC 1979/1980) and check shot/sonic surveys as part of the safety report for the Skagit/Hanford Nuclear project (RDH/10-AMCP-0164). Check shot surveys are used to obtain an in situ measure of compressional-wave seismic velocity for sediment and rock in the vicinity of the well point, and provide the seismic-wave travel time to geologic horizons of interest. The check shot method deploys a downhole seismic receiver (geophone) to record the arrival of seismic waves generated by a source at the ground surface. The travel time of the first arriving seismic-wave is determined and used to create a time-depth function to correlate encountered geologic intervals with the seismic data. This critical tie with the underlying geology improves the interpretation of seismic reflection profile information. Fieldwork for this investigation was conducted by in house staff during the weeks of September 22, 2008 for 5 wells in the 200 East Area (Figure 2); June 1, 2009 for 7 wells in the 200-PO-1 OU and Gable Gap regions (see Figure 3 and Figure 4); and March 22, 2010 and April 19, 2010 for 17 wells in the 200 East, The initial scope of survey work was planned for Wells 299-EI8-1, 699-2-E14, 699-12-18, 699-16-51, 699-42-30, 699-53-55B, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B. Well 299-E18-1 could not be entered due to bent casing (prevented removal of the pump), wells 699-12-18 and 699-42-30 could not be safely reached by the logging truck, Well 699-16-51 was decommissioned prior to survey start, Well 699-53-55B did not have its pump pulled, and Wells 699-2-EI4, 699-54-18D, and 699-84-34B are artesian and capped with an igloo structure. Table 1 provides a list of wells that were surveyed and Figure 1 through Figure 5 show the well locations relative to the Hanford Site.

  6. Interband magneto-spectroscopy in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kasturiarachchi, T.; Edirisooriya, M.; Mishima, T. D.; Doezema, R. E.; Santos, M. B.; Saha, D.; Pan, X.; Sanders, G. D.; Stanton, C. J.

    2015-06-07

    We measure the magneto-optical absorption due to intersubband optical transitions between conduction and valence subband Landau levels in InSb square and parabolic quantum wells. InSb has the narrowest band gap (0.24?eV at low temperature) of the III–V semiconductors leading to a small effective mass (0.014 m{sub 0}) and a large g–factor (?51). As a result, the Landau level spacing is large at relatively small magnetic fields (<8?T), and one can observe spin-splitting of the Landau levels. We examine two structures: (i) a multiple-square-well structure and (ii) a structure containing multiple parabolic wells. The energies and intensities of the strongest features are well explained by a modified Pidgeon-Brown model based on an 8-band k•p model that explicitly incorporates pseudomorphic strain. The strain is essential for obtaining agreement between theory and experiment. While modeling the square well is relatively straight-forward, the parabolic well consists of 43 different layers of various thickness to approximate a parabolic potential. Agreement between theory and experiment for the parabolic well validates the applicability of the model to complicated structures, which demonstrates the robustness of our model and confirms its relevance for developing electronic and spintronic devices that seek to exploit the properties of the InSb band structure.

  7. Robust Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring (HFM) of Multiple Time Overlapping Events Using a Generalized Discrete Radon Transform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ely, Gregory

    2013-01-01

    In this work we propose a novel algorithm for multiple-event localization for Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring (HFM) through the exploitation of the sparsity of the observed seismic signal when represented in a basis consisting of space time propagators. We provide explicit construction of these propagators using a forward model for wave propagation which depends non-linearly on the problem parameters - the unknown source location and mechanism of fracture, time and extent of event, and the locations of the receivers. Under fairly general assumptions and an appropriate discretization of these parameters we first build an over-complete dictionary of generalized Radon propagators and assume that the data is well represented as a linear superposition of these propagators. Exploiting this structure we propose sparsity penalized algorithms and workflow for super-resolution extraction of time overlapping multiple seismic events from single well data.

  8. Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beckhaus, Steffi

    Slow technology for well-being Steffi Beckhaus IAD - Technical University of Darmstadt interactiondesign@steffi.beckhaus.de ABSTRACT Slow technology is technology that actively influences our well): Miscellaneous General Terms Slow Technology SLOW TECHNOLOGY IS... Slow technology is technology that actively

  9. Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    1 Improved Efficiency of Oil Well Drilling through Case Based Reasoning Paal Skalle Norwegian drilling, has been developed in cooperation with an oil company. From several reoccurring problems during oil well drilling the problem of "lost circulation", i.e. loss of circulating drilling fluid

  10. KNOWLEDGE-BASED DECISION SUPPORT IN OIL WELL DRILLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    KNOWLEDGE-BASED DECISION SUPPORT IN OIL WELL DRILLING Combining general and case-specific knowledge of Computer and Information Science. agnar.aamodt@idi.ntnu.no Abstract: Oil well drilling is a complex process for information handling, decision-making, and on-the-job learning for drilling personnel in their daily working

  11. STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS BASED ON STATE ESTIMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    oil and gas from wells with low reservoir pressure by reducing the hydrostatic pressure in the tubing.imsland bjarne.foss}@itk.ntnu.no Abstract: This paper treats stabilization of multiphase flow in a gas lifted oil well. Two different controllers are investigated, PI control using the estimated downhole pressure

  12. STABILIZATION OF GAS LIFTED WELLS Gisle Otto Eikrem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foss, Bjarne A.

    the system at low downhole pressures. The structure which stabilizes the system at the lowest downhole is a technology to produce from wells with low reservoir pressure by reducing the hydrostatic pressure, e-mail: (hubin mgolan)@ipt.ntnu.no Abstract: Increased production from gas lifted oil wells can

  13. Magnetoresistance oscillations in triple quantum wells under microwave irradiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusev, Guennady

    to the ``photovoltaic'' mechanism describing combined action of the microwave and dc fields on both temporal and angular 1011 cmÀ2 Þ and a mobility of 5 Â 105 cm2 =V s. The central well width is 230 °A and both side wells

  14. Well Productivity Enhancement of High Temperature Heterogeneous Carbonate Reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Guanqun

    2014-05-08

    . Uneven acid distribution always results in productivity enhancement under expectation. When such a well is drilled, the temperature of the well could be too high to keep the acid reaction under control. The acid used in the treatment fluid, most commonly...

  15. Compatibility of monitor well completion methods with geologic conditions 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ten Wolde, Eric Jozef

    1996-01-01

    Proper completion of a well is essential to the protection of ground-water resources. Selecting a proper material for the annular seal should be based on the geologic conditions at the well site. Previous studies have not adequately linked annular...

  16. Coherent control of atomic spin currents in a double well

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Shih-I; Ng, H. T.

    2012-02-27

    We propose a method for controlling the atomic currents of a two-component Bose-Einstein condensate in a double well by applying an external field to the atoms in one of the potential wells. We study the ground-state properties of the system...

  17. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nardi, Anthony P. (Burlington, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting a resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  18. Resonant acoustic transducer system for a well drilling string

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kent, William H. (Westford, MA); Mitchell, Peter G. (Concord, MA)

    1981-01-01

    For use in transmitting acoustic waves propagated along a well drilling string, a piezoelectric transducer is provided operating in the relatively low loss acoustic propagation range of the well drilling string. The efficiently coupled transmitting transducer incorporates a mass-spring-piezoelectric transmitter combination permitting resonant operation in the desired low frequency range.

  19. Applications of CBR in oil well drilling "A general overview"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aamodt, Agnar

    in drilling operations indicates that this is a potential method to reduce cost of drilling, and increase drilling of an oil well is also an expensive operation, costing typically 250,000 US$ per day per rigApplications of CBR in oil well drilling "A general overview" Samad Valipour Shokouhi1,3 , Agnar

  20. Quantum Dynamical Effects as a Singular Perturbation for Observables in Open Quasi-Classical Nonlinear Mesoscopic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gennady P. Berman; Fausto Borgonovi; Diego A. R. Dalvit

    2008-01-29

    We review our results on a mathematical dynamical theory for observables for open many-body quantum nonlinear bosonic systems for a very general class of Hamiltonians. We show that non-quadratic (nonlinear) terms in a Hamiltonian provide a singular "quantum" perturbation for observables in some "mesoscopic" region of parameters. In particular, quantum effects result in secular terms in the dynamical evolution, that grow in time. We argue that even for open quantum nonlinear systems in the deep quasi-classical region, these quantum effects can survive after decoherence and relaxation processes take place. We demonstrate that these quantum effects in open quantum systems can be observed, for example, in the frequency Fourier spectrum of the dynamical observables, or in the corresponding spectral density of noise. Estimates are presented for Bose-Einstein condensates, low temperature mechanical resonators, and nonlinear optical systems prepared in large amplitude coherent states. In particular, we show that for Bose-Einstein condensate systems the characteristic time of deviation of quantum dynamics for observables from the corresponding classical dynamics coincides with the characteristic time-scale of the well-known quantum nonlinear effect of phase diffusion.

  1. Quantum Anomalous Hall Effect in Hg_1-yMn_yTe Quantum Wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chao-Xing; /Tsinghua U., Beijing /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Qi, Xiao-Liang; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; /Beijing, Inst. Phys.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-19

    The quantum Hall effect is usually observed when the two-dimensional electron gas is subjected to an external magnetic field, so that their quantum states form Landau levels. In this work we predict that a new phenomenon, the quantum anomalous Hall effect, can be realized in Hg{sub 1-y}Mn{sub y}Te quantum wells, without the external magnetic field and the associated Landau levels. This effect arises purely from the spin polarization of the Mn atoms, and the quantized Hall conductance is predicted for a range of quantum well thickness and the concentration of the Mn atoms. This effect enables dissipationless charge current in spintronics devices.

  2. Optical spectroscopy of quantum confined states in GaAs/AlGaAs quantum well tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Teng; Fickenscher, Melodie; Smith, Leigh; Jackson, Howard; Yarrison-Rice, Jan; Gao, Qiang; Tan, Hoe; Jagadish, Chennupati; Etheridge, Joanne; Wong, Bryan M.

    2013-12-04

    We have investigated the quantum confinement of electronic states in GaAs/Al{sub x}Ga{sub 1?x}As nanowire heterostructures which contain radial GaAs quantum wells of either 4nm or 8nm. Photoluminescence and photoluminescence excitation spectroscopy are performed on single nanowires. We observed emission and excitation of electron and hole confined states. Numerical calculations of the quantum confined states using the detailed structural information on the quantum well tubes show excellent agreement with these optical results.

  3. Magnetic Semiconductor Quantum Wells in High Fields to 60 Tesla: Photoluminescence Linewidth Annealing at Magnetization Steps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Awschalom, D.D.; Crooker, S.A.; Lyo, S.K.; Rickel, D.G.; Samarth, N.

    1999-05-24

    Magnetic semiconductors offer a unique possibility for strongly tuning the intrinsic alloy disorder potential with applied magnetic field. We report the direct observation of a series of step-like reductions in the magnetic alloy disorder potential in single ZnSe/Zn(Cd,Mn)Se quantum wells between O and 60 Tesla. This disorder, measured through the linewidth of low temperature photoluminescence spectra drops abruptly at -19, 36, and 53 Tesla, in concert with observed magnetization steps. Conventional models of alloy disorder (developed for nonmagnetic semiconductors) reproduce the general shape of the data, but markedly underestimate the size of the linewidth reduction.

  4. Dewatering of coalbed methane wells with hydraulic gas pump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amani, M.; Juvkam-Wold, H.C.

    1995-12-31

    The coalbed methane industry has become an important source of natural gas production. Proper dewatering of coalbed methane (CBM) wells is the key to efficient gas production from these reservoirs. This paper presents the Hydraulic Gas Pump as a new alternative dewatering system for CBM wells. The Hydraulic Gas Pump (HGP) concept offers several operational advantages for CBM wells. Gas interference does not affect its operation. It resists solids damage by eliminating the lift mechanism and reducing the number of moving parts. The HGP has a flexible production rate and is suitable for all production phases of CBM wells. It can also be designed as a wireline retrievable system. We conclude that the Hydraulic Gas Pump is a suitable dewatering system for coalbed methane wells.

  5. Helicopter Surveys for Locating Wells and Leaking Oilfield Infrastructure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hammack, R.W.; Veloski, G.A.; Hodges, G. (Fugro Airborne Surveys)

    2006-10-01

    Prior to the injection of CO2 into geological formations, either for enhanced oil recovery or for CO2 sequestration, it is necessary to locate wells that perforate the target formation and are within the radius of influence for planned injection wells. Locating and plugging wells is necessary because improperly plugged well bores provide the most rapid route for CO2 escape to the surface. This paper describes the implementation and evaluation of helicopter and ground-based well detection strategies at a 100+ year old oilfield in Wyoming where a CO2 flood is planned. This project was jointly funded by the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory and Fugro Airborne Surveys

  6. Effect of exciton oscillator strength on upconversion photoluminescence in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kojima, Osamu, E-mail: kojima@phoenix.kobe-u.ac.jp; Okumura, Shouhei; Kita, Takashi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai, Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Akahane, Kouichi [National Institute of Information and Communications Technology, 4-2-1 Nukui-kitamachi, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8795 (Japan)

    2014-11-03

    We report upconversion photoluminescence (UCPL) in GaAs/AlAs multiple quantum wells. UCPL from the AlAs barrier is caused by the resonant excitation of the excitons in the GaAs well. When the quantum well has sufficient miniband width, UCPL is hardly observed because of the small exciton oscillator strength. The excitation-energy and excitation-density dependences of UCPL intensity show the exciton resonant profile and a linear increase, respectively. These results demonstrate that the observed UCPL caused by the saturated two-step excitation process requires a large number of excitons.

  7. General relativistic observables of the GRAIL mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turyshev, Slava G; Sazhin, Mikhail V

    2012-01-01

    We present a realization of astronomical relativistic reference frames in the solar system and its application to the GRAIL mission. We model the necessary spacetime coordinate transformations for light-trip time computations and address some practical aspects of the implementation of the resulting model. We develop all the relevant relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of the GRAIL spacecraft and to compute all observable quantities. We take into account major relativistic effects contributing to the dual one-way range observable, which is derived from one-way signal travel times between the two GRAIL spacecraft. We develop a general relativistic model for this fundamental observable of GRAIL, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m. We develop and present a relativistic model for another key observable of this experiment, the dual one-way range-rate, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m/s. The presented formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRAIL mission. It may also be ...

  8. General relativistic observables of the GRAIL mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slava G. Turyshev; Viktor T. Toth; Mikhail V. Sazhin

    2012-12-18

    We present a realization of astronomical relativistic reference frames in the solar system and its application to the GRAIL mission. We model the necessary spacetime coordinate transformations for light-trip time computations and address some practical aspects of the implementation of the resulting model. We develop all the relevant relativistic coordinate transformations that are needed to describe the motion of the GRAIL spacecraft and to compute all observable quantities. We take into account major relativistic effects contributing to the dual one-way range observable, which is derived from one-way signal travel times between the two GRAIL spacecraft. We develop a general relativistic model for this fundamental observable of GRAIL, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m. We develop and present a relativistic model for another key observable of this experiment, the dual one-way range-rate, accurate to 1 $\\mu$m/s. The presented formulation justifies the basic assumptions behind the design of the GRAIL mission. It may also be used to further improve the already impressive results of this lunar gravity recovery experiment after the mission is complete. Finally, we present transformation rules for frequencies and gravitational potentials and their application to GRAIL.

  9. State observer for synchronous motors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lang, Jeffrey H. (Waltham, MA)

    1994-03-22

    A state observer driven by measurements of phase voltages and currents for estimating the angular orientation of a rotor of a synchronous motor such as a variable reluctance motor (VRM). Phase voltages and currents are detected and serve as inputs to a state observer. The state observer includes a mathematical model of the electromechanical operation of the synchronous motor. The characteristics of the state observer are selected so that the observer estimates converge to the actual rotor angular orientation and velocity, winding phase flux linkages or currents.

  10. New design of a guidelineless horizontal tree for deepwater ESP wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olijnik, L.A.; Vigesa, S.; Paula, M.T.R.; Figueiredo, M.W. de; Rutherford, H.W.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents the new design of a horizontal tree for deepwater installation, as a key piece of equipment for application of a Electrical Submersible Pump in Subsea Wells. The production from subsea wells equipped with ESPs is a reality since October/94 with the first installation in Campos Basin. The horizontal tree adds simplicity to workover operations expected to be two to three times more frequency when compared to natural flow or gas lifted wells. The design and fabrication of the deepwater horizontal tree is a result of a Technological Cooperation Agreement. The design incorporates new solutions, mainly in diverless guidelineless connection of power cables and flowlines using the vertical connection system. The guidelineless horizontal subsea tree is fully prepared to be integrated on the new manifolds being designed for the Brazilian deepwater oilfields. The applications of the horizontal trees in subsea ESP wells reduce intervention cost, increasing economical attractiveness and scenarios for the applications of this new boosting technology.

  11. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  12. Study of Flow Regimes in Multiply-Fractured Horizontal Wells in Tight Gas and Shale Gas Reservoir Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freeman, Craig M.

    2010-07-14

    Various analytical, semi-analytical, and empirical models have been proposed to characterize rate and pressure behavior as a function of time in tight/shale gas systems featuring a horizontal well with multiple hydraulic fractures. Despite a small...

  13. Time-resolved energy transfer from single chloride-terminated nanocrystals to graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ajayi, O. A. E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; Wong, C. W. E-mail: cww2104@columbia.edu; Anderson, N. C.; Wolcott, A.; Owen, J. S.; Cotlet, M.; Petrone, N.; Hone, J.; Gu, T.; Gesuele, F.

    2014-04-28

    We examine the time-resolved resonance energy transfer of excitons from single n-butyl amine-bound, chloride-terminated nanocrystals to two-dimensional graphene through time-correlated single photon counting. The radiative biexponential lifetime kinetics and blinking statistics of the individual surface-modified nanocrystal elucidate the non-radiative decay channels. Blinking modification as well as a 4× reduction in spontaneous emission were observed with the short chloride and n-butylamine ligands, probing the energy transfer pathways for the development of graphene-nanocrystal nanophotonic devices.

  14. Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, Thomas M. (San Francisco, CA)

    1998-01-01

    A method of synthesis for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well (26) in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well (26) includes at least one orifice (74) extending into the well (26), and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well (26) to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of B) expelling the reagent solution from the well (26), while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit (80) of the orifice (74) exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well (26) through the orifice exit (80).

  15. Method for polymer synthesis in a reaction well

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brennan, T.M.

    1998-09-29

    A method of synthesis is described for building a polymer chain, oligonucleotides in particular, by sequentially adding monomer units to at least one solid support for growing and immobilizing a polymer chain thereon in a liquid reagent solution. The method includes the step of: (A) depositing a liquid reagent in a reaction well in contact with at least one solid support and at least one monomer unit of the polymer chain affixed to the solid support. The well includes at least one orifice extending into the well, and is of a size and dimension to form a capillary liquid seal to retain the reagent solution in the well to enable polymer chain growth on the solid support. The method further includes the step of (B) expelling the reagent solution from the well, while retaining the polymer chain therein. This is accomplished by applying a first gas pressure to the reaction well such that a pressure differential between the first gas pressure and a second gas pressure exerted on an exit of the orifice exceeds a predetermined amount sufficient to overcome the capillary liquid seal and expel the reagent solution from the well through the orifice exit. 9 figs.

  16. Predicting multiphase flow behavior in a deviated well

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hasan, A.R. (Univ. of North Dakota (US)); Kabir, C.S. (Schlumberger Well Services (US))

    1988-11-01

    In deviated wells of an offshore producing environment, flow of two- or three-phase mixtures is invariably encountered. While many investigators have studied vertical multiphase flow behavior, few studies, often entirely empirical, deal with deviated well systems. The main objective of this work is to present a model that predicts both flow regime and pressure gradient in a deviated wellbore. In the modeling of flow-pattern transition and void fraction, an approach similar to that for vertical flow is taken; i.e., four principal flow regimes are recognized: bubbly, slug, churn, and annular. The transition form bubbly to slug flow is found to be at a local void fraction of 0.25. This transition criterion in terms of gas and liquid superficial velocities is found to be significantly affected by the well deviation, particularly in highly deviated wells. The transitions from slug to churn flow and churn to annular flow occur at high fluid velocities and are unaffected by well deviation. The velocity-profile-distribution parameter for bubbly, slug, and churn flows is found to be unaffected by the well deviation angle. Similarly, the terminal rise velocity for small bubbles also appears to be insignificantly affected by the well deviation. In contrast, the ''Taylor'' bubble-rise velocity changes dramatically as deviation angle is increased. Thus, the characters of slug and churn flows in a deviated well differ from those in a vertical well. Data on gas void fraction were obtained both from a 5-in. (127-mm) circular pipe and from annular flow channels for deviation angles up to 32/sup 0/ from the vertical. The validity of the proposed model is demonstrated with these data and with laboratory data from other sources. Several field examples are presented to show the application of the model.

  17. Predicting horizontal well performance in solution-gas drive reservoirs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plahn, Sheldon Von

    1986-01-01

    University Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Richard A. Star tzman Drilling horizontal wells to accelerate the recovery of oil is an old idea, but the practice was not widespread. Due to r ecent improvements in drilling technology, interest in drilling... permeability on hoi izontal 33 well pe formance INTRODUCTION Ba~cc~rLiiI The idea of dr illing horizontal wells to accelei ate the recovery of oil dates back to the 1940's. But, due to a lack of reliable directional drilling techniques and a relatively...

  18. Pulsed rectifier limitations for well casing cathodic protection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dabkowski, J. [Electro Sciences, Inc., Crystal Lake, IL (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Rectifier current pulses applied to deep well casings suffer considerable waveform deterioration as well depth increases. Cathodic protection (CP) attributed to the use of a pulsed rectifier will not be effective below a certain depth, which is a function of pulse characteristics and soil resistivity. A hypothetical 3,000-m length well casing is modeled as a distributed lossy electrical transmission line. Below 300- to 500-m depths, the higher frequency of the pulse is severely attenuated. Therefore, the CP process results at greater depths will not differ significantly from those obtained with a nonpulsed DC rectifier.

  19. THE BENEFITS OF VLBI ASTROMETRY TO PULSAR TIMING ARRAY SEARCHES FOR GRAVITATIONAL RADIATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Madison, D. R.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M.

    2013-11-10

    Precision astrometry is an integral component of successful pulsar timing campaigns. Astrometric parameters are commonly derived by fitting them as parameters of a timing model to a series of pulse times of arrival (TOAs). TOAs measured to microsecond precision over spans of several years can yield position measurements with sub-milliarcsecond precision. However, timing-based astrometry can become biased if a pulsar displays any red spin noise or a red signal produced by the stochastic gravitational wave background. We investigate how noise of different spectral types is absorbed by timing models, leading to significant estimation biases in the astrometric parameters. We find that commonly used techniques for fitting timing models in the presence of red noise (Cholesky whitening) prevent the absorption of noise into the timing model remarkably well if the time baseline of observations exceeds several years, but are inadequate for dealing with shorter pulsar data sets. Independent of timing, pulsar-optimized very long baseline interferometry (VLBI) is capable of providing position estimates precise to the sub-milliarcsecond levels needed for high-precision timing. In order to make VLBI astrometric parameters useful in pulsar timing models, the transformation between the International Celestial Reference Frame (ICRF) and the dynamical solar system ephemeris used for pulsar timing must be constrained to within a few microarcseconds. We compute a transformation between the ICRF and pulsar timing frames and quantitatively discuss how the transformation will improve in coming years. We find that incorporating VLBI astrometry into the timing models of pulsars for which only a couple of years of timing data exist will lead to more realistic assessments of red spin noise and could enhance the amplitude of gravitational wave signatures in post-fit timing residuals by factors of 20 or more.

  20. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and OilPublictearing

  1. Observation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration wouldMass mapSpeeding access to scienceSpeedingLightweight MaterialsGas and

  2. Observation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding accessby aLEDSpeeding accessSpeeding access

  3. Transient well testing in two-phase geothermal reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aydelotte, S.R.

    1980-03-01

    A study of well test analysis techniques in two-phase geothermal reservoirs has been conducted using a three-dimensional, two-phase, wellbore and reservoir simulation model. Well tests from Cerro Prieto and the Hawaiian Geothermal project have been history matched. Using these well tests as a base, the influence of reservoir permeability, porosity, thickness, and heat capacity, along with flow rate and fracturing were studied. Single and two-phase transient well test equations were used to analyze these tests with poor results due to rapidly changing fluid properties and inability to calculate the flowing steam saturation in the reservoir. The injection of cold water into the reservoir does give good data from which formation properties can be calculated.

  4. Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Chemistry of spring and well waters on Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii, and vicinity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Chemistry of spring...

  5. Predicting proppant flowback from fracture-stimulated wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Canon Moreno, Javier Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    In this thesis, the usefulness and benefits of predicting proppant flowback in the design stage of hydraulic fracturing treatments are evidenced. A new prediction model, as well as a methodology, is proposed in this work. ...

  6. Technical, economic and risk analysis of multilateral wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arcos Rueda, Dulce Maria

    2009-05-15

    . The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to assist engineers in the decision making process of maximizing access to reserves. The process encompasses technical, economic and risk analysis of various alternatives in the completion of a well...

  7. Midcontinent well operators learn advantages of coiled-tubing techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lyle, D.

    1995-07-01

    From well cleanup to velocity strings to squeeze jobs, more Midcontinent operators are adding coiled-tubing methods to their oilfield techniques. The advantages of these techniques are discussed.

  8. Development Wells At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Suemnicht...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Diablo field between 1993 and 1995 prompted the construction of the Basalt Canyon Pipeline later in 2005 to support the MP-I plant with additional fluids from wells 57-22 and...

  9. Electrode wells for powerline-frequency electrical heating of soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buettner, Harley M. (Livermore, CA); Daily, William D. (Livermore, CA); Aines, Roger D. (Livermore, CA); Newmark, Robin L. (Livermore, CA); Ramirez, Abelardo L. (Pleasanton, CA); Siegel, William H. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01

    An electrode well for use in powerline-frequency heating of soils for decontamination of the soil. Heating of soils enables the removal of volatile organic compounds from soil when utilized in combination with vacuum extraction. A preferred embodiment of the electrode well utilizes a mild steel pipe as the current-carrying conductor to at least one stainless steel electrode surrounded by a conductive backfill material, preferably graphite or steel shot. A covering is also provided for electrically insulating the current-carrying pipe. One of the electrode wells is utilized with an extraction well which is under subatmospheric pressure to withdraw the volatile material, such as gasoline and trichioroethylene (TCE) as it is heated.

  10. Seismic Signal Processing for Single Well Imaging Applications 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walsh, Brendan

    2007-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the concept of Single Well Imaging (SWI) in which a seismic source and receivers are deployed in a borehole to investigate the surrounding geology. The Uniwell project (1997-1999) was the first ...

  11. Simulation studies of waterflood performance with horizontal wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferreira, Horacio

    1995-01-01

    Two-and three-dimensional simulation studies have been carried out to evaluate waterflood oil recovery in a 40-acre 5-spot pattern using horizontal and vertical well systems. The three-dimensional simulation results indicate that the parameters...

  12. Catalytic destruction of groundwater contaminants in reactive extraction wells

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McNab, Jr., Walt W. (Concord, CA); Reinhard, Martin (Stanford, CA)

    2002-01-01

    A system for remediating groundwater contaminated with halogenated solvents, certain metals and other inorganic species based on catalytic reduction reactions within reactive well bores. The groundwater treatment uses dissolved hydrogen as a reducing agent in the presence of a metal catalyst, such a palladium, to reduce halogenated solvents (as well as other substituted organic compounds) to harmless species (e.g., ethane or methane) and immobilize certain metals to low valence states. The reactive wells function by removing water from a contaminated water-bearing zone, treating contaminants with a well bore using catalytic reduction, and then reinjecting the treated effluent into an adjacent water-bearing zone. This system offers the advantages of a compact design with a minimal surface footprint (surface facilities) and the destruction of a broad suite of contaminants without generating secondary waste streams.

  13. The Performance of Fractured Horizontal Well in Tight Gas Reservoir 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lin, Jiajing

    2012-02-14

    Horizontal wells have been used to increase reservoir recovery, especially in unconventional reservoirs, and hydraulic fracturing has been applied to further extend the contact with the reservoir to increase the efficiency of development...

  14. The Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS) How-To Guide Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  15. Transient and Pseudosteady-State Productivity of Hydraulically Fractured Well 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lumban Gaol, Ardhi

    2012-10-19

    Numerical simulation method is used in this work to solve the problem of transient and pseudosteady-state flow of fluid in a rectangular reservoir with impermeable boundaries. Development and validation of the numerical solution for various well-fracture...

  16. Acoustic measurement of the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well flow rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Camilli, Richard

    On May 31, 2010, a direct acoustic measurement method was used to quantify fluid leakage rate from the Deepwater Horizon Macondo well prior to removal of its broken riser. This method utilized an acoustic imaging sonar and ...

  17. Development and application of a transient well index 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yildiz, Tabiat Tan

    2001-01-01

    In integrated reservoir studies flow simulation models are created with the goal of honoring diverse static and dynamic data types. If well test data are available, an integrated model should aim to honor these data. However, finite difference...

  18. A Diffusion Study of the Federally Mandated School Wellness Policy 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harriger, Dinah Jane

    2012-10-19

    review to organize and analyze the current literature on SWP implementation. The third manuscript presented a qualitative case study of one local school district's experience implementing the School Wellness Policy. Interviewing school personnel...

  19. U.S. Geothermal Completes Second Successful Production Well at...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    U.S. Geothermal Completes Second Successful Production Well at Neal Hot Springs Project Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: U.S. Geothermal...

  20. Electrode wells for powerline-frequency electrical heating of soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buettner, H.M.; Daily, W.D.; Aines, R.D.; Newmark, R.L.; Ramirez, A.L.; Siegel, W.H.

    1999-05-25

    An electrode well is described for use in powerline-frequency heating of soils for decontamination of the soil. Heating of soils enables the removal of volatile organic compounds from soil when utilized in combination with vacuum extraction. A preferred embodiment of the electrode well utilizes a mild steel pipe as the current-carrying conductor to at least one stainless steel electrode surrounded by a conductive backfill material, preferably graphite or steel shot. A covering is also provided for electrically insulating the current-carrying pipe. One of the electrode wells is utilized with an extraction well which is under subatmospheric pressure to withdraw the volatile material, such as gasoline and trichloroethylene (TCE) as it is heated. 4 figs.

  1. Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Washington State Department of Ecology: Replacement Wells Requiring a Water Right Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document- OtherOther:...

  2. NMOCD - Form G-102 - Geothermal Resources Well Location and Acreage...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    NMOCD - Form G-102 - Geothermal Resources Well Location and Acreage Dedication Plat Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library General: NMOCD - Form G-102 -...

  3. What is Your Environmental Wellness? The environmental dimension involves accepting the impact we have on our world and doing something

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    What is Your Environmental Wellness? The environmental dimension involves accepting the impact we sprays. _____ 7. I do not litter. _____ 8. I volunteer my time for environmental conservation projects about doing my part to preserve the environment. _____ Total for Environmental Wellness SCORE MEANING 15

  4. VOLUME 86, NUMBER 21 P H Y S I C A L R E V I E W L E T T E R S 21 MAY 2001 Time Resolved Collapse of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Sol M.

    of a Folding Protein Observed with Small Angle X-Ray Scattering L. Pollack,1, * M. W. Tate,1 A. C. Finnefrock,1 in conjunction with microfabricated rapid-fluid mixing devices to monitor the early events in protein folding scale. The role of chain collapse, one of the initial stages of protein folding, is not currently

  5. Negative Time Delay in Strongly Naked Singularity Lensing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Justin P. DeAndrea; Kevin Alexander

    2014-05-12

    We model the supermassive galactic center of the Milky Way galaxy as a strongly naked singularity lens described by the Janis-Newman-Winicour metric. This metric has an ordinary mass and massless scalar charge parameters. For very accurate results, we use the Virbhadra-Ellis lens equation for computations. The galactic center serving as gravitational lens gives rise to 4 images: 2 images on the same side as the source and 2 images on the opposite side of the source from the optic axis. We compute positions and time delays of these images for many values of the angular source position. The time delays of primary images decrease with an increase in angular source position and are always negative. The time delays of the other 3 images are negative for small angular source position; however, they increase with an increase in angular source position. Such observations would support strongly naked singularity interpretation of the galactic center and, if ever observed, would disprove the cosmic censorship hypothesis proposed by Roger Penrose as well as a weaker version by Virbhadra that allows existence of weakly, but not marginally and strongly naked singularities.

  6. PrimeEnergy/DOE/GRI slant well. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Drimal, C.E.; Muncey, G.; Carden, R.

    1991-12-01

    This report presents final results of the Sterling Boggs 1240 slant well. Objectives of the project were (1) to test the potential for improved recovery efficiency in a fractured Devonian Shale reservoir from a directionally drilled well, (2) to perform detailed tests of reservoir properties and completion methods, and (3) to provide technology to industry which may ultimately improve the economics of drilling in the Devonian Shale and thereby stimulate development of its resources.

  7. Fluid-Rock Characterization and Interactions in NMR Well Logging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirasaki, George J.; Mohanty, Kishore K.

    2003-02-10

    The objective of this project was to characterize the fluid properties and fluid-rock interactions which are needed for formation evaluation by NMR well logging. NMR well logging is finding wide use in formation evaluation. The formation parameters commonly estimated were porosity, permeability, and capillary bound water. Special cases include estimation of oil viscosity, residual oil saturation, location of oil/water contact, and interpretation on whether the hydrocarbon is oil or gas.

  8. Regulated water production to control water coning in oil wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sim?ha, I?s?vara

    1975-01-01

    REGULATED WATER PRODUCTION TO CONTROL WATER CONING IN OIL WELLS A Thesis by ISHWAR SINGH Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1975 Major... Subject: Petroleum Engineering REGULATED WATER PRODUCTION TO CONTROL WATER CONING IN OIL WELLS A Thesis by ISHWAR SINGH Approved as to style and content by (Chairman of Committee) (Membe ) (Head of Departmen lVlemb ) May 1975 ( I ABST RACT...

  9. RAPID/Geothermal/Well Field/Nevada | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/Colorado <RAPID/Geothermal/Water Use/Nevada < RAPID‎ |WellRAPID/Geothermal/Well

  10. NS&T MANAGEMENT OBSERVATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-06-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  11. NS&T Management Observations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gianotto, David

    2014-09-01

    The INL Management Observation Program (MOP) is designed to improve managers and supervisors understanding of work being performed by employees and the barriers impacting their success. The MOP also increases workers understanding of managements’ expectations as they relate to safety, security, quality, and work performance. Management observations (observations) are designed to improve the relationship and trust between employees and managers through increased engagement and interactions between managers and researchers in the field. As part of continuous improvement, NS&T management took initiative to focus on the participation and quality of observations in FY 14. This quarterly report is intended to (a) summarize the participation and quality of management’s observations, (b) assess observations for commonalities or trends related to facility or process barriers impacting research, and (c) provide feedback and make recommendations for improvements NS&T’s MOP.

  12. Observation of Fluorescence Emissions from Single-Bubble Sonoluminescence in Water doped with Quinine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, J Q; Lin, F K; Liu, Y H

    2005-01-01

    Sonoluminescence is a phenomenon involving the transduction of sound into light. The detailed mechanism as well as the energy-focusing potentials are not yet fully explored and understood. So far only optical photons are observed, while emissions in the ultra-violet range are only inferred. By doping the fluorescent dye quinine into water with dilute sulphuric acid, the high energy photons can be converted into the optical photons with slower decay constants. These sonoluminescence and fluorescent emissions were observed in coincidence, and the emitted energy of the two modes can be differentiated by their respective timing profiles. Plans for using this technique as a diagnostic tool to quantitatively study ultra-violet and other high energy emissions in sonoluminescence are discussed.

  13. Geopressured-geothermal well report. Volume I. Drilling and completion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-01-01

    Gladys McCall site activities are covered through the completion of the test well and salt water disposal well. The test well was drilled to a total depth of 16,510 feet, then plugged back to 15,831 feet. Three 4'' diameter diamond cores were taken for analysis. An existing well on site, the Getty-Butts Gladys McCall No. 1, was reentered and completed to a depth of 3514 feet as a salt water disposal well. The geologic interpretation of the Gladys McCall site indicated target sands for testing at 15,080 feet through 15, 831 feet. Reservoir fluid temperature at this depth is estimated to be approximately 313/sup 0/F and pressure is estimated to be +-12,800 psi. The preliminary reservoir volume estimate is 3.6 billion barrels of brine. The design wells program includes environmental monitoring of the Gladys McCall site by Louisiana State University. Field stations are set up to monitor surface and ground water quality, subsidence, land loss and shoreline erosion, and seismicity. As of December 31, 1981 the study shows no significant impact on the environment by site operations.

  14. Comparison of Emperical Decline Curve Analysis for Shale Wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kanfar, Mohammed Sami

    2013-07-13

    Recovery (EUR) accuracy, goodness of fit, and ease of matching. In addition, these methods are compared against each other at different production times in order to understand the effect of production time on forecasts. As a part of validation process, all...

  15. An alternative well-posedness property and static spacetimes with naked singularities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ricardo E. Gamboa Saravi; Marcela Sanmartino; Philippe Tchamitchian

    2010-09-30

    In the first part of this paper, we show that the Cauchy problem for wave propagation in some static spacetimes presenting a singular time-like boundary is well posed, if we only demand the waves to have finite energy, although no boundary condition is required. This feature does not come from essential self-adjointness, which is false in these cases, but from a different phenomenon that we call the alternative well-posedness property, whose origin is due to the degeneracy of the metric components near the boundary. Beyond these examples, in the second part, we characterize the type of degeneracy which leads to this phenomenon.

  16. Experimental investigation of spin-orbit coupling in n-type PbTe quantum wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peres, M. L.; Monteiro, H. S.; Castro, S. de; Chitta, V. A.; Oliveira, N. F.; Mengui, U. A.; Rappl, P. H. O.; Abramof, E.; Maude, D. K.

    2014-03-07

    The spin-orbit coupling is studied experimentally in two PbTe quantum wells by means of weak antilocalization effect. Using the Hikami-Larkin-Nagaoka model through a computational global optimization procedure, we extracted the spin-orbit and inelastic scattering times and estimated the strength of the zero field spin-splitting energy ?{sub so}. The values of ?{sub so} are linearly dependent on the Fermi wave vector (k{sub F}) confirming theoretical predictions of the existence of large spin-orbit coupling in IV-VI quantum wells originated from pure Rashba effect.

  17. Recent advances in well-based monitoring of CO2 sequestration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freifeld, B.; Daley, T.; Hovorka, S.; Henninges, J.; Underschultz, J.; Sharma, S.

    2008-10-15

    Recent CO{sub 2} sequestration pilot projects have implemented novel approaches to well-based subsurface monitoring aimed at increasing the amount and quality of information available from boreholes. Some of the drivers for the establishment of new well-based technologies and methodologies arise from: (1) the need for data to assess physical and geochemical subsurface processes associated with CO{sub 2} emplacement; (2) the high cost of deep boreholes and need to maximize data yield from each; (3) need for increased temporal resolution to observe plume evolution; (4) a lack of established processes and technologies for integrated permanent sensors in the oil and gas industry; and (5) a lack of regulatory guidance concerning the amount, type, and duration of monitoring required for long-term performance confirmation of a CO{sub 2} storage site. In this paper we will examine some of the latest innovations in well-based monitoring and present examples of integrated monitoring programs.

  18. Test of Department of Energy Strategic Petroleum Reserve Cavern Bryan Mound 104. [Salt cavern entry wells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goin, K.L.

    1985-05-01

    This document reports the certification test of Cavern Bryan Mound 104 conducted between September 19 and November 9, 1984. The test included pressurization with oil to near maximum test gradient, depressuring to maximum operating gradient, and doing nitrogen leak tests of the three cavern entry wells. Test results indicate nitrogen loss rates from the wells of 35 bbl/y from 104A, 19 bbl/y from 104B, and 0 bbl/y from 104C. These nitrogen loss rates can reasonably be assumed to correspond to a total cavern oil loss rate of 5.4 bbl/y, which is well within the DOE acceptance criterion of 100 bbl/y of oil per cavern. The final phase of the nitrogen leak test was observed by a representative of the Texas Railroad Commission. 7 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. Space time and the passage of time

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    George F. R. Ellis; Rituparno Goswami

    2012-08-26

    This paper examines the various arguments that have been put forward suggesting either that time does not exist, or that it exists but its flow is not real. I argue that (i) time both exists and flows; (ii) an Evolving Block Universe (`EBU') model of spacetime adequately captures this feature, emphasizing the key differences between the past, present, and future; (iii) the associated surfaces of constant time are uniquely geometrically and physically determined in any realistic spacetime model based in General Relativity Theory; (iv) such a model is needed in order to capture the essential aspects of what is happening in circumstances where initial data does not uniquely determine the evolution of spacetime structure because quantum uncertainty plays a key role in that development. Assuming that the functioning of the mind is based in the physical brain, evidence from the way that the mind apprehends the flow of time prefers this evolving time model over those where there is no flow of time.

  20. Analytical and semi-analytical solutions of horizontal well capture times under no-ow and constant-head boundaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhan, Hongbin

    for oil and gas production in the past decade [15,21]. Extensive studies on pressure anal- ysis-head. The third scenario is recovery from a low-permeability layer bounded above and below by much higher developed analytical solutions of the transient and steady-state gas pressure and the steady-state stream